WorldWideScience

Sample records for student attrition rate

  1. Attrition and success rates of accelerated students in nursing courses: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Doggrell, Sheila Anne; Schaffer, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a comprehensive literature on the academic outcomes (attrition and success) of students in traditional/baccalaureate nursing programs, but much less is known about the academic outcomes of students in accelerated nursing programs. The aim of this systematic review is to report on the attrition and success rates (either internal examination or NCLEX-RN) of accelerated students, compared to traditional students. Methods For the systematic review, the databases (Pubmed, Cinah...

  2. Attrition and success rates of accelerated students in nursing courses: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggrell, Sheila Anne; Schaffer, Sally

    2016-01-01

    There is a comprehensive literature on the academic outcomes (attrition and success) of students in traditional/baccalaureate nursing programs, but much less is known about the academic outcomes of students in accelerated nursing programs. The aim of this systematic review is to report on the attrition and success rates (either internal examination or NCLEX-RN) of accelerated students, compared to traditional students. For the systematic review, the databases (Pubmed, Cinahl and PsychINFO) and Google Scholar were searched using the search terms 'accelerated' or 'accreditation for prior learning', 'fast-track' or 'top up' and 'nursing' with 'attrition' or 'retention' or 'withdrawal' or 'success' from 1994 to January 2016. All relevant articles were included, regardless of quality. The findings of 19 studies of attrition rates and/or success rates for accelerated students are reported. For international accelerated students, there were only three studies, which are heterogeneous, and have major limitations. One of three studies has lower attrition rates, and one has shown higher success rates, than traditional students. In contrast, another study has shown high attrition and low success for international accelerated students. For graduate accelerated students, most of the studies are high quality, and showed that they have rates similar or better than traditional students. Thus, five of six studies have shown similar or lower attrition rates. Four of these studies with graduate accelerated students and an additional seven studies of success rates only, have shown similar or better success rates, than traditional students. There are only three studies of non-university graduate accelerated students, and these had weaknesses, but were consistent in reporting higher attrition rates than traditional students. The paucity and weakness of information available makes it unclear as to the attrition and/or success of international accelerated students in nursing programs. The

  3. A Correlational Study of a Reading Comprehension Program and Attrition Rates of ESL Nursing Students in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Wendy M

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between English as a second language (ESL), a reading comprehension program, and attrition rates of nursing students. Higher attrition rates of ESL nursing students are an assumption, seemingly based on anecdotal evidence. Data reflecting ESL student attrition should be measured and analyzed so that students can be identified prior to attrition. A secondary analysis of a large database of 27 initial licensure programs in Texas was completed. Data analysis identified that ESL students who used a reading comprehension program were almost twice as likely to be off track or out of the program as ESL students who did not use the program. Nurse educators need to evaluate student profile characteristics in a comprehensive way when determining risk of attrition.

  4. Workshop on Language Student Attrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whelan, Bree

    2001-01-01

    Seventy individuals from Government agencies (military and civilian), academia, and contractor organizations attended all or parts of a Workshop on student Attrition held at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC...

  5. Dental Hygiene Student Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynda J.; Fellows, Avis L.

    1981-01-01

    A study to determine differences between graduating and withdrawing students in the University of Minnesota Dental Hygiene program is discussed. The identification of differences may prove useful in the selection process for future classes through identification of students likely to complete their education. (MLW)

  6. Factors Influencing Students' Attrition at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghanboosi, Salim Saleen

    2013-01-01

    The students' attrition rates among students enrolled at SQU ranged between 6.8% (1998), 7.8% (1999), and 7.9% (2000). However, the drop-out rate at the Sultan Qaboos University is increasing gradually, and this increase represents a problem for the university that provides free education and financial aid for all male students coming from areas…

  7. Attrition of undergraduate nursing students at selected South African universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Roos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The nursing profession forms the backbone of many healthcare systems. It therefore needs a consistent supply of registered nurses to deliver continuous and safe quality healthcare, and to replace the nurses leaving or retiring from the profession. Attrition actively occurs among nursing students in South Africa and threatens the future supply of registered nurses. Aim: The aim of the study was to describe the attrition rate at selected South African universities and the factors influencing undergraduate nursing students to discontinue their nursing studies at these universities. Method: A quantitative descriptive design was followed. Heads of the nursing departments at the selected universities captured data with a specifically designed questionnaire. Thereafter their former nursing students provided information via a structured telephonic interview on the reasons why they discontinued the nursing programme. Results: The study revealed that attrition of undergraduate nursing students for three intake years (2007, 2008 and 2009 at the participating universities was between 39.3% and 58.7%. Academic and financial reasons as well as poor wellness and health were the main causes for attrition. Another factor was failure to cope with the demands of the clinical environment. Conclusion: Attrition might not occur immediately when a nursing student is challenged, as the student might exploit the various types of support offered. Although some nursing students do benefit from the offered support, a large number of nursing students still discontinue the undergraduate nursing programme.

  8. Predicting Student Attrition with Data Mining Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delen, Dursun

    2012-01-01

    Affecting university rankings, school reputation, and financial well-being, student retention has become one of the most important measures of success for higher education institutions. From the institutional perspective, improving student retention starts with a thorough understanding of the causes behind the attrition. Such an understanding is…

  9. Reducing Nursing Student Attrition: The Search for Effective Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubec, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    This review of the literature summarizes recent exploration of nursing student attrition. Attrition places financial burdens on students who leave a program, results in lost revenue for the college, and compounds the existing nursing shortage. Some research investigated the student selection process, which seeks to decrease attrition by admitting…

  10. Expectations and voluntary attrition in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a series of findings generated during a larger study which aimed to develop a theoretical understanding of the reasons why nursing students voluntarily leave pre-registration nursing programmes. In this study, significant incongruence was found to exist between student expectations of pre-registration nursing programmes and the reality of these programmes following entry. The resulting dissonance was identified as an important factor in student decisions to voluntarily withdraw. A single case study design was selected to explore the causes of voluntary attrition in nursing students within a School of Nursing and Midwifery. The study population was obtained through purposeful sampling and consisted of 15 students who had previously voluntarily withdrawn from pre-registration nursing programmes. A semi-structured interview method was used to collect data from study participants. The interview schedule developed for use in the study reflected the key components of the conceptual model of higher education (HE) student attrition (Tinto, 1975, 1987, 1993). All interviews were tape recorded to facilitate later transcription. The Cyclical or Interactive Model of Qualitative Research (Miles and Huberman, 1994) was used to analyse data collected from study participants. This paper describes the unrealistic range of expectations which nursing students have of nursing, the information sources and experiences which inform student expectations and how ambiguous expectations contributed to voluntarily attrition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Obstacles to Success--Doctoral Student Attrition in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    The article explores doctoral attrition in South Africa, investigating and comparing the attributions of attrition of doctoral students and PhD programme leaders. The article is based on secondary data analysis of two large studies on doctoral education in South Africa. The main point of the article is that the different understandings of the…

  12. Attrition Cost Model Instruction Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagiura, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    This instruction manual explains in detail how to use the Attrition Cost Model program, which estimates the cost of student attrition for a state's higher education system. Programmed with SAS, this model allows users to instantly calculate the cost of attrition and the cumulative attrition rate that is based on the most recent retention and…

  13. Self-esteem and self-efficacy as predictors of attrition in associate degree nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Graziose, Virginia; Bryer, Jennifer; Nikolaidou, Maria

    2013-06-01

    There is a serious and growing shortage of nurses in the United States, and the high rate of student attrition from nursing programs has further added to this problem. The challenge for schools of nursing is to recruit increased numbers of qualified candidates into their programs and to determine ways to decrease the rate of student attrition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-esteem, self-efficacy, and life stressors were significantly related to student attrition in first-semester associate degree nursing students. A descriptive correlational design and nonprobability convenience sample of first-semester associate degree nursing students was used. Data were gathered using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Holmes and Rahe Social Readjustment Rating Scale. Findings indicated that self-esteem was significantly associated with student attrition. Results from this study provide the basis for targeted interventions designed to decrease student attrition rates in associate degree nursing programs. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. How can attrition rates be reduced in cancer drug discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lucas; Pearson, Andrew D J

    2013-04-01

    Attrition is a major issue in anticancer drug development with up to 95% of drugs tested in Phase I trials not reaching a marketing authorisation making the drug development process enormously costly and inefficient. It is essential that this problem is addressed throughout the whole drug development process to improve efficiency which will ultimately result in increased patient benefit with more profitable drugs. The approach to reduce cancer drug attrition rates must be based on three pillars. The first of these is that there is a need for new pre-clinical models which can act as better predictors of success in clinical trials. Furthermore, clinical trials driven by tumour biology with the incorporation of predictive and pharmacodynamic biomarkers would be beneficial in drug development. Finally, there is a need for increased collaboration to combine the unique strengths between industry, academia and regulators to ensure that the needs of all stakeholders are met.

  15. Developing a national computerised absence monitoring and management system to reduce nursing student attrition: evaluation of staff and student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Kay; McCallum, Jacqueline; Murray, John; Scott, Janine; Strachan, Evelyn; Yates, Lynda; Wright, Marty

    2014-05-01

    avoid student frustration. Further research on the longer term impact of CAMMS on attrition rates is warranted. © 2013.

  16. Issues concerning recruitment, retention and attrition of student nurses in the 1950/60s: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinks, Annette M; Richardson, Kathleen; Jones, Chris; Kirton, Jennifer A

    2014-11-01

    To investigate student nurse recruitment and attrition in the 1950' and 1960s and undertake comparisons to modern day concerns. The study was set in one hospital in the U.K. In the period studied nursing was unpopular as a profession and there were difficulties surrounding recruitment. Attrition rates were high. Documentary analysis of 641 training records dating 1955 to 1968 was undertaken. Attrition rates, reasons for non-completion and employment following successful completion were determined. Most recruits were young, unmarried, females and had overseas addresses. The majority (n = 88) had prior nursing experience. Over 69% (n = 443) successfully completed their training. Attrition rates were over 30% (n = 198), the main reason being academic failure. Following completion over 40% (n = 183) undertook midwifery training (n = 183) or secured a staff nurse post (n = 153). Issues relating to recruitment, retention and attrition in the 1950s and 1960s put into context present day issues. Recent attrition rates from pre-registration nurse education have fallen, nevertheless some of the issues of yesteryear remain problematic. In the present study significant numbers of entrants left due to domestic and ill-health problems resonates with many modern day studies. Also failure to complete due to academic shortcomings continues to be a concern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Predicting the Risk of Attrition for Undergraduate Students with Time Based Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Kevin E. K.; Gibson, David

    2015-01-01

    Improving student retention is an important and challenging problem for universities. This paper reports on the development of a student attrition model for predicting which first year students are most at-risk of leaving at various points in time during their first semester of study. The objective of developing such a model is to assist…

  18. Attrition from Student Affairs: Perspectives from Those Who Exited the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Sarah M.; Gardner, Megan Moore; Hughes, Carole; Lowery, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Attrition of student affairs professionals is an issue of concern for the profession. This mixed methods study highlights reasons why participants left their student affairs careers. Seven general themes emerged from the study, including burnout, salary issues, career alternatives, work/family conflict, limited advancement, supervisor issues and…

  19. Minimising Attrition: Strategies for Assisting Students Who Are at Risk of Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Caroline L.; Perry, Beth; Edwards, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores strategies aimed at minimising attrition by encouraging persistence among online graduate students who are considering withdrawal. It builds upon earlier studies conducted by a team of researchers who teach online graduate students in health care at Athabasca University. First, in 2008-2009, Park, Boman, Care, Edwards, and…

  20. Pilot Testing for Feasibility in a Study of Student Retention and Attrition in Online Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Joy; Fahlman, Dorothy; Arscott, Jane; Guillot, Isabelle

    2018-01-01

    Prior to undertaking a descriptive study on attrition and retention of students in two online undergraduate health administration and human service programs, a pilot test was conducted to assess the procedures for participant recruitment, usability of the survey questionnaire, and data collection processes. A retention model provided the…

  1. Patterns of Student Enrolment and Attrition in Australian Open Access Online Education: A Preliminary Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Steven J.; Moore, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Swinburne University of Technology has experienced tremendous growth in open access online learning and as such is typical of the many Australian institutions that have ventured into online tertiary education. While research in online education continues to expand, comparatively little investigates students' enrolment and attrition. This research…

  2. Development of an attrition risk prediction tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, John; Norrie, Peter

    To review lecturers' and students' perceptions of the factors that may lead to attrition from pre-registration nursing and midwifery programmes and to identify ways to reduce the impact of such factors on the student's experience. Comparable attrition rates for nursing and midwifery students across various universities are difficult to monitor accurately; however, estimates that there is approximately a 25% national attrition rate are not uncommon. The financial and human implications of this are significant and worthy of investigation. A study was carried out in one medium-sized UK school of nursing and midwifery, aimed at identifying perceived factors associated with attrition and retention. Thirty-five lecturers were interviewed individually; 605 students completed a questionnaire, and of these, 10 were individually interviewed. Attrition data kept by the student service department were reviewed. Data were collected over an 18-month period in 2007-2008. Regression analysis of the student data identified eight significant predictors. Four of these were 'positive' factors in that they aided student retention and four were 'negative' in that they were associated with students' thoughts of resigning. Student attrition and retention is multifactorial, and, as such, needs to be managed holistically. One aspect of this management could be an attrition risk prediction tool.

  3. Are pilot trials useful for predicting randomisation and attrition rates in definitive studies: A review of publicly funded trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Amy; Pottrill, Edward; Julious, Steven A; Walters, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Background/aims: External pilot trials are recommended for testing the feasibility of main or confirmatory trials. However, there is little evidence that progress in external pilot trials actually predicts randomisation and attrition rates in the main trial. To assess the use of external pilot trials in trial design, we compared randomisation and attrition rates in publicly funded randomised controlled trials with rates in their pilots. Methods: Randomised controlled trials for which there was an external pilot trial were identified from reports published between 2004 and 2013 in the Health Technology Assessment Journal. Data were extracted from published papers, protocols and reports. Bland–Altman plots and descriptive statistics were used to investigate the agreement of randomisation and attrition rates between the full and external pilot trials. Results: Of 561 reports, 41 were randomised controlled trials with pilot trials and 16 met criteria for a pilot trial with sufficient data. Mean attrition and randomisation rates were 21.1% and 50.4%, respectively, in the pilot trials and 16.8% and 65.2% in the main. There was minimal bias in the pilot trial when predicting the main trial attrition and randomisation rate. However, the variation was large: the mean difference in the attrition rate between the pilot and main trial was −4.4% with limits of agreement of −37.1% to 28.2%. Limits of agreement for randomisation rates were −47.8% to 77.5%. Conclusion: Results from external pilot trials to estimate randomisation and attrition rates should be used with caution as comparison of the difference in the rates between pilots and their associated full trial demonstrates high variability. We suggest using internal pilot trials wherever appropriate. PMID:29361833

  4. The Flip Side of the Attrition Coin: Faculty Perceptions of Factors Supporting Graduate Student Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna A Gilmore

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Doctoral attrition consistently hovers around 50% with relevant literature identifying several mediating factors, including departmental culture, student demographics, and funding. To advance this literature, we interviewed 38 graduate faculty advisors in science, engineering, or mathematics disciplines at a research-extensive university to capture their perceptions of factors supporting graduate student success. Using a constant-comparison method, we found that faculty perceptions aligned within three major categories, termed: motivated student behaviors, formative student learning experiences, and essential student knowledge and skills. Student motivation was most prominently represented in findings. This aligns with prior studies showing that faculty tend to identify the cause of graduate student failure as lying within the students themselves and rarely discuss their role or the department’s contribution to attrition. Thus findings offer an opportunity to reflect and improve upon practice. The study also highlights actions graduate students can take to increase success, such as developing collegial relationships and early involvement in research and scholarly writing. We encourage graduate faculty advisors and others to identify ways to help graduate students overcome common obstacles to enduring and succeeding within graduate programs. Faculty perceptions are also examined by discipline and faculty rank, and directions for future research are offered.

  5. Non-Rated Air Force Line Officer Attrition Rates Using Survival Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    Further complicating human resourcing, all Air Force members–enlisted and officer–start at entry-level. Personnel entering the Air Force inventory are...the system [8]. Chi-squared automatic interaction detection (CHAID) is an algorithm “to predict the response behaviour [sic] of individuals as...branches with the highest probability may require incentives to increase attrition. The branches could be defined by gender, career field, religion

  6. Effectiveness of Student Admission Essays in Identifying Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Judith

    2003-01-01

    From a longitudinal sample of nursing students, 193 completers and 43 noncompleters were compared, revealing significant differences in the groups' mean scores on admission essays but not admission grade point averages. Content analysis revealed how completers had internalized the role of nurse. (Contains 12 references.) (SK)

  7. Vocation, friendship and resilience: a study exploring nursing student and staff views on retention and attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Graham R; Health, Val; Proctor-Childs, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    There is international concern about retention of student nurses on undergraduate programmes. United Kingdom Higher Education Institutions are monitored on their attrition statistics and can be penalised financially, so they have an incentive to help students remain on their programmes beyond their moral duty to ensure students receive the best possible educational experience. to understand students' and staff concerns about programmes and placements as part of developing our retention strategies. This study reports qualitative data on retention and attrition collected as part of an action research study. One University School of Nursing and Midwifery in the South West of England. Staff, current third year and ex-student nurses from the adult field. Data were collected in focus groups, both face-to face and virtual, and individual telephone interviews. These were transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis. FOUR THEMES EMERGED: Academic support, Placements and mentors, Stresses and the reality of nursing life, and Dreams for a better programme. The themes Academic support, Placements and mentors and Stresses and the reality of nursing life, resonate with international literature. Dreams for a better programme included smaller group learning. Vocation, friendship and resilience seem instrumental in retaining students, and Higher Education Institutions should work to facilitate these. 'Vocation' has been overlooked in the retention discussions, and working more actively to foster vocation and belongingness could be important.

  8. Dreams and disappointments regarding nursing: Student nurses' reasons for attrition and retention. A qualitative study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Castelein, Stynke; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2017-07-01

    In the Netherlands, hundreds of students register annually for a nursing programme, but not all of these students manage to complete their training. The main aim of this study was to examine which factors affect student nurses' decision to leave or complete their programme. The study used an exploratory descriptive design, employing a qualitative phenomenological approach. Student nurses (n=17) at the beginning of their third year of the four-year Bachelor's programme. Data were collected at four Universities of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands, from December 2013 to January 2014. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect the data, using an interview guide. The main reasons for students to become nurses were the caring aspect, personal experiences with healthcare, role models in their immediate environment, and job opportunities. They had both altruistic and professional perceptions of their profession. Reasons for attrition were strongly related to the training programme and to their clinical placements, in particular the perceived lack of support from mentors and team. Feelings of being welcomed and working in a nice team proved to be more important reasons for completing the programme than the specific clinical field. Student nurses started their studies with many dreams, such as caring for people and having the opportunity to deliver excellent nursing care. When their expectations were not met, their dreams became disappointments which caused them to consider stopping and even to leave (attrition). The role of lecturers and mentors seems invaluable in protecting and guiding students through their programme and placements. Optimal cooperation between lecturers and mentors is of paramount importance to retain student nurses in their training programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2011-12. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2012-01-01

    This document contains 3 statistical reports. The first report, "Attrition Rate Decline Seems Promising--Though High Schools are Still Losing One in Four Students" (by Roy L. Johnson), presents results of long-term trend assessments of attrition data in Texas public high schools. The second report, "Slow Declining Pace Keeps Zero…

  10. Articulating attrition: Graduate school experiences of female doctoral students in the sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Kathryn Ann

    2005-07-01

    Despite decades of research and reform efforts designed to bolster female retention in scientific disciplines, the conundrum of women's departure from doctoral programs in the sciences remains. This qualitative case study investigated the aspects of the graduate school experience that female doctoral students described as facilitating or impeding their successful degree completion in chemistry. I analyzed the graduate school narratives of twelve female participants who represented both successful and unsuccessful doctoral recipients from four advisors at one university. Participants identified four types of experiences that facilitated their retention in the doctoral program: feeling successful and confident in meeting the program requirements, having positive research experiences, receiving support from social networks, and being dedicated to career goals. Participants cited four kinds of experiences that impeded their continued participation in the doctoral program: having negative research experiences, feeling a lack of success and confidence in meeting the program requirements, changing career goals, and receiving no support from social networks. The graduate school experiences of participants who did and did not successfully attain their degree objectives differed in terms of four dimensions: pre-program experiences, academic experiences, advisory experiences, and social experiences. Based on these findings, I have proposed a model of attrition and retention that emphasizes the role that these unique program experiences play in shaping participants' sense of professional fit within the community of doctoral chemists, consequently contributing to their differential program outcomes. This study not only offers a new perspective on the phenomenon of female doctoral attrition in the sciences but also informs the development of more gender-inclusive graduate science practices and policies that will support the retention of female doctoral students.

  11. Relationship between Measures of Academic Quality and Undergraduate Student Attrition: The Case of Higher Education Institutions in the Colombian Caribbean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Anabella; Borjas, Mónica; Herrera, Mariela; Valencia, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate student attrition is a major concern in higher education. It is usually explained by the impact of student attributes; however, recent developments in student success literature point to the need of exploring institutional practices that may impact a student's decision to abandon their studies. The current weight of academic quality…

  12. Improving retention and graduation rates for black students in nursing education: a developmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S H

    1992-01-01

    High attrition rates among black students are a significant factor in the decline in graduation rates from nursing programs. Nursing education needs a program to address problems of anger, frustration, and loneliness and to develop the black student as a whole person.

  13. Programmatic Factors Associated with Undergraduate Athletic Training Student Retention and Attrition Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Wathington, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Athletic training programs (ATPs) are charged with meeting an increased demand for athletic trainers with adequate graduates. Currently, the retention rate of athletic training students in ATPs nationwide and the programmatic factors associated with these retention rates remain unknown. Objective: Determine the retention rate for athletic…

  14. The Case for Increasing Workplace Decision-Making: Proposing a Model for Special Educator Attrition Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Teresa A.; Brunner, C. Cryss

    2014-01-01

    The chronically high rate of special educator attrition across U.S. schools creates a dilemma for educational leaders because special educators provide direct services to students with special needs. Attrition exacerbates already high special educator shortages reported in most districts, and nearly one million schoolchildren with disabilities…

  15. A review of trends in attrition rates for surgical faculty: a case for a sustainable retention strategy to cope with demographic and economic realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satiani, Bhagwan; Williams, Thomas E; Brod, Heather; Way, David P; Ellison, E Christopher

    2013-05-01

    Our aim was to compare trends in retention of academic surgeons by reviewing surgical faculty attrition rates (leaving academic surgery for any reason) of 3 cohorts at 5-year intervals between 1996 and 2011. The Association of American Medical Colleges' Faculty Administrative Management On-Line User System database was queried for a retention report of all tenure/clinical track full-time MD faculty within our academic medical center on July 1, 1996 (group 1), July 1, 2001 (group 2), and July 1, 2006 (group 3). Retention was tracked for 5 years post snapshot. The individual 5-year cohort attrition rates (observed frequencies) were compared with combined attrition rates for all 3 groups (expected frequencies). Overall, attrition trends for groups 2 (lower) and 3 (higher) were significantly different than the trends for all groups combined. Minorities and professors at the full or associate rank in group 3 contributed to this difference. Faculty in group 3 leaving our academic medical center were significantly more likely to transition into nonacademic practice compared with the other 2 groups. Greater attrition in the last 5-year cohort, despite the increase in faculty positions, is worrisome. A continuous retention life cycle is critical if academic medical centers hope to compete for talent. Retention planning should include on-boarding programs for enculturation, monitoring of professional satisfaction, formalized mentoring of younger surgeons, retaining academic couples and a part-time workforce, leadership and talent management, exit interviews, and competitive financial packages. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Patterns of online student enrolment and attrition in Australian open access online education: a preliminary case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Greenland

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Swinburne University of Technology has experienced tremendous growth in open access online learning and as such is typical of the many Australian institutions that have ventured into online tertiary education. While research in online education continues to expand, comparatively little investigates students’ enrolment and attrition.This research examines commencing enrolment and associated student withdrawal data, as well as performance scores from eight units forming a Marketing Major for an open access online undergraduate degree. Since data were collected over a five year period, trends and patterns within a substantial online undergraduate program can be explored.The paper discusses the challenges of analysing enrolment data. Initial findings suggest that retention strategies should be designed according to the stage students are at in their studies. Furthermore, the research informs the prioritisation and development of more effective enrolment and performance datareporting capabilities, which in turn would benefit student management and retention.http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.6.1.95

  17. Dreams and disappointments regarding nursing : Student nurses' reasons for attrition and retention. A qualitative study design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Castelein, Stynke; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    Background: In the Netherlands, hundreds of students register annually for a nursing programme, but not all of these students manage to complete their training. Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine which factors affect student nurses' decision to leave or complete their programme.

  18. Nontraditional Student Graduation Rate Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan B.

    2014-01-01

    The prominence of discourse on postsecondary degree completion, student persistence, and retention has increased in the national dialogue. Heightened attention to college completion rates by the federal government and pressure to tie state funding to performance metrics associated with graduation rates are catalysts for the discussion.…

  19. Factors of Attrition in Cohort Doctoral Education: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Linda Ann

    2013-01-01

    Attrition rates, completion rates, and time to degree are the key areas researchers have sought to examine influencing factors and patterns of behavior that describe the departure process of students in doctoral study. Through the lens of self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985), the purpose of this phenomenological qualitative study was…

  20. The Dissertation Story: What Is the Relationship between the Officer Candidate School Attrition Rate and Officer Training Command, Naval Service Training Command and Navy Recruiting Command Leadership Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    attrition (Goodstadt, 1981). Kubisiak, et al. contend that leaders should consider attrition a negative occurrence and that each leader should develop...related to the information, and the consequences associated with the options. The ability to ruminate before acting when presented with new information or

  1. Implications of Attrition in a Longitudinal Web-Based Survey: An Examination of College Students Participating in a Tobacco Use Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bennett; Haardoerfer, Regine; Windle, Michael; Goodman, Michael; Berg, Carla

    2017-10-16

    Web-based survey research has several benefits, including low cost and burden, as well as high use of the Internet, particularly among young adults. In the context of longitudinal studies, attrition raises concerns regarding the validity of data, given the potential associations with individual and institutional characteristics, or the focal area of study (eg, cigarette use). The objective of this study was to compare baseline characteristics of nonresponders versus responders in a sample of young adult college students in a Web-based longitudinal study regarding tobacco use. We conducted a secondary data analysis of 3189 college students from seven Georgia colleges and universities in a 2-year longitudinal study. We examined baseline tobacco use, as well as individual- and institutional-level factors, as predictors of attrition between wave 1 (October and November 2014) and wave 2 (February and March 2015) using multilevel modeling. Results: A total 13.14% (419/3189) participants were lost to follow-up at wave 2. Predictors of nonresponse were similar in the models examining individual-level factors and institutional-level factors only and included being black versus white (odds ratio [OR] 1.74, CI 1.23-2.46); being male versus female (OR 1.41, CI 1.10-1.79); seeking a bachelor's degree versus advanced degree (OR 1.41, CI 1.09-1.83); not residing on campus (OR 0.62, CI 0.46-0.84); past 30-day tobacco use (OR 1.41, CI 1.10-1.78); attending a nonprivate college (OR 0.48, CI 0.33-0.71); and attending a college with ≤10,000 students (OR 0.56, CI 0.43-0.73). Future longitudinal studies should assess predictors of attrition to examine how survey topic and other individual and institutional factors might influence the response to allow for correction of selection bias. ©Bennett McDonald, Regine Haardoerfer, Michael Windle, Michael Goodman, Carla Berg. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 16.10.2017.

  2. Vocabulary Attrition among Adult English as a Foreign Language Persian Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Azadeh; Bin Mustapha, Ghazali

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the attrition rate of EFL concrete and abstract vocabulary among continuing and non-continuing Iranian female and male English language learners across different proficiency levels. They are students of a University and majored in different fields (between 20 and 25 years old). There was no treatment in this study…

  3. Medical School Attrition-Beyond the Statistics A Ten Year Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Bridget M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical school attrition is important - securing a place in medical school is difficult and a high attrition rate can affect the academic reputation of a medical school and staff morale. More important, however, are the personal consequences of dropout for the student. The aims of our study were to examine factors associated with attrition over a ten-year period (2001–2011 and to study the personal effects of dropout on individual students. Methods The study included quantitative analysis of completed cohorts and qualitative analysis of ten-year data. Data were collected from individual student files, examination and admission records, exit interviews and staff interviews. Statistical analysis was carried out on five successive completed cohorts. Qualitative data from student files was transcribed and independently analysed by three authors. Data was coded and categorized and key themes were identified. Results Overall attrition rate was 5.7% (45/779 in 6 completed cohorts when students who transferred to other medical courses were excluded. Students from Kuwait and United Arab Emirates had the highest dropout rate (RR = 5.70, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.65 to 12.27;p  Absenteeism was documented in 30% of students, academic difficulty in 55.7%, social isolation in 20%, and psychological morbidity in 40% (higher than other studies. Qualitative analysis revealed recurrent themes of isolation, failure, and despair. Student Welfare services were only accessed by one-third of dropout students. Conclusions While dropout is often multifactorial, certain red flag signals may alert us to risk of dropout including non-EU origin, academic struggling, absenteeism, social isolation, depression and leave of absence. Psychological morbidity amongst dropout students is high and Student Welfare services should be actively promoted. Absenteeism should prompt early intervention. Behind every dropout statistic lies a personal story. All

  4. Factors affecting attrition from associate degree nursing programs in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Erin; Belsky, Daniel W; Gaul, Katie; Carpenter, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Projected nursing shortfalls have spurred the state of North Carolina to initiate a series of strategies to increase the number of graduates from pre-licensure Registered Nurse (RN) programs. These efforts have been largely successful, but attrition rates from Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs remain high. Only 58% of students entering ADN programs complete the degree. While policy makers are keenly aware that attrition from ADN programs is problematic, there is a lack of empirical evidence to identify the specific factors contributing to student attrition. In late 2007, the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) asked the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research to conduct a study of Associate Degree Nursing program attrition and its causes. This paper summarizes the findings from that study and identifies the student- and program-level characteristics associated with more and less successful ADN programs. While this study was conducted in a single state in the US, the substantive findings--as well as the methodological approach--may be useful to other states and other countries. The study revealed that socioeconomically disadvantaged students (those with GEDs and those who received Pell Grants), non-white students, and younger and older students were less likely to graduate on-time. When programs were grouped into high and low performance categories on the basis of risk adjusted graduation rates, high performing programs were distinguished by more stringent admissions policies and better educated faculties. Nursing shortages have garnered significant attention and resources from state and national workforce planners in recent years. But to date, investments in expanding program capacity have not been matched by attention to program completion rates, with the result that we have enlarged the pipeline without fixing the leaks. Faculty shortages and recession-induced resource constraints limit further program expansion. Addressing attrition

  5. Medical school attrition-beyond the statistics a ten year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Bridget M; Hynes, Helen; Sweeney, Catherine; Khashan, Ali S; O'Rourke, Margaret; Doran, Kieran; Harris, Anne; Flynn, Siun O'

    2013-01-31

    Medical school attrition is important--securing a place in medical school is difficult and a high attrition rate can affect the academic reputation of a medical school and staff morale. More important, however, are the personal consequences of dropout for the student. The aims of our study were to examine factors associated with attrition over a ten-year period (2001-2011) and to study the personal effects of dropout on individual students. The study included quantitative analysis of completed cohorts and qualitative analysis of ten-year data. Data were collected from individual student files, examination and admission records, exit interviews and staff interviews. Statistical analysis was carried out on five successive completed cohorts. Qualitative data from student files was transcribed and independently analysed by three authors. Data was coded and categorized and key themes were identified. Overall attrition rate was 5.7% (45/779) in 6 completed cohorts when students who transferred to other medical courses were excluded. Students from Kuwait and United Arab Emirates had the highest dropout rate (RR = 5.70, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.65 to 12.27;p psychological morbidity in 40% (higher than other studies). Qualitative analysis revealed recurrent themes of isolation, failure, and despair. Student Welfare services were only accessed by one-third of dropout students. While dropout is often multifactorial, certain red flag signals may alert us to risk of dropout including non-EU origin, academic struggling, absenteeism, social isolation, depression and leave of absence. Psychological morbidity amongst dropout students is high and Student Welfare services should be actively promoted. Absenteeism should prompt early intervention. Behind every dropout statistic lies a personal story. All medical schools have a duty of care to support students who leave the medical programme.

  6. Regional Disparities in Apprentice Attrition Rates: Heat and Quarter Four's Significance in Northern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Don; Brearley, Matt; Oppermann, Elspeth

    2017-01-01

    Apprenticeship completion rates have remained persistently low for decades in spite of broad agreement over the causes of non-completions. A possible factor missing from these explanations is climate, particularly in northern Australia where traditional trade apprentices are exposed to extreme conditions and exert themselves. We hypothesize that:…

  7. Waiting Time Increases Risk of Attrition in Gambling Disorder Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Pedersen, Anders Sune

    2014-01-01

    Attrition is a well known problem in psychotherapeutic treatment. Patients with addiction have high attrition rates, and it is therefore important to identify factors that can improve completion rates in addiction. Here, we investigated the influence of waiting time as a predictor of treatment...

  8. Outlook on Student Retention in Higher Education University Reforms in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Zoulal; Moumine, Mohamed El Amine

    2017-01-01

    High student attrition rates at university have become one of the most challenging issues in higher education worldwide in the last five decades. Moroccan universities are no exception. At-risk students drop out of studies for a plethora of reasons, and the attrition rate is increasing despite the efforts made in education reforms carried out…

  9. Team-Based Learning Reduces Attrition in a First-Semester General Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeford, Lorrie

    2016-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an instructional method that has been shown to reduce attrition and increase student learning in a number of disciplines. TBL was implemented in a first-semester general chemistry course, and its effect on attrition was assessed. Attrition from sections before implementing TBL (fall 2008 to fall 2009) was compared with…

  10. Study of Navy Enlisted Attrition: Race, Ethnicity, and Type of Occupation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carroll, James M

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to gain a better understanding of Navy first-term enlisted attrition among racial/ethnic minorities by comparing attrition rates in technical and nontechnical occupations...

  11. STUDENTS WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS: BRAILLE READING RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Blagoj Dimitrova-Radojichikj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison reading performance was done between 8 students who are using Braille and 14 students who are using enlarged print to read. Reading performance was determined using reading rate (words per minute, wpm. Reading rate results showed no significant difference (p>0.05 between those using the Braille (16.62±11.61 wpm and those using the enlarged print (27.21±24.89 wpm. This study has shown that Braille reader students read at lower reading rate compared to print reader students with visual impairment.

  12. Defining Administrative Support and Its Relationship to the Attrition of Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Edward J.; Albrecht, Susan Fread; Johns, Beverley H.

    2013-01-01

    Special education faces serious shortages of teachers, and the area of special education teaching with the greatest shortage is in the field emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). This study was conducted to identify the perceptions of current teachers of students with EBD on the definition of and the extent and importance of administrative…

  13. Language Attrition: The Fate of the Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lynne

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the literature on psycholinguistic aspects of language attrition over the past half decade. Discusses evidence from studies on hesitation phenomena in attriter speech, variables affecting language attrition, and relearning. (Author/VWL)

  14. Factors Associated with Veterinary Clinical Faculty Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Martin

    Faculty attrition and recruitment for veterinary clinical faculty positions have been reported as significant problems in veterinary medical education. To investigate the factors that may be important in veterinary clinical faculty retention, the perceptions and views of veterinary clinical academic faculty were determined using a web-distributed electronic survey. Responses were dichotomized by whether the respondent had or had not left an academic position and were analyzed for their association with faculty attrition. A total of 1,226 responses were recorded, and results demonstrated that factors other than compensation were associated with veterinary clinical faculty attrition, including departmental culture, work-life balance, and recognition and support of clinical medicine by the administration. Forty-four percent of respondents who had held a faculty appointment reported leaving academia either voluntarily or for non-voluntary reasons such as failure to achieve tenure, retirement, or having their position closed. Attention to correcting deficiencies in workplace culture and professional rewards could be a beneficial means by which to decrease the faculty attrition rates currently observed in clinical academic veterinary medicine.

  15. Web-Based Alcohol Intervention: Study of Systematic Attrition of Heavy Drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Theda; Ostergaard, Mathias; Cooke, Richard; Scholz, Urte

    2017-06-28

    Web-based alcohol interventions are a promising way to reduce alcohol consumption because of their anonymity and the possibility of reaching a high numbers of individuals including heavy drinkers. However, Web-based interventions are often characterized by high rates of attrition. To date, very few studies have investigated whether individuals with higher alcohol consumption show higher attrition rates in Web-based alcohol interventions as compared with individuals with lower alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to examine the attrition rate and predictors of attrition in a Web-based intervention study on alcohol consumption. The analysis of the predictors of attrition rate was performed on data collected in a Web-based randomized control trial. Data collection took place at the University of Konstanz, Germany. A total of 898 people, which consisted of 46.8% males (420/898) and 53.2% females (478/898) with a mean age of 23.57 years (SD 5.19), initially volunteered to participate in a Web-based intervention study to reduce alcohol consumption. Out of the sample, 86.9% (781/898) were students. Participants were classified as non-completers (439/898, 48.9%) if they did not complete the Web-based intervention. Potential predictors of attrition were self-reported: alcohol consumption in the last seven days, per week, from Monday to Thursday, on weekends, excessive drinking behavior measured with the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), and drinking motives measured by the Drinking Motive Questionnaire (DMQ-R SF). Significant differences between completers and non-completers emerged regarding alcohol consumption in the last seven days (B=-.02, P=.05, 95% CI [0.97-1.00]), on weekends (B=-.05, P=.003, 95% CI [0.92-0.98]), the AUDIT (B=-.06, P=.007, 95% CI [0.90-0.98], and the status as a student (B=.72, P=.001, 95% CI [1.35-3.11]). Most importantly, non-completers had a significantly higher alcohol consumption compared with completers. Hazardous

  16. Limestone particle attrition and size distribution in a small circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongxiang Chen; John R. Grace; C. Jim Lim [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2008-06-15

    Limestone particle attrition was investigated in a small circulating fluidized bed reactor at temperatures from 25 to 850{sup o}C, 1 atm pressure and superficial gas velocities from 4.8 to 6.2 m/s. The effects of operating time, superficial gas velocity and temperature were studied with fresh limestone. No calcination or sulfation occurred at temperatures {le} 580{sup o}C, whereas calcination and sulfation affected attrition at 850{sup o}C. Increasing the temperature (while maintaining the same superficial gas velocity) reduced attrition if there was negligible calcination. Attrition was high initially, but after about 24 h, the rate of mass change became constant. The ratio of initial mean particle diameter to that at later times increased linearly with time and with (U{sub g} - U{sub mf}){sup 2}, while decreasing exponentially with temperature, with an activation energy for fresh limestone of -4.3 kJ/mol. The attrition followed Rittinger's surface theory. The change of surface area of limestone particles was proportional to the total excess kinetic energy consumed and to the total attrition time, whereas the change of surface area decreased exponentially with increasing temperature. At 850{sup o}C, the attrition rate of calcined lime was highest, whereas the attrition rate was lowest for sulfated particles. When online impact attrition was introduced, the attrition rate was about an order of magnitude higher than without impacts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Military Personnel Attrition and Retention: Research in Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    NATIONAL ANALYSES OF ATTRITION 13 H. Wallace Sinaiko and Kenneth C. Scheflen AIR FORCE ATTRITION RESEARCH: ANALISIS OF PRE- AND POST- 15 ENLISTMENT FACTORS...are specific types ot codes used, to icdentity categories of reenlistments, extensions, and losses. These SPD codes will be clustered in various ways...two enlistment terms in the Navy. The Navy’s 110 ratings were grouped into 24 occupational tields which represented clusters of similar skills, similar

  18. Attrition of Women Business Majors in an Urban Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Janice M.

    2004-01-01

    Identified intervention protocols that could help reduce the attrition of women business majors at an urban community college. Review of academic progress data and data from student surveys which examined students' reasons for leaving the institution indicated that there was a need for support mechanisms throughout the freshman year and extending…

  19. Cyclic efforts to improve completion rates of masters’ degree students in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth Roets

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Supervisors at Higher Education Institutions are challenged to shorten throughput of Master’s degree students in nursing as researchers are needed to improve the art and science of the nursing profession. Globally the completion time for a postgraduate degree in the health sciences varies between 4.7 and 5.5 years. The purpose of the study was to describe strategies that were implemented to shorten completion time and attrition rate of postgraduate students. A cyclic technical, scientific collaborative mode within an action research methodology was used to identify factors impeding completion time in this study. Contrary to other studies, supervision was not an inhibiting factor in this study. Physical, technical, academic and financial aspects were identified by postgraduate students through questionnaires and informal discussion groups with supervisors as well as progress reports. Strategies were implemented to address these. Following implementation of all strategies, 42% of the postgraduate students in the School of Nursing completed their Master’s degree within two years. This implies a 34% improvement. Although the completion rate improved it was still unsatisfactory and new challenges were identified during the second cycle, for example, the number of inexperienced supervisors increased and they needed mentoring. Speed mentoring is a possible solution to the problem.

  20. Causes of Teacher Attrition of First, Second, and Third Year Teachers in Rural Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Arkeco Lashay Lewis

    2012-01-01

    Early attrition from teaching bears enormous costs. High attrition means that schools must take funds urgently needed for school improvements and spend them instead in a manner that produces little long-term payoff for student learning (Kain & Singleton, 1996). Keeping highly qualified teachers should always be at the top of the priority list…

  1. Predictors of early faculty attrition at one Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Brenda A; Valley, Morgan; Welch, Cheryl; Tran, Zung Vu; Lowenstein, Steven R

    2014-02-10

    Faculty turnover threatens the research, teaching and clinical missions of medical schools. We measured early attrition among newly-hired medical school faculty and identified personal and institutional factors associated with early attrition. This retrospective cohort study identified faculty hired during the 2005-2006 academic year at one school. Three-year attrition rates were measured. A 40-question electronic survey measured demographics, career satisfaction, faculty responsibilities, institutional/departmental support, and reasons for resignation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) identified variables associated with early attrition. Of 139 faculty, 34% (95% CI = 26-42%) resigned within three years of hire. Attrition was associated with: perceived failure of the Department Chair to foster a climate of teaching, research, and service (OR = 6.03; 95% CI: 1.84, 19.69), inclusiveness, respect, and open communication (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.04, 9.98). Lack of professional development of the faculty member (OR = 3.84; 95% CI: 1.25, 11.81); institutional recognition and support for excellence in teaching (OR = 2.96; 95% CI: 0.78, 11.19) and clinical care (OR = 3.87; 95% CI: 1.04, 14.41); and >50% of professional time devoted to patient care (OR = 3.93; 95% CI: 1.29, 11.93) predicted attrition. Gender, race, ethnicity, academic degree, department type and tenure status did not predict early attrition. Of still-active faculty, an additional 27 (48.2%, 95% CI: 35.8, 61.0) reported considering resignation within the 5 years. In this pilot study, one-third of new faculty resigned within 3 years of hire. Greater awareness of predictors of early attrition may help schools identify threats to faculty career satisfaction and retention.

  2. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  3. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2016-17. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  4. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2014-15. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  5. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2015-16. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix; Hinojosa, David

    2016-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  6. When did they leave, and why? A retrospective case study of attrition on the Nottingham undergraduate medical course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yates Janet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of a wider study into students who experience difficulties, we examined the course files of those who had failed to graduate. This was an exploratory, descriptive study investigating how many students left after academic failure or non-academic problems, or simply changed their minds about reading medicine, and at what stage. The aim of the study was to increase our knowledge about the timings of, and reasons for, attrition. This understanding might help to reduce student loss in the future, by informing selection procedures and improving pastoral support at critical times. It might also assist in long-term workforce planning in the NHS. Methods Relevant data on admission and course progress were extracted manually from the archived files of students who had failed to graduate from five recent consecutive cohorts (entry in 2000–2004 inclusive, using a customised Access database. Discrete categories of information were supplemented with free text entries. Results 1188 students registered over the five-year entry period and 73 (6% failed to graduate. The highest rates of attrition (46/1188, 4% occurred during the first two years (largely preclinical studies, with 34 students leaving voluntarily, including 11 within the first semester, and 12 having their courses terminated for academic failure. Seventeen left at the end of the third year (Honours course plus early clinical practice and the remaining ten during the final two clinical years. The reasons for attrition were not always clear-cut and often involved a mixture of academic, personal, social and health factors, especially mental health problems. Conclusions The causes of attrition are complex. A small number of students with clear academic failure might require individual educational interventions for remediation. However, this could have substantial resource implications for the Faculty. Mental health problems predominate in late course attrition and may have

  7. Application of a Duration Model in Programs for Prevention of University Attrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Herrero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Institutional practices related to the prevention of desertion of university students increasingly require validated instruments in order to anticipate such behavior. In this regard, different statistical models generated from information related to the students themselves, their homes, their academic performance, among other determinants have demonstrated to be of crucial value. This study aims to demonstrate the importance of a series of determinants explored in other studies. The main objective is to apply a dropout rate predictive model with at risk university students in order to generate early and progressively more effective results. The research demonstrates the usefulness of the duration models in a sample of classroom students and the capacity to anticipate behavior of permanence/attrition across time. This was done with risk estimates using the Cox model.

  8. Student Loan Default Rates in Minnesota, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    While Minnesota undergraduates are more likely to take out student loans, they are substantially less likely than their peers nationally to default on federal student loans. Fifty-four percent of Minnesota undergraduates took out student loans in 2007-2008, compared to 39 percent of undergraduates across the U.S. Minnesota undergraduates were also…

  9. Variables That Can Affect Student Ratings of Their Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Attribution theory was applied to help predict the results of an experiment that examined the effects of three independent variables on students' ratings of their professors. The dependent variables were students' perceptions of whether the professor caused the students' grades and student satisfaction with their professor. The results suggest…

  10. Predicting Engineering Student Attrition Risk Using a Probabilistic Neural Network and Comparing Results with a Backpropagation Neural Network and Logistic Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Cindi; Twomey, Janet; Wright, David; Whitman, Lawrence

    2018-01-01

    As the need for engineers continues to increase, a growing focus has been placed on recruiting students into the field of engineering and retaining the students who select engineering as their field of study. As a result of this concentration on student retention, numerous studies have been conducted to identify, understand, and confirm…

  11. Relationship of Physical Attractiveness to Students' Ratings of Teaching Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Maria T.

    1987-01-01

    A study found that the physical attractiveness of a dental school teacher affected the student's opinion of teaching effectiveness, regardless of the student's sex, with effectiveness ratings correlating with pleasing appearance. (MSE)

  12. Personal, Situational, and Organizational Determinants of Navy Enlisted Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    of regular high school instruction. The GED test battery contains five testsz writing skills, social studies, science, reading skills, and mathematics ...expanded apprentice train- ing program for airmen and seamen might, ceteris paribus, bring the GENDET attrition rate closer to acceptable lvels . 13 ] KN

  13. Navy Recruit Attrition Prediction Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    have high correlation with attrition, such as age, job characteristics, command climate, marital status, behavior issues prior to recruitment, and the...the additive model. glm(formula = Outcome ~ Age + Gender + Marital + AFQTCat + Pay + Ed + Dep, family = binomial, data = ltraining) Deviance ...0.1 ‘ ‘ 1 (Dispersion parameter for binomial family taken to be 1) Null deviance : 105441 on 85221 degrees of freedom Residual deviance

  14. Understanding attrition from international Internet health interventions: a step towards global eHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Adam W A; Torres, Leandro D; Leykin, Yan; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Muñoz, Ricardo F

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide automated Internet health interventions have the potential to greatly reduce health disparities. High attrition from automated Internet interventions is ubiquitous, and presents a challenge in the evaluation of their effectiveness. Our objective was to evaluate variables hypothesized to be related to attrition, by modeling predictors of attrition in a secondary data analysis of two cohorts of an international, dual language (English and Spanish) Internet smoking cessation intervention. The two cohorts were identical except for the approach to follow-up (FU): one cohort employed only fully automated FU (n = 16 430), while the other cohort also used 'live' contact conditional upon initial non-response (n = 1000). Attrition rates were 48.1 and 10.8% for the automated FU and live FU cohorts, respectively. Significant attrition predictors in the automated FU cohort included higher levels of nicotine dependency, lower education, lower quitting confidence and receiving more contact emails. Participants' younger age was the sole predictor of attrition in the live FU cohort. While research on large-scale deployment of Internet interventions is at an early stage, this study demonstrates that differences in attrition from trials on this scale are (i) systematic and predictable and (ii) can largely be eliminated by live FU efforts. In fully automated trials, targeting the predictors we identify may reduce attrition, a necessary precursor to effective behavioral Internet interventions that can be accessed globally.

  15. Attrition of Tyee Formation Sandstone in a Natural Fluvial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    brandes, J. B.; Sanfilippo, J. D.; Lancaster, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    The data from this study will provide a rate of attrition with respect to change in volume, time and distance in a natural stream setting. Sandstone gravel attrition has been observed in previous studies with the use of rock tumblers, but measurements in natural systems are rare or absent. This study will use rocks with implanted passive integrated transponders (PIT) tags to track sediment movement. The study area is a natural mountain stream of approximately 4m width and 1m depth. This study is part of larger study of sediment transport. The rock volumes will be recorded prior to placement in an active channel using water displacement, the specific location along the channel will be recorded, and each tracer rock will be tracked using its individual radio frequency identification (RFID) number. Tracer rock deployment will occur before the annual high-water season. After one rainy season, the rocks will be located and removed from the stream using a radio frequency mobile radio frequency tracker. Their travel distances will be recorded and final volumes determined. Differences between initial and final volumes and travel distances will yield a distribution of attrition rates and, therefore, a mean gravel attrition rate.

  16. Factors Affecting Examination Attrition: Does Academic Support Help? A Survey of ACN203S (Cost Accounting and Control) Students at Unisa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tladi, Lerato Sonia

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the attributing and contributing factors to examination absence as well as whether the academic and social support available to students had a role to play in discouraging or reducing absence from examinations using results from a quantitative survey of ACN203S (Cost Accounting and Control) students who were admitted…

  17. Using the factors that have a positive impact on the retention of low socioeconomic students to prepare accelerated enrolled nurses for the science units of a nursing degree. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Doggrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At a campus in a low socioeconomic (SES area, our University allows enrolled nurses entry into the second year of a Bachelor of Nursing, but attrition is high.  Using the factors, described by Yorke and Thomas (2003 to have a positive impact on the attrition of low SES students, we developed strategies to prepare the enrolled nurses for the pharmacology and bioscience units of a nursing degree with the aim of reducing their attrition.  As a strategy, the introduction of review lectures of anatomy, physiology and microbiology, was associated with significantly reduced attrition rates. The subsequent introduction of a formative website activity of some basic concepts in bioscience and pharmacology, and a workshop addressing study skills and online resources, were associated with a further reduction in attrition rates of enrolled nursing students in a Bachelor of Nursing

  18. Investigating Strategies to Increase Persistence and Success Rates among Anatomy & Physiology Students: A Case Study at Austin Community College District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedartham, Padmaja B.

    Community colleges train 60% of healthcare workers nationwide. Human anatomy and physiology (A&P) courses are considered prerequisite courses for all students who aspire to enter health-related programs. The attrition rates for A&P students at community colleges nationally are close to 50%. Community colleges with open-door policies admit nontraditional students who have historically been educationally and economically disadvantaged and are labeled at risk. At-risk students offer a challenge to the colleges and in particular to allied health programs with their mathematical and science oriented requirements. This case study was designed to determine the strategies used to increase the success rates and retention rates among A&P students at Austin Community College District (ACC) in Texas. Data show that ACC has almost 100% retention and higher success rates among A&P students as compared to other colleges. Qualitative data were collected from eight full-time faculty, three administrators, three administrative staff, one director, and two advisors. The findings linked both academic and nonacademic variables to high retention and success rates. The key strategies that helped the A&P students to overcome the challenges to persist and succeed were an assessment test, two preparatory biology courses, technology, and teaching strategies. Taking an assessment test before being permitted to access the class helped students prepare themselves for the rigors of A&P. These strategies provided the students with the foundation of knowledge in the basic biological principles and processes, study skills, and time management skills that would prepare them for the material presented in A&P courses and later in the allied health programs. The principle themes identified in this research--namely requiring students to take the assessment test, providing materials (BIOL.1308, CE4000, and online modules) to prepare students for taking the test, a $2 million grant awarded by the

  19. Relationship between Academic Performance, Spatial Competence, Learning Styles and Attrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Noriega Biggio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the results of research on factors affecting academic performance and attrition in a sample of 1,500 freshman students majoring in architecture, design and urbanism at the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina [University of Buenos Aires, Argentina] who were enrolled in a drafting course. The hypotheses we tested concern the mediating role of learning styles on the relationship between spatial competence and academic performance, learning-style differences by gender and cohort, and the relationship between attrition, spatial competence level and learning style. Statistical analysis of the data was performed and spatial competence enhanced by motivational profile was found to predict final achievement. Educational implications are identified, highlighting the need to promote in students those academic behaviors that characterize a self-regulated learning style and encourage the use of specific intellectual abilities.

  20. The Role of Personality Type on Minority Attrition at the US Naval Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Provost as more likely to attrite were ISTP, ESTP, ISFP, and ENFJ . “These students tend to be less organized, more passive in their relationship to...MBTI ISTP ISTJ ISFP ISFJ INTP INTJ INFP INFJ ESTP ESTJ ESFP ESFJ ENTP ENTJ ENFP ENFJ C ou nt 400 300 200 100 0 33 Table 12: Minority Attrition...reason to believe that all who are admitted have the potential to graduate. B. PURPOSE OF STUDY This thesis examines the relationship

  1. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  2. The Affection of Student Ratings of Instruction toward EFL Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingling

    2018-01-01

    Student ratings of instruction can be a valuable indicator of teaching because the quality measurement of instruction identifies areas where improvement is needed. Student ratings of instruction are expected to evaluate and enhance the teaching strategies. Evaluation of teaching effectiveness has been officially implemented in Taiwanese higher…

  3. Rating Students' Problem Behaviour: The Role of Teachers' Individual Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M.; Kargiotidis, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the role of teachers' personal characteristics and mental health status on their frequency ratings of student problem behaviour. A sample of 121 primary school teachers were asked to rate the frequency of a student's behavioural problems, and to self-report their personality traits, psychopathology symptoms and burnout.…

  4. Thailand's Student Loans Fund: Interest Rate Subsidies and Repayment Burdens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Bruce; Lounkaew, Kiatanantha; Polsiri, Piruna; Sarachitti, Rangsit; Sitthipongpanich, Thitima

    2010-01-01

    Government student loan schemes typically have implicit interest rate subsidies which, while these are a cost to taxpayers, they have the benefit of diminishing repayment burdens for graduates. Our goal is to illustrate the extent of both interest rate subsidies and repayment burdens with respect to Thailand's Student Loans Fund (SLF), using…

  5. The development of a student rating of teaching effectiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of student ratings of teaching effectiveness has become the most widely used, and often the only, source of information to assess and improve teaching effectiveness. Important prerequisites for questionnaires for student ratings should, therefore, be reliability and validity. The research reported in this article presents ...

  6. Estimating Effective Subsidy Rates of Student Aid Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Stacey H. CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Every year millions of high school students and their parents in the US are asked to fill out complicated financial aid application forms. However, few studies have estimated the responsiveness of government financial aid schemes to changes in financial needs of the students. This paper identifies the effective subsidy rate (ESR) of student aid, as defined by the coefficient of financial needs in the regression of financial aid. The ESR measures the proportion of subsidy of student aid under ...

  7. Determinants of attrition in students of the Faculty of Health Sciences University of Cesar Popular among the years 2005 and 2009-I period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Esther Hernández Almanza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present document has an objective to present how the faculty of Health Sciences University Popular del Cesar has been affected by the problem of desertion in the form of undergraduate, in addition, determine the main factors that dominate student desertion and finally to propose strategies to decrease its incidence.  

  8. Measuring Creative Capacity in Gifted Students: Comparing Teacher Ratings and Student Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Todd; Bower, Janessa

    2017-01-01

    Creativity and giftedness are frequently associated, and schools may use measures of creativity for identifying gifted and talented students. The researchers examined three aspects of elementary student creativity: (a) the relationship between a teacher's rating of student creativity and rubric-scored student writing samples, (b) group differences…

  9. A Comparative Study of Administrator and Special Education Teacher Perceptions of Special Education Teacher Attrition and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Danielle Angelina

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study identifies perceived causes of and solutions to the attrition of special education teachers. Researchers have documented that special education teaching positions encounter higher attrition rates than their general education peers (Katsiyannis, Zhang, & Conroy in Olivarez & Arnold, 2006; Mitchell & Arnold,…

  10. Using Arduino to Teach Programming to First-Year Computer Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wee Lum; Venema, Sven; Gonzalez, Ruben

    2017-01-01

    Transitioning to university is recognised as a challenging endeavour for commencing students. For commencing Computer Science students specifically, evidence suggests a link between poor performance in introductory technical courses, such as programming, and high attrition rates. Building resilience in students, particularly at the start of their…

  11. Are Student Loan Default Rates Linked to Institutional Capacity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitani, Terry T.; McKitrick, Sean A.

    2016-01-01

    As more undergraduates have taken out loans to attend college, the number of borrowers who fail to repay their student loans has increased. While previous research has focused on students' likelihood to default, this study employed institutional cohort default rates (CDRs) as an outcome variable. Using Integrated Postsecondary Education Data…

  12. Hepatitis B Vaccination Rate Among Medical Students At The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    KEYWORDS. Hepatitis B, vaccination rate, Medical students; Nigeria. Correspondence: Dr PaulNsirimobul. Email- nsypaul@yahoo.co.uk. INTRODUCTION. The hepatitis B virus .... students of the College of Health Sciences,. University of Port Harcourt .... work schedule in the hospital, procrastination, to long queues at the ...

  13. College Students' Perceived Disease Risk versus Actual Prevalence Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B.; Sosa, Erica T.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare college students' perceived disease risk with disease prevalence rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 625 college students collected with an Internet-based survey. Paired t-tests were used to separately compare participants' perceived 10-year and lifetime disease risk for 4 diseases: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and…

  14. Attrition in a 30-year follow-up of a perinatal birth risk cohort: factors change with age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Launes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Attrition is a major cause of potential bias in longitudinal studies and clinical trials. Attrition rate above 20% raises concern of the reliability of the results. Few studies have looked at the factors behind attrition in follow-ups spanning decades.Methods. We analyzed attrition and associated factors of a 30-year follow-up cohort of subjects who were born with perinatal risks for neurodevelopmental disorders. Attrition rates were calculated at different stages of follow-up and differences between responders and non-responders were tested. To find combinations of variables influencing attrition and investigate their relative importance at birth, 5, 9, 16 and 30 years of follow-up we used the random forest classification.Results. Initial loss of potential participants was 13%. Attrition was 16% at five, 24% at nine, 35% at 16 and 46% at 30 years. The only group difference that emerged between responders and non-responders was in socioeconomic status (SES. The variables identified by random forest classification analysis were classified into Birth related, Development related and SES related. Variables from all these categories contributed to attrition, but SES related variables were less important than birth and development associated variables. Classification accuracy ranged between 0.74 and 0.96 depending on age.Discussion. Lower SES is linked to attrition in many studies. Our results point to the importance of the growth and development related factors in a longitudinal study. Parents’ decisions to participate depend on the characteristics of the child. The same association was also seen when the child, now grown up, decided to participate at 30 years. In addition, birth related medical variables are associated with the attrition still at the age of 30. Our results using a data mining approach suggest that attrition in longitudinal studies is influenced by complex interactions of a multitude of variables, which are not

  15. Lanchester's attrition models and fights among social animals

    OpenAIRE

    Eldridge S. Adams; Michael Mesterton-Gibbons

    2003-01-01

    Lanchester's models of attrition during warfare have served as the basis for several predictions about conflicts between groups of animals. These models and their extensions describe rates of mortality during battles as functions of the number and fighting abilities of individuals in each group, allowing analysis of the determinants of group strength and of the cumulative numbers of casualties. We propose modifications to Lanchester's models to improve their applicability to social animals. I...

  16. Military Enlistment and Attrition. An Analysis of Decision Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    instability, defined as being unemployed at the time of enlistment or having had a spell of jobless- ness within the past 12 months. For graduates, attrition...opportunities. The level of education an individual obtains is related to the value of higher education to the individual (both monetary and psychic ...value, does suggest that unemployed graduates are more likely to enlist, all other things equal, the higher their previous wage rate. The previous

  17. Association between substandard classroom ventilation rates and students' academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverinen-Shaughnessy, U; Moschandreas, D J; Shaughnessy, R J

    2011-04-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between classroom ventilation rates and academic achievement. One hundred elementary schools of two school districts in the southwest United States were included in the study. Ventilation rates were estimated from fifth-grade classrooms (one per school) using CO(2) concentrations measured during occupied school days. In addition, standardized test scores and background data related to students in the classrooms studied were obtained from the districts. Of 100 classrooms, 87 had ventilation rates below recommended guidelines based on ASHRAE Standard 62 as of 2004. There is a linear association between classroom ventilation rates and students' academic achievement within the range of 0.9-7.1 l/s per person. For every unit (1 l/s per person) increase in the ventilation rate within that range, the proportion of students passing standardized test (i.e., scoring satisfactory or above) is expected to increase by 2.9% (95%CI 0.9-4.8%) for math and 2.7% (0.5-4.9%) for reading. The linear relationship observed may level off or change direction with higher ventilation rates, but given the limited number of observations, we were unable to test this hypothesis. A larger sample size is needed for estimating the effect of classroom ventilation rates higher than 7.1 l/s per person on academic achievement. The results of this study suggest that increasing the ventilation rates toward recommended guideline ventilation rates in classrooms should translate into improved academic achievement of students. More studies are needed to fully understand the relationships between ventilation rate, other indoor environmental quality parameters, and their effects on students' health and achievement. Achieving the recommended guidelines and pursuing better understanding of the underlying relationships would ultimately support both sustainable and productive school environments for students and personnel. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. In Their Own Words: A Text Analytics Investigation of College Course Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Greg V.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive course attrition is costly to both the student and the institution. While most institutions have systems to quantify and report the numbers, far less attention is typically paid to each student's reason(s) for withdrawal. In this case study, text analytics was used to analyze a large set of open-ended written comments in which students…

  19. Attitudes of non-practicing chiropractors: a pilot survey concerning factors related to attrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Lawrence H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research into attitudes about chiropractors who are no longer engaged in active clinical practice is non-existent. Yet non-practicing chiropractors (NPCs represent a valid sub-group worthy of study. Aim The purpose of this research was to assess attrition attitudes of NPCs about the chiropractic profession and develop a scale to assess such attitudes. Methods A 48 item survey was developed using the PsychData software. This survey included 35 Likert-style items assessing various aspects of the profession namely financial, educational, psychosocial and political. An internet discussion site where NPCs may be members was accessed for recruitment purposes. Results A total of 70 valid responses were received for analysis. A majority of respondents were male with 66% being in non-practice status for 3 to 5 years and less with 43% indicating that they had graduated since the year 2000. Most respondents were employed either in other healthcare professions and non-chiropractic education. A majority of NPCs believed that business ethics in chiropractic were questionable and that overhead expense and student loans were factors in practice success. A majority of NPCs were in associate practice at one time with many believing that associates were encouraged to prolong the care of patients and that associate salaries were not fair. Most NPCs surveyed believed that chiropractic was not a good career choice and would not recommend someone to become a chiropractor. From this survey, a 12 item scale was developed called the "chiropractor attrition attitude scale" for future research. Reliability analysis of this novel scale demonstrated a coefficient alpha of 0.90. Conclusion The low response rate indicates that findings cannot be generalized to the NPC population. This study nonetheless demonstrates that NPCs attrition attitudes can be assessed. The lack of a central database of NPCs is a challenge to future research. Appropriate

  20. Comparison of Urban and Rural Dropout Rates of Distance Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hart, K. L.; Venter J. M. P.

    2013-01-01

    South Africa has one of the highest university dropout rates in the world. As a country, it also has a history of forced location and the withholding of resources, including quality education, from certain rural areas. This study investigates, the effect of urbanization (of the area in which a student resides) on the dropout rate of distance…

  1. Student Ratings of Instruction in Turkish Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Sert

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The end-of-term student evaluations have a twofold purpose: to provide information for administrators to make personnel decisions, and to help instructors to improve the quality of their teaching. The aim of this study is to investigate the ‘utility’ of the Student Ratings of Instruction (SRI. To that end, the concerns of the administrators, instructors and students regarding the use of the SRI in formative and summative evaluations are questioned. This study also investigates possible variables associated with the SRI: 1 what are the differences in ratings among the below-average, average and the above-average students? and 2 what is the correlation between the students’ grades and ratings? The participants of the study consisted of 5 administrators, 17 instructors and 292 students from the faculty of education of a foundation university in Ankara. A triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods was adopted. In the first phase, causal comparative and correlation research methods were implemented. In the second phase, qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in the SRI among the below-average, average and above-average students. The correlation between the student grades and the SRI was significant at a low level. The SRI were reportedly utilised to make teaching more effective and to make decisions when employing part-time personnel only. The permanent personnel were not affected by the SRI. Suggestions have been put forward to verify the usefulness of SRI.

  2. Increasing the graduation rates of minority medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J L; Nowacki, C M; Girotti, J A; Townsel, J; Plagge, J C; Beckham, T W

    1986-05-01

    The University of Illinois College of Medicine has operated a program since 1969 to recruit minority students into the college and to increase the graduation rates of these students once they enroll. Known as the Medical Opportunities Program (MOP) until 1978, the program was expanded in 1978 and renamed the Urban Health Program (UHP). The authors of the present paper discuss the results of these programs, particularly the effect of granting minority students delays in completing graduation requirements. The MOP (1969 through 1978) increased graduation rates for minority students from 55 percent for those who graduated on time to 81 percent for both on-time and delayed graduates. Under the first seven years of the UHP (1979 through 1985), more minority students have been offered places, and more have enrolled than in the 10 years of the MOP. The retention rate under the UHP, if it holds, will be higher than that under the MOP. For the combined MOP-UHP period, the retention rate for minority students was 88 percent; 69.8 percent of the graduates were on time, and 30.2 were delayed.

  3. The Canadian Forces Recruitment/Attrition Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wait, Tracey

    1998-01-01

    ...), as part of its mandate to provide analysis of potential impacts of trends and change on defense and defense related issues, has designed a prototype model of recruitment and attrition of the Canadian Forces (C F...

  4. Peer tutoring program for academic success of returning nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    High attrition rates among students in associate degree nursing programs are a concern for faculty, administrators, and students. Programs offering academic and emotional support for students at risk for failing a clinical course may decrease attrition rates and improve academic performance. A peer tutoring program was developed for returning nursing students who were unsuccessful in a previous clinical course. Peer tutors met with returning students weekly to review course work, complete case studies and practice NCLEX questions. Trusting, supportive relationships developed among students and a significant increase in grades was noted at the end of the course for 79% of students. Implementation of peer tutoring was beneficial for returning students, tutors, and the nursing program and may be valuable in other courses where academic achievement is a concern.

  5. Medical students' subjective ratings of stress levels and awareness of student support services about mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa Li-Wey; Norgren Jaconelli, Sanna; Lampe, Lisa; Malhi, Gin S; Hunt, Glenn

    2013-06-01

    To descriptively assess medical students' concerns for their mental and emotional state, perceived need to conceal mental problems, perceived level of support at university, knowledge and use of student support services, and experience of stresses of daily life. From March to September 2011, medical students at an Australian university were invited to complete an anonymous online survey. 475 responses were received. Students rated study and examinations (48.9%), financial concerns (38.1%), isolation (19.4%) and relationship concerns (19.2%) as very or extremely stressful issues. Knowledge of available support services was high, with 90.8% indicating they were aware of the university's medical centre. Treatment rates were modest (31.7%). Students' concerns about their mental state were generally low, but one in five strongly felt they needed to conceal their emotional problems. Despite widespread awareness of appropriate support services, a large proportion of students felt they needed to conceal mental and emotional problems. Overall treatment rates for students who were greatly concerned about their mental and emotional state appeared modest, and, although comparable with those of similarly aged community populations, may reflect undertreatment. It would be appropriate for universities to address stressors identified by students. Strategies for encouraging distressed students to obtain appropriate assessment and treatment should also be explored. Those students who do seek healthcare are most likely to see a primary care physician, suggesting an important screening role for these health professionals.

  6. Adaptation of abbreviated mathematics anxiety rating scale for engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Sayed Kushairi Sayed; Samat, Khairul Fadzli; Sultan, Al Amin Mohamed; Halim, Bushra Abdul; Ismail, Siti Fatimah; Mafazi, Nurul Wirdah

    2015-05-01

    Mathematics is an essential and fundamental tool used by engineers to analyse and solve problems in their field. Due to this, most engineering education programs involve a concentration of study in mathematics courses whereby engineering students have to take mathematics courses such as numerical methods, differential equations and calculus in the first two years and continue to do so until the completion of the sequence. However, the students struggled and had difficulties in learning courses that require mathematical abilities. Hence, this study presents the factors that caused mathematics anxiety among engineering students using Abbreviated Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale (AMARS) through 95 students of Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM). From 25 items in AMARS, principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that there are four mathematics anxiety factors, namely experiences of learning mathematics, cognitive skills, mathematics evaluation anxiety and students' perception on mathematics. Minitab 16 software was used to analyse the nonparametric statistics. Kruskal-Wallis Test indicated that there is a significant difference in the experience of learning mathematics and mathematics evaluation anxiety among races. The Chi-Square Test of Independence revealed that the experience of learning mathematics, cognitive skills and mathematics evaluation anxiety depend on the results of their SPM additional mathematics. Based on this study, it is recommended to address the anxiety problems among engineering students at the early stage of studying in the university. Thus, lecturers should play their part by ensuring a positive classroom environment which encourages students to study mathematics without fear.

  7. A Criterion-Referenced Approach to Student Ratings of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J. Patrick; Doromal, Justin B.; Wei, Xiaoxin; Zhu, Shi

    2017-01-01

    We developed a criterion-referenced student rating of instruction (SRI) to facilitate formative assessment of teaching. It involves four dimensions of teaching quality that are grounded in current instructional design principles: Organization and structure, Assessment and feedback, Personal interactions, and Academic rigor. Using item response…

  8. Instructor Reputation: An Expectancy Relationship Involving Student Ratings and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Raymond P.

    1979-01-01

    Instructor expressiveness and lecture content were combined with instructor reputation in a 2 X 2 X 2 factorial design to assess interaction effects. Results indicated that reputation interacted with expressiveness but not content, in which students rated positive, high-expressive instructors more favorably than negative, high-expressive…

  9. Reliability and Agreement in Student Ratings of the Class Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter M.; Christ, Theodore J.

    2016-01-01

    The current study estimated the reliability and agreement of student ratings of the classroom environment obtained using the Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teaching (REACT; Christ, Nelson, & Demers, 2012; Nelson, Demers, & Christ, 2014). Coefficient alpha, class-level reliability, and class agreement indices were…

  10. Unemployment, the Great Recession, and Apprenticeship Attrition in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilginsoy, Cihan

    2018-01-01

    The author estimates the impacts of the local rate of unemployment and the Great Recession on the quit and graduation rates of the U.S. construction trade apprentices over the 2001-2014 period. Trade union participation in training sponsorship had a strong influence on attrition rates. The impacts of the business cycle and the Great Recession on…

  11. Building Student Success Using Problem-Based Learning Approach in the Accounting Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawver, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    A major area of concern in academia is that of student retention at the university, college, and departmental levels. As academics, there is a considerable amount that we can do to improve student retention, and reduce the attrition rates in our departments. One way to solve this is to take an innovative approach in the classroom to enhance the…

  12. Student Motivation in Graduate Music Programmes: An Examination of Personal and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Moreno, Patricia Adelaida

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of students in music education graduate programmes, attrition rates suggest a lack of success in retaining and assisting them to the completion of their degree. Based on the expectancy-value theory, the aim of this study was to examine students' motivations (values and competence beliefs) and their complex interaction…

  13. Reducing Student "Suspension Rates" and Engaging Students in Learning: Principal and Teacher Approaches that Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Geoff

    2006-01-01

    The negative effects of student suspension from school on both the individual and the community are well documented and relate to a wide range of matters, including school completion rates, homelessness and crime. Two recent, extensive reviews of student suspensions in government and non-government schools in N.S.W. (Gonczi and Riordan, 2002;…

  14. No differential attrition was found in randomized controlled trials published in general medical journals: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutzen, Rik; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Kotz, Daniel; Spigt, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Differential attrition is regarded as a major threat to the internal validity of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). This study identifies the degree of differential attrition in RCTs covering a broad spectrum of clinical areas and factors that are related to this. A PubMed search was conducted to obtain a random sample of 100 RCTs published between 2008 and 2010 in journals from the ISI Web of Knowledge(SM) category of medicine, general and internal. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies were primary publications of two-arm parallel randomized clinical trials, containing human participants and one or multiple follow-up measurements whose availability depended on the patients' willingness to participate. A significant amount of differential attrition was observed in 8% of the trials. The average differential attrition rate was 0.99 (95% confidence interval: 0.97-1.01), indicating no general difference in attrition rates between intervention and control groups. Moreover, no indication of heterogeneity was found, suggesting that the occurrence of differential attrition in the published literature is mostly a chance finding, unrelated to any particular design factors. Differential attrition did not generally occur in RCTs covering a broad spectrum of clinical areas within general and internal medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Social Support in First-Term Sailors’ Attrition from Recruit Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    absenteeism , and job turnover during the first year of employment. Academy of Management Journal, 28, 88-109. Shils, E. A. & Janowitz, M. (1948). Cohesion and...British Army. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 19, 745-767. Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition

  16. Faculty ratings of retention strategies for minority nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Barbara H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a) the types of retention strategies used by undergraduate nursing programs for the purpose of retaining minority students, b) the rated effectiveness of the strategies, as identified by faculty in those programs, and c) whether there is a relationship between strategies rated as effective and the type of nursing program, baccalaureate (BSN) or associate (AD) degree. Administrator-selected faculty from randomly sampled BSN and AD nursing programs within a 16-state area of the southeastern United States were asked to respond to an online survey regarding the use and effectiveness of retention strategies selected from the literature. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests for association were used to analyze the data. Of the 14 strategies included in this analysis, faculty availability and timely feedback on tests and clinical performances were used by all undergraduate programs. Organized study groups and peer mentoring were the least used strategies. Faculty from both BSN and AD programs reported using many of the strategies and rated their use as effective overall for minority nursing student retention. The highest rated strategies were those that involved direct interaction of nurse faculty and students.

  17. Assessing students' communication skills: validation of a global rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Simone; Muehlinghaus, Isabel; Froehmel, Annette; Ortwein, Heiderose

    2008-12-01

    Communication skills training is an accepted part of undergraduate medical programs nowadays. In addition to learning experiences its importance should be emphasised by performance-based assessment. As detailed checklists have been shown to be not well suited for the assessment of communication skills for different reasons, this study aimed to validate a global rating scale. A Canadian instrument was translated to German and adapted to assess students' communication skills during an end-of-semester-OSCE. Subjects were second and third year medical students at the reformed track of the Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin. Different groups of raters were trained to assess students' communication skills using the global rating scale. Validity testing included concurrent validity and construct validity: Judgements of different groups of raters were compared to expert ratings as a defined gold standard. Furthermore, the amount of agreement between scores obtained with this global rating scale and a different instrument for assessing communication skills was determined. Results show that communication skills can be validly assessed by trained non-expert raters as well as standardised patients using this instrument.

  18. Outlook on Student Retention in Higher Education University Reforms in Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Zoulal Mansouri; Mohamed El Amine Moumine

    2017-01-01

    High student attrition rates at university have become one of the most challenging issues in higher education worldwide in the last five decades. Moroccan universities are no exception. At-risk students drop out of studies for a plethora of reasons, and the attrition rate is increasing despite the efforts made in education reforms carried out since 1999. This article reviews the most important components of the higher education reforms that have been adopted in Moroccan higher education in th...

  19. Incorporating direct marketing activity into latent attrition models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweidel, David A.; Knox, George

    2013-01-01

    When defection is unobserved, latent attrition models provide useful insights about customer behavior and accurate forecasts of customer value. Yet extant models ignore direct marketing efforts. Response models incorporate the effects of direct marketing, but because they ignore latent attrition,

  20. Retention and Attrition Among African Americans in the STAR*D Study: What Causes Research Volunteers to Stay or Stray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Eleanor J; Kassem, Layla; Chemerinski, Anat; Rush, A. John; Laje, Gonzalo; McMahon, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Background High attrition rates among African-Americans (AA) volunteers are a persistent problem that makes clinical trials less representative and complicates estimation of treatment outcomes. Many studies contrast AA with other ethnic/racial groups, but few compare the AA volunteers who remain in treatment with those who leave. Here, in addition to comparing patterns of attrition between African Americans and whites, we identify predictors of overall and early attrition among African Americans. Method Sample comprised non-Hispanic African-American (n=673) and white (n=2,549) participants in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Chi-square tests were used to examine racial group differences in reasons for exit. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine predictors of overall attrition, early attrition (by Level 2) and top reasons cited for attrition among African Americans. Results For both African-American and white dropouts, non-compliance reasons for attrition were most commonly cited during the earlier phases of the study while reasons related to efficacy and medication side effects were cited later in the study. Satisfaction with treatment strongly predicted overall attrition among African Americans independent of socioeconomic, clinical, medical or psychosocial factors. Early attrition among African American dropouts was associated with less psychiatric comorbidity, and higher perceived physical functioning but greater severity of clinician-rated depression. Conclusions The decision to drop out is a dynamic process that changes over the course of a clinical trial. Strategies aimed at retaining African Americans in such trials should emphasize engagement with treatment and patient satisfaction immediately following enrollment and after treatment initiation. PMID:23723044

  1. Beyond student ratings: peer observation of classroom and clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Ronald A; Naumann, Phyllis L; Appling, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    Peer observation of classroom and clinical teaching has received increased attention over the past decade in schools of nursing to augment student ratings of teaching effectiveness. One essential ingredient is the scale used to evaluate performance. A five-step systematic procedure for adapting, writing, and building any peer observation scale is described. The differences between the development of a classroom observation scale and an appraisal scale to observe clinical instructors are examined. Psychometric issues peculiar to observation scales are discussed in terms of content validity, eight types of response bias, and interobserver reliability. The applications of the scales in one school of nursing as part of the triangulation of methods with student ratings and the teaching portfolio are illustrated. Copies of the scales are also provided.

  2. An experimental study on the primary fragmentation and attrition of limestones in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Xuan; Zhang, Hai; Yang, Hairui; Liu, Qing; Wang, Jinwei; Yue, Guangxi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental study on the primary fragmentation and attrition of 5 limestones in a fluidized bed was conducted. The intensity of fragmentation and attrition were measured in the same apparatus but at different fluidizing velocities. It was found that the averaged size of the particles decreased by about 10-20% during the fragmentation process. The important factors for particle comminution include limestone types, heating rate, calcination condition and ambient CO 2 concentration. Fragmentation mainly occurred in the first a few minutes in the fluidized bed and it was more intense than that in the muffle furnace at the same temperature. The original size effect was ambiguous, depending on the limestone type. The comminution caused by attrition mainly occurred during calcination process rather than sulphation process. The sulphation process was fragmentation and attrition resisted. The attrition rate of sulphate was similar to that of lime in trend, decaying exponentially with time, but was one-magnitude-order smaller than that of lime. Present experimental results indicate that fragmentation mechanism of the limestone is dominated by CO 2 release instead of thermal stress. (author)

  3. Digital Intraoral Imaging Re-Exposure Rates of Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Anthea; Winand, Curtis; Ganatra, Seema; Lai, Hollis; Alsulfyani, Noura; Pachêco-Pereira, Camila

    2018-01-01

    A guiding principle of radiation safety is ensuring that radiation dosage is as low as possible while yielding the necessary diagnostic information. Intraoral images taken with conventional dental film have a higher re-exposure rate when taken by dental students compared to experienced staff. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of and reasons for re-exposure of digital intraoral images taken by third- and fourth-year dental students in a dental school clinic. At one dental school in Canada, the total number of intraoral images taken by third- and fourth-year dental students, re-exposures, and error descriptions were extracted from patient clinical records for an eight-month period (September 2015 to April 2016). The data were categorized to distinguish between digital images taken with solid-state sensors or photostimulable phosphor plates (PSP). The results showed that 9,397 intraoral images were made, and 1,064 required re-exposure. The most common error requiring re-exposure for bitewing images was an error in placement of the receptor too far mesially or distally (29% for sensors and 18% for PSP). The most common error requiring re-exposure for periapical images was inadequate capture of the periapical area (37% for sensors and 6% for PSP). A retake rate of 11% was calculated, and the common technique errors causing image deficiencies were identified. Educational intervention can now be specifically designed to reduce the retake rate and radiation dose for future patients.

  4. "The Accommodation I Make Is Turning a Blind Eye": Faculty Support for Student Mothers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Martina; Tennant, Lilly

    2018-01-01

    The levels of support which faculty provide to students have been linked to a number of positive effects on students such as lower rates of attrition, greater satisfaction with college life, enhanced self-concept, improved academic performance and more likelihood of remaining enrolled in college through stressful life periods. There are surely…

  5. Exploring Beginning Teachers' Attrition in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Brok, Perry; Wubbels, Theo; van Tartwijk, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Based on a review of recent studies and reports, this research investigates attrition among beginning teachers in the Netherlands as well as reasons for teacher attrition, and compares the finding with studies on this topic conducted elsewhere in the world. The findings suggest that attrition among beginning teachers in the Netherlands with a…

  6. Attrition resistant gamma-alumina catalyst support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2006-03-14

    A .gamma.-alumina catalyst support having improved attrition resistance produced by a method comprising the steps of treating a particulate .gamma.-alumina material with an acidic aqueous solution comprising water and nitric acid and then, prior to adding any catalytic material thereto, calcining the treated .gamma.-alumina.

  7. Examining the Relationship Between Mental, Physical, and Organizational Factors Associated With Attrition During Maritime Forces Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsch, Olaf; Banko, Katherine M; Veenstra, Bertil J; Valk, Pierre J L

    2015-11-01

    For infantry units of the Dutch Ministry of Defence, high attrition rates (varying from 42 to 68%) during initial training are a persisting problem. The reasons for this attrition are diverse. Having better insight into the causes of attrition is a prerequisite for implementing preventive measures. To achieve this, a monitoring assessment system was developed that integrated the effects of physical, mental, and organizational determinants on operational readiness. The aim of this study was to implement the monitoring tools and to establish the set of determinants that best predicted attrition during infantry training of new recruits. Eighty-five recruits were monitored over a 24-week infantry training course. Before the training, recruits were screened for medical, psychological, and physical wellness. During the monitoring phase, mental, physiological, and organizational indicants were obtained using an array of tools such as questionnaires, chest belt monitors (for heart rate, acceleration, and skin temperature measurements), and computerized tests (e.g., vigilance, long-term memory). Survival analyses were used to tease out the determinants of individual and grouped predictors of attrition. Nearly half the recruits (47%) failed the training. Attrition was predicted by both physiological and mental determinants. However, the organizational determinant "trainers' judgment" on the "recruits' military quality" dominated the physiological and mental determinants. It was concluded that the monitoring system was successfully implemented during infantry training, and that the survival analysis method emphasized on single effects and interactions between the different determinants. Based on the current findings, we recommend several steps to successfully implement a monitoring method in settings with high demands.

  8. Why students leave in the UK: an integrative review of the international research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Joan; Roxburgh, Michelle; Taylor, Julie; Lauder, William

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this integrative review of the literature was to find and review international research studies that explored student attrition to determine what is known about the topic and to identify gaps in the research with a view to addressing the situation in the UK. Attrition from nursing programmes is a serious problem in the UK. It is recognised as a complex phenomenon, not attributable to a single cause. Regardless of actual attrition rates and trends, departments of nursing are challenged to perform in a business-like manner. Consequently, every student lost to a programme of study equates to a financial penalty for the department and to the future workforce and community.   Integrative review of the literature. Using electronic databases and specific search terms, 18 articles were identified and reviewed. Findings from the identified international research literature were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Four broad themes that accounted for factors of relevance to attrition were identified: Social, Prediction, Programme and Personal. Retention studies are fraught with methodological problems. These include incomplete or inaccurate data and low response rates. Attrition early in programmes may be attributed to a failure to understand the roles of nurses in contemporary societies. This has led to dissatisfaction with programmes and academic failure, as students may underestimate the intellectual demands of their programmes. Attrition later in the programme may be attributed to a combination of personal factors that culminate in a personal crisis. The research literature suggests that stereotyping of nurses is a major factor in attrition. Both professions need to find ways of communicating contemporary roles to wider society. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. The measurement of change in functional ability: dealing with attrition and the floor/ceiling effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, Bjørn E; Avlund, Kirsten; Due, Pernille

    2006-01-01

    , functional ability at baseline, relative wealth, social network, self-rated health, and life-satisfaction. Inclusion of the dead in statistical models for the study of change in functional ability reduced the attrition problem. A logistic model for paired observations of functional ability at two points...

  10. Special Education Teacher Perception of Administrative Supports That Encourage, Decrease Burnout, and Reduce Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Jay

    2017-01-01

    The field of special education is facing a shortage of teachers. A shortage of special education teachers is an example of a pressing issue within education. The problem is that teacher attrition rates are among the highest within special education. Many special education teachers are leaving the profession after a few years of teaching for varied…

  11. Student Evaluation of Teaching: A Study Exploring Student Rating Instrument Free-Form Text Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupans, Ieva; McGuren, Therese; Babey, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    Student rating instruments are recognised to be valid indicators of effective instruction, providing a valuable tool to improve teaching. However, free-form text comments obtained from the open-ended question component of such surveys are only infrequently analysed comprehensively. We employed an innovative, systematic approach to the analysis of…

  12. Reliability and Cost Impacts for Attritable Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    on reliability and cost: a probabilistic model. Electric Power Systems Research, 72(3), 213-224. Kalbfleisch, J.D. & Prentice, R.L. (1980). The...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENV-MS-17-M-172 RELIABILITY AND COST IMPACTS FOR ATTRITABLE SYSTEMS THESIS Presented to... power of discrete time Markov chains, whether homogeneous or non-homogeneous, to model the reliability and dependability of repairable systems should

  13. A qualitative and quantitative study of the reasons of attrition in an Indian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasturi Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study attempts to evaluate the reasons of attrition in the organization from the perspective of the existing as well as the leaving employees; compare and identify the gaps, if any between the perspectives of these two employees groups. The study also aims to critically analyze the utility of ′exit interviews′ for analyzing the reasons of attrition. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a 150-bedded hospital in Ahmedabad, India, during May-July 2015. Exit interview data of forty leaving employees were collected and reviewed. One hundred existing employees were interviewed through quantitative and qualitative methods to understand their perceptions about attrition in the organization. Results: Attrition rate of 26% was observed in the study and 57% leaving employees were nurses. 70% leaving employees cite "blanket reasons" such as better opportunity and personal reasons during exit interviews. 72.5% leaving employees believed that exit interview is largely for record purpose and 11% were unsure of its utility. However, when existing employees were probed qualitatively, a variety of responses were received. 65% existing employees quoted salary issues, partiality/poor recognition, improper assignment of tasks, and monotonous work as reasons for attrition in the organization. Conclusion: Exit interviews somewhere fail to probe into the real reasons of attrition. To improve retention, organizations must monitor their existing employee′s intention to continue working in the organization and any sign indicating a poor intention to continue must be addressed immediately to avoid ripple effects. Moreover, to use exit interview as a tool to improve employee retention, leaving employees must be interviewed in-depth to uncover the actual reasons for quitting the job.

  14. Analytical modelling for ultrasonic surface mechanical attrition treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Rong Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The grain refinement, gradient structure, fatigue limit, hardness, and tensile strength of metallic materials can be effectively enhanced by ultrasonic surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT, however, never before has SMAT been treated with rigorous analytical modelling such as the connection among the input energy and power and resultant temperature of metallic materials subjected to SMAT. Therefore, a systematic SMAT model is actually needed. In this article, we have calculated the averaged speed, duration time of a cycle, kinetic energy and kinetic energy loss of flying balls in SMAT for structural metallic materials. The connection among the quantities such as the frequency and amplitude of attrition ultrasonic vibration motor, the diameter, mass and density of balls, the sample mass, and the height of chamber have been considered and modelled in details. And we have introduced the one-dimensional heat equation with heat source within uniform-distributed depth in estimating the temperature distribution and heat energy of sample. In this approach, there exists a condition for the frequency of flying balls reaching a steady speed. With these known quantities, we can estimate the strain rate, hardness, and grain size of sample.

  15. The Surgical Personality: Does Surgery Resident Motivation Predict Attrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symer, Matthew M; Abelson, Jonathan S; Yeo, Heather L; Sosa, Julie A; Rosenthal, M Zachary

    2018-05-01

    There is limited understanding of the wide variation in attrition rates among general surgery residencies. We used the validated Behavior Inhibitory System/Behavior Approach System (BIS/BAS) instrument to compare motivational traits among residents who did and not complete surgical training. All US general surgery categorical interns in the class of 2007-2008 were surveyed with a validated motivational trait assessment tool. American Board of Surgery records from 2008-2016 were used to determine who completed training. Motivation, an aspect of personality, was assessed with the BIS/BAS, which correlates with an individual's tendency to approach pleasant stimuli (BAS) or avoid negative stimuli (BIS). Subscale mean scores were compared with regard to the primary end point, attrition. Eight hundred and one (76.5%) interns completed the survey and had matching records. Six hundred and forty-five (80.5%) completed training. Men had lower scores than women in the BAS Drive subscale (12.0 vs 12.5; p scale (19.3 vs 20.9; p academic 17.3 vs community 17.6 vs military 16.6; p motivational personality traits. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors related to attrition from trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamser-Nanney, Rachel; Steinzor, Cazzie E

    2017-04-01

    Attrition from child trauma-focused treatments such as Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) is common; yet, the factors of children who prematurely terminate are unknown. The aim of the current study was to identify risk factors for attrition from TF-CBT. One hundred and twenty-two children (ages 3-18; M=9.97, SD=3.56; 67.2% females; 50.8% Caucasian) who received TF-CBT were included in the study. Demographic and family variables, characteristics of the trauma, and caregiver- and child-reported pretreatment symptoms levels were assessed in relation to two operational definitions of attrition: 1) clinician-rated dropout, and 2) whether the child received an adequate dose of treatment (i.e., 12 or more sessions). Several demographic factors, number of traumatic events, and children's caregiver-rated pretreatment symptoms were related to clinician-rated dropout. Fewer factors were associated with the adequate dose definition. Child Protective Services involvement, complex trauma exposure, and child-reported pretreatment trauma symptoms were unrelated to either attrition definition. Demographics, trauma characteristics, and level of caregiver-reported symptoms may help to identify clients at risk for premature termination from TF-CBT. Clinical and research implications for different operational definitions and suggestions for future work will be presented. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Higher Education Support Services and Graduation Rates of Structured Education Program Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepner, Seth

    2017-01-01

    The 1st-year retention rate of the Structured Education Program (SEP) is 90%, yet the 6-year graduation rate of SEP students is 29%. The gap between SEP 1st-year retention and graduation rates is the problem that this study addressed. The low graduation rate of SEP students is an important issue because graduation rates are used to measure the…

  18. Rising Tide II: Do Black Students Benefit as Grad Rates Increase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Andrew Howard; Eberle-Sudré, Kimberlee; Welch, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    "Rising Tide II: Do Black Students Benefit as Grad Rates Increase?" looks at a decade of graduation rates for African American students at four-year, public institutions that improved student success during the past decade. It shows that while a majority (almost 70 percent) of institutions we examined improved graduation rates for black…

  19. Effectiveness of Consultation on Student Ratings Feedback: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Angela R.; Coe, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Consultation on student ratings is recognized as an important strategy to support university teachers in learning from student ratings feedback. However, there is little evidence to suggest which practices and strategies are most important for successful consultation. As the use of student ratings increases, such evidence becomes increasingly…

  20. Assessing the psychometric questioner for students rating teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razaghi Reza Sharif

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Educational institutions use different ways to evaluate their teachers. Asking students to rate their teachers is common practice. The purpose of this research was to examine the reliability of the instruments used to evaluate the instructors in a college of medicine. This cross-sectional descriptive research used questioners that evaluated instructors. The questioner was targeting different dimensions of instructors. Item analysis in addition to exploratory factor analysis was performed on 1040questioners answered by the students of the College of Medicine of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. SPSS software was used to perform the analysis. The psychometric properties of questionnaires including Cronbach alpha was determined. The result of exploratory factor analysis and item analysis indicated that three of the subscales of the questioner showed sufficient reliability to evaluate the instructors and two subscales needed further examination. This type of evaluations is necessary to ensure quality of instructors working in an institution as well as providing reliable feedback to the instructors. The result showed that while some subscales of the questioner seems to target the concept of interest; a re-evaluation of the instrument would be valuable to increase its reliability for the administrators in the colleges.

  1. Identification of cognitive and non-cognitive predictive variables related to attrition in baccalaureate nursing education programs in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    This study sought to identify a variable or variables predictive of attrition among baccalaureate nursing students. The study was quantitative in design and multivariate correlational statistics and discriminant statistical analysis were used to identify a model for prediction of attrition. The analysis then weighted variables according to their predictive value to determine the most parsimonious model with the greatest predictive value. Three public university nursing education programs in Mississippi offering a Bachelors Degree in Nursing were selected for the study. The population consisted of students accepted and enrolled in these three programs for the years 2001 and 2002 and graduating in the years 2003 and 2004 (N = 195). The categorical dependent variable was attrition (includes academic failure or withdrawal) from the program of nursing education. The ten independent variables selected for the study and considered to have possible predictive value were: Grade Point Average for Pre-requisite Course Work; ACT Composite Score, ACT Reading Subscore, and ACT Mathematics Subscore; Letter Grades in the Courses: Anatomy & Physiology and Lab I, Algebra I, English I (101), Chemistry & Lab I, and Microbiology & Lab I; and Number of Institutions Attended (Universities, Colleges, Junior Colleges or Community Colleges). Descriptive analysis was performed and the means of each of the ten independent variables was compared for students who attrited and those who were retained in the population. The discriminant statistical analysis performed created a matrix using the ten variable model that was able to correctly predicted attrition in the study's population in 77.6% of the cases. Variables were then combined and recombined to produce the most efficient and parsimonious model for prediction. A six variable model resulted which weighted each variable according to predictive value: GPA for Prerequisite Coursework, ACT Composite, English I, Chemistry & Lab I, Microbiology

  2. Baccalaureate Minority Nursing Students Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Clinical Education Practices: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Crystal L; Phillips, Shannon M; Newman, Susan D; Atz, Teresa W

    2016-01-01

    This integrative review synthesized baccalaureate minority nursing students' perceptions of their clinical experiences. The diversity of the nursing workforce does not mirror the United States population. Attrition rates of minority nursing students remain higher than rates for White students. Literature examining facilitators and barriers to minority student success predominantly focuses on academic factors, excluding those relevant to clinical education. An integrative review using literature from nursing and education. Three common perceived barriers were identified: discrimination from faculty, peers, nursing staff, and patients; bias in faculty grading practices; and isolation. Although little is known about the relationship between clinical failures and overall attrition, this review provides evidence that minority students encounter significant barriers in clinical education. To increase the diversity of the nursing workforce, faculty must address these issues and make modifications to ensure an equal opportunity at a quality education for all students.

  3. Demographic and psychological predictors of panel attrition: evidence from the New Zealand attitudes and values study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Satherley

    Full Text Available This study examines attrition rates over the first four years of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study, a longitudinal national panel sample of New Zealand adults. We report the base rate and covariates for the following four distinct classes of respondents: explicit withdrawals, lost respondents, intermittent respondents and constant respondents. A multinomial logistic regression examined an extensive range of demographic and socio-psychological covariates (among them the Big-Six personality traits associated with membership in these classes (N = 5,814. Results indicated that men, Māori and Asian peoples were less likely to be constant respondents. Conscientiousness and Honesty-Humility were also positively associated with membership in the constant respondent class. Notably, the effect sizes for the socio-psychological covariates of panel attrition tended to match or exceed those of standard demographic covariates. This investigation broadens the focus of research on panel attrition beyond demographics by including a comprehensive set of socio-psychological covariates. Our findings show that core psychological covariates convey important information about panel attrition, and are practically important to the management of longitudinal panel samples like the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study.

  4. Differences Do Make a Difference: Recruitment Strategies for the Non-Traditional Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanou, Sonia

    Many colleges and universities lack a comprehensive, fully integrated marketing plan to combat high attrition rates in programs offered to non-traditional students. A clear understanding of the needs of the marketplace is crucial to an effective marketing program. Research suggests that life transitions are what motivate adults to pursue…

  5. The Impact of Digital Games on Student Persistence and Retention in an Online Higher Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Randall E.

    2013-01-01

    Enrollment in online higher education programs has been climbing for the past decade but research suggests that online courses exhibit significantly higher attrition rates than their face-to-face counterparts. Consequently, while significantly more students are enrolling in higher education programs, far too few are graduating. Self-determination…

  6. The Impact of Graduate First Project on Students with Disabilities: Perceptions of Key Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Tamera Garrett

    2012-01-01

    The Graduate First initiative was implemented to address the dropout crisis among students with disabilities in the state of Georgia, who continue to demonstrate a rate of attrition twice that of their non-disabled peers (Georgia Department of Education [GA DOE], 2010). This mixed method case study explored the perceptions and experiences of a…

  7. Postgraduate Students' Level of Dependence on Supervisors in Coping with Academic Matters and Using Digital Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Gurnam Kaur; Kaur, Sarjit; Fook, Chan Yuen

    2016-01-01

    In order to build and empower human capital development, the Malaysian Ministry of Education devised a plan referred to as "MyBrain15". Under this plan, Malaysia hopes to produce a total of 60,000 doctoral degree holders by 2023. However, high attrition and low completion rates among postgraduate students to date have hindered the noble…

  8. Begin with the End in Mind: Measuring the Effectiveness of Remediation on Student Performance on the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS-V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberbatch-Sullivan, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative, causal-comparative research study investigated the effectiveness of a strategy to address concerns in nursing education about the high attrition rates and poor retention rates of pre-licensure nursing students, particularly in the first semester of nursing school. Two research questions guided this study and focused on the…

  9. WWC Quick Review of the Report: "Scaling Up SimCalc Project: Can a Technology Enhanced Curriculum Improve Student Learning of Important Mathematics?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This study examines whether "SimCalc Mathworlds"[TM] improves students' knowledge of the algebra concepts of rate and proportionality. Strengths: The study is a well implemented randomized controlled trial (RCT) with acceptable sample attrition rates and no indications of other problems. Cautions: The study authors describe a rigorous…

  10. The management of over closured anterior teeth due to attrition

    OpenAIRE

    Eha Djulaeha; Sukaedi Sukaedi

    2009-01-01

    Background: Tooth is the hardest tissue in human body, that can be injured because of attrition process. For old people, denture attrition process is caused by psysiological process relating with the mastication function which also supported by some bad habits such an bruxism, premature contact, and consuming habit of abrasive food. Attrition or abrasion can also be happened with patien’t dentition who does not have teeth subtutition for long time due the lost of their maxillary as well as ma...

  11. The effect of disability disclosure on the graduation rates of college students with disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Robyn Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies on postsecondary graduation rates indicated that college students with disabilities have lower graduation rates than students without disabilities. As many college students do not disclose their disability to their institution upon enrollment, the effect of the timing of disability disclosure on graduation rates warranted examination. This study was a quantitative study of 14,401 undergraduate students at one large research university in the years 2002, 2003, and 2004, of w...

  12. Assessing the Reliability of Self- and Peer Rating in Student Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Johnston, Lucy; Kilic, Gulsen Bagci

    2008-01-01

    Peer and self-ratings have been strongly recommended as the means to adjust individual contributions to group work. To evaluate the quality of student ratings, previous research has primarily explored the validity of these ratings, as indicated by the degree of agreement between student and teacher ratings. This research describes a…

  13. Rates of Student Disciplinary Action in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Although a growing body of research has been conducted on student misconduct in universities, quantitative data on disciplinary action undertaken by institutions against student transgressions are largely absent from the literature. This paper provides baseline quantitative data on disciplinary action against students in the universities. It is…

  14. In Good Standing: "Helping Colleges Manage Student Default Rates"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education estimates that 20 percent of community college students default on their student loan obligations (compared with 14.7 percent of all student loan borrowers), and that number is rising. What can community college financial officers do to keep their default numbers low? In this article, Heather Boerner describes the…

  15. The Influence of the Student Mobility Rate on the Graduation Rate in the State of New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lavetta S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influence of the student mobility rate on the high school graduation rate of schools in the state of New Jersey. Variables found to have an influence on the graduation rate in the extant literature were evaluated and reported. The analysis included multiple and hierarchical regression models for school variables (i.e.,…

  16. Survey on workforce retention and attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-03-01

    The Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) is conducting a survey to gather information on why technical professionals change jobs or quit working. The survey, prompted by concern about the retention of skilled workers, aims to provide information to employers that can assist them in addressing practices that can lead to significant workforce attrition. To participate in the survey, which is open to everyone (including those who are not SPE members), go to http://research.spe.org/se.ashx?s=705E3F1335720258 through 15 May 2013. For more information, contact speresearch@spe.org.

  17. The Rapier or the Club: The Relationship between Attrition and Maneuver Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Springman, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    ...? This project compares the relationship between attrition and maneuver warfare. The study considers whether there are times when wars of attrition should be fought, and whether there are conditions that force wars of attrition...

  18. Low methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage rate among Italian dental students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petti, S.; Kakisina, N.; Volgenant, C.M.C.; Messano, G.A.; Barbato, E.; Passariello, C.; de Soet, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage rate among dental students from an Italian university. A total of 157 subjects participated (67 preclinical students and 90 clinical students); samples were collected from the nose, mouth, and skin. Five preclinical students and

  19. The influence of temperature on limestone sulfation and attrition under fluidized bed combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagnaro, Fabio [Dipartimento di Chimica - Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario del Monte di Sant' Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Salatino, Piero [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Piazzale Vincenzo Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica - Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Vincenzo Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Scala, Fabrizio [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Piazzale Vincenzo Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    The influence of temperature on attrition of two limestones during desulfurization in a fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Differences in the microstructure of the two limestones were reflected by a different thickness of the sulfate shell formed upon sulfation and by a different value of the ultimate calcium conversion degree. Particle attrition and fragmentation were fairly small under moderately bubbling fluidization conditions for both limestones. An increase of temperature from 850 C to 900 C led to an increase of the attrition rate, most likely because of a particle weakening effect caused by a faster CO{sub 2} evolution during calcination. This weakening effect, however, was not sufficiently strong to enhance particle fragmentation in the bed. The progress of sulfation, associated to the build-up of a hard sulfate shell around the particles, led in any case to a decrease of the extent of attrition. Sulfation at 900 C was less effective than at 850 C, and this was shown to be related to the porosimetric features of the different samples. (author)

  20. Attrition from surgical residency training: perspectives from those who left.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Tasce; Yeo, Heather; Sosa, Julie A; Yoo, Peter S; Long, Theodore; Rosenthal, Marjorie; Berg, David; Curry, Leslie; Nunez-Smith, Marcella

    2015-10-01

    High rates of attrition from general surgery residency may threaten the surgical workforce. We sought to gain further insight regarding resident motivations for leaving general surgery residency. We conducted in-depth interviews to generate rich narrative data that explored individual experiences. An interdisciplinary team used the constant comparative method to analyze the data. Four themes characterized experiences of our 19 interviewees who left their residency program. Participants (1) felt an informal contract was breached when clinical duties were prioritized over education, (2) characterized a culture in which there was no safe space to share personal and programmatic concerns, (3) expressed a scarcity of role models who demonstrated better work-life balance, and (4) reported negative interactions with authority resulting in a profound loss of commitment. As general surgery graduate education continues to evolve, our findings may inform interventions and policies regarding programmatic changes to boost retention in surgical residency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An Examination of Dropout Rates for Hispanic or Latino Students Enrolled in Online K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corry, Michael; Dardick, William; Stella, Julie

    2017-01-01

    As the number of online K-12 educational offerings continues to grow it is important to better understand key indicators of success for students enrolled in these classes. One of those indicators is student dropout rates. This is particularly important for Hispanic or Latino students who traditionally have high dropout rates. The purpose of this…

  2. Grade Inflation Rates among Different Ability Students, Controlling for Other Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Spirit, Stephanie; Jones, Kirk E.

    1999-01-01

    Compared grade inflation rates among students of different abilities at an open-admissions public university by examining trends in graduating grade point average from 1983 to 1996. The higher grade inflation rates among low aptitude students suggest that faculty might be using grades to encourage learning among marginal students. (SLD)

  3. A + (B[subscript 1]) Professor--student Rapport + (B[subscript 2]) Humor + (B[subscript 3]) Student Engagement = (Y) Student Ratings of Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Aaron S.; Berglund, Majken B.; Epelbaum, Vadim B.; Klein, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching effectiveness is often evaluated through student ratings of instruction (SRI). Research suggests that there are many potential factors that can predict student's perceptions of teaching effectiveness such as professor-student rapport, student engagement, and perceived humor of the instructor. Therefore, we sought to assess whether…

  4. Attrition resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2004-05-25

    A catalyst support having improved attrition resistance and a catalyst produced therefrom. The catalyst support is produced by a method comprising the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina having no catalytic material added thereto with an acidic aqueous solution having an acidity level effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the calcined .gamma.-alumina.

  5. Early Career Teacher Attrition: Intentions of Teachers Beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandinin, D. Jean; Long, Julie; Schaefer, Lee; Downey, C. Aiden; Steeves, Pam; Pinnegar, Eliza; McKenzie Robblee, Sue; Wnuk, Sheri

    2015-01-01

    Early career teacher attrition has most often been conceptualized as either a problem associated with individual factors (e.g. burnout) or a problem associated with contextual factors (e.g. support and salary). This study considered early career teacher attrition as an identity making process that involves a complex negotiation between individual…

  6. The pattern of attrition from an antiretroviral treatment program in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Odafe

    Full Text Available To evaluate the rate and factors associated with attrition of patients receiving ART in tertiary and secondary hospitals in Nigeria.We reviewed patient level data collected between 2007 and 2010 from 11 hospitals across Nigeria. Kaplan-Meier product-limit and Cox regression were used to determine probability of retention in care and risk factors for attrition respectively. Of 6,408 patients in the cohort, 3,839 (59.9% were females, median age of study population was 33years (IQR: 27-40 and 4,415 (69% were from secondary health facilities. The NRTI backbone was Stavudine (D4T in 3708 (57.9% and Zidovudine (ZDV in 2613 (40.8% of patients. Patients lost to follow up accounted for 62.7% of all attrition followed by treatment stops (25.3% and deaths (12.0%. Attrition was 14.1 (N = 624 and 15.1% (N = 300 in secondary and tertiary hospitals respectively (p = 0.169 in the first 12 months on follow up. During the 13 to 24 months follow up period, attrition was 10.7% (N = 407 and 19.6% (N = 332 in secondary and tertiary facilities respectively (p<0.001. Median time to lost to follow up was 11.1 (IQR: 6.1 to 18.5 months in secondary compared with 13.6 (IQR: 9.9 to 17.0 months in tertiary sites (p = 0.002. At 24 months follow up, male gender [AHR 1.18, 95% CI: 1.01-1.37, P = 0.038]; WHO clinical stage III [AHR 1.30, 95%CI: 1.03-1.66, P = 0.03] and clinical stage IV [AHR 1.90, 95%CI: 1.20-3.02, p = 0.007] and care in a tertiary hospital [AHR 2.21, 95% CI: 1.83-2.67, p<0.001], were associated with attrition.Attrition could potentially be reduced by decentralizing patients on ART after the first 12 months on therapy to lower level facilities, earlier initiation on treatment and strengthening adherence counseling amongst males.

  7. Limestone fragmentation and attrition during fluidized bed oxyfiring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Piero Salatino [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Attrition/fragmentation of limestone under simulated fluidized bed oxyfiring conditions was investigated by means of an experimental protocol that had been previously developed for characterization of attrition/fragmentation of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric fluidized bed combustors. The protocol was based on the use of different and mutually complementary techniques. The extent and pattern of attrition by surface wear in the dense phase of a fluidized bed were assessed in experiments carried out with a bench scale fluidized bed combustor under simulated oxyfiring conditions. Sorbent samples generated during simulated oxyfiring tests were further characterized from the standpoint of fragmentation upon high velocity impact by means of a purposely designed particle impactor. Results showed that under calcination-hindered conditions attrition and fragmentation patterns are much different from those occurring under air-blown atmospheric combustion conditions. Noteworthy, attrition/fragmentation enhanced particle sulfation by continuously regenerating the exposed particle surface. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Limestone attrition under simulated oxyfiring Fluidized-Bed combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, F. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Salatino, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica - Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Limestone attrition by surface wear was studied during the flue gas desulfurization under simulated fluidized-bed (FB) oxyfiring conditions and hindered calcination. Bench-scale experimental tests were carried out using well-established techniques previously developed for the characterization of sulfation and attrition of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric FB combustors. The experimental limestone conversion and attrition results were compared with those previously obtained with the same limestone under simulated air-blown combustion conditions. The differences in the conversion and attrition extents and patterns associated with oxyfiring as compared to air-blown atmospheric combustion were highlighted and related to the different particle morphologies and thicknesses of the sulfate layer. It was noted that attrition could play an important role in practical circulating FB combustor operation, by effectively enhancing particle sulfation under both oxyfiring and air-blown combustion conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Understanding the psychology of seeking support to increase Health Science student engagement in academic support services. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Francis Hoyne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing student engagement within higher education academic support services is a constant challenge. Whilst engagement with support is positively associated with successful retention, and non-engagement connected to attrition, the most vulnerable students are often the least likely to engage. Our data has shown that Health Science students are reluctant to engage with academic support services despite being made aware of their academic deficiencies. The “psychology of seeking support” was used as a lens to identify some of the multifaceted issues around student engagement. The School of Health Sciences made attendance at support courses compulsory for those students who were below the benchmark score in a post entrance literacy test. Since the policy change was implemented, there has been a 50% reduction in the fail rate of “at risk” students in a core literacy unit. These findings are encouraging and will help reduce student attrition in the long term.

  10. A Review of the Contemporary International Literature on Student Retention in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Aljohani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major issues that concerns tertiary institutions around the world is the student retention rate. In general, higher rates of completion give more positive image about the academic, administrative and financial statues of these institutions. However, improving the student completion and retention rates can be a challenging task. One way toward this goal is utilising strategies and techniques that are informed by the findings of theoretical models and empirical studies. Therefore, this paper reviews some of the contemporary studies in the student retention literature from different higher educational contexts around the world followed by a list of the variables that are commonly linked to the student retention phenomenon in higher education and a discussion of the factors that are most frequently associated with student attrition as reported by these studies. A summary of the factors associated with the student attrition phenomenon suggested that, the central factors were the quality of students’ institutional experiences and their level of integration into the academic and social systems of their academic institutions. These factors relate to students’ experiences with the administrative system of their academic institution, including the admission, registration and disciplinary rules and policies and the availability and quality of student services and facilities. Keywords: Higher education, student retention, attrition, persistence

  11. Rates and Patterns of Professional Mobility in Student Personnel Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherburne, Paul Rogers

    1970-01-01

    This study piloted the recently developed technique known in business as mobilography." Methods can be adapted to study the mobility among student personnel workers. Greater mobility can be expected within the entrance level. (Author)

  12. The Impact of Lottery Incentives on Student Survey Response Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A controlled experiment tested the effects of lottery incentives using a prospective college applicant Web survey, with emails sent to more than 9,000 high school students. Found minimal effect of postpaid incentives for increasing levels of incentive. (EV)

  13. Predicting Active Duty Air Force Pilot Attrition Given an Anticipated Increase in Major Airline Pilot Hiring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    the Air Force in addressing some quality-of-life issues, such as updating 3,800 family housing units, 21 dormitories, and building three child ...of pilots into the airlines (Air Force Personnel Center, FY 07). By allowing this crop of pilots to leave on the Air Force’s terms, the service felt...attrition rates compared with pilots with more general skills (flying mobility aircraft) (Stephen P. Barrows, 1993). This may be due to the phenomenon in

  14. Influence of attrition variables on iron ore flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Fonseca Fortes

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of slimes is harmful to the flotation process: the performance and consumption of reagents are negatively affected. Traditionally, the desliming stage has been responsible for removing slimes. However, depending on the porosity of the mineral particles, desliming may not be sufficient to maximize the concentration results. An attrition process before the desliming operation can improve the removal of slime, especially when slimes cover the surface and/or are confined to the cavities/pores of the mineral particles. Attrition is present in the flowcharts of the beneficiation process of phosphate and industrial sand (silica sand. Research has been undertaken for its application to produce pre-concentrates of zircon and iron ore. However, there is still little knowledge of the influence of the attrition variables on the beneficiation process of iron ore. This study presents a factorial design and analysis of the effects of these variables on the reverse flotation of iron ore. The standard of the experimental procedures for all tests included the attrition of pulp, under the conditions of dispersion, desliming and flotation. The parameter analysed (variable response was the metallurgical recovery in reverse flotation tests. The planning and analysis of the full factorial experiment indicated that with 95% reliability, the rotation speed of the attrition cell impeller was the main variable in the attrition process of the iron ore. The percentage of solid variables in the pulp and the time of the attrition, as well as their interactions, were not indicated to be significant.

  15. Concordance between Self and Standardized Patient Ratings of Medical Students' Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Min Ji; Lee, Su Hyun; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Sung Soo

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the concordance between self and standardized patient (SP) ratings of medical students' communication skills. Forty-three students interviewed SPs. The students were asked to complete a communication skills questionnaire that comprised 2 measures (empathy and interpersonal communication) before the interview. After each student's interview with the SP, the latter completed the same questionnaire as the students. Based on Lin's concordance coefficient, there was strong disconcordance between students' self-ratings and the SPs' ratings. With regard to empathic communication, more than 50% of students who considered themselves higher than middle level were regarded by SP as low level. On interpersonal communication, 39% of students who assessed themselves as higher than middle level were scored low level by SPs. There was strong disconcordance between students' self-ratings and the SPs' ratings-students tended to overevaluate themselves regarding their communication skills. These differences might result in patient dissatisfaction and noncompliance. Further, it could become a serious hindrance to the development of a good doctor-patient relationship. Medical educators should make sincere efforts to reduce this gap by teaching medical students the importance of the patients' perception of his doctors' communication skills.

  16. Effect of Conceptual Change Approach on Students' Understanding of Reaction Rate Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingir, Sevgi; Geban, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of conceptual change text oriented instruction compared to traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of reaction rate concepts. 45 students from two classes of the same teacher in a public high school participated in this study. Students in the experimental group…

  17. Outlook on Student Retention in Higher Education University Reforms in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoulal Mansouri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High student attrition rates at university have become one of the most challenging issues in higher education worldwide in the last five decades. Moroccan universities are no exception. At-risk students drop out of studies for a plethora of reasons, and the attrition rate is increasing despite the efforts made in education reforms carried out since 1999. This article reviews the most important components of the higher education reforms that have been adopted in Moroccan higher education in their endeavor to enhance student retention in university. These components are chronologically reviewed, first in the National Charter of Education and Training (NCET launched in 1999, second in the Emergency Plan conducted in 2009-2012, and finally in the latest Strategic Vision of Reform 2015-2030. It is concluded that more efforts are necessary to strike a balance between quantity and quality in terms of student retention in university education.

  18. Assessing Teachers' Judgements of Students' Academic Motivation and Emotions across Two Rating Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingjing; Urhahne, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the accuracy of teachers' judgements about students' motivation and emotions in English learning with two different rating methods. A sample of 480 sixth-grade Chinese students reported their academic self-concept, learning effort, enjoyment, and test anxiety via a questionnaire and were rated on these dimensions by…

  19. Students' Ideas about Reaction Rate and Its Relationship with Concentration or Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, Gultekin; Leach, John; Donnelly, James

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional study identifies key conceptual difficulties experienced by upper secondary school and pre-service chemistry teachers (N = 191) in the area of reaction rates. Students' ideas about reaction rates were elicited through a series of written tasks and individual interviews. In this paper, students' ideas related to reaction rate…

  20. Efficiency in Assessment: Can Trained Student Interns Rate Essays as Well as Faculty Members?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Tracy L.; Cochran, Loretta F.; Troboy, L. Kim; Roach, David W.

    2012-01-01

    What are the most efficient and effective methods in measuring outcomes for assurance of learning in higher education? This study examines the merits of outsourcing part of the assessment workload by comparing ratings completed by trained student interns to ratings completed by faculty. Faculty evaluation of students' written work samples provides…

  1. What's in a Name: Exposing Gender Bias in Student Ratings of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNell, Lillian; Driscoll, Adam; Hunt, Andrea N.

    2015-01-01

    Student ratings of teaching play a significant role in career outcomes for higher education instructors. Although instructor gender has been shown to play an important role in influencing student ratings, the extent and nature of that role remains contested. While difficult to separate gender from teaching practices in person, it is possible to…

  2. Pre-Licensed Nursing Students Rate Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garee, Denise L.

    2016-01-01

    Ethical decision making of new nurses relies on professional values and moral development obtained during training. This descriptive, comparative study demonstrated the importance values attributed to the items of the Nurses' Professional Values Scale-Revised (Weis & Schank, 2009), by a sample of senior ADN and BSN students from across the…

  3. Using Derivatives to Hedge Interest Rate Risk: A Student Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Jeff; Flagg, Donald

    2014-01-01

    In a world of fluctuating asset prices, many firms find the need to hedge in order to avoid or reduce losses. From a gold miner selling gold derivatives to airlines buying oil futures to protect against rising fuel costs, hedging is common practice across many different industries. In this paper, we provide students with a simplified example of a…

  4. Examining Reliability of Reading Comprehension Ratings of Fifth Grade Students' Oral Retellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernfeld, L. Elizabeth Shirley; Morrison, Timothy G.; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Wilcox, Brad

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to rate oral retellings of fifth graders to determine how passages, raters, and rating occasions affect those ratings, and to identify what combination of those elements produce reliable retelling ratings. A group of 36 fifth grade students read and orally retold three contemporary realistic fiction passages. Two…

  5. Tone Attrition in Mandarin Speakers of Varying English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, Sarah C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether the degree of dominance of Mandarin–English bilinguals' languages affects phonetic processing of tone content in their native language, Mandarin. Method We tested 72 Mandarin–English bilingual college students with a range of language-dominance profiles in the 2 languages and ages of acquisition of English. Participants viewed 2 photographs at a time while hearing a familiar Mandarin word referring to 1 photograph. The names of the 2 photographs diverged in tone, vowels, or both. Word recognition was evaluated using clicking accuracy, reaction times, and an online recognition measure (gaze) and was compared in the 3 conditions. Results Relative proficiency in English was correlated with reduced word recognition success in tone-disambiguated trials, but not in vowel-disambiguated trials, across all 3 dependent measures. This selective attrition for tone content emerged even though all bilinguals had learned Mandarin from birth. Lengthy experience with English thus weakened tone use. Conclusions This finding has implications for the question of the extent to which bilinguals' 2 phonetic systems interact. It suggests that bilinguals may not process pitch information language-specifically and that processing strategies from the dominant language may affect phonetic processing in the nondominant language—even when the latter was learned natively. PMID:28124064

  6. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil

  7. A systematic review of satisfaction and pediatric obesity treatment: new avenues for addressing attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Joseph A; Irby, Megan Bennett; Geiger, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric obesity treatment programs report high attrition rates, but it is unknown if family experience and satisfaction contributes. This review surveys the literature regarding satisfaction in pediatric obesity and questions used in measurement. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using Medline, PsychINFO, and CINAHL. Studies of satisfaction in pediatric weight management were reviewed, and related studies of obesity were included. Satisfaction survey questions were obtained from the articles or from the authors. Eighteen studies were included; 14 quantitative and 4 qualitative. Only one study linked satisfaction to attrition, and none investigated the association of satisfaction and weight outcomes. Most investigations included satisfaction as a secondary aim or used single-item questions of overall satisfaction; only one assessed satisfaction in noncompleters. Overall, participants expressed high levels of satisfaction with obesity treatment or prevention programs. Surveys focused predominantly on overall satisfaction or specific components of the program. Few in-depth studies of satisfaction with pediatric obesity treatment have been conducted. Increased focus on family satisfaction with obesity treatment may provide an avenue to lower attrition rates and improve outcomes. Enhancing measurement of satisfaction to yield actionable responses could positively influence outcomes, and a framework, via patient-centered care principles, is provided. © 2013 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  8. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafson, Irene; Currie, Jane; O'Dwyer, Sabrina; Woolf, Katherine; Griffin, Ann

    2017-06-02

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and 'peri-attrition' - a term coined to describe the trainee who has seriously considered leaving the specialty. The authors identified six key themes which describe trainees' feelings about attrition in obstetrics and gynaecology: morale and undermining; training processes and paperwork; support and supervision; work-life balance and realities of life; NHS environment; and job satisfaction. This article discusses themes of an under-resourced health service, bullying, lack of work-life balance and poor personal support.

  9. Could Realistic Job Previews Reduce First-Term Attrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brose, Gary

    1999-01-01

    .... The military's use of educational screens, trends and costs of first-term attrition, and labor market theories of turnover are discussed to provide a common frame of reference within which to view...

  10. Averting the Train Wreck of Captain Attrition - A Leadership Solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weafer, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    .... This paper looks at officer attrition in the context of a leadership challenge - it examines current perceived problems in leadership culture and command climate and recommends several changes focused on improving morale and retention of young officers.

  11. Hepatitis B Vaccination Rate Among Medical Students At The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    this study was to determine the hepatitis. B vaccination ... have serologic evidence of past or present ... care workers as well as medical students are a ... States in the 1970's demonstrated that ... National and Institutional levels on ... Married. 3 (0.9). 11 (3.5). 14(4.4). Separated. 1 (0.3). 1 (0.3). 2(0.6). Divorced ... Mass Media.

  12. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology

    OpenAIRE

    Gafson, I.; Currie, J.; O Dwyer, S.; Woolf, K.; Griffin, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and ‘peri-attrition’ – a term coined to describe the trainee who has...

  13. Rate My Information Systems Professor: Exploring the Factors That Influence Student Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Mark; Crable, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    Based on 820 entries on Ratemyprofessors.com, we explore whether information systems course ratings differ from those in marketing or management courses, whether lower level course ratings differ from those in senior or graduate level courses, whether course ratings differ between genders, and whether perceived course difficulty impacts course…

  14. A systematic review of factors influencing student ratings in undergraduate medical education course evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Schiekirka, Sarah; Raupach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Background Student ratings are a popular source of course evaluations in undergraduate medical education. Data on the reliability and validity of such ratings have mostly been derived from studies unrelated to medical education. Since medical education differs considerably from other higher education settings, an analysis of factors influencing overall student ratings with a specific focus on medical education was needed. Methods For the purpose of this systematic review, online databases (Pu...

  15. Posttreatment attrition and its predictors, attrition bias, and treatment efficacy of the anxiety online programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asadi, Ali M; Klein, Britt; Meyer, Denny

    2014-10-14

    Although relatively new, the field of e-mental health is becoming more popular with more attention given to researching its various aspects. However, there are many areas that still need further research, especially identifying attrition predictors at various phases of assessment and treatment delivery. The present study identified the predictors of posttreatment assessment completers based on 24 pre- and posttreatment demographic and personal variables and 1 treatment variable, their impact on attrition bias, and the efficacy of the 5 fully automated self-help anxiety treatment programs for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A complex algorithm was used to diagnose participants' mental disorders based on the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision; DSM-IV-TR). Those who received a primary or secondary diagnosis of 1 of 5 anxiety disorders were offered an online 12-week disorder-specific treatment program. A total of 3199 individuals did not formally drop out of the 12-week treatment cycle, whereas 142 individuals formally dropped out. However, only 347 participants who completed their treatment cycle also completed the posttreatment assessment measures. Based on these measures, predictors of attrition were identified and attrition bias was examined. The efficacy of the 5 treatment programs was assessed based on anxiety-specific severity scores and 5 additional treatment outcome measures. On average, completers of posttreatment assessment measures were more likely to be seeking self-help online programs; have heard about the program from traditional media or from family and friends; were receiving mental health assistance; were more likely to learn best by reading, hearing and doing; had a lower pretreatment Kessler-6 total score; and were older

  16. Song Leading Effectiveness of Undergraduate Education Majors: A Comparison of Student Self Ratings and Expert Ratings under Three Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Nancy H.; Orlofsky, Diane DeNicola

    1997-01-01

    Examines the song leading effectiveness of undergraduate education majors under three conditions: unaccompanied, accompanied with autoharp, and accompanied by recording. Finds that students rate themselves higher than experts do; there is greater eye contact using rote or recording; and there is greater tempo accuracy using rote and autoharp. (DSK)

  17. ART Attrition across Health Facilities Implementing Option B+ in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrtil, Martine Pamphile; Puttkammer, Nancy; Gloyd, Stephen; Robinson, Julia; Yuhas, Krista; Domercant, Jean Wysler; Honoré, Jean Guy; Francois, Kesner

    2018-01-01

    Describing factors related to high attrition is important in order to improve the implementation of the Option B+ strategy in Haiti. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to describe the variability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) retention across health facilities among pregnant and lactating women and assess for differences in ART retention between Option B+ clients and other ART patients. There were 1989 Option B+ clients who initiated ART in 45 health facilities. The percentage of attrition varied from 9% to 81% across the facilities. The largest health facilities had 38% higher risk of attrition (relative risk [RR]: 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-1.77, P = .009). Private institutions had 18% less risk of attrition (RR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.70-0.96, P = .020). Health facilities located in the West department and the South region had lower risk of attrition. Being on treatment in a large or public health facility or a facility located in the North region was a significant risk factor associated with high attrition among Option B+ clients. The implementation of the Option B+ strategy must be reevaluated in order to effectively eliminate mother-to-child HIV transmission.

  18. Students' perceptions of their learning experiences: A repeat regional survey of healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshire, Claire; Barrett, Neil; Langan, Mark; Harris, Edwin; Wibberley, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Student experience is an international concern and recent research has focused on initiatives to improve students' learning experiences and ultimately reduce attrition levels. To determine similarities and differences between students' perceptions of their learning experiences between 2011 and 2015 in relation to campus-based learning, placement-based learning and personal circumstances. A repeat online survey in 2011 and 2015; using a questionnaire developed from thematic analysis of narrative interviews with a subsample of the target population. Nine universities in the North West of England. A total of 1080 students completed the survey in 2011 and 1983 students in 2015 from a target population of all students studying on commissioned pre-registration healthcare education programmes. An online survey was made available to all undergraduate students studying on Health Education funded programmes within the region and survey respondents were invited to give demographic information and rate their agreement to statements on four-point Likert-type responses. Responses to a repeat survey of healthcare studying in the North West of England in 2015 were strikingly similar overall to those of an original 2011 survey. Although the students were positive overall about their experiences, a number were dissatisfied with some aspects of their experiences - particularly in relation to initial support on campus and whilst studying on placement. Four years on from the original survey, despite a considerable investment in improving students' experiences across the region, there appears to be little change in students' perceptions of their learning experiences CONCLUSION: In the short-term monitoring of student experience needs to be continued; and links to attrition (potential or actual) noted and acted upon. However, given that attrition from these courses has been a long-term problem and the complexity of its resolution a recurrent finding in the literature; new ways of framing

  19. Pre-service mathematics student teachers’ conceptions of nominal and effective interest rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judah P. Makonye

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The general public consumes financial products such as loans that are administered in the realm of nominal and effective interest rates. It is debatable if most consumers really understand how these rates function. This article explores the conceptions that student teachers have about nominal and effective interest rates. The APOS theory illuminates analysis of students’ levels of conception. Seventy second-year mathematics students’ responses to Grade 12 tasks on effective and nominal interest rates were analysed, after which 12 students were interviewed about their mathematical thinking in solving the tasks. The findings varied. While some students could not do the tasks due to erratic use of formulae (algebra, I ascertained that some students obtained correct answers through scrupulous adherence to the external prompt of formulae. Most of those students remained stuck at the action and process stages and could not view their processes as mathematical objects. A few students had reached the object and schema stages, showing mature understanding of the relationship between nominal and effective interest rates. As most students remained at the operational stages rather than the structural, the findings accentuate that when teaching this topic, teachers ought to take their time to build learners’ schema for these notions. They need to guide their learners through the necessary action-process-object loop and refrain from introducing students to formulae too soon as this stalls their advancement to the object and schema stages which are useful in making them smart consumers of financial products.

  20. Do Graduate Student Teacher Training Courses Affect Placement Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, John; Balarezo, Christine; Miles, Tom

    2014-01-01

    We investigate whether the existence of a required graduate course on "Teaching in Political Science" is related to overall job placement rates reported by graduate political science programs. We examine this in light of evidence from 73 public PhD-granting political science departments across the country. We find that the existence of…

  1. K-State Problem Identification Rating Scales for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John M.; Benton, Stephen L.; Newton, Fred B.; Downey, Ronald G.; Marsh, Patricia A.; Benton, Sheryl A.; Tseng, Wen-Chih; Shin, Kang-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The K-State Problem Identification Rating Scales, a new screening instrument for college counseling centers, gathers information about clients' presenting symptoms, functioning levels, and readiness to change. Three studies revealed 7 scales: Mood Difficulties, Learning Problems, Food Concerns, Interpersonal Conflicts, Career Uncertainties,…

  2. Professor Gender, Age, and "Hotness" in Influencing College Students' Generation and Interpretation of Professor Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Boswell, Stefanie S.; McCaleb, Kayla; Robertson, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    A sample of 230 undergraduate psychology students rated their expectations of a bogus professor (who was randomly designated a man or woman and "hot" versus "not hot") based on ratings and comments found on RateMyProfessors.com. Five professor qualities were derived using principal components analysis: dedication,…

  3. Generalizability of Standardized Patients' Satisfaction Ratings of Their Clinical Encounter with Fourth-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Nu Viet; And Others

    1990-01-01

    At the end of their clinical clerkship rotations, all students in one medical school's classes of 1988 (N=69), 1989 (N=63), 1990 (N=66) took the Post-Clerkship Examination. This study examined the nature of the patients' satisfaction ratings; reliability of patient satisfaction ratings and number of patients needed to derive reliable ratings; etc.…

  4. Academic Fit of Student-Athletes: An Analysis of NCAA Division 1-A Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Eric; Finster, Mark; McDonald, David

    2004-01-01

    Federal law mandates that universities reveal their graduation rates purportedly to inform policy makers and constituencies about efforts to support educational attainment for students and athletes. These rates are widely used to compare universities. Analysis of 10 years of graduation rates across all major athletic programs concludes that…

  5. What Types of Instructional Shifts Do Students Experience? Investigating Active Learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Classes across Key Transition Points from Middle School to the University Level

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth Akiha; Kenneth Akiha; Emilie Brigham; Emilie Brigham; Brian A. Couch; Justin Lewin; Justin Lewin; Marilyne Stains; MacKenzie R. Stetzer; MacKenzie R. Stetzer; Erin L. Vinson; Erin L. Vinson; Michelle K. Smith; Michelle K. Smith

    2018-01-01

    Despite the need for a strong Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) workforce, there is a high attrition rate for students who intend to complete undergraduate majors in these disciplines. Students who leave STEM degree programs often cite uninspiring instruction in introductory courses, including traditional lecturing, as a reason. While undergraduate courses play a critical role in STEM retention, little is understood about the instructional transitions students encounter upon m...

  6. Increased prevalence of pregnancy and comparative risk of program attrition among individuals starting HIV treatment in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles B Holmes

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization now recommends initiating all pregnant women on life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART, yet there is limited information about the characteristics and program outcomes of pregnant women already on ART in Africa. Our hypothesis was that pregnant women comprised an increasing proportion of those starting ART, and that sub-groups of these women were at higher risk for program attrition.We used the International Epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS- East Africa (IeDEA-EA to conduct a retrospective cohort study including HIV care and treatment programs in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania. The cohort consecutively included HIV-infected individuals 13 years or older starting ART 2004-2014. We examined trends over time in the proportion pregnant, their characteristics and program attrition rates compared to others initiating and already receiving ART. 156,474 HIV-infected individuals (67.0% women started ART. The proportion of individuals starting ART who were pregnant women rose from 5.3% in 2004 to 12.2% in 2014. Mean CD4 cell counts at ART initiation, weighted for annual program size, increased from 2004 to 2014, led by non-pregnant women (annual increase 20 cells/mm3 and men (17 cells/mm3 annually, with lower rates of change in pregnant women (10 cells/mm3 per year (p<0.0001. There was no significant difference in the cumulative incidence of program attrition at 6 months among pregnant women starting ART and non-pregnant women. However, healthy pregnant women starting ART (WHO stage 1/2 had a higher rate of attrition rate (9.6%, compared with healthy non-pregnant women (6.5%; in contrast among women with WHO stage 3/4 disease, pregnant women had lower attrition (8.4% than non-pregnant women (14.4%. Among women who initiated ART when healthy and remained in care for six months, subsequent six-month attrition was slightly higher among pregnant women at ART start (3.5% compared to those who were not pregnant (2.4%, (absolute

  7. Increased prevalence of pregnancy and comparative risk of program attrition among individuals starting HIV treatment in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Charles B; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Elul, Batya; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Ssali, John; Kambugu, Andrew; Musick, Beverly S; Cohen, Craig; Williams, Carolyn; Diero, Lameck; Padian, Nancy; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K

    2018-01-01

    The World Health Organization now recommends initiating all pregnant women on life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART), yet there is limited information about the characteristics and program outcomes of pregnant women already on ART in Africa. Our hypothesis was that pregnant women comprised an increasing proportion of those starting ART, and that sub-groups of these women were at higher risk for program attrition. We used the International Epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS- East Africa (IeDEA-EA) to conduct a retrospective cohort study including HIV care and treatment programs in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania. The cohort consecutively included HIV-infected individuals 13 years or older starting ART 2004-2014. We examined trends over time in the proportion pregnant, their characteristics and program attrition rates compared to others initiating and already receiving ART. 156,474 HIV-infected individuals (67.0% women) started ART. The proportion of individuals starting ART who were pregnant women rose from 5.3% in 2004 to 12.2% in 2014. Mean CD4 cell counts at ART initiation, weighted for annual program size, increased from 2004 to 2014, led by non-pregnant women (annual increase 20 cells/mm3) and men (17 cells/mm3 annually), with lower rates of change in pregnant women (10 cells/mm3 per year) (p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in the cumulative incidence of program attrition at 6 months among pregnant women starting ART and non-pregnant women. However, healthy pregnant women starting ART (WHO stage 1/2) had a higher rate of attrition rate (9.6%), compared with healthy non-pregnant women (6.5%); in contrast among women with WHO stage 3/4 disease, pregnant women had lower attrition (8.4%) than non-pregnant women (14.4%). Among women who initiated ART when healthy and remained in care for six months, subsequent six-month attrition was slightly higher among pregnant women at ART start (3.5%) compared to those who were not pregnant (2.4%), (absolute

  8. Computational toxicology: Its essential role in reducing drug attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naven, R T; Louise-May, S

    2015-12-01

    Predictive toxicology plays a critical role in reducing the failure rate of new drugs in pharmaceutical research and development. Despite recent gains in our understanding of drug-induced toxicity, however, it is urgent that the utility and limitations of our current predictive tools be determined in order to identify gaps in our understanding of mechanistic and chemical toxicology. Using recently published computational regression analyses of in vitro and in vivo toxicology data, it will be demonstrated that significant gaps remain in early safety screening paradigms. More strategic analyses of these data sets will allow for a better understanding of their domain of applicability and help identify those compounds that cause significant in vivo toxicity but which are currently mis-predicted by in silico and in vitro models. These 'outliers' and falsely predicted compounds are metaphorical lighthouses that shine light on existing toxicological knowledge gaps, and it is essential that these compounds are investigated if attrition is to be reduced significantly in the future. As such, the modern computational toxicologist is more productively engaged in understanding these gaps and driving investigative toxicology towards addressing them. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. The management of over closured anterior teeth due to attrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eha Djulaeha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tooth is the hardest tissue in human body, that can be injured because of attrition process. For old people, denture attrition process is caused by psysiological process relating with the mastication function which also supported by some bad habits such an bruxism, premature contact, and consuming habit of abrasive food. Attrition or abrasion can also be happened with patien’t dentition who does not have teeth subtutition for long time due the lost of their maxillary as well as mandibulary. The pasient will loose their vertical dimension of occlusion, injure, and the lower jaw becomes over closed which is called over closure. Purpose: This article reported the management of over closured anterior teeth due to attrition. Case: a seventy six year old woman patient came to Prosthodontic Clinic in Faculty of Dentistry, Airlangga University, to rehabilitate her upper and lower severe attrited anterior teeth and her posterior teeth. The patient has experienced of wearing acrylic removable mandibular partial denture ten years ago. Unfortunaly, the denture was uncomfortable, and she did not wear it anymore since five years ago. Case management: The severe attrition of anterior teeth with the lost of occlusal vertical dimension can be treated by improving the occlusal vertical dimension gradually. The treatment is then followed by the increasing of the height of the anterior teeth by lengthening the crown teeth of upper jaw with 12 units of span bridge and the acrylic removable partial denture of lower jaw. Conclusion: The severe attrition of anterior teeth with the lost of occlusal vertical dimension can be treated by improving the occlusal vertical dimension gradually, using long span bridge and acrylic removable partial denture.

  10. Attributions or Retributions: Student Ratings and the Perceived Causes of Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theall, Michael; And Others

    The nature and extent of variations in student attributions about performance in their courses were studied, and the relationships between the attributions and responses on certain items of a student ratings questionnaire were determined. Causal or predictive relationships among these variables were also investigated. Data were collected using:…

  11. Food Insecurity, Self-Rated Health, and Obesity among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knol, Linda L.; Robb, Cliff A.; McKinley, Erin M.; Wood, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of food insecurity among college students ranges from 14% to 59%. Most of the research to date has examined the determinants of food insecurity. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between food insecurity and self-rated health and obesity among college students living off campus. Methods:…

  12. Low Graduation Rates among Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Student Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alvin D.

    2017-01-01

    A review of literature reveals that there is a dearth of research examining the low graduation rates among student-athletes at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU's). By comparison, there has been numerous studies that have examined the African American student-athlete attending predominately White institutions (PWI's). The…

  13. Rates and Psychological Effects of Exposure to Family Violence among Sri Lankan University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M.; de Zoysa, Piyanjli

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The study had two objectives: to examine the rates of exposure to family violence among students in a non-Western society, with Sri Lanka as a case study and to examine the psychological effects of their exposure. Method: Four hundred seventy six medical students in Sri Lanka were surveyed. A self-administered questionnaire was…

  14. The Impact of School Socioeconomic Status on Student-Generated Teacher Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses ordinary least squares, logit and probit regressions, along with chi-square analysis applied to nationwide data from the New Zealand ratemyteacher website to establish if there is any correlation between student ratings of their teachers and the socioeconomic status of the school the students attend. The results show that students…

  15. Substance Use among Middle School Students: Associations with Self-Rated and Peer-Nominated Popularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joan S.; Green, Harold D., Jr.; Zhou, Annie J.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Shih, Regina A.; D'Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Associations of popularity with adolescent substance use were examined among 1793 6-8th grade students who completed an in-school survey. Popularity was assessed through both self-ratings and peer nominations. Students who scored higher on either measure of popularity were more likely to be lifetime cigarette smokers, drinkers, and marijuana…

  16. The Effect of Conceptual Change Pedagogy on Students' Conceptions of Rate of Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Kolomuc, Ali; Karagolge, Zafer

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the effect of conceptual change pedagogy on students' conceptions of "rate of reaction" concepts. The study used a pre-test/post-test non-equivalent comparison group design approach and the sample consisted of 72 Turkish grade-11 students (aged 16-18 years) selected from two intact classrooms.…

  17. Ratings of Severity of Life Events by Ninth-Grade Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Jerry B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Special education, basic, and honors ninth-grade students (n=60) rated the severity of stress for each of the life events on the Source of Stress Inventory (Chandler, 1981). There was a significant positive relationship between the Chandler rankings (teachers and mental health workers) and the student rankings. (Author/NB)

  18. A Comparison of Student Ratings in Traditional and Interactive Television Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Morgan; Dunham, Mardis; Lyons, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Although interactive television (ITV) allows colleges and universities to reach a wider audience, little research has been conducted exploring the effectiveness of the courses as perceived by students. This study compared student ratings of teacher effectiveness between 331 traditional courses and 125 ITV courses. The data included 456 graduate…

  19. Rates of Mental Illness and Associated Academic Impacts in Ontario's College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Alana; Silvestri, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Staff at campus-based counselling and disability centres in 15 of Ontario's 24 community colleges completed 3,536 surveys on 1,964 individual students querying the presence of mental illness and academic challenges as reported by students accessing these services. Survey data were analyzed to determine prevalence rates of mental disorders and…

  20. Student Evaluations of College Professors: Are Female and Male Professors Rated Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basow, Susan A.; Silberg, Nancy T.

    1987-01-01

    Over 1,000 undergraduates evaluated 16 male and female professors in terms of teaching effectiveness and sex-typed characteristics. Male students gave female professors significantly poorer ratings than male professors on the six teaching evaluation measures. Female students evaluated female professors less favorably than male professors on three…

  1. Development of a student rating scale to evaluate teachers' competencies for facilitating reflective learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub-de Jong, Mirabelle A.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Dekker, Hanke; Verkerk, Marian; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    Context Teaching students in reflection calls for specific teacher competencies. We developed and validated a rating scale focusing on Student perceptions of their Teachers' competencies to Encourage Reflective Learning in small Groups (STERLinG). Methods We applied an iterative procedure to reduce

  2. Punishing the Vulnerable: Exploring Suspension Rates for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brobbey, Gordon

    2018-01-01

    Students with learning disabilities are suspended at disproportionate rates in schools. Although research has shown the ineffectiveness of suspension as a disciplinary tool, school administrators continue to use it to combat behavior infractions. This column presents a review of the literature on suspension for students with learning disabilities,…

  3. Time utilization rate (TUR) of NTI-PGDE Students in self-study: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to find out the rate of time utilization in self-study among the Post-Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) students of the National Teachers' Institute. A sample of forty (40) students drawn from a population of sixty (60) by simple random sampling technique was used for the study.

  4. Factors Influencing University Nursing Students' Measles Vaccination Rate During a Community Measles Outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Kim, RN, PhD

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: A systematic measles vaccination program targeting nursing students upon their entry to university is needed. In order to increase the measles vaccination rate, application of effective promotion campaigns and education programs is necessary.

  5. Using data to help increase STEM retention rates for at-risk students; Student expectations and skill building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D. E.; Jones, G.; Heaney, A.

    2013-12-01

    Retention in the STEM fields is often a focus for higher education due to a shortage of trained workforce members. In particular, much effort has been spent on first year retention rates and introductory level courses under the assumption that students are more likely to drop out of STEM majors early in their higher education degree progress. While the retention rates of women, minorities, and low income students have been a priority by both the National Science Foundation and the private sector, we are interested in at-risk first year students for this study. The University of Wyoming Synergy Program's goal is to promote academic success and retention for underprepared and at-risk students by creating a series of first semester curricula as theme-based college transition skills courses that are paired with English courses. This creates a cohort group of courses for the students with increased communication between instructors at the same time allowing greater development of student social networks. In this study we are highlighting the results of the STEM students as compared with other at-risk participants in the program. The Synergy Program enrolls approximately 144 students each year with pre- and post-course surveys that directly measure which college skills students select as important as well as student expectations of the amount of time required for STEM courses. Follow-up surveys track the same queries for students who persist to their junior and senior year. In addition, instructors complete a summative survey about skills they find important to student success and individual student's challenges and successes with a variety of skills. Our results show a large gap in skills between those identified as important by students and those identified by their instructors. Expectations for the amount of time required to complete work for STEM courses and the reported time spent on course work are not constant when progressing throughout college. This analysis

  6. Evaluating clinical teachers with the Maastricht clinical teaching questionnaire: how much 'teacher' is in student ratings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerboom, Tobias B B; Mainhard, Tim; Dolmans, Diana H J M; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, A D C

    2012-01-01

    Students are a popular source of data to evaluate the performance of clinical teachers. Instruments to obtain student evaluations must have proven validity. One aspect of validity that often remains underexposed is the possibility of effects of between-student differences and teacher and student characteristics not directly related to teaching performance. The authors examined the occurrence of such effects, using multilevel analysis to analyse data from the Maastricht clinical teaching questionnaire (MCTQ), a validated evaluation instrument, in a veterinary curriculum. The 15-item MCTQ covers five domains. The authors used multilevel analysis to divide the variance in the domain scores in components related to, respectively, teachers and students. They estimated subsequent models to explore how the MCTQ scores are dependent on teacher and student characteristics. Significant amounts of variance in student ratings were due to between-teacher differences, particularly for learning climate, modelling and coaching. The effects of teacher and student characteristics were mostly non-significant or small. Large portions of variance in MCTQ scores were due to differences between teachers, while the contribution of student and teacher characteristics was negligible. The results support the validity of student ratings obtained with the MCTQ for evaluating teacher performance.

  7. What is appropriate to post on social media? Ratings from students, faculty members and the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anuja; Petty, Elizabeth M; Jaber, Reda M; Tackett, Sean; Purkiss, Joel; Fitzgerald, James; White, Casey

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain what medical students, doctors and the public felt was unprofessional for medical students, as future doctors, to post on a social media site, Facebook(®) . The significance of this is that unprofessional content reflects poorly on a student, which in turn can significantly affect a patient's confidence in that student's clinical abilities. An online survey was designed to investigate the perceptions of University of Michigan medical students, attending physicians and non-health care university-wide employees (that serves as a subset of the public) regarding mock medical students' Facebook(®) profile screenshots. For each screenshot, respondents used a 5-point Likert scale to rate 'appropriateness' and whether they would be 'comfortable' having students posting such content as their future doctors. Compared with medical students, faculty members and public groups rated images as significantly less appropriate (p public' have different thresholds of what is acceptable on a social networking site. Our findings will prove useful for students to consider the perspectives of patients and faculty members when considering what type of content to post on their social media sites. In this way, we hope that our findings provide insight for discussions, awareness and the development of guidelines related to online professionalism for medical students. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Attrition and bias in the MRC cognitive function and ageing study: an epidemiological investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Fiona E

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Any hypothesis in longitudinal studies may be affected by attrition and poor response rates. The MRC Cognitive Function and Ageing study (MRC CFAS is a population based longitudinal study in five centres with identical methodology in England and Wales each recruiting approximately 2,500 individuals. This paper aims to identify potential biases in the two-year follow-up interviews. Methods Initial non-response: Those not in the baseline interviews were compared in terms of mortality to those who were in the baseline interviews at the time of the second wave interviews (1993–1996. Longitudinal attrition: Logistic regression analysis was used to examine baseline differences between individuals who took part in the two-year longitudinal wave compared with those who did not. Results Initial non-response: Individuals who moved away after sampling but before baseline interview were 1.8 times more likely to die by two years (95% Confidence interval(CI 1.3–2.4 compared to respondents, after adjusting for age. The refusers had a slightly higher, but similar mortality pattern to responders (Odds ratio 1.2, 95%CI 1.1–1.4. Longitudinal attrition: Predictors for drop out due to death were being older, male, having impaired activities of daily living, poor self-perceived health, poor cognitive ability and smoking. Similarly individuals who refused were more likely to have poor cognitive ability, but had less years of full-time education and were more often living in their own home though less likely to be living alone. There was a higher refusal rate in the rural centres. Individuals who moved away or were uncontactable were more likely to be single, smokers, demented or depressed and were less likely to have moved if in warden-controlled accommodation at baseline. Conclusions Longitudinal estimation of factors mentioned above could be biased, particularly cognitive ability and estimates of movements from own home to residential homes

  9. Attrition, occlusion, (dys)function, and intervention: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Spijker, Arie; Kreulen, Cees M; Creugers, Nico H J

    2007-06-01

    Attrition and occlusal factors and masticatory function or dysfunction are thought to be related. This study aims to systematically review the literature on this topic with the emphasis to find evidence for occlusion-based treatment protocols for attrition. Literature was searched using PubMed (1980 to 2/2006) and the Cochrane Library of Clinical Trials with the keywords 'tooth' and 'wear'. Five steps were followed. Exclusion was based on the following: (1) reviews, case-reports, studies on non-human tooth material, and studies not published in English and (2) historical or forensic studies. Included were (3) in vivo studies. Next, studies on (4) occlusal factors, function or dysfunction [temporomandibular disorders (TMD), bruxism], or intervention, and (5) attrition were included. Two investigators independently assessed the abstracts; measure of agreement was calculated using Cohen's kappa; disagreement was resolved by discussion. Full-text articles were obtained and correlation between outcomes on occlusal factors, (dys)function, treatment, and attrition were retrieved. References in the papers included in the final analysis were cross-matched with the original list of references to add references that met the inclusion criteria. The search procedure revealed 1289 references on tooth wear. The numbers of included studies after each step were (1) 345 (kappa=0.8), (2) 287 (kappa=0.87), (3) 174 (kappa=0.99), (4) 81 (kappa=0.71), and (5) 27 (kappa=0.68). Hand searches through the reference lists revealed six additional papers to be included. Analysis of the 33 included papers failed to find sound evidence for recommending a certain occlusion-based treatment protocol above another in the management of attrition. Some studies reported correlations between attrition and anterior spatial relationships. No studies were found suggesting that absent posterior support necessarily leads to increased attrition, though one study found that fewer number of teeth resulted in

  10. Australian aboriginal tooth succession, interproximal attrition, and Begg's theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corruccini, R S

    1990-04-01

    In 1954, P.R. Begg analyzed interproximal attrition as a prehistorically universal mechanism to reduce tooth size. With modern processed diets and the virtual disappearance of constant interproximal attrition, Begg asserted, teeth remain too large for the arches and become crowded. Later investigators have questioned Begg's estimate of attritional tooth-size reduction, as well as aspects of his theory relating the succession sequence of permanent teeth to different malocclusions. The present paper examines the theory using longitudinal casts and records of modern Australian aborigines who are among the first generation lacking notable interproximal attrition thanks to a "modernized" diet. Deciduous and permanent tooth size, arch size, and occlusal relational variables were analyzed with respect to the expected occlusal outcomes in the absence of attritional tooth reduction. Permanent incisor overjet correlated with crowding status, as predicted by Begg. On the other hand, longer teeth did not relate to crowding in general nor to crowding in relevant local areas or during developmental stages. Unfavorable leeway space did not relate clearly to crowding or other malocclusions. Lowered correlations among structures and narrowness of the maxilla related more significantly to malocclusion. These results are in keeping with recent thinking that small jaws rather than large teeth underlie tooth/arch discrepancy.

  11. Attrition during graduate medical education: medical school perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Dorothy A; Jeffe, Donna B; Hageman, Heather L; Klingensmith, Mary E; McAlister, Rebecca P; Whelan, Alison J

    2008-12-01

    To identify predictors of attrition during graduate medical education (GME) in a single medical school cohort of contemporary US medical school graduates. Retrospective cohort study. Single medical institution. Recent US allopathic medical school graduates. Attrition from initial GME program. Forty-seven of 795 graduates (6%) did not complete the GME in their initial specialty of choice. At bivariate analysis, attrition was associated with election to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, being an MD-PhD degree holder, and specialty choice (all P PhD degree holder (odds ratio, 3.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-9.26; P = .02), election to Alpha Omega Alpha (2.19; 1.04-4.66; P = .04), choice of general surgery for GME (5.32; 1.98-14.27; P < .001), and choice of 5-year surgical specialty including those surgical specialties with a GME training requirement of 5 years or longer (2.74; 1.16-6.44; P = .02) each independently predicted greater likelihood of attrition. Academically highly qualified graduates and graduates who chose training in general surgery or in a 5-year surgical specialty were at increased risk of attrition during GME.

  12. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  13. First-Quarter Academic Performance. Indicators as Predictors of College Attrition: A Study of the 1976-1980 Class at Central State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Elaine

    The validity of students' first-quarter academic performance in predicting attrition at Central State University, Ohio, was investigated. It was hypothesized that freshmen who performed satisfactorily during the first quarter were more likely to complete their baccalaureate programs than were those who performed less well. Data on 287 students…

  14. Retention and risk factors for attrition in a large public health ART program in Myanmar: a retrospective cohort analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aye Thida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The outcomes from an antiretroviral treatment (ART program within the public sector in Myanmar have not been reported. This study documents retention and the risk factors for attrition in a large ART public health program in Myanmar. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of a cohort of adult patients enrolled in the Integrated HIV Care (IHC Program between June 2005 and October 2011 and followed up until April 2012 is presented. The primary outcome was attrition (death or loss-follow up; a total of 10,223 patients were included in the 5-year cumulative survival analysis. Overall 5,718 patients were analyzed for the risk factors for attrition using both logistic regression and flexible parametric survival models. RESULT: The mean age was 36 years, 61% of patients were male, and the median follow up was 13.7 months. Overall 8,564 (84% patients were retained in ART program: 750 (7% were lost to follow-up and 909 (9% died. During the 3 years follow-up, 1,542 attritions occurred over 17,524 person years at risk, giving an incidence density of 8.8% per year. The retention rates of participants at 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months were 86, 82, 80, 77 and 74% respectively. In multivariate analysis, being male, having high WHO staging, a low CD4 count, being anaemic or having low BMI at baseline were independent risk factors for attrition; tuberculosis (TB treatment at ART initiation, a prior ART course before program enrollment and literacy were predictors for retention in the program. CONCLUSION: High retention rate of IHC program was documented within the public sector in Myanmar. Early diagnosis of HIV, nutritional support, proper investigation and treatment for patients with low CD4 counts and for those presenting with anaemia are crucial issues towards improvement of HIV program outcomes in resource-limited settings.

  15. Retention and risk factors for attrition in a large public health ART program in Myanmar: a retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thida, Aye; Tun, Sai Thein Than; Zaw, Sai Ko Ko; Lover, Andrew A; Cavailler, Philippe; Chunn, Jennifer; Aye, Mar Mar; Par, Par; Naing, Kyaw Win; Zan, Kaung Nyunt; Shwe, Myint; Kyaw, Thar Tun; Waing, Zaw Htoon; Clevenbergh, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes from an antiretroviral treatment (ART) program within the public sector in Myanmar have not been reported. This study documents retention and the risk factors for attrition in a large ART public health program in Myanmar. A retrospective analysis of a cohort of adult patients enrolled in the Integrated HIV Care (IHC) Program between June 2005 and October 2011 and followed up until April 2012 is presented. The primary outcome was attrition (death or loss-follow up); a total of 10,223 patients were included in the 5-year cumulative survival analysis. Overall 5,718 patients were analyzed for the risk factors for attrition using both logistic regression and flexible parametric survival models. The mean age was 36 years, 61% of patients were male, and the median follow up was 13.7 months. Overall 8,564 (84%) patients were retained in ART program: 750 (7%) were lost to follow-up and 909 (9%) died. During the 3 years follow-up, 1,542 attritions occurred over 17,524 person years at risk, giving an incidence density of 8.8% per year. The retention rates of participants at 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months were 86, 82, 80, 77 and 74% respectively. In multivariate analysis, being male, having high WHO staging, a low CD4 count, being anaemic or having low BMI at baseline were independent risk factors for attrition; tuberculosis (TB) treatment at ART initiation, a prior ART course before program enrollment and literacy were predictors for retention in the program. High retention rate of IHC program was documented within the public sector in Myanmar. Early diagnosis of HIV, nutritional support, proper investigation and treatment for patients with low CD4 counts and for those presenting with anaemia are crucial issues towards improvement of HIV program outcomes in resource-limited settings.

  16. Attrition and retention in university physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Bjørn Friis

    This thesis tells the story about a traditional physics programme where it was long forgotten why students are educated the way they are. A one year longitudinal interview study with 18 first year physics students uncovers the consequences or their learning. The result is that to cope, some...... students need to defer their need for intellectual gratification. The consequence of long term deference of intellectual gratification appears to be that initially proactively disposed students are slowly subdued and end by relying mostly on learning strategies that research reports consistently point out...

  17. Attrition from Web-Based Cognitive Testing: A Repeated Measures Comparison of Gamification Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Jim; Skinner, Andy; Coyle, David; Lawrence, Natalia; Munafo, Marcus

    2017-11-22

    The prospect of assessing cognition longitudinally and remotely is attractive to researchers, health practitioners, and pharmaceutical companies alike. However, such repeated testing regimes place a considerable burden on participants, and with cognitive tasks typically being regarded as effortful and unengaging, these studies may experience high levels of participant attrition. One potential solution is to gamify these tasks to make them more engaging: increasing participant willingness to take part and reducing attrition. However, such an approach must balance task validity with the introduction of entertaining gamelike elements. This study aims to investigate the effects of gamelike features on participant attrition using a between-subjects, longitudinal Web-based testing study. We used three variants of a common cognitive task, the Stop Signal Task (SST), with a single gamelike feature in each: one variant where points were rewarded for performing optimally; another where the task was given a graphical theme; and a third variant, which was a standard SST and served as a control condition. Participants completed four compulsory test sessions over 4 consecutive days before entering a 6-day voluntary testing period where they faced a daily decision to either drop out or continue taking part. Participants were paid for each session they completed. A total of 482 participants signed up to take part in the study, with 265 completing the requisite four consecutive test sessions. No evidence of an effect of gamification on attrition was observed. A log-rank test showed no evidence of a difference in dropout rates between task variants (χ 2 2 =3.0, P=.22), and a one-way analysis of variance of the mean number of sessions completed per participant in each variant also showed no evidence of a difference (F 2,262 =1.534, P=.21, partial η 2 =0.012). Our findings raise doubts about the ability of gamification to reduce attrition from longitudinal cognitive testing studies

  18. A systematic review of factors influencing student ratings in undergraduate medical education course evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiekirka, Sarah; Raupach, Tobias

    2015-03-05

    Student ratings are a popular source of course evaluations in undergraduate medical education. Data on the reliability and validity of such ratings have mostly been derived from studies unrelated to medical education. Since medical education differs considerably from other higher education settings, an analysis of factors influencing overall student ratings with a specific focus on medical education was needed. For the purpose of this systematic review, online databases (PubMed, PsycInfo and Web of Science) were searched up to August 1st, 2013. Original research articles on the use of student ratings in course evaluations in undergraduate medical education were eligible for inclusion. Included studies considered the format of evaluation tools and assessed the association of independent and dependent (i.e., overall course ratings) variables. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were checked by two independent reviewers, and results were synthesised in a narrative review. Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria. Qualitative research (2 studies) indicated that overall course ratings are mainly influenced by student satisfaction with teaching and exam difficulty rather than objective determinants of high quality teaching. Quantitative research (23 studies) yielded various influencing factors related to four categories: student characteristics, exposure to teaching, satisfaction with examinations and the evaluation process itself. Female gender, greater initial interest in course content, higher exam scores and higher satisfaction with exams were associated with more positive overall course ratings. Due to the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of included studies, results must be interpreted with caution. Medical educators need to be aware of various influences on student ratings when developing data collection instruments and interpreting evaluation results. More research into the reliability and validity of overall course ratings as typically used in the

  19. Estimating Survival Rates in Engineering for Community College Transfer Students Using Grades in Calculus and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugerman, Marcia; Shelley, Mack; Rover, Diane; Mickelson, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This study uses a unique synthesized set of data for community college students transferring to engineering by combining several cohorts of longitudinal data along with transcript-level data, from both the Community College and the University, to measure success rates in engineering. The success rates are calculated by developing Kaplan-Meier…

  20. The Detection and Correction of Bias in Student Ratings of Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladyna, Thomas; Hess, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    A Rasch model was used to detect and correct bias in Likert rating scales used to assess student perceptions of college teaching, using a database of ratings. Statistical corrections were significant, supporting the model's potential utility. Recommendations are made for a theoretical rationale and further research on the model. (Author/MSE)

  1. The Effects of Increased Accountability Standards on Graduation Rates for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mitzi Lee

    2012-01-01

    This research sought to determine if unintended effects of increased accountability standards on graduation rates for students with disabilities existed. Data from one southeastern state were utilized in order to determine if graduation rates were impacted as a result of higher accountability standards. In addition, administrator attitudes on…

  2. The Impact of Institutional Student Support on Graduation Rates in US Ph.D. Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolli, Thomas; Agasisti, Tommaso; Johnes, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    Using National Research Council data, we investigate the determinants of graduation rates in US Ph.D. programmes. We emphasise the impact that support and facilities offered to doctoral students have on completion rates. Significant, strong and positive effects are found for the provision of on-site graduate conferences and dedicated workspace,…

  3. College Graduation Rates Depend Mainly on the Students--But Colleges Matter Too. Here's How Much.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    College graduation rates are a source of concern; many students fail to complete degree programs and therefore miss out on the socioeconomic benefits accruing to college graduates. Some have proposed that colleges be evaluated based on their graduation rates, with financial aid dollars directed away from poor performers. However, none of these…

  4. The Impact of Part-Time Staff on Art & Design Students' Ratings of Their Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Mantz

    2014-01-01

    Art & Design receives ratings on a number of scales of the UK's National Student Survey (NSS) that are less strong than those for some other subject areas. Art & Design, along with performing arts, is characterised by a relatively high level of part-time (PT) staffing. PT staffing data are set against NSS ratings for post-92 universities…

  5. Should Global Items on Student Rating Scales Be Used for Summative Decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the simplest indicators of teaching or course effectiveness is student ratings on one or more global items from the entire rating scale. That approach seems intuitively sound and easy to use. Global items have even been recommended by a few researchers to get a quick-read, at-a-glance summary for summative decisions about faculty. The…

  6. Heart Rates of Elementary Physical Education Students during the Dancing Classrooms Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-01-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4…

  7. CU-STARs: Promoting STEM Diversity by Addressing First-year Attrition of Underrepresented Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Cara; Silvia, Devin W.; Ellingson, Erica; Sturner, Andrew P.; Peck, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Upon first entering university, the fraction of students interested in pursuing a STEM major are distributed according to societal demographics (with 25% being underrepresented minorities), but by graduation, the fraction of students receiving STEM degrees is unbalanced, with underrepresented minorities receiving only 15% of STEM bachelor's degrees. The CU-STARs (CU Science, Technology, and Astronomy Recruits) program at the University of Colorado, Boulder is targeted to address the main triggers of early career attrition for underrepresented minorities in STEM disciplines. A select group of students are given financial support through work-study at the Fiske planetarium on campus, while resources to address other triggers of attrition are available to the entire cohort of interested students (typically ~5-10 per year). These resources are designed to promote social engagement and mentorship, while also providing a support network and resources to combat inadequate high school preparation for STEM courses. We achieve these goals through activities that include social events, mentor meetings, free tutoring, and special events to meet and talk with scientists. The culmination of the program for the recruits are a series of high school outreach events in underserved areas (inner city and rural alike), in which they become the expert. The STARs are paid for their time and take the lead in planning, teaching, and facilitating programs for the high school students, including classroom presentations, interactive lab activities, solar observing, and star parties. The high school outreach events provide role models and STEM exposure for the underserved high school community while simultaneously cementing the personal achievements and successes for the STARs. CU-STARs is now in its 4th year and is still growing. We are beginning the process of formal assessments of the program's success. We present details of the program implementation, a discussion of potential obstacles

  8. Study of Attrition Documentation at the U.S. Navy Recruit Training Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Condon, Nancy K; Eckenrode, John E

    2006-01-01

    .... Navy's Recruit Training Command (RTC). A random sample of 754 "retained files" from Customer Service Desk RTC was examined for attrition documentation and the information obtained was compared with attrition documentation contained...

  9. A Longitudinal Examination of First Term Attrition and Reenlistment among FY1999 Enlisted Accessions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strickland, William J

    2005-01-01

    ... the service, completed training segments, conducted duty assignments, and left the service. These models explored reasons for attrition and reenlistment intentions, and suggested management strategies that might be employed to reduce attrition...

  10. Blood Telomere Length Attrition and Cancer Development in the Normative Aging Study Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Hou

    2015-06-01

    Interpretation: Age-related BTL attrition was faster in cancer cases but their age-adjusted BTL attrition began decelerating as diagnosis approached. This may explain prior inconsistencies and help develop BTL as a cancer detection biomarker.

  11. Student Socioeconomic Status and Gender: Impacts on School Counselors' Ratings of Student Personal Characteristics and School Counselors' Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glance, Dorea E.

    2012-01-01

    This research focused on how students' socioeconomic status and gender impact school counselors' ratings of student personal characteristics and school counselor self-efficacy. While previous literature focuses on how students' socioeconomic status and gender impact school counselors' ratings of academic characteristics such as…

  12. The effect of inquiry-flipped classroom model toward students' achievement on chemical reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paristiowati, Maria; Fitriani, Ella; Aldi, Nurul Hanifah

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this research is to find out the effect of Inquiry-Flipped Classroom Models toward Students' Achievement on Chemical Reaction Rate topic. This study was conducted at SMA Negeri 3 Tangerang in Eleventh Graders. The Quasi Experimental Method with Non-equivalent Control Group design was implemented in this study. 72 students as the sample was selected by purposive sampling. Students in experimental group were learned through inquiry-flipped classroom model. Meanwhile, in control group, students were learned through guided inquiry learning model. Based on the data analysis, it can be seen that there is significant difference in the result of the average achievement of the students. The average achievement of the students in inquiry-flipped classroom model was 83,44 and the average achievement of the students in guided inquiry learning model was 74,06. It can be concluded that the students' achievement with inquiry-flipped classroom better than guided inquiry. The difference of students' achievement were significant through t-test which is tobs 3.056 > ttable 1.994 (α = 0.005).

  13. Rate of Speech and Reading in Second and Fifth Grade Primary Students in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourieh Ahadi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The purpose of this research is to study the standardization of speaking and reading rates in a group of normal speaker of female students, and to compare them. As the rate of speech is an important variable in the evaluation and treatment of stuttering, cluttering, dysarthria and apraxia. Materials and Method: One hundred of second grade students of primary school and an equal number of fifth grade students participated in this study. All subjects were native speakers of Farsi, who passed an informal, screening test of articulation and speech. None of the subjects had a history of speech, hearing, or neurological disorders. The subjects were asked to read from the 180 words portion of their Farsi book and tell story. Their speech was recorded by using a tape recorder. Then the data were analyzed for word and syllable rate. In transcribing the samples, single morpheme was counted as single word and compound words were counted as two words if they had two free morphemes. Non-word interjections were excluded from word and syllable counts while word interjections and repeated words were included in the count. Independent t-test and paired t-test were used for analyzing. Results: In the second grade students the reading rate is, on the average, 189.4 syllable per minute (SPM(94.9 word per minute(WPM, 3.1 syllable per second(SPS and the talking rate is 189.8 SPM (99.1 WPM, 3.1 SPS and in the fifth grade student the reading rate is 223.9 SPM (119.0 WPM, 3.7SPS and the talking rate is 210.26 SPM (109.5 WPM , 3.4 SPS. Conclusion: The result highlight that in the fifth grade students, reading rates are higher than talking rates while in the second grade they are not, because they do not have enough skills for whole word reading. A remarkable finding in this research is that, reading and talking rates in the fifth grade students are higher than the second grade students.

  14. The Relationships between a Freshman Transition Academy, Student WESTEST Scores, and Student Dropout Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roy G.

    2013-01-01

    High school administrators in the United States find students dropping out of school problematic. The federal government created the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) mandate to provide a system of accountability to public schools and school systems, while stressing the importance of teaching research-based lessons. According to the mandate, schools and…

  15. The Value of Student Ratings: Perceptions of Students, Teachers, and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Judith Prugh; Bozeman, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Colleges and universities invest time, personnel, and money into the process of student evaluations of faculty. These data provide only one measure of evaluating the quality and effectiveness of instruction. This research responded to the lack of emphasis on more effective use of the data for the purpose of improving teaching effectiveness by…

  16. Combined student ratings and self-assessment provide useful feedback for clinical teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Wolfhagen, Ineke H. A. P.; Peters, Wim G.; van Coppenolle, Lieve; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Many evaluation instruments have been developed to provide feedback to physicians on their clinical teaching but written feedback alone is not always effective. We explored whether feedback effectiveness improved when teachers’ self-assessment was added to written feedback based on student ratings. 37 physicians (10 residents, 27 attending physicians) from different specialties (Internal Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Dermatology, Ophthalmology, ENT, and Psychiatry) were invited to fill out a self-assessment questionnaire on their teaching skills. Students completed an almost identical questionnaire to evaluate the same teachers based on their experiences during clerkships. After receiving written feedback incorporating their self-assessment and the student ratings, the teachers indicated their perceptions of the self-assessment exercise and the written feedback in a questionnaire (five-point Likert scale items) and next, in more detail, in semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 12 of the participating teachers. 25 physicians participated (67%). The results showed that self-assessment and student feedback were both perceived as useful (3.7, SD 1.0) but the latter was considered more effective. The physicians we interviewed considered the combination of self-assessment with student ratings more effective than either self-assessment or written feedback alone. Notably, discrepancies between student ratings and self-assessment were deemed a strong incentive for change. We conclude that self-assessment can be a useful tool to stimulate improvement of clinical teaching when it is combined with written feedback based on student ratings. Future research among larger groups is needed to confirm our findings and examine whether these combined tools actually lead to improved teaching. PMID:19779976

  17. [Tobacco use rate and associated factors in middle school students in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, L; Feng, G Z; Jiang, Y; Zhang, J R; Liu, L X

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To understand tobacco use rate and explore the factors associated with tobacco use in middle school students in China. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted among 155 117 eligible middle students selected through multi-stage stratified cluster sampling from 31 provinces of China. The questionnaire consists of the following topics: tobacco use and cessation, passive smoking, access to tobacco products, tobacco control and tobacco advertisement, and knowledge about and attitudes to tobacco. Software SAS 9.3 was used for sample weighting and data analysis. Results: Current tobacco use rate was 6.9 % in middle school students in China. The rate was higher in boys (11.2 % ) than in girls (2.2 % ), and in rural area (7.8 % ) than in urban area (4.8 % ). Students in western area had the highest tobacco use rate (10.3 % ), followed by the students in middle area (6.4 % ), and the rate in students in eastern area was lowest (4.5 % ). Parent smoking (especially mother smoking), friend smoking, teacher smoking, pocket money for a week>20 yuan, tobacco advertisement or promotion, passive smoking, misconception of tobacco addiction, active attitude to smoking behavior were the risk factors for tobacco use. Conclusions: Smoking rate in boys in China was higher than the average global level. A comprehensive intervention strategy by Framework Convention on Tobacco Control should be used to reduce tobacco use in adolescents, including health education, increasing cigarette price, banning tobacco advertisement and promotion, and smoke-free legislation.

  18. A Conceptual Framework for Evaluating Attrition in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, C. Linda; Laing, Gregory K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework that considers the role that the sense of isolation and alienation play in contributing to attrition in online courses in the higher education sector. The approach adopted in this paper is a theoretical study aimed at synthesizing existing theories. The ultimate contribution of this…

  19. Attrition, burnout, job dissatisfaction and occupational therapy managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeger, M M; Walker, K F

    1992-01-01

    At a time when there is growing concern about the person-power shortages in occupational therapy, there is a need to address reasons why therapists leave the job market. Two job-related reasons for attrition are burnout and job dissatisfaction. The burnout phenomenon occurs as a result of personnel shortages, high-stress demands on therapists, the severity and complexity of client's problems, and the therapist's own ''worker personality.'' Bureaucratic constraints, limited advancement, issues related to a profession which is made up predominantly of women, lack of autonomy, and type of management and supervision are factors that contribute to job dissatisfaction. Occupational therapy managers can consider the causes of burnout and job dissatisfaction and initiate resources to retain therapists. Managers can increase the job benefits, such as flexible working hours, take steps to reduce stress in the workplace, offer career laddering opportunities, and promote staff development. By identifying the causes for attrition and by addressing those causes, the threat of losing therapists from the work force may be averted. Respondents (n = 106) to a survey of occupational therapy managers indicated that job dissatisfaction, burnout, and attrition of registered occupational therapists were not major problems in their settings. They reported a variety of strategies to reduce job dissatisfaction, burnout, and attrition. When these problems were present, managers cited bureaucratic red tape, lack of opportunity for advancement, and increasing role demands as contributing factors.

  20. Evaluation of the Dehulling Efficiency of Soybean Using Attrition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditioned seeds were dehulled in the huller section of commercial rice milling machine and attrition milling machine. A dehulling efficiency (e) value of 55%, which corresponded to an extraction yield (E) of 44% was achieved using the huller section of a commercial rice milling machine, while 90% dehulling efficiency (e), ...

  1. The Effects of Turnover: What We Know about Teacher Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Karen

    2012-01-01

    School business officials are likely to know better than anyone else about the financial costs to districts and schools associated with teacher attrition. Perhaps less well-known, though, is what else has been learned about this issue in recent years--information that may affect how one thinks about teacher turnover. Here is some of that research:…

  2. Teacher Attrition Variables That Influence Retention and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Leslie Garmon

    2014-01-01

    Teacher attrition is a major problem. According to researchers at North Carolina State University, more teachers are leaving the profession than staying or entering. Accordingly, school systems in the United States find themselves in the predicament where they must hire teachers who have little teaching experience or who have not been adequately…

  3. The Career Officer Attrition Dilemma: An Underlying Cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-09

    BOOMER, XER, & MILLENIAL TRAITS COMPARISON ..................................... 23 vii viii THE CAREER OFFICER ATTRITION DILEMMA: AN UNDERLYING...provide a sustainable solution. Multiple generations in the military will always be present. What will change, however, is which generation will be in the... MILLENIAL TRAITS COMPARISON cause serious frustration both for the senior leadership and their subordinates. Even as the Xers begin to take over from

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of a smoothed war of attrition game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Swami; Killingback, Timothy

    2016-05-07

    In evolutionary game theory the War of Attrition game is intended to model animal contests which are decided by non-aggressive behavior, such as the length of time that a participant will persist in the contest. The classical War of Attrition game assumes that no errors are made in the implementation of an animal׳s strategy. However, it is inevitable in reality that such errors must sometimes occur. Here we introduce an extension of the classical War of Attrition game which includes the effect of errors in the implementation of an individual׳s strategy. This extension of the classical game has the important feature that the payoff is continuous, and as a consequence admits evolutionary behavior that is fundamentally different from that possible in the original game. We study the evolutionary dynamics of this new game in well-mixed populations both analytically using adaptive dynamics and through individual-based simulations, and show that there are a variety of possible outcomes, including simple monomorphic or dimorphic configurations which are evolutionarily stable and cannot occur in the classical War of Attrition game. In addition, we study the evolutionary dynamics of this extended game in a variety of spatially and socially structured populations, as represented by different complex network topologies, and show that similar outcomes can also occur in these situations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. General Education Teachers' Ratings of the Academic Engagement Level of Students Who Read Braille: A Comparison with Sighted Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Julie A.; Lewis, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    English and language arts teachers of braille-reading students in general education classes rated these students' academic engagement and the academic achievement of low- and average-achieving sighted students in the same classrooms. The braille readers were found to be statistically similar to the low-achieving students with regard to effort,…

  6. 'Show me the money': financial incentives increase chlamydia screening rates among tertiary students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Marian J; Schmidt, Matthias; Davis, Belinda K; Baynes, Anne M; O'Keefe, Elissa J; Bavinton, Tim P; McNiven, Michelle; Martin, Sarah J; Bowden, Francis J

    2010-03-01

    We hypothesise that text-messaging and financial incentives would increase tertiary student participation in chlamydia screening. A cross-sectional study was conducted over two phases on eight tertiary campuses during 2007. During Phase 1 (6 months) study activities were advertised through student organisations and media. Education and screening were offered during a range of student activities. During Phase 2 (4 days) education and screening were offered via text messages. Non-financial incentives were offered during Phase 1 and a $10 cash incentive was offered during Phase 2. Rates of specimens provided by students and the direct costs incurred during each phase were compared. 2786 students attended the 31 activities conducted in Phase 1. Of these, 627 students (22.5%) provided urine specimens for chlamydia testing. During Phase 2, the dissemination of 866 text messages resulted in urine specimens from 392 students (45.3%). Costs per test were AUD $175.11 in Phase 1 and AUD $27.13 in Phase 2. Compared with more labour intensive (and therefore more expensive) screening activities conducted over a 6-month period, offering a small financial incentive to tertiary students through text messaging over a 4-day period significantly increased participation in on-campus chlamydia screening. This model could readily be applied to other populations to increase participation in chlamydia screening.

  7. Preparing nursing students for the future: Development and implementation of an Australian Bachelor of Nursing programme with a community health focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon; Cant, Robyn; Browning, Mark; Robinson, Eddie

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on changes in the educational preparation of undergraduate nurses in line with contemporary primary and preventative healthcare models. We evaluated a new Australian nursing and community care degree programme using focus groups with 38 students in their first years of study, and quantitative performance data (regarding entry, performance and course attrition). Four main themes were identified related to students' course experience: 'I think community health should be an elective'; 'Focus on relevance to practice'; 'Teaching by non-nursing academics' and 'Access to support during transition to university.' Overall pass rates were 94% (first year) and 97% (second year) with a low 11% attrition rate. We conclude that based on prior experiences and stereotypical views, students may be ambivalent about the inclusion of primary and preventative care models which nevertheless are essential to enhance practice and to prepare the future nursing workforce.

  8. Attrition in longitudinal randomized controlled trials: home visits make a difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Janey C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Participant attrition in longitudinal studies can introduce systematic bias, favoring participants who return for follow-up, and increase the likelihood that those with complications will be underestimated. Our aim was to examine the effectiveness of home follow-up (Home F/U to complete the final study evaluation on potentially “lost” participants by: 1 evaluating the impact of including and excluding potentially “lost” participants (e.g., those who required Home F/U to complete the final evaluation on the rates of study complications; 2 examining the relationship between timing and number of complications on the requirement for subsequent Home F/U; and 3 determining predictors of those who required Home F/U. Methods We used data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT conducted from 1991–1994 among coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients that investigated the effect of High mean arterial pressure (MAP (intervention vs. Low MAP (control during cardiopulmonary bypass on 5 complications: cardiac morbidity/mortality, neurologic morbidity/mortality, all-cause mortality, neurocognitive dysfunction and functional decline. We enhanced completion of the final 6-month evaluation using Home F/U. Results Among 248 participants, 61 (25% required Home F/U and the remaining 187 (75% received Routine F/U. By employing Home F/U, we detected 11 additional complications at 6 months: 1 major neurologic complication, 6 cases of neurocognitive dysfunction and 4 cases of functional decline. Follow-up of 61 additional Home F/U participants enabled us to reach statistical significance on our main trial outcome. Specifically, the High MAP group had a significantly lower rate of the Combined Trial Outcome compared to the Low MAP group, 16.1% vs. 27.4% (p=0.032. In multivariate analysis, participants who were ≥ 75 years (OR=3.23, 95% CI 1.52-6.88, p=0.002 or on baseline diuretic therapy (OR=2.44, 95% CI 1.14-5.21, p=0.02 were more

  9. [Corrective effect of aromatherapy on indices of heart rate variability in students under exam stress conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamyan, H T; Minasyan, S M

    2016-01-01

    There were investigated changes in indices of the activity of regulatory mechanisms of heart rhythm in student under exam stress conditions and the possibility of their correction with aid of aromatherapy. The examination stress was established to be accompanied by pronounced shifts of integral and spectral indices of heart rhythm in students, indicating to the activation of the sympathetic circuit of Autonomic Nervous System in conditions of examination stress. A positive, relaxation impact of the essential oil of orange on the investigated indices was also recorded. The latter is expressed by weakly pronounced changes or lack of them in data of integral and spectral heart rate indices in students from the experimental group, that indicates to the stabilizing effect of used ethereal oil on the psycho-physiological state of students in conditions of exam stress

  10. Relationship between interaction parent-child with addictability rate and heterosexual orientation in students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Hosseinkhanzadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the purpose of this study was to study relationship between interaction parent-child with addictability rate and heterosexual orientation in students. Method: The statistical population consisted of all students of Guilan University in 2012-2013 academic year, which among them a sample of 200 students were selected by random cluster sampling method and they completed preparation to addiction scale relationship between parent–child scale and attitude and heterosexual orientation before marriage. Findings: Correlation analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between addictability in female students and male students with relationship with father, and positive affect, interlace and communication subscales. The relationship between female students’ addictability with relationship with mother and positive affect, hurt and confusion and communication subscales was observed significant negative correlation, also there is a significant negative relationship between male students’ addictability with the relationship with mother. There is significant negative relationship between heterosexual orientations in male students with relation with father, positive affects and interlace. Results of regression analysis showed that relationship with father and relationship with mother can anticipate addict ability in female and male students. Conclusion: If parents cannot establish an appropriate and constructive interaction with their child cause child face with affection and emotional deprivation and this poor emotional and affection deprivation may cause he or she bring to the addict ability and heterosexual orientation.

  11. Isoniazid Completion Rates for Latent Tuberculosis Infection among College Students Managed by a Community Pharmacist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Karl; Goad, Jeffery; Wu, Joanne; Johnson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors' objective was to document 9-month and previously recommended 6-month treatment completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in a pharmacist-managed LTBI clinic in a community pharmacy on a college campus, and to describe patient characteristics. Participants: Participants were university students diagnosed with…

  12. Factor-Based Student Rating in Academic Performance in Southern Province of Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulinda, Ephrard; Role, Elizabeth; Makewa, Lazarus Ndiku

    2013-01-01

    This study examined students' perception on academic performance using five-factor ratings namely, principal's instructional leadership, school climate, school facilities, teachers' effectiveness and family support. Data for this study were collected from selected Parent's Private Seventh-Day Adventist Secondary Schools (PPSDASS) in Southern…

  13. Raising African American Student Graduation Rates: A Best Practices Study of Predominantly White Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore best practices at small, private liberal arts institutions that experienced large increases in African American graduation rates. Particular focus was on institutions that enrolled less than 17% minority students whose overall enrollment fell within the middle 50% of all SAT scores and the middle 50% of…

  14. Texas Community College Graduation and Persistence Rates as a Function of Student Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, J. Mark; Slate, John R.

    2015-01-01

    In this investigation, the graduation and persistence rates of Texas community college students by ethnic membership (i.e., White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian) for the 2000, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010 academic years were examined. Statistically significant differences were present between the 2000 and the 2010 graduation and…

  15. Identifying Gifted Students in Puerto Rico: Validation of a Spanish Translation of the Gifted Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Javier I.; Pfeiffer, Steven; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of correctly identifying gifted students is a critical issue. Gifted education in Puerto Rico is marked by insufficient support and a lack of appropriate identification methods. This study examined the reliability and validity of a Spanish translation of the "Gifted Rating Scales-School Form" (GRS) with a sample of 618…

  16. Evaluating Effective Teaching in College Level Economics Using Student Ratings of Instruction: A Factor Analytic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbetsiafa, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the factors that affect students' evaluation of economic instruction using a sample of 1300 completed rating instruments at a comprehensive four-year mid-western public university. The study uses factor analysis to determine the validity and reliability of the evaluation instrument in assessing instructor or course…

  17. A Behavior Rating Scale for Emotionally Disturbed Students: The Pupil Observation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong-Hugg, Robin L.; And Others

    The paper describes development of the Pupil Observation Schedule (POS), a computer based system which provides a framework for assessing, evaluating, and reporting behavioral progress of emotionally disturbed students. The POS is used to rate five skill areas--computation, language, reading, reference, and psychomotor skills; and nine behavioral…

  18. Teacher Ratings of ADHD Symptoms in Ethnic Minority Students: Bias or Behavioral Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosterman, Shelley J.; DuPaul, George J.; Jitendra, Asha K.

    2008-01-01

    Disproportionate placement of African American and Hispanic students into disability and special education categories may result from true behavioral and cognitive differences, bias in assessment and referral, or some combination of the two. Studies of commonly used ADHD rating scales suggest teacher bias may contribute to placement discrepancies.…

  19. 78 FR 53433 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the Federal Family Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the Federal Family Education Loan Program... Federal Student Aid announces the interest rates for the period July 1, 2013, through June 30, 2014, for..., 2010. The Chief Operating Officer takes this action to give notice of FFEL Program loan interest rates...

  20. The Role of Gender in Students' Ratings of Teaching Quality in Computer Science and Environmental Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Linda; Svensson, Ingrid; Borell, Jonas; Richardson, John T. E.

    2017-01-01

    Students' ratings of teaching quality on course units in a computer science program and an environmental engineering program at a large Swedish university were obtained using the Course Experience Questionnaire; 8888 sets of ratings were obtained from men and 4280 sets were obtained from women over ten academic years. These student ratings from…

  1. 78 FR 53431 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan... Operating Officer for Federal Student Aid announces the interest rates for the period July 1, 2013, through...(b)), provides formulas for determining the interest rates charged to borrowers for loans made under...

  2. 78 FR 5431 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the... amended, the Chief Operating Officer for Federal Student Aid announces the interest rates for the period... interest rates to the public. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ian Foss, U.S. Department of Education, 830...

  3. [Injury rate and incidence of accidents with biological risk among infirmary students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martín, A; Novalbos Ruiz, J P; Costa Alonso, M J; Zafra Mezcua, J A

    2000-09-09

    A study of the incidence and characteristics of biological accidents among infirmary students during their practicals at the hospital. A retrospective study carried out at five centres by means of two questionnaires, one on the duration of the training and the rate of accidents and the other on the characteristics, precautions and ports exposure behaviour. Out of 397 students, 70,5% had accidents at a rate of 64% (CI 95%, 59-68). Of these, 15% were accidents with biological risk, the majority being jabs (39%) and splashes (32,5%). It is worth note that 49,2% occurred while putting away the material and 58% in the absence of any individual protective measures. One out of 8 accidents implied a biological risk. A very high rate of accidents was observed with important deficiencies in security.

  4. High attrition among HIV-infected patients with advanced disease treated in an intermediary referral center in Maputo, Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Molfino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Mozambique, antiretroviral therapy (ART scale-up has been successfully implemented. However, attrition in care remains a major programmatic challenge. In 2009, an intermediary-level HIV referral center was created in Maputo to ensure access to specialized care for HIV-infected patients with complications (advanced clinical-immunological stage, Kaposi sarcoma, or suspected ART failure. Objective: To determine the attrition from care and to identify risk factors that lead to high attrition among patients referred to an intermediary-level HIV referral center. Design: This was a retrospective cohort study from 2009 to 2011. Results: A total of 1,657 patients were enrolled, 847 (51% were men, the mean age was 36 years (standard deviation: 11, the mean CD4 count was 27 cells/µl (interquartile range: 11–44, and one-third were severely malnourished. The main reasons for referral were advanced clinical stages (WHO stages 3 and 4, and CD4 count <50 cells/µl in 70% of the cases, and 19% had Kaposi sarcoma. The overall attrition rate was 28.7 per 100 person-years (PYs – the mortality rate was 5.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.2–5.9 per 100 PYs, and the loss-to-follow-up rate was 23.7 (95% CI: 21.9–25.6 per 100 PYs. There were 793 attritions – 137 deaths and 656 lost to follow-up (LTFU; 77% of all attrition happened within the first year. The factors independently associated with attrition were male sex (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.0–1.3, low body mass index (aHR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.2–1.8, WHO clinical stage 3 or 4 (aHR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.0–1.6; and aHR: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.4–2.5, later year of enrollment (aHR 1.61, 95% CI 1.3–1.9, and ‘being already on ART’ at enrollment (aHR 13.71, 95% CI 11.4–16.4. Conclusions: Attrition rates among HIV-infected patients enrolled in an intermediary referral center were high, mainly related to advanced stage of clinical disease. Measures are required to address this

  5. Listen-Identify-Brainstorm-Reality-Test-Encourage (LIBRE) Problem-Solving Model: Addressing Special Education Teacher Attrition through a Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to Teacher Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Norma S.; Hernandez, Art; Hector, Alison M.; Crosby, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Special education teacher attrition rates continue to challenge the profession. A cognitive-behavioral problem-solving approach was used to examine three alternative certification program special education teachers' professional development through a series of 41 interviews conducted over a 2-year period. Beginning when they were novice special…

  6. Development and Initial Validation of the Student Rating of Environmental Stressors Scale: Stressors Faced by Students in Accelerated High School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suldo, Shannon M.; Dedrick, Robert F.; Shaunessy-Dedrick, Elizabeth; Roth, Rachel A.; Ferron, John

    2015-01-01

    High school students in accelerated curricula face stressors beyond typical adolescent developmental challenges. The Student Rating of Environmental Stressors Scale (StRESS) is a self-report measure of environmental stressors appropriate for students in Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses. We developed the StRESS…

  7. Medical students' attitude of their success rate in clerkship period in Birjand University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hadjyabady

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background With regard to accelerated progresses in the world of science and technology, as well as changes in the needs of the society, medical education should be a developing process. One of the main factors that can promote education from a static to a dynamic and effective state is evaluation. Purpose The purpose of the present survey is to determine the rate of success of medical students passing their clerkship in Birjand University of Medical Sciences from their own views of attaining educational goals of Urology Department. Methods The study is descriptive-analytical and has been performed on 50 medical students in Birjand University of Medical Sciences. Having determined the validity as well as the reliability of the question­naires, we used them to collect the data. Results Participants were 37 men (74% and 13 women (26%. T-test demonstrated a significant statical difference between male and female students in practical management of cases in urology ward (p<0.03. significant. Better practical performance was evident when the students take practical approach, in addition to looking and listening. Also, if students used various methods of teaching and learning, they would better manage cases. Conclusion The rate of medical students' success in their clerkship period for educational goals of urology was good. However, providing required facilities for giving instructions on clinical skills such as educational clinical workshops, clinical skill workshops and clinical skills centre, educational films and bed­ side practice under supervision of professors, will promote the fulfilment of educational goals. Key word educational goals, medical students, urology ward

  8. The influence of different curriculum designs on students' dropout rate: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergel, John; Quintero, Gustavo A; Isaza-Restrepo, Andrés; Ortiz-Fonseca, Martha; Latorre-Santos, Catalina; Pardo-Oviedo, Juan Mauricio

    2018-12-01

    The relationship between students' withdrawal and educational variables has generated a considerable number of publications. As the explosion of information in sciences and integration theories led to creating different curriculum designs, it has been assumed that differences among designs explain academic success and, therefore, students' retention. However, little attention has been given to examine explicitly how diverse designs influence dropout rates in practice, which questions if decisions to reform curricula are sufficiently informed. This article describes our curriculum reform, which exposes our former and current curriculum designs as having had dissimilar dropout percentages. Furthermore, we aimed to explore the influence of different curriculum designs on students' dropout rates. The conclusion is that dropout variations may be explained not only because of the curriculum design itself, but also because of the power relationship changes between teachers and students that brought out the design change. Consequently, more research is needed to fully understand the political implications of different curriculum designs and their influence on dropout rates.

  9. 78 FR 17647 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the Federal Family Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the.... Department of Education published in the Federal Register (78 FR 5433) a notice announcing the interest rates... bill rate Margin Total rate First disbursed on or after disbursed interest rate (percent) (percent...

  10. Ash production by attrition in volcanic conduits and plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T J; Russell, J K

    2017-07-17

    Tephra deposits result from explosive volcanic eruption and serve as indirect probes into fragmentation processes operating in subsurface volcanic conduits. Primary magmatic fragmentation creates a population of pyroclasts through volatile-driven decompression during conduit ascent. In this study, we explore the role that secondary fragmentation, specifically attrition, has in transforming primary pyroclasts upon transport in volcanic conduits and plumes. We utilize total grain size distributions from a suite of natural and experimentally produced tephra to show that attrition is likely to occur in all explosive volcanic eruptions. Our experimental results indicate that fine ash production and surface area generation is fast (eruption column stability, tephra dispersal, aggregation, volcanic lightening generation, and has concomitant effects on aviation safety and Earth's climate.

  11. Effects of Classroom Ventilation Rate and Temperature on Students' Test Scores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Haverinen-Shaughnessy

    Full Text Available Using a multilevel approach, we estimated the effects of classroom ventilation rate and temperature on academic achievement. The analysis is based on measurement data from a 70 elementary school district (140 fifth grade classrooms from Southwestern United States, and student level data (N = 3109 on socioeconomic variables and standardized test scores. There was a statistically significant association between ventilation rates and mathematics scores, and it was stronger when the six classrooms with high ventilation rates that were indicated as outliers were filtered (> 7.1 l/s per person. The association remained significant when prior year test scores were included in the model, resulting in less unexplained variability. Students' mean mathematics scores (average 2286 points were increased by up to eleven points (0.5% per each liter per second per person increase in ventilation rate within the range of 0.9-7.1 l/s per person (estimated effect size 74 points. There was an additional increase of 12-13 points per each 1°C decrease in temperature within the observed range of 20-25°C (estimated effect size 67 points. Effects of similar magnitude but higher variability were observed for reading and science scores. In conclusion, maintaining adequate ventilation and thermal comfort in classrooms could significantly improve academic achievement of students.

  12. Effects of Classroom Ventilation Rate and Temperature on Students' Test Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverinen-Shaughnessy, Ulla; Shaughnessy, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Using a multilevel approach, we estimated the effects of classroom ventilation rate and temperature on academic achievement. The analysis is based on measurement data from a 70 elementary school district (140 fifth grade classrooms) from Southwestern United States, and student level data (N = 3109) on socioeconomic variables and standardized test scores. There was a statistically significant association between ventilation rates and mathematics scores, and it was stronger when the six classrooms with high ventilation rates that were indicated as outliers were filtered (> 7.1 l/s per person). The association remained significant when prior year test scores were included in the model, resulting in less unexplained variability. Students' mean mathematics scores (average 2286 points) were increased by up to eleven points (0.5%) per each liter per second per person increase in ventilation rate within the range of 0.9-7.1 l/s per person (estimated effect size 74 points). There was an additional increase of 12-13 points per each 1°C decrease in temperature within the observed range of 20-25°C (estimated effect size 67 points). Effects of similar magnitude but higher variability were observed for reading and science scores. In conclusion, maintaining adequate ventilation and thermal comfort in classrooms could significantly improve academic achievement of students.

  13. COMPENSATORY STRATEGIES OF FIRST-LANGUAGE-ATTRITED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahdan Syahdan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the compensatory strategies used by two Indonesian children who experienced first language attrition when acquiring English in the English-speaking environment. They use compensatory strategies to compensate for their lack of competence in first language. They employ both interlingual strategies and discourse strategies when they have difficulties in communication. Interlingual strategies used are codeswitching and lexical borrowings and the discourse strategies are overt comments, appeal for assistance, and avoidance.

  14. The Impact of Fund Attrition on Superannuation Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Drew, Michael E.; Stanford, Jon D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of fund attrition on returns from a sample of superannuation fund managers (specialising in the management of domestic stock portfolios) for the period 1991 through 1999, using a four-factor asset pricing model. Survivorship bias is estimated at 23 basis points per annum. The evidence presented in this study is consistent with recent international evidence that suggests that a sampling technique that excludes terminated funds would result in an overestimatio...

  15. Germanic heritage languages in North America: Acquisition, attrition and change

    OpenAIRE

    Johannessen, Janne Bondi; Salmons, Joseph C.; Westergaard, Marit; Anderssen, Merete; Arnbjörnsdóttir, Birna; Allen, Brent; Pierce, Marc; Boas, Hans C.; Roesch, Karen; Brown, Joshua R.; Putnam, Michael; Åfarli, Tor A.; Newman, Zelda Kahan; Annear, Lucas; Speth, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents new empirical findings about Germanic heritage varieties spoken in North America: Dutch, German, Pennsylvania Dutch, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, West Frisian and Yiddish, and varieties of English spoken both by heritage speakers and in communities after language shift. The volume focuses on three critical issues underlying the notion of ‘heritage language’: acquisition, attrition and change. The book offers theoretically-informed discussions of heritage language processe...

  16. Predictors of Attrition in the Finnish Conscript Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Dawson et al., 1994; Kassel, Jackson, & Unrod, 2000; Lazarus & Folkman , 1984; Pierce & Lydon, 1998; Thompson & Gignac, 2001). These expectations toward...organizational socialization. USAWC Strategy Research Project Carlisle Barracks, PA: U.S. Army War College. Hicks, J. M., & Nogami, G. Y . (1984...of Navy attrition. II. A demonstration of potential usefulness for screening. (Report No. 01-06). Military Medicine, 167, 770-776. Lazarus , R. S

  17. Reduced withdrawal and failure rates of accelerated nursing students enrolled in pharmacology is associated with a supportive intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggrell, Sheila Anne; Schaffer, Sally

    2016-02-01

    To reduce nursing shortages, accelerated nursing programs are available for domestic and international students. However, the withdrawal and failure rates from these programs may be different than for the traditional programs. The main aim of our study was to improve the retention and experience of accelerated nursing students. The academic background, age, withdrawal and failure rates of the accelerated and traditional students were determined. Data from 2009 and 2010 were collected prior to intervention. In an attempt to reduce the withdrawal of accelerated students, we set up an intervention, which was available to all students. The assessment of the intervention was a pre-post-test design with non-equivalent groups (the traditional and the accelerated students). The elements of the intervention were a) a formative website activity of some basic concepts in anatomy, physiology and pharmacology, b) a workshop addressing study skills and online resources, and c) resource lectures in anatomy/physiology and microbiology. The formative website and workshop was evaluated using questionnaires. The accelerated nursing students were five years older than the traditional students (p students, than for traditional students who have undertaken first year courses in anatomy and physiology (p = 0.04 in 2010). The withdrawing students were predominantly the domestic students with non-university qualifications or equivalent experience. The failure rates were also higher for this group, compared to the traditional students (p = 0.05 in 2009 and 0.03 in 2010). In contrast, the withdrawal rates for the international and domestic graduate accelerated students were very low. After the intervention, the withdrawal and failure rates in pharmacology for domestic accelerated students with non-university qualifications were not significantly different than those of traditional students. The accelerated international and domestic graduate nursing students have low withdrawal

  18. Significance of experts' overall ratings for medical student competence in relation to history-taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ernesto de Almeida Troncon

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Overall ratings (ORs of competence, given by expert physicians, are increasingly used in clinical skills assessments. Nevertheless, the influence of specific components of competence on ORs is incompletely understood. The aim here was to investigate whether ORs for medical student history-taking competence are influenced by performance relating to communication skills, completeness of questioning and asking contentdriven key questions. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive, quantitative study at Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: Thirty-six medical students were examined in a 15-station high-stake objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. At four stations devoted to history-taking, examiners filled out checklists covering the components investigated and independently rated students’ overall performance using a five-point scale from 1 (poor to 5 (excellent. Physician ratings were aggregated for each student. Nonparametric correlations were made between ORs. RESULTS: ORs presented significant correlations with checklist scores (Spearman’s rs = 0.38; p = 0.02 and OSCE general results (rs = 0.52; p < 0.001. Scores for "communication skills" tended to correlate with ORs (rs = 0.31, but without reaching significance (p = 0.06. Neither the scores for "completeness" (rs = 0.26; p = 0.11 nor those for "asking key questions" (rs = 0.07; p = 0.60 correlated with ORs. CONCLUSIONS: Experts’ overall ratings for medical student competence regarding history-taking is likely to encompass a particular dimension, since ratings were only weakly influenced by specific components of performance.

  19. Taking into account the impact of attrition on the assessment of response shift and true change: a multigroup structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Mathilde G E; Oort, Frans J; van der Linden, Yvette M; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2015-03-01

    Missing data due to attrition present a challenge for the assessment and interpretation of change and response shift in HRQL outcomes. The objective was to handle such missingness and to assess response shift and 'true change' with the use of an attrition-based multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) approach. Functional limitations and health impairments were measured in 1,157 cancer patients, who were treated with palliative radiotherapy for painful bone metastases, before [time (T) 0], every week after treatment (T1 through T12), and then monthly for up to 2 years (T13 through T24). To handle missing data due to attrition, the SEM procedure was extended to a multigroup approach, in which we distinguished three groups: short survival (3-5 measurements), medium survival (6-12 measurements), and long survival (>12 measurements). Attrition after third, sixth, and 13th measurement occasions was 11, 24, and 41 %, respectively. Results show that patterns of change in functional limitations and health impairments differ between patients with short, medium, or long survival. Moreover, three response-shift effects were detected: recalibration of 'pain' and 'sickness' and reprioritization of 'physical functioning.' If response-shift effects would not have been taken into account, functional limitations and health impairments would generally be underestimated across measurements. The multigroup SEM approach enables the analysis of data from patients with different patterns of missing data due to attrition. This approach does not only allow for detection of response shift and assessment of true change across measurements, but also allow for detection of differences in response shift and true change across groups of patients with different attrition rates.

  20. Volatility modeling for IDR exchange rate through APARCH model with student-t distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Didit Budi; Susanto, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to empirically investigate the performance of APARCH(1,1) volatility model with the Student-t error distribution on five foreign currency selling rates to Indonesian rupiah (IDR), including the Swiss franc (CHF), the Euro (EUR), the British pound (GBP), Japanese yen (JPY), and the US dollar (USD). Six years daily closing rates over the period of January 2010 to December 2016 for a total number of 1722 observations have analysed. The Bayesian inference using the efficient independence chain Metropolis-Hastings and adaptive random walk Metropolis methods in the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme has been applied to estimate the parameters of model. According to the DIC criterion, this study has found that the APARCH(1,1) model under Student-t distribution is a better fit than the model under normal distribution for any observed rate return series. The 95% highest posterior density interval suggested the APARCH models to model the IDR/JPY and IDR/USD volatilities. In particular, the IDR/JPY and IDR/USD data, respectively, have significant negative and positive leverage effect in the rate returns. Meanwhile, the optimal power coefficient of volatility has been found to be statistically different from 2 in adopting all rate return series, save the IDR/EUR rate return series.

  1. Determination of the attrition resistance of granular charcoals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, V.R.

    1979-01-01

    A laboratory procedure has been developed to evaluate the attrition of granular adsorbent charcoals on passing an air flow through the bed. Two factors observed in plant operations were selected as relevant: (1) the characteristic structural vibrations in plant scale equipment (motors, fans, etc.) that are transmitted to charcoal particles and cause the particles to move and rub each other, and (2) the rapid air flow that results in the movement of the attrited dust. In the test a container for charcoal [50 mm diameter and 50 mm high] was vibrated at a frequency of 60 Hz and at a constant energy input manually controlled using a vibration meter in the acceleration mode. Simultaneously, air was applied and exited through glass fiber filter paper. The quantity of dust trapped on the exit filter was then determined, either optically or gravimetrically. The dust formed per minute (attrition coefficient) was found to approach a constant value. The plateau-values from sequential determinations varied with the source of the charcoal; a 5-fold difference was found among a large variety of commercial products. The first testing of a sample released the excess dust accumulated in previous handling of the charcoal. The plateau values were then attained in the succeeding tests and these were characteristic of the material. The results were compared with those obtained for the same charcoals using older test methods such as the Ball and Pan Hardness Test described in RDTM16-1T

  2. Attrition Resistant Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Based on FCC Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyiga, Adeyinka

    2010-02-05

    Commercial spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts provided by Engelhard and Albemarle were used as supports for Fe-based catalysts with the goal of improving the attrition resistance of typical F-T catalysts. Catalysts with the Ruhrchemie composition (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 spent FCC on mass basis) were prepared by wet impregnation. XRD and XANES analysis showed the presence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in calcined catalysts. FeC{sub x} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were present in the activated catalysts. The metal composition of the catalysts was analyzed by ICP-MS. F-T activity of the catalysts activated in situ in CO at the same conditions as used prior to the attrition tests was measured using a fixed bed reactor at T = 573 K, P = 1.38 MPa and H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 0.67. Cu and K promoted Fe supported over Engelhard provided spent FCC catalyst shows relatively good attrition resistance (8.2 wt% fines lost), high CO conversion (81%) and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbons selectivity (18.3%).

  3. Effect of Modifying Intervention Set Size with Acquisition Rate Data among Students Identified with a Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Katherine; Burns, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    The amount of information that students can successfully learn and recall at least 1 day later is called an acquisition rate (AR) and is unique to the individual student. The current study extended previous drill rehearsal research with word recognition by (a) using students identified with a learning disability in reading, (b) assessing set sizes…

  4. The Effect of an Academic Dismissal Policy on Dropout, Graduation Rates and Student Satisfaction. Evidence from the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneyers, Eline; De Witte, Kristof

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of the introduction of an academic dismissal (AD) policy (i.e. an intervention, which can lead to compulsory student withdrawal) on student dropout, student graduation rates and satisfaction with the study program. Using a difference-in-differences type of estimator, we compare programs that introduced an AD policy…

  5. School Location, School Section and Students' Gender as Predictors to Secondary School Dropout Rate in Rivers State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to underscore the extent the variables of school location, students' gender and school section can predict the rate of drop out of secondary school students. Ex post facto design was adopted and all data on students' enrollment, retention and completion were collected from available schools' records for two cohorts of…

  6. A preliminary study on the association between ventilation rates in classrooms and student performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, R J; Haverinen-Shaughnessy, U; Nevalainen, A; Moschandreas, D

    2006-12-01

    Poor conditions leading to substandard indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms have been frequently cited in the literature over the past two decades. However, there is limited data linking poor IAQ in the classrooms to student performance. Whereas, it is assumed that poor IAQ results in reduced attendance and learning potential, and subsequent poor student performance, validating this hypothesis presents a challenge in today's school environment. This study explores the association between student performance on standardized aptitude tests that are administered to students on a yearly basis, to classroom carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, which provide a surrogate of ventilation being provided to each room. Data on classroom CO2 concentrations (over a 4-5 h time span within a typical school day) were recorded in fifth grade classrooms in 54 elementary schools within a school district in the USA. Results from this preliminary study yield a significant (P classroom-level ventilation rate and test results in math. They also indicate that non-linear effects may need to be considered for better representation of the association. A larger sample size is required in order to draw more definitive conclusions. Practical Implications Future studies could focus on (1) gathering more evidence on the possible association between classroom ventilation rates and students' academic performance; (2) the linear/non-linear nature of the association; and (3) whether it is possible to detect 'no observed adverse effect level' for adequate ventilation with respect to academic performance in schools. All of this information could be used to improve guidance and take regulatory actions to ensure adequate ventilation in schools. The high prevalence of low ventilation rates, combined with the growing evidence of the positive impact that sufficient ventilation has on human performance, suggests an opportunity for improving design and management of school facilities.

  7. Effects of autogenic training on stress response and heart rate variability in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Joo; Kim, Chunmi

    2014-12-01

    This study was undertaken to confirm the effects of autogenic training (AT) on stress response and heart rate variability in nursing school students experiencing stress related to clinical training. The study was carried out from September 2012 to April 2013 in a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group using a pretest-posttest design. The participants were 40 nursing students in their third year at either of two nursing colleges. All consented to participate. Nineteen nursing students at one college were assigned to the experimental group and underwent the 8-week AT program, and the other 21 were assigned to the control group and did not undergo any training. Stress response was assessed by questionnaire and HRV was measured three times, that is, before the program, at the end of the program, and 6 months after the end of the AT program. A significant time/group interaction was found for stress response (F = 4.68, p = .012), a subjective indicator. However, no significant interaction was found for the objective indicators of heart rate variability, normalized low frequency (F = 2.59, p = .090), normalized high frequency (F = 2.59, p = .090), or low frequency to high frequency ratio (F = 1.38, p = .257). The results suggest that AT provides an acceptable approach to stress reduction in nursing students. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Revalidating the Arabic Scale for Teachers' Ratings of Basic Education Gifted Students' Characteristics Using Rasch Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Eldin Farah Atallah Bakheit

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arabic scale for teachers' ratings of basic education gifted students' characteristics is one of the most common Arabic measures used for initial identification of gifted students in some Arabic countries. One of the shortcomings of this scale is that it is based on the classical the-ory of measurement. This study sought to reval-idate the scale in the light of Rasch modeling which rests upon the modern theory of meas-urement and to develop different criteria for in-terpreting the levels of individuals' traits. The scale was administered to 830 of Basic Educa-tion students in Khartoum (ages ranged from 7 to 12 years. Two groups of students partici-pated in the study: a calibration sample (N = 250 and a standardization sample (N = 580. The statistical treatments were performed using the PSAW 18 and RUMM 2020 programs ac-cording to Rasch's unidimentional model. Six of the scale's items were deleted for not conform-ing to Rasch Modeling. This left the scale with 31 items. Besides, new criteria for the scale were developed by obtaining the t-scores and special education scores that match the various ratings of the individuals' ability.

  9. Differences in Persistence and Graduation Rates of Hispanic Students in Texas Community Colleges: A Texas Statewide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Danielle R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this journal-ready dissertation was to examine the 1-year persistence rates of Hispanic community college students in Texas for the 2007-2008 through the 2013-2014 academic years. Specifically, the relationship of the 1-year persistence rates for Hispanic students as a function of their institutional status (i.e., stayed or…

  10. A Comparison of For-Profit and Traditional Universities' Student Persistence, Graduation Rate, and Job Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Deborah L.

    2017-01-01

    This research project is a study comparing for-profit schools and traditional universities related to student persistence, graduation rate, and job placement. The results based on a sample size of 92 students indicate that there is no significant difference between persistence, graduation rates and successful job placement at either school. There…

  11. Differences in Persistence and Graduation Rates of Black Students in Texas Community Colleges: A Multiyear, Statewide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this journal-ready dissertation was to examine the 1-year and 2-year persistence rates of Black students in Texas community colleges for the 2007-2008 through the 2014-2015 academic years. Specifically, the relationship of the 1-year and 2-year persistence rates for Black students as a function of their institutional status…

  12. Impact of problem-based, active learning on graduation rates for 10 generations of Dutch medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Henk G.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Arends, Lidia R.

    We aimed to study the effects of active-learning curricula on graduation rates of students and on the length of time needed to graduate. Graduation rates for 10 generations of students enrolling in the eight Dutch medical schools between 1989 and 1998 were analysed. In addition, time needed to

  13. Relationship between Credit Recovery Programs and Graduation Rates for At-Risk Students on the Navajo Indian Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Low graduation rates of high school students are a problem for the Native American community. One possible solution for low graduation rates is a credit recovery program that may assist Native American students to recover credit not earned in their early high school years. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a credit…

  14. Completing College: A National View of Student Attainment Rates--Fall 2010 Cohort (Signature Report No. 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Doug; Dundar, Afet; Wakhungu, Phoebe Khasiala; Yuan, Xin; Nathan, Angel; Hwang, Youngsik

    2016-01-01

    This fifth annual report on national college completion rates offers a look at the six-year outcomes for students who began postsecondary education in fall 2010, toward the end of the Great Recession. It looks at the various pathways students took toward degree completion, as well as the completion rates through May 2016 for the different student…

  15. The Study of the Application Rate of Effective Learning Technologies in Self-Regulation of KFU and VIIU Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuziakhmetov, Anvar N.; Amin, Azimi Sayed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is the study of the application rate of learning technologies in KFU and VIIU electronic courses to improve students' self-regulation. For this aim, this research was based on Kitsantas research, the rate of the use of effective learning technologies in students' self-regulation in electronic courses in these two…

  16. Revising the IDEA Student Ratings of Instruction System 2002-2011 Data. IDEA Technical Report No. 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Stephen L.; Li, Dan; Brown, Ron; Guo, Meixi; Sullivan, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the processes undertaken to revise the IDEA Student Ratings of Instruction (SRI) system. The previous revision occurred in 1999, as described in IDEA Technical Report No. 11, "Revising the IDEA System for Obtaining Student Ratings of Instructors and Courses" (Hoyt, Chen, Pallett, & Gross, 1999). The procedures…

  17. Isoniazid completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection among college students managed by a community pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Karl; Goad, Jeffery; Wu, Joanne; Johnson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The authors' objective was to document 9-month and previously recommended 6-month treatment completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in a pharmacist-managed LTBI clinic in a community pharmacy on a college campus, and to describe patient characteristics. Participants were university students diagnosed with LTBI. The authors conducted a retrospective review of pharmacy records from 2000 to 2006. Main outcome measures included 6-month and 9-month LTBI treatment completion rates, total isoniazid (INH) tablets taken, characteristics of completers versus noncompleters, average time to treatment completion, and reported adverse drug events. The 9-month completion rate was 59%, and the 6-month completion rate was 67%. Among those not completing treatment, 15.2% experienced fatigue and 2.2% experienced a rash (p=.04 and p=.03, respectively). LTBI clinics are a unique niche for community pharmacies and can provide individualized patient care to ensure LTBI treatment adherence, monitoring for disease progression, and safety of INH.

  18. Failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block among dental students and interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHindi, Maryam; Rashed, Bayan; AlOtaibi, Noura

    2016-01-01

    To report the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) among dental students and interns, causes of failure, investigate awareness of different IANB techniques, and to report IANB-associated complications.   A 3-page questionnaire containing 13 questions was distributed to a random sample of 350 third to fifth years students and interns at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on January 2011. It included demographic questions (age, gender, and academic level) and questions on IANB failure frequency and reasons, actions taken to overcome the failure, and awareness of different anesthetic techniques, supplementary techniques, and complications.   Of the 250 distributed questionnaires, 238 were returned (68% response rate). Most (85.7%) of surveyed sample had experienced IANB failure once or twice. The participants attributed the failures most commonly (66.45%) to anatomical variations. The most common alternative technique used was intraligamentary injection (57.1%), although 42.8% of the sample never attempted any alternatives. Large portion of the samples stated that they either lacked both knowledge of and training for other techniques (44.9%), or that they had knowledge of them but not enough training to perform them (45.8%).  To  decrease IANB failure rates for dental students and interns, knowledge of landmarks, anatomical variation and their training in alternatives to IANB, such as the Gow-Gates and Akinosi techniques, both theoretically and clinically in the dental curriculum should be enhanced.

  19. Failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block among dental students and interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam AlHindi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To report the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB among dental students and interns, causes of failure, investigate awareness of different IANB techniques, and to report IANB-associated complications. Methods: A 3-page questionnaire containing 13 questions was distributed to a random sample of 350 third to fifth years students and interns at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on January 2011. It included demographic questions (age, gender, and academic level and questions on IANB failure frequency and reasons, actions taken to overcome the failure, and awareness of different anesthetic techniques, supplementary techniques, and complications. Results: Of the 250 distributed questionnaires, 238 were returned (68% response rate. Most (85.7% of surveyed sample had experienced IANB failure once or twice. The participants attributed the failures most commonly (66.45% to anatomical variations. The most common alternative technique used was intraligamentary injection (57.1%, although 42.8% of the sample never attempted any alternatives. Large portion of the samples stated that they either lacked both knowledge of and training for other techniques (44.9%, or that they had knowledge of them but not enough training to perform them (45.8%. Conclusion: To decrease IANB failure rates for dental students and interns, knowledge of landmarks, anatomical variation and their training in alternatives to IANB, such as the Gow-Gates and Akinosi techniques, both theoretically and clinically in the dental curriculum should be enhanced.

  20. Self-rated Health and Internet Addiction in Iranian Medical Sciences Students; Prevalence, Risk Factors and Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Valizadeh, Farzaneh; Mirshojaee, Seyede Roqaie; Ahmadli, Robabeh; Mokhtari, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ahmadi, Ali; Rezaei, Heshmatollah; Ansari, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-rated health is a brief measure for general health. It is a comprehensive and sensitive index for prediction of health in future. Due to the high internet usage in medical students, the current study designed to evaluate the self-rated health (SRH) in relationship with internet addiction risk factors in medical students. Methods: This cross sectional study conducted on 254 students of Qom University of Medical Sciences 2014. Participants selected by two stage sampling metho...

  1. Social factors outside of family and school related to student dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanović-Ilić Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a systematisation of broader social factors affecting student dropout in Serbia from the framework of Bronfenbrenner’s approach. Although recognised by authors and commonly related to community and education as a system, these factors are rarely investigated. Starting from our previous research into dropout, focused primarily on family and school, this study is aimed at investigating community and systemic factors. The data were compiled by semi-structured interviews with respondents from the following groups (including relevant public statistical data: students who dropped out/are at risk and their parents; school principals and counsellors from schools with high and low attrition rates; teachers’, parents’ and students’ representatives from schools with high dropout rates; social workers in charge of schools with a low attrition rate; representatives of national educational institutions. The findings reveal that factors with a negative impact on children’s education dominate over supportive ones which could have a preventive effect on attrition. Negative influences exist in all social niches: in microsystems (peers prone to risky behaviour, poor neighbourhoods, in weak mesosystem connections of school and family with local institutions, in exosystems (undeveloped regions, up to the macrosystem level (legislative inefficiency, lack of cooperation within educational institutions and between governmental departments. Productive features were observed in mesosystem connections of schools as examples of good practice, as well as at macrosystem level in the form of recognising the dropout problem at the national level. Although preliminary, the obtained results provide useful guidelines for future investigations.

  2. The first year: A cultural shift towards improving student progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky Jobe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Student attrition has been a primary focus among higher education institutions for nearly 50 years, yet overall retention and graduation rates continue to be of significant concern. Despite increased attention, ongoing struggles of colleges and universities to effectively address potential barriers to student progress are well-documented.  Part of the challenge lies in garnering widespread organizational commitment that establishes student progress as an institutional priority.  Along with leadership commitment, broad institutional involvement and adherence to a systematic approach to testing new, innovative solutions are necessary to better position the institution to make clear, evidence-based decisions that improve the student experience. The purpose of this manuscript is to detail one university’s cultural shift towards establishing a clear student progress strategy (with particular focus on the first year, and the methodological approach that laid the foundation for a multi-year study of initiatives that resulted in improved student satisfaction, performance, and retention.

  3. Heart rate variability affected by radiofrequency electromagnetic field in adolescent students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misek, Jakub; Belyaev, Igor; Jakusova, Viera; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Barabas, Jan; Jakus, Jan

    2018-05-01

    This study examines the possible effect of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The effect of RF EMF on ANS activity was studied by measuring heart rate variability (HRV) during ortho-clinostatic test (i.e., transition from lying to standing and back) in 46 healthy grammar school students. A 1788 MHz pulsed wave with intensity of 54 ± 1.6 V/m was applied intermittently for 18 min in each trial. Maximum specific absorption rate (SAR 10 ) value was determined to 0.405 W/kg. We also measured the respiration rate and estimated a subjective perception of EMF exposure. RF exposure decreased heart rate of subjects in a lying position, while no such change was seen in standing students. After exposure while lying, a rise in high frequency band of HRV and root Mean Square of the Successive Differences was observed, which indicated an increase in parasympathetic nerve activity. Tympanic temperature and skin temperature were measured showing no heating under RF exposure. No RF effect on respiration rate was observed. None of the tested subjects were able to distinguish real exposure from sham exposure when queried at the end of the trial. In conclusion, short-term RF EMF exposure of students in a lying position during the ortho-clinostatic test affected ANS with significant increase in parasympathetic nerve activity compared to sham exposed group. Bioelectromagnetics. 39:277-288, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The nature and causes of attrition in the British Household Panel Study

    OpenAIRE

    Uhrig, S.C. Noah

    2008-01-01

    Panel attrition is a process producing data absent from panel records due to survey non-participation or other data unavailability. I examine the nature and causes of attrition resulting from non-contact and survey refusal in the British Household Panel Study. Focusing on non-response transitions amongst Wave 1 respondents using discrete time transition models, I locate attrition at first non-response over the first 14 waves. Physical impediments to contact, less time spent at home and high l...

  5. An Analysis of Recruit Training Attrition in the U.S. Marine Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-02-01

    Administration NR 170-819 I I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS It. ROILPORT CATS Organizational Effectiveness Research Programs February 1978 / Office of...for over 60% of the administrativo reasons for attrition. This finding underscores the importance of behavioral approaches to understanding and... controlled attrition may serve to confound individual level analyses of attrition. Although the R2 in this study is .10, this is not trivial. This

  6. Tuberculosis in foreign students in Japan, 2010–2014: a comparison with the notification rates in their countries of origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ota

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the foreign students with tuberculosis (TB registered in Japan from 2010 to 2014 and compares their TB notification rates with those in their countries of origin. The TB notification rates in foreign students were retrieved from the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Disease system in Japan. National TB notification data from 16 countries and areas were extracted from the World Health Organization’s and the official health websites of the countries and areas. There were 1128 foreign students in Japan who developed TB between 2010 and 2014; nearly half of the cases were from China (n = 530, 46.9%, and 688 (61.0% were male with a median age of 23 years. The TB notification data for foreign students were highest in students from the Philippines (675/100 000 person years, 95% confidence interval: 372–977. The notification rates in foreign students from seven countries were significantly higher than the average notification rate in their countries of origin (China, Indonesia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines and Viet Nam. The Republic of Korea and Taiwan, China had significantly lower rates in foreign students than in their countries of origin. The notification rates for foreign students in Japan may reflect a more accurate risk of developing TB among the immigrants to Japan than the TB notification rates in their countries of origin. These results may be helpful to identify the immigrants’ countries/areas of origin with the necessity of pre-entry TB screening.

  7. Heart Rate Responses of High School Students Participating in Surfing Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Michelle M; Cummins, Kevin M; Nessler, Jeff A; Newcomer, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    Despite the nation's rising epidemic of childhood obesity and diabetes, schools struggle to promote physical activities that help reduce risks for cardiovascular disease. Emerging data suggest that adopting novel activities into physical education (PE) curriculum may serve as an effective strategy for increasing physical activity in children. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize activity in the water and heart rates (HRs) of high school students participating in surf PE courses. Twenty-four male (n = 20) and female (n = 4) high school students (mean age = 16.7 ± 1.0 years) who were enrolled in surf PE courses at 2 high schools participated in this investigation. Daily measurements of surfing durations, average HR, and maximum HR were made on the students with HR monitors (PolarFT1) over an 8-week period. In addition, HR and activity in the water was evaluated during a single session in a subset of students (n = 11) using a HR monitor (PolarRCX5) and a video camera (Canon HD). Activity and HR were synchronized and evaluated in 5-second intervals during data analyses. The average duration that PE students participated in surfing during class was 61.7 ± 1.0 minutes. Stationary, paddling, wave riding, and miscellaneous activities comprised 42.7 ± 9.5, 36.7 ± 7.9, 2.9 ± 1.4, and 17.8 ± 11.4 percent of the surf session, respectively. The average and maximum HRs during these activities were 131.1 ± 0.9 and 177.2 ± 1.0 b·min, respectively. These data suggest that high school students participating in surf PE attained HRs and durations that are consistent with recommendations with cardiovascular fitness and health. In the future, PE programs should consider incorporating other action sports into their curriculum to enhance cardiovascular health.

  8. The effect of hand hygiene on illness rate among students in university residence halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Cindy; Kolble, Robin; Carlson, Rebecca; Lipson, Natasha; Dolan, Mike; Ali, Yusuf; Cline, Mojee

    2003-10-01

    Several studies have indicated a connection between hand sanitization and infection control in numerous settings such as extended care facilities, schools, and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of both a hand-hygiene message campaign and the use of an alcohol gel hand sanitizer in decreasing the incidence of upper-respiratory illness among students living in university residence halls. This study involved a total of 430 students recruited from 4 residence halls during the fall semester at the University of Colorado at the Boulder campus. Dormitories were paired into control and product groups. In the product groups, alcohol gel hand-sanitizer dispensers were installed in every room, bathroom, and dining hall. The data were statistically analyzed for the differences between product and control groups in reported symptoms, illness rates, and absenteeism from classes. The overall increase in hand-hygiene behavior and reduction in symptoms, illness rates, and absenteeism between the product group and control group was statistically significant. Reductions in upper respiratory-illness symptoms ranged from 14.8% to 39.9%. Total improvement in illness rate was 20%. The product group had 43% less missed school/work days. Hand-hygiene practices were improved with increased frequency of handwashing through increasing awareness of the importance of hand hygiene, and the use of alcohol gel hand sanitizer in university dormitories. This resulted in fewer upper respiratory-illness symptoms, lower illness rates, and lower absenteeism.

  9. Initial Entry Training: Reducing First Term Attrition Through Effective Organizational Socialization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayden, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    .... Behavioral scientist claim that attrition in organizations can be attributed to many factors such as lack of commitment to the organization, poor skill development, mismatch in employee expectations...

  10. Drop-out and admission cancel rate among the students in a selected medical college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahed, F; Latif, S A; Mahamud, M M; Nessa, A; Hossain, M A; Sultana, S Z; Hossain, M B

    2011-04-01

    A record based descriptive type of study was carried out among the under-graduate students of Mymensingh Medical College from the session 1966-67 to 2006-07. The academic years were divided into four decades and admission was followed into three categories such as retained, cancellation and drop-out. Total number of the students was 5892. Among them 3848(65.30%) were male and 2044(34.69%) were female. Out of 5892 students drop-out was 282(4.78%) and admission cancel was 304(5.15%). It was also found that drop-out in male was 232(6.02%) and in female was 50(2.44%) and admission cancel in male was 266(5.87%) and in female was 78(3.81%). The difference was found statistically significant (pcancel rate is decreasing from the very beginning to till now. It was also observed that all drop-out and admission cancellation were in first & second year students. There was no continuation of their class roll numbers in third year registration.

  11. Analysis of air temperature changes on blood pressure and heart rate and performance of undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Joseana C F; da Silva, Luiz Bueno; Coutinho, Antônio S; Rodrigues, Rafaela M

    2017-01-01

    The increase in air temperature has been associated with human deaths, some of which are related to cardiovascular dysfunctions, and with the reduction of physical and cognitive performance in humans. To analyze the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) and the cognitive performance of students who were submitted to temperature changes in classrooms. The university students answered a survey that was adapted from the Battery of Reasoning Tests over 3 consecutive days at different air temperatures while their thermal state and HR were measured. During those 3 days, BP and HR were evaluated before and after the cognitive test. The average and final HR increased at high temperatures; the tests execution time was reduced at high temperatures; and the cognitive tests was related to Mean BP at the beginning of the test, the maximum HR during the test and the air temperature. The cognitive performance of undergraduate students in the field of engineering and technology will increase while performing activities in a learning environment with an air temperature of approximately 23.3°C (according to their thermal perception), if students have an initial MBP of 93.33 mmHg and a 60 bpm HRmax.

  12. Improving completion rates of students in biomedical PhD programs: an interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viđak, Marin; Tokalić, Ružica; Marušić, Matko; Puljak, Livia; Sapunar, Damir

    2017-08-25

    Analysis of graduation success at the University of Split School of Medicine PhD programs conducted in 2011 revealed that only 11% of students who enrolled and completed their graduate coursework between 1999 and 2011 earned a doctoral degree. In this prospective cohort study we evaluated and compared three PhD programs within the same medical school, where the newest program, called Translational Research in Biomedicine (TRIBE), established in the academic year 2010/11, aimed to increase the graduation rate through an innovative approach. The intervention in the new program was related to three domains: redefined recruitment strategy, strict study regulations, and changes to the curriculum. We compared performance of PhD students between the new and existing programs and analyzed their current status, time to obtain a degree (from enrolment to doctorate), age at doctorate, number of publications on which the thesis was based and the impact factor of journals in which these were published. These improvement strategies were associated with higher thesis completion rate and reduced time to degree for students enrolled in the TRIBE program. There was no change in the impact factor or number of publications that were the basis for the doctoral theses. Our study describes good practices which proved useful in the design or reform of the PhD training program.

  13. Attrition of limestone by impact loading in fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Napoli (Italy). Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione

    2007-09-15

    The present study addresses limestone attrition and fragmentation associated with impact loading, a process which may occur extensively in various regions of fluidized bed (FB) combustors/gasifiers, primarily the jetting region of the bottom bed, the exit region of the riser, and the cyclone. An experimental protocol for the characterization of the propensity of limestone to undergo attrition/fragmentation by impact loading is reported. The application of the protocol is demonstrated with reference to an Italian limestone whose primary fragmentation and attrition by surface wear have already been characterized in previous studies. The experimental procedure is based on the characterization of the amount and particle size distribution of the debris generated upon the impact of samples of sorbent particles against a target. Experiments were carried out at a range of particle impact velocities between 10 and 45 m/s, consistent with jet velocities corresponding to typical pressure drops across FB gas distributors. The protocol has been applied to either raw or preprocessed limestone samples. In particular, the effect of calcination, sulfation, and calcination/recarbonation cycles on the impact damage suffered by sorbent particles has been assessed. The measurement of particle voidage and pore size distribution by mercury intrusion was also accomplished to correlate fragmentation with the structural properties of the sorbent samples. Fragmentation by impact loading of the limestone is significant. Lime displays the largest propensity to undergo impact damage, followed by the sorbent sulfated to exhaustion, the recarbonated sorbent, and the raw limestone. Fragmentation of the raw limestone and of the sulfated lime follows a pattern typical of the failure of brittle materials. The fragmentation behavior of lime and recarbonated lime better conforms to a disintegration failure mode, with an extensive generation of very fine fragments. 27 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab.

  14. Early nurse attrition in New Zealand and associated policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L; Clendon, J

    2018-03-01

    To examine the factors contributing to nurses choosing to exit the nursing profession before retirement age. Population growth, ageing and growing demand for health services mean increased demand for nurses. Better retention could help meet this demand, yet little work has been done in New Zealand to understand early attrition. An online survey of registered and enrolled nurses and nurse practitioners who had left nursing was used. This study reports analysis of responses from 285 ex-nurses aged under 55. The primary reasons nurses left the profession were as follows: workplace concerns; personal challenges; career factors; family reasons; lack of confidence; leaving for overseas; unwillingness to complete educational requirements; poor work-life balance; and inability to find suitable nursing work. Most nurses discussed their intentions to leave with a family member or manager and most reported gaining transferrable skills through nursing. Nurses leave for many reasons. Implementing positive practice environments and individualized approaches to retaining staff may help reduce this attrition. Generational changes in the nature of work and careers mean that nurses may continue to leave the profession sooner than anticipated by policymakers. If the nursing workforce is to be able to meet projected need, education, recruitment and retention policies must urgently address issues leading to early attrition. In particular, policies improving the wider environmental context of nursing practice and ensuring that working environments are safe and nurses are well supported must be developed and implemented. Equally, national nursing workforce planning must take into account that nursing is no longer viewed as a career for life. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Student laboratory experiments exploring optical fibre communication systems, eye diagrams, and bit error rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Douglas; Moodie, David; Mauchline, Iain; Conner, Steve; Johnstone, Walter; Culshaw, Brian

    2005-06-01

    Optical fibre communications has proved to be one of the key application areas, which created, and ultimately propelled the global growth of the photonics industry over the last twenty years. Consequently the teaching of the principles of optical fibre communications has become integral to many university courses covering photonics technology. However to reinforce the fundamental principles and key technical issues students examine in their lecture courses and to develop their experimental skills, it is critical that the students also obtain hands-on practical experience of photonics components, instruments and systems in an associated teaching laboratory. In recognition of this need OptoSci, in collaboration with university academics, commercially developed a fibre optic communications based educational package (ED-COM). This educator kit enables students to; investigate the characteristics of the individual communications system components (sources, transmitters, fibre, receiver), examine and interpret the overall system performance limitations imposed by attenuation and dispersion, conduct system design and performance analysis. To further enhance the experimental programme examined in the fibre optic communications kit, an extension module to ED-COM has recently been introduced examining one of the most significant performance parameters of digital communications systems, the bit error rate (BER). This add-on module, BER(COM), enables students to generate, evaluate and investigate signal quality trends by examining eye patterns, and explore the bit-rate limitations imposed on communication systems by noise, attenuation and dispersion. This paper will examine the educational objectives, background theory, and typical results for these educator kits, with particular emphasis on BER(COM).

  16. Combined Versus Detailed Evaluation Components in Medical Student Global Rating Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim L. Askew

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To determine if there is any correlation between any of the 10 individual components of a global rating index on an emergency medicine (EM student clerkship evaluation form. If there is correlation, to determine if a weighted average of highly correlated components loses predictive value for the final clerkship grade. Methods: This study reviewed medical student evaluations collected over two years of a required fourth-year rotation in EM. Evaluation cards, comprised of a detailed 10-part evaluation, were completed after each shift. We used a correlation matrix between evaluation category average scores, using Spearman’s rho, to determine if there was any correlation of the grades between any of the 10 items on the evaluation form. Results: A total of 233 students completed the rotation over the two-year period of the study. There were strong correlations (>0.80 between assessment components of medical knowledge, history taking, physical exam, and differential diagnosis. There were also strong correlations between assessment components of team rapport, patient rapport, and motivation. When these highly correlated were combined to produce a four-component model, linear regression demonstrated similar predictive power in terms of final clerkship grade (R2 =0.71, CI95=0.65–0.77 and R2 =0.69, CI95=0.63–0.76 for the full and reduced models respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed that several components of the evaluation card had a high degree of correlation. Combining the correlated items, a reduced model containing four items (clinical skills, interpersonal skills, procedural skills, and documentation was as predictive of the student’s clinical grade as the full 10-item evaluation. Clerkship directors should be aware of the performance of their individual global rating scales when assessing medical student performance, especially if attempting to measure greater than four components.

  17. 78 FR 5433 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the Federal Family Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the... announces the interest rates for the period July 1, 2012, through June 30, 2013, for certain loans made... give notice of FFEL Program loan interest rates to the public. DATES: This notice is effective January...

  18. 78 FR 59011 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the... Aid announces the interest rates for loans made under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct...(b)), provides formulas for determining the interest rates charged to borrowers for loans made under...

  19. Influence of User Ratings, Expert Ratings and Purposes of Information Use on the Credibility Judgments of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sook; Steffel, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study examined whether user ratings, expert ratings and the purpose of the use of a book on a user-generated site influenced the credibility of the book. It also examined whether the effects of user ratings and expert ratings on credibility judgments of the book varied according to the purpose of information use. In addition,…

  20. State Anxiety and Nonlinear Dynamics of Heart Rate Variability in Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriev, Dimitriy A; Saperova, Elena V; Dimitriev, Aleksey D

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and experimental research studies have demonstrated that the emotional experience of anxiety impairs heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. The present study investigated whether changes in state anxiety (SA) can also modulate nonlinear dynamics of heart rate. A group of 96 students volunteered to participate in the study. For each student, two 5-minute recordings of beat intervals (RR) were performed: one during a rest period and one just before a university examination, which was assumed to be a real-life stressor. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess the level of SA. Before adjusting for heart rate, a Wilcoxon matched pairs test showed significant decreases in Poincaré plot measures, entropy, largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), and pointwise correlation dimension (PD2), and an increase in the short-term fractal-like scaling exponent of detrended fluctuation analysis (α1) during the exam session, compared with the rest period. A Pearson analysis indicated significant negative correlations between the dynamics of SA and Poincaré plot axes ratio (SD1/SD2), and between changes in SA and changes in entropy measures. A strong negative correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and LLE. A significant positive correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and α1. The decreases in Poincaré plot measures (SD1, complex correlation measure), entropy measures, and LLE were still significant after adjusting for heart rate. Corrected α1 was increased during the exam session. As before, the dynamics of adjusted LLE was significantly correlated with the dynamics of SA. The qualitative increase in SA during academic examination was related to the decrease in the complexity and size of the Poincaré plot through a reduction of both the interbeat interval and its variation.

  1. Relationship between Self-Rated Health and Lifestyle and Food Habits in Japanese High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Osera

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Self-rated health (SRH, a subjective assessment of health status, is extensively used in the field of public health. It is an important and valid measure that is strongly related to morbidity, mortality, longevity and health status. Adolescence is a crucial period for the formation of health status, because health-risk behaviours (e.g., skipping breakfast are often established during this period. In this study, we investigated the relationship of SRH with lifestyle and eating habits in Japanese high school students. In this study, 1296 students aged 16–18 years from 11 high schools in Japan participated. A questionnaire was administered to these participants that included a question on SRH, five questions on demographic characteristics, six questions on lifestyle items (e.g., wake-up time, five questions on miscellaneous health issues (e.g., anorexia, and 25 questions on food habits and attitudes towards food. We examined the differences between self-rated healthy and unhealthy groups using logistic regression analysis adjusted for gender and age. A dichotomy regression analysis was performed using a stepwise elimination method. Of the 1296 respondents, 16.7% reported feeling unhealthy, 57.7% of whom were females. The self-rated healthy group had a higher frequency of eating breakfast (odds ratio (OR: 2.13; confidence interval (CI: 1.07–4.24 and liked home meals to a greater extent (OR: 3.12; CI: 1.27–7.65 than the self-rated unhealthy group. The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of other lifestyle factors or unidentified complaints. Our results suggest that liking home meals during adolescence may lead to the development of good eating habits, i.e., eating breakfast, and better SRH.

  2. State Anxiety and Nonlinear Dynamics of Heart Rate Variability in Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriy A Dimitriev

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental research studies have demonstrated that the emotional experience of anxiety impairs heart rate variability (HRV in humans. The present study investigated whether changes in state anxiety (SA can also modulate nonlinear dynamics of heart rate.A group of 96 students volunteered to participate in the study. For each student, two 5-minute recordings of beat intervals (RR were performed: one during a rest period and one just before a university examination, which was assumed to be a real-life stressor. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess the level of SA.Before adjusting for heart rate, a Wilcoxon matched pairs test showed significant decreases in Poincaré plot measures, entropy, largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE, and pointwise correlation dimension (PD2, and an increase in the short-term fractal-like scaling exponent of detrended fluctuation analysis (α1 during the exam session, compared with the rest period. A Pearson analysis indicated significant negative correlations between the dynamics of SA and Poincaré plot axes ratio (SD1/SD2, and between changes in SA and changes in entropy measures. A strong negative correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and LLE. A significant positive correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and α1. The decreases in Poincaré plot measures (SD1, complex correlation measure, entropy measures, and LLE were still significant after adjusting for heart rate. Corrected α1 was increased during the exam session. As before, the dynamics of adjusted LLE was significantly correlated with the dynamics of SA.The qualitative increase in SA during academic examination was related to the decrease in the complexity and size of the Poincaré plot through a reduction of both the interbeat interval and its variation.

  3. Relationship between Self-Rated Health and Lifestyle and Food Habits in Japanese High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osera, Tomoko; Awai, Mitsuyo; Kobayashi, Misako; Tsutie, Setsuko; Kurihara, Nobutaka

    2017-10-18

    Self-rated health (SRH), a subjective assessment of health status, is extensively used in the field of public health. It is an important and valid measure that is strongly related to morbidity, mortality, longevity and health status. Adolescence is a crucial period for the formation of health status, because health-risk behaviours (e.g., skipping breakfast) are often established during this period. In this study, we investigated the relationship of SRH with lifestyle and eating habits in Japanese high school students. In this study, 1296 students aged 16-18 years from 11 high schools in Japan participated. A questionnaire was administered to these participants that included a question on SRH, five questions on demographic characteristics, six questions on lifestyle items (e.g., wake-up time), five questions on miscellaneous health issues (e.g., anorexia), and 25 questions on food habits and attitudes towards food. We examined the differences between self-rated healthy and unhealthy groups using logistic regression analysis adjusted for gender and age. A dichotomy regression analysis was performed using a stepwise elimination method. Of the 1296 respondents, 16.7% reported feeling unhealthy, 57.7% of whom were females. The self-rated healthy group had a higher frequency of eating breakfast (odds ratio (OR): 2.13; confidence interval (CI): 1.07-4.24) and liked home meals to a greater extent (OR: 3.12; CI: 1.27-7.65) than the self-rated unhealthy group. The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of other lifestyle factors or unidentified complaints. Our results suggest that liking home meals during adolescence may lead to the development of good eating habits, i.e., eating breakfast, and better SRH.

  4. The network of corporate clients: customer attrition at commercial banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lublóy, Á.; Szenes, M.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial banks might profit from the adoption of methods widely used in network theory. A decision making process might become biased if one disregards network effects within the corporate client portfolio. This paper models the phenomenon of customer attrition by generating a weighted and directed network of corporate clients linked by financial transactions. During the numerical study of the agent-based toy model we demonstrate that multiple steady states may exist. The statistical properties of the distinct steady states show similarities. We show that most companies of the same community choose the same bank in the steady state. In contrast to the case for the steady state of the Barabási-Albert network, market shares in this model equalize by network size. When modeling customer attrition in the network of 3 × 105 corporate clients, none of the companies followed the behavior of the initial switcher in three quarters of the simulations. The number of switchers exceeded 20 in 1% of the cases. In the worst-case scenario a total of 688 companies chose a competitor bank. Significant network effects have been discovered; high correlation prevailed between the degree of the initial switcher and the severity of the avalanche effect. This suggests that the position of the corporate client in the network might be much more important than the underlying properties (industry, size, profitability, etc) of the company.

  5. From emigrant to expat : Changed perspectives on first language attrition in a digital era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, Merel

    2015-01-01

    L1 attrition is the (partial) language loss that is found in healthy individuals who stop routinely using their L1 after moving to an L2 environment. Over the years, the phenomenon has attracted much interest, from the general public who have (directly and indirectly) experienced attrition, but also

  6. "Should I Stay or Should I Go?": Unpacking Teacher Attrition/Retention as an Educational Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelchtermans, Geert

    2017-01-01

    The paper starts from the observation that teacher attrition/retention seems to be a wicked issue: it seems to have strong face validity and a commonsense meaning, but the literature doesn't provide a clear and distinctive definition. In the first section, the author analyzes the different ways in which the issue of teacher attrition and retention…

  7. Travel time and attrition from VHA care among women veterans: how far is too far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sarah A; Frayne, Susan M; Berg, Eric; Hamilton, Alison B; Washington, Donna L; Saechao, Fay; Maisel, Natalya C; Lin, Julia Y; Hoggatt, Katherine J; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2015-04-01

    Travel time, an access barrier, may contribute to attrition of women veterans from Veterans Health Administration (VHA) care. We examined whether travel time influences attrition: (a) among women veterans overall, (b) among new versus established patients, and (c) among rural versus urban patients. This retrospective cohort study used logistic regression to estimate the association between drive time and attrition, overall and for new/established and rural/urban patients. In total, 266,301 women veteran VHA outpatients in the Fiscal year 2009. An "attriter" did not return for VHA care during the second through third years after her first 2009 visit (T0). Drive time (log minutes) was between the patient's residence and her regular source of VHA care. "New" patients had no VHA visits within 3 years before T0. Models included age, service-connected disability, health status, and utilization as covariates. Overall, longer drive times were associated with higher odds of attrition: drive time adjusted odds ratio=1.11 (99% confidence interval, 1.09-1.14). The relationship between drive time and attrition was stronger among new patients but was not modified by rurality. Attrition among women veterans is sensitive to longer drive time. Linking new patients to VHA services designed to reduce distance barriers (telemedicine, community-based clinics, mobile clinics) may reduce attrition among women new to VHA.

  8. Hypertension prevalence and influence of basal metabolic rate on blood pressure among adult students in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurshad Ali

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertension is a global health issue and is currently increasing at rapid pace in South Asian countries including Bangladesh. Although, some studies on hypertension have been conducted in Bangladesh, there is a lack of scientific evidence in the adult student population that was missing from the previous and recent national cross-sectional studies. Moreover, the specific risk factors of hypertension in the Bangladeshi adults still need to be investigated. This study was conducted to estimate hypertension prevalence among adult students in Bangladesh and to test the hypothesis of Luke et al. (Hypertension 43:555–560, 2004 that basal metabolic rate (BMR and blood pressure are positively associated independent of body size. Method The data was collected on 184 adult university students (118 female and 66 male in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Anthropometric, BMR details and an average of at least two blood pressure measurements were obtained. Hypertension was defined by a systolic blood pressure (SBP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or, diastolic blood pressure (DBP ≥ 90 mmHg. Results Overall, 6.5% of participants had hypertension with significantly (p < 0.001 higher prevalence in male (12.1% than in the female (3.4% students. Age and BMI showed positive and significant correlation with hypertension among the students. When adjusted for body mass index (BMI, as well as other potentially confounding variables such as age, sex, smoking status and degree of urbanization, BMR was positively correlated with SBP and DBP (p < 0.001. Thus, higher BMR is associated with SBP and DBP; this is opposite the well documented inverse relationship between physical activity and blood pressure. If the influence of BMR on blood pressure is confirmed, the systematically elevated BMR might be an important predictor that can explain relatively high blood pressure and hypertension in humans. Conclusion This study reports the prevalence and associated risk factors

  9. Hypertension prevalence and influence of basal metabolic rate on blood pressure among adult students in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nurshad; Mahmood, Shakil; Manirujjaman, M; Perveen, Rasheda; Al Nahid, Abdullah; Ahmed, Shamim; Khanum, Farida Adib; Rahman, Mustafizur

    2017-07-25

    Hypertension is a global health issue and is currently increasing at rapid pace in South Asian countries including Bangladesh. Although, some studies on hypertension have been conducted in Bangladesh, there is a lack of scientific evidence in the adult student population that was missing from the previous and recent national cross-sectional studies. Moreover, the specific risk factors of hypertension in the Bangladeshi adults still need to be investigated. This study was conducted to estimate hypertension prevalence among adult students in Bangladesh and to test the hypothesis of Luke et al. (Hypertension 43:555-560, 2004) that basal metabolic rate (BMR) and blood pressure are positively associated independent of body size. The data was collected on 184 adult university students (118 female and 66 male) in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Anthropometric, BMR details and an average of at least two blood pressure measurements were obtained. Hypertension was defined by a systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mmHg and/or, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg. Overall, 6.5% of participants had hypertension with significantly (p < 0.001) higher prevalence in male (12.1%) than in the female (3.4%) students. Age and BMI showed positive and significant correlation with hypertension among the students. When adjusted for body mass index (BMI), as well as other potentially confounding variables such as age, sex, smoking status and degree of urbanization, BMR was positively correlated with SBP and DBP (p < 0.001). Thus, higher BMR is associated with SBP and DBP; this is opposite the well documented inverse relationship between physical activity and blood pressure. If the influence of BMR on blood pressure is confirmed, the systematically elevated BMR might be an important predictor that can explain relatively high blood pressure and hypertension in humans. This study reports the prevalence and associated risk factors of hypertension in the Bangladeshi adult students. The

  10. Impact of problem-based, active learning on graduation rates for 10 generations of Dutch medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Henk G; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Arends, Lidia R

    2009-03-01

    We aimed to study the effects of active-learning curricula on graduation rates of students and on the length of time needed to graduate. Graduation rates for 10 generations of students enrolling in the eight Dutch medical schools between 1989 and 1998 were analysed. In addition, time needed to graduate was recorded. Three of the eight schools had curricula emphasising active learning, small-group instruction and limited numbers of lectures; the other five had conventional curricula to varying degrees. Overall, the active-learning curricula graduated on average 8% more students per year, and these students graduated on average 5 months earlier than their colleagues from conventional curricula. Four hypotheses potentially explaining the effect of active learning on graduation rate and study duration were considered: (i) active-learning curricula promote the social and academic integration of students; (ii) active-learning curricula attract brighter students; (iii) active-learning curricula retain more poor students, and (iv) the active engagement of students with their study required by active-learning curricula induces better academic performance and, hence, lower dropout rates. The first three hypotheses had to be rejected. It was concluded that the better-learning hypothesis provides the most parsimonious account for the data.

  11. Students' Ways of Thinking about Two-Variable Functions and Rate of Change in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Eric David

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes an investigation of four students' ways of thinking about functions of two variables and rate of change of those two-variable functions. Most secondary, introductory algebra, pre-calculus, and first and second semester calculus courses do not require students to think about functions of more than one variable. Yet…

  12. A Study of the Significant Factors That Affect the Job Placement Rates of Students Who Have Completed a HERO Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructional Development and Evaluation Associates, Inc., Berkeley, MI.

    A three-year study examined the significant factors that affect the job placement rates of students completing a Home Economics Related Occupations (HERO) program. Other purposes of the study were to develop and pilot test a model that could be used to determine factors related to student placement in a variety of vocational education programs and…

  13. Let's go formative: continuous student ratings with Web 2.0 application Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Stefan; Burger, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    Student ratings have been a controversial but important method for the improvement of teaching quality during the past several decades. Most universities rely on summative evaluations conducted at the end of a term or course. A formative approach in which each course unit is evaluated may be beneficial for students and teachers but has rarely been applied. This is most probably due to the time constraints associated with various procedures inherent in formative evaluation (numerous evaluations, high amounts of aggregated data, high administrative investment). In order to circumvent these disadvantages, we chose the Web 2.0 Internet application Twitter as evaluation tool and tested whether it is useful for the implementation of a formative evaluation. After a first pilot and subsequent experimental study, the following conclusions were drawn: First, the formative evaluation did not come to the same results as the summative evaluation at the end of term, suggesting that formative evaluations tap into different aspects of course evaluation than summative evaluations do. Second, the results from an offline (i.e., paper-pencil) summative evaluation were identical with those from an online summative evaluation of the same course conducted a week later. Third, the formative evaluation did not influence the ratings of the summative evaluation at the end of the term. All in all, we can conclude that Twitter is a useful tool for evaluating a course formatively (i.e., on a weekly basis). Because of Twitter's simple use and the electronic handling of data, the administrative effort remains small.

  14. USE OF MARK-RATING SYSTEM IN ESTIMATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS OF PEDIATRIC DEPARTMENT DURING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gumenyuk O.I.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors demonstrate the results of using mark-rating system in estimation of professional competence of the fifth-year students of pediatric department during summer professional practice.

  15. Colleges with High Default Rates on Guaranteed Loans Given 3 Years to Cut Them or Risk Losing Student Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stacy E.; Wilson, Robin

    1987-01-01

    Colleges and universities will be held directly responsible for loan repayments by their former students. Most postsecondary institutions with default rates of more than 20% are for-profit trade schools, community colleges, or historically Black colleges. (MLW)

  16. Dropout rates in medical students at one school before and after the installation of admission tests in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibnegger, Gilbert; Caluba, Hans-Christian; Ithaler, Daniel; Manhal, Simone; Neges, Heide Maria; Smolle, Josef

    2011-08-01

    Admission to medical studies in Austria since academic year 2005-2006 has been regulated by admission tests. At the Medical University of Graz, an admission test focusing on secondary-school-level knowledge in natural sciences has been used for this purpose. The impact of this important change on dropout rates of female versus male students and older versus younger students is reported. All 2,860 students admitted to the human medicine diploma program at the Medical University of Graz from academic years 2002-2003 to 2008-2009 were included. Nonparametric and semiparametric survival analysis techniques were employed to compare cumulative probability of dropout between demographic groups. Cumulative probability of dropout was significantly reduced in students selected by active admission procedure versus those admitted openly (P students was only 0.145 (95% CI, 0.106-0.198). Among openly admitted students, but not for selected ones, the cumulative probabilities for dropout were higher for females (P students (P dropout hazard is highest during the second year of study. The introduction of admission testing significantly decreased the cumulative probability for dropout. In openly admitted students a significantly higher risk for dropout was found in female students and in older students, whereas no such effects can be detected after admission testing. Future research should focus on the sex dependence, with the aim of improving success rates among female applicants on the admission tests.

  17. A Self-Regulation-Based eHealth Intervention to Promote a Healthy Lifestyle: Investigating User and Website Characteristics Related to Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Mispel, Celien; Poppe, Louise; Crombez, Geert; Verloigne, Maïté; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2017-07-11

    eHealth interventions can reach large populations and are effective in increasing physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable intake. Nevertheless, the effects of eHealth interventions are overshadowed by high attrition rates. Examining more closely when users decide to leave the intervention can help eHealth developers to make informed decisions about which intervention components should be reshaped or simply removed. Investigating which users are more likely to quit an intervention can inform developers about whether and how their intervention should be adapted to specific subgroups of users. This study investigated the pattern of attrition in a Web-based intervention to increase PA, fruit, and vegetable intake. The first aim was to describe attrition rates according to different self-regulation components. A second aim was to investigate whether certain user characteristics are predictors for start session completion, returning to a follow-up session and intervention completion. The sample consisted of 549 adults who participated in an online intervention, based on self-regulation theory, to promote PA and fruit and vegetable intake, called "MyPlan 1.0." Using descriptive analysis, attrition was explored per self-regulation component (eg, action planning and coping planning). To identify which user characteristics predict completion, logistic regression analyses were conducted. At the end of the intervention program, there was an attrition rate of 78.2% (330/422). Attrition rates were very similar for the different self-regulation components. However, attrition levels were higher for the fulfillment of questionnaires (eg, to generate tailored feedback) than for the more interactive components. The highest amount of attrition could be observed when people were asked to make their own action plan. There were no significant predictors for first session completion. Yet, two subgroups had a lower chance to complete the intervention, namely male users (OR: 2.24, 95

  18. Australian and International Student Success Rates in Group of Eight Universities. Go8 Backgrounder 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    This Go8 Backgrounder compares the academic performance of three cohorts of students in Group of Eight (Go8) universities: Australian students, international students on campus in Australia (onshore) and international students overseas (offshore). Analysis of data supplied by Go8 universities shows that in 2007 students passed 91.8% of the courses…

  19. The effect of acquiring life skills through humor on social adjustment rate of the female students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudi, Jahangir; Sabour, Nazanin Hashemi; Yazdani, Mohsen; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2010-01-01

    Life skills have different effects on various aspects of the mental health. Social adjustment prepares adolescents for entering to the adulthood. On the other hand, humor and joking in the education is considered as a stress reducer and learning increaser. Therefore, the present study conducted aimed to determine the effect of acquiring life skills through humor on the social adjustment rate of the high school girls. This was a two-group semi-experimental study including three phases. The study population included 69 first year high school female students of Isfahan Department of Education district 3 who were selected in simple random sampling. First of all, the social adjustment rate was measured using California Personality Inventory. Thereafter, life skills education was conducted using humor during five sessions. Finally, a test was taken in order to assess the acquisition of the life skills in which passing score was required for re-completing the questionnaire. The data were analyzed using software SPSS(10) and independent and paired t-tests. The findings of the study indicated that the mean score of the social adjustment statistically had a significant difference in the intervention group before and after the intervention. Furthermore, statistically, there was a significant difference between mean score of the social adjustment in the control group and test group after conducting the intervention. The findings of the study indicated that life skills education has been increased through humor on the social adjustment rate of the high school girl students. Considering the efficacy of learning life skills on the social adjustment and results of the other studies which were in accordance with the present study, implementing such trainings with a new method comprehensively is recommended in the schools.

  20. Teachers' participation in research programs improves their students' achievement in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Samuel C; Dubner, Jay; Miller, Jon; Glied, Sherry; Loike, John D

    2009-10-16

    Research experience programs engage teachers in the hands-on practice of science. Program advocates assert that program participation enhances teachers' skills in communicating science to students. We measured the impact of New York City public high-school science teachers' participation in Columbia University's Summer Research Program on their students' academic performance in science. In the year before program entry, students of participating and nonparticipating teachers passed a New York State Regents science examination at the same rate. In years three and four after program entry, participating teachers' students passed Regents science exams at a rate that was 10.1% higher (P = 0.049) than that of nonparticipating teachers' students. Other program benefits include decreased teacher attrition from classroom teaching and school cost savings of U.S. $1.14 per $1 invested in the program.

  1. Does self-help increase rates of help seeking for student mental health problems by minimizing stigma as a barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E; Krafft, Jennifer; Levin, Crissa

    2018-01-01

    This study examined whether self-help (books, websites, mobile apps) increases help seeking for mental health problems among college students by minimizing stigma as a barrier. A survey was conducted with 200 college students reporting elevated distress from February to April 2017. Intentions to use self-help were low, but a significant portion of students unwilling to see mental health professionals intended to use self-help. Greater self-stigma related to lower intentions to seek professional help, but was unrelated to seeking self-help. Similarly, students who only used self-help in the past reported higher self-stigma than those who sought professional treatment in the past. Although stigma was not a barrier for self-help, alternate barriers were identified. Offering self-help may increase rates of students receiving help for mental health problems, possibly by offering an alternative for students unwilling to seek in-person therapy due to stigma concerns.

  2. Attrition during a randomized controlled trial of reduced nicotine content cigarettes as a proxy for understanding acceptability of nicotine product standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercincavage, Melissa; Wileyto, E Paul; Saddleson, Megan L; Lochbuehler, Kirsten; Donny, Eric C; Strasser, Andrew A

    2017-06-01

    To determine (1) if nicotine content affects study attrition-a potential behavioral measure of acceptability-in a trial that required compliance with three levels of reduced nicotine content (RNC) cigarettes, and (2) if attrition is associated with subjective and behavioral responses to RNC cigarettes. Secondary analysis of a 35-day, parallel-design, open-label, randomized controlled trial. After a 5-day baseline period, participants were randomized to smoke for three 10-day periods: their preferred brand (control group) or RNC cigarettes with three nicotine levels in a within-subject stepdown (one group: high-moderate-low) or non-stepdown (five groups: high-low-moderate, low-moderate-high, low-high-moderate, moderate-low-high, moderate-high-low) fashion. A single site in Philadelphia, PA, USA. A total of 246 non-treatment-seeking daily smokers [mean age = 39.52, cigarettes per day (CPD) = 20.95, 68.3% white] were recruited from October 2007 to June 2013. The primary outcome was attrition. Key predictors were nicotine content transition and study period. Exploratory predictors were taste and strength subjective ratings, total puff volume and carbon monoxide (CO) boost. Covariates included: age, gender, race, education and nicotine dependence. Overall attrition was 31.3% (n = 77): 24.1% of the control and 25.0% of the stepdown RNC cigarette groups dropped out versus 44.6% of non-stepdown groups (P = 0.006). Compared with controls, attrition odds were 4.5 and 4.7 times greater among smokers transitioning from preferred and the highest RNC cigarettes to the lowest RNC cigarettes, respectively (P = 0.001 and 0.003). Providing more favorable initial taste ratings of study cigarettes decreased attrition odds by 2% (P = 0.012). The majority of participants completed a 35-day trial of varying levels of reduced nicotine content cigarettes. Participant dropout was greater for cigarettes with lower nicotine content and less in smokers reporting more favorable

  3. THE USE OF ELECTRONIC JOURNALS IN SCORE RATING ACCOUNTING SYSTEM OF EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И Н Куринин

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a method of using electronic journals as a tool for efficient organization of teacher’s practical work in conditions of computerization of educational process and the widespread implementation of credit-modular system of educational process organization and grade-rating system for basic educational programs proficiency examination. A version of the electronic journal designed by the authors and realized in the program MS Excel is also presented in the article. An example of a completed “Academic Progress” page of the university educational web portal is discussed. It contains a marked electronic student grade book section and the stated conditions and criteria for grades allocation, according to a 100-point scale.

  4. Similarity of Students' Experiences and Accuracy of Faculty and Staff Perceptions: Issues for Student Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

    Research on attrition of university students has recently examined "dropping out" as the culmination of a complex interactive process. In order to examine differences between successful students (persisters) and students who officially withdrew from a major university, and to examine the accuracy of faculty and staff perceptions of students'…

  5. Comparisons of High School Graduation Rates of Students with Disabilities and Their Peers in Twelve Southern States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Theodore Scott; Manuel, Nancy; Stokes, Billy R.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared differences in diploma and graduation dropout rates among students with and without disabilities, analyzed differences in various graduation-types by disabilities, and offered recommendations to improve graduation rates through evidence-based practices. The geographic catchment area of this study was limited to twelve Southern…

  6. Are Final Comments in Web Survey Panels Associated with Next-Wave Attrition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia McLauchlan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Near the end of a web survey respondents are often asked whether they have further comments. Such final comments are usually ignored, in part because open-ended questions are challenging to analyse. We explored whether final comments are associated with next-wave attrition in survey panels. We categorized a random sample of final comments in the Longitudinal Studies for the Social Sciences (LISS panel and Dutch Immigrant panel into one of eight categories (neutral, positive, six subcategories of negative and regressed the indicator of next-wave attrition on comment length, comment category and socio-demographic variables. In the Immigrant panel we found shorter final comments (55 words with decreased next-wave attrition relative to making no comment. Comments about unclear survey questions quadruple the odds of attrition and “other” (uncategorized negative comments almost double the odds of attrition. In the LISS panel, making a comment (vs. not and comment length are not associated with attrition. However, when specifying individual comment categories, neutral comments are associated with half the odds of attrition relative to not making a comment.

  7. Migration as a form of workforce attrition: a nine-country study of pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuliji, Tana; Carter, Sarah; Bates, Ian

    2009-04-09

    There is a lack of evidence to inform policy development on the reasons why health professionals migrate. Few studies have sought to empirically determine factors influencing the intention to migrate and none have explored the relationship between factors. This paper reports on the first international attempt to investigate the migration intentions of pharmacy students and identify migration factors and their relationships. Responses were gathered from 791 final-year pharmacy students from nine countries: Australia, Bangladesh, Croatia, Egypt, Portugal, Nepal, Singapore, Slovenia and Zimbabwe. Data were analysed by means of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and two-step cluster analysis to determine the relationships between factors influencing migration and the characteristics of subpopulations most likely and least likely to migrate. Results showed a significant difference in attitudes towards the professional and sociopolitical environment of the home country and perceptions of opportunities abroad between those who have no intention of migrating and those who intend to migrate on a long-term basis. Attitudes of students planning short-term migration were not significantly different from those of students who did not intend to migrate. These attitudes, together with gender, knowledge of other migrant pharmacists and past experiences abroad, are associated with an increased propensity for migration. Given the influence of the country context and environment on migration intentions, research and policy should frame the issue of migration in the context of the wider human resource agenda, thus viewing migration as one form of attrition and a symptom of other root causes. Remuneration is not an independent stand-alone factor influencing migration intentions and cannot be decoupled from professional development factors. Comprehensive human resource policy development that takes into account the issues of both remuneration and professional development are necessary

  8. Teacher Rated School Ethos and Student Reported Bullying-A Multilevel Study of Upper Secondary Schools in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modin, Bitte; Låftman, Sara B; Östberg, Viveca

    2017-12-13

    School ethos refers to the school leadership's purposive efforts to shape and direct the attitudes, values and behaviors needed in order to promote an active learning environment and to prevent the emergence of undesirable behaviors by creating shared meaning and common goals for the school. The aim of this study was to examine how teacher rated aspects of school ethos are linked with manifestations of bullying among 11th grade students. Five teacher-rated sub-dimensions of school ethos (staff stability, teacher morale, structure-order, student focus, and academic atmosphere) were examined in relation to student-reported perpetration of and exposure to traditional school bullying and cyberbullying. The data material combines student and teacher information from two separate data collections performed in 2016, comprising teachers and students in 58 upper secondary schools in Stockholm. Analyses showed that bullying was associated with all but one of the five sub-dimensions of school ethos, namely structure and order for dealing with bullying behaviors at the school. Results are discussed in light of this counter-intuitive finding. Our findings nevertheless lend support to the idea that the social organization of schools, as reflected in their teacher-rated ethos, can affect individual students' attitudes in a way that prevents the emergence of bullying behavior among students.

  9. Alcohol policy enforcement and changes in student drinking rates in a statewide public college system: a follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Sion K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heavy alcohol use among U.S. college students is a major contributor to young adult morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to examine whether college alcohol policy enforcement levels predict changes in student drinking and related behaviors in a state system of public colleges and universities, following a system-wide change to a stricter policy. Methods Students and administrators at 11 Massachusetts public colleges/universities completed surveys in 1999 (N of students = 1252, one year after the policy change, and again in 2001 (N = 1074. We calculated policy enforcement scores for each school based on the reports of deans of students, campus security chiefs, and students, and examined the correlations between perceived enforcement levels and the change in student drinking rates over the subsequent two year period, after weighting the 2001 data to adjust for demographic changes in the student body. Results Overall rates of any past-30-days drinking, heavy episodic drinking, and usual heavy drinking among past-30-days drinkers were all lower in 2001 compared to 1999. School-level analyses (N = 11 found deans' baseline reports of stricter enforcement were strongly correlated with subsequent declines in heavy episodic drinking (Pearson's r = -0.73, p = 0.011. Moreover, consistently high enforcement levels across time, as reported by deans, were associated with greater declines in heavy episodic drinking. Such relationships were not found for students' and security chiefs' reports of enforcement. Marijuana use did not rise during this period of decline in heavy drinking. Conclusions Study findings suggest that stronger enforcement of a stricter alcohol policy may be associated with reductions in student heavy drinking rates over time. An aggressive enforcement stance by deans may be an important element of an effective college alcohol policy.

  10. The Relationships among Teachers' Perceptions of Student Behaviour, Teachers' Characteristics, and Ratings of Students' Emotional and Behavioural Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljequist, Laura; Renk, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among teachers' perceptions of students' behavioural problems and their own efficacy and psychological symptoms. Findings suggested that teachers were more bothered by externalising (i.e., acting out) than internalising (i.e., withdrawal, depression) behavioural problems in their students, and believed that…

  11. Data mining of Students Withdrawal at University of Tehran, Focusing on Fee Paid Students (to prevent customer churn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Ali Akbar Ahmadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Student withdrawal in higher education is one the important challenges in universities. This paper considers the admission of fee paid students as a business and their withdrawals as customer churn. The aim is to investigate the attrition and predicted risk of attrition to adapt interventionist polices deterrent. This study is a descriptive an applicable technique that uses quantitative and qualitative data. It uses Crisp technology of data mining. The data are derived from educational system of University of Tehran including 21420 fee paid students accepted at 2010 to 2014. The main goal is to analyze the behavior that is at risk of attrition and withdrawal. After data analyze and construction of predictive modeling, the probability table of attrition and regression model will be presented. The final results show that the first and second semester (especially the age range 24-31 of M.Sc students are the most likely risk of withdrawal of happening.

  12. Comparison of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning and the rate of contact among students from nine different healthcare courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Vítor Falcão; Bittencourt, Mariana Fonseca; Navarro Pinto, Ícaro França; Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas Granero; da Silva Ezequiel, Oscarina; Lucchetti, Giancarlo

    2018-04-01

    Despite the growth in the interprofessional literature, there are still few studies that have evaluated the differences among courses and periods in relation to Readiness for Interprofessional Learning. Likewise, the relationship between the influences of contact among students from different professions is still controversial. To evaluate whether greater contact among students from diverse health courses could be associated with improved Readiness for Interprofessional Learning (RIPLS) at the undergraduate level and to compare the RIPLS among healthcare courses, analyzing differences among courses and periods of their academic training. Cross-sectional study. A Brazilian public university. Students enrolled in the first and final periods of nine healthcare courses. The rates of contact between students and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning were assessed. A comparison between students from these nine healthcare courses was carried out. A total of 545 (73.45%) students answered the questionnaire. The highest RIPLS scores were from Nursing (42.39), Dentistry (41.33) and Pharmacy students (40.72) and the lowest scores were from Physical Education (38.02), Medicine (38.17) and Psychology (38.66) students. The highest rates of contact between students (RC) were from Physical Education, Nutrition and Psychology students and the lowest RC were from Pharmacy, Social service and Dentistry. There was a significant effect of "healthcare course" on RIPLS. Comparing RIPLS and RC between the first and final years we found that, considering all courses, there was an increase in the RC, whereas a decrease in RIPLS scores. No correlation was found between RIPLS and RC in general. The current study found that RIPLS scores are very different between healthcare students. Although we found a significant increase in the RC, there was a decrease in the RIPLS scores. These findings lead to a greater understanding of the difficulties facing and potential for interprofessional

  13. RateMyProfessors.com versus formal in-class student evaluations of teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Coladarci

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Using data for 426 instructors at the University of Maine, we examined the relationship between RateMyProfessors.com (RMP indices and formal in-class student evaluations of teaching (SET. The two primary RMP indices correlate substantively and significantly with their respective SET items: RMP overall quality correlates r = .68 with SET item, Overall, how would you rate the instructor?; and RMP ease correlates r = .44 with SET item, How did the work load for this course compare to that of others of equal credit? Further, RMP overall quality and RMP ease each correlates with its corresponding SET factor derived from a principal components analysis of all 29 SET items: r = .57 and .51, respectively. While these RMP/SET correlations should give pause to those who are inclined to dismiss RMP indices as meaningless, the amount of variance left unexplained in SET criteria limits the utility of RMP. The ultimate implication of our results, we believe, is that higher education institutions should make their SET data publicly available online.

  14. Teaching with Spiritual Impact: An Analysis of Student Comments Regarding High- and Low-Rated Spiritually Inspiring Religion Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, John, III; Sweat, Anthony; Griffin, Tyler; Griffiths, Casey Paul

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 2,621 written student comments to better understand themes which most contribute to religion classes being rated high or low in terms of the spiritual benefit students received from the class. From 2,448 religion classes taught from September of 2010 through April of 2014, comments from the top 61 (2.5 percent) and bottom 51 (2.1…

  15. Teacher Rated School Ethos and Student Reported Bullying—A Multilevel Study of Upper Secondary Schools in Stockholm, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modin, Bitte; Låftman, Sara B.; Östberg, Viveca

    2017-01-01

    School ethos refers to the school leadership’s purposive efforts to shape and direct the attitudes, values and behaviors needed in order to promote an active learning environment and to prevent the emergence of undesirable behaviors by creating shared meaning and common goals for the school. The aim of this study was to examine how teacher rated aspects of school ethos are linked with manifestations of bullying among 11th grade students. Five teacher-rated sub-dimensions of school ethos (staff stability, teacher morale, structure-order, student focus, and academic atmosphere) were examined in relation to student-reported perpetration of and exposure to traditional school bullying and cyberbullying. The data material combines student and teacher information from two separate data collections performed in 2016, comprising teachers and students in 58 upper secondary schools in Stockholm. Analyses showed that bullying was associated with all but one of the five sub-dimensions of school ethos, namely structure and order for dealing with bullying behaviors at the school. Results are discussed in light of this counter-intuitive finding. Our findings nevertheless lend support to the idea that the social organization of schools, as reflected in their teacher-rated ethos, can affect individual students’ attitudes in a way that prevents the emergence of bullying behavior among students. PMID:29236039

  16. Students' motivational processes and their relationship to teacher ratings in school physical education: a self-determination theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standage, Martyn; Duda, Joan L; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2006-03-01

    In the present study, we used a model of motivation grounded in self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 1991; Ryan & Deci, 2000a, 2000b, 2002) to examine the relationship between physical education (PE) students' motivational processes and ratings of their effort and persistence as provided by their PE teacher. Data were obtained from 394 British secondary school students (204 boys, 189 girls, 1 gender not specified; M age = 11.97 years; SD = .89; range = 11-14 years) who responded to a multisection inventory (tapping autonomy-support, autonomy, competence, relatedness, and self-determined motivation). The students' respective PE teachers subsequently provided ratings reflecting the effort and persistence each student exhibited in their PE classes. The hypothesized relationships among the study variables were examined via structural equation modeling analysis using latent factors. Results of maximum likelihood analysis using the bootstrapping method revealed the proposed model demonstrated a good fit to the data, chi-squared (292) = 632.68, p self-determination. Student-reported levels of self-determined motivation positively predicted teacher ratings of effort and persistence in PE. The findings are discussed with regard to enhancing student motivation in PE settings.

  17. Examining parents' ratings of middle-school students' academic self-regulation using principal axis factoring analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peggy P; Cleary, Timothy J; Lui, Angela M

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of a parent rating scale, the Self-Regulation Strategy Inventory: Parent Rating Scale (SRSI-PRS), using a sample of 451 parents of sixth- and seventh-grade middle-school students. Principal axis factoring (PAF) analysis revealed a 3-factor structure for the 23-item SRSI-PRS: (a) Managing Behavior and Learning (α = .92), (b) Maladaptive Regulatory Behaviors (α = .76), and (c) Managing Environment (α = .84). The majority of the observed relations between these 3 subscales, and the SRSI-SR, student motivation beliefs, and student mathematics grades were statistically significant and in the small to medium range. After controlling for various student variables and motivation indices of parental involvement, 2 SRSI-PRS factors (Managing Behavior and Learning, Maladaptive Regulatory Behaviors) reliably predicted students' achievement in their mathematics course. This study provides initial support for the validity and reliability of the SRSI-PRS and underscores the advantages of obtaining parental ratings of students' SRL behaviors. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Teacher Rated School Ethos and Student Reported Bullying—A Multilevel Study of Upper Secondary Schools in Stockholm, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitte Modin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available School ethos refers to the school leadership’s purposive efforts to shape and direct the attitudes, values and behaviors needed in order to promote an active learning environment and to prevent the emergence of undesirable behaviors by creating shared meaning and common goals for the school. The aim of this study was to examine how teacher rated aspects of school ethos are linked with manifestations of bullying among 11th grade students. Five teacher-rated sub-dimensions of school ethos (staff stability, teacher morale, structure-order, student focus, and academic atmosphere were examined in relation to student-reported perpetration of and exposure to traditional school bullying and cyberbullying. The data material combines student and teacher information from two separate data collections performed in 2016, comprising teachers and students in 58 upper secondary schools in Stockholm. Analyses showed that bullying was associated with all but one of the five sub-dimensions of school ethos, namely structure and order for dealing with bullying behaviors at the school. Results are discussed in light of this counter-intuitive finding. Our findings nevertheless lend support to the idea that the social organization of schools, as reflected in their teacher-rated ethos, can affect individual students’ attitudes in a way that prevents the emergence of bullying behavior among students.

  19. The Aftermath of Remedial Math: Investigating the Low Rate of Certificate Completion among Remedial Math Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Peter Riley

    2013-01-01

    Nationally, a majority of community college students require remedial assistance with mathematics, but comparatively few students who begin the remedial math sequence ultimately complete it and achieve college-level math competency. The academic outcomes of students who begin the sequence but do not complete it are disproportionately unfavorable:…

  20. Expected Rate of Return on the Personal Investment in Education of No-Fee Preservice Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    Return on personal investment is an important factor affecting the decision to invest in education. This article analyzes the personal education costs of no-fee preservice students, estimates and forecasts the return on their personal education investment, and compares the costs and benefits of for-fee preservice students and nonteaching students.…

  1. Evaluating clinical teachers with the Maastricht clinical teaching questionnaire : How much 'teacher' is in student ratings?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, Tobias B. B.; Mainhard, Tim; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; Van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, A. D. (Debbie) C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Students are a popular source of data to evaluate the performance of clinical teachers. Instruments to obtain student evaluations must have proven validity. One aspect of validity that often remains underexposed is the possibility of effects of between-student differences and teacher and

  2. Do Structured Study Programmes Lead to Lower Rates of Dropout and Student Transfer from University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovdhaugen, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    One of the main intentions of the comprehensive higher education reform in Norway in 2003 was to improve student performance and completion. One way of doing this is to reduce the number of students leaving an institution. Institutions have limited options for reducing student departure, and one of the few routes open to them is changing the…

  3. Options to Change Interest Rates and Other Terms on Student Loans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congressional Budget Office, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Federal Direct Student Loan Program offers loans to students and their parents to help pay for postsecondary education. Under current law, about $1.4 trillion in new direct loans will be made to students between 2013 and 2023, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projects. Analysts and policymakers have raised concerns about various features…

  4. Australian Universities' Strategic Goals of Student Exchange and Participation Rates in Outbound Exchange Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Amanda; Barker, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    International student exchange programmes are acknowledged as one aspect of a broader suite of internationalisation strategies aimed at enhancing students' intercultural understanding and competence. The decision to participate in an exchange programme is dependent on both individual and contextual factors such as student exchange policies and…

  5. In China, students in crowded dormitories with a low ventilation rate have more common colds: evidence for airborne transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuexia Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test whether the incidence of common colds among college students in China is associated with ventilation rates and crowdedness in dormitories. METHODS: In Phase I of the study, a cross-sectional study, 3712 students living in 1569 dorm rooms in 13 buildings responded to a questionnaire about incidence and duration of common colds in the previous 12 months. In Phase II, air temperature, relative humidity and CO(2 concentration were measured for 24 hours in 238 dorm rooms in 13 buildings, during both summer and winter. Out-to indoor air flow rates at night were calculated based on measured CO(2 concentrations. RESULTS: In Phase I, 10% of college students reported an incidence of more than 6 common colds in the previous 12 months, and 15% reported that each infection usually lasted for more than 2 weeks. Students in 6-person dorm rooms were about 2 times as likely to have an incidence of common colds ≥6 times per year and a duration ≥2 weeks, compared to students in 3-person rooms. In Phase II, 90% of the measured dorm rooms had an out-to indoor air flow rate less than the Chinese standard of 8.3 L/s per person during the heating season. There was a dose-response relationship between out-to indoor air flow rate per person in dorm rooms and the proportion of occupants with annual common cold infections ≥6 times. A mean ventilation rate of 5 L/(s•person in dorm buildings was associated with 5% of self reported common cold ≥6 times, compared to 35% at 1 L/(s•person. CONCLUSION: Crowded dormitories with low out-to indoor airflow rates are associated with more respiratory infections among college students.

  6. Health worker attrition at a rural district hospital in Rwanda: a need ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health worker attrition at a rural district hospital in Rwanda: a need for improved placement and retention strategies. Jackline Odhiambo, Felix Cyamatare Rwabukwisi, Christian Rusangwa, Vincent Rusanganwa, Lisa Ruth Hirschhorn, Evrard Nahimana, Patient Ngamije, Bethany Lynn Hedt-Gauthier ...

  7. Initial Entry Training: Reducing First Term Attrition Through Effective Organizational Socialization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayden, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines Initial Entry Training (IET) from an organizational behavior perspective to identify if the Army's socialization experience can be enhanced to have a positive impact on first term attrition within the Army...

  8. The relationship between beginning teachers' stress causes, stress responses, teaching behaviour and attrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, Ruth; Lorenz, Michelle; Maulana, Ridwan; van Veen, Klaas

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the relationships between beginning teachers’ perceived stress causes, stress responses, observed teaching behaviour and attrition is investigated employing structural equation modelling (SEM). A total of 143 BTs were surveyed using the Questionnaire on the Experience and Evaluation

  9. Risk Attitudes, Sample Selection and Attrition in a Longitudinal Field Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    with respect to risk attitudes. Our design builds in explicit randomization on the incentives for participation. We show that there are significant sample selection effects on inferences about the extent of risk aversion, but that the effects of subsequent sample attrition are minimal. Ignoring sample...... selection leads to inferences that subjects in the population are more risk averse than they actually are. Correcting for sample selection and attrition affects utility curvature, but does not affect inferences about probability weighting. Properly accounting for sample selection and attrition effects leads...... to findings of temporal stability in overall risk aversion. However, that stability is around different levels of risk aversion than one might naively infer without the controls for sample selection and attrition we are able to implement. This evidence of “randomization bias” from sample selection...

  10. A Longitudinal Examination of First Term Attrition and Reenlistment among FY1999 Enlisted Accessions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strickland, William J

    2005-01-01

    .... This effort allowed the evaluation of models of attrition and reenlistment intentions based on information contained in personnel records and collected from Soldiers who were surveyed as they entered...

  11. Analysis of Recruit Attrition from the Navy's Delayed Entry Program and Recruit Training Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neuhalfen, Jon K

    2007-01-01

    .... The analysis uses the PRIDE database, provided by Commander, Navy Recruiting Command. Trend analyses are used to identify significant changes in enlistment and attrition behavior for recruits who joined from fiscal years 1998 through 2005...

  12. Using social media as a strategy to address 'sophomore slump' in second year nursing students: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Marion; Blacklock, Eddie; Watson, Bernadette; Heffernan, Catherine; Tronoff, Glenyss

    2015-11-01

    An important contributing factor to the shortfall in the nursing workforce is the high attrition rate of students from nursing programmes. Recently, researchers have begun to examine the 'sophomore slump' phenomenon, related to students' sense of low self-efficacy associated with learning in their second year of study, that may be related to attrition. Academic success is heavily influenced by self-efficacy, or a student's belief in their ability to be successful. Strategies that enhance self-efficacy include peer learning, which increases students' engagement and reinforces self-regulated learning. Social networking sites such as Facebook provide students the opportunity to take part in peer learning and may promote students' self-efficacy. The aim of the study was to develop a Facebook forum that utilised peer learning, to build self-efficacy related to learning, of students commencing into the second year of a three year nursing programme. Students commencing into year two of a Bachelor of Nursing programme were invited to join a Facebook forum to support their study. One hundred and ninety-eight students accepted the invitation. Data was collected over a twelve-week period. Text from the Facebook forum was downloaded and analysed thematically. Analysis suggests that Facebook forums may be a useful peer learning strategy to build students' self-efficacy related to study in the second year of nursing study. Students shared mastery experiences, provided modelling experiences, and used verbal persuasion to reframe problems which suggested that it helped build students' self-efficacy, and alleviated some of the physiological response associated with stress. The findings suggest that social media platforms are important tools by which students can engage in peer learning to build self-efficacy around their nursing studies. This may in part help address the 'sophomore slump' phenomenon, enhance students' learning experiences more widely, and impact on students

  13. The impact of attrition on the representativeness of cohort studies of older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brilleman Samuel L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are well-established risk factors, such as lower education, for attrition of study participants. Consequently, the representativeness of the cohort in a longitudinal study may deteriorate over time. Death is a common form of attrition in cohort studies of older people. The aim of this paper is to examine the effects of death and other forms of attrition on risk factor prevalence in the study cohort and the target population over time. Methods Differential associations between a risk factor and death and non-death attrition are considered under various hypothetical conditions. Empirical data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH for participants born in 1921-26 are used to identify associations which occur in practice, and national cross-sectional data from Australian Censuses and National Health Surveys are used to illustrate the evolution of bias over approximately ten years. Results The hypothetical situations illustrate how death and other attrition can theoretically affect changes in bias over time. Between 1996 and 2008, 28.4% of ALSWH participants died, 16.5% withdrew and 10.4% were lost to follow up. There were differential associations with various risk factors, for example, non-English speaking country of birth was associated with non-death attrition but not death whereas being underweight (body mass index Conclusions Deaths occur in both the target population and study cohort, while other forms of attrition occur only in the study cohort. Therefore non-death attrition may cause greater bias than death in longitudinal studies. However although more than a quarter of the oldest participants in the ALSWH died in the 12 years following recruitment, differences from the national population changed only slightly.

  14. How fair are we? Italian students rate the ethics of geoscientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva, Elena; Musacchio, Gemma; Piangiamore, Giovanna; Solarino, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The social perception of scientific world is sometimes biased by false or inexact information, and dissemination might even be driven by an on-purpose discredit. A few case studies that led the public believe that business or even conspiracy were motivating incomplete information from the scientists about recent catastrophes, will be discussed. In most cases a significant role was played by the limitations of knowledge on the matter, or an underestimated scientific uncertainty, the backwardness to design a future scenario in lack of complete scientific evidences or simply the misunderstanding and mistakes in the flow of information through the filter of the media and press. Public awareness on how ethics affect geoscientists in conducting their activities is then a major issue. In this study we analyze results from a questionnaire compiled by young Italian students (15-18 years) that rates their trust in scientists, the reliability of scientific communication and ethics in the world of Geoscience. Areas exposed to various level of geohazards are taken into account. Results are discussed in the light of geoscientist's role played in society, by providing information and support decision-making.

  15. Disability profile/clinician-rated: validity for Brazilian university students with social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro de Morais Abumusse, Luciene; Osório, Flávia L; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2013-01-01

    Functional impairment scales are important to assess Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) patients. The present study aims to evaluate the reliability, internal consistency, validity and factorial structure of the Disability Profile/Clinician-Rate (DP) scale, as well as to present an interview-guide to support its application by clinicians. University students (n = 173) of both genders participated in the study (SAD = 84 and Non-SAD = 89), with ages ranging between 17 and 35 years, systematically diagnosed. The SAD group presented more difficulties when compared to the Non-SAD group. The DP presented, for the SAD group, internal consistency of 0.68 (lifetime) and 0.67 (last two weeks). Inter-rater reliability varied from 0.75 to 0.93. Two factors were extracted and the correlation among such factors and the Social Phobia Inventory subscales presented association between fear and avoidance symptoms and the functional impairments. The scale presents good psychometric properties and can contribute to the assessment of functional impairments.

  16. Flotability Improvement of Ilmenite Using Attrition-Scrubbing as a Pretreatment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihua Zhai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flotation technology of the recovery and utilization of ilmenite from tailings of iron beneficiated in Panzhihua was investigated based on mineralogical study. The results of mineralogical study show that the main occurrence of the valuable mineral are liberated grains of ilmenite. Experimental results of flotation conditions show that attrition-scrubbing raw ores exhibit good flotability with higher recoveries and a slight decrease in grade compared to ores without attrition-scrubbing. Further, open-circuit experiments also prove the superiority of attrition-scrubbing raw ores. The results of closed-circuit experiments show that qualified ilmenite concentrate can be obtained and the yield, grade, and recovery are 22.26%, 47.06%, and 60.73%, respectively. Theoretical study and analysis show that there are two contributions to superior flotability for attrition-scrubbing samples. The first is that the attrition-scrubbing samples can uncover more ferrous ions on the newly-produced fresh ilmenite surface, resulting in the increase in active sites. The other is that in the process of attrition-scrubbing, the transformation of ferrous ions to ferric ions can be promoted.

  17. Selective attrition and intraindividual variability in response time moderate cognitive change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Christie; Stawski, Robert S; Hultsch, David F; MacDonald, Stuart W S

    2016-01-01

    Selection of a developmental time metric is useful for understanding causal processes that underlie aging-related cognitive change and for the identification of potential moderators of cognitive decline. Building on research suggesting that time to attrition is a metric sensitive to non-normative influences of aging (e.g., subclinical health conditions), we examined reason for attrition and intraindividual variability (IIV) in reaction time as predictors of cognitive performance. Three hundred and four community dwelling older adults (64-92 years) completed annual assessments in a longitudinal study. IIV was calculated from baseline performance on reaction time tasks. Multilevel models were fit to examine patterns and predictors of cognitive change. We show that time to attrition was associated with cognitive decline. Greater IIV was associated with declines on executive functioning and episodic memory measures. Attrition due to personal health reasons was also associated with decreased executive functioning compared to that of individuals who remained in the study. These findings suggest that time to attrition is a useful metric for representing cognitive change, and reason for attrition and IIV are predictive of non-normative influences that may underlie instances of cognitive loss in older adults.

  18. Weight Loss Expectations and Attrition in Treatment-Seeking Obese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The analysis of the relation between weight loss goals and attrition in the treatment of obesity has produced conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of weight loss goals on attrition in a cohort of obese women seeking treatment at 8 Italian medical centres. Methods: 634 women with obesity, consecutively enrolled in weight loss programmes, were included in the study. Weight loss goals were evaluated with the Goals and Relative Weights Questionnaire (GRWQ, reporting a sequence of unrealistic (‘dream' and ‘happy' and more realistic (‘acceptable' and ‘disappointing' weight loss goals. Attrition was assessed at 12 months on the basis of patients' medical records. Results: At 12 months, 205/634 patients (32.3% had interrupted their programme and were lost to follow-up. After adjustment for age, baseline weight, education and employment status, attrition was significantly associated with higher percent acceptable and disappointing weight loss targets, not with dream and happy weight loss. Conclusion: In ‘real world' clinical settings, only realistic expectations might favour attrition whenever too challenging, whereas unrealistic weight loss goals have no effect. Future studies should assess the effect of interventions aimed at coping with too challenging weight goals on attrition.

  19. Identifying Students Struggling in Courses by Analyzing Exam Grades, Self-reported Measures and Study Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bianca Clavio; Bemman, Brian; Knoche, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    . In this paper, we present a set of instrument`s designed to identify at-risk undergraduate students in a Problem-based Learning (PBL) university, using an introductory programming course between two campus locations as a case study. Collectively, these instruments form the basis of a proposed learning ecosystem...... in the prediction model. Results of a multiple linear regression model found several significant assessment predictors related to how often students attempted self-guided course assignments and their self-reported programming experience, among others.......Technical educations often experience poor student performance and consequently high rates of attrition. Providing students with early feedback on their learning progress can assist students in self-study activities or in their decision-making process regarding a change in educational direction...

  20. A Qualitative Evaluation of Engagement and Attrition in a Nurse Home Visiting Program: From the Participant and Provider Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Lana O; Ridings, Leigh E; Smith, Tyler J; Shields, Jennifer D; Silovsky, Jane F; Beasley, William; Bard, David

    2018-05-01

    Beginning parenting programs in the prenatal and early postnatal periods have a large potential for impact on later child and maternal outcomes. Home-based parenting programs, such as the Nurse Family Partnership (NFP), have been established to help address this need. Program reach and impact is dependent on successful engagement of expecting mothers with significant risks; however, NFP attrition rates remain high. The current study qualitatively examined engagement and attrition from the perspectives of NFP nurses and mothers in order to identify mechanisms that enhance service engagement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in focus groups composed of either engaged (27 total mothers) or unengaged (15 total mothers) mothers from the NFP program. NFP nurses (25 total nurses) were recruited for individual semi-structured interviews. Results suggest that understanding engagement in the NFP program requires addressing both initial and sustained engagement. Themes associated with enhanced initial engagement include nurse characteristics (e.g., flexible, supportive, caring) and establishment of a solid nurse-family relationship founded on these characteristics. Factors impacting sustained engagement include nurse characteristics, provision of educational materials on child development, individualized services for families, and available family support. Identified barriers to completing services include competing demands and lack of support. Findings of this study have direct relevance for workforce planning, including hiring and training through integrating results regarding effective nurse characteristics. Additional program supports to enhance parent engagement may be implemented across home-based parenting programs in light of the current study's findings.

  1. Does Coordinated, Multidisciplinary Treatment Limit Medical Disability and Attrition Related to Spine Conditions in the US Navy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke, Gregg; Campello, Marco; Hiebert, Rudi; Weiner, Shira Schecter; Rennix, Chris; Nordin, Margareta

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions account for the largest proportion of cases resulting in early separation from the US Navy. This study evaluates the impact of the Spine Team, a multidisciplinary care group that included physicians, physical therapists, and a clinical psychologist, for the treatment of active-duty service members with work-disabling, nonspecific low back pain at the Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, VA, USA. We compared the impact of the introduction of the Spine Team in limiting disability and attrition from work-disabling spine conditions with the experience of the Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA, USA, where there is no comparable spine team. Is a multidisciplinary spine team effective in limiting disability and attrition related to work-disabling spine conditions as compared with the current standard of care for US military active-duty service members? This is a retrospective, pre-/post-study with a separate, concurrent control group using administratively collected data from two large military medical centers during the period 2007 to 2009. In this study, disability is expressed as the proportion of active-duty service members seeking treatment for a work-disabling spine condition that results in the assignment of a first-career limited-duty status. Attrition is expressed as the proportion of individuals assigned a first-career limited-duty status for a work-disabling spine condition who were referred to a Physical Evaluation Board. We analyzed 667 individuals assigned a first-career limited-duty for a work-disabling spine condition between 2007 and 2009 who received care at the Naval Medical Center Portsmouth or Naval Medical Center San Diego. Rates of first-career limited-duty assignments for spine conditions decreased from 2007 to 2009 at both sites, but limited-duty rates decreased to a greater extent at the intervention site (Naval Medical Center Portsmouth; from 8.5 per 100 spine cases in 2007 to 5.1 per 100 cases in 2009, p Team was

  2. Predicting Educational Success and Attrition in Problem-Based Learning: Do First Impressions Count?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnia, Lisette; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Derous, Eva; Koendjie, Nitaasha S.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether tutors (N?=?15) in a problem-based learning curriculum were able to predict students' success in their first year and their entire bachelor programme. Tutors were asked to rate each student in their tutorial group in terms of the chance that this student would successfully finish their first year and the entire…

  3. Mining Educational Data Using Classification to Decrease Dropout Rate of Students

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Saurabh

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, number of Higher Education Institutions (HEI) grows rapidly in India. Since most of the institutions are opened in private mode therefore, a cut throat competition rises among these institutions while attracting the student to got admission. This is the reason for institutions to focus on the strength of students not on the quality of education. This paper presents a data mining application to generate predictive models for engineering student's dropout management. Gi...

  4. Tit-For-Tat Strategy for Increasing Medical Student Evaluation Response Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G. Malone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducation It is essential for faculty to receive feedback on their teaching for the purpose of improvement as well as promotion. It can be challenging to motivate students to provide feedback to preceptors and fill out evaluation forms when not a clerkship requirement. Furthermore, there is concern that making the evaluations a requirement can compromise the quality of the feedback. The objective of this study was to identify an increase in the number of faculty and resident evaluations completed by students rotating through their Emergency Medicine clerkship following the implementation of a tit-for-tat incentive strategy. Method Prior to the implementation of Tit-for-Tat, students rotating through their emergency medicine clerkship were asked to fill out evaluations of residents and faculty members with whom they worked. These were encouraged but voluntary. Beginning in the 2014–2015 academic year, a tit-for-tat strategy was employed whereby students had to complete a resident or faculty evaluation in order to view the student assessment completed by that resident or faculty preceptor. Results Students submitted 1101 evaluations in the control, with a mean of 3.60 evaluations completed per student and 3.77 evaluations received per preceptor. Following the implementation of tit-for-tat, students submitted 2736 evaluations, with a mean of 8.19 evaluations completed per student and 7.52 evaluations received per preceptor. Both the increase in evaluations completed per student and evaluations received per preceptor were statistically significant with p-value <0.001. Conclusion The tit-for-tat strategy significantly increased the number of evaluations submitted by students rotating through their emergency medicine clerkship. This has served as an effective tool to increase the overall number of evaluations completed, the number of evaluations each instructor received on average and the proportion of students that completed evaluations

  5. A Study of the Relationship between Gender, Salary, and Student Ratings of Instruction at a Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magel, Rhonda C.; Doetkott, Curt; Cao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Salary studies in the United States and some other countries show a gap between male and female faculty salaries in higher education that widens over time. The present study examines one possible explanation, particularly at research universities, by examining changes in faculty salaries in relation to student ratings of instruction. Student…

  6. The Influence of New Product Characteristics on Rate of Adoption: Increasing Student Comprehension with the "Bidding for Buyers" Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Schee, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    The five characteristics that influence new product rate of adoption are routinely covered in the Principles of Marketing course. Any particular marketing concept such as relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, divisibility, and communicability may not capture interest or engagement among students who take the course as a graduation…

  7. Understanding the Effect of Response Rate and Class Size Interaction on Students Evaluation of Teaching in a Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; AlQuraan, Mahmoud; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the interaction between response rate and class size and its effects on students' evaluation of instructors and the courses offered at a higher education Institution in Saudi Arabia. Study Design: A retrospective study design was chosen. Methods: One thousand four hundred and forty four different courses…

  8. Self-rated Health and Internet Addiction in Iranian Medical Sciences Students; Prevalence, Risk Factors and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Valizadeh, Farzaneh; Mirshojaee, Seyede Roqaie; Ahmadli, Robabeh; Mokhtari, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ahmadi, Ali; Rezaei, Heshmatollah; Ansari, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Self-rated health is a brief measure for general health. It is a comprehensive and sensitive index for prediction of health in future. Due to the high internet usage in medical students, the current study designed to evaluate the self-rated health (SRH) in relationship with internet addiction risk factors in medical students. This cross sectional study conducted on 254 students of Qom University of Medical Sciences 2014. Participants selected by two stage sampling method including stratified and simple random sampling. The Young's questionnaire of internet addiction and SRH question used for data collection. Chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression used in data analysis. More than 79.9% of students reported their general health good and very good. The student's mean score of general health was higher than the average. In addition, the prevalence of internet addiction was 28.7%. An inverse significant correlation observed between SRH and internet addiction score (r=-0.198, p=0.002). Using internet for Entertainment, using private Email and chat rooms were the most important predictors of affecting to internet addiction. Moreover, internet addiction is the most predictors of SRH and increased the odds of bad SRH. The good SRH of medical students was higher than general population but in health faculty' students were lower than others. Due to the effect of internet addiction on SRH and increasing trend of internet use in medical students, as well as low age of participants, attention to psychological aspects and the job expectancy in future, can effective on increasing the good SRH.

  9. Proximity of food retailers to schools and rates of overweight ninth grade students: an ecological study in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulfrost Brian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of obesity and overweight in youth has increased dramatically since the 1980s, and some researchers hypothesize that increased consumption of low-nutrient, energy-dense foods is a key contributor. The potential importance of food retailers near schools has received increasing attention, but public health research and policy has focused primarily on fast food restaurants. Less is known about the relationship between overweight/obesity and other types of retailers. This study aims to investigate the potential associations between nearby 1 fast food restaurants, 2 convenience stores, and 3 supermarkets, and rates of overweight students in California schools. Methods We examined the rate of overweight ninth grade students in public schools in 2007 using linear regression. The percentage of overweight students per school was determined by a state required physical fitness test, with three different options for measuring individual body composition. Our key independent variables were the presence of three different types of retailers within 800 m network buffers of the schools. Additional independent variables included school ethnic, gender and socioeconomic composition, as well as urban/non-urban location. We obtained the data from the California Department of Education and ESRI, Inc. Results The presence of a convenience store within a 10-minute walking distance of a school was associated with a higher rate of overweight students than schools without nearby convenience stores, after controlling for all school-level variables in the regression (1.2%, 95% confidence interval 0.03, 2.36. Nearby fast food restaurants and supermarkets, however, were not associated with school rates of overweight students. Conclusions Public health researchers and policy-makers interested in the food environments outside schools should expand their recent focus on nearby fast food restaurants to include convenience stores, which may also

  10. Effects of Intradistrict School Mobility and High Student Turnover Rates on Early Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBoeuf, Whitney A.; Fantuzzo, John W.

    2018-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the relations between concurrent, cumulative, and contextual intradistrict school mobility and early reading achievement. Longitudinal administrative school records were used for an entire cohort of students in a large urban district from first through third grade. Findings indicated that students with a…

  11. Comparing Ratings: In-Class (Paper) vs. out of Class (Online) Student Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Ronald R.; Opengart, Rose A.

    2012-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching (SET) are used by institutions of higher learning in the tenure and promotion process and in awarding merit pay increases. The trend at some institutions has been towards using an online student assessment instrument (SAI) in lieu of the traditional paper-based, in-class assessment. This study examines the…

  12. Making Every Diploma Count: Using Extended-Year Graduation Rates to Measure Student Success. Updated

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Youth Policy Forum, 2012

    2012-01-01

    States and districts are under increasing pressure to ensure all students complete high school in four years; however, many students who fall off-track on the way to graduation take longer than the traditional four years to earn a high school diploma or its equivalent. Unfortunately, those schools and districts serving overage, under-credit…

  13. Every Student Succeeds Act High School Graduation Rate: Non-Regulatory Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Student graduation from high school with a regular high school diploma is an important indicator of school success and one of the most significant indicators of student college and career readiness. In addition, there are substantial economic benefits to high school completion. For example, according to the U.S. Department of Education's National…

  14. High School Graduation Rates across English Learner Student Subgroups in Arizona. REL 2017-205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Haas, Eric; Zhu, Niufeng; Tran, Loan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have documented differences in academic achievement between current and former English learner students. These differences validate calls for more focused analyses of achievement across English learner student subgroups. Specifically, there is interest in examining variation in academic success based on the amount of time a student…

  15. Language Ability of Students with Emotional Disturbance: Discrepancies between Teacher Ratings and Direct Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jason C.; Hollo, Alexandra

    2018-01-01

    Language impairment often goes unidentified in students with behavioral disorders, perhaps in part because different forms of problem behavior deflect adult attention from more subtle language deficits. Therefore, attention to teachers' perception of students' language and behavioral performance is merited. The present study examines agreement…

  16. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  17. Comparing Computer Game and Traditional Lecture Using Experience Ratings from High and Low Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, Michael; Green, Richard; Nilsen, Trond; Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Computer games are purported to be effective instructional tools that enhance motivation and improve engagement. The aim of this study was to investigate how tertiary student experiences change when instruction was computer game based compared to lecture based, and whether experiences differed between high and low achieving students. Participants…

  18. Federal Student Loan Interest Rates: History, Subsidies, and Cost. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Occupy Wall Street protests brought countless media reports about unemployed college graduates struggling to repay their student loans and headlines sounding alarms that outstanding student loan debt will soon reach $1 trillion. Even though evidence is mixed on whether today's college graduates leave school with significantly more debt…

  19. Students' Ratings of Teacher Support and Academic and Social-Emotional Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Jaclyn E.; Demaray, Michelle K.; Malecki, Christine K.; Terry, Melissa N.; Clary, Michael; Elzinga, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Data on students' perceptions of teacher social support, academic functioning, and social-emotional functioning were collected from a sample of 796 7th and 8th grade middle school students using the Child and Adolescent Social Support Scale (CASSS; Malecki, Demaray, & Elliott, 2000), Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) and school records, and…

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunizations among Asian American College Students: Infection, Exposure, and Immunity Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Watanabe, Paul; Halon, Patricia; Shi, Ling; Church, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, exposure, and immunity among Asian American college students as a basis for evaluating HBV screening and vaccination policy. Participants and Methods: Self-identified Asian American college students aged 18 years or older were examined. Serological tests of HBV surface…

  1. A Faceted Taxonomy for Rating Student Bibliographies in an Online Information Literacy Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Chris; Markey, Karen; Yakel, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study measured the quality of student bibliographies through creation of a faceted taxonomy flexible and fine-grained enough to encompass the variety of online sources cited by today's students. The taxonomy was developed via interviews with faculty, iterative refinement of categories and scoring, and testing on example student…

  2. What Do K-12 Teachers Think about Including Student Surveys in Their Performance Ratings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretzke, Beverly J.; Sheldon, Timothy D.; Lim, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated K-12 teachers' opinions about the use of student surveys as a component of a teacher evaluation system. Surveys were administered to teachers at the beginning of the school year and again in the spring. Analyses of teachers' responses on the fall survey indicated tentative support for the inclusion of student feedback in…

  3. Will they lead by example? Assessment of vaccination rates and attitudes to human papilloma virus in millennial medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Nelia M; Kavanagh, Maurice J; Swanberg, Stephanie M; Schulte, Jeanne M; Wunderlich, Tracy; Lucia, Victoria C

    2017-01-06

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. It is also well established that HPV viruses are responsible for a variety of cancers. Little is known about the prevailing knowledge and attitudes toward the HPV vaccine in our future healthcare providers, a majority of whom were among the first in the target age group to receive the vaccine; the same vaccine that they will in turn be expected to recommend to their patients. The aims of this pilot study were to examine the HPV vaccination rate among medical students and determine their knowledge about HPV and attitudes toward vaccination. To aid in the development of an HPV educational intervention, a needs assessment survey was administered to discover medical students' knowledge and attitudes toward the HPV vaccine. All medical students at a Midwestern US medical school were invited to complete the survey. Two hundred fourteen of 390 medical students completed the survey with 44% having been previously vaccinated. Although 82% of all respondents believed they would recommend the vaccine to family and friends, only 40% felt knowledgeable about the vaccine and 40% felt comfortable counseling patients. More positive attitudes and better knowledge scores were found in fully vaccinated students compared to non-vaccinated students. Provider recommendation was strongly associated with HPV vaccination status. This study revealed the unique perspectives of U.S. millennial medical students as the first group of future healthcare providers to have personally encountered the HPV vaccine. Overall, students' knowledge as well as their comfort level in counseling patients was lacking. This assessment has guided the development of targeted educational interventions to address knowledge gaps and prepare students to appropriately discuss the vaccine with patients and parents and help protect young people from life threatening cancers.

  4. Assessing Communication Skills of Medical Students in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE)--A Systematic Review of Rating Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Musa; Zill, Jördis Maria; Christalle, Eva; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and assessment of communication skills have become essential in medical education. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been found as an appropriate means to assess communication skills within medical education. Studies have demonstrated the importance of a valid assessment of medical students' communication skills. Yet, the validity of the performance scores depends fundamentally on the quality of the rating scales used in an OSCE. Thus, this systematic review aimed at providing an overview of existing rating scales, describing their underlying definition of communication skills, determining the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified rating scales. We conducted a systematic review to identify psychometrically tested rating scales, which have been applied in OSCE settings to assess communication skills of medical students. Our search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed), reference tracking and consultation of experts. We included studies that reported psychometric properties of communication skills assessment rating scales used in OSCEs by examiners only. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated using the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Data of twelve studies reporting on eight rating scales on communication skills assessment in OSCEs were included. Five of eight rating scales were explicitly developed based on a specific definition of communication skills. The methodological quality of studies was mainly poor. The psychometric quality of the eight rating scales was mainly intermediate. Our results reveal that future psychometric evaluation studies focusing on improving the methodological quality are needed in order to yield psychometrically

  5. Internet addiction detection rate among college students in the People's Republic of China: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yao-Jun; Zheng, Tong; Wang, Yan-Qiu; Liu, Ling; Chen, Yan; Yao, Ying-Shui

    2018-01-01

    With the development of economy and technology, the Internet is becoming more and more popular. Internet addiction has gradually become a serious issue in public health worldwide. The number of Internet users in China has reached 731 million, with an estimated 24 million adolescents determined as having Internet addiction. In this meta-analysis, we attempted to estimate the prevalence of Internet addiction among College Students in the People's Republic of China in order to improve the mental health level of college students and provide evidence for the prevention of Internet addiction. Eligible articles about the prevalence of Internet addiction among college students in China published between 2006 and 2017 were retrieved from online Chinese periodicals, the full-text databases of Wan Fang, VIP, and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, as well as PubMed. Stata 11.0 was used to perform the analyses. A total of 26 papers were included in the analyses. The overall sample size was 38,245, with 4573 diagnosed with Internet addiction. The pooled detection rate of Internet addiction was 11% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9-13%) among college students in China. The detection rate was higher in male students (16%) than female students (8%). The Internet addiction detection rate was 11% (95% CI 8-14%) in southern areas, 11% (95% CI 7-14%) in northern areas, 13% (95% CI 8-18%) in eastern areas and 9% (95% CI 8-11%) in the mid-western areas. According to different scales, the Internet addiction detection rate was 11% (95% CI 8-15%) using the Young scale and 9% (95% CI 6-11%) using the Chen scale respectively. Cumulative meta analysis showed that the detection rate had a slight upward trend and gradually stabilized in the last 3 years. The pooled Internet addiction detection rate of Chinese college students in out study was 11%, which is higher than in some other countries and strongly demonstrates a worrisome situation. Effective measures should be taken to prevent

  6. The impact of a College of Nursing Retention Program on the graduation rates of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatem, E; Payne, J L

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the impact of a College of Nursing's (CON) Retention Program on students enrolled in a baccalaureate degree nursing program. Within the last ten years, undergraduate nurses increasingly have utilized the CON retention program. These students traditionally face a number of barriers to their academic endeavors. This study was designed to assess the effect of the CON program on the barriers to academic success of students who entered the CON in the Fall classes of 1991, 1992 and 1993. The sample size was 320 students. The control group consisted of 137 students who received no intervention and the experimental group was comprised of 183 students who attended intervention sessions with the Retention Coordinator in the CON. It was hypothesized that the most successful students during this period (1991-1993) were the most frequent attendees of the CON retention program intervention sessions. The alternative hypothesis was that those persons who did not attend the sessions, but were still highly persistent and successful, were enrollees who had entered with high entrance credentials as demonstrated by the transfer grade point averages (GPA). The results of this study indicated the need, use and value of this systematic approach to retention.

  7. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intercultural Development Research Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This infographic shows how Texas public schools are losing one out of four students. The statistics show that schools are twice as likely to lose Hispanic students and Black students before they graduate, and universal high school education is at least a quarter of a century away. The flyer also provides information on getting informed, getting…

  8. Forms of Attrition in a Longitudinal Study of Religion and Health in Older Adults and Implications for Sample Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R David; Krause, Neal

    2016-02-01

    The use of longitudinal designs in the field of religion and health makes it important to understand how attrition bias may affect findings in this area. This study examines attrition in a 4-wave, 8-year study of older adults. Attrition resulted in a sample biased toward more educated and more religiously involved individuals. Conditional linear growth curve models found that trajectories of change for some variables differed among attrition categories. Ineligibles had worsening depression, declining control, and declining attendance. Mortality was associated with worsening religious coping styles. Refusers experienced worsening depression. Nevertheless, there was no evidence of bias in the key religion and health results.

  9. Predicting Attrition, Performance, Reenlistment, and Hospitalizations from the Smoking History of Women Prior to Entering the Navy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Conway, Terry L

    2006-01-01

    This study of women sailors examined whether tobacco use prior to entering the Navy predicted subsequent career outcomes related to length of service, early attrition, misconduct, and hospitalizations...

  10. 34 CFR 668.48 - Report on completion or graduation rates for student-athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Institutional and Financial Assistance Information for Students § 668.48 Report on completion or graduation... Management and Budget under control number 1845-0004) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1092) [60 FR 61788, Dec. 1, 1995...

  11. Fostering students' experimentation skills - developmental time and offspring rates of flour beetles

    OpenAIRE

    Asshoff, R.; Roth, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Tribolium castanaeum is a widespread insect in temperate regions. Because of its short generation time and easy handling, it serves as a model organism for various scientific questions. However, T. castanaeum, or its larger-sized relative Tenebrio molitor, can also he used at a school or college level to foster students' experimentation skills. We present a set of inquiry tasks that build stepwise on one another, using T. castanaeum or T. molitor as the model. The students will learn not only...

  12. Prevalence Rate of Using ٍEcstasy among Medical Sciences Students in Urmia University in 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Miri Ghaffarzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The present study aims to achieve a comprehensive depiction of ecstasy consumption among the students of Urmia University of medical sciences in 2007.Materials & Methods: Totally 950 students were surveyed in this cross-sectional descriptive study. A census was used as a sampling method. A self-report questionnaire regarding demographic details and ecstasy consumption was completed by students. Data was stored in a database and then was analyzed through descriptive tests by SPSS software. Chi square test was used to determine the correlation coefficient.Results: There were 798 subjects of all target population who had never used this drug. However, 132 subjects (18 regularly, 56 occasionally for fun and 58 at least once consumed ecstasy pills. Thus the point prevalence of ecstasy consumption among the students was 14.19 percent. There were 232 subjects who had never heard of the term “ecstasy". Instead, the knowledge source of the rest about ecstasy was books (116 subject, internet (56 subjects, mass media (489 subjects, friends (28 subjects, and family (2 subjects. A significant relation was observed between ecstasy consumption and other variables (parents' education, residence in student campus, attending parties, smoking, canabis and opium consumption. Conclusion: Results of this study revealed that the point prevalence of ecstasy pills consumption among university students was 14.19% that raises the need for purposive intervention and the necessity of planning to prevent and decrease this phenomenon.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:67-72

  13. Success rate of 10th semester dental students of Tehran University of Medical students in infra alveolar nerve block injection technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseinitodashki H.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Inducing anesthesia is one of the important tasks in dentistry. Among various techniques for injection, the Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block (IANB technique is one of the most practical and prevalent methods. However, according to some proofs in reference books, the success rate for this technique is some how low. Therefore the success rate of IANB performed by 10th-semester undergraduare students from Faculty of Dentistry of Tehran University of Medical Sciences was assessed in this study. "nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study from patients referring to oral and maxillofacial surgery ward, 20 patients with predefined conditions were selected. For each of them, two IANB injections were done in two separated days; one by a student and the other by an attend (or resident of maxillofacial surgery ward. Success or failure of each injection was examined by Pin Prick test. In this study, the non-parametric Willcoxon test was used. "nResults: In this study, the success rate of IANB was 70% and 90%, respectively for students and attends (or resident. "nConclusion: Significant statistically difference was seen between the two groups, we hope that through further practical education, this differences rsduce in following similar studies.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2001-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H 2 ) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H 2 /CO ratios. However, a serious problem with use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Recently, fundamental understanding of physical attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried Fe-based catalyst having aps of 70 mm with high attrition resistance. This Fe-based attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H 2 /CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C 5 + selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of <5%. However, further development of the catalyst is needed to address the chemical attrition due to phase changes that any Fe-catalyst goes through potentially causing internal stresses within the particle and resulting in weakening, spalling or cracking. The objective of this research is to develop robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry bubble column reactor. Specifically we aim to develop to: (i) improve the performance and preparation procedure of the high activity, high attrition resistant, high alpha iron

  15. Attitudes and factors contributing to attrition in Canadian surgical specialty residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Simon; Ginther, David Nathan; Neuls, Evan; Hayes, Paul

    2017-08-01

    We recently studied attrition in Canadian general surgical programs; however, there are no data on whether residents enrolled in other surgical residencies harbour the same intents as their general surgical peers. We sought to determine how many residents in surgical disciplines in Canada consider leaving their programs and why. An anonymous survey was administered to all residents in 9 surgical disciplines in Canada. Significance of association was determined using the Pearson χ2 test. The Canadian Post-MD Education Registry (CAPER) website was used to calculate the response rate. We received 523 responses (27.6% response rate). Of these respondents, 140 (26.8%) were either "somewhat" or "seriously" considering leaving their program. Residents wanting to pursue additional fellowship training and those aspiring to an academic career were significantly less likely to be considering changing specialties ( p = 0.003 and p = 0.005, respectively). Poor work-life balance and fear of unemployment/underemployment were the top reasons why residents would change specialty (55.5% and 40.8%, respectively), although the reasons cited were not significantly different between those considering changing and those who were not ( p = 0.64). Residents who were considering changing programs were significantly less likely to enjoy their work and more likely to cite having already invested too much time to change as a reason for continuing ( p work-life balance and limited employment prospects. Efforts to educate prospective residents about the reality of the surgical lifestyle and to optimize employment prospects may improve completion rates.

  16. Bounding the effects of social experiments: accounting for attrition in administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogger, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Social experiments frequently exploit data from administrative records. However, most administrative data systems are designed to track earnings or benefit payments among residents within a single state. When an experimental participant moves across state lines, his entries in the data system of his state of origin consist entirely of zeros. Such attrition may bias the estimated effect of the experiment. To estimate the attrition arising from interstate mobility and provide bounds on the effect of the experiment. Attrition is estimated from runs of zeros at the end of the sample period. Bounds are constructed from these estimates. These estimates can be refined by imposing a stationarity assumption. The width of the estimated bounds depends importantly on the nature of the data being analyzed. Negatively correlated outcomes provide tighter bounds than positively correlated outcomes. Attrition can introduce considerable ambiguity into the estimated effects of experimental programs. To reduce ambiguity, one should collect as much data as possible. Even data on outcomes of no direct interest to the objectives of the experiment may be valuable for reducing the ambiguity that arises due to attrition.

  17. The Impact of a Modified Repeated-Reading Strategy Paired with Optical Character Recognition on the Reading Rates of Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattillo, Suzan Trefry; Heller, Kathryn Wolf; Smith, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    The repeated-reading strategy and optical character recognition were paired to demonstrate a functional relationship between the combined strategies and two factors: the reading rates of students with visual impairments and the students' self-perceptions, or attitudes, toward reading. The results indicated that all five students increased their…

  18. Problems and Strategies Regarding Reducing America's Migrant Student Dropout Rate. Congressional Testimony Delivered in Response to a Request from the National Commission on Migrant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helge, Doris

    Studies conducted by the National Rural Development Institute (NRDI) indicate that migrant students have a higher school dropout rate than non-migrant students. In addition, rural migrant students experience higher levels of family dysfunction and abuse, teen pregnancy, emotional difficulties such as depression or low self-esteem, poverty,…

  19. Determination of rate of customer focus in educational programs at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences(1) based on students' viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Assadollah; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hosein; Abbarik, Hadi Hayati

    2012-01-01

    Today, the challenges of quality improvement and customer focus as well as systems development are important and inevitable matters in higher education institutes. There are some highly competitive challenges among educational institutes, including accountability to social needs, increasing costs of education, diversity in educational methods and centers and their consequent increasing competition, and the need for adaptation of new information and knowledge to focus on students as the main customers. Hence, the purpose of this study was to determine the rate of costumer focus based on Isfahan University of Medical Sciences students' viewpoints and to suggest solutions to improve this rate. This was a cross-sectional study carried out in 2011. The statistical population included all the students of seven faculties of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. According to statistical formulae, the sample size consisted of 384 subjects. Data collection tools included researcher-made questionnaire whose reliability was found to be 87% by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Finally, using the SPSS statistical software and statistical methods of independent t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Likert scale based data were analyzed. The mean of overall score for customer focus (student-centered) of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences was 46.54. Finally, there was a relation between the mean of overall score for customer focus and gender, educational levels, and students' faculties. Researcher suggest more investigation between Medical University and others. It is a difference between medical sciences universities and others regarding the customer focus area, since students' gender must be considered as an effective factor in giving healthcare services quality. In order to improve the customer focus, it is essential to take facilities, field of study, faculties, and syllabus into consideration.

  20. Factors associated with self-rated health status in university students: a cross-sectional study in three European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudziak Urszula

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-rated health status (SRHS is a reliable and valid measure for assessing the subjective and objective health of individuals. Previous studies have either focused predominantly on the elderly or investigated only a narrow range of factors potentially associated with SRHS. In examining student populations, these past studies were limited to single countries. The objectives of this study were to assess which candidate variables were independently associated with SRHS in university students, to compare these variables by country and by gender, and to investigate which of the variables was most important as a rating frame for SRHS. Methods The data is from the Cross-National Student Health Survey, conducted in 2005 in universities in Germany, Bulgaria, and Poland (n = 2103; mean age = 20.7 years. SRHS was assessed with a single question using a five-point scale ranging from "excellent" to "poor". The study also measured a wide range of variables including: physical and psychological health, studying, social contacts/social support, and socio-demographic status. Results Psychosomatic complaints (considered an aspect of physical health and, adjusted for psychological health were the most important indicators in forming a rating frame for students' SRHS. There were few differences in the effects of variables associated with SRHS by gender (well-being: a measure of psychological health and the variables associated with SRHS by country (well-being and self-efficacy. The remaining variables showed homogenous effects for both genders and for all three countries. Conclusion The results suggest that SRHS can be reasonably used to compare students' health across countries. SRHS is affected by different physical, psychological and psychosomatic aspects of health; however, its strongest association is with psychosomatic complaints.

  1. Halo Effects in Employer Ratings of Career Education Students and Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, David C.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the problems involved when employers are asked to rate graduates of vocational programs. Suggests that school systems adopt their own "forced-choice" scale to improve rating procedures. (HMV)

  2. Factors affecting graduation and student dropout rates at the University of KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Murray

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to introduce into the literature a competing risks methodology that can be used to help identify some student-specific and/or institutional factors which may be influencing the type of outcome experienced by a student when they leave the university system. Focusing on the length of time that it takes students to graduate or drop out from their studies, this new methodology was applied to a database comprising all students enrolled for a degree at the University of KwaZulu-Natal between the years 2004 and 2012. Financial aid and residence-based accommodation were found to help students who will eventually graduate to do so quicker in terms of the number of credit points that they have to repeat. These same factors, however, also cause someone who will eventually be excluded on academic grounds to linger longer in the system. By focusing on the number of extra credit points that it takes to reach a particular exit point, this paper introduces into the literature a new measure whose use will help to overcome some of the more obvious problems that can occur when one uses calendar time to measure the length of time that it takes to reach a particular exit point.

  3. Personality Disorder in Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Attrition and Change During Long-term Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gift, Thomas E; Reimherr, Frederick W; Marchant, Barrie K; Steans, Tammy A; Wender, Paul H

    2016-05-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) are commonly found in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and are associated with increased ADHD symptoms and psychosocial impairment. To assess the impact of PDs or personality traits on retention rates in ADHD trials and whether treating ADHD affects the expression of PD, data were analyzed from 2 methylphenidate trials. Assessment of PDs and personality traits included using the Wisconsin Personality Disorders Inventory IV and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Personality Disorders. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms were evaluated using the Wender-Reimherr Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Scale. Major findings were that subjects with cluster A, cluster B, passive-aggressive, or more than 1 PD showed more attrition. Subjects dropping out also had more schizoid and narcissistic traits. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms (p Disorders Inventory IV items that improved most, 8 resembled ADHD or oppositional defiant disorder symptoms.

  4. [Study on the detection rate and risk factors regarding non-suicidal self-injurious behavior in middle school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Zhu, Cui-zhen; Situ, Ming-jing; DU, Na; Huang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    To understand the prevalence and risk factors of non-suicidal self-injury in middle school students. 1312 middle school students of Pengzhou and Santai were selected to fill in a Risky Behavior Questionnaire for Adolescence (RBQ-A), Family Environment Scale (FES), Center for Epidemiological Survey, Depression Scale (CES-D), Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Check List (ASLEC), Social Support Scale for Adolescents (SSSA) and self-administered questionnaire. In all the research subjects, 1288 were qualified for the study in April 2011 before the risk factors for non-suicidal self-injury were identified by logistic regression. In 1288 middle school students, 22.67% had a history of non-suicidal self-injury, with 22.70% in boys and 22.64% in girls. 63.36% of students had injured themselves through variously ways, more seen in boys (26.88%) than in girls (11.36%) who cut or burnt themselves. The scores of ASLEC and CES-D in non-suicidal self-injury group appeared higher than that in the control group and the score of SSSA was found higher in the control group. The main risk factors for non-suicidal self-injuries were family conflict, depressive emotion, negative life events and receiving less social support. The prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury among middle school students in Pengzhou was high, which called for more attention.

  5. Will they lead by example? Assessment of vaccination rates and attitudes to human papilloma virus in millennial medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelia M. Afonso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. It is also well established that HPV viruses are responsible for a variety of cancers. Little is known about the prevailing knowledge and attitudes toward the HPV vaccine in our future healthcare providers, a majority of whom were among the first in the target age group to receive the vaccine; the same vaccine that they will in turn be expected to recommend to their patients. The aims of this pilot study were to examine the HPV vaccination rate among medical students and determine their knowledge about HPV and attitudes toward vaccination. Methods To aid in the development of an HPV educational intervention, a needs assessment survey was administered to discover medical students’ knowledge and attitudes toward the HPV vaccine. All medical students at a Midwestern US medical school were invited to complete the survey. Results Two hundred fourteen of 390 medical students completed the survey with 44% having been previously vaccinated. Although 82% of all respondents believed they would recommend the vaccine to family and friends, only 40% felt knowledgeable about the vaccine and 40% felt comfortable counseling patients. More positive attitudes and better knowledge scores were found in fully vaccinated students compared to non-vaccinated students. Provider recommendation was strongly associated with HPV vaccination status. Conclusions This study revealed the unique perspectives of U.S. millennial medical students as the first group of future healthcare providers to have personally encountered the HPV vaccine. Overall, students’ knowledge as well as their comfort level in counseling patients was lacking. This assessment has guided the development of targeted educational interventions to address knowledge gaps and prepare students to appropriately discuss the vaccine with patients and parents and help protect young people from

  6. ON ONE OF THE APPROACHES TO ENHANCING THE MOTIVATION OF STUDENTS TO EDUCATIONAL AND EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES THROUGH THE RATING SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Soghoyan S. S.; Dyachenko R. A.; Belchenko I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The problems of increasing the motivation of students of organizations of secondary vocational education and higher education to educational and training activities is due to the use of score-rating approach to recording achievements. The article examines factors that have a negative impact on training and outside training activities, such as TV entertainment, online games, social networks. We consider the activities that have a positive impact on the educational and training activities outsi...

  7. [Motivation effect on EEG spectral power and heart rate parameters in students during examination stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhebrailova, T D; Korobeĭnikova, I I; Rudneva, L P

    2014-09-01

    EEG spectral power was calculated in 24 students (18-21 years) with different levels of motivation and anxiety (tested by Spielberger) in two experimental conditions: during the common educational process and the examination stress. Before examination tests, in subjects with high motivation and anxiety level the relative delta activity power increased in right frontal (F4) brain areas. In students with medium motivation immediately before an examination the relative beta2-activity power increased in right frontal (F4) brain areas. It is suggested that delta oscillati- ons reflect activity of the defensive motivational system, whereas beta2 oscillations may be associated with the achievement motivation.

  8. Exploring Differences in Industry Supervisors' Ratings of Student Performance on WIL Placements and the Relative Importance of Skills: Does Remuneration Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Lisa; Caldicott, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Assessment in work integrated learning (WIL) programs typically involves workplace supervisors rating student performance against criteria based on employability skills. Yet investigations of differences in employer ratings that may impact on student outcomes are rare. This paper reports on a pilot study that examined supervisor evaluations of the…

  9. Reading Achievement and In-Grade Retention Rate Differentials for Mexican-American and Black Students in Selected States of the Southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavantes, Edward Joseph

    Two sets of data from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights' Mexican American Education Study were selected for analysis in the areas of (1) comparative reading achievement rates of Mexican Americans and black students; and (2) differential in-grade retention rates of Anglo, Mexican American, and black students. Two separate issues were examined.…

  10. A study of the effect of relaxing music on heart rate recovery after exercise among healthy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fuitze; Tengah, Asrin; Nee, Lo Yah; Fredericks, Salim

    2014-05-01

    Music has been employed in various clinical settings to reduce anxiety. However, meta-analysis has shown music to have little influence on haemodynamic parameters. This study aimed at investigating the effect of relaxing music on heart rate recovery after exercise. Twenty-three student volunteers underwent treadmill exercise and were assessed for heart rate recovery and saliva analysis; comparing exposure to sedative music with exposure to silence during the recovery period immediately following exercise. No differences were found between music and non-music exposure regarding: heart rate recovery, resting pulse rate, and salivary cortisol. Music was no different to silence in affecting these physiological measures, which are all associated with anxiety. Relaxing music unaccompanied by meditation techniques or other such interventions may not have a major role in reducing anxiety in certain experimental settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Why do faculty leave? Reasons for attrition of women and minority faculty from a medical school: four-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropsey, Karen L; Masho, Saba W; Shiang, Rita; Sikka, Veronica; Kornstein, Susan G; Hampton, Carol L

    2008-09-01

    Faculty attrition, particularly among female and minority faculty, is a serious problem in academic medical settings. The reasons why faculty in academic medical settings choose to leave their employment are not well understood. Further, it is not clear if the reasons why women and minority faculty leave differ from those of other groups. One hundred sixty-six medical school faculty who left the School of Medicine (SOM) between July 1, 2001, and June 30, 2005, completed a survey about their reasons for leaving. The three most common overall reasons for leaving the institution included career/professional advancement (29.8%), low salary (25.5%), and chairman/departmental leadership issues (22.4%). The ranking of these reasons varied slightly across racial and gender groups, with women and minority faculty also citing personal reasons for leaving. Women and minority faculty were at lower academic ranks at the time they left the SOM compared with male and majority groups. Although salary differences were not present at the time of initial hire, sex was a significant predictor of lower salary at the start of the new position. Opportunity for advancement and the rate of promotion were significantly different between women and men. Job characteristics prior to leaving that were rated most poorly were protected time for teaching and research, communication across the campus, and patient parking. Harassment and discrimination were reported by a small number of those surveyed, particularly women and minority faculty. The majority of reasons for faculty attrition are amenable to change. Retaining high-quality faculty in medical settings may justify the costs of faculty development and retention efforts.

  12. Particle Separation of Non-Decontamination Soil using Attrition and Washing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Daeseo; Sung, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Seung-Soo; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyoung; Choi, Jong-Won

    2017-01-01

    In this study, to improve the decontamination efficiency of uranium soil, a preliminary experiment on the particle separation of non-decontamination soil was carried out using attrition and washing. The characteristics of the attrition and washing system are investigated. A conditional experiment on particle separation of non-decontamination soil will be performed. A preliminary experiment on the particle separation of non-decontamination soil was carried out to improve the decontamination efficiency of uranium soil. This experiment was performed with the ratio of soil to water (1:4) for the particle separation of non-decontamination soil. The operations of all equipment such as attrition scrubber, ultrasonic reaction, vibrating screen, and hydro-cyclone were conducted and confirmed. In the future, the additional experiments will be conducted for optimal experimental condition.

  13. The implications of selective attrition for estimates of intergenerational elasticity of family income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeni, Robert F; Wiemers, Emily E

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies have estimated a high intergenerational correlation in economic status. Such studies do not typically attend to potential biases that may arise due to survey attrition. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics - the data source most commonly used in prior studies - we demonstrate that attrition is particularly high for low-income adult children with low-income parents and particularly low for high-income adult children with high-income parents. Because of this pattern of attrition, intergenerational upward mobility has been overstated for low-income families and downward mobility has been understated for high-income families. The bias among low-income families is greater than the bias among high-income families implying that intergenerational elasticity in family income is higher than previous estimates with the Panel Study of Income Dynamics would suggest.

  14. Developing a Teacher Evaluation Instrument to Provide Formative Feedback Using Student Ratings of Teaching Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lans, Rikkert M.; van de Grift, Wim J. C. M.; van Veen, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the development of a teacher evaluation instrument, based on students' observations, which exhibits cumulative ordering in terms of the complexity of teaching acts. The study integrates theory on teacher development with theory on teacher effectiveness and applies a cross-validation procedure to verify whether teaching acts…

  15. How Students Rate the Quality Service Climate on Campus. National Research Report, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2012

    2012-01-01

    How satisfied are students with the service they receive--and how important is it to them? This report documents significant strides that colleges and universities have made in recent years to improve service quality and their overall campus climate, yet also finds that campuses still have room for improvement. A few highlights: (1) While progress…

  16. How Students Rate the Quality Service Climate on Campus. National Research Report, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2011

    2011-01-01

    How satisfied are students with the service they receive--and how important is it to them? This report documents significant strides that colleges and universities have made in recent years to improve service quality and their overall campus climate, yet also finds that campuses still have room for improvement. A few highlights: (1) While progress…

  17. Examining Readability Estimates' Predictions of Students' Oral Reading Rate: Spache, Lexile, and Forcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoin, Scott P.; Williams, Jessica C.; Christ, Theodore J.; Klubnik, Cynthia; Wellborn, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Beyond reliability and validity, measures used to model student growth must consist of multiple probes that are equivalent in level of difficulty to establish consistent measurement conditions across time. Although existing evidence supports the reliability of curriculum-based measurement in reading (CBMR), few studies have empirically evaluated…

  18. Student Dropout Rates in Catalan Universities: Profile and Motives for Disengagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairín, Joaquín; Triado, Xavier M.; Feixas, Mònica; Figuera, Pilar; Aparicio-Chueca, Pilar; Torrado, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Data from over 21,600 students who left Catalan higher education institutions during the academic years 2000-2001 and 2001-2002 have been analysed in order to describe the academic and personal profiles of university dropouts. Additionally, a telephone survey and face-to-face interviews with a pilot group of leavers were conducted to gather…

  19. Alcohol Consumption and Abuse among College Students: Alarming Rates among the Best and the Brightest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Jairo N.; Hoffman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study examined alcohol consumption at two college campuses, a "dry" urban campus and a "wet" rural campus. We examined alcohol consumption as a function of students' membership in: Greek Organizations, NCAA Varsity Athletic teams, or as being Unaffiliated in these groups. Participants: Two hundred eighty-eight…

  20. Increasing the admission rate to secondary school: The case of primary school student career guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Anders; Jensen, Vibeke Myrup; Nielsen, Lisbeth Palmhøj

    Although several studies investigate the effects of school resources on student performance, these studies tend to focus more on intervention effect sizes than on their cost-effectiveness. Exploiting policy-induced variation in Denmark and using high-quality administrative data, we investigate...

  1. Dropout Rates, Student Momentum, and Course Walls: A New Tool for Distance Education Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Steven S.; Spackman, Jonathan S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores a new tool for instructional designers. By calculating and graphing the Student Momentum Indicator (M) for 196 university-level online courses and by employing the constant comparative method within the grounded theory framework, eight distinct graph shapes emerged as meaningful categories of dropout behavior. Several of the…

  2. Rates of Cyber Victimization and Bullying among Male Australian Primary and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Tass; Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and nature of electronic forms of bullying (cyberbullying) was investigated among 1,530 primary and secondary school aged male students (Years 6 to 12; 9-18 years, chronologically) in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. Findings revealed that victimization via the Internet was the most common form of cyberbullying with 11.5 percent of…

  3. Effects of Music on Physical Activity Rates of Junior High School Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Lindsey; Barney, David C.; Prusak, Keven A.; Pennington, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Music is an everyday occurrence in a person's life. Music is heard in the workplace, in homes, and in the mall. Music can also be heard as a person exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on junior high students (n = 305) step counts and time in activity in junior high school physical education classes.…

  4. Class Attendance and Students' Evaluations of Teaching: Do No-Shows Bias Course Ratings and Rankings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbring, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many university departments use students' evaluations of teaching (SET) to compare and rank courses. However, absenteeism from class is often nonrandom and, therefore, SET for different courses might not be comparable. Objective: The present study aims to answer two questions. Are SET positively biased due to absenteeism? Do…

  5. Exploring Predictability of Instructor Ratings Using a Quantitative Tool for Evaluating Soft Skills among MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Robert T.; Gilfoil, David M.; Doll, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Academic researchers have often touted the growing importance of "soft skills" for modern day business leaders, especially leadership and communication skills. Despite this growing interest and attention, relatively little work has been done to develop and validate tools to assess soft skills. Forty graduate students from nine MBA…

  6. Patient attrition from the HIV antiretroviral therapy program at two hospitals in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttkammer, Nancy H; Zeliadt, Steven B; Baseman, Janet G; Destiné, Rodney; Wysler Domerçant, Jean; Labbé Coq, Nancy Rachel; Atwood Raphael, Nernst; Sherr, Kenneth; Tegger, Mary; Yuhas, Krista; Barnhart, Scott

    2014-10-01

    To identify factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) attrition among patients initiating therapy in 2005-2011 at two large, public-sector department-level hospitals, and to inform interventions to improve ART retention. This retrospective cohort study used data from the iSanté electronic medical record (EMR) system. The study characterized ART attrition levels and explored the patient demographic, clinical, temporal, and service utilization factors associated with ART attrition, using time-to-event analysis methods. Among the 2 023 patients in the study, ART attrition on average was 17.0 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 15.8-18.3). In adjusted analyses, risk of ART attrition was up to 89% higher for patients living in distant communes compared to patients living in the same commune as the hospital (hazard ratio: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.54-2.33; P Hospital site, earlier year of ART start, spending less time enrolled in HIV care prior to ART initiation, receiving a non-standard ART regimen, lacking counseling prior to ART initiation, and having a higher body mass index were also associated with attrition risk. The findings suggest quality improvement interventions at the two hospitals, including: enhanced retention support and transportation subsidies for patients accessing care from remote areas; counseling for all patients prior to ART initiation; timely outreach to patients who miss ART pick-ups; "bridging services" for patients transferring care to alternative facilities; routine screening for anticipated interruptions in future ART pick-ups; and medical case review for patients placed on non-standard ART regimens. The findings are also relevant for policymaking on decentralization of ART services in Haiti.

  7. Patient attrition from the HIV antiretroviral therapy program at two hospitals in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy H. Puttkammer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART attrition among patients initiating therapy in 2005-2011 at two large, public-sector department-level hospitals, and to inform interventions to improve ART retention. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study used data from the iSanté electronic medical record (EMR system. The study characterized ART attrition levels and explored the patient demographic, clinical, temporal, and service utilization factors associated with ART attrition, using time-to-event analysis methods. RESULTS: Among the 2 023 patients in the study, ART attrition on average was 17.0 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI: 15.8-18.3. In adjusted analyses, risk of ART attrition was up to 89% higher for patients living in distant communes compared to patients living in the same commune as the hospital (hazard ratio: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.54-2.33; P < 0.001. Hospital site, earlier year of ART start, spending less time enrolled in HIV care prior to ART initiation, receiving a non-standard ART regimen, lacking counseling prior to ART initiation, and having a higher body mass index were also associated with attrition risk. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest quality improvement interventions at the two hospitals, including: enhanced retention support and transportation subsidies for patients accessing care from remote areas; counseling for all patients prior to ART initiation; timely outreach to patients who miss ART pick-ups; "bridging services" for patients transferring care to alternative facilities; routine screening for anticipated interruptions in future ART pick-ups; and medical case review for patients placed on non-standard ART regimens. The findings are also relevant for policymaking on decentralization of ART services in Haiti.

  8. Identifying Attrition Risk Based on the First Year Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Ryan; Baik, Chi; Arkoudis, Sophia

    2018-01-01

    Using data collected from a recent national survey of Australian first-year students, this paper defines and validates four scales--belonging, feeling supported, intellectual engagement and workload stress--to measure the student experience of university. These scales provide insights into the university experience for both groups and individual…

  9. First year engineering students: Perceptions of engineers and engineering work amongst domestic and international students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Bennett

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite being well ahead of many other disciplines in establishing strong and evidence-based research and practice, engineering in many countries still experiences high rates of student and graduate attrition. One possible reason for this is that students enter engineering study without understanding the realities of either their degree program or engineering work, and without a sense of motivation and commitment. The research reported here aimed to extend understanding of first year engineering students’ thinking about their competencies, identity, self-efficacy, motivation, and career. The study involved over 1,100 first year engineering students enrolled in a common first year unit. Responses were coded using the Engineers Australia graduate competencies as a framework, and this paper reports findings from the most diverse cohort of students (n=260, of whom 49% were international students with English as their second language. The research identified differences between international and domestic students’ perceptions of self and of career competencies, possibly related to self-esteem. Implications include improved confidence and motivation to learn as students consider their strengths, interests and goals. Further, the research raises the need for analysis of international students’ cultural and educational background to determine how different cohorts of international students self-appraise and how they associate learning with their future careers.

  10. Lead optimization attrition analysis (LOAA): a novel and general methodology for medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Mark; Lieberman, Harvey; Tserlin, Elina; Rocnik, Jennifer; Ge, Jie; Fitzgerald, Maria; Patel, Vinod; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we report a novel and general method, lead optimization attrition analysis (LOAA), to benchmark two distinct small-molecule lead series using a relatively unbiased, simple technique and commercially available software. We illustrate this approach with data collected during lead optimization of two independent oncology programs as a case study. Easily generated graphics and attrition curves enabled us to calibrate progress and support go/no go decisions on each program. We believe that this data-driven technique could be used broadly by medicinal chemists and management to guide strategic decisions during drug discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mature students' perspectives of studying radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.; Decker, S.

    2009-01-01

    The study set out to explore the experiences of all final year mature students on a diagnostic radiography course, in one United Kingdom University. The aims were to identify any difficulties they may have had and to make recommendations to improve mature students' learning experiences with the hope of lowering attrition rates in this group. A qualitative study involving one-to-one audio recorded interviews was utilised. Analysis of the transcripts of interviews suggested that the group believed that their maturity and previous experiences helped them in the clinical environment and put them in a good position, when asked, to counsel younger students. However for some of the mature students these experiential skills did not extend fully into seeking appropriate support for themselves. The mature students were found to be highly motivated but there was a conflict between balancing clinical and academic aspects of studying as well as balancing studying with home life. The group was found to be unprepared for the volume of academic work and its detrimental effect on family life as they sacrificed other aspects of their lives in order to complete the course. It is recommended that forewarning and forearming prospective mature students be considered by radiography education providers. Setting up and utilising an on-line forum providing a 24/7 peer support environment would aid in coping with academic, clinical or personal problems

  12. Learning by Heart: Students Use Heart Rate Patterns To Identify Nervous System Imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerly, Spafford C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science unit on heart rate variability (HVR) patterns. Uses spectral analysis to determine the effects of environmental stimulants such as music and emotional stress on heart rate. Observes relaxation techniques and their effects on the autonomous nervous system. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  13. Putting Reaction Rates and Collision Theory in the Hands of Your Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Andy

    2002-01-01

    Describes a simulation that can be used to give concrete analogies of collision theory and the factors that affect reaction rates including temperature, concentration, catalyst, and molecular orientation. The simulation works best if done as an introduction to the concepts to help prevent misconceptions about reaction rates and collision theory.…

  14. Agreeableness and Conscientiousness as Predictors of University Students' Self/Peer-Assessment Rating Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandi, Parviz; Siyyari, Masood

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the role of two personality traits (i.e. Agreeableness and Conscientiousness from the Big Five personality traits) in predicting rating error in the self-assessment and peer-assessment of composition writing. The average self/peer-rating errors of 136 Iranian English major undergraduates…

  15. The rate of knowledge retention in basic sciences courses among dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S Mazloomi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acquiring and recalling knowledge can be considered as the starting point of learning; so increasing  the acquisition  of knowledge and information  recall is one the most important goals of education.Objective: To determine the students'  information recall in the basic courses of histology, immunology, physiology, biochemistry,  head and neck anatomy,  and microbiology  in dentistry  school.Method:  In this descriptive  survey, 60 students who had passed their basis courses were studied. The tests  were  held  five semesters  following  the basic  courses,  and  were  like  those  they  had  passed previously.Results: The results revealed that information recall was the highest for the physiology course (z=0.72, while it was the lowest for anatomy (z=0.07. For the histology course, the lowest mean score was achieved by the students entered in the  year 1997, and the highest  by those  entered  in 1999. The relationship between the entry year  of the  students  and  their  information recall  is  statistically significant  (p<0.05.Discussant: The results showed that the teaching basic science courses such as physiology, anatomy, immunology, microbiology, and biochemistry should  accompany new  strategies in  teaching  and learning. One of these is the inclusion by the teachers of retrieval cues in any course so as to facilitate learning.Keywords:  knowledge retention,  basic sciences

  16. Dietary behaviors and body image recognition of college students according to the self-rated health condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Joung; Lim, Ye Rom; Kwak, Ho Kyung

    2008-01-01

    This study was done to investigate the relationship between the perception of body image, body weight satisfaction or dietary behavior and self-rated health status in Korean college students. Subjects, 285 college students, were divided into three groups (healthy, normal, and unhealthy) according to the answer for the self-rated health question. Information about demographic status, self-rated health condition, height and weight, perception of body image, satisfaction of body weight, concern for body weight control, dietary behavior, nutritional knowledge, and health-related characteristics collected by a self-reported questionnaire. The proportion of men and women in each group was not significantly different. The academic year, major, experience of nutritional education, and type of residence were not significantly related with self-rated health but the pocket money range was significantly associated (ppocket money range and was increased in less than 210 thousand won or over 300 thousand won pocket money ranges. There were no significant differences for age, height, weight and BMI between the groups. The body image perception and body weight satisfaction levels of healthy group was significantly higher than those of unhealthy group (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively), but the level of concern for body weight control in healthy subjects was significantly lower than that in unhealthy subjects (p<0.05). The proportion of subjects reported as healthy was significantly increased with increased frequencies of following food behaviors; weekly use of protein foods (p<0.01), vegetables (p<0.05) and dairy products (p<0.01), and food habits such as "regularity of meal time" (p<0.01), "eating in moderation" (p<0.05), and "eating breakfast" (p<0.001). Overall results suggested that the college students have tended to have a better perception of health when they have better body image perception, body weight satisfaction and dietary behaviors.

  17. The Deviant University Student: Historical Discourses about Student Failure and "Wastage" in the Antipodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manathunga, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of academic development in Anglophone higher education was linked to post Second World War massification and concerns about student failure. These concerns were driven by increasing statistical investigations into student attrition and degree times to completion, particularly in Australia and Aotearoa, New Zealand. There was a…

  18. Task shifting for cataract surgery in eastern Africa: productivity and attrition of non-physician cataract surgeons in Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliah, Edson; Lewallen, Susan; Kalua, Khumbo; Courtright, Paul; Gichangi, Michael; Bassett, Ken

    2014-01-01

    This project examined the surgical productivity and attrition of non-physician cataract surgeons (NPCSs) in Tanzania, Malawi, and Kenya. Baseline (2008-9) data on training, support, and productivity (annual cataract surgery rate) were collected from officially trained NPCSs using mailed questionnaires followed by telephone interviews. Telephone interviews were used to collect follow-up data annually on productivity and semi-annually on attrition. A detailed telephone interview was conducted if a surgeon left his/her post. Data were entered into and analysed using STATA. Among the 135 NPCSs, 129 were enrolled in the study (Kenya 88, Tanzania 38, and Malawi 3) mean age 42 years; average time since completing training 6.6 years. Employment was in District 44%, Regional 24% or mission/ private 32% hospitals. Small incision cataract surgery was practiced by 38% of the NPCSs. The mean cataract surgery rate was 188/year, median 76 (range 0-1700). For 39 (31%) NPCSs their surgical rate was more than 200/year. Approximately 22% in Kenya and 25% in Tanzania had years where the cataract surgical rate was zero. About 11% of the surgeons had no support staff. High quality training is necessary but not sufficient to result in cataract surgical activity that meets population needs and maintains surgical skill. Needed are supporting institutions and staff, functioning equipment and programs to recruit and transport patients.

  19. Attrition in the Austrian Generations and Gender Survey: Is there a bias by fertility-relevant aspects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Buber-Ennser

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In longitudinal research the loss of sample members between waves is a possible source of bias. It is therefore crucial to analyse attrition. Objective: This paper analyses attrition in a longitudinal study on family and fertility, by distinguishing between attrition due to non-contact and attrition due to non-cooperation. Methods: Based on the first two waves of the Austrian Generations and Gender Survey, the two components of attrition are studied separately by using bivariate as well as multivariate methods. Moreover, overall dropout - the combination of both components - isanalysed. Apart from various socio-economic characteristics and data collection information, the study focuses on fertility-relevant variables such as fecundity, fertility intentions, sexual orientation, and traditional attitudes. Results: Fecundity, fertility intentions, and homosexual relationships are associated with higher attrition due to non-cooperation in bivariate analyses, but have no explanatory power inthe multivariate model. Pregnancy and traditional attitudes towards marriage are associated with significantly lower attrition due to non-cooperation in the multivariate context. Overall dropout is significantly lower only among persons with traditionalattitudes towards marriage, although small in size and statistical significance. Moreover, various individual and regional characteristics are significantly associated with dropout, with differences between attrition due to non-contact and attrition due to non-cooperation. Conclusions: Detailed insights into attrition are not only important when using longitudinal data and interpreting results, but also for the design of future data collections. The Austrian GGS panel has a relatively low dropout (22Š and is affected by a small bias towards familyoriented persons as well as less-educated respondents and persons with migrationbackgrounds, but the data can be used without concern about selectivity.

  20. The Effect of Downsizing on Attrition Rates in the Department of Defense (DoD)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broas, Tina M

    2007-01-01

    .... Downsizing has been shown to have an affect on the employees the organization retains, often termed survivors, and has been linked to increased turnover and decreased productivity and effectiveness...

  1. Federal Workforce: Attrition Rates at Ex-Im Bank and Similar Agencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hess, James

    1997-01-01

    .... Financing and protection provided by Ex-Im Bank includes (1) loans to foreign buyers of U.S. exports, (2) loan guarantees to commercial lenders providing repayment protection for loans to foreign buyers...

  2. The Effect of Different Enlistment Ages on First-Term Attrition Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    consent); no conscription; women allowed to serve in most combat roles, except the Army special forces (2013) Canada 17 years of age for voluntary male...information, such as SSN Number, date of birth, gender, race, accession date, separation date, education level, marital status, character of service (COS...23 22 Canada 17 34 23 Chile 18 45 24 Comoros 18 25 Congo, Republic of the 18 26 Croatia 18 27 62 NO COUNTRIES MIN ENLISTMENT AGE MAX

  3. Federal Workforce: Attrition Rates at Ex-Im Bank and Similar Agencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hess, James

    1997-01-01

    The Ex-Im Bank's mission is to assist U.S. exporters by offering a wide range of financing at terms competitive with those of other governments' export financing agencies and absorbing risks that the private sector is reluctant to cover...

  4. Longitudinal effects of induction on teaching skills and attrition rates of beginning teacher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helms-Lorenz, Michelle; van de Grift, Wim; Maulana, Ridwan

    The teaching profession faces a shortage as well as a decline of teaching skills. A possible way to mitigate this is to implement evidence-based induction arrangements. Seventy-one schools with 338 beginning secondary education teachers were randomly allocated to an experimental or a control group.

  5. Nanocrystalline-grained tungsten prepared by surface mechanical attrition treatment: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hong-Yan; Xia, Min; Wu, Zheng-Tao; Chan, Lap-Chung; Dai, Yong; Wang, Kun; Yan, Qing-Zhi; He, Man-Chao; Ge, Chang-Chun; Lu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    A nanostructured surface layer was fabricated on commercial pure tungsten using the method of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). The microstructure evolution of the surface layer was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its formation mechanism was discussed as well. Both refinement and elongation of the brittle W grains were confirmed. The elongated SMATed W was heavily strained, the maximum value of the strain at the grain boundaries reaches as high as 3–5%. Dislocation density in the SMATed W nanograins was found to be 5 × 10 12  cm −2 . The formation of the nanograins in the top surface layer of the W was ascribed to the extremely high strain and strain rate, as well as the multidirectional repetitive loading. Bending strength of commercial W could be improved from 825 MPa to 1850 MPa by SMAT process. Microhardness results indicated the strain range in SMATed W can reach up to 220 μm beneath the top surface. The notched Charpy testing results demonstrated that SMATed W possess higher ductility than that of commercial W. The top surface of the W plates with and without SMATe processing possesses residual compressive stress of about −881 MPa and −234 MPa in y direction, and −872 MPa and −879 MPa in x direction respectively. The improvement of toughness (DBTT shift) of SMATed W may be the synergistic effect of residual compressive stress, dislocation density improvement and microstructure refinement induced by SMAT processing. SMAT processing could be a complementary method to further decrease the DBTT value of tungsten based materials.

  6. Nanocrystalline-grained tungsten prepared by surface mechanical attrition treatment: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hong-Yan [State Key Laboratory for GeoMechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Institute of Nuclear Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tae Chee Avenue Kowloon, Hong Kong 999077 (China); Xia, Min, E-mail: xmdsg@ustb.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Zheng-Tao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Chan, Lap-Chung [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tae Chee Avenue Kowloon, Hong Kong 999077 (China); Dai, Yong; Wang, Kun [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5323 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Yan, Qing-Zhi [Institute of Nuclear Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); He, Man-Chao [State Key Laboratory for GeoMechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Ge, Chang-Chun, E-mail: ccge@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tae Chee Avenue Kowloon, Hong Kong 999077 (China)

    2016-11-15

    A nanostructured surface layer was fabricated on commercial pure tungsten using the method of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). The microstructure evolution of the surface layer was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its formation mechanism was discussed as well. Both refinement and elongation of the brittle W grains were confirmed. The elongated SMATed W was heavily strained, the maximum value of the strain at the grain boundaries reaches as high as 3–5%. Dislocation density in the SMATed W nanograins was found to be 5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. The formation of the nanograins in the top surface layer of the W was ascribed to the extremely high strain and strain rate, as well as the multidirectional repetitive loading. Bending strength of commercial W could be improved from 825 MPa to 1850 MPa by SMAT process. Microhardness results indicated the strain range in SMATed W can reach up to 220 μm beneath the top surface. The notched Charpy testing results demonstrated that SMATed W possess higher ductility than that of commercial W. The top surface of the W plates with and without SMATe processing possesses residual compressive stress of about −881 MPa and −234 MPa in y direction, and −872 MPa and −879 MPa in x direction respectively. The improvement of toughness (DBTT shift) of SMATed W may be the synergistic effect of residual compressive stress, dislocation density improvement and microstructure refinement induced by SMAT processing. SMAT processing could be a complementary method to further decrease the DBTT value of tungsten based materials.

  7. The effects of cooperative learning on students enrolled in a level 1 medical-surgical nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbs, J

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to create an environment that the literature contends will be more conducive to learning and one that will build the necessary social skills impacting students' performance. These social skills are essential if a nurse is to be effective in her role as a competent provider of care as well as an effective member of the inter-disciplinary health care team. The concept of cooperative learning was applied to nursing theoretical content in an effort to (a) decrease attrition rates in a first level medical-surgical nursing course, (b) increase student's knowledge and (c) enhance student's patient-teaching skills. Increased knowledge was assessed by student's performance on teacher-made paper and pencil examinations. The Classroom Life Instrument questionnaire was used for feedback on the teaching strategy and the Griffin tool was the basis for the pre-test and post-test assessment and implementation of the patient teaching plan.

  8. Assessing Communication Skills of Medical Students in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) - A Systematic Review of Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Musa; Zill, Jördis Maria; Christalle, Eva; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Teaching and assessment of communication skills have become essential in medical education. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been found as an appropriate means to assess communication skills within medical education. Studies have demonstrated the importance of a valid assessment of medical students’ communication skills. Yet, the validity of the performance scores depends fundamentally on the quality of the rating scales used in an OSCE. Thus, this systematic review aimed at providing an overview of existing rating scales, describing their underlying definition of communication skills, determining the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified rating scales. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify psychometrically tested rating scales, which have been applied in OSCE settings to assess communication skills of medical students. Our search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed), reference tracking and consultation of experts. We included studies that reported psychometric properties of communication skills assessment rating scales used in OSCEs by examiners only. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated using the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Results Data of twelve studies reporting on eight rating scales on communication skills assessment in OSCEs were included. Five of eight rating scales were explicitly developed based on a specific definition of communication skills. The methodological quality of studies was mainly poor. The psychometric quality of the eight rating scales was mainly intermediate. Discussion Our results reveal that future psychometric evaluation studies focusing on improving the methodological quality are needed

  9. Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability features for real-life stress detection. Case study: students under stress due to university examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Paolo; Bracale, Marcello; Pecchia, Leandro

    2011-11-07

    This study investigates the variations of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) due to a real-life stressor and proposes a classifier based on nonlinear features of HRV for automatic stress detection. 42 students volunteered to participate to the study about HRV and stress. For each student, two recordings were performed: one during an on-going university examination, assumed as a real-life stressor, and one after holidays. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed by using Poincaré Plot, Approximate Entropy, Correlation dimension, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, Recurrence Plot. For statistical comparison, we adopted the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and for development of a classifier we adopted the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Almost all HRV features measuring heart rate complexity were significantly decreased in the stress session. LDA generated a simple classifier based on the two Poincaré Plot parameters and Approximate Entropy, which enables stress detection with a total classification accuracy, a sensitivity and a specificity rate of 90%, 86%, and 95% respectively. The results of the current study suggest that nonlinear HRV analysis using short term ECG recording could be effective in automatically detecting real-life stress condition, such as a university examination.

  10. Cardiorespiratory endurance evaluation using heart rate analysis during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test in elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Taek; Roh, Hyo Lyun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Efficient management using exercise programs with various benefits should be provided by educational institutions for children in their growth phase. We analyzed the heart rates of children during ski simulator exercise and the Harvard step test to evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance by calculating their post-exercise recovery rate. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects (n = 77) were categorized into a normal weight and an overweight/obesity group by body mass index. They performed each exercise for 3 minutes. The cardiorespiratory endurance was calculated using the Physical Efficiency Index formula. [Results] The ski simulator and Harvard step test showed that there was a significant difference in the heart rates of the 2 body mass index-based groups at each minute. The normal weight and the ski-simulator group had higher Physical Efficiency Index levels. [Conclusion] This study showed that a simulator exercise can produce a cumulative load even when performed at low intensity, and can be effectively utilized as exercise equipment since it resulted in higher Physical Efficiency Index levels than the Harvard step test. If schools can increase sport durability by stimulating students' interests, the ski simulator exercise can be used in programs designed to improve and strengthen students' physical fitness.

  11. Career Stories of Israeli Teachers Who Left Teaching: A Salutogenic View of Teacher Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinon, Hayuta; Orland-Barak, Lily

    2017-01-01

    Many countries experience a high percentage of teachers who leave the profession before retirement. Most of the explanations, such as teacher burnout, adopt a pathogenic point of view which perceives attrition as a negative work outcome. In contrast, the qualitative project that this article is based on, which characterizes the career…

  12. Teacher Attrition in the USA: The Relational Elements in a Utah Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Melissa; Allsop, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Previous work on teacher attrition in the US has indicated that those who stay in the profession and those who leave are not separate homogenous groups. In this study, the lived experience of former teachers is examined to determine the issues that distinguish leavers from stayers. The sample is from the state of Utah, a state with one of the…

  13. Analysis of Civilian Employee Attrition at the Naval Postgraduate School and Naval Support Activity - Monterey Bay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valverde, Xavier

    1997-01-01

    ...) and Naval Support Activity-Monterey Bay (NSA-MB) to determine what civilian non-faculty employee jobs are likely to be left vacant in the next three years due to attrition and to identify what training and skills will be needed by personnel whose...

  14. A Strategy of Attrition through Enforcement: The Unmaking of Irregular Migration in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Choo Chin Low

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews Malaysia's attempt to achieve zero migration irregularity by focusing on workplace enforcement, and examines how Malaysia's migration control has become a struggle between the state and employers. Applying the framework of "enforcement through attrition", this research examines three newly introduced principles governing workplace enforcement: employer sanctions, the Strict Liability Principle, and the Employers' Mandatory Commitment. The shift to employers in Malaysia's ...

  15. The Effect of Household and Community on School Attrition: An Analysis of Thai Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korinek, Kim; Punpuing, Sureeporn

    2012-01-01

    We analyze school attrition among youth in Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. We find that family investments in schooling are shaped by both household and local community contexts. There is an enrollment advantage for girls across different households and communities. We find that youth whose mothers have migrated and youth in immigrant households…

  16. An Exploration of Teacher Attrition and Mobility in High Poverty Racially Segregated Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djonko-Moore, Cara M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mobility (movement to a new school) and attrition (quitting teaching) patterns of teachers in high poverty, racially segregated (HPRS) schools in the US. Using 2007-9 survey data from the National Center for Education Statistics, a multi-level multinomial logistic regression was performed to examine the…

  17. Disappearing Act: Persistence and Attrition of Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) in an Open Access Medical Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Aragudige; Joseph, Shine A.; Polen, Hyla H.; Clauson, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to assess and catalogue the magnitude of URL attrition in a high-impact, open access (OA) general medical journal. Design/methodology/approach: All "Public Library of Science Medicine (PLoS Medicine)" articles for 2005-2007 were evaluated and the following items were assessed: number of entries per issue; type of…

  18. ART attrition and risk factors among Option B+ patients in Haiti: A retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Puttkammer

    Full Text Available In October 2012, the Haitian Ministry of Health endorsed the "Option B+" strategy to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV and achieve HIV epidemic control. The objective of this paper is to assess and identify risk factors for attrition from the national ART program among Option B+ patients in the 12 months after ART initiation.This retrospective cohort study included patients newly initiating ART from October 2012-August 2013 at 68 ART sites covering 45% of all newly enrolled ART patients in all regions of Haiti.With data from electronic medical records, we carried out descriptive analysis of sociodemographic, clinical, and pregnancy-related correlates of ART attrition, and used a modified Poisson regression approach to estimate relative risks in a multivariable model.There were 2,166 Option B+ patients who initiated ART, of whom 1,023 were not retained by 12 months (47.2%. One quarter (25.3% dropped out within 3 months of ART initiation. Protective factors included older age, more advanced HIV disease progression, and any adherence counseling prior to ART initiation, while risk factors included starting ART late in gestation, starting ART within 7 days of HIV testing, and using an atypical ART regimen.Our study demonstrates early ART attrition among Option B+ patients and contributes evidence on the characteristics of women who are most at risk of attrition in Haiti. Our findings highlight the importance of targeted strategies to support retention among Option B+ patients.

  19. Attrition in Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs and Self-Efficacy at Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verevkina, Nina; Shi, Yunfeng; Fuentes-Caceres, Veronica Alejandra; Scanlon, Dennis Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Among other goals, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is designed to improve self-efficacy of the chronically ill. However, a substantial proportion of the enrollees often leave CDSMPs before completing the program curriculum. This study examines factors associated with program attrition in a CDSMP implemented in a community…

  20. Journey to Becoming a Thai English Teacher: New Perspective on Investigating Teacher Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabjandee, Denchai

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the author provides a unique perspective on teacher shortage by focusing on teacher retention, in terms of why teachers stay in the teaching profession, rather than focusing on teacher attrition, or why teachers leave the teaching profession. The change in perspective created an opportunity to study the journey of how teachers chose…