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Sample records for structure formation ii

  1. Flow structure formation in an ion-unmagnetized plasma: The HYPER-II experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaka, K.; Tanaka, M. Y.; Yoshimura, S.; Aramaki, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawazu, F.; Furuta, K.; Takatsuka, N.; Masuda, M.; Nakano, R.

    2015-01-01

    The HYPER-II device has been constructed in Kyushu University to investigate the flow structure formation in an ion-unmagnetized plasma, which is an intermediate state of plasma and consists of unmagnetized ions and magnetized electrons. High density plasmas are produced by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and the flow field structure in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is investigated with a directional Langmuir probe method and a laser-induced fluorescence method. The experimental setup has been completed and the diagnostic systems have been installed to start the experiments. A set of coaxial electrodes will be introduced to control the azimuthal plasma rotation, and the effect of plasma rotation to generation of rectilinear flow structure will be studied. The HYPER-II experiments will clarify the overall flow structure in the inhomogeneous magnetic field and contribute to understanding characteristic feature of the intermediate state of plasma.

  2. The Structure of the Young Star Cluster NGC 6231. II. Structure, Formation, and Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michael A.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Sills, Alison; Gromadzki, Mariusz; Medina, Nicolás; Borissova, Jordanka; Kurtev, Radostin

    2017-12-01

    The young cluster NGC 6231 (stellar ages ˜2-7 Myr) is observed shortly after star formation activity has ceased. Using the catalog of 2148 probable cluster members obtained from Chandra, VVV, and optical surveys (Paper I), we examine the cluster’s spatial structure and dynamical state. The spatial distribution of stars is remarkably well fit by an isothermal sphere with moderate elongation, while other commonly used models like Plummer spheres, multivariate normal distributions, or power-law models are poor fits. The cluster has a core radius of 1.2 ± 0.1 pc and a central density of ˜200 stars pc-3. The distribution of stars is mildly mass segregated. However, there is no radial stratification of the stars by age. Although most of the stars belong to a single cluster, a small subcluster of stars is found superimposed on the main cluster, and there are clumpy non-isotropic distributions of stars outside ˜4 core radii. When the size, mass, and age of NGC 6231 are compared to other young star clusters and subclusters in nearby active star-forming regions, it lies at the high-mass end of the distribution but along the same trend line. This could result from similar formation processes, possibly hierarchical cluster assembly. We argue that NGC 6231 has expanded from its initial size but that it remains gravitationally bound.

  3. Scope Oriented Thermoeconomic analysis of energy systems. Part II: Formation Structure of Optimality for robust design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piacentino, Antonio; Cardona, Ennio

    2010-01-01

    This paper represents the Part II of a paper in two parts. In Part I the fundamentals of Scope Oriented Thermoeconomics have been introduced, showing a scarce potential for the cost accounting of existing plants; in this Part II the same concepts are applied to the optimization of a small set of design variables for a vapour compression chiller. The method overcomes the limit of most conventional optimization techniques, which are usually based on hermetic algorithms not enabling the energy analyst to recognize all the margins for improvement. The Scope Oriented Thermoeconomic optimization allows us to disassemble the optimization process, thus recognizing the Formation Structure of Optimality, i.e. the specific influence of any thermodynamic and economic parameter in the path toward the optimal design. Finally, the potential applications of such an in-depth understanding of the inner driving forces of the optimization are discussed in the paper, with a particular focus on the sensitivity analysis to the variation of energy and capital costs and on the actual operation-oriented design.

  4. Temperature-dependent structural changes in intrinsically disordered proteins: formation of alpha-helices or loss of polyproline II?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    temperature, which most likely reflects formation of transient alpha-helices or loss of polyproline II (PPII) content. Using three IDPs, ACTR, NHE1, and Spd1, we show that the temperature-induced structural change is common among IDPs and is accompanied by a contraction of the conformational ensemble...... with increasing temperature, and accordingly these were not responsible for the change in the CD spectra. In contrast, the nonhelical regions exhibited a general temperature-dependent structural change that was independent of long-range interactions. The temperature-dependent CD spectroscopic signature of IDPs...

  5. Spiral structure and star formation. II. Stellar lifetimes and cloud kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausman, M.A.; Roberts, W.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    We present further results of our model, introduced in Paper I, of star formation and star-gas interactions in the cloud-dominated ISMs of spiral density wave galaxies. The global density distribution and velocity field of the gas clouds are virtually independent of stellar parameters and even of mean free path for the wide range of values studied, but local density variations are found which superficially resemble cloud complexes. Increasing the average life span of ''spiral tracer'' stellar associations beyond about 20 Myr washes out the spiral pattern which younger associations show. Allowing clouds to form several successive associations (sequential star formation) slightly increases the frequency of interarm, young-star spurs and substantially increases the average star formation rate. The mean velocity field of clouds shows tipped oval streamlines, similar to both continuum gas dynamical models and stellar-kinematic models of spiral density waves. These streamlines are almost ballistic orbits except close to the spiral arms. Newly formed stellar associations leave the spiral density peak with initial tangential velocitie shigher than ''postshock'' values and do not fall back into the ''preshock'' region. By varying our stellar parametes within physically reasonable limits, we may reproduce spiral galaxies with a wide range of morphological appearaces

  6. Cu(II) promotes amyloid pore formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hangyu, E-mail: hangyuz@uw.edu [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Rochet, Jean-Christophe [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Stanciu, Lia A. [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. - Highlights: • Cu(II) promoted the annular protofibril formation of α-synuclein in vitro. • Cu(II) postponed the in vitro fibrillization of α-synuclein. • Neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils.

  7. Cu(II) promotes amyloid pore formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hangyu; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Stanciu, Lia A.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. - Highlights: • Cu(II) promoted the annular protofibril formation of α-synuclein in vitro. • Cu(II) postponed the in vitro fibrillization of α-synuclein. • Neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils

  8. Data structures II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Smolarski, Dennis C

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Data Structures II includes sets, trees, advanced sorting, elementary graph theory, hashing, memory management and garbage collection, and appendices on recursion vs. iteration, alge

  9. Unexpected formation and crystal structure of tetrakis(1H-pyrazole-κN2palladium(II dichloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wagner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The title salt, [Pd(C3H4N24]Cl2, was obtained unexpectedly by the reaction of palladium(II dichloride with equimolar amounts of 1-chloro-1-nitro-2,2,2-tris(pyrazolylethane in methanol solution. The Pd2+ cation is located on an inversion centre and has a square-planar coordination sphere defined by four N atoms of four neutral pyrazole ligands. The average Pd—N distance is 2.000 (2 Å. The two chloride anions are not coordinating to Pd2+. They are connected to the complex cations through N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds. In addition, C—H...Cl hydrogen bonds are observed, leading to a three-dimensional linkage of cations and anions.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of two new zinc(II) coordination polymers with bidentate flexible ligands: Formation of a 2D structure with (44.62)-sql topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalegani, Arash; Khaledi Sardashti, Mohammad; Gajda, Roman; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2017-12-01

    Zinc(II) coordination polymers [Zn(bip)2(NCS)2]n (1) and [Zn(μ-bbd)(N3)2]n (2) were synthesized by using the neutral flexible bidentate N-donor ligands 1,4-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)butane (bbd) and 1,3-bis(imidazolyl)propane (bip), mono-anionic NCS- or N3-ligand and zinc(II) chloride salts. The results of the X-ray analyses demonstrate that in the structure of 1, the zinc(II) ion is located on an inversion center and exhibits an ZnN6 octahedral arrangement while, in the structure of 2, the zinc(II) ion adopts an ZnN4 tetrahedral geometry. In the polymer 1, the NCS groups are terminally N-bonded to the metal center and the each bip with anti-gauche conformation acts as bridging connecting four zinc(II) ions to form a two-dimensional network with a sql [point symbol (44.62)] topology while, in the polymer 1, the N3 groups are terminally bonded to the metal center and each bbd with anti-anti-anti conformation acts as bridging ligand connecting two zinc(II) ions to form a one-dimensional zig-zag chain. Coordination compounds 1 and 2 have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Thermal analyses of polymers were also presented.

  11. The role of order-disorder transitions in the quest for molecular multiferroics: structural and magnetic neutron studies of a mixed valence iron(II)-iron(III) formate framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Fabelo, Oscar; Rodríguez-Velamazán, J Alberto; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Mason, Sax A; Pardo, Emilio; Lloret, Francesc; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Bu, Xian-He; Simonet, Virginie; Colin, Claire V; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Juan

    2012-12-05

    Neutron diffraction studies have been carried out to shed light on the unprecedented order-disorder phase transition (ca. 155 K) observed in the mixed-valence iron(II)-iron(III) formate framework compound [NH(2)(CH(3))(2)](n)[Fe(III)Fe(II)(HCOO)(6)](n). The crystal structure at 220 K was first determined from Laue diffraction data, then a second refinement at 175 K and the crystal structure determination in the low temperature phase at 45 K were done with data from the monochromatic high resolution single crystal diffractometer D19. The 45 K nuclear structure reveals that the phase transition is associated with the order-disorder of the dimethylammonium counterion that is weakly anchored in the cavities of the [Fe(III)Fe(II)(HCOO)(6)](n) framework. In the low-temperature phase, a change in space group from P31c to R3c occurs, involving a tripling of the c-axis due to the ordering of the dimethylammonium counterion. The occurrence of this nuclear phase transition is associated with an electric transition, from paraelectric to antiferroelectric. A combination of powder and single crystal neutron diffraction measurements below the magnetic order transition (ca. 37 K) has been used to determine unequivocally the magnetic structure of this Néel N-Type ferrimagnet, proving that the ferrimagnetic behavior is due to a noncompensation of the different Fe(II) and Fe(III) magnetic moments.

  12. Translocation and gross deletion breakpoints in human inherited disease and cancer II: Potential involvement of repetitive sequence elements in secondary structure formation between DNA ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuzhanova, Nadia; Abeysinghe, Shaun S; Krawczak, Michael; Cooper, David N

    2003-09-01

    Translocations and gross deletions are responsible for a significant proportion of both cancer and inherited disease. Although such gene rearrangements are nonuniformly distributed in the human genome, the underlying mutational mechanisms remain unclear. We have studied the potential involvement of various types of repetitive sequence elements in the formation of secondary structure intermediates between the single-stranded DNA ends that recombine during rearrangements. Complexity analysis was used to assess the potential of these ends to form secondary structures, the maximum decrease in complexity consequent to a gross rearrangement being used as an indicator of the type of repeat and the specific DNA ends involved. A total of 175 pairs of deletion/translocation breakpoint junction sequences available from the Gross Rearrangement Breakpoint Database [GRaBD; www.uwcm.ac.uk/uwcm/mg/grabd/grabd.html] were analyzed. Potential secondary structure was noted between the 5' flanking sequence of the first breakpoint and the 3' flanking sequence of the second breakpoint in 49% of rearrangements and between the 5' flanking sequence of the second breakpoint and the 3' flanking sequence of the first breakpoint in 36% of rearrangements. Inverted repeats, inversions of inverted repeats, and symmetric elements were found in association with gross rearrangements at approximately the same frequency. However, inverted repeats and inversions of inverted repeats accounted for the vast majority (83%) of deletions plus small insertions, symmetric elements for one-half of all antigen receptor-mediated translocations, while direct repeats appear only to be involved in mediating simple deletions. These findings extend our understanding of illegitimate recombination by highlighting the importance of secondary structure formation between single-stranded DNA ends at breakpoint junctions. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Kinetically guided colloidal structure formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, Fabian M.; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    The well-studied self-organization of colloidal particles is predicted to result in a variety of fascinating applications. Yet, whereas self-assembly techniques are extensively explored, designing and producing mesoscale-sized objects remains a major challenge, as equilibration times and thus structure formation timescales become prohibitively long. Asymmetric mesoscopic objects, without prior introduction of asymmetric particles with all its complications, are out of reach––due to the underl...

  14. Structures and Heats of Formation of Simple Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds II: Fluorides, Chlorides, Oxides, and Hydroxides for Ba, Sr, and Ra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Hill, J Grant; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A

    2018-01-11

    Geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, heats of formation, bond dissociation energies, cohesive energies, and selected fluoride affinities (difluorides) are predicted for the late alkaline earth (Sr, Ba, and Ra) oxides, fluorides, chlorides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory CCSD(T) level. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic and pseudopotential corrections, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were included to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation following the Feller-Peterson-Dixon methodology. The calculated values are compared to the experimental data where available. In some cases, especially for Ra compounds, there are no experimental results, or the experimental energetics and geometries are not reliable or have very large error bars. All of the Sr, Ba, and Ra difluorides, dichlorides, and dihydroxides are bent structures with the OMO bond angles decreasing going down the group. The cohesive energies of bulk Be dihalides are predicted to be quite low, while those of Ra are relatively large. The fluoride affinities show that the difluorides are moderately strong Lewis acids and that such trifluorides may form under the appropriate experimental conditions.

  15. Small Galactic H II regions. II. The molecular clouds and star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.A.; Thronson, H.A. Jr.; Wilton, C.

    1990-01-01

    CO maps of molecular clouds associated with 11 small Galactic H II regions are presented and compared with IR images obtained by IRAS. The molecular masses of the clouds are computed and compared with the masses of the stellar content. The mapped clouds have masses of 1000-60,000 solar and are typical of the more numerous, smaller Galactic molecular clouds. All of the clouds have recently made massive OB stars, and many have complex spatial and kinematic structures. The coincidence of IRAS sources and CO peaks suggests that many of the clouds have sites of star formation other than the optically visible H II region. Star-formation efficiencies are uncertain, with values for the clouds ranging from 0.02 to 0.6 with an average value of 0.2. There is no trend of the upper stellar mass limit with Galactic radius and with molecular cloud mass. 53 refs

  16. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  17. Dark Energy and Structure Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anupam

    2010-01-01

    We study the gravitational dynamics of dark energy configurations. We report on the time evolution of the dark energy field configurations as well as the time evolution of the energy density to demonstrate the gravitational collapse of dark energy field configurations. We live in a Universe which is dominated by Dark Energy. According to current estimates about 75% of the Energy Density is in the form of Dark Energy. Thus when we consider gravitational dynamics and Structure Formation we expect Dark Energy to play an important role. The most promising candidate for dark energy is the energy density of fields in curved space-time. It therefore become a pressing need to understand the gravitational dynamics of dark energy field configurations. We develop and describe the formalism to study the gravitational collapse of fields given any general potential for the fields. We apply this formalism to models of dark energy motivated by particle physics considerations. We solve the resulting evolution equations which determine the time evolution of field configurations as well as the dynamics of space-time. Our results show that gravitational collapse of dark energy field configurations occurs and must be considered in any complete picture of our universe.

  18. New μ-OAC bridged dinuclear copper(II) complex with tridentate Schiff base ligand: synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, and CuO nano-particles formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grivani, G.; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal; Sadeghi, B.; Khalaji, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 7 (2015), s. 456-461 ISSN 1070-3284 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Schiff base * complex structure * x-ray crystallography * Jana2006 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.516, year: 2015

  19. The structure of metallo-DNA with consecutive thymine-Hg-II-thymine base pairs explains positive entropy for the metallo base pair formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamaguchi, H.; Šebera, Jakub; Kondo, J.; Oda, S.; Komuro, T.; Kawamura, T.; Dairaku, T.; Kondo, Y.; Okamoto, I.; Ono, A.; Burda, J. V.; Kojima, C.; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Tanaka, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2014), s. 4094-4099 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0228 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR structures * mercury * metalation * metal- DNA binding * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.112, year: 2014 http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/42/6/4094.full

  20. Conversion of Phase II Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Data to Common Format; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    A vast amount of aerodynamic, structural, and turbine performance data were collected during three phases of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE). To compare data from the three phases, a similar format of engineering unit data is required. The process of converting Phase II data from a previous engineering unit format to raw integer counts is discussed. The integer count files can then be input to the new post-processing software, MUNCH. The resulting Phase II engineering unit files are in a common format with current and future UAE engineering unit files. An additional objective for changing the file format was to convert the Phase II data from English units to SI units of measurement

  1. SPMHD simulations of structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David J.; On, Alvina Y. L.; Wu, Kinwah; Kawata, Daisuke

    2018-05-01

    The intracluster medium of galaxy clusters is permeated by μ {G} magnetic fields. Observations with current and future facilities have the potential to illuminate the role of these magnetic fields play in the astrophysical processes of galaxy clusters. To obtain a greater understanding of how the initial seed fields evolve to the magnetic fields in the intracluster medium requires magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We critically assess the current smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamic (SPMHD) schemes, especially highlighting the impact of a hyperbolic divergence cleaning scheme and artificial resistivity switch on the magnetic field evolution in cosmological simulations of the formation of a galaxy cluster using the N-body/SPMHD code GCMHD++. The impact and performance of the cleaning scheme and two different schemes for the artificial resistivity switch is demonstrated via idealized test cases and cosmological simulations. We demonstrate that the hyperbolic divergence cleaning scheme is effective at suppressing the growth of the numerical divergence error of the magnetic field and should be applied to any SPMHD simulation. Although the artificial resistivity is important in the strong field regime, it can suppress the growth of the magnetic field in the weak field regime, such as galaxy clusters. With sufficient resolution, simulations with divergence cleaning can reproduce observed magnetic fields. We conclude that the cleaning scheme alone is sufficient for galaxy cluster simulations, but our results indicate that the SPMHD scheme must be carefully chosen depending on the regime of the magnetic field.

  2. CHROMIUM(II) AMIDES - SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; GAMBAROTTA, S; MEETSMA, A; SPEK, AL; SMEETS, WJJ; CHIANG, MY

    1993-01-01

    A novel class of mono- and di-meric chromium(II) amides has been prepared and characterized. Reaction of [CrCl2(thf)2] (thf = tetrahydrofuran) with 2 equivalents of M(NR2) (R = C6H11, Pr(i), Ph, or phenothiazinyl; M = Li or Na) allowed the formation of the homoleptic amides [{Cr(mu-NR2)(NR2)}2] (R =

  3. ICC Type II large-format FPA detector assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Thomas H.; Powers, Thomas P.

    1997-08-01

    ICC presents a new addition to their integrated detector assembly product line with the announcement of their type II large format staring class FPA units. A result of internally funded research and development, the ICC type II detector assembly can accommodate all existing large format staring class PtSi, InSb and MCT focal planes, up to 640 by 480. Proprietary methodologies completely eliminate all FPA stresses to allow for maximum FPA survivability. Standard optical and cryocooler interfaces allow for the use of BEI, AEG, TI SADA Hughes/Magnavox and Joule Thompson coolers. This unit has been qualified to the current SADA II thermal environmental specifications and was tailored around ICC's worldwide industry standard type IV product. Assembled in a real world flexible manufacturing environment, this unit features a wide degree of adaptability and can be easily modified to a user's specifications via standard options and add-ons that include optical interfaces, electrical interfaces and window/filter material selections.

  4. The Formation of Metal (M=Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)) Complexes by Aminosilanes Immobilized within Mesoporous Molecular Sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Choe, Sang Joon

    1999-01-01

    The immobilization of APTMS(3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyltrimethoxysilane) and AAPTMS(3-(2-(2-aminoethyl) aminoethylamino)propyltrimethoxysilane) on the surface of high quality mesoporous molecular sieves MCM-41 and MCM-48 have been confirmed by F.T.-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, 29 Si solid state NMR, and a surface polarity measurement using Reichardt's dye. The formation of metal (Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)) complexes by immobilized aminosilanes have been investigated by photoacoustic spectroscopy(PAS). The assignment of UV-Vis. PAS bands makes it possible to identify the structure of metal complexes within mesoporous molecular sieves. Co(II) ion may be coordinated mainly in a tetrahedral symmetry by two APTMS onto MCM-41, and in an octahedral one by two AAPTMS. Both Ni(II) and Cu(II) coordinated by aminosilanes within MCM-41 form possibly the octahedral complexes such as [Ni(APTMS) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] 2+ , [Ni(AAPTMS) 2 ] 2+ , [Cu(APTMS) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] 2+ , and [Cu(AAPTMS)(H 2 O) 3 ] 2+ , respectively. The PAS band shapes of complexes onto MCM-48 are similar to those of corresponding MCM-41 with the variation of PAS intensity. Most of metal ion(II) within MCM-41 and MCM-48 are coordinated by aminosilanes without the impregnation on the surface

  5. Cosmological Structure Formation: From Dawn till Dusk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Caroline Samantha

    Cosmology has entered an era where a plethora data is available on structure formation to constrain astrophysics and underlying cosmology. This thesis strives to both investigate new observables and modeling of the Epoch of Reionization, as well as to constrain dark energy phenomenology with mass......Cosmology has entered an era where a plethora data is available on structure formation to constrain astrophysics and underlying cosmology. This thesis strives to both investigate new observables and modeling of the Epoch of Reionization, as well as to constrain dark energy phenomenology...... with massive galaxy clusters, traveling from the dawn of structure formation, when the first galaxies appear, to its dusk, when a representative part of the mass in the Universe is settled in massive structures. This hunt for accurate constraints on cosmology is complemented with the demonstration of novel...... Bayesian statistical tools and kinematical constraints on dark energy. Starting at the dawn of structure formation, we study emission line fluctuations, employing semi-numerical simulations of cosmological volumes of their line emission, in order to cross-correlate fluctuations in brightness. This cross...

  6. STRUCTURE FORMATION PRINCIPLES OF INTERFERENCE BEAM SPLITTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gubanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of interference beam splitters construction, formed by symmetric cells of dielectric layers is considered. The methodology of short-wave and long-wave interference beam splitters formation is given. The impact analysis of symmetric cells number and their structure on output parameters is considered.

  7. Crystal structure representations for machine learning models of formation energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Felix [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, University of Basel Switzerland; Lindmaa, Alexander [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping Sweden; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, University of Basel Switzerland; Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont Illinois 60439; Armiento, Rickard [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping Sweden

    2015-04-20

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a dataset of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consisting of 3000 crystals, the generalization error in predicting formation energies of new structures corresponds to (i) 0.49, (ii) 0.64, and (iii) 0.37eV/atom for the respective representations.

  8. Star Cluster Structure from Hierarchical Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudic, Michael; Hopkins, Philip; Murray, Norman; Lamberts, Astrid; Guszejnov, David; Schmitz, Denise; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Young massive star clusters (YMCs) spanning 104-108 M⊙ in mass generally have similar radial surface density profiles, with an outer power-law index typically between -2 and -3. This similarity suggests that they are shaped by scale-free physics at formation. Recent multi-physics MHD simulations of YMC formation have also produced populations of YMCs with this type of surface density profile, allowing us to narrow down the physics necessary to form a YMC with properties as observed. We show that the shallow density profiles of YMCs are a natural result of phase-space mixing that occurs as they assemble from the clumpy, hierarchically-clustered configuration imprinted by the star formation process. We develop physical intuition for this process via analytic arguments and collisionless N-body experiments, elucidating the connection between star formation physics and star cluster structure. This has implications for the early-time structure and evolution of proto-globular clusters, and prospects for simulating their formation in the FIRE cosmological zoom-in simulations.

  9. THE FORMATION OF IRIS DIAGNOSTICS. II. THE FORMATION OF THE Mg II h and k LINES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenaarts, J.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Uitenbroek, H., E-mail: jorritl@astro.uio.no, E-mail: tiago.pereira@astro.uio.no, E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no, E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com, E-mail: huitenbroek@nso.edu [NSO/Sacramento Peak P.O. Box 62 Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) small explorer mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h and k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations requires forward modeling of Mg II h and k line formation from three-dimensional (3D) radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) models. This paper is the second in a series where we undertake this modeling. We compute the vertically emergent h and k intensity from a snapshot of a dynamic 3D RMHD model of the solar atmosphere, and investigate which diagnostic information about the atmosphere is contained in the synthetic line profiles. We find that the Doppler shift of the central line depression correlates strongly with the vertical velocity at optical depth unity, which is typically located less than 200 km below the transition region (TR). By combining the Doppler shifts of the h and k lines we can retrieve the sign of the velocity gradient just below the TR. The intensity in the central line depression is anti-correlated with the formation height, especially in subfields of a few square Mm. This intensity could thus be used to measure the spatial variation of the height of the TR. The intensity in the line-core emission peaks correlates with the temperature at its formation height, especially for strong emission peaks. The peaks can thus be exploited as a temperature diagnostic. The wavelength difference between the blue and red peaks provides a diagnostic of the velocity gradients in the upper chromosphere. The intensity ratio of the blue and red peaks correlates strongly with the average velocity in the upper chromosphere. We conclude that the Mg II h and k lines are excellent probes of the very upper chromosphere just below the TR, a height regime that is impossible to probe with other spectral lines. They also provide decent temperature and velocity diagnostics of the middle

  10. The structure and formation of natural categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Langley, Pat

    1990-01-01

    Categorization and concept formation are critical activities of intelligence. These processes and the conceptual structures that support them raise important issues at the interface of cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence. The work presumes that advances in these and other areas are best facilitated by research methodologies that reward interdisciplinary interaction. In particular, a computational model is described of concept formation and categorization that exploits a rational analysis of basic level effects by Gluck and Corter. Their work provides a clean prescription of human category preferences that is adapted to the task of concept learning. Also, their analysis was extended to account for typicality and fan effects, and speculate on how the concept formation strategies might be extended to other facets of intelligence, such as problem solving.

  11. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Iris D; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Stan, Claudiu A; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Long Vo, Pham; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M; Glownia, James M; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S; Lane, Thomas J; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Waterman, David G; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T; Zwart, Petrus H; Adams, Paul D; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2016-12-15

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S 0 to S 4 ), in which S 1 is the dark-stable state and S 3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O 2 evolution. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S 1 ), two-flash illuminated (2F; S 3 -enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH 3 ; S 3 -enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S 1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster in the S 2 and S 3 states. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site. This approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms.

  12. Simulating the formation of cosmic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, C S

    2002-06-15

    A timely combination of new theoretical ideas and observational discoveries has brought about significant advances in our understanding of cosmic evolution. Computer simulations have played a key role in these developments by providing the means to interpret astronomical data in the context of physical and cosmological theory. In the current paradigm, our Universe has a flat geometry, is undergoing accelerated expansion and is gravitationally dominated by elementary particles that make up cold dark matter. Within this framework, it is possible to simulate in a computer the emergence of galaxies and other structures from small quantum fluctuations imprinted during an epoch of inflationary expansion shortly after the Big Bang. The simulations must take into account the evolution of the dark matter as well as the gaseous processes involved in the formation of stars and other visible components. Although many unresolved questions remain, a coherent picture for the formation of cosmic structure is now beginning to emerge.

  13. Structure formation control of foam concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steshenko, Aleksei; Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya; Syrkin, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The process of predetermined foam concrete structure formation is considered to be a crucial issue from the point of process control and it is currently understudied thus defining the need for additional research. One of the effective ways of structure formation control in naturally hardening foam concrete is reinforcement with dispersed fibers or introduction of plasticizers. The paper aims at studying the patterns of influence of microreinforcing and plasticizing additives on the structure and performance properties of foam concrete. Preparation of foam concrete mix has been conducted using one-step technology. The structure of modified foam concrete has been studied by means of electron microscopy. The cellular structure of foam concrete samples with the additives is homogeneous; the pores are uniformly distributed over the total volume. It has been revealed that introduction of the Neolas 5.2 plasticizer and microreinforcing fibers in the foam concrete mixture in the amount of 0.4 - 0.1 % by weight of cement leads to reduction of the average pore diameter in the range of 45.3 to 30.2 microns and the standard deviation of the pore average diameter from 23.6 to 9.2 in comparison with the sample without additive. Introduction of modifying additives has stimulated formation of a large number of closed pores. Thus porosity of conditionally closed pores has increased from 16.06 % to 34.48 %, which has lead to increase of frost resistance brand of foam concrete from F15 to F50 and to reduction of its water absorption by weight by 20 %.

  14. The Mechanism of Redox Reaction between Palladium(II Complex Ions and Potassium Formate in Acidic Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojnicki M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics studies of redox reaction between palladium(II chloride complex ions and potassium formate in acidic aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown, that the reduction reaction of Pd(II is selective in respect to Pd(II complex structure. The kinetic of the process was monitored spectrophotometrically. The influence of chloride ions concentration, Pd(II initial concentration, reductant concentration, ionic strength as well as the temperature were investigated in respect to the process dynamics. Arrhenius equation parameters were determined and are equal to 65.8 kJ/mol, and A = 1.12×1011 s−1.

  15. Crystal structure of bis(4-acetylanilinium tetrachloridomercurate(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Thairiyaraja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title salt, (C8H10NO2[HgCl4], is isotypic with that of the cuprate(II and cobaltate(II analogues. The asymmetric unit contains one 4-acetylanilinium cation and one half of a tetrachloridomercurate(II anion (point group symmetry m. The Hg—Cl distances are in the range 2.4308 (7–2.5244 (11 Å and the Cl—Hg—Cl angles in the range of 104.66 (2–122.94 (4°, indicating a considerable distortion of the tetrahedral anion. In the crystal, cations are linked by an intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen-bonding interaction, leading to a C(8 chain motif with the chains extending parallel to the b axis. There is also a π–π stacking interaction with a centroid-to-centroid distance of 3.735 (2 Å between neighbouring benzene rings along this direction. The anions lie between the chains and interact with the cations through intermolecular N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network structure.

  16. The formation of structure in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Efstathiou, G P

    1995-01-01

    The discovery of temperature anisotropies in the microwave background radiation by the COBE satellite provides the first direct detection of fluctuations in the early universe. I will review more recent experiments, espacially those designed to detect anisotropies on angular scales of less than a degree,corresponding to fluctuations with physical sizes of superclusters of galaxies. I will describe the COBRAS/SAMBA satellite that is under consideration by ESA for possible launch in 2003 and show how measurements of the background anisotropies can be linked with observations of the present day galaxy ditribution to construct models of structure formation extending from the very early universe to the present day.

  17. PROPERTY OF THE LARGE FORMAT DIGITAL AERIAL CAMERA DMC II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jacobsen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Z/I Imaging introduced with the DMC II 140, 230 and 250 digital aerial cameras with a very large format CCD for the panchromatic channel. The CCDs have with 140 / 230 / 250 mega pixel a size not available in photogrammetry before. CCDs in general have a very high relative accuracy, but the overall geometry has to be checked as well as the influence of not flat CCDs. A CCD with a size of 96mm × 82mm must have a flatness or knowledge of flatness in the range of 1μm if the camera accuracy in the range of 1.3μm shall not be influenced. The DMC II cameras have been evaluated with three different flying heights leading to 5cm, 9cm and 15cm or 20cm GSD, crossing flight lines and 60% side lap. The optimal test conditions guaranteed the precise determination of the object coordinates as well as the systematic image errors. All three camera types show only very small systematic image errors, ranging in the root mean square between 0.12μm up to 0.3μm with extreme values not exceeding 1.6μm. The remaining systematic image errors, determined by analysis of the image residuals and not covered by the additional parameters, are negligible. A standard deviation of the object point heights below the GSD, determined at independent check points, even in blocks with just 20% side lap and 60% end lap is standard. Corresponding to the excellent image geometry the object point coordinates are only slightly influenced by the self calibration. For all DMCII types the handling of image models for data acquisition must not be supported by an improvement of the image coordinates by the determined systematic image errors. Such an improvement up to now is not standard for photogrammetric software packages. The advantage of a single monolithic CCD is obvious. An edge analysis of pan-sharpened DMC II 250 images resulted in factors for the effective resolution below 1.0. The result below 1.0 is only possible by contrast enhancement, but this requires with low image noise

  18. Graphitic structure formation in ion implanted polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavenner, E., E-mail: tazman1492@gmail.com [Creative Polymers Pty. Ltd., 41 Wilkinson Street, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Wood, B. [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Curry, M.; Jankovic, A.; Patel, R. [Center for Applied Science and Engineering, Missouri State University, 524 North Boonville Avenue, Springfield, MO 65806 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ion implantation is a technique that is used to change the electrical, optical, hardness and biocompatibility of a wide range of inorganic materials. This technique also imparts similar changes to organic or polymer based materials. With polymers, ion implantation can produce a carbon enriched volume. Knowledge as to the nature of this enrichment and its relative concentration is necessary to produce accurate models of the physical properties of the modified material. One technique that can achieve this is X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In this study the formation of graphite like structures in the near surface of polyetheretherketone by ion implantation has been elucidated from detailed analysis of the C 1s and valence band peak structures generated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further evidence is given by both Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection.

  19. Modulated structure formation in demixing paraffin blends

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, E P

    2002-01-01

    Small angle scattering (SANS and SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry have been measured from C sub 2 sub 8 :C sub 3 sub 6 normal paraffin mixtures of varying composition quenched from the melt. Satellite peaks are observed in the SAXS whose offset in Q, relative to Bragg diffraction peaks associated with the average structure, are composition dependent. The offset is close to the position of the most intense peak observed in SANS. Scattering from the quenched structures is consistent with a correlated displacement and substitutional disorder model yielding modulations that are incommensurate with the average lattice. DSC shows an additional endotherm in the mixtures that is not present in the pure components and is associated with this superstructure formation. (orig.)

  20. Modulated structure formation in demixing paraffin blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.P.

    2002-01-01

    Small angle scattering (SANS and SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry have been measured from C 28 :C 36 normal paraffin mixtures of varying composition quenched from the melt. Satellite peaks are observed in the SAXS whose offset in Q, relative to Bragg diffraction peaks associated with the average structure, are composition dependent. The offset is close to the position of the most intense peak observed in SANS. Scattering from the quenched structures is consistent with a correlated displacement and substitutional disorder model yielding modulations that are incommensurate with the average lattice. DSC shows an additional endotherm in the mixtures that is not present in the pure components and is associated with this superstructure formation. (orig.)

  1. Compact stellar object: the formation and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF/MCT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The formation of compact objects is viewed at the final stages of stellar evolution. The supernova explosion events are then focalized to explain the formation of pulsars, hybrid neutron star and the limit case of the latter, the quark stars. We discuss the stability and structure of these objects in connection with the properties of the hadron and quark-gluon plasma equation of state. The hadron-quark phase transition in deep interior of these objects is discussed taking into account the implications on the density distribution of matter along the radial direction. The role of neutrinos confinement in the ultradense stellar medium in the early stages of pulsar formation is another interesting aspect to be mentioned in this presentation. Recent results for maximum mass of compact stellar objects for different forms of equations of state will be shown, presenting some theoretical predictions for maximum mass of neutron stars allowed by different equations of state assigned to dense stellar medium. Although a density greater than few times the nuclear equilibrium density appears in deep interior of the core, at the crust the density decreases by several orders of magnitude where a variety of hadronic states appears, the 'pasta'-states of hadrons. More externally, a lattice of nuclei can be formed permeated not only by electrons but also by a large amount of free neutrons and protons. These are possible structure of neutron star crust to have the density and pressures with null values at the neutron star surface. The ultimate goal of this talk is to give a short view of the compact star area for students and those who are introducing in this subject. (author)

  2. Mediator structure and rearrangements required for holoenzyme formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yu, Xiaodi; Gopalan, Sneha; Chao, Ti-Chun; Zhang, Ying; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Murakami, Kenji; Conaway, Ronald C; Conaway, Joan W; Asturias, Francisco J

    2017-04-13

    The conserved Mediator co-activator complex has an essential role in the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription in all eukaryotes. Understanding the structure and interactions of Mediator is crucial for determining how the complex influences transcription initiation and conveys regulatory information to the basal transcription machinery. Here we present a 4.4 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy map of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mediator in which conserved Mediator subunits are individually resolved. The essential Med14 subunit works as a central backbone that connects the Mediator head, middle and tail modules. Comparison with a 7.8 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy map of a Mediator-RNA polymerase II holoenzyme reveals that changes in the structure of Med14 facilitate a large-scale Mediator rearrangement that is essential for holoenzyme formation. Our study suggests that access to different conformations and crosstalk between structural elements are essential for the Mediator regulation mechanism, and could explain the capacity of the complex to integrate multiple regulatory signals.

  3. Structure formation cosmic rays: Identifying observational constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanović T.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Shocks that arise from baryonic in-fall and merger events during the structure formation are believed to be a source of cosmic rays. These "structure formation cosmic rays" (SFCRs would essentially be primordial in composition, namely, mostly made of protons and alpha particles. However, very little is known about this population of cosmic rays. One way to test the level of its presence is to look at the products of hadronic reactions between SFCRs and the ISM. A perfect probe of these reactions would be Li. The rare isotope Li is produced only by cosmic rays, dominantly in αα → 6Li fusion reactions with the ISM helium. Consequently, this nuclide provides a unique diagnostic of the history of cosmic rays. Exactly because of this unique property is Li affected most by the presence of an additional cosmic ray population. In turn, this could have profound consequences for the Big-Bang nucleosynthesis: cosmic rays created during cosmic structure formation would lead to pre-Galactic Li production, which would act as a "contaminant" to the primordial 7Li content of metalpoor halo stars. Given the already existing problem of establishing the concordance between Li observed in halo stars and primordial 7Li as predicted by the WMAP, it is crucial to set limits to the level of this "contamination". However, the history of SFCRs is not very well known. Thus we propose a few model-independent ways of testing the SFCR species and their history, as well as the existing lithium problem: 1 we establish the connection between gamma-ray and Li production, which enables us to place constraints on the SFCR-made lithium by using the observed Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background (EGRB; 2 we propose a new site for testing the primordial and SFCR-made lithium, namely, low-metalicity High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs, which retain the pre-Galactic composition without any significant depletion. Although using one method alone may not give us strong constraints, using them in

  4. Small scale structure formation in chameleon cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Ph.; Bruck, C. van de; Davis, A.C.; Green, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Chameleon fields are scalar fields whose mass depends on the ambient matter density. We investigate the effects of these fields on the growth of density perturbations on sub-galactic scales and the formation of the first dark matter halos. Density perturbations on comoving scales R<1 pc go non-linear and collapse to form structure much earlier than in standard ΛCDM cosmology. The resulting mini-halos are hence more dense and resilient to disruption. We therefore expect (provided that the density perturbations on these scales have not been erased by damping processes) that the dark matter distribution on small scales would be more clumpy in chameleon cosmology than in the ΛCDM model

  5. Formation of Structure in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, John; Fisher, Karl; Miralda-Escude, Jordi; Strauss, Michael; Weinberg, David

    1997-01-01

    This grant supported research by the investigators through summer salary support for Strauss and Weinberg, support for graduate students at Princeton University and Ohio State University, and travel, visitor, and publication support for the investigators. The grant originally had a duration of 1 year, and it was extended (without additional funding) for an additional year. The impact of the grant was considerable given its relatively modest duration and funding level, in part because it provided 'seed' funding to get Strauss and Weinberg started at new institutions, and in part because it was combined with support from subsequent grants. Here we summarize progress in the three general areas described in the grant proposal: Lyman alpha absorbers and the intergalactic medium, galaxy formation; and large scale structure.

  6. Formation of Calcite Biocrystals; Structure and Formation of Matrix Glycoproteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lennarz, William

    1997-01-01

    .... In these organisms, including the primitive skeleton (spicule) of the sea urchin embryo, the structural and functional role of these proteins either in the biomineralization process or in control of the structural features of the biocrystals is unclear...

  7. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Madumycin II inhibits peptide bond formation by forcing the peptidyl transferase center into an inactive state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Khabibullina, Nelli F.; Komarova, Ekaterina S.; Kasatsky, Pavel; Kartsev, Victor G.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Konevega, Andrey L.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Polikanov, Yury S. (InterBioScreen); (UIC); (MSU-Russia); (Kurchatov)

    2017-05-13

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is limiting the effectiveness of commonly used antibiotics, which spurs a renewed interest in revisiting older and poorly studied drugs. Streptogramins A is a class of protein synthesis inhibitors that target the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the large subunit of the ribosome. In this work, we have revealed the mode of action of the PTC inhibitor madumycin II, an alanine-containing streptogramin A antibiotic, in the context of a functional 70S ribosome containing tRNA substrates. Madumycin II inhibits the ribosome prior to the first cycle of peptide bond formation. It allows binding of the tRNAs to the ribosomal A and P sites, but prevents correct positioning of their CCA-ends into the PTC thus making peptide bond formation impossible. We also revealed a previously unseen drug-induced rearrangement of nucleotides U2506 and U2585 of the 23S rRNA resulting in the formation of the U2506•G2583 wobble pair that was attributed to a catalytically inactive state of the PTC. The structural and biochemical data reported here expand our knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms by which peptidyl transferase inhibitors modulate the catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  9. Sub-structure formation in starless cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, C.; Galli, D.; Verdini, A.; Del Zanna, L.; Landi, S.

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by recent observational searches of sub-structure in starless molecular cloud cores, we investigate the evolution of density perturbations on scales smaller than the Jeans length embedded in contracting isothermal clouds, adopting the same formalism developed for the expanding Universe and the solar wind. We find that initially small amplitude, Jeans-stable perturbations (propagating as sound waves in the absence of a magnetic field) are amplified adiabatically during the contraction, approximately conserving the wave action density, until they either become non-linear and steepen into shocks at a time tnl, or become gravitationally unstable when the Jeans length decreases below the scale of the perturbations at a time tgr. We evaluate analytically the time tnl at which the perturbations enter the non-linear stage using a Burgers' equation approach, and we verify numerically that this time marks the beginning of the phase of rapid dissipation of the kinetic energy of the perturbations. We then show that for typical values of the rms Mach number in molecular cloud cores, tnl is smaller than tgr, and therefore density perturbations likely dissipate before becoming gravitational unstable. Solenoidal modes grow at a faster rate than compressible modes, and may eventually promote fragmentation through the formation of vortical structures.

  10. EPR study of complex formation between copper (II) ions and sympathomimetic amines in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preoteasa, E.A. [Inst. of Atomic Physics, IFIN, Bucharest (Romania); Duliu, O.G.; Grecu, V.V. [Bucharest, Univ. (Romania). Dept. of Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    1997-07-01

    The complex formation between sympathomimetic amines (SA): adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), ephedrine (ED) and p-tyramine (pTA), and Cu(II) ion in aqueous solution has been studied by X-band EPR at room temperature. Excepting pTA, all investigated SA yielded two types of complexes in different pH domains. All complexes consistent with a ligand fields having a distorted octahedral symmetry, i.e., hexacoordination of Cu(II). The covalence coefficient calculated from the isotropic g and A values has shown strong ionic sigma-type ligand bonds. A structural model with the Cu(II) ion bound by four catecholic O(hydroxy) atoms for the low pH complexes of AD, NA and DA is proposed. For the high pH complexes of the former compounds as well as for both Ed complexes, the authors suppose Cu(II) bound by two N (amino) and two O (hydroxy) atoms. The spectra are consistent to water binding on the longitudinal octahedron axis in all compounds excepting the high pH complex of Ed, where OH2- ions are bound. Possible implications for the SA-cell receptors interactions are discussed.

  11. Melanoidin formation in ethanolic monosaccharide – arylamine – copper (II systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherepanov I. S.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of studying of melanoidin formation regularities at interaction of D-glucose and D-xylose with p-amino benzoic acid (PABA in acidic ethanolic media have been presented; features of the chosen threefold systems are, firstly, existence of the low-active amino-compound of benzene series, secondly, presence of catalytic amounts of the biogenic metal. Regularities of melanoidins structure formation from similar systems are almost not studied, at the same time some important biological properties are predicted for them that demands research of reactions' kinetics and development of techniques of their directional synthesis. Studying has been carried out by synthetic methods in total with a sample drawing technique with UV-Vis-spectrophotometry filing and engaging of FTIR-spectroscopy. Based on electronic spectra analysis more intensive melanoidin formation in case of reaction from D-xylose has been shown, this can be bound to steric hindrance and to ability of aldopentoses to give more reactionary capable intermediates in comparison with aldohexoses. The accelerating role of copper (II ions as the complexing center catalyzing both formation and degradation of the intermediate products at different reaction stages has been confirmed, at the same time the accelerating action is considerably shown since copper ion concentrations about 60 mg/l, but Cu(II chelation degree by final products is low. The effect of solvent has been noted, in particular the influence of ethanol on nature of amino-carbonyl interactions manifested in strengthening of carbohydrates tendency to re-cyclization, it also probably accelerates melanoidin formation. The data obtained have shown the percent of carbohydrates direct destruction (caramelization in the presented conditions is insignificant, that allows developing based on the present researches target synthetic techniques for melanoidin products' preparation.

  12. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  13. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  14. Dissociation behavior of methane--ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro; Narita, Hideo

    2010-09-09

    Dissociation behavior of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II at constant temperatures less than 223 K was studied with use of powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. The diffraction patterns at temperatures less than 203 K showed both structures I and II simultaneously convert to Ih during the dissociation, but the diffraction pattern at temperatures greater than 208 K showed different dissociation behavior between structures I and II. Although the diffraction peaks from structure II decreased during measurement at constant temperatures greater than 208 K, those from structure I increased at the initial step of dissociation and then disappeared. This anomalous behavior of the methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II was examined by using the (13)C NMR technique. The (13)C NMR spectra revealed that the anomalous behavior results from the formation of ethane-rich structure I. The structure I hydrate formation was associated with the dissociation rate of the initial methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate.

  15. Consensus formation on coevolving networks: groups' formation and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozma, Balazs; Barrat, Alain

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of adaptivity on a social model of opinion dynamics and consensus formation. We analyse how the adaptivity of the network of contacts between agents to the underlying social dynamics affects the size and topological properties of groups and the convergence time to the stable final state. We find that, while on static networks these properties are determined by percolation phenomena, on adaptive networks the rewiring process leads to different behaviors: adaptive rewiring fosters group formation by enhancing communication between agents of similar opinion, though it also makes possible the division of clusters. We show how the convergence time is determined by the characteristic time of link rearrangement. We finally investigate how the adaptivity yields nontrivial correlations between the internal topology and the size of the groups of agreeing agents

  16. A fluorescent chemosensor for Zn(II). Exciplex formation in solution and the solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencini, Andrea; Berni, Emanuela; Bianchi, Antonio; Fornasari, Patrizia; Giorgi, Claudia; Lima, Joao C; Lodeiro, Carlos; Melo, Maria J; de Melo, J Seixas; Parola, Antonio Jorge; Pina, Fernando; Pina, Joao; Valtancoli, Barbara

    2004-07-21

    The macrocyclic phenanthrolinophane 2,9-[2,5,8-triaza-5-(N-anthracene-9-methylamino)ethyl]-[9]-1,10-phenanthrolinophane (L) bearing a pendant arm containing a coordinating amine and an anthracene group forms stable complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) in solution. Stability constants of these complexes were determined in 0.10 mol dm(-3) NMe(4)Cl H(2)O-MeCN (1:1, v/v) solution at 298.1 +/- 0.1 K by means of potentiometric (pH metric) titration. The fluorescence emission properties of these complexes were studied in this solvent. For the Zn(II) complex, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies were performed in ethanol solution and in the solid state. In solution, intramolecular pi-stacking interaction between phenanthroline and anthracene in the ground state and exciplex emission in the excited state were observed. From the temperature dependence of the photostationary ratio (I(Exc)/I(M)), the activation energy for the exciplex formation (E(a)) and the binding energy of the exciplex (-DeltaH) were determined. The crystal structure of the [ZnLBr](ClO(4)).H(2)O compound was resolved, showing that in the solid state both intra- and inter-molecular pi-stacking interactions are present. Such interactions were also evidenced by UV-vis absorption and emission spectra in the solid state. The absorption spectrum of a thin film of the solid complex is red-shifted compared with the solution spectra, whereas its emission spectrum reveals the unique featureless exciplex band, blue shifted compared with the solution. In conjunction with X-ray data the solid-state data was interpreted as being due to a new exciplex where no pi-stacking (full overlap of the pi-electron cloud of the two chromophores - anthracene and phenanthroline) is observed. L is a fluorescent chemosensor able to signal Zn(II) in presence of Cd(II) and Hg(II), since the last two metal ions do not give rise either to the formation of pi-stacking complexes or to exciplex emission in solution.

  17. Structure formation and microlensing with axion miniclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Marsh, David J. E.; Quevillon, Jérémie; Rozier, Simon

    2018-04-01

    If the symmetry breaking responsible for axion dark matter production occurs during the radiation-dominated epoch in the early Universe, then this produces large amplitude perturbations that collapse into dense objects known as axion miniclusters. The characteristic minicluster mass, M0, is set by the mass inside the horizon when axion oscillations begin. For the QCD axion M0˜10-10 M⊙, however, for an axionlike particle, M0 can approach M⊙ or higher. Using the Press-Schechter formalism we compute the mass function of halos formed by hierarchical structure formation from these seeds. We compute the concentrations and collapse times of these halos and show that they can grow to be as massive as 1 06M0. Within the halos, miniclusters likely remain tightly bound, and we compute their gravitational microlensing signal taking the fraction of axion dark matter collapsed into miniclusters, fMC, as a free parameter. A large value of fMC severely weakens constraints on axion scenarios from direct detection experiments. We take into account the non-Gaussian distribution of sizes of miniclusters and determine how this affects the number of microlensing events. We develop the tools to consider microlensing by an extended mass function of nonpointlike objects, and we use microlensing data to place the first observational constraints on fMC. This opens a new window for the potential discovery of the axion.

  18. Structural and kinematic analysis from Montevideo Formation rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masquelin, E.; Gutierrez, L.; Sienra, M.

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to bring new advances about structural and kinematic analysis from Montevideo Formation rocks. This information was collected by means of the classic methodology used for metamorphic terrains: (i) to recognize the nature of the protoliths, (ii) to discriminate the diversity of intrusive rocks and their relative age, (iii) to evaluate the intensity of strain, and (iv) to find the relationship between this strain and related displacements, in accordance to the unified theory for ductile shear zones. The exposed results show that there are not enough evidences to prove that the layering found in para-amphibolites and para-gneisses is the bedding surface. Although various lava primary structures were presented, these structures do not bring the bedding plane directly, and sedimentary structures are suspicious. In the other hand, the strain has proved to be very intense, by the development of isoclinal folds (may be intrafolial), highly strained veins of plagioclase-bearing gneiss and the boudinage of the duplicated sequence parallel to the axes of D2 later folds. The D2 fold axes parallel direction could be acted as the transport direction of a major strike-slip shear zone, striking N70 0 E. The fact is that various ductile flow vorticity indicators were found in para-amphibolites showing a dextral shear sense [es

  19. The Taxonomy of Blue Amorphous Galaxies. II. Structure and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Amanda T.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    1999-09-01

    Dwarf galaxies play an important role in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution, and starbursts are believed to affect the structure and evolution of dwarf galaxies strongly. We have therefore embarked on a systematic study of 12 of the nearest dwarf galaxies thought to be undergoing bursts of star formation. These were selected primarily by their morphological type (blue ``amorphous'' galaxies). We show that these blue amorphous galaxies are not physically distinguishable from dwarfs selected as starbursting by other methods, such as blue compact dwarfs (BCDs) and H II galaxies. All these classes exhibit surface brightness profiles that are exponential in the outer regions (r>~1.5re) but often have a predominantly central blue excess, suggesting a young burst in an older, redder galaxy. Typically, the starbursting ``cores'' are young (~107-108 yr) events compared to the older (~109-1010 yr) underlying galaxy (the ``envelope''). The ratio of the core to envelope in blue light ranges from essentially zero to about 2. These starbursts are therefore modest events involving only a few percent of the stellar mass. The envelopes have surface brightnesses that are much higher than typical dwarf irregular (dI) galaxies, so it is unlikely that there is a straightforward evolutionary relation between typical dIs and dwarf starburst galaxies. Instead we suggest that amorphous galaxies may repeatedly cycle through starburst and quiescent phases, corresponding to the galaxies with strong and weak/absent cores, respectively. Once amorphous galaxies use up the available gas (either through star formation or galactic winds) so that star formation is shut off, the faded remnants would strongly resemble dwarf elliptical galaxies. However, in the current cosmological epoch, this is evidently a slow process that is the aftermath of a series of many weak, recurring bursts. Present-day dE's must have experienced more rapid and intense evolution than this in the distant past.

  20. Formation of disorientations in dislocation structures during plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, W.

    2002-01-01

    Disorientations developing during plastic deformation in dislocation structures are investigated. Based on expected mechanisms for the formation of different types of dislocation boundaries (statistical trapping of dislocations or differently activated slip systems) the formation of the disorient...

  1. Spiral Structure and Global Star Formation Processes in M 51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruendl, Robert A.

    1994-12-01

    The nearby grand design spiral galaxy, M 51, is an obvious proving ground for studies of spiral structure and large scale star formation processes. New near--infrared observations of M 51 made with COB (Cryogenic Optical Bench) on the Kitt Peak 1.3m allow us to examine the stellar distribution and the young star formation regions as well as probe regions of high extinction such as dust lanes. We also present an analysis of the kinematics of the ionized gas observed with the Maryland--Caltech Imaging Fabry Perot. The color information we derive from the near--infrared bands provides a more accurate tracer of extinction than optical observations. We find that the dust extinction and CO emission in the arms are well correlated. Our kinematic data show unambiguously that these dense gas concentrations are associated with kinematic perturbations. In the inner disk, these perturbations are seen to be consistent with the streaming motions predicted by classical density wave theory. The dust lanes, and presumably the molecular arms, form a narrow ridge that matches these velocity perturbations wherever the viewing angle is appropriate. This interpretation requires that the corotation radius be inward of the outer tidal arms. The outer tidal arms however show streaming velocities of the sign that would be expected interior to the corotation point. This can be reconciled if the outer arms are part of a second spiral pattern, most likely due to the interaction with the companion NGC 5195. The near--infrared observations also show emission from the massive star forming regions. These observations are less affected by extinction than optical observations of H II regions and show clearly that the sites of massive star formation are correlated with but downstream from the concentrations of dense molecular material. This provides clear evidence that the ISM has been organized by the streaming motions which have in turn triggered massive star formation.

  2. Structural properties of MHC class II ligands, implications for the prediction of MHC class II epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Winther Jørgensen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility class II (MHC-II molecules sample peptides from the extracellular space allowing the immune system to detect the presence of foreign microbes from this compartment. Prediction of MHC class II ligands is complicated by the open binding cleft of the MHC class II molecule, allowing binding of peptides extending out of the binding groove. Furthermore, only a few HLA-DR alleles have been characterized with a sufficient number of peptides (100-200 peptides per allele to derive accurate description of their binding motif. Little work has been performed characterizing structural properties of MHC class II ligands. Here, we perform one such large-scale analysis. A large set of SYFPEITHI MHC class II ligands covering more than 20 different HLA-DR molecules was analyzed in terms of their secondary structure and surface exposure characteristics in the context of the native structure of the corresponding source protein. We demonstrated that MHC class II ligands are significantly more exposed and have significantly more coil content than other peptides in the same protein with similar predicted binding affinity. We next exploited this observation to derive an improved prediction method for MHC class II ligands by integrating prediction of MHC- peptide binding with prediction of surface exposure and protein secondary structure. This combined prediction method was shown to significantly outperform the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction method when used to identify MHC class II ligands. We also tried to integrate N- and O-glycosylation in our prediction methods but this additional information was found not to improve prediction performance. In summary, these findings strongly suggest that local structural properties influence antigen processing and/or the accessibility of peptides to the MHC class II molecule.

  3. Dual pathway for angiotensin II formation in human internal mammary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, A. A.; Pinto, Y. M.; Buikema, H.; Urata, H.; Oosterga, M.; Rooks, G.; Grandjean, J. G.; Ganten, D.; van Gilst, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    1. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is thought to be the main enzyme to convert antiotensin I to the vasoactive angiotensin II. Recently, in the human heart, it was found that the majority of angiotensin II formation was due to another enzyme, identified as human heart chymase. In the human

  4. Formation control of unicycle robots using virtual structure approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadowska, A.D.; Huijberts, H.J.C.; Kostic, D.; Wouw, van de N.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of formation control of groups of unicycle robots with possibly time-varying formation shapes. To solve the problem, we propose two simple distributed formation control algorithms based on the virtual structure approach. We prove exponential convergence of error

  5. Acceptors in II-IV Semiconductors - Incorporation and Complex Formation

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A strong effort is currently devoted to the investigation of defects and the electrical activation of dopant atoms in II-VI semiconductors. In particular, the knowledge about the behaviour of acceptors, prerequisite for the fabrication of p-type semiconductors, is rather limited. The perturbed $\\,{\\gamma\\gamma}$ -angular correlation technique (PAC) and the photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) using the radioactive isotopes $^{77}\\!$Br and $^{111}\\!$Ag will be applied for investigating the behaviour of acceptor dopant atoms and their interactions with defects in II-VI semiconductors. The main topic will be the identification of the technical conditions for the incorporation of electrically active acceptors in the II-VI semiconductors ~ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe with particular emphasis on the compounds~ CdTe, ZnSe, and ZnTe. The investigations will be supplemented by first exploratory PL experiments with the group V acceptors $^{71}\\!$As and $^{121}\\!$Sb. With help of the probe $^{111}\\!$Ag, the pos...

  6. Fungal oxidative dissolution of the Mn(II)-bearing mineral rhodochrosite and the role of metabolites in manganese oxide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanzhi; Zeiner, Carolyn A; Santelli, Cara M; Hansel, Colleen M

    2013-04-01

    Microbially mediated oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides influences the cycling of metals and remineralization of carbon. Despite the prevalence of Mn(II)-bearing minerals in nature, little is known regarding the ability of microbes to oxidize mineral-hosted Mn(II). Here, we explored oxidation of the Mn(II)-bearing mineral rhodochrosite (MnCO3 ) and characteristics of ensuing Mn oxides by six Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi. All fungal species substantially enhanced rhodochrosite dissolution and surface modification. Mineral-hosted Mn(II) was oxidized resulting in formation of Mn(III/IV) oxides that were all similar to δ-MnO2 but varied in morphology and distribution in relation to cellular structures and the MnCO3 surface. For four fungi, Mn(II) oxidation occurred along hyphae, likely mediated by cell wall-associated proteins. For two species, Mn(II) oxidation occurred via reaction with fungal-derived superoxide produced at hyphal tips. This pathway ultimately resulted in structurally unique Mn oxide clusters formed at substantial distances from any cellular structure. Taken together, findings for these two fungi strongly point to a role for fungal-derived organic molecules in Mn(III) complexation and Mn oxide templation. Overall, this study illustrates the importance of fungi in rhodochrosite dissolution, extends the relevance of biogenic superoxide-based Mn(II) oxidation and highlights the potential role of mycogenic exudates in directing mineral precipitation. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Composite Structure Monitoring using Direct Write Sensors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project seeks to develop and demonstrate a suite of sensor products to monitor the health of composite structures. Sensors will be made using...

  8. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  9. Young stellar population and ongoing star formation in the H II complex Sh2-252

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jessy; Pandey, A. K.; Samal, M. R.; Ojha, D. K.; Ogura, K.; Kim, J. S.; Kobayashi, N.; Goyal, A.; Chauhan, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, an extensive survey of the star-forming complex Sh2-252 has been undertaken with an aim to explore its hidden young stellar population as well as to understand the structure and star formation history for the first time. This complex is composed of five prominent embedded clusters associated with the subregions A, C, E, NGC 2175s and Teu 136. We used Two Micron All Sky Survey-near-infrared and Spitzer-Infrared Array Camera, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer photometry to identify and classify the young stellar objects (YSOs) by their infrared (IR) excess emission. Using the IR colour-colour criteria, we identified 577 YSOs, of which, 163 are Class I, 400 are Class II and 14 are transition disc YSOs, suggesting a moderately rich number of YSOs in this complex. Spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs shows that they are mostly clustered around the subregions in the western half of the complex, suggesting enhanced star formation activity towards its west. Using the spectral energy distribution and optical colour-magnitude diagram-based age analyses, we derived probable evolutionary status of the subregions of Sh2-252. Our analysis shows that the region A is the youngest (˜0.5 Myr), the regions B, C and E are of similar evolutionary stage (˜1-2 Myr) and the clusters NGC 2175s and Teu 136 are slightly evolved (˜2-3 Myr). Morphology of the region in the 1.1 mm map shows a semicircular shaped molecular shell composed of several clumps and YSOs bordering the western ionization front of Sh2-252. Our analyses suggest that next generation star formation is currently under way along this border and that possibly fragmentation of the matter collected during the expansion of the H II region as one of the major processes is responsible for such stars. We observed the densest concentration of YSOs (mostly Class I, ˜0.5 Myr) at the western outskirts of the complex, within a molecular clump associated with water and methanol masers and we suggest that it

  10. Acrylamide and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural formation during biscuit baking. Part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.T.; Fels, van der Ine; Boekel, van Tiny

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated acrylamide and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation during biscuit baking. Four types of wheat flour with different molar ratios of total fructose and glucose to asparagine were investigated. Nevertheless, the molar ratio in all four biscuit doughs exceeded one after

  11. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoust, R.

    2008-07-01

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  12. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoust, R.

    2008-01-01

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  13. Template Syntheses, Crystal Structures and Supramolecular Assembly of Hexaaza Macrocyclic Copper(II) Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Ju Chang; Lough, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Two new hexaaza macrocyclic copper(II) complexes were prepared by a template method and structurally characterized. In the solid state, they were self-assembled by intermolecular interactions to form the corresponding supramolecules 1 and 2, respectively. In the structure of 1, the copper(II) macrocycles are bridged by a tp ligand to form a macrocyclic copper(II) dimer. The dimer extends its structure by intermolecular forces such as hydrogen bonds and C-H···π interactions, resulting in the formation of a double stranded 1D supramolecule. In 2, the basic structure is a monomeric copper(II) macrocycle with deprotonated imidazole pendants. An undulated 1D hydrogen bonded array is achieved through hydrogen bonds between imidazole pendants and secondary amines, where the imidazole pendants act as a hydrogen bond acceptor. The 1D hydrogen bonded supramolecular chain is supported by C-H···π interactions between the methyl groups of acetonitrile ligands and imidazole pendants of the copper(II) macrocycles. In both complexes, the introduction of imidazoles to the macrocycle as a pendant plays an important role for the formation of supramolecules, where they act as intermolecular hydrogen bond donors and/or acceptors, C-H···π and π-π interactions

  14. Meniscus Dynamics in Bubble Formation. Part II: Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Bunganič, Radovan; Drahoš, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 10 (2009), s. 1357-1365 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200720801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * periodic bubbling * meniscus oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009

  15. Sequestration and Distribution Characteristics of Cd(II by Microcystis aeruginosa and Its Role in Colony Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the sequestration and distribution characteristics of Cd(II by Microcystis aeruginosa and its role in Microcystis colony formation, M. aeruginosa was exposed to six different Cd(II concentrations for 10 days. Cd(II exposure caused hormesis in the growth of M. aeruginosa. Low concentrations of Cd(II significantly induced formation of small Microcystis colonies (P93% of Cd(II was sequestrated in the groups with lower added concentrations of Cd(II. More than 80% of the sequestrated Cd(II was bioadsorbed by bEPS. The Pearson correlation coefficients of exterior and interior factors related to colony formation of M. aeruginosa revealed that Cd(II could stimulate the production of IPS and bEPS via increasing Cd(II bioaccumulation and bioadsorption. Increased levels of cross-linking between Cd(II and bEPS stimulated algal cell aggregation, which eventually promoted the formation of Microcystis colonies.

  16. NONA Cure of Prepreg Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG's no-oven, no-autoclave (NONA) cure of OoA or autoclave prepreg materials allows the manufacture of large composite structures without the expensive and...

  17. Optimizing the structure of Tetracyanoplatinate(II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2013-01-01

    . For the C-N bond these trends are reversed and an order of magnitude smaller. With respect to the basis set dependence we observed that a triple zeta basis set with polarization functions gives in general sufficiently converged results, but while for the Pt-C bond it is advantageous to include extra diffuse......The geometry of tetracyanoplatinate(II) (TCP) has been optimized with density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to compare different computational strategies. Two approximate scalar relativistic methods, i.e. the scalar zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) and non...... is almost quantitatively reproduced in the ZORA and ECP calculations. In addition, the effect of the exchange-correlation functional and one-electron basis set was studied by employing the two generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals, BLYP and PBE, as well as their hybrid version B3LYP and PBE0...

  18. A study on complex formation of cadmium (II) ions, 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Haruo

    1984-01-01

    Formation constants of cadmium (11) complexes with dicarboxylic acids such as oxalic, malonic, methylmalonic, succinic, and glutaric acids were determined in aqueous solutions containing 3 mol.dm -3 LiClO 4 as a constan ionic medium at 25 0 C by potentiometric titrations. It was reported in the previous works that cadmium (11)- aspartic acid complexes contained two chelate rings. However, a problem remained whether the second chelate ring could be formed by six membered-ring containing -O-Cd-N- bond or by seven membered-ring containing -O-Cd-O- bond. The results of the present work suggested that it would be formed by a six membered ring. Cadmium (11) ions were coordinated with a carboxylic group of the dicarboxylic acids studied, and formed no chelate ring within the complexes. The white precipitate appeared in the solution containing cadmium (11) ion and oxalic acid, in the pH range below 3.0, therefore, the chelate formation was not ascertained in this case. The formation constants, log βsub(pr)= log([Cdsub(p)Lsub(r)sup((2p-2r)+)]/([Cd 2+ ]sup(p)[L 2- ]sup(r))), of the complexes were: log β 11 = 1.98, log β 12 = 3.05 for cadmium (11)-malonic acid; log β 11 = 2.28, log β 12 = 3.06 for cadmium (11)-methylmalonic acid; log β 11 = 1.78, log β 12 = 3.08 for cadmium (11)-succinic acid; log β 11 = 1.85, log β 12 = 3.28 for cadmium (11)-glutaric acid complexes. (author)

  19. On the importance of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel; Proctor, Jeff R.; Meyer, Irmtraud M.

    2013-01-01

    The expression of genes, both coding and noncoding, can be significantly influenced by RNA structural features of their corresponding transcripts. There is by now mounting experimental and some theoretical evidence that structure formation in vivo starts during transcription and that this cotranscriptional folding determines the functional RNA structural features that are being formed. Several decades of research in bioinformatics have resulted in a wide range of computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structures. Almost all state-of-the-art methods in terms of prediction accuracy, however, completely ignore the process of structure formation and focus exclusively on the final RNA structure. This review hopes to bridge this gap. We summarize the existing evidence for cotranscriptional folding and then review the different, currently used strategies for RNA secondary-structure prediction. Finally, we propose a range of ideas on how state-of-the-art methods could be potentially improved by explicitly capturing the process of cotranscriptional structure formation. PMID:24131802

  20. Formation of structures in the very early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami Neto, O.; Marques, G.C.; Ventura, I.

    1984-01-01

    An alternative picture of cosmological phase transition is sketched and its implications to the formation of structures in the very early Universe is studied. It is shown that the condensation of walls at high temperatures leads to fluctuations which are in accordance to all necessary conditions to the formation of structures in the Universe. Furthermore the number of aglutination centers is roughly equal to the numbers of great structures observed in the Universe today. (Author) [pt

  1. Ring Formation in Lime Kilns; Ringbildning i Mesaugnar II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhak, Janice [AaF-Process AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-07-15

    The key to a cost efficient and high performance pulp production is low variations in the production level. Despite the fact that all pulp mills always work with improvements to eliminate problems with ring formations, AaF has at several mill seen that the operation of a lime kiln still often is disturbed by ring formation. In 1999 AAF made an extensive investigation of more than 10 lime kilns in Sweden, considering operational data, kiln data and lime chemical analyzes. The result pointed out the importance of how the lime kiln is operated and that dead load and contaminants in the lime was less important. The report suggested that it is the difference in the temperature between the flue gas and the lime that is of importance. There are no quantified process values available that guides for a 'best practice' way to run a lime kiln to avoid ring formation. The goal with this project has been to develop a strategy for operation of a kiln in a way that lowers the risk for ring formation. The results from simulations of a number of lime kilns in this project could not proof that a low difference in the temperature between the flue gas and the lime was the main cause of problems with ring formation and thus it was not possible to quantify the optimal difference to avoid rings. Probably the most important information from the simulations was that it is not the temperature difference in number of degrees that is of importance, rather the fact that the temperature difference in the kalcining zone varies, and time to time reach below the critical level were lime occasionally is cooled down. It can be the case if the temperature profile of the flue gas temporarily changes or if the lime mud temperature profile is changed. The reason for changes in the temperature profile is discussed in the report. The most important factors discussed are: Variations in the energy input e.g. oil and methanol/strong gases in cocombustion. One single fuel is easier to control

  2. Extreme emulsification: formation and structure of nanoemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.G.Mason

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoemulsions are metastable dispersions of nanodroplets of one liquid that have been ruptured by shear in another immiscible liquid. The ruptured droplets are stabilized against subsequent coalescence by a surfactant. Because the nanodroplets do not form spontaneously, as they can in lyotropic ``microemulsion'' phases, the structure of nanoemulsions is primarily dependent on the history of the applied shear stresses relative to the interfacial restoring stresses. By applying extremely high shear rates and controlling the composition of the emulsion, we have been able to rupture microscale droplets down to diameters as small as 30 nm in a microfluidic process that yields bulk quantities suitable for commercial production. Following ultracentrifugal fractionation to make the droplets uniform, we study the structure of these emulsions using small angle neutron scattering (SANS at dilute and concentrated volume fractions. We contrast the structure of a concentrated nanoemulsion with the structure factor of hard spheres at a similar volume fraction.

  3. Profile structures of TJ-II stellarator plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herranz, J.; Pastor, I.; Castejon, F.; de la Luna, E.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Barth, C. J.; Ascasibar, E.; Sanchez, J.; Tribaldos, V.

    2000-01-01

    Fine structures are found in the TJ-II stellarator electron temperature and density profiles, when they are measured using a high spatial resolution Thomson scattering system. These structures consist of peaks and valleys superimposed to a smooth average. Some irregularities remain in an ensemble

  4. Structural basis for hyperactivity of cN-II mutants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnízda, Aleš; Škerlová, Jana; Šinalová, Martina; Pachl, Petr; Man, Petr; Novák, Petr; Fábry, Milan; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Veverka, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 4 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : cN-II mutants * enzyme hyperactivity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  5. The Reliability of [C II] as a Star Formation Rate Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Looze Ilse

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a calibration of the star formation rate (SFR as a function of the [C II] 157.74 μm luminosity for a sample of 24 star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe. In order to calibrate the SFR against the line luminosity, we rely on both GALEX FUV data, which is an ideal tracer of the unobscured star formation, and Spitzer MIPS 24 μm, to probe the dust-enshrouded fraction of star formation. For this sample of normal star-forming galaxies, the [C II] luminosity correlates well with the star formation rate. However, the extension of this relation to more quiescent (Hα EW≤10 Å or ultra luminous galaxies (LTIR ≥1012 L⊙ should be handled with caution, since these objects show a non-linearity in the L[C II]-to-LFIR ratio as a function of LFIR (and thus, their star formation activity. Two possible scenarios can be invoked to explain the tight correlation between the [C II] emission and the star formation activity on a global galaxy-scale. The first interpretation could be that the [C II] emission from photo dissociation regions arises from the immediate surroundings of actively star-forming regions and contributes a more or less constant fraction on a global galaxy-scale. Alternatively, we consider the possibility that the [C II] emission is associated to the cold interstellar medium, which advocates an indirect link with the star formation activity in a galaxy through the Schmidt law.

  6. The Influence of Temperature on the Formation of Cubic Structured CdO Nanoparticles and Their Thin Films from Bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydatocadmium(II Complex via Thermal Decomposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thokozani Xaba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have developed a great interest in the synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles due to their potential applications in various fields of science and industry, especially in catalysis, due to their high activity. Bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydatocadmium(II complexes were prepared and used as precursors for the synthesis of cadmium oxide nanoparticles via thermal decomposition method using HDA as a stabilizing agent. The prepared complexes were also used as single source precursors to prepare CdO thin films onto the glass substrates by spin coating and were annealed at 250, 300, and 350°C, respectively. The precursors were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The synthesized CdO nanoparticles and CdO thin films were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM.

  7. Stellar Population and Star Formation History of the Distant Galactic H II Regions NGC 2282 and Sh2-149

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S.; Mondal, S.; Jose, J.; Das, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    We present here the recent results on two distant Galactic H II regions, namely NGC 2282 and Sh2-149, obtained with multiwavelength observations. Our optical spectroscopic analysis of the bright sources have been used to identify the massive members, and to derive the fundamental parameters such as age and distance of these regions. Using IR color-color criteria and Hα-emission properties, we have identified and classified the candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in these regions. The 12CO(1-0) continuum maps along with the K-band extinction maps, and spatial distribution of YSOs are used to investigate the structure and morphology of the molecular cloud associated with these H II regions. Overall analysis of these regions suggests that the star formation occurs at the locations of the denser gas, and we also find possible evidences of the induced star formation due to the feedback from massive stars to its surrounding molecular medium.

  8. Simultaneous determination of Hg(II)-Ag(I)-Cd(II) by conductometric titration using the formation of ternary complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Ichiro; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Taga, Mitsuhiko; Hikime, Seiichiro

    1979-01-01

    A conductometric determination of Hg(II), Ag(I) and Cd(II) was carried out by using the insoluble ternary complex formation of the metal ions with iodide ion in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). Recommended procedure is as follows; An aliquot of sample solution containing (14 -- 29) mg of Hg(II), (8 -- 16) mg of Ag(I), and (9 -- 17) mg of Cd(II) transfered into a 100 ml beaker. Add to acetate buffer and stoichiometric amounts of phen (40% ethanol-water solution). Amounts of nitrate ion which was estimated separately by other titration with 0.1 M Ag(phen) 2 complex (40% ethanol-water solution) are adjusted in the range of (4.0 -- 6.0) mM. The sample solution is titrated with 0.1 M KI standard solution at the rate of 0.20 ml/min or less. The titration curve showed three end-points corresponding to the formation of (1) Hg(phen) 2 I 2 , (2) Ag(phen)I, and (3) Cd(phen) 2 I 2 . The relative standard deviation was less than 0.8%, when the pH value was controlled at 4.0 -- 4.5 (acetate buffer) and the nitrate concentration was adjusted in the range of (4.0 -- 6.0)mM. The effect of diverse ions on the determination was also investigated in detail. (author)

  9. Mechanism of structural type formation of rare earth polychalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'micheva, G.M.; Eliseev, A.A.; Khalina, S.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    It proved to be possible to obtain the structural motives not only of all the known polychalcogenides of rare earth elements but to forecast compounds not yet existing on the basis of two initial structural motives. All the structural motives can be divided into superstructures and polytypes as to the mechanism of their formation [ru

  10. Elastogranular Mechanics: Buckling, Jamming, and Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunter, David J.; Brandenbourger, Martin; Perriseau, Sophia; Holmes, Douglas P.

    2018-02-01

    Confinement of a slender body into a granular array induces stress localization in the geometrically nonlinear structure, and jamming, reordering, and vertical dislodging of the surrounding granular medium. By varying the initial packing density of grains and the length of a confined elastica, we identify the critical length necessary to induce jamming, and demonstrate how folds couple with the granular medium to localize along grain boundaries. Above the jamming threshold, the characteristic length of elastica deformation is shown to diverge in a manner that is coupled with the motion and rearrangement of the grains, suggesting the ordering of the granular array governs the deformation of the slender structure. However, overconfinement of the elastica will vertically dislodge grains, a form of stress relaxation in the granular medium that illustrates the intricate coupling in elastogranular interactions.

  11. Elastogranular Mechanics: Buckling, Jamming, and Structure Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunter, David J; Brandenbourger, Martin; Perriseau, Sophia; Holmes, Douglas P

    2018-02-16

    Confinement of a slender body into a granular array induces stress localization in the geometrically nonlinear structure, and jamming, reordering, and vertical dislodging of the surrounding granular medium. By varying the initial packing density of grains and the length of a confined elastica, we identify the critical length necessary to induce jamming, and demonstrate how folds couple with the granular medium to localize along grain boundaries. Above the jamming threshold, the characteristic length of elastica deformation is shown to diverge in a manner that is coupled with the motion and rearrangement of the grains, suggesting the ordering of the granular array governs the deformation of the slender structure. However, overconfinement of the elastica will vertically dislodge grains, a form of stress relaxation in the granular medium that illustrates the intricate coupling in elastogranular interactions.

  12. The Formation of Structure of Marketing Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Dubickis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the changing high-level complex environment, it is moreand more important for the companies to focus on the marketand costumer. Or, in other words, the companies supposed toturn their attention to the marketing. Despite the fact that themajor subject of an economy is a company, the analysis of themarket-ing issues on the company level is limited. Meanwhile,both practical and scientific problems are significant. One ofthe most important issues is forming the structure of marketingdepartment. Its functions and the content of implementingmeasures determine that its structure supposed to consist ofthe market research and segmentation, development of businessstrategy, strategic planning as well as advertising and realizationof production.

  13. Semiconductor structure and recess formation etch technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Bin; Sun, Min; Palacios, Tomas Apostol

    2017-02-14

    A semiconductor structure has a first layer that includes a first semiconductor material and a second layer that includes a second semiconductor material. The first semiconductor material is selectively etchable over the second semiconductor material using a first etching process. The first layer is disposed over the second layer. A recess is disposed at least in the first layer. Also described is a method of forming a semiconductor structure that includes a recess. The method includes etching a region in a first layer using a first etching process. The first layer includes a first semiconductor material. The first etching process stops at a second layer beneath the first layer. The second layer includes a second semiconductor material.

  14. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M.

    2014-01-01

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After...... cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against...... detachment and decomposition. The chemical reaction between gluteraldehyde, the cross-linking agent, and chitosan was followed in situ using total internal reflection Raman (TIRR) spectroscopy, which provided a molecular insight into the complex reaction mechanism, as well as the means to quantify the cross...

  15. Metastable structure formation during high velocity grinding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarin, A.N.; Klyuev, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Metastable structures in surface layers of samples are; investigated during force high-velocity abrasive grinding. Samples of martensitic (40Kh13), austenitic (12Kh18N10T), ferritic (05Kh23Yu5) steels and some alloys, in particular KhN77TYuR (EhI437B), were grinded for one pass at treatment depth from 0.17 up to 2.6 mm. It is established that processes of homogenizing, recrystallization and coagulation are; developed during force high-velocity grinding along with polymorphic transformations in the zone of thermomechanical effect, that leads to changes of physical and mechanical properties of the surface

  16. Structures formation through self-organized accretion on cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdzek, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we shall show that the formation of structures through accretion by a cosmic string is driven by a natural feed-back mechanism: a part of the energy radiated by accretions creates a pressure on the accretion disk itself. This phenomenon leads to a nonlinear evolution of the accretion process. Thus, the formation of structures results as a consequence of a self-organized growth of the accreting central object.

  17. Exciplex formation of copper(II) octaethylporphyrin revealed by pulsed x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.X.; Shaw, G.B.; Liu, T.; Jennings, G.; Attenkofer, K.

    2004-01-01

    The triplet excited structures of Cu(II) octaethylporphyrin (CuOEP) in toluene and in 1:1 mixture of toluene and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were investigated by time-domain laser pulse pump, X-ray pulse probe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (pump-probe XAS) at room temperature using X-rays from a third generation synchrotron source with 100-ps time resolution. The transient optical absorption measurements indicate a strong solvent dependency of the triplet excited state lifetime due to the presence of oxygen-containing solvent molecules. While the ground state CuOEP molecules remain square-planar in both solvents, the attenuation of a peak attributed to the 1s → 4p z transition at the Cu K-edge for the laser excited CuOEP in the THF/toluene mixture revealed the penta-coordinated exciplex formation which is responsible for the shortening of the triplet excited state lifetime. Meanwhile, the average Cu-N distance in the triplet excited state is lengthened by 0.03 (angstrom) due to ligation with a THF solvent molecule, which agrees with a domed coordination structure for copper in the penta-coordinated exciplex.

  18. Synthesis, structure and fluorescence properties of a novel 3D Sr(II) coordination polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu-Hui; Xu, Qing; Gu, Zhi-Feng; Gao, Ji-Xing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chang-Shan; Tang, Yun-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Solvothermal reaction of 2,2‧-bipyridine-5,5‧-dicarboxylic acid (H2bpdc) and SrCl2 affords a novel coordination polymer [Sr(Hbpdc)2]n1. X-ray structure determination shows that 1 exhibits a novel three-dimensional network. The unique Sr II cation sits on a two-fold axis and coordinated by four O-atom donors from four Hbptc- ligands and four N-atom donors from two Hbptc- ligands in distorted dodecahedral geometry. In 1 each Sr II cation connects to six different Hbptc- ligands and each Hbptc- ligand bridges three different Sr II cations which results in the formation of a three-dimensional polymeric structure. Corresponding to the free ligand, the fluorescent emission of complex 1 display remarkable "Einstain" shifts, which may be attributed to the coordination interaction of Sr atoms, thus reduce the rigidity of pyridyl rings.

  19. Structure and reactivity of a mononuclear gold(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiß, Sebastian; Förster, Christoph; Otto, Sven; Bauer, Matthias; Müller, Patrick; Hinderberger, Dariush; Hashemi Haeri, Haleh; Carella, Luca; Heinze, Katja

    2017-12-01

    Mononuclear gold(II) complexes are very rare labile species. Transient gold(II) species have been suggested in homogeneous catalysis and in medical applications, but their geometric and electronic structures have remained essentially unexplored: even fundamental data, such as the ionic radius of gold(II), are unknown. Now, an unprecedentedly stable neutral gold(II) complex of a porphyrin derivative has been isolated, and its structural and spectroscopic features determined. The gold atom adopts a 2+2 coordination mode in between those of gold(III) (four-coordinate square planar) and gold(I) (two-coordinate linear), owing to a second-order Jahn-Teller distortion enabled by the relativistically lowered 6s orbital of gold. The reactivity of this gold(II) complex towards dioxygen, nitrosobenzene and acids is discussed. This study provides insight on the ionic radius of gold(II), and allows it to be placed within the homologous series of nd9 Cu/Ag/Au divalent ions and the 5d8/9/10 Pt/Au/Hg 'relativistic' triad in the periodic table.

  20. Bifurcation of learning and structure formation in neuronal maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschler, Christian; Faust-Ellsässer, Carmen; Starke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    to map formation in the laminar nucleus of the barn owl's auditory system. Using equation-free methods, we perform a bifurcation analysis of spatio-temporal structure formation in the associated synaptic-weight matrix. This enables us to analyze learning as a bifurcation process and follow the unstable...... states as well. A simple time translation of the learning window function shifts the bifurcation point of structure formation and goes along with traveling waves in the map, without changing the animal's sound localization performance....

  1. Dual pathway for angiotensin II formation in human internal mammary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, AA; Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; Urata, H; Oosterga, M; Roos, G; Grandjean, JG; Ganten, D; van Gilst, WH

    1 Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is thought to be the main enzyme to convect antiotensin I to the vasoactive angiotensin II. Recently, in the human heart, it was found that the majority of angiotensin ZI formation was due to another enzyme, identified as human heart chymase. In the human

  2. Structure and membrane organization of photosystem II in green plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankamer, B; Barber, J; Boekema, EJ

    1997-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the pigment protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria that uses solar energy to drive the photosynthetic water-splitting reaction. This chapter reviews the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of PSII as

  3. Electronic structure and formation energy of a vacancy in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, B.; Siegel, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    The electronic structure of a vacancy in Al was calculated self-consistently using norm-conserving ionic pseudopotentials obtained from ab initio atomic calculations. A 27-atom-site supercell containing 1 vacancy and 26 atoms was used to simulate the environment of the vacancy. A vacancy formation energy of 1.5 eV was also calculated (cf. the experimental value of 0.66 eV). The effects of the supercell and the nature of the ionic potential on the resulting electronic structure and formation energy are discussed. Results for the electronic structure of a divacancy are also presented. 3 figures

  4. C ii RADIATIVE COOLING OF THE GALATIC DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: INSIGHT INTO THE STAR FORMATION IN DAMPED Ly α SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Nirupam [Department of Physics and Centre for Theoretical Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Frank, Stephan; Mathur, Smita [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Carilli, Christopher L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Wolfe, Arthur M., E-mail: nroy@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    The far-infrared [C ii] 158 μ m fine structure transition is considered to be a dominant coolant in the interstellar medium (ISM). For this reason, under the assumption of a thermal steady state, it may be used to infer the heating rate and, in turn, the star formation rate (SFR) in local as well as in high redshift systems. In this work, radio and ultraviolet observations of the Galactic ISM are used to understand whether C ii is indeed a good tracer of the SFR. For a sample of high Galactic latitude sightlines, direct measurements of the temperature indicate the presence of C ii in both the cold and the warm phases of the diffuse interstellar gas. The cold gas fraction (∼10%–50% of the total neutral gas column density) is not negligible even at high Galactic latitude. It is shown that to correctly estimate the SFR, C ii cooling in both phases should hence be considered. The simple assumption, that the [C ii] line originates only from either the cold or the warm phase, significantly underpredicts or overpredicts the SFR, respectively. These results are particularly important in the context of Damped Ly α systems for which a similar method is often used to estimate the SFR. The derived SFRs in such cases may not be reliable if the temperature of the gas under consideration is not constrained independently.

  5. Synthesis and characterisation of the Fe(II-III) hydroxy-formate green rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refait, P.; Abdelmoula, M.; Genin, J.-M. R.; Jeannin, M.

    2006-01-01

    A new methodology was envisioned in order to prepare green rust compounds build on organic anions that could intervene in microbiologically influenced corrosion processes of iron and steel. The formate ion was chosen as an example. The formation of rust was simulated by the oxidation of aqueous suspensions of Fe(OH) 2 precipitated from Fe(II) lactate and sodium hydroxide, in the presence of sodium formate to promote the formation of the corresponding green rust. The evolution of the precipitate with time was followed by transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy at 15 K. It was observed that the initial hydroxide was transformed into a new GR compound. Its spectrum is composed of three quadrupole doublets, D 1 (δ = 1.28 mm s -1 , Δ = 2.75 mm s -1 ) and D 2 (δ = 1.28 mm s -1 , Δ 2.48 mm s -1 ) that correspond to Fe(II) and D 3 (δ = 0.49 mm s -1 , Δ = 0.37 mm s -1 ) that corresponds to Fe(III). The relative area of D 3 , close to the proportion of Fe(III) in the GR, was found at 28.5 ± 1.5% (∼2/7). Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the intermediate compound was a Fe(II-III) hydroxy-formate, GR(HCOO - ).

  6. Energy Levels, wavelengths and hyperfine structure measurements of Sc II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hala, Fnu; Nave, Gillian

    2018-01-01

    Lines of singly ionized Scandium (Sc II) along with other Iron group elements have been observed [1] in the region surrounding the massive star Eta Carinae [2,3] called the strontium filament (SrF). The last extensive analysis of Sc II was the four-decade old work of Johansson & Litzen [4], using low-resolution grating spectroscopy. To update and extend the Sc II spectra, we have made observation of Sc/Ar, Sc/Ne and Sc/Ge/Ar hollow cathode emission spectrum on the NIST high resolution FT700 UV/Vis and 2 m UV/Vis/IR Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS). More than 850 Sc II lines have been measured in the wavelength range of 187 nm to 3.2 μm. connecting a total of 152 energy levels. The present work also focuses to resolve hyperfine structure (HFS) in Sc II lines. We aim to obtain accurate transition wavelengths, improved energy levels and HFS constants of Sc II. The latest results from work in progress will be presented.Reference[1] Hartman H, Gull T, Johansson S and Smith N 2004 Astron. Astrophys. 419 215[2] Smith N, Morse J A and Gull T R 2004 Astrophys. J. 605 405[3] Davidson K and Humphreys R M 1997 Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 35[4] Johansson S and Litzén U 1980 Phys. Scr. 22 49

  7. Star Formation and Young Population of the H II Complex Sh2-294

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chauhan, N.; Jose, J.; Pandey, B.

    2012-08-01

    The Sh2-294 H II region ionized by a single B0V star features several infrared excess sources, a photodissociation region, and also a group of reddened stars at its border. The star formation scenario in this region seems to be quite complex. In this paper, we present follow-up results of Sh2-294 H II region at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), coupled with H2 (2.12 μm) observation, to characterize the young population of the region and to understand its star formation history. We identified 36 young stellar object (YSO, Class I, Class II, and Class I/II) candidates using IRAC color-color diagrams. It is found that Class I sources are preferentially located at the outskirts of the H II region and associated with enhanced H2 emission; none of them are located near the central cluster. Combining the optical to mid-infrared (MIR) photometry of the YSO candidates and using the spectral energy distribution fitting models, we constrained stellar parameters and the evolutionary status of 33 YSO candidates. Most of them are interpreted by the model as low-mass (<4 M ⊙) YSOs; however, we also detected a massive YSO (~9 M ⊙) of Class I nature, embedded in a cloud of visual extinction of ~24 mag. Present analysis suggests that the Class I sources are indeed a younger population of the region relative to Class II sources (age ~ 4.5 × 106 yr). We suggest that the majority of the Class I sources, including the massive YSOs, are second-generation stars of the region whose formation is possibly induced by the expansion of the H II region powered by a ~4 × 106 yr B0 main-sequence star.

  8. STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG POPULATION OF THE H II COMPLEX Sh2-294

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Chauhan, N.; Jose, J.; Ojha, D. K.; Pandey, B.

    2012-01-01

    The Sh2-294 H II region ionized by a single B0V star features several infrared excess sources, a photodissociation region, and also a group of reddened stars at its border. The star formation scenario in this region seems to be quite complex. In this paper, we present follow-up results of Sh2-294 H II region at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), coupled with H 2 (2.12 μm) observation, to characterize the young population of the region and to understand its star formation history. We identified 36 young stellar object (YSO, Class I, Class II, and Class I/II) candidates using IRAC color-color diagrams. It is found that Class I sources are preferentially located at the outskirts of the H II region and associated with enhanced H 2 emission; none of them are located near the central cluster. Combining the optical to mid-infrared (MIR) photometry of the YSO candidates and using the spectral energy distribution fitting models, we constrained stellar parameters and the evolutionary status of 33 YSO candidates. Most of them are interpreted by the model as low-mass ( ☉ ) YSOs; however, we also detected a massive YSO (∼9 M ☉ ) of Class I nature, embedded in a cloud of visual extinction of ∼24 mag. Present analysis suggests that the Class I sources are indeed a younger population of the region relative to Class II sources (age ∼ 4.5 × 10 6 yr). We suggest that the majority of the Class I sources, including the massive YSOs, are second-generation stars of the region whose formation is possibly induced by the expansion of the H II region powered by a ∼4 × 10 6 yr B0 main-sequence star.

  9. High precision measurements of hyperfine structure in Tm II, N2+ and Sc II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, N.B.; Dinneen, T.P.; Young, L.

    1988-01-01

    We have applied the technique of collinear fast-ion-beam laser spectroscopy to measure the hyperfine structure (hfs) in Sc II, Tm II and N 2 + . Laser induced fluorescence was observed from a 50 keV ion beam which was superimposed with the output of an actively stabilized ring dye laser (rms bandwidth 2 and the excited 3d4p configuration of Sc II and in the 4f 13 6s and 4f 13 5d configurations of the Tm II. The fine and hyperfine structure of N 2 + has been observed in the (0,1) and (1,2) band of B 2 Σ/sub u/ + /minus/X 2 Σ/sub g/ + system. Higher resolution measurements of the metastable 3d 2 configuration in Sc II were also made by laser-rf double resonance. The experimental results will be compared with those obtained by multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock ab-initio calculations. 15 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and photophysical properties of structurally diverse polyazine-bridged Ru(II),Pt(II) and Os(II),Ru(II),Pt(II) supramolecular motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Jessica D; Arachchige, Shamindri M; Wang, Guangbin; Rangan, Krishnan; Miao, Ran; Higgins, Samantha L H; Okyere, Benjamin; Zhao, Meihua; Croasdale, Paul; Magruder, Katherine; Sinclair, Brian; Wall, Candace; Brewer, Karen J

    2011-09-19

    Five new tetrametallic supramolecules of the motif [{(TL)(2)M(dpp)}(2)Ru(BL)PtCl(2)](6+) and three new trimetallic light absorbers [{(TL)(2)M(dpp)}(2)Ru(BL)](6+) (TL = bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine or phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; M = Ru(II) or Os(II); BL = dpp = 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine, dpq = 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)quinoxaline, or bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine) were synthesized and their redox, spectroscopic, and photophysical properties investigated. The tetrametallic complexes couple a Pt(II)-based reactive metal center to Ru and/or Os light absorbers through two different polyazine BL to provide structural diversity and interesting resultant properties. The redox potential of the M(II/III) couple is modulated by M variation, with the terminal Ru(II/III) occurring at 1.58-1.61 V and terminal Os(II/III) couples at 1.07-1.18 V versus Ag/AgCl. [{(TL)(2)M(dpp)}(2)Ru(BL)](PF(6))(6) display terminal M(dπ)-based highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) with the dpp(π*)-based lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy relatively unaffected by the nature of BL. The coupling of Pt to the BL results in orbital inversion with localization of the LUMO on the remote BL in the tetrametallic complexes, providing a lowest energy charge separated (CS) state with an oxidized terminal Ru or Os and spatially separated reduced BL. The complexes [{(TL)(2)M(dpp)}(2)Ru(BL)](6+) and [{(TL)(2)M(dpp)}(2)Ru(BL)PtCl(2)](6+) efficiently absorb light throughout the UV and visible regions with intense metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions in the visible at about 540 nm (M = Ru) and 560 nm (M = Os) (ε ≈ 33,000-42,000 M(-1) cm(-1)) and direct excitation to the spin-forbidden (3)MLCT excited state in the Os complexes about 720 nm. All the trimetallic and tetrametallic Ru-based supramolecular systems emit from the terminal Ru(dπ)→dpp(π*) (3)MLCT state, λ(max)(em) ≈ 750 nm. The tetrametallic systems display complex excited state dynamics with quenching of the (3)MLCT emission at

  11. Structural control of void formation in dual phase steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azuma, Masafumi

    The objective of this study is to explore the void formation mechanisms and to clarify the influence of the hardness and structural parameters (volume fraction, size and morphology) of martensite particles on the void formation and mechanical properties in dual phase steels composed of ferrite...... and (iii) strain localization. The critical strain for void formation depends on hardness of the martensite, but is independent of the volume fraction, shape, size and distribution of the martensite. The strain partitioning between the martensite and ferrite depends on the volume fraction and hardness...... of the martensite accelerates the void formation in the martensite by enlarging the size of voids both in the martensite and ferrite. It is suggested that controlling the hardness and structural parameters associated with the martensite particles such as morphology, size and volume fraction are the essential...

  12. Structure Formation Mechanisms during Solid Ti with Molten Al Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L; Pronichev, D; Trunov, M

    2016-01-01

    The study discuses advantages and disadvantages of previously proposed mechanisms of the formation of structure between solid Ti and molten Al and presents a new mechanism based on the reviewed and experimental data. The previously proposed mechanisms were classified into three groups: mechanisms of precipitation, mechanisms of destruction and mechanisms of chemical interaction between intermetallics and melt. The reviewed mechanisms did not explain the formation of heterogeneous interlayer with globular aluminide particles and thin layers of pure Al, while the present study reveals variation in the solid Ti/molten Al reaction kinetics during various phases of laminated metal-intermetallic composite formation. The proposed mechanism considers formed during composite fabrication thin oxide interlayers between Ti and Al evolution and its impact on the intermetallic compound formation and explains the initial slow rate of intermetallic interlayer formation and its subsequent acceleration when the oxide foils are ruptured. (paper)

  13. Controlling Non-Equilibrium Structure Formation on the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Benedikt; Hecht, Fabian Manfred; Pernpeintner, Carla; Lohmueller, Theobald; Bausch, Andreas R

    2017-12-06

    Controlling the structure formation of gold nanoparticle aggregates is a promising approach towards novel applications in many fields, ranging from (bio)sensing to (bio)imaging to medical diagnostics and therapeutics. To steer structure formation, the DNA-DNA interactions of DNA strands that are coated on the surface of the particles have become a valuable tool to achieve precise control over the interparticle potentials. In equilibrium approaches, this technique is commonly used to study particle crystallization and ligand binding. However, regulating the structural growth processes from the nano- to the micro- and mesoscale remains elusive. Here, we show that the non-equilibrium structure formation of gold nanoparticles can be stirred in a binary heterocoagulation process to generate nanoparticle clusters of different sizes. The gold nanoparticles are coated with sticky single stranded DNA and mixed at different stoichiometries and sizes. This not only allows for structural control but also yields access to the optical properties of the nanoparticle suspensions. As a result, we were able to reliably control the kinetic structure formation process to produce cluster sizes between tens of nanometers up to micrometers. Consequently, the intricate optical properties of the gold nanoparticles could be utilized to control the maximum of the nanoparticle suspension extinction spectra between 525 nm and 600 nm. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Classification and description of world formation types. Part II (Description of formation types)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Faber-Langendoen; T. Keeler-Wolf; D. Meidinger; C. Josse; A. Weakley; D. Tart; G. Navarro; B. Hoagland; S. Ponomarenko; J.P. Saucier; G. Fults; E. Helmer

    2012-01-01

    A vegetation-ecologic classification approach has been developed in which a combination of vegetation attributes (physiognomy, structure, and floristics) and their response to ecological and biogeographic factors are used as the basis for classifying vegetation types (Faber-Langendoen et al. 2012). This approach can help support international, national and subnational...

  15. Mechanism and conditions of the chessboard structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Yong; Khachaturyan, Armen G.

    2008-01-01

    The observations of the pseudo-periodical chessboard (CB) microstructure in metal and ceramic solid solutions indicate that this is a general phenomenon. We propose a theory and three-dimensional (3-D) computational modeling explaining the origin of the CB microstructure in the cubic → tetragonal decomposition. The 3-D modeling demonstrates that the formation of two-phase CB structures is contingent on the formation of a compositionally stabilized precursor state with the tweed structure that is spontaneously formed at the initial stage of the transformation. The modeling has shown that this tweed structure is a distribution of spatially correlated tetragonal nanodomains whose spatial arrangement has the CB topological features. This precursor tweed structure serves as a template for the precipitation of the equilibrium cubic phase. The CB-like tweed template channels the microstructure evolution towards the two-phase CB structure whose complex and detailed 3-D geometry is in excellent agreement with electron microscopic observations. The thermodynamic analysis and obtained evolution sequences allow us to formulate the necessary thermodynamic, structural and kinetic conditions for the CB structure formation. Reasons for its relative stability are discussed. It is also shown that the coherency between the cubic and tetragonal phases comprising the CB structure produces the stress-induced tetragonality of the cubic phase, orthorhombicity of the tetragonal phase, and rotations of cubic phase rods. These effects should diminish and disappear upon lifting of coherency

  16. Circulating Microparticles Alter Formation, Structure, and Properties of Fibrin Clots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairova, Laily D; Nabiullina, Roza M; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Zuev, Yuriy F; Mustafin, Ilshat G; Litvinov, Rustem I; Weisel, John W

    2015-12-04

    Despite the importance of circulating microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis, there is limited evidence for potential causative effects of naturally produced cell-derived microparticles on fibrin clot formation and its properties. We studied the significance of blood microparticles for fibrin formation, structure, and susceptibility to fibrinolysis by removing them from platelet-free plasma using filtration. Clots made in platelet-free and microparticle-depleted plasma samples from the same healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Microparticles accelerate fibrin polymerisation and support formation of more compact clots that resist internal and external fibrinolysis. These variations correlate with faster thrombin generation, suggesting thrombin-mediated kinetic effects of microparticles on fibrin formation, structure, and properties. In addition, clots formed in the presence of microparticles, unlike clots from the microparticle-depleted plasma, contain 0.1-0.5-μm size granular and CD61-positive material on fibres, suggesting that platelet-derived microparticles attach to fibrin. Therefore, the blood of healthy individuals contains functional microparticles at the levels that have a procoagulant potential. They affect the structure and stability of fibrin clots indirectly through acceleration of thrombin generation and through direct physical incorporation into the fibrin network. Both mechanisms underlie a potential role of microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis as modulators of fibrin formation, structure, and resistance to fibrinolysis.

  17. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of two 1-D helical coordination polymeric Cu(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, He-Dong; Yang, Xiao-E.; Yu, Qing; Chen, Zi-Lu; Liang, Hong; Yan, Shi-Ping; Liao, Dai-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Two helical coordination polymeric copper(II) complexes bearing amino acid Schiff bases HL or HL', which are condensed from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde with 2-aminobenzoic acid or L-valine, respectively, have been prepared and characterised by X-ray crystallography. In [CuL] n ( 1) the copper(II) atoms are bridged by syn- anti carboxylate groups giving infinite 1-D right-handed helical chains which are further connected by weak C-H⋯Cu interactions to build a 2-D network. While in [CuL'] n ( 2) the carboxylate group acts as a rare monatomic bridge to connect the adjacent copper(II) atoms leading to the formation of a left-handed helical chain. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that 1 exhibits weak ferromagnetic interactions whereas an antiferromagnetic coupling is established for 2. The magnetic behavior can be satisfactorily explained on the basis of the structural data.

  18. Formation of cellular structure in beryllium at plastic working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papirov, I.I.; Nikolaenko, A.A.; Shokurov, V.S.; Pikalov, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    Conditions of cellular structure formation are investigated at various kinds of deformation and heat treatment of beryllium ingots. It is shown that the cellular structure plays the important role in formation of complex of physical mechanical properties of beryllium. Influence of impurity, various conditions of deformation (temperature, squeezing degree) and heat treatments on substructure, texture and mechanical properties of metal is investigated. Optimum conditions of rolling and heat treatments of beryllium are defined. The way of sign-variable cyclic deformation of beryllium ingots is offered for reception quasi-isotropic fine-grained metal. Physical-mechanical properties of ultra fine-grained metal are studied

  19. Discourse, Paragraph, and Sentence Structure in Selected Philippine Languages. Final Report. Volume II, Sentence Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longacre, Robert E.

    Volume II of "Discourse, Paragraph, and Sentence Structure in Selected Philippine Languages" begins with an explanation of certain assumptions and postulates regarding sentence structure. A detailed treatment of systems of sentence structure and the parameters of such systems follows. Data in the various indigenous languages are…

  20. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS. II. COMPARING STAR FORMATION IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF NGC 2782

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Christopher [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 550 E. Tyler Mall, Room PSF-686 (P.O. Box 871404), Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Mullan, Brendan; Charlton, Jane [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA (United States); Konstantopoulos, Iraklis [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde NSW 1670 (Australia); Knezek, Patricia M., E-mail: karen.knierman@asu.edu, E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu, E-mail: tveach@asu.edu, E-mail: cgroppi@asu.edu, E-mail: mullan@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: iraklis@aao.gov.au, E-mail: pknezek@noao.edu [WIYN Consortium, Inc., 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a minor merger with a mass ratio {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun. However, deep UBVR and H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail, though it lacks massive star clusters and cluster complexes. Using Herschel PACS spectroscopy, we discover 158 {mu}m [C II] emission at the location of the three most luminous H{alpha} sources in the eastern tail, but not at the location of the even brighter H{alpha} source in the western tail. The western tail is found to have a normal star formation efficiency (SFE), but the eastern tail has a low SFE. The lack of CO and [C II] emission suggests that the western tail H II region may have a low carbon abundance and be undergoing its first star formation. The western tail is more efficient at forming stars, but lacks massive clusters. We propose that the low SFE in the eastern tail may be due to its formation as a splash region where gas heating is important even though it has sufficient molecular and neutral gas to make massive star clusters. The western tail, which has lower gas surface density and does not form high-mass star clusters, is a tidally formed region where gravitational compression likely enhances star formation.

  1. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS. II. COMPARING STAR FORMATION IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF NGC 2782

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Christopher; Mullan, Brendan; Charlton, Jane; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Knezek, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a minor merger with a mass ratio ∼4: 1 occurring ∼200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun. However, deep UBVR and Hα narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail, though it lacks massive star clusters and cluster complexes. Using Herschel PACS spectroscopy, we discover 158 μm [C II] emission at the location of the three most luminous Hα sources in the eastern tail, but not at the location of the even brighter Hα source in the western tail. The western tail is found to have a normal star formation efficiency (SFE), but the eastern tail has a low SFE. The lack of CO and [C II] emission suggests that the western tail H II region may have a low carbon abundance and be undergoing its first star formation. The western tail is more efficient at forming stars, but lacks massive clusters. We propose that the low SFE in the eastern tail may be due to its formation as a splash region where gas heating is important even though it has sufficient molecular and neutral gas to make massive star clusters. The western tail, which has lower gas surface density and does not form high-mass star clusters, is a tidally formed region where gravitational compression likely enhances star formation

  2. Hyperfine Structure and Isotope Shifts in Dy II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan F. Del Papa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using fast-ion-beam laser-fluorescence spectroscopy (FIBLAS, we have measured the hyperfine structure (hfs of 14 levels and an additional four transitions in Dy II and the isotope shifts (IS of 12 transitions in the wavelength range of 422–460 nm. These are the first precision measurements of this kind in Dy II. Along with hfs and IS, new undocumented transitions were discovered within 3 GHz of the targeted transitions. These atomic data are essential for astrophysical studies of chemical abundances, allowing correction for saturation and the effects of blended lines. Lanthanide abundances are important in diffusion modeling of stellar interiors, and in the mechanisms and history of nucleosynthesis in the universe. Hfs and IS also play an important role in the classification of energy levels, and provide a benchmark for theoretical atomic structure calculations.

  3. Incommensurate composite crystal structure of scandium-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa; Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki

    2005-01-01

    The long-unknown crystal structure of the high pressure phase scandium-II was solved by powder x-ray diffraction and was found to have tetragonal host channels along the c axis and guest chains that are incommensurate with the host, as well as the high pressure phases of Ba, Sr, Bi, and Sb. The pressure dependences of the lattice constants, the incommensurability, the atomic distances, and the atomic volume were investigated

  4. In-situ observation of structure formation in polymer processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    In-situ X-ray scattering in polymer processing is a crucial method to elucidate the mechanism of structure formation in the process. Fiber spinning is one such process primarily imposing extensional deformation on polymeric melt at the spin-line during rapid cooling. In-situ small-angle X-ray scattering using synchrotron radiation on the spinning process allows direct observation of the transient structure developing in the process. (author)

  5. Investigation on the formation of monomethylmercury(II) in the Elbe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebinghaus, R.; Wilken, R.D.; Gisder, P.

    1994-01-01

    Very little is known about transformation reactions of pollutants attached to suspended materials in the Elbe. In the present study, the influence of bacteria present in suspended particulate matter and in Elbe sediments, on dynamic transformations of mercury species was investigated. The formation of highly toxic monomethylmercury is more effective in the presence of organotin, - lead and arsenic compounds, via transmethylation reactions, than in the presence of biogenic methyldonors. Under oxic conditions, bacteria isolated from suspended particulate matter decompose methlmercury very rapidly to inorganic Hg(II), which is immobilized by the cells. In sediments, redox potential and pH value are important for the formation of methylmercury. Under anoxic conditions a pH of 6.5 is advantageous for the methylation of mercury(II)ions. (orig.) [de

  6. Crystal structure of bis(4-acetylanilinium tetrachloridocobaltate(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Thairiyaraja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title salt, (C8H10NO2[CoCl4], is isotypic with the analogous cuprate(II structure. The asymmetric unit contains one 4-acetylanilinium cation and one half of a tetrachloridocobaltate(II anion for which the CoII atom and two Cl− ligands lie on a mirror plane. The Co—Cl distances in the distorted tetrahedral anion range from 2.2519 (6 to 2.2954 (9 Å and the Cl—Co—Cl angles range from 106.53 (2 to 110.81 (4°. In the crystal, cations are self-assembled by intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions, leading to a C(8 chain motif with the chains running parallel to the b axis. π–π stacking interactions between benzene rings, with a centroid-to-centroid distance of 3.709 Å, are also observed along this direction. The CoCl42− anions are sandwiched between the cationic chains and interact with each other through intermolecular N—H...Cl hydrogen-bonding interactions, forming a three-dimensional network structure.

  7. Formation of nanoscale tungsten oxide structures and colouration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The X-ray diffraction, together with transmission electron microscopic studies have revealed formation of regular polyhedral nanocrystalline ..... For molecular structure and orientation determination, the ... self-similarity within a complicated system. ..... Hummel R I 1997 Handbook of optical properties: Optics of small particles ...

  8. Testing Structure Formation in the Universe via Coupled Matter Fluids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kagoyire

    the universe is dominated by two “dark” components- dark matter. (DM) and dark energy (DE)- that contribute about 26% and 69% respectively to the total cosmic energy budget, raises key questions about the nature of the “dark-sector” and large-scale structure formation (Planck Collaboration XVI, 2014). Motivated by a ...

  9. Structural formation of aluminide phases on titanium alloy during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamaeva, A.A.; Romankov, S.E.; Sagdoldina, Zh.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aluminum layer on the surface of titanium alloy has been formed by thermal deposition. The structural formation of aluminide phases on the surface has been studied. The sequence of structural transformations at the Ti/Al interface is limited by the reaction temperature and time. The sequence of aluminide phase formation is occurred in compliance with Ti-Al equilibrium phase diagram. At the initial stages at the Ti/Al interface the Al3Ti alloy starts forming as a result of interdiffusion, and gradually the whole aluminum films is spent on the formation of this layer. The Al3Ti layer decomposes with the increase of temperature (>600C). At 800C the two-phase (Ti3Al+TiAl) layer is formed on the titanium surface. The TiAl compound is unstable and later on with the increase of the exposure time at 800C gradually transforms into the Ti3Al. The chain of these successive transformations leads to the formation of the continuous homogeneous layer consisting of the Ti3Al compound on the surface. At temperatures exceeding the allotropic transformation temperature (>900C) the Ti3Al compound starts decomposing. All structural changes taking place at the Ti/Al interface are accompanied by considerable changes in micro hardness. The structure of initial substrate influences on kinetics of phase transformation and microstructure development. (author)

  10. Cross section library DOSCROS77 (in the SAND-II format)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijp, W.L.; Nolthenius, H.J.; Borg, N.J.C.M. van der.

    1977-08-01

    The dosimetry cross section library DOSCROS77 is documented with tables, plots and cross section values averaged over a few reference spectra. This library is based on the ENDF/B-IV dosimetry file, supplemented with some other evaluations. The total number of reaction cross section sets incorporated in this library is 49 (+3 cover cross sections sets). The cross section data are available in a format which is suitable for the program SAND-II

  11. Data base formation for important components of reactor TRIGA MARK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R.; Mavko, B.; Kozuh, M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper represents specific data base formation for reactor TRIGA MARK II in Podgorica. Reactor operation data from year 1985 to 1990 were collected. Two groups of collected data were formed. The first group includes components data and the second group covers data of reactor scrams. Time related and demand related models were used for data evaluation. Parameters were estimated by classical method. Similar data bases are useful everywhere where components unavailabilities may have severe drawback. (author) [sl

  12. Endothelial microparticle formation by angiotensin II is mediated via Ang II receptor type I/NADPH oxidase/ Rho kinase pathways targeted to lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Dylan; Montezano, Augusto C; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; He, Ying; Carter, Anthony; Touyz, Rhian M

    2011-08-01

    Circulating microparticles are increased in cardiovascular disease and may themselves promote oxidative stress and inflammation. Molecular mechanisms underlying their formation and signaling are unclear. We investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Rho kinase, and lipid rafts in microparticle formation and examined their functional significance in endothelial cells (ECs). Microparticle formation from angiotensin II (Ang II)-stimulated ECs and apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice was assessed by annexin V or by CD144 staining and electron microscopy. Ang II promoted microparticle formation and increased EC O(2)(-) generation and Rho kinase activity. Ang II-stimulated effects were inhibited by irbesartan (Ang II receptor type I blocker) and fasudil (Rho kinase inhibitor). Methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin, which disrupt lipid rafts/caveolae, blocked microparticle release. Functional responses, assessed in microparticle-stimulated ECs, revealed increased O(2)(-) production, enhanced vascular cell adhesion molecule/platelet-EC adhesion molecule expression, and augmented macrophage adhesion. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor blocked the prooxidative and proinflammatory effects of microparticles. In vitro observations were confirmed in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice, which displayed vascular inflammation and high levels of circulating endothelial microparticles, effects that were reduced by apocynin. We demonstrated direct actions of Ang II on endothelial microparticle release, mediated through NADPH oxidase, ROS, and Rho kinase targeted to lipid rafts. Microparticles themselves stimulated endothelial ROS formation and inflammatory responses. Our findings suggest a feedforward system whereby Ang II promotes EC injury through its own endothelial-derived microparticles.

  13. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Deepjyoti [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  14. Orogenic structural inheritance and rifted passive margin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Mora, Claudio A.; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Structural inheritance is related to mechanical weaknesses in the lithosphere due to previous tectonic events, e.g. rifting, subduction and collision. The North and South Atlantic rifted passive margins that formed during the breakup of Western Gondwana, are parallel to the older Caledonide and the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogenic belts. In the South Atlantic, 'old' mantle lithospheric fabric resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of olivine is suggested to play a role during rifted margin formation (Tommasi and Vauchez, 2001). Magnetometric and gravimetric mapping of onshore structures in the Camamu and Almada basins suggest that extensional faults are controlled by two different directions of inherited older Brasiliano structures in the upper lithosphere (Ferreira et al., 2009). In the South Atlantic Campos Basin, 3D seismic data indicate that inherited basement structures provide a first order control on basin structure (Fetter, 2009). Here we investigate the role of structural inheritance on the formation of rifted passive margins with high-resolution 2D thermo-mechanical numerical experiments. The numerical domain is 1200 km long and 600 km deep and represents the lithosphere and the sublithospheric mantle. Model experiments were carried out by creating self-consistent orogenic inheritance where a first phase of orogen formation is followed by extension. We focus in particular on the role of varying amount of orogenic shortening, crustal rheology, contrasting styles of orogen formation on rifted margin style, and the time delay between orogeny and subsequent rifted passive formation. Model results are compared to contrasting structural styles of rifted passive margin formation as observed in the South Atlantic. Ferreira, T.S., Caixeta, J.M., Lima, F.D., 2009. Basement control in Camamu and Almada rift basins. Boletim de Geociências da Petrobrás 17, 69-88. Fetter, M., 2009. The role of basement tectonic reactivation on the structural evolution

  15. Self-regulating star formation and disk structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopita, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation processes determine the disk structure of galaxies. Stars heavier than about 1 solar mass determine the chemical evolution of the system and are produced at a rate which maintains (by the momentum input of the stars) the phase structure, pressure, and vertical velocity dispersion of the gas. Low mass stars are produced quiescently within molecular clouds, and their associated T-Tauri winds maintain the support of molecular clouds and regulate the star formation rate. Inefficient cooling suppresses this mode of star formation at low metallicity. Applied to the solar neighborhood, such a model can account for age/metallicity relationships, the increase in the O/Fe ratio at low metallicity, the paucity of metal-poor G and K dwarf stars, the missing mass in the disk and, possibly, the existence of a metal-poor thick disk. For other galaxies, it accounts for constant w-velocity dispersion of the gas, the relationship between gas content and specific rates of star formation, the surface brightness/metallicity relationship and for the shallow radial gradients in both star formation rates and HI content. 71 references

  16. Flexible Structure Control Scheme of a UAVs Formation to Improve the Formation Stability During Maneuvers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kownacki Cezary

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the issues related to formation flights, which requires to be still discussed, is the stability of formation flight in turns, where the aerodynamic conditions can be substantially different for outer vehicles due to varying bank angles. Therefore, this paper proposes a decentralized control algorithm based on a leader as the reference point for followers, i.e. other UAVs and two flocking behaviors responsible for local position control, i.e. cohesion and repulsion. But opposite to other research in this area, the structure of the formation becomes flexible (structure is being reshaped and bent according to actual turn radius of the leader. During turns the structure is bent basing on concentred circles with different radiuses corresponding to relative locations of vehicles in the structure. Simultaneously, UAVs' air-speeds must be modified according to the length of turn radius to achieve the stability of the structure. The effectiveness of the algorithm is verified by the results of simulated flights of five UAVs.

  17. Structure of the Ni(II) complex of Escherichia coli peptide deformylase and suggestions on deformylase activities depending on different metal(II) centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ngo Thi Hai; Bogdanović, Xenia; Palm, Gottfried J; Kühl, Olaf; Hinrichs, Winfried

    2010-02-01

    Crystal structures of polypeptide deformylase (PDF) of Escherichia coli with nickel(II) replacing the native iron(II) have been solved with chloride and formate as metal ligands. The chloro complex is a model for the correct protonation state of the hydrolytic hydroxo ligand and the protonated status of the Glu133 side chain as part of the hydrolytic mechanism. The ambiguity that recently some PDFs have been identified with Zn(2+) ion as the active-site centre whereas others are only active with Fe(2+) (or Co(2+), Ni(2+) is discussed with respect to Lewis acid criteria of the metal ion and substrate activation by the CD loop.

  18. Propagating star formation and irregular structure in spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.W.; Arnett, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model is proposed which describes the irregular optical appearance often seen in late-type spiral galaxies. If high-mass stars produce spherical shock waves which induce star formation, new high-mass stars will be born which, in turn, produce new shock waves. When this process operates in a differentially rotating disk, our numerical model shows that large-scale spiral-shaped regions of star formation are built up. The structure is seen to be most sensitive to a parameter which governs how often a region of the interstellar medium can undergo star formation. For a proper choice of this parameter, large-scale features disappear before differential rotation winds them up. New spiral features continuously form, so some spiral structure is seen indefinitely. The structure is not the classical two-armed symmetric spiral pattern which the density-wave theory attempts to explain, but it is asymmetric and disorderly.The mechanism of propagating star formation used in our model is consistent with observations which connect young OB associations with expanding shells of gas. We discuss the possible interaction of this mechanism with density waves

  19. Triggering the formation of the supergiant H II region NGC 604 in M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachihara, Kengo; Gratier, Pierre; Sano, Hidetoshi; Tsuge, Kisetsu; Miura, Rie E.; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    Formation mechanism of a supergiant H II region NGC 604 is discussed in terms of collision of H I clouds in M 33. An analysis of the archival H I data obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA) reveals complex velocity distributions around NGC 604. The H I clouds are composed of two velocity components separated by ˜20 km s-1 for an extent of ˜700 pc, beyond the size of the the H II region. Although the H I clouds are not easily separated in velocity with some mixed component represented by merged line profiles, the atomic gas mass amounts to 6 × 106 M_{⊙} and 9 × 106 M_{⊙} for each component. These characteristics of H I gas and the distributions of dense molecular gas in the overlapping regions of the two velocity components suggest that the formation of giant molecular clouds and the following massive cluster formation have been induced by the collision of H I clouds with different velocities. Referring to the existence of a gas bridging feature connecting M 33 with M 31 reported by large-scale H I surveys, the disturbed atomic gas possibly represents the result of past tidal interaction between the two galaxies, which is analogous to the formation of the R 136 cluster in the LMC.

  20. Heterometallic Pd(II)-Ni(II) complexes with meso-substituted dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene: double C-H bond activation and formation of a rectangular tetradibenzotetraaza[14]annulene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaledi, Hamid; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Fukuda, Takamitsu; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2014-11-03

    Three isomeric 2[Pd(II)-Ni(II)] metal complexes, derived from indoleninyl meso-substituted dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, were synthesized. The resulting dimers feature Ni···Ni or, alternatively, Ni···π interactions in staggered or slipped cofacial structures. A remarkable insertion of palladium into two different C-H bonds yielded a 4[Pd(II)-Ni(II)] rectangular complex with dimensions of 8.73 × 10.38 Å.

  1. Sequestration and Distribution Characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and Its Role in Colony Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiangdong; Yan, Ran; Li, Fenxiang; Dai, Wei; Jiao, Kewei; Zhou, Qixing; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the sequestration and distribution characteristics of Cd(II) by Microcystis aeruginosa and its role in Microcystis colony formation, M. aeruginosa was exposed to six different Cd(II) concentrations for 10 days. Cd(II) exposure caused hormesis in the growth of M. aeruginosa . Low concentrations of Cd(II) significantly induced formation of small Microcystis colonies ( P bEPS) contents of M. aeruginosa significantly ( P 93% of Cd(II) was sequestrated in the groups with lower added concentrations of Cd(II). More than 80% of the sequestrated Cd(II) was bioadsorbed by bEPS. The Pearson correlation coefficients of exterior and interior factors related to colony formation of M. aeruginosa revealed that Cd(II) could stimulate the production of IPS and bEPS via increasing Cd(II) bioaccumulation and bioadsorption. Increased levels of cross-linking between Cd(II) and bEPS stimulated algal cell aggregation, which eventually promoted the formation of Microcystis colonies.

  2. [C II] 158 μm EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION TRACER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Wolfire, M. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Smith, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Croxall, K. V. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 4051 McPherson Laboratory, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C.; Boquien, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Helou, G. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Walter, F.; Meidt, S. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Draine, B. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sandstrom, K. M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Aniano, G. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS (UMR8617) Université Paris-Sud 11, Batiment 121, Orsay (France); Hunt, L. K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Galametz, M. [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2015-02-10

    The [C II] 157.74 μm transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [C II] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [C II] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The uncertainty of the Σ{sub [C} {sub II]} – Σ{sub SFR} calibration is ±0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted Σ{sub [C} {sub II]} – Σ{sub SFR} correlation is valid over almost five orders of magnitude in Σ{sub SFR}, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [C II] luminosity instead of surface brightness to estimate SFR suffers from worse systematics, frequently underpredicting SFR in luminous infrared galaxies even after IR color adjustment (although this depends on the SFR measure employed). We suspect that surface brightness relations are better behaved than the luminosity relations because the former are more closely related to the local far-UV field strength, most likely the main parameter controlling the efficiency of the conversion of far-UV radiation into gas heating. A simple model based on Starburst99 population-synthesis code to connect SFR to [C II] finds that heating efficiencies are 1%-3% in normal galaxies.

  3. Modeling the fusion of cylindrical bioink particles in post bioprinting structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matt; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method to describe the shape evolution and biomechanical relaxation processes in multicellular systems. Thus, CPD is a useful tool to predict the outcome of post-printing structure formation in bioprinting. The predictive power of CPD has been demonstrated for multicellular systems composed of spherical bioink units. Experiments and computer simulations were related through an independently developed theoretical formalism based on continuum mechanics. Here we generalize the CPD formalism to (i) include cylindrical bioink particles often used in specific bioprinting applications, (ii) describe the more realistic experimental situation in which both the length and the volume of the cylindrical bioink units decrease during post-printing structure formation, and (iii) directly connect CPD simulations to the corresponding experiments without the need of the intermediate continuum theory inherently based on simplifying assumptions. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  4. Star Formation Activity in the Galactic H II Region Sh2-297

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm-3 and 9.15 × 105 cm-6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ~7farcm5 × 7farcm5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H - K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ~0.1-2 M ⊙ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V-I) and NIR (J/J-H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ~1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  5. Vesicles and vesicle gels - structure and dynamics of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzielski, M

    2003-01-01

    Vesicles constitute an interesting morphology formed by self-aggregating amphiphilic molecules. They exhibit a rich structural variety and are of interest both from a fundamental point of view (for studying closed bilayer systems) and from a practical point of view (whenever one is interested in the encapsulation of active molecules). In many circumstances vesicular structures have to be formed by external forces, but of great interest are amphiphilic systems, where they form spontaneously. Here the question arises of whether this means that they are also thermodynamically stable structures, which at least in some systems appears to be the case. If such vesicles are well defined in size, it is possible to pack them densely and thereby form vesicle gels that possess highly elastic properties even for relatively low volume fractions of amphiphile. Conditions for the formation and the microstructure of such vesicle gels have been studied in some detail for the case of unilamellar vesicles. Another important and topical issue is the dynamics of vesicle formation/breakdown, as the understanding of the transition process will open the way to a deeper understanding of their stability and also allow controlling of the structures formed, by means of their formation processes. Significant progress in the study of the transformation processes has been achieved, in particular by means of time-resolved scattering experiments. (topical review)

  6. One-dimensional Co(II)/Ni(II) complexes of 2-hydroxyisophthalate: Structures and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kai; Zou, Hua-Hong; Chen, Zi-Lu; Zhang, Zhong; Sun, Wei-Yin; Liang, Fu-Pei

    2015-01-01

    The solvothermal reactions of 2-hydroxyisophthalic acid (H 3 ipO) with M(NO 3 ) 2 ∙6H 2 O (M=Co, Ni) afforded two complexes [Co 2 (HipO) 2 (Py) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] (1) and [Ni(HipO)(Py)H 2 O] (2) (Py=pyridine). They exhibit similar zig-zag chain structures with the adjacent two metal centers connected by a anti-syn bridging carboxylate group from the HipO 2− ligand. The magnetic measurements reveal the dominant antiferromagnetic interactions and spin-canting in 1 while ferromagnetic interactions in 2. Both of them exhibit magnetocaloric effect (MCE) with the resulting entropy changes (−ΔS m ) of 12.51 J kg −1 K −1 when ΔH=50 kOe at 3 K for 1 and 11.01 J kg −1 K −1 when ΔH=50 kOe at 3 K for 2, representing the rare examples of one-dimensional complexes with MCE. - Graphical abstract: Synopsis: Two Co(II)/Ni(II) complexes with zig-zag chain structures have been reported. 1-Co shows cant-antiferromagnetism while 2-Ni shows ferromagnetism. Magnetocaloric effect is also found in both of them. - Highlights: • Two one-dimensional Co(II)/Ni(II) complexes were solvothermally synthesized. • The Co-complex exhibits canted antiferromagnetism. • The Ni-complex exhibits ferromagnetism. • Both of the complexes display magnetocaloric effect

  7. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 μm and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 μm to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK

  8. DNA structure in human RNA polymerase II promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1998-01-01

    with a very low level of sequence similarity. The sequences, which include both TATA-containing and TATA-less promoters, are aligned by hidden Markov models. Using three different models of sequence-derived DNA bendability, the aligned promoters display a common structural profile with bendability being low...... protein in a manner reminiscent of DNA in a nucleosome. This notion is further supported by the finding that the periodic bendability is caused mainly by the complementary triplet pairs CAG/CTG and GGC/GCC, which previously have been found to correlate with nucleosome positioning. We present models where......The fact that DNA three-dimensional structure is important for transcriptional regulation begs the question of whether eukaryotic promoters contain general structural features independently of what genes they control. We present an analysis of a large set of human RNA polymerase II promoters...

  9. Waste disposal of HYLIFE II structure: Issues and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Initial analysis has shown that by using 304 stainless steel (SS) a significant fraction (92 wt%) of the structural mass in the initial HYLIFE-II design could be disposed of by shallow burial. And if all the structural components are mixed together and treated as one entity, all of it could be disposed of by shallow burial. Two other types of SSs assessed, Mn-modified 316 and Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA), were found to require disposal by deep geologic burial of most of the structural mass. The presents of Nb and Mo in Mn-modified 316 and Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA), were found to dominate the generation of long term wastes produced and their presence should be avoided

  10. Physical phenomena stipulating nucleus formation, growth and structure films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrov, L N [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Fiziki Poluprovodnikov

    1975-03-01

    This review is concerned with the physical phenomena responsible for the nucleation, growth and structure of films. Emphasis is placed on the study of films of solid-metal systems, semiconductors (In, As, Cd, Se, CdS), and dielectrics. The following problems are discussed in the paper: general regularities of the thermodynamics and kinetics of film formation, methods of obtaining a solid film, the process of film formation, the rate of growth of individual grains. The critical film thickness and its measurement are also considered. The results of investigating the process of formation of mono- and polycrystalline films are discussed. It is concluded, on the basis of studies into the relaxation processes accompanying the growth of films, that an insight into these processes will permits improving film properties.

  11. Spiral chain structure of high pressure selenium-II' and sulfur-II from powder x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Yamada, Takahiro; Honda, Kazumasa; Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki; Le Bihan, Tristan

    2004-01-01

    The structure of high pressure phases, selenium-II ' (Se-II ' ) and sulfur-II (S-II), for α-Se 8 (monoclinic Se-I) and α-S 8 (orthorhombic S-I) was studied by powder x-ray diffraction experiments. Se-II ' and S-II were found to be isostructural and to belong to the tetragonal space group I4 1 /acd, which is made up of 16 atoms in the unit cell. The structure consisted of unique spiral chains with both 4 1 and 4 3 screws. The results confirmed that the structure sequence of the pressure-induced phase transitions for the group VIb elements depended on the initial molecular form. The chemical bonds of the phases are also discussed from the interatomic distances that were obtained

  12. Spontaneous Self-Formation of 3D Plasmonic Optical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Inhee; Shin, Yonghee; Song, Jihwan; Hong, SoonGweon; Park, Younggeun; Kim, Dongchoul; Kang, Taewook; Lee, Luke P

    2016-08-23

    Self-formation of colloidal oil droplets in water or water droplets in oil not only has been regarded as fascinating fundamental science but also has been utilized in an enormous number of applications in everyday life. However, the creation of three-dimensional (3D) architectures by a liquid droplet and an immiscible liquid interface has been less investigated than other applications. Here, we report interfacial energy-driven spontaneous self-formation of a 3D plasmonic optical structure at room temperature without an external force. Based on the densities and interfacial energies of two liquids, we simulated the spontaneous formation of a plasmonic optical structure when a water droplet containing metal ions meets an immiscible liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) interface. At the interface, the metal ions in the droplet are automatically reduced to form an interfacial plasmonic layer as the liquid PDMS cures. The self-formation of both an optical cavity and integrated plasmonic nanostructure significantly enhances the fluorescence by a magnitude of 1000. Our findings will have a huge impact on the development of various photonic and plasmonic materials as well as metamaterials and devices.

  13. Fourier imaging of non-linear structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandbyge, Jacob; Hannestad, Steen

    2017-01-01

    We perform a Fourier space decomposition of the dynamics of non-linear cosmological structure formation in ΛCDM models. From N -body simulations involving only cold dark matter we calculate 3-dimensional non-linear density, velocity divergence and vorticity Fourier realizations, and use these to calculate the fully non-linear mode coupling integrals in the corresponding fluid equations. Our approach allows for a reconstruction of the amount of mode coupling between any two wavenumbers as a function of redshift. With our Fourier decomposition method we identify the transfer of power from larger to smaller scales, the stable clustering regime, the scale where vorticity becomes important, and the suppression of the non-linear divergence power spectrum as compared to linear theory. Our results can be used to improve and calibrate semi-analytical structure formation models.

  14. Fourier imaging of non-linear structure formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandbyge, Jacob; Hannestad, Steen, E-mail: jacobb@phys.au.dk, E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2017-04-01

    We perform a Fourier space decomposition of the dynamics of non-linear cosmological structure formation in ΛCDM models. From N -body simulations involving only cold dark matter we calculate 3-dimensional non-linear density, velocity divergence and vorticity Fourier realizations, and use these to calculate the fully non-linear mode coupling integrals in the corresponding fluid equations. Our approach allows for a reconstruction of the amount of mode coupling between any two wavenumbers as a function of redshift. With our Fourier decomposition method we identify the transfer of power from larger to smaller scales, the stable clustering regime, the scale where vorticity becomes important, and the suppression of the non-linear divergence power spectrum as compared to linear theory. Our results can be used to improve and calibrate semi-analytical structure formation models.

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM, a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes. Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper function of insulin signaling. Accumulating evidence suggests that deleterious ER stress and excessive intracellular lipids in nonadipose tissues, such as myocyte, cardiomyocyte, and hepatocyte, cause pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance, leading to type II diabetes. The excessive deposition of lipid droplets (LDs in specialized cell types, such as adipocytes, hepatocytes, and macrophages, has been found as a hallmark in ER stress-associated metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis. However, much work remains to be done in understanding the mechanism by which ER stress response regulates LD formation and the pathophysiologic role of ER stress-associated LD in metabolic disease. This paper briefly summarizes the recent advances in ER stress-associated LD formation and its involvement in type II diabetes.

  16. The roles of tertiary amine structure, background organic matter and chloramine species on NDMA formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Kim, Daekyun; Ates, Nuray; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-02-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a probable human carcinogen, is a disinfection by-product that has been detected in chloraminated and chlorinated drinking waters and wastewaters. Formation mechanisms and precursors of NDMA are still not well understood. The main objectives of this study were to systematically investigate (i) the effect of tertiary amine structure, (ii) the effect of background natural organic matter (NOM), and (iii) the roles of mono vs. dichloramine species on the NDMA formation. Dimethylamine (DMA) and 20 different tertiary aliphatic and aromatic amines were carefully examined based on their functional groups attached to the basic DMA structure. The wide range (0.02-83.9%) of observed NDMA yields indicated the importance of the structure of tertiary amines, and both stability and electron distribution of the leaving group of tertiary amines on NDMA formation. DMA associated with branched alkyl groups or benzyl like structures having only one carbon between the ring and DMA structure consistently gave higher NDMA yields. Compounds with electron withdrawing groups (EWG) reacted preferentially with monochloramine, whereas compounds with electron donating group (EDG) showed tendency to react with dichloramine to form NDMA. When the selected amines were present in NOM solutions, NDMA formation increased for compounds with EWG while decreased for compounds with EDG. This impact was attributed to the competitions between NOM and amines for chloramine species. The results provided additional information to the commonly accepted mechanism for NDMA formation including chloramine species reacting with tertiary amines and the role of the leaving group on overall NDMA conversion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation. II. Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ke-Jung [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Whalen, Daniel J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Portsmouth University, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Wollenberg, Katharina M. J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S., E-mail: ken.chen@nao.ac.jp [Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    Metals from Population III (Pop III) supernovae led to the formation of less massive Pop II stars in the early universe, altering the course of evolution of primeval galaxies and cosmological reionization. There are a variety of scenarios in which heavy elements from the first supernovae were taken up into second-generation stars, but cosmological simulations only model them on the largest scales. We present small-scale, high-resolution simulations of the chemical enrichment of a primordial halo by a nearby supernova after partial evaporation by the progenitor star. We find that ejecta from the explosion crash into and mix violently with ablative flows driven off the halo by the star, creating dense, enriched clumps capable of collapsing into Pop II stars. Metals may mix less efficiently with the partially exposed core of the halo, so it might form either Pop III or Pop II stars. Both Pop II and III stars may thus form after the collision if the ejecta do not strip all the gas from the halo. The partial evaporation of the halo prior to the explosion is crucial to its later enrichment by the supernova.

  18. Reaction of Pb(II) and Zn(II) with Ethyl Linoleate To Form Structured Hybrid Inorganic–Organic Complexes: A Model for Degradation in Historic Paint Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Margaret G.; Palmer, Michael R.; Suchomel, Matthew R.; Berrie, Barbara H. (NGA); (Bordeaux)

    2016-09-23

    To investigate soap formation in drying oils in historic paints, the reaction between metal acetates (K+, Zn2+, Pb2+) and ethyl linoleate (EL) was studied using optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and electron microscopy. Pb(II) and Zn(II) react rapidly with EL to form highly structured, spherulitic, luminescent crystallites that aggregate. Evidence from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis and high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction indicates that these are organic–inorganic hybrid complexes or coordination polymers. FTIR absorbance peaks at ca. 1540 cm–1 for Pb(II) and ca. 1580 cm–1 for Zn(II) are consistent with the formation of carboxylate complexes. The complexes formed offer insight into the degradation processes observed in oil paint films, suggesting that soap formation is rapid when metal ions are solubilized and can occur with unsaturated fatty acids that are present in fresh oils. These complexes may account for the atypical luminescence observed in lead-containing cured oil paint films.

  19. Sequestration of chelated copper by structural Fe(II): Reductive decomplexation and transformation of Cu{sup II}-EDTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hongping [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wu, Deli, E-mail: wudeli@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao, Linghui [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Luo, Cong [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, GA 30332 (United States); Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Yalei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Structural Fe(II) was found to reveal high sequestration potential in various chelated copper. • Chelated copper was reduced to Cu(0) and Cu{sub 2}O by =Fe(II), whcih was oxidized to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O. • Both electron transfer and surface =Fe(II) were found to be crucial during chelated copper reduction. • The indispensible role of reductive decomplexation was identified in chelated copper sequestration. - Abstract: Chelated coppers, such as Cu{sup II}-EDTA, are characteristically refractory and difficult to break down because of their high stability and solubility. Cu{sup II}–EDTA sequestration by structural Fe(II) (=Fe(II)) was investigated intensively in this study. Up to 101.21 mgCu(II)/gFe(II) was obtained by =Fe(II) in chelated copper sequestration under near neutral pH condition (pH 7.70). The mechanism of Cu{sup II}-EDTA sequestration by =Fe(II) was concluded as follows: 3Cu{sup II}–EDTA + 7=Fe(II) + 9H{sub 2}O → Cu(0) ↓ + Cu{sub 2}O ↓ (the major product) + 2Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O ↓ + 3Fe{sup II}–EDTA +14H{sup +} Novel results strongly indicate that Cu{sup II} reductive transformation induced by surface =Fe(II) was mainly responsible for chelated copper sequestration. Cu(0) generation was initially facilitated, and subsequent reduction of Cu(II) into Cu(I) was closely combined with the gradual increase of ORP (Oxidation-Reduction Potential). Cu-containing products were inherently stable, but Cu{sub 2}O would be reoxidized to Cu(II) with extra-aeration, resulting in the release of copper, which was beneficial to Cu reclamation. Concentration diminution of Cu{sup II}–EDTA within the electric double layer and competitive adsorption were responsible for the negative effects of Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}. By generating vivianite, PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} was found to decrease surface =Fe(II) content. This study is among the first ones to identify the indispensible role of reductive decomplexation in chelated copper

  20. Complex formation of hypoxanthine and 6-mercaptopurine with Cd(II) ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perello, L.; Borras, J.; Soto, L.; Gordo, F.J.; Gordo, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Reaction of Cd(II) ion with hypoxanthine (H 2 Y) and with 6-mercaptopurine (H 2 MP) in dioxane-water (50%) leads to the formation of CdY x 2H 2 O and Cd(HMP) 2 x 2H 2 O, respectively. In methanolic medium Cd(II) and H 2 MP give Cd(MP) x H 2 O. These compounds have been characterized by chemical analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis. The stability constant of CdY complex at 25 +- 0.1 0 C and 1M ionic strength with NaClO 4 in dioxane-water medium is logβ = 10.25 +- 0.05. (Author)

  1. Complex formation of hypoxanthine and 6-mercaptopurine with Cd(II) ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perello, L.; Borras, J.; Soto, L.; Gordo, F.J.; Gordo, J.C. (Valencia Univ. (Spain))

    1984-01-01

    Reaction of Cd(II) ion with hypoxanthine (H/sub 2/Y) and with 6-mercaptopurine (H/sub 2/MP) in dioxane-water (50%) leads to the formation of CdY x 2H/sub 2/O and Cd(HMP)/sub 2/ x 2H/sub 2/O, respectively. In methanolic medium Cd(II) and H/sub 2/MP give Cd(MP) x H/sub 2/O. These compounds have been characterized by chemical analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis. The stability constant of CdY complex at 25 +- 0.1/sup 0/C and 1M ionic strength with NaClO/sub 4/ in dioxane-water medium is log..beta.. = 10.25 +- 0.05.

  2. Engineering characterization of ground motion. Task II: Soil structure interaction effects on structural response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luco, J E; Wong, H L [Structural and Earthquake Engineering Consultants, Inc., Sierra Madre, CA (United States); Chang, C -Y; Power, M S; Idriss, I M [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1986-08-01

    This report presents the results of part of a two-task study on the engineering characterization of earthquake ground motion for nuclear power plant design. The overall objective of this research program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is to develop recommendations for methods for selecting design response spectra or acceleration time histories to be used to characterize motion at the foundation level of nuclear power plants. Task I of the study, which is presented in Vol. 1 of NUREG/CR-3805, developed a basis for selecting design response spectra taking into account the characteristics of free-field ground motion found to be significant in causing structural damage. Task II incorporates additional considerations of effects of spatial variations of ground motions and soil-structure interaction on foundation motions and structural response. The results of Task II are presented in Vols. 2 through of NUREG/CR-3805 as follows: Vol. 2 effects of ground motion characteristics on structural response considering localized structural nonlinearities and soil-structure interaction effects; Vol. 3 observational data on spatial variations of earthquake ground motions; Vol. 4 soil-structure interaction effects on structural response; and Vol. 5, summary based on Tasks I and II studies. This report presents the results of the Vol. 4 studies.

  3. STAR FORMATION IN SELF-GRAVITATING DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. EPISODIC FORMATION OF BROAD-LINE REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WangJianmin; Du Pu; Ge Junqiang; Hu Chen; Baldwin, Jack A.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers discussing the process and effects of star formation in the self-gravitating disk around the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have previously suggested that warm skins are formed above the star-forming (SF) disk through the diffusion of warm gas driven by supernova explosions. Here we study the evolution of the warm skins when they are exposed to the powerful radiation from the inner part of the accretion disk. The skins initially are heated to the Compton temperature, forming a Compton atmosphere (CAS) whose subsequent evolution is divided into four phases. Phase I is the duration of pure accumulation supplied by the SF disk. During phase II clouds begin to form due to line cooling and sink to the SF disk. Phase III is a period of preventing clouds from sinking to the SF disk through dynamic interaction between clouds and the CAS because of the CAS overdensity driven by continuous injection of warm gas from the SF disk. Finally, phase IV is an inevitable collapse of the entire CAS through line cooling. This CAS evolution drives the episodic appearance of broad-line regions (BLRs). We follow the formation of cold clouds through the thermal instability of the CAS during phases II and III, using linear analysis. Since the clouds are produced inside the CAS, the initial spatial distribution of newly formed clouds and angular momentum naturally follow the CAS dynamics, producing a flattened disk of clouds. The number of clouds in phases II and III can be estimated, as well as the filling factor of clouds in the BLR. Since the cooling function depends on the metallicity, the metallicity gradients that originate in the SF disk give rise to different properties of clouds in different radial regions. We find from the instability analysis that clouds have column density N H ∼ 22 cm –2 in the metal-rich regions whereas they have N H ∼> 10 22 cm –2 in the metal-poor regions. The metal-rich clouds

  4. [Fungal community structure in phase II composting of Volvariella volvacea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changqing; Li, Tong; Jiang, Yun; Li, Yu

    2014-12-04

    To understand the fungal community succession during the phase II of Volvariella volvacea compost and clarify the predominant fungi in different fermentation stages, to monitor the dynamic compost at the molecular level accurately and quickly, and reveal the mechanism. The 18S rDNA-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing methods were used to analyze the fungal community structure during the course of compost. The DGGE profile shows that there were differences in the diversity of fungal community with the fermentation progress. The diversity was higher in the stages of high temperature. And the dynamic changes of predominant community and relative intensity was observed. Among the 20 predominant clone strains, 9 were unknown eukaryote and fungi, the others were Eurotiales, Aspergillus sp., Melanocarpus albomyces, Colletotrichum sp., Rhizomucor sp., Verticillium sp., Penicillium commune, Microascus trigonosporus and Trichosporon lactis. The 14 clone strains were detected in the stages of high and durative temperature. The fungal community structure and predominant community have taken dynamic succession during the phase II of Volvariella volvacea compost.

  5. Comparison of integral cross section values of several cross section libraries in the SAND-II format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijp, W.L.; Nolthenius, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of some integral cross section values for several cross section libraries in the SAND-II format is presented. The integral cross section values are calculated with aid of the spectrum functions for a Watt fission spectrum, a 1/E spectrum and a Maxwellian spectrum. The libraries which are considered here are CCC-112B, ENDF/B-IV, DETAN74, LAPENAS and CESNEF. These 5 cross section libraries used have all the SAND-II format. (author)

  6. Picosecond kinetics of the electron-hole layers formation in wide-bandgap II-VI type-II heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filatov, E.V.; Zaitsev, S.V.; Tartakovskii, I.I.; Maksimov, A.A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Yakovlev, D.R. [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Experimentelle Physik II, Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Waag, A. [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Braunschweig Technical University, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Considerable slowdown of luminescence kinetics of the direct optical transition was discovered in ZnSe/BeTe type-II heterostructures under high levels of optical pumping. The effect is attributed to forming of a potential barrier for holes in the ZnSe layer due to band bending at high densities of spatially separated carriers. That results in a longer time of the photoexcited holes energy relaxation to their ground state in the BeTe layer. The decrease of overlapping of electron and hole wavefunctions in the ZnSe layer in thick ZnSe/BeTe structures at high levels of optical excitation reveals an additional important effect, that leads to sufficient retardation of radiative recombination time for photoexcited carriers (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. COMPOSITIONAL AND SUBSTANTIAL STRUCTURE OF THE MEDICAL DOCUMENT: FORMATION STAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romashova Olga Vladimirovna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the compositional and substantial structure of the ambulatory medical record, or "case history", which has being formed for a long time. The author allocates the three main periods in the formation of this medical document: the first period (the beginning of the 19th century – 1920s is connected with the origin and formation; the second period (1920-1980s is marked by emergence of the normative legal acts regulating registration and maintaining; the third period (1980s – up to the present is associated with the cancellation of regulations and the introduction of the new order of the Ministry of Health of the USSR that changed the document's form and name. It is determined that the composition of the case history consists of the title page and the main part. The following processes take place in the course of ambulatory medical record's formation: strengthening formalization, increase in the number of pattern text fragments, increase in the text's volume, and the implementation of bigger number of functions. The author reveals the main (informative and cumulative, accounting and additional (scientific, controlling, legal, financial functions of the document. The implementation of these functions is reflected in the compositional and substantial structure of the document text and is conditioned by a number of extralinguistic factors.

  8. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju; Wu, Yuefang

    2015-01-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ( 13 CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ( 12 CO, 13 CO, C 18 O J = 3–2, HCO + , and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution

  9. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Wu, Yuefang, E-mail: sparon@iafe.uba.ar [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China)

    2015-06-15

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ({sup 13}CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ({sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O J = 3–2, HCO{sup +}, and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  10. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Zeng Li, Jin; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  11. Structural analysis of group II chitinase (ChtII) catalysis completes the puzzle of chitin hydrolysis in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Qu, Mingbo; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Qing

    2018-02-23

    Chitin is a linear homopolymer of N -acetyl-β-d-glucosamines and a major structural component of insect cuticles. Chitin hydrolysis involves glycoside hydrolase family 18 (GH18) chitinases. In insects, chitin hydrolysis is essential for periodic shedding of the old cuticle ecdysis and proceeds via a pathway different from that in the well studied bacterial chitinolytic system. Group II chitinase (ChtII) is a widespread chitinolytic enzyme in insects and contains the greatest number of catalytic domains and chitin-binding domains among chitinases. In Lepidopterans, ChtII and two other chitinases, ChtI and Chi-h, are essential for chitin hydrolysis. Although ChtI and Chi-h have been well studied, the role of ChtII remains elusive. Here, we investigated the structure and enzymology of Of ChtII, a ChtII derived from the insect pest Ostrinia furnacalis We present the crystal structures of two catalytically active domains of Of ChtII, Of ChtII-C1 and Of ChtII-C2, both in unliganded form and complexed with chitooligosaccharide substrates. We found that Of ChtII-C1 and Of ChtII-C2 both possess long, deep substrate-binding clefts with endochitinase activities. Of ChtII exhibited structural characteristics within the substrate-binding cleft similar to those in Of Chi-h and Of ChtI. However, Of ChtII lacked structural elements favoring substrate binding beyond the active sites, including an extra wall structure present in Of Chi-h. Nevertheless, the numerous domains in Of ChtII may compensate for this difference; a truncation containing one catalytic domain and three chitin-binding modules ( Of ChtII-B4C1) displayed activity toward insoluble polymeric substrates that was higher than those of Of Chi-h and Of ChtI. Our observations provide the last piece of the puzzle of chitin hydrolysis in insects. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Universal Scaling Relations in Scale-Free Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Hopkins, Philip F.; Grudić, Michael Y.

    2018-04-01

    A large number of astronomical phenomena exhibit remarkably similar scaling relations. The most well-known of these is the mass distribution dN/dM∝M-2 which (to first order) describes stars, protostellar cores, clumps, giant molecular clouds, star clusters and even dark matter halos. In this paper we propose that this ubiquity is not a coincidence and that it is the generic result of scale-free structure formation where the different scales are uncorrelated. We show that all such systems produce a mass function proportional to M-2 and a column density distribution with a power law tail of dA/d lnΣ∝Σ-1. In the case where structure formation is controlled by gravity the two-point correlation becomes ξ2D∝R-1. Furthermore, structures formed by such processes (e.g. young star clusters, DM halos) tend to a ρ∝R-3 density profile. We compare these predictions with observations, analytical fragmentation cascade models, semi-analytical models of gravito-turbulent fragmentation and detailed "full physics" hydrodynamical simulations. We find that these power-laws are good first order descriptions in all cases.

  13. Formation of singlet oxygen by decomposition of protein hydroperoxide in photosystem II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Pathak

    Full Text Available Singlet oxygen (1O2 is formed by triplet-triplet energy transfer from triplet chlorophyll to O2 via Type II photosensitization reaction in photosystem II (PSII. Formation of triplet chlorophyll is associated with the change in spin state of the excited electron and recombination of triplet radical pair in the PSII antenna complex and reaction center, respectively. Here, we have provided evidence for the formation of 1O2 by decomposition of protein hydroperoxide in PSII membranes deprived of Mn4O5Ca complex. Protein hydroperoxide is formed by protein oxidation initiated by highly oxidizing chlorophyll cation radical and hydroxyl radical formed by Type I photosensitization reaction. Under highly oxidizing conditions, protein hydroperoxide is oxidized to protein peroxyl radical which either cyclizes to dioxetane or recombines with another protein peroxyl radical to tetroxide. These highly unstable intermediates decompose to triplet carbonyls which transfer energy to O2 forming 1O2. Data presented in this study show for the first time that 1O2 is formed by decomposition of protein hydroperoxide in PSII membranes deprived of Mn4O5Ca complex.

  14. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE GALACTIC H II REGION Sh2-297

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm –3 and 9.15 × 10 5 cm –6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ∼7.'5 × 7.'5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H – K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ∼0.1-2 M ☉ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V–I) and NIR (J/J–H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ∼1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  15. Formation of Mixed-Ligand Complexes of Metals(II) with Monoamine Complexones and Amino Acids in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyreu, D. F.; Gridchin, S. N.

    2018-05-01

    The formation of mixed-ligand complexes in the M(II)-Nta, Ida-L (M = Cu(II), Ni, Zn, Co(II), L = Ser, Thr, Asp, Arg, Asn) systems, where Ida and Nta are the residues of iminodiacetic and nitrilotriacetic acids, respectively, is studied using pH measurements, calorimetry and spectrophotometry. The thermodynamic parameters (log K, Δr G 0, Δr H, Δr S) of their formation at 298.15 K and ionic strength I = 0.5 (KNO3) are determined. The most likely scenario of amino acid residue coordination in the composition of mixed complexes is discussed.

  16. Lead(ii) soaps: crystal structures, polymorphism, and solid and liquid mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Casado, F J; Ramos-Riesco, M; Rodríguez-Cheda, J A; Redondo-Yélamos, M I; Garrido, L; Fernández-Martínez, A; García-Barriocanal, J; da Silva, I; Durán-Olivencia, M; Poulain, A

    2017-07-05

    The long-chain members of the lead(ii) alkanoate series or soaps, from octanoate to octadecanoate, have been thoroughly characterized by means of XRD, PDF analysis, DSC, FTIR, ssNMR and other techniques, in all their phases and mesophases. The crystal structures at room temperature of all of the members of the series are now solved, showing the existence of two polymorphic forms in the room temperature crystal phase, different to short and long-chain members. Only nonanoate and decanoate present both forms, and this polymorphism is proven to be monotropic. At higher temperature, these compounds present a solid mesophase, defined as rotator, a liquid crystal phase and a liquid phase, all of which have a similar local arrangement. Since some lead(ii) soaps appear as degradation compounds in oil paintings, the solved crystal structures of lead(ii) soaps can now be used as fingerprints for their detection using X-ray diffraction. Pair distribution function analysis on these compounds is very similar in the same phases and mesophases for the different members, showing the same short range order. This observation suggests that this technique could also be used in the detection of these compounds in disordered phases or in the initial stages of formation in paintings.

  17. The Role of Angiotensin II in Parietal Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Crescent Formation in Glomerular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Paola; Novelli, Rubina; Rota, Cinzia; Gagliardini, Elena; Ruggiero, Barbara; Rottoli, Daniela; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) is a devastating disease with rapidly progressive deterioration in kidney function, which, histologically, manifests as crescent formation in most glomeruli. We previously found that crescents derive from the aberrant proliferation and migration of parietal epithelial cells (PECs)/progenitor cells, and that the angiotensin (ang) II/ang II type-1 (AT 1 ) receptor pathway may participate, together with the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 axis, in the development of those lesions. Herein, we elucidated sequential events and cellular and molecular interactions occurring during crescentic lesion onset and evolution. By analyzing kidney biopsy specimens of patients with extracapillary GN, divided according to the grade of glomerular lesions, we found that the accumulation of macrophages expressing matrix metalloproteinase-12 started manifesting in glomeruli affected by early-stage lesions, whereas AT 1 receptor expression could not be detected. In glomeruli with advanced lesions, AT 1 receptor expression increased markedly, and the up-regulation of SDF-1, and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 7, was documented on podocytes and PECs, respectively. In vitro studies were instrumental to demonstrating the role of ang II in inducing podocyte SDF-1 production, which ultimately activates PECs. The present findings support the possibility that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment might limit PEC activation and reduce the frequency and extension of crescents in extracapillary GN. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and structural characterisation of iron(II) and copper(II) diphosphates containing flattened metal oxotetrahedra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keates, Adam C.; Wang, Qianlong; Weller, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Single crystal and bulk polycrystalline forms of K 2 MP 2 O 7 (M=Fe(II), Cu(II)) have been synthesised and their structures determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Both compounds crystallize in the tetragonal system, space group P-42 1 m. Their structures are formed from infinite sheets of linked oxopolyhedra of the stoichiometry [MP 2 O 7 ] 2− with potassium cations situated between the layers. The MO 4 tetrahedra share oxygen atoms with [P 2 O 7 ] 4− diphosphate groups and the potassium ions have KO 8 square prismatic geometry. In both compounds the M(II) centre has an unusual strongly flattened, tetrahedral coordination to oxygen, as a result of the Jahn–Teller (JT) effect for the high spin d 6 Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing or a second order JT effect for d 9 Cu(II) centres in four fold coordination. The uncommon transition metal ion environments found in these materials are reflected in their optical absorption spectra and magnetism data. - Graphical abstract: The structures of the tetragonal polymorphs of K 2 MP 2 O 7 , M=Cu(II), Fe(II), consist of infinite sheets of stoichiometry [MP 2 O 7 ] 2− , formed from linked pyrophosphate groups and MO 4 tetrahedra, separated by potassium ions. In both compounds the unusual tetrahedral coordination of the M(II) centre is strongly flattened as a result of Jahn–Teller (JT) effects for high spin, d 6 Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing and second-order JT effects for d 9 Cu(II). Display Omitted - Highlights: • Tetrahedral copper and iron(II) coordinated by oxygen. • New layered phosphate structure. • Jahn–Teller and d 10 distorted coordinations

  19. Nonlinear structure formation with the environmentally dependent dilaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Bruck, Carsten van de; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas J.; Li, Baojiu

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the nonlinear structure formation of the environmentally dependent dilaton model using N-body simulations. We find that the mechanism of suppressing the scalar fifth force in high-density regions works very well. Within the parameter space allowed by the solar-system tests, the dilaton model predicts small deviations of the matter power spectrum and the mass function from their ΛCDM counterparts. The importance of taking full account of the nonlinearity of the model is also emphasized.

  20. Tin( ii ) ketoacidoximates: synthesis, X-ray structures and processing to tin( ii ) oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-10-21

    Tin(ii) ketoacidoximates of the type [HONCRCOO]Sn (R = Me 1, CHPh 2) and (MeONCMeCOO)Sn] NH·2HO 3 were synthesized by reacting pyruvate- and hydroxyl- or methoxylamine RONH (R = H, Me) with tin(ii) chloride dihydrate SnCl·2HO. The single crystal X-ray structure reveals that the geometry at the Sn atom is trigonal bipyramidal in 1, 2 and trigonal pyramidal in 3. Inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in 1-3. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis shows that the decomposition of 1-3 to SnO occurs at ca. 160 °C. The evolved gas analysis during TG indicates complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step for 1 whereas a small organic residue is additionally removed at temperatures >400 °C for 2. Above 140 °C, [HONC(Me)COO]Sn (1) decomposes in air to spherical SnO particles of size 10-500 nm. Spin coating of 1 on Si or a glass substrate followed by heating at 200 °C results in a uniform film of SnO. The band gap of the produced SnO film and nanomaterial was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to be in the range of 3.0-3.3 eV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates surface oxidation of the SnO film to SnO in ambient atmosphere.

  1. Structured assessment format for evaluating operative reports in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergis, Ashley; Gillman, Lawrence; Minor, Samuel; Taylor, Mark; Park, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Despite its multifaceted importance, no validated or reliable tools assess the quality of the dictated operative note. This study determined the construct validity, interrater reliability, and internal consistency of a Structured Assessment Format for Evaluating Operative Reports (SAFE-OR) in general surgery. SAFE-OR was developed by using consensus criteria set forth by the Canadian Association of General Surgeons. This instrument includes a structured assessment and a global quality rating scale. Residents divided into novice and experienced groups viewed and dictated a videotaped laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy. Blinded, independent faculty evaluators graded the transcribed reports using SAFE-OR. Twenty-one residents participated in the study. Mean structured assessment scores (out of 44) were significantly lower for novice versus experienced residents (23.3 +/- 5.2 vs 34.1 +/- 6.0, t = .001). Mean global quality scores (out of 45) were similarly lower for novice residents (25.6 +/- 4.7 vs 35.9 +/- 7.6, t = .006). Interclass correlation coefficients were .98 (95% confidence interval, .96-.99) for structured assessment and .93 (95% confidence interval, .83-.97) for global quality scales. Cronbach alpha coefficients for internal consistency were .85 for structured assessment and .96 for global quality assessment scales. SAFE-OR shows significant construct validity, excellent interrater reliability, and high internal consistency. This tool will allow educators to objectively evaluate the quality of trainee operative reports and provide a mechanism for implementing, monitoring, and refining curriculum for dictation skills.

  2. Crystal structure of dichloridobis(dimethyl N-cyanodithioiminocarbonatecobalt(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamadou Birame Diop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the mononuclear title complex, [{(H3CS2C=NC[triple-bond] N}2CoCl2], consists of a CoII atom coordinated in a distorted tetrahedral manner by two Cl− ligands and the terminal N atoms of two dimethyl N-cyanodithioiminocarbonate ligands. The two organic ligands are almost coplanar, with a dihedral angle of 5.99 (6° between their least-squares planes. The crystal packing features pairs of inversion-related complexes that are held together through C—H...Cl and C—H...S interactions and π–π stacking [centroid-to-centroid distance = 3.515 (su? Å]. Additional C—H...Cl and C—H...S interactions, as well as Cl...S contacts < 3.6 Å, consolidate the crystal packing.

  3. Formation, structure, and stability of MHD intermediate shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Contrary to the usual belief that MHD intermediate shocks are extraneous, the author has recently shown by numerical solutions of dissipative MHD equations that intermediate shocks are admissible and can be formed through nonlinear wave steepening from continuous waves. In this paper, the formation, structure and stability of intermediate shocks in dissipative MHD are considered in detail. The differences between the conventional theory and his are pointed out and clarified. He shows that all four types of intermediate shocks can be formed from smooth waves. He also shows that there are free parameters in the structure of the intermediate shocks, and that these parameters are related to the shock stability. In addition, he shows that a rotational discontinuity can not exist with finite width, indicate how this is related to the existence of time-dependent intermediate shocks, and show why the conventional theory is not a good approximation to dissipative MHD solutions whenever there is rotation in magnetic field

  4. Influence of crystal structure on the CoII diffusion behavior in the Zn1-xCoxO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiteado, M.; Makovec, D.; Villegas, M.; Caballero, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    The solid state interaction of the Zn 1-x Co x O nominal system is investigated by means of diffusion couples and analysis of co-precipitated samples. The formation of a homogeneous Co:ZnO solid solution is found to be determined by the crystal structure from which Co II ions diffuse into the wurtzite lattice. No diffusion is observed whenever the CoO rock-salt structure is formed from the Co II precursor. On the contrary, the diffusion from the Co 3 O 4 spinel phase is feasible but has a limited temperature range defined by the reduction at a high temperature of Co III -Co II , since this process again leads to the formation of the rock-salt structure. However, when using a highly reactive and homogeneous co-precipitated starting powder, neither the spinel phase nor the rock-salt structure is formed, and a Co II :ZnO solid solution is obtained, which remains stable up to high temperatures. - Graphical abstract: Maximum diffusion distance for the ZnO-CoO x couple as a function of temperature. Dashed gray lines represent the temperature values at which the transformations between CoO and Co 3 O 4 compounds take place

  5. THE SECOND SURVEY OF THE MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD BY NANTEN. II. STAR FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Akiko; Mizuno, Yoji; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Onishi, Toshikazu; Fukui, Yasuo; Fillipovic, Miroslav D.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Kim, Sungeun; Mizuno, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We studied star formation activities in the molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We have utilized the second catalog of 272 molecular clouds obtained by NANTEN to compare the cloud distribution with signatures of massive star formation including stellar clusters, and optical and radio H II regions. We find that the molecular clouds are classified into three types according to the activities of massive star formation: Type I shows no signature of massive star formation; Type II is associated with relatively small H II region(s); and Type III with both H II region(s) and young stellar cluster(s). The radio continuum sources were used to confirm that Type I giant molecular clouds (GMCs) do not host optically hidden H II regions. These signatures of massive star formation show a good spatial correlation with the molecular clouds in the sense that they are located within ∼100 pc of the molecular clouds. Among possible ideas to explain the GMC types, we favor that the types indicate an evolutionary sequence; i.e., the youngest phase is Type I, followed by Type II, and the last phase is Type III, where the most active star formation takes place leading to cloud dispersal. The number of the three types of GMCs should be proportional to the timescale of each evolutionary stage if a steady state of massive star and cluster formation is a good approximation. By adopting the timescale of the youngest stellar clusters, 10 Myr, we roughly estimate the timescales of Types I, II, and III to be 6 Myr, 13 Myr, and 7 Myr, respectively, corresponding to a lifetime of 20-30 Myr for the GMCs with a mass above the completeness limit, 5 x 10 4 M sun .

  6. Structural characterization and antioxidant properties of Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes derived from dicyandiamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertmen, Seda Nur; Gonul, Ilyas; Kose, Muhammet

    2018-01-01

    New Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes derived from dicyandiamide were synthesized and characterised by spectroscopic and analytical methods. Molecular structures of the complexes were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In the complexes, the Cu(II) or Ni(II) ions are four-coordinate with a slight distorted square planar geometry. The ligands (L-nPen and L-iPen) derived from dicyandiamide formed via nucleophilic addition of alcohol solvent molecule in the presence Cu(II) or Ni(II) ions. Complexes were stabilised by intricate array of hydrogen bonding interactions. Antioxidant activity of the complexes was evaluated by DPPH radical scavenging and CUPRAC methods. The complexes exhibit antioxidant activity, however, their activities were much lower than standard antioxidants (Vitamin C and trolox).

  7. Excimer Formation Dynamics of Dipyrenyldecane in Structurally Different Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anita; Pandey, Siddharth

    2017-12-07

    Ionic liquids, being composed of ions alone, may offer alternative pathways for molecular aggregation. These pathways could be controlled by the chemical structure of the cation and the anion of the ionic liquids. Intramolecular excimer formation dynamics of a bifluorophoric probe, 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)decane [1Py(10)1Py], where the fluorophoric pyrene moieties are separated by a long decyl chain, is investigated in seven different ionic liquids in 10-90 °C temperature range. The long alkyl separator allows for ample interaction with the solubilizing milieu prior to the formation of the excimer. The ionic liquids are composed of two sets, one having four ionic liquids of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([bmim + ]) with different anions and the other having four ionic liquids of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion ([Tf 2 N - ]) with different cations. The excimer-to-monomer emission intensity ratio (I E /I M ) is found to increase with increasing temperature in sigmoidal fashion. Chemical structure of the ionic liquid controls the excimer formation efficiency, as I E /I M values within ionic liquids with the same viscosities are found to be significantly different. The excited-state intensity decay kinetics of 1Py(10)1Py in ionic liquids do not adhere to a simplistic Birk's scheme, where only one excimer conformer forms after excitation. The apparent rate constants of excimer formation (k a ) in highly viscous ionic liquids are an order of magnitude lower than those reported in organic solvents. In general, the higher the viscosity of the ionic liquid, the more sensitive is the k a to the temperature with higher activation energy, E a . The trend in E a is found to be similar to that for activation energy of the viscous flow (E a,η ). Stokes-Einstein relationship is not followed in [bmim + ] ionic liquids; however, with the exception of [choline][Tf 2 N], it is found to be followed in [Tf 2 N - ] ionic liquids suggesting the cyclization dynamics of 1Py(10)1Py

  8. PROPERTIES OF BULGELESS DISK GALAXIES. II. STAR FORMATION AS A FUNCTION OF CIRCULAR VELOCITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Linda C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Martini, Paul; Wong, Man-Hong [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lisenfeld, Ute [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Boeker, Torsten [European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Schinnerer, Eva, E-mail: lwatson@cfa.harvard.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-06-01

    We study the relation between the surface density of gas and star formation rate in 20 moderately inclined, bulgeless disk galaxies (Sd-Sdm Hubble types) using CO(1-0) data from the IRAM 30 m telescope, H I emission line data from the VLA/EVLA, H{alpha} data from the MDM Observatory, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission data derived from Spitzer IRAC observations. We specifically investigate the efficiency of star formation as a function of circular velocity (v{sub circ}). Previous work found that the vertical dust structure and disk stability of edge-on, bulgeless disk galaxies transition from diffuse dust lanes with large scale heights and gravitationally stable disks at v{sub circ} < 120 km s{sup -1} (M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }) to narrow dust lanes with small scale heights and gravitationally unstable disks at v{sub circ} > 120 km s{sup -1}. We find no transition in star formation efficiency ({Sigma}{sub SFR}/{Sigma}{sub Hi+H{sub 2}}) at v{sub circ} = 120 km s{sup -1} or at any other circular velocity probed by our sample (v{sub circ} = 46-190 km s{sup -1}). Contrary to previous work, we find no transition in disk stability at any circular velocity in our sample. Assuming our sample has the same dust structure transition as the edge-on sample, our results demonstrate that scale height differences in the cold interstellar medium of bulgeless disk galaxies do not significantly affect the molecular fraction or star formation efficiency. This may indicate that star formation is primarily affected by physical processes that act on smaller scales than the dust scale height, which lends support to local star formation models.

  9. Metal-ion exchange induced structural transformation as a way of forming novel Ni(II)− and Cu(II)−salicylaldimine structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jing-Yun, E-mail: jyunwu@ncnu.edu.tw; Tsai, Chi-Jou; Chang, Ching-Yun; Wu, Yung-Yuan

    2017-02-15

    A Zn(II)−salicylaldimine complex [Zn(L{sup salpyca})(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1, where H{sub 2}L{sup salpyca}=4-hydroxy-3-(((pyridin-2-yl)methylimino)methyl)benzoic acid), with a one-dimensional (1D) chain structure, has been successfully converted to a discrete Ni(II)−salicylaldimine complex [Ni(L{sup salpyca})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}] (2) and an infinite Cu(II)−salicylaldimine complex ([Cu(L{sup salpyca})]·3H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) through a metal-ion exchange induced structural transformation process. However, such processes do not worked by Mn(II) and Co(II) ions. Solid-state structure analyses reveal that complexes 1–3 form comparable coordinative or supramolecular zigzag chains running along the crystallographic [201] direction. In addition, replacing Zn(II) ion by Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions caused changes in coordination environment and sphere of metal centers, from a 5-coordinate intermediate geometry of square pyramidal and trigonal bipyramidal in 1 to a 6-coordinate octahedral geometry in 2, and to a 4-coordiante square planar geometry in 3. This study shows that metal-ion exchange serves as a very efficient way of forming new coordination complexes that may not be obtained through direct synthesis. - Graphical abstract: A Zn(II)−salicylaldimine zigzag chain has been successfully converted to a Ni(II)−salicylaldimine supramolecular zigzag chain and a Cu(II)−salicylaldimine coordinative zigzag chain through metal-ion exchange induced structural transformations, which is not achieved by Mn(II) and Co(II) ions.

  10. STAR FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES. II. THE EFFECT OF STAR FORMATION AND PHOTOELECTRIC HEATING ON THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasker, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of star formation and diffuse photoelectric heating on the properties of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in high-resolution (∼ H,c >100 cm -3 are identified as GMCs. Between 1000 and 1500 clouds are created in the simulations with masses M>10 5 M sun and 180-240 with masses M>10 6 M sun in agreement with estimates of the Milky Way's population. We find that the effect of photoelectric heating is to suppress the fragmentation of the interstellar medium, resulting in a filamentary structure in the warm gas surrounding clouds. This environment suppresses the formation of a retrograde rotating cloud population, with 88% of the clouds rotating prograde with respect to the galaxy after 300 Myr. The diffuse heating also reduces the initial star formation rate (SFR), slowing the conversation of gas into stars. We therefore conclude that the interstellar environment plays an important role in the GMC evolution. Our clouds live between 0 and 20 Myr with a high infant mortality (t' < 3 Myr) due to cloud mergers and star formation. Other properties, including distributions of mass, size, and surface density, agree well with observations. Collisions between our clouds are common, occurring at a rate of ∼ 1/4 of the orbital period. It is not clear whether such collisions trigger or suppress star formation at our current resolution. Our SFR is a factor of 10 higher than observations in local galaxies. This is likely due to the absence of localized feedback in our models.

  11. Roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in long-term memory formation in crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Mizunami

    Full Text Available Ca(2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII is a key molecule in many systems of learning and memory in vertebrates, but roles of CaMKII in invertebrates have not been characterized in detail. We have suggested that serial activation of NO/cGMP signaling, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, Ca(2+/CaM and cAMP signaling participates in long-term memory (LTM formation in olfactory conditioning in crickets, and here we show participation of CaMKII in LTM formation and propose its site of action in the biochemical cascades. Crickets subjected to 3-trial conditioning to associate an odor with reward exhibited memory that lasts for a few days, which is characterized as protein synthesis-dependent LTM. In contrast, animals subjected to 1-trial conditioning exhibited memory that lasts for only several hours (mid-term memory, MTM. Injection of a CaMKII inhibitor prior to 3-trial conditioning impaired 1-day memory retention but not 1-hour memory retention, suggesting that CaMKII participates in LTM formation but not in MTM formation. Animals injected with a cGMP analogue, calcium ionophore or cAMP analogue prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention, and co-injection of a CaMKII inhibitor impaired induction of LTM by the cGMP analogue or that by the calcium ionophore but not that by the cAMP analogue, suggesting that CaMKII is downstream of cGMP production and Ca(2+ influx and upstream of cAMP production in biochemical cascades for LTM formation. Animals injected with an adenylyl cyclase (AC activator prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention. Interestingly, a CaMKII inhibitor impaired LTM induction by the AC activator, although AC is expected to be a downstream target of CaMKII. The results suggest that CaMKII interacts with AC to facilitate cAMP production for LTM formation. We propose that CaMKII serves as a key molecule for interplay between Ca(2+ signaling and cAMP signaling for LTM formation, a new role of Ca

  12. Standard molar enthalpies of formation of nickel(II) {beta}-diketonates and monothio-{beta}-diketonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: risilva@fc.up.pt; Santos, Luis M.N.B.F. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Giera, Edward [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, ul. F. Joliot-Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The standard (p{sup o}=0.1MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of the crystalline diaquobis(dibenzoylmethanate)nickel(II), Ni(dbm){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, diaquobis(thenoyltrifluoroacetonate)nickel(II), Ni(ttfa){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} bis(monothiodibenzoylmethanate)nickel(II), Ni(dbmS){sub 2} and bis(monothiothenoyltrifluoroacetonate)nickel(II), Ni(HttfaS){sub 2} were determined, at T=298.15K, by high precision solution-reaction calorimetry. The standard molar enthalpy of sublimation of the monothiothenoyltrifluoroacetone (HttfaS) complex was measured by high-temperature Calvet microcalorimetry. From the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the complexes in the gaseous state, the mean nickel(II)-ligand molar dissociation enthalpies, (Ni-L), were derived. {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o}(cr)/(kJ.mol{sup -1})Diaquobis(dibenzoylmethanate)nickel(II), Ni(dbm){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}-993.3+/-3.8Diaquobis(thenoyltrifluoroacetonate)nickel(II), Ni(ttfa){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}-2452.0+/-8.3Bis(monothiodibenzoylmethanate)nickel(II), Ni(dbmS){sub 2}-42.1+/-5.9Bis(monothiothenoyltrifluoroacetonate)nickel(II), Ni(ttfaS){sub 2}-1473.5+/-8.1.

  13. Influence of Hybrid Perovskite Fabrication Methods on Film Formation, Electronic Structure, and Solar Cell Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnier, Tobias; Emara, Jennifer; Olthof, Selina; Meerholz, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid organic/inorganic halide perovskites have lately been a topic of great interest in the field of solar cell applications, with the potential to achieve device efficiencies exceeding other thin film device technologies. Yet, large variations in device efficiency and basic physical properties are reported. This is due to unintentional variations during film processing, which have not been sufficiently investigated so far. We therefore conducted an extensive study of the morphology and electronic structure of a large number of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite where we show how the preparation method as well as the mixing ratio of educts methylammonium iodide and lead(II) iodide impact properties like film formation, crystal structure, density of states, energy levels, and ultimately the solar cell performance. PMID:28287555

  14. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  15. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorenko, S. G. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Burshtein, A. I. [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  16. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics

  17. Structural mechanisms of formation of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Sokovikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical study of plastic deformation instability and localization in materials subjected to dynamic loading and high-velocity perforation. We investigate the behavior of samples dynamically loaded during Hopkinson-Kolsky pressure bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions. Experiments were carried out using samples of a special shape and appropriate test rigging, which allowed us to realize a plane strain state. Also, the shear-compression specimens proposed in were investigated. The lateral surface of the samples was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. Use of a transmission electron microscope for studying the surface of samples showed that in the regions of strain localization there are parts taking the shape of bands and honeycomb structure in the deformed layer. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was investigated using a high-speed infra-red camera. A specially designed ballistic set-up for studying perforation was used to test samples in different impulse loading regimes followed by plastic flow instability and plug ejection. Changes in the velocity of the rear surface at different time of plug ejection were analyzed by Doppler interferometry techniques. The microstructure of tested samples was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The subsequent processing of 3D deformation relief data enabled estimation of the distribution of plastic strain gradients at different time of plug formation and ejection. It has been found that in strain localization areas the subgrains are elongated taking the shape of bands and undergo fragmentation leading to the formation of super-microcrystalline structure, in which the

  18. Anisotropic formation and distribution of stacking faults in II-VI semiconductor nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven M; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-01-09

    Nanocrystals of cadmium selenide exhibit a form of polytypism with stable forms in both the wurtzite and zinc blende crystal structures. As a result, wurtzite nanorods of cadmium selenide tend to form stacking faults of zinc blende along the c-axis. These faults were found to preferentially form during the growth of the (001) face, which accounts for 40% of the rod's total length. Since II-VI semiconductor nanorods lack inversion symmetry along the c-axis of the particle, the two ends of the nanorod may be identified by this anisotropic distribution of faults.

  19. Hydration characteristics and structure formation of cement pastes containing metakaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvorkin Leonid

    2018-01-01

    crystalline structure with dominance of partially crystalized hydrosilicates and gel-like formations.

  20. Data base formation for important components of reactor TRIGA MARK II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, R; Mavko, B; Kozuh, M [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    The paper represents specific data base formation for reactor TRIGA MARK II in Podgorica. Reactor operation data from year 1985 to 1990 were collected. Two groups of collected data were formed. The first group includes components data and the second group covers data of reactor scrams. Time related and demand related models were used for data evaluation. Parameters were estimated by classical method. Similar data bases are useful everywhere where components unavailabilities may have severe drawback. (author) [Slovenian] V referatu smo prikazali raziskavo, v okviru katere smo za raziskovalni reaktor TRIGA MARK II v Podgorici izoblikovali specificno bazo podatkov. Zbrali smo podatke obratovanja reaktorja od leta 1985 do 1990. Rezultate raziskave dogodkov smo razdelili v dve glavni skupini. V prvo spadajo obratovalni podatki o komponentah, v drugo skupino pa spadajo zagoni oz. zaustavitve reaktorja. Podatke smo ovrednotili z modelom v casovnem prostoru in z modelom na zahtevo. Parametre modelov smo dolocili s klasicno metodo. Opisane baze podatkov so uporabne povsod, kjer so lahko posledice nezanesljivega delovanja sistemov velike. [author].

  1. Including crystal structure attributes in machine learning models of formation energies via Voronoi tessellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan; Liu, Ruoqian; Krishna, Amar; Hegde, Vinay I.; Agrawal, Ankit; Choudhary, Alok; Wolverton, Chris

    2017-07-01

    While high-throughput density functional theory (DFT) has become a prevalent tool for materials discovery, it is limited by the relatively large computational cost. In this paper, we explore using DFT data from high-throughput calculations to create faster, surrogate models with machine learning (ML) that can be used to guide new searches. Our method works by using decision tree models to map DFT-calculated formation enthalpies to a set of attributes consisting of two distinct types: (i) composition-dependent attributes of elemental properties (as have been used in previous ML models of DFT formation energies), combined with (ii) attributes derived from the Voronoi tessellation of the compound's crystal structure. The ML models created using this method have half the cross-validation error and similar training and evaluation speeds to models created with the Coulomb matrix and partial radial distribution function methods. For a dataset of 435 000 formation energies taken from the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), our model achieves a mean absolute error of 80 meV/atom in cross validation, which is lower than the approximate error between DFT-computed and experimentally measured formation enthalpies and below 15% of the mean absolute deviation of the training set. We also demonstrate that our method can accurately estimate the formation energy of materials outside of the training set and be used to identify materials with especially large formation enthalpies. We propose that our models can be used to accelerate the discovery of new materials by identifying the most promising materials to study with DFT at little additional computational cost.

  2. Structural modification in the formation of starch – silver nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, S. N. Suraiya; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal, E-mail: perumal.ramasamy@gmail.com [Department of Applied Science and Technology, A.C.Tech. Campus, Anna University, Chennai – 600 025 (India); Aswal, V. K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polymer based nanocomposites have gained wide applications in field of battery technology. Starch is a naturally occurring polysaccharide with sustainable properties such as biodegradable, non toxic, excellent film forming capacity and it also act as reducing agent for the metal nanoparticles. In our research various concentration of silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) was added to the starch solution and films were obtained using solution casting method. Surface electron microscope (SEM) of the films shows modifications depending upon the concentration of AgNO{sub 3}. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis showed that addition of silver nitrate modifies the starch to disc like structures and with increasing the AgNO{sub 3} concentration leads to the formation of fractals. This research could benefit battery technology where solid polymer membranes using starch is used.

  3. Structural modification in the formation of starch – silver nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, S. N. Suraiya; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal; Aswal, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer based nanocomposites have gained wide applications in field of battery technology. Starch is a naturally occurring polysaccharide with sustainable properties such as biodegradable, non toxic, excellent film forming capacity and it also act as reducing agent for the metal nanoparticles. In our research various concentration of silver nitrate (AgNO_3) was added to the starch solution and films were obtained using solution casting method. Surface electron microscope (SEM) of the films shows modifications depending upon the concentration of AgNO_3. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis showed that addition of silver nitrate modifies the starch to disc like structures and with increasing the AgNO_3 concentration leads to the formation of fractals. This research could benefit battery technology where solid polymer membranes using starch is used.

  4. Structural modification in the formation of starch - silver nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, S. N. Suraiya; Aswal, V. K.; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal

    2016-05-01

    Polymer based nanocomposites have gained wide applications in field of battery technology. Starch is a naturally occurring polysaccharide with sustainable properties such as biodegradable, non toxic, excellent film forming capacity and it also act as reducing agent for the metal nanoparticles. In our research various concentration of silver nitrate (AgNO3) was added to the starch solution and films were obtained using solution casting method. Surface electron microscope (SEM) of the films shows modifications depending upon the concentration of AgNO3. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis showed that addition of silver nitrate modifies the starch to disc like structures and with increasing the AgNO3 concentration leads to the formation of fractals. This research could benefit battery technology where solid polymer membranes using starch is used.

  5. Nano-sized Adsorbate Structure Formation in Anisotropic Multilayer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Yanovsky, Vladimir V.

    2017-05-01

    In this article, we study dynamics of adsorbate island formation in a model plasma-condensate system numerically. We derive the generalized reaction-diffusion model for adsorptive multilayer system by taking into account anisotropy in transfer of adatoms between neighbor layers induced by electric field. It will be found that with an increase in the electric field strength, a structural transformation from nano-holes inside adsorbate matrix toward separated nano-sized adsorbate islands on a substrate is realized. Dynamics of adsorbate island sizes and corresponding distributions are analyzed in detail. This study provides an insight into details of self-organization of adatoms into nano-sized adsorbate islands in anisotropic multilayer plasma-condensate systems.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibits Deficient Biofilm Formation in the Absence of Class II and III Ribonucleotide Reductases Due to Hindered Anaerobic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Astola, Josep; Torrents, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II, and III). Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development. In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this

  7. Structure formation in inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, R.C.; Pace, F.

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the linear and non-linear regimes of structure formation. In these models the energy density of dark energy is non-negligible at high redshifts and the fluctuations in the dark energy component can have the same order of magnitude of dark matter fluctuations. Since two basic approximations usually taken in the standard scenario of quintessence models, that both dark energy density during the matter dominated period and dark energy fluctuations on small scales are negligible, are not valid in such models, we first study approximate analytical solutions for dark matter and dark energy perturbations in the linear regime. This study is helpful to find consistent initial conditions for the system of equations and to analytically understand the effects of Early Dark Energy and its fluctuations, which are also verified numerically. In the linear regime we compute the matter growth and variation of the gravitational potential associated with the Integrated Sachs-Wolf effect, showing that these observables present important modifications due to Early Dark Energy fluctuations, though making them more similar to the ΛCDM model. We also make use of the Spherical Collapse model to study the influence of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the nonlinear regime of structure formation, especially on δ c parameter, and their contribution to the halo mass, which we show can be of the order of 10%. We finally compute how the number density of halos is modified in comparison to the ΛCDM model and address the problem of how to correct the mass function in order to take into account the contribution of clustered dark energy. We conclude that the inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models are more similar to the ΛCDM model than its homogeneous counterparts

  8. Types of tectonic structures, sedimentary volcanogenetic formations of a mantle, favourable processes for exogenetic and polygenetic uranium deposits formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danchev, V.I.; Komarnitskij, G.M.; Levin, V.N.; Shumlyanskij, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Factors, affecting mineralization processes are considered. Characteristic features of uranium-bearing provinces are as follows: the presence of crust of continental type; deep-seated tectonic structures-rises and saggings, roofs, gneiss domes, rift zones and transform fractures; specialization for uranium of sedimentary and magmatic formations; the presence of manifestation regions of deep thermal and gaseous flow, etc. In uranium-bearing provinces territories favourable for the manifestation of different types of uranium mineralization: metamorphogenetic, polygenetic and exogenetic ones, are singled out. Different epochs of uranium ore formation are established. In sedimentary masses tectonic regime and climate are of special importance, and for epigenetic deposits, formed with an aid of underground waters-hydrogeological conditions. In the limits of the main structural elements of the Earth crust and geotectonic structures of higher orders the following types of sedimentary and volcanic formations can be singled out: 1-formations with exogenous uranium mineralization; 2-formations, accumulated in the epochs of epigenous ore formation; 3-formations fav ourable for epigenous uranium deposit formation; 4-formations unfavourable for the formation and localization of uranium mineralization

  9. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Nakamura, Fumitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Loo, Sven Van [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Christie, Duncan [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collins, David [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We investigate giant molecular cloud collisions and their ability to induce gravitational instability and thus star formation. This mechanism may be a major driver of star formation activity in galactic disks. We carry out a series of 3D, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study how cloud collisions trigger formation of dense filaments and clumps. Heating and cooling functions are implemented based on photo-dissociation region models that span the atomic-to-molecular transition and can return detailed diagnostic information. The clouds are initialized with supersonic turbulence and a range of magnetic field strengths and orientations. Collisions at various velocities and impact parameters are investigated. Comparing and contrasting colliding and non-colliding cases, we characterize morphologies of dense gas, magnetic field structure, cloud kinematic signatures, and cloud dynamics. We present key observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, especially: relative orientations between magnetic fields and density structures, like filaments; {sup 13}CO( J = 2-1), {sup 13}CO( J = 3-2), and {sup 12}CO( J = 8-7) integrated intensity maps and spectra; and cloud virial parameters. We compare these results to observed Galactic clouds.

  10. Structural diversity of three Cu(II) compounds based on a new tripodal zwitterionic ligand: Syntheses, structures and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhao, Jing-Song; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Jian; Du, Lin; Xie, Ming-Jin; Zhao, Qi-Hua

    2018-03-01

    An exploration of reactions of 1,1‧,1″-(benzene-1,3,5-triyltris(methylene))tris(4-carboxypyridinium)-tribromide (H3LBr3) with Cu(II) salt under different pH conditions has led to the formation of three complexes, [Cu(HL)2(H2O)3]·4(ClO4)·3H2O (1), [Cu2(HL)(μ3-OH)(μ2-H2O)(H2O)2]·4(ClO4)·6H2O (2), and [Cu3(L)2Cl6(H2O)4]·4H2O (3). Single-crystal X-ray analyses revealed that complex 1 displays a discrete mononuclear structure with the ligand in a bowl-shaped configuration. Complex 2 possesses a tetranuclear 1D beaded chain structure. While complex 3 features a discrete trinuclear 'H-type' structure with the ligand in a chair-like configuration. The distinct compositions and structures of 1-3 are mainly ascribed to the different pH values of the reaction solution, the influences of anions, as well as the configurations which the zwitterion ligands adopt. The magnetic properties of 2, and the photoluminescence properties of 2, and 3 have been investigated. Moreover, powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis were also performed.

  11. Constraints on vacuum energy from structure formation and Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Fred C.; Grohs, Evan [Physics Department, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Alexander, Stephon [Physics Department, Brown University, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Providence, RI, 02912 (United States); Mersini-Houghton, Laura, E-mail: fca@umich.edu, E-mail: stephon_alexander@brown.edu, E-mail: egrohs@umich.edu, E-mail: mersini@physics.unc.edu [Physics Department, University of North Carolina, 120 E. Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This paper derives an upper limit on the density ρ{sub Λ} of dark energy based on the requirement that cosmological structure forms before being frozen out by the eventual acceleration of the universe. By allowing for variations in both the cosmological parameters and the strength of gravity, the resulting constraint is a generalization of previous limits. The specific parameters under consideration include the amplitude Q of the primordial density fluctuations, the Planck mass M {sub pl}, the baryon-to-photon ratio η, and the density ratio Ω {sub M} /Ω {sub b} . In addition to structure formation, we use considerations from stellar structure and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) to constrain these quantities. The resulting upper limit on the dimensionless density of dark energy becomes ρ{sub Λ}/ M {sub pl}{sup 4} < 10{sup −90}, which is ∼30 orders of magnitude larger than the value in our universe ρ{sub Λ}/ M {sub pl}4 ∼ 10{sup −120}. This new limit is much less restrictive than previous constraints because additional parameters are allowed to vary. With these generalizations, a much wider range of universes can develop cosmic structure and support observers. To constrain the constituent parameters, new BBN calculations are carried out in the regime where η and G = M {sub pl}{sup −2} are much larger than in our universe. If the BBN epoch were to process all of the protons into heavier elements, no hydrogen would be left behind to make water, and the universe would not be viable. However, our results show that some hydrogen is always left over, even under conditions of extremely large η and G , so that a wide range of alternate universes are potentially habitable.

  12. The Latent Symptom Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Outpatients with Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Lena C.; Zhang, K. Anne; Bagby, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a self-report instrument frequently used in clinical and research settings to assess depression severity. Although investigators have examined the factor structure of the BDI-II, a clear consensus on the best fitting model has not yet emerged, resulting in different recommendations regarding how to best…

  13. Thermodynamic model of Ni(II) solubility, hydrolysis and complex formation with ISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Siso, Maria Rosa; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi [Amphos21, Barcelona (Spain); Gaona, Xavier; Altmaier, Marcus [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2018-04-01

    The solubility of β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) was investigated at T=(22±2) C in the absence and presence of α-isosaccharinic acid (ISA), the main degradation product of cellulose under alkaline pH conditions. Batch solubility experiments were performed from undersaturation conditions under inert gas (Ar) atmosphere. Solubility experiments in the absence of ISA were conducted in 0.5 and 3.0 M NaCl-NaOH solutions at 7.5 ≤ pH{sub m} ≤ 13 (with pH{sub m} = -log{sub 10}[H{sup +}]). XRD analyses of selected solid phases collected after completing the solubility experiments (∼300 days) confirmed that β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) remains as solid phase controlling the solubility of Ni(II) in all investigated conditions. Based on the slope analysis (log{sub 10}[Ni] vs. pH{sub m}) of the solubility data and solid phase characterization, the equilibrium reactions β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr)+2 H{sup +} <=> Ni{sup 2+}+2 H{sub 2}O(l) and β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) <=> Ni(OH){sub 2}(aq) were identified as controlling the solubility of Ni(II) within the investigated pH{sub m} region. The conditional equilibrium constants determined from the solubility experiments at different ionic strengths were evaluated with the specific ion interaction theory (SIT). In contrast to the current thermodynamic selection in the NEA-TDB, solubility data collected in the present work does not support the formation of the anionic hydrolysis species Ni(OH){sub 3}{sup -} up to pH{sub m} ≤ 13.0. Solubility experiments in the presence of ISA were conducted in 0.5 M NaCl-NaOH-NaISA solutions with 0.01 M ≤ [NaISA] ≤ 0.2 M and 9 ≤ pH{sub m} ≤ 13. XRD analyses confirmed that β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) is also the solid phase controlling the solubility of Ni(II) in the presence of ISA. Solubility data of all investigated systems can be properly explained with chemical and thermodynamic models including the formation of the complexes NiOHISA(aq), Ni(OH){sub 2}ISA{sup -} and Ni(OH){sub 3}ISA{sup 2-}. The reported data confirm

  14. Palladium(II)-Stabilized Pyridine-2-Diazotates: Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Cytotoxicity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tskhovrebov, Alexander G; Vasileva, Anna A; Goddard, Richard; Riedel, Tina; Dyson, Paul J; Mikhaylov, Vladimir N; Serebryanskaya, Tatiyana V; Sorokoumov, Viktor N; Haukka, Matti

    2018-02-05

    Well-defined diazotates are scarce. Here we report the synthesis of unprecedented homoleptic palladium(II) diazotate complexes. The palladium(II)-mediated nitrosylation of 2-aminopyridines with NaNO 2 results in the formation of metal-stabilized diazotates, which were found to be cytotoxic to human ovarian cancer cells.

  15. Telomerase deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells attenuates angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Hannes M; Gizard, Florence; Zhao, Yue; Cohn, Dianne; Heywood, Elizabeth B; Jones, Karrie L; Lovett, David H; Howatt, Deborah A; Daugherty, Alan; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2011-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are an age-related vascular disease and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. In this study, we sought to determine whether the catalytic component of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), modulates angiotensin (Ang) II-induced AAA formation. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLr-/-) mice were lethally irradiated and reconstituted with bone marrow-derived cells from TERT-deficient (TERT-/-) mice or littermate wild-type mice. Mice were placed on a diet enriched in cholesterol, and AAA formation was quantified after 4 weeks of Ang II infusion. Repopulation of LDLr-/- mice with TERT-/- bone marrow-derived cells attenuated Ang II-induced AAA formation. TERT-deficient recipient mice revealed modest telomere attrition in circulating leukocytes at the study end point without any overt effect of the donor genotype on white blood cell counts. In mice repopulated with TERT-/- bone marrow, aortic matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity was reduced, and TERT-/- macrophages exhibited decreased expression and activity of MMP-2 in response to stimulation with Ang II. Finally, we demonstrated in transient transfection studies that TERT overexpression activates the MMP-2 promoter in macrophages. TERT deficiency in bone marrow-derived macrophages attenuates Ang II-induced AAA formation in LDLr-/- mice and decreases MMP-2 expression. These results point to a previously unrecognized role of TERT in the pathogenesis of AAA.

  16. Comparison of integral cross section values of several cross section libraries in the SAND-II format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijp, W.L.; Nolthenius, H.J.

    1976-09-01

    A comparison of some integral cross-section values for several cross-section libraries in the SAND-II format is presented. The integral cross-section values are calculated with the aid of the spectrum functions for a Watt fission spectrum, a 1/E spectrum and a Maxwellian spectrum. The libraries which are considered here are CCC-112B, ENDF/B-IV, DETAN74, LAPENAS and CESNEF. These 5 cross-section libraries used have all the SAND-II format. Discrepancies between cross-sections in the different libraries are indicated but not discussed

  17. Frequency formats, probability formats, or problem structure? A test of the nested-sets hypothesis in an extensional reasoning task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Neace

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Five experiments addressed a controversy in the probability judgment literature that centers on the efficacy of framing probabilities as frequencies. The natural frequency view predicts that frequency formats attenuate errors, while the nested-sets view predicts that highlighting the set-subset structure of the problem reduces error, regardless of problem format. This study tested these predictions using a conjunction task. Previous studies reporting that frequency formats reduced conjunction errors confounded reference class with problem format. After controlling this confound, the present study's findings show that conjunction errors can be reduced using either a probability or a frequency format, that frequency effects depend upon the presence of a reference class, and that frequency formats do not promote better statistical reasoning than probability formats.

  18. Structure of diphosphine complexes of Co(II) in solutions of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraev, V.V.; Mandyuk, I.M.; Ratovskii, G.V.; Dmitrieva, T.V.; Shmidt, F.K.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the dichloride complexes of cobalt(II) with 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (DPPE) and 1,1-bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (DPPM) in organic solvents has been investigated by ESR and electronic spectroscopy. It has been shown that the low-spin complex Co(DPPE) 2 Cl 2 exists in dichloroethane and ethanol solutions in the form of a trigonal bipyramid. Cobalt dichloride reacts with DPPM to form 1:1 and 1:2 complexes, between which there is an equilibrium in a dichloroethane solution. The equilibrium is displaced under the action of the free diphosphine toward the formation of the 1:2 complex. Elimination of the diphosphine from the coordination sphere of cobalt occurs in an ethanol solution

  19. Standard molar enthalpies of formation of copper(II) {beta}-diketonates and monothio-{beta}-diketonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: risilva@fc.up.pt; Santos, Luis M.N.B.F. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2006-07-15

    The standard (p{sup o}=0.1MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of the crystalline complexes of dibenzoylmethane (Hdbm), thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Httfa), monothiodibenzoylmethane (HdbmS), and monothiothenoyltrifluoroacetone (HttfaS) of copper(II) were determined, at T=298.15K, by high precision solution-reaction calorimetry. The standard molar enthalpies of sublimation of the copper(II) {beta}-diketonate complexes were measured by high-temperature Calvet microcalorimetry. From the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the complexes in the gaseous state, the mean molar dissociation enthalpies copper(II)-ligand, (Cu-L), were derived. {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o} (cr){delta}{sub cr}{sup g}H{sub m}{sup o} kJ.mol{sup -1}kJ.mol{sup -1}Bis(dibenzoylmethanate)copper(II), Cu(dbm){sub 2}-364.0+/-3.9230.7+/-8.2Bis(thenoyltrifluoroacetonate)copper(II), Cu(ttfa){sub 2}-1824.3+/-8.3167.9+/-7.4Bis(monothiodibenzoylmethanate)copper(II), Cu(dbmS){sub 2}35.6+/-7.7[241+/-15]Bis(monothiothenoyltrifluoroacetonate) copper(II), Cu(ttfaS){sub 2}-1405.7+/-8.3[177+/-15].

  20. Standard molar enthalpies of formation of copper(II) β-diketonates and monothio-β-diketonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V.; Santos, Luis M.N.B.F.

    2006-01-01

    The standard (p o =0.1MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of the crystalline complexes of dibenzoylmethane (Hdbm), thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Httfa), monothiodibenzoylmethane (HdbmS), and monothiothenoyltrifluoroacetone (HttfaS) of copper(II) were determined, at T=298.15K, by high precision solution-reaction calorimetry. The standard molar enthalpies of sublimation of the copper(II) β-diketonate complexes were measured by high-temperature Calvet microcalorimetry. From the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the complexes in the gaseous state, the mean molar dissociation enthalpies copper(II)-ligand, m >(Cu-L), were derived. Δ f H m o (cr)Δ cr g H m o kJ.mol -1 kJ.mol -1 Bis(dibenzoylmethanate)copper(II), Cu(dbm) 2 -364.0+/-3.9230.7+/-8.2Bis(thenoyltrifluoroacetonate)copper(II), Cu(ttfa) 2 -1824.3+/-8.3167.9+/-7.4Bis(monothiodibenzoylmethanate)copper(II), Cu(dbmS) 2 35.6+/-7.7[241+/-15]Bis(monothiothenoyltrifluoroacetonate) copper(II), Cu(ttfaS) 2 -1405.7+/-8.3[177+/-15

  1. General principles for the formation of dust self-organizing structures. Dust collective attraction and plasma crystal formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a homogeneous dusty plasma is universally unstable to form structures. The effect of collective grain attraction is a basic phenomenon for the proposed new paradigm (general principles) for the plasma crystal formation

  2. Mechanisms of bands and spirals formation during the drying of watery solutions of mercury (II) chloride with agar-agar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez-DomInguez, Edgardo Jonathan; Betancourt-Mar, Juvencio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    It is proposed two mechanisms to explain the formation of periodic and non periodic bands and spirals as thin films of gelatinous aqueous solutions of mercury (II) chloride are dried. The first mechanism supposes an homogeneous drying, where the height of the film decreases at constant rate, forming Liesegang bands. The second mechanism implies a non homogeneous drying where an evaporation front drives the formation of periodic bands and spirals

  3. The Effects of Subsurface Bioremediation on Soil Structure, Colloid Formation, and Contaminant Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Liang, X.; Zhuang, J.; Radosevich, M.

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic bioremediation is widely applied to create anaerobic subsurface conditions designed to stimulate microorganisms that degrade organic contaminants and immobilize toxic metals in situ. Anaerobic conditions that accompany such techniques also promotes microbially mediated Fe(III)-oxide mineral reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) could potentially cause soil structure breakdown, formation of clay colloids, and alternation of soil surface chemical properties. These processes could then affect bioremediation and the migration of contaminants. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of anaerobic bioreduction on soil structure, hydraulic properties, colloid formation, and transport of three tracers (bromide, DFBA, and silica shelled silver nanoparticles). Columns packed with inoculated water stable soil aggregates were placed in anaerobic glovebox, and artificial groundwater media was pumped into the columns to simulate anaerobic bioreduction process for four weeks. Decent amount of soluble Fe(II) accompanied by colloids were detected in the effluent from bioreduction columns a week after initiation of bioreduction treatment, which demonstrated bioreduction of Fe(III) and formation of colloids. Transport experiments were performed in the columns before and after bioreduction process to assess the changes of hydraulic and surface chemical properties through bioreduction treatment. Earlier breakthrough of bromide and DFBA after treatment indicated alterations in flow paths (formation of preferential flow paths). Less dispersion of bromide and DFBA, and less tailing of DFBA after treatment implied breakdown of soil aggregates. Dramatically enhanced transport and early breakthrough of silica shelled silver nanoparticles after treatment supported the above conclusion of alterations in flow paths, and indicated changes of soil surface chemical properties.

  4. Orientational structure formation of silk fibroin with anisotropic properties in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholmuminov, A.A.

    2008-06-01

    Key words:silk fibroin, dissolution, solution's model systems, gelation, orientational crystallization, optical polarization, longitudinal stream, α - β transition, structure formation, phase transformations, relaxation, anisotropy of swelling and desorption, thermo- and biodegradation. Subjects of the inquiry: silk fibroin is the main subject of investigation. Fibroin's solutions were obtained on the base of water and organic solvents, containing salts. Comparative investigations were carried out by using biosolution - secretion of silkworm, solutions of silk sericin, cotton cellulose, methylcellulose, polystyrene and (co) polycrylonitrile. Aim of the inquiry: the elucidation of the regularities of silk fibroin anisotropic structures formation in the direct generation of orientational ordering in solutions taking into account of influences of its the molecular structures, configuration information, α - β conformational transformations, and development jointly using polarization-optical and hydrodynamic methods to control of structure formation. And also definition of possibility fields for use biopolymers anisotropic structure formation principles. Method of inquiry: birefringence, dispersion optical rotation, circular dichroism, polarization- ultramicroscope, ultracentrifuge, viscosimetry, potentiometry, differential thermal analysis, chromatography, x-ray analysis, spectroscopy. The results achieved and their novelty: the physical regularity amorphous-crystalline fibroin dissolutions in salt-containing solvents based on chains melting, distribution and redistribution were recognized; fibroin statistical parameters, molecular-mass and conformational characteristics were established; It was shown that fibroin molecules turned into fully uncoiled and oriented state with the breakdown decay of α-spiral chain sections by I type phase transition mechanism, but in oriented state with α-spiral conservation by II type transition; the presence of longitudinal field

  5. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins

  6. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M., E-mail: gulick@hwi.buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins.

  7. Molecular Cloud Structures and Massive Star Formation in N159

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, O.; Meixner, M.; Fukui, Y.; Tachihara, K.; Onishi, T.; Saigo, K.; Tokuda, K.; Harada, R.

    2018-02-01

    The N159 star-forming region is one of the most massive giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We show the 12CO, 13CO, CS molecular gas lines observed with ALMA in N159 west (N159W) and N159 east (N159E). We relate the structure of the gas clumps to the properties of 24 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) that include 10 newly identified YSOs based on our search. We use dendrogram analysis to identify properties of the molecular clumps, such as flux, mass, linewidth, size, and virial parameter. We relate the YSO properties to the molecular gas properties. We find that the CS gas clumps have a steeper size–linewidth relation than the 12CO or 13CO gas clumps. This larger slope could potentially occur if the CS gas is tracing shocks. The virial parameters of the 13CO gas clumps in N159W and N159E are low (<1). The threshold for massive star formation in N159W is 501 M ⊙ pc‑2, and the threshold for massive star formation in N159E is 794 M ⊙ pc‑2. We find that 13CO is more photodissociated in N159E than N159W. The most massive YSO in N159E has cleared out a molecular gas hole in its vicinity. All the massive YSO candidates in N159E have a more evolved spectral energy distribution type in comparison to the YSO candidates in N159W. These differences lead us to conclude that the giant molecular cloud complex in N159E is more evolved than the giant molecular cloud complex in N159W.

  8. Synthesis and structural characterisation of iron(II) and copper(II) diphosphates containing flattened metal oxotetrahedra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keates, Adam C. [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1B,. UK (United Kingdom); Wang, Qianlong [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Weller, Mark T., E-mail: m.t.weller@bath.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Single crystal and bulk polycrystalline forms of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M=Fe(II), Cu(II)) have been synthesised and their structures determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Both compounds crystallize in the tetragonal system, space group P-42{sub 1}m. Their structures are formed from infinite sheets of linked oxopolyhedra of the stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2−} with potassium cations situated between the layers. The MO{sub 4} tetrahedra share oxygen atoms with [P{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 4−} diphosphate groups and the potassium ions have KO{sub 8} square prismatic geometry. In both compounds the M(II) centre has an unusual strongly flattened, tetrahedral coordination to oxygen, as a result of the Jahn–Teller (JT) effect for the high spin d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing or a second order JT effect for d{sup 9} Cu(II) centres in four fold coordination. The uncommon transition metal ion environments found in these materials are reflected in their optical absorption spectra and magnetism data. - Graphical abstract: The structures of the tetragonal polymorphs of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, M=Cu(II), Fe(II), consist of infinite sheets of stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2−}, formed from linked pyrophosphate groups and MO{sub 4} tetrahedra, separated by potassium ions. In both compounds the unusual tetrahedral coordination of the M(II) centre is strongly flattened as a result of Jahn–Teller (JT) effects for high spin, d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing and second-order JT effects for d{sup 9} Cu(II). Display Omitted - Highlights: • Tetrahedral copper and iron(II) coordinated by oxygen. • New layered phosphate structure. • Jahn–Teller and d{sup 10} distorted coordinations.

  9. Nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes of N,N-dialkyl-N‧-3-chlorobenzoylthiourea: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structures, Hirshfeld surfaces and antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzet, Gun; Gumus, Ilkay; Dogen, Aylin; Flörke, Ulrich; Kulcu, Nevzat; Arslan, Hakan

    2018-06-01

    We synthesized four new N,N-dialkyl-N‧-3-chlorobenzoylthiourea ligands (Alkyl: Dimethyl, diethyl, di-n-propyl and di-n-butyl) and their metal complexes with copper and nickel atoms. The structure of all synthesized compounds was fully characterized by physicochemical, spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis techniques. The physical, spectral and analytical data of the newly synthesized metal complexes have shown the formation of 1:2 (metal:ligand) ratio. The benzoylthiourea ligands coordinate with metal atoms through oxygen and sulphur atoms. The metal atoms are in slightly distorted square-planar coordination geometry in Ni(II) or Cu(II) complex. Two oxygen and two sulphur atoms are mutually cis to each other in Ni(II) or Cu(II) complex. The intermolecular contacts in the compounds, which are HL1 and HL3, were examined by Hirshfeld surfaces and fingerprint plots using the data obtained from X-ray single crystal diffraction measurement. Besides these, their antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and anti-yeast activity (Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans) were investigated. This exhibited some promising results towards testing organism. Among all the compounds, Ni(L1)2 complex showed high activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC values at 7.81 μg/mL.

  10. Massive star formation by accretion. II. Rotation: how to circumvent the angular momentum barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerlé, L.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Charbonnel, C.; Klessen, R. S.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Rotation plays a key role in the star-formation process, from pre-stellar cores to pre-main-sequence (PMS) objects. Understanding the formation of massive stars requires taking into account the accretion of angular momentum during their PMS phase. Aims: We study the PMS evolution of objects destined to become massive stars by accretion, focusing on the links between the physical conditions of the environment and the rotational properties of young stars. In particular, we look at the physical conditions that allow the production of massive stars by accretion. Methods: We present PMS models computed with a new version of the Geneva Stellar Evolution code self-consistently including accretion and rotation according to various accretion scenarios for mass and angular momentum. We describe the internal distribution of angular momentum in PMS stars accreting at high rates and we show how the various physical conditions impact their internal structures, evolutionary tracks, and rotation velocities during the PMS and the early main sequence. Results: We find that the smooth angular momentum accretion considered in previous studies leads to an angular momentum barrier and does not allow the formation of massive stars by accretion. A braking mechanism is needed in order to circumvent this angular momentum barrier. This mechanism has to be efficient enough to remove more than two thirds of the angular momentum from the inner accretion disc. Due to the weak efficiency of angular momentum transport by shear instability and meridional circulation during the accretion phase, the internal rotation profiles of accreting stars reflect essentially the angular momentum accretion history. As a consequence, careful choice of the angular momentum accretion history allows circumvention of any limitation in mass and velocity, and production of stars of any mass and velocity compatible with structure equations.

  11. Effect of Cell Sheet Manipulation Techniques on the Expression of Collagen Type II and Stress Fiber Formation in Human Chondrocyte Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongin, Sopita; Waikakul, Saranatra; Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong; Siriwatwechakul, Wanwipa; Viravaidya-Pasuwat, Kwanchanok

    2018-03-01

    Cell sheet technology is applied to human articular chondrocytes to construct a tissue-like structure as an alternative treatment for cartilage defect. The effect of a gelatin manipulator, as a cell sheet transfer system, on the quality of the chondrocyte sheets was investigated. The changes of important chondrogenic markers and stress fibers, resulting from the cell sheet manipulation, were also studied. The chondrocyte cell sheets were constructed with patient-derived chondrocytes using a temperature-responsive polymer and a gelatin manipulator as a transfer carrier. The properties of the cell sheets, including sizes, expression levels of collagen type II and I, and the localization of the stress fibers, were assessed and compared with those of the cell sheets harvested without the gelatin manipulator. Using the gelatin manipulator, the original size of the chondrocyte cell sheets was retained with abundant stress fibers, but with a decrease in the expression of collagen type II. Without the gelatin manipulator, although the cell shrinkage occurred, the cell sheet with suppressed stress fiber formation showed significantly higher levels of collagen type II. These results support our observations that stress fiber formation in chondrocyte cell sheets affected the production of chondrogenic markers. These densely packed tissue-like structures possessed a good chondrogenic activity, indicating their potential for use in autologous chondrocyte implantation to treat cartilage defects.

  12. Synthesis, NMR characterization, X-ray crystal structure of Co(II) Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of a pyridine containing self-assembling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjbar, M.; Taghavipour, M.; Moghimi, A.; Aghabozorg, H.

    2002-01-01

    In the recent years, the self-assembling systems have been attracted chemists. The intermolecular bond in such systems mainly consists of ion pairing and hydrogen bonding [1,2]. The reaction between self-assembling system liquid LH 2 (py dc=2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and py da=2,6- pyridine diamin) with cobalt (II) nitrate, nickel (II) chloride, and copper (II) acetate in water leads to the formation of self- assemble coordination complexes, [py da.H] 2 [M(py dc) 2 ]. H 2 O, M=Co(II),Ni(II), and Cu(II). The characterization was performed using elemental analysis, ESI mass spectroscopy, 1 H and 13 C NMR and X-ray crystallography. The crystal systems are monoclinic with space group P2 1 /n and four molecules per unit cell. These complexes shows 13 C NMR resonances of cationic counter ion [(py dc,H)] + in DMSO- d 6 but no signal corresponding to the two coordinated ligands [py dc] 2- The metal atoms are six-coordinated with a distorted octahedral geometry. The two [py de] 2- units are almost perpendicular to each other

  13. Field theoretic approach to structure formation in an anisotropic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, Minu; Kuriakose, V.C.

    2003-01-01

    Considering a real scalar field distribution which is assumed to be locally anisotropic and coupled to a Bianchi type-I background spacetime, the energy density and pressure associated with the anisotropic matter field distribution are evaluated. The vanishing of the expectation values of the nondiagonal components of T μν allows us to treat the scalar field in complete analogy with the distribution of fluid. The primeval density perturbations produced by the vacuum fluctuations of the scalar field are considered and the Jeans criterion for structure formation is obtained. The metric and matter field perturbations are considered and it is found that for the present anisotropic case the perturbations of the pressure in the radial and tangential directions are different. The Jeans instability is discussed and the Jeans wave number for the present case is evaluated. It is found that for the anisotropic case the Jeans length depends on the velocity of the fluctuations in the radial and transverse directions and thus on the direction of propagation of the perturbations

  14. Baryon bias and structure formation in an accelerating universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendola, Luca; Tocchini-Valentini, Domenico

    2002-01-01

    In most models of dark energy the structure formation stops after the accelerated expansion begins. In contrast, we show that the coupling of dark energy to dark matter may induce the growth of perturbations even in the accelerated regime. In particular, we show that this occurs in the models proposed to solve the cosmic coincidence problem, in which the ratio of dark energy to dark matter is constant. Depending on the parameters, the growth may be much faster than in a standard matter-dominated era. Moreover, if the dark energy couples only to dark matter and not to baryons, as requested by the constraints imposed by local gravity measurements, the baryon fluctuations develop a constant, scale-independent, large-scale bias which is in principle directly observable. We find that a lower limit to the baryon bias b>0.5 requires the total effective parameter of state w e =1+p/ρ to be larger than 0.6 while a limit b>0.73 would rule out the model

  15. Using Black Hole Mergers to Explore Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, E.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Observations of gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers will open a new window into the era of structure formation in the early universe. Past efforts have concentrated on calculating merger rates using different physical assumptions, resulting in merger rate estimates that span a wide range (0.1 - 10(exp 4) mergers/year). We develop a semi-analytical, phenomenological model of massive black hole mergers that includes plausible combinations of several physical parameters, which we then turn around to determine how well observations with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be able to enhance our understanding of the universe during the critical z approximately equal to 5-30 epoch. Our approach involves generating synthetic LISA observable data (total BH masses, BH mass ratios, redshifts, merger rates), which are then analyzed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, thus finding constraints for the physical parameters of the mergers. We find that our method works well at estimating merger parameters and that the number of merger events is a key discriminant among models, therefore making our method robust against observational uncertainties. Our approach can also be extended to more physically-driven models and more general problems in cosmology. This work is supported in part by the Cooperative Education Program at NASA/GSFC.

  16. Crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride and its copper(II) and cobalt(III) chloride complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Bocelli, G.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Shova, S. G.; Gulea, A. P.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride hydrate hemiethanol solvate (I), salicylideneguanylhydrazinium trichloroaquacuprate(II) (II), and bis(salicylideneguanylhydrazino)cobalt(III) chloride trihydrate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. The structures of compounds I, II, and III are solved by direct methods and refined using the least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms to the final factors R = 0.0597, 0.0212, and 0.0283, respectively. In the structure of compound I, the monoprotonated molecules and chlorine ions linked by hydrogen bonds form layers aligned parallel to the (010) plane. In the structure of compound II, the salicylaldehyde guanylhydrazone cations and polymer chains consisting of trichloroaquacuprate(II) anions are joined by an extended three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds. In the structure of compound III, the [Co(LH) 2 ] + cations, chloride ions, and molecules of crystallization water are linked together by a similar network

  17. Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordinastion polymers based on amino-tetrazole and phenylcarboxylate: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Dong-Sheng; Sui, Yan; Chen, Weng-Tong; Huang, Jian-Gen; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Huang, Chang-Cang

    2012-01-01

    Two Zn(II) and Cd(II) compounds with the in-situ generated ligand of 5-amino-tetrazolate (atz − ) were prepared from the hydrothermal reactions of the corresponding Cd or Zn(II) salts with phenylcarboxylate, and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and TGA. The results of X-ray crystallographic analysis reveal that compound [Zn 2 (BZA)(atz) 2 (OH)] n (1) (BZA=benzoic acid) presents a two-dimensional (2D) “hcb” topological network constructed from the ZnN 2 O 2 tetrahedra. In compound [Cd 6 (atz) 6 (PTA) 3 ] n (2) (PTA=terephthalic acid), the identical [Cd 3 (atz) 3 )] 3+ n clusters are connected by atz ligands to generate a 2D cationic layer, and the neighboring cationic layers are pillared by PTA giving birth to 3D network. After simplifying, the complicated 3D network of 2 can be presented as an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. The formations of the structures show a good example that using the combination of the in-situ generated ligand and other coligand synthetic strategy can construct interesting topological structures. The thermal stabilities and fluorescent properties of the complexes have also been studied. - Graphical abstract: Two d 10 metal complexes have been synthesized by employing mixed-ligand synthetic approach. Complex 1 presents a 2D “hcb” topological network. Complex 2 shows an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. Highlights: ► Coligand synthetic strategy was applied to obtain new MOFs with useful properties. ► Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes were constructed from the mixed-ligand. ► Topologically, compound 2 presented an unprecedented (4, 4, 10)-connected trinodal topology. ► The two compounds may be excellent candidates for potential photoactive material.

  18. Efficient electron-induced removal of oxalate ions and formation of copper nanoparticles from copper(II oxalate precursor layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Rückriem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper(II oxalate grown on carboxy-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAM using a step-by-step approach was used as precursor for the electron-induced synthesis of surface-supported copper nanoparticles. The precursor material was deposited by dipping the surfaces alternately in ethanolic solutions of copper(II acetate and oxalic acid with intermediate thorough rinsing steps. The deposition of copper(II oxalate and the efficient electron-induced removal of the oxalate ions was monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS. Helium ion microscopy (HIM reveals the formation of spherical nanoparticles with well-defined size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS confirms their metallic nature. Continued irradiation after depletion of oxalate does not lead to further particle growth giving evidence that nanoparticle formation is primarily controlled by the available amount of precursor.

  19. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippova, E. V.; Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI 2 with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD + -azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state

  20. Hydroxyl Radical Formation from HULIS and Fe(II) Interactions: Fulvic Acid-Fe(II) Complexes in Simulated and Human Lung Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, D.

    2017-12-01

    Inhalation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has long been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, the causative agents and underlying mechanisms for these health effects have yet to be identified. One hypothesis is that PM2.5 deposited in the alveoli produce an excess of highly reactive radicals, leading to oxidative stress. The OH radical may be the most physiologically damaging, capable of oxidizing of lipids, proteins and DNA. Due to the variability and uncertainty in PM2.5 composition, the components that contribute to OH formation are not well understood. Soluble Fe is a component of PM2.5that produces OH under physiological conditions. Humic-like substances are water soluble organics found in biomass burning and tobacco smoke. Humic-like substances are capable of binding to Fe and enhancing OH formation, but this chemistry is not well understood. In this work, we use soil derived fulvic acid as a surrogate for Humic-like substances and investigate its effect on OH formation from Fe(II) under conditions relevant to the lungs. We use a fluorescent OH trapping probe, chemical kinetics and thermodynamic modeling to investigate OH formation from fulvic acid and Fe(II) dissolved in simulated and human lung fluids. In simulated lung fluid, we find that fulvic acid binds to Fe(II) and enhances the rate of key reactions that form OH. When fulvic acid is added to human lung fluids containing Fe(II), an enhancement of OH formation is observed. In human lung fluid, fulvic acid and metal binding proteins compete for Fe binding. These metal binding proteins are typically not found in simulated lung fluids. Results show that fulvic acid strongly binds Fe(II) and catalyzes key reactions that form OH in both simulated and human lung fluids. These results may help explain the role of Humic-like substances and Fe in oxidative stress and adverse health outcomes. Furthermore, we suggest that future studies employ simulated lung fluids containing metal binding proteins

  1. New Mn(II, Ni(II, Cd(II, Pb(II complexes with 2-methylbenzimidazole and other ligands. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, crystal structure, magnetic susceptibility and biological activity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayma A. Shaker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of Mn(II, Ni(II, Cd(II and Pb(II mixed ligand complexes of 2-methylbenzimidazole with other ligands have been reported. The structure of the ligands and their complexes was investigated using elemental analysis, IR, UV–Vis, (1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy, molar conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. In all the studies of complexes, the 2-methylbenzimidazole behaves as a neutral monodentate ligand which is coordinated with the metal ions through the N atom. While benzotriazole behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand which is coordinated with the Ni(II ion through the two N atoms. Moreover, the N-acetylglycine behaves as a bidentate ligand which is coordinated with the Mn(II, Ni(II and Pb(II ions through the N atom and the terminal carboxyl oxygen atom. The magnetic and spectral data indicate the tetrahedral geometry for Mn(II complex, irregular tetrahedral geometry for Pb(II complex and octahedral geometry for Ni(II complex. The X-ray single crystal diffraction method was used to confirm a centrosymmetric dinuclear Cd(II complex as each two metal ions are linked by a pair of thiocyanate N = S bridge. Two 2-methylbenzimidazole N-atom donors and one terminal thiocyanate N atom complete a highly distorted square pyramid geometry around the Cd atom. Besides, different cell types were used to determine the inhibitory effect of Mn(II, Ni(II, Cd(II and Pb(II complexes on cell growth using MTT assay. Cd(II complex showed cytotoxic effect on various types of cancer cell lines with different EC50 values.

  2. Nanocomposites with thermosetting matrix: structure formation at the interphase boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOROLEV Evgenij Valerjevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Composites with thermosetting matrix are often characterized by elevated values of operational properties – flexural and compressive strength, resistance to aggressive environments, etc. At the same time the cost of most thermosets (particularly – epoxy resins is quite high. Because of this the area of application of polymer composites in construction is limited. One of such application is the creation of multifunctional coatings. The high cost of resin dictates the need to improve the operational properties to ensure economic efficiency. So far, the known way to improve the operational properties is to produce nanoscale interfacial layer between fine filler and matrix in block. This way proved to be effective, but mechanism of the improvement is still uncertain. There areat least two different theories – so-called «adhesion theory» and «theory of deformable layer». The investigation is complicated by the variety of oligomers, hardeners (crosslinking agents and precursors of nanomodifiers. It is becoming more common lately to use adducts of aliphatic amines and epoxy oligomers as hardeners. As precursors of nanomodifiers the organosilicon compounds with siloxane bond in the main chain can be successfully used. In this paper we present results of investigation of a model system comprised of oligomer, crosslinking agent and precursor. The analysis of structure is carried out by means of Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. It is shown that at gelation point modifier has no significant effect on the chemical composition of the curing products; nevertheless, the admixture of modifier reduces the regularity of the emerging three-dimensional spatial net of thermoset. After completion of curing process the irregular spatial grid is still present. This indicates that in composites admixture of organosilicon precursors may lead to the formation of transition layer with reduced modulus of elasticity. Such layer, in turn, causes stress

  3. Metal Matrix Composite Enchanced Aluminum Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research pursues a path for reducing structural weight, increasing structural performance, and reducing fabrication cost while also minimizing...

  4. The formation and deformation of protein structures with viscoelastic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van L.E.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the formation of a gluten substitute.

    Chapter 1 describes the properties that are necessary to obtain a gluten substitute.

    Chapter 2 describes the formation and properties of protein particle suspensions. Two proteins with different

  5. A High Sensitivity Micro Format Chemiluminescence Enzyme Inhibition Assay for Determination of Hg(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchanmala Deshpande

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive and specific enzyme inhibition assay based on alcohol oxidase (AlOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP for determination of mercury Hg(II in water samples has been presented. This article describes the optimization and miniaturization of an enzymatic assay using a chemiluminescence reaction. The analytical performance and detection limit for determination of Hg(II was optimized in 96 well plates and further extended to 384 well plates with a 10-fold reduction in assay volume. Inhibition of the enzyme activity by dissolved Hg(II was found to be linear in the range 5–500 pg.mL−1 with 3% CVin inter-batch assay. Due to miniaturization of assay in 384 well plates, Hg(II was measurable as low as 1 pg.mL−1 within15 min. About 10-fold more specificity of the developed assay for Hg(II analysis was confirmed by challenging with interfering divalent metal ions such as cadmium Cd(II and lead Pb(II. Using the proposed assay we could successfully demonstrate that in a composite mixture of Hg(II, Cd(II and Pb(II, inhibition by each metal ion is significantly enhanced in the presence of the others. Applicability of the proposed assay for the determination of the Hg(II in spiked drinking and sea water resulted in recoveries ranging from 100–110.52%.

  6. Effects of lead(II) on the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Dai, Wei; Xing, Ke-zhing; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lead(II) on the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), including bound extracellular polysaccharides (bEPS) and soluble extracellular polysaccharides (sEPS), and the colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to four concentrations (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L) of lead(II) for 10 d under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L lead(II) stimulated M. aeruginosa growth throughout the experiment while 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth in the first 2 d exposure and then stimulated it. As compared to the control group, significant increases in the bEPS and sEPS production were observed in 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) treatments (P bEPS production, which conversely promoted colony formation, suggesting that heavy metals might be contributing to the bloom-forming of M. aeruginosa in natural conditions.

  7. Syntheses, structures and luminescence behaviour of some zinc(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2, the zinc(II) centre is bound by four N atoms of the tailored Schiff base L2 and two O atoms of the chelated acetate. .... determination parameters for 1 and 2 is given in table 1. 3. Results ..... Shields G P, Taylor R, Towler M and van de Streek J.

  8. Synthesis and structure of copper(II) complexes: Potential cyanide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    easy accessibility to Cu(I), Cu(II) and Cu(III) oxidation states.3,20–38 ... erty to oxidize primary alcohol to aldehyde since they are potential N,O ... Electronic spectra were recorded on a. Shimadzu .... the appropriate temperature 37. ◦. C for 24h.

  9. Spin–Orbit TDDFT Electronic Structure of Diplatinum(II,II) Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záliš, Stanislav; Lam, Y.; Ch.; Gray, H. B.; Vlček, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 7 (2015), s. 3491-3500 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : BINUCLEAR PLATINUM(II) PHOTOCHEMISTRY * DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY * SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.820, year: 2015

  10. Ru(II)-polypyridyl surface functionalised gold nanoparticles as DNA targeting supramolecular structures and luminescent cellular imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Orange, Kim N; Elmes, Robert B P; la Cour Poulsen, Bjørn; Williams, D Clive; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2016-01-07

    The development of Ru(II) functionalized gold nanoparticles 1–3·AuNP is described. These systems were found to be mono-disperse with a hydrodynamic radius of ca. 15 nm in water but gave rise to the formation of higher order structures in buffered solution. The interaction of 1–3·AuNP with DNA was also studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods and suggested the formation of large self-assembly structures in solution. The uptake of 1–3·AuNP by cancer cells was studied using both confocal fluorescence as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with the aim of investigating their potential as tools for cellular biology. These systems displaying a non-toxic profile with favourable photophysical properties may have application across various biological fields including diagnostics and therapeutics.

  11. Investigation of detergent effects on the solution structure of spinach Light Harvesting Complex II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Mateus B; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T; O' Neill, Hugh, E-mail: hellerwt@ornl.gov, E-mail: oneillhm@ornl.gov [Center for Structural Molecular Biology, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The properties of spinach light harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in the detergents Triton X-100 (TX100) and n-Octyl-{beta}-D-Glucoside (BOG), were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The LHC II-BOG scattering curve overlaid well with the theoretical scattering curve generated from the crystal structure of LHC II indicating that the protein preparation was in its native functional state. On the other hand, the simulated LHC II curve deviated significantly from the LHC II-TX100 experimental data. Analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy supported the SANS analysis and showed that LHC II-TX100 is inactivated. This investigation has implications for extracting and stabilizing photosynthetic membrane proteins for the development of biohybrid photoconversion devices.

  12. Effect of amino acid sequence and pH on nanofiber formation of self-assembling peptides EAK16-II and EAK16-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yooseong; Legge, Raymond L; Zhang, S; Chen, P

    2003-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ASDA-P) were used to investigate the mechanism of self-assembly of peptides. The peptides chosen consisted of 16 alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids, where the hydrophilic residues possess alternating negative and positive charges. Two types of peptides, AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK (EAK16-II) and AEAEAEAEAKAKAKAK (EAK16-IV), were investigated in terms of nanostructure formation through self-assembly. The experimental results, which focused on the effects of the amino acid sequence and pH, show that the nanostructures formed by the peptides are dependent on the amino acid sequence and the pH of the solution. For pH conditions around neutrality, one of the peptides used in this study, EAK16-IV, forms globular assemblies and has lower surface tension at air-water interfaces than another peptide, EAK16-II, which forms fibrillar assemblies at the same pH. When the pH is lowered below 6.5 or raised above 7.5, there is a transition from globular to fibrillar structures for EAK16-IV, but EAK16-II does not show any structural transition. Surface tension measurements using ADSA-P showed different surface activities of peptides at air-water interfaces. EAK16-II does not show a significant difference in surface tension for the pH range between 4 and 9. However, EAK16-IV shows a noticeable decrease in surface tension at pH around neutrality, indicating that the formation of globular assemblies is related to the molecular hydrophobicity.

  13. THE ROLE OF PEBBLE FRAGMENTATION IN PLANETESIMAL FORMATION. II. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Karl Wahlberg; Johansen, Anders [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Syed, Mohtashim Bukhari; Blum, Jürgen [Technische Universität Braunschweig, Institut für Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik, Mendelssohnstraße 3, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2017-01-20

    Some scenarios for planetesimal formation go through a phase of collapse of gravitationally bound clouds of millimeter- to centimeter-size pebbles. Such clouds can form, for example, through the streaming instability in protoplanetary disks. We model the collapse process with a statistical model to obtain the internal structure of planetesimals with solid radii between 10 and 1000 km. During the collapse, pebbles collide, and depending on their relative speeds, collisions have different outcomes. A mixture of particle sizes inside a planetesimal leads to better packing capabilities and higher densities. In this paper we apply results from new laboratory experiments of dust aggregate collisions (presented in a companion paper) to model collision outcomes. We find that the internal structure of a planetesimal is strongly dependent on both its mass and the applied fragmentation model. Low-mass planetesimals have no/few fragmenting pebble collisions in the collapse phase and end up as porous pebble piles. The number of fragmenting collisions increases with increasing cloud mass, resulting in wider particle size distributions and higher density. The collapse is nevertheless “cold” in the sense that collision speeds are damped by the high collision frequency. This ensures that a significant fraction of large pebbles survive the collapse in all but the most massive clouds. Our results are in broad agreement with the observed increase in density of Kuiper Belt objects with increasing size, as exemplified by the recent characterization of the highly porous comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

  14. Physiology, Fe(II oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D. Swanner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for Fe(II oxidation and deposition of Fe(III-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF. While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II-rich waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III (oxyhydroxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in Fe(II toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II. These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  15. Ion structure and sequence of ion formation in acetylene flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionova, I.A.; Fialkov, B.S.; Kalinich, K.YA.; Fialkov, A.B.; Ospanov, B.S.

    1993-06-01

    Results of a study of the ion composition of acetylene-air flames burning at low pressures are reported. Data on ion formation are compared for flames of saturated hydrocarbons, oxygen-containing fuels, and acetylene. It is shown that the characteristics of ion formation in the flame front and directly ahead of it are similar to those observed in flames of other fuels. These characteristics, however, are different in the low-temperature region. 9 refs.

  16. Copper(II) and palladium(II) complexes with tridentate NSO donor Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, characterization and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujit Baran; Solanki, Ankita; Kundu, Suman

    2017-09-01

    Mononuclear copper(II) complex [CuL2] and palladium(II) complexes [Pd(X)L] where X = benzoate(bz) or salicylate(sal) and HL = 2-(methylthio)phenylimino)methyl)phenol, a Schiff base ligand with NSO coordination sites have been synthesized and characterized by microanalyses, IR, UV-Visible spectra, conductivity measurement and magnetic studies. Crystal structures of all the complexes have been solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and showed that there are two molecules in a unit cell in the [CuL2] complex - one molecule has square planar geometry whereas second molecule has distorted square pyramidal geometry and palladium(II) complexes have distorted square planar geometry.

  17. Rim formation and fission gas behaviour: some structure remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spino, J.; Papaioannou, D.; Ray, I.; Baron, D.

    2002-01-01

    In high burn-up LWR nuclear fuel an increase of the Xe-mobility is observed in the rim region according to EPMA. This often coincides with an increase of the local porosity and the grain subdivision of the material in regions around the pores. The restructuring does not always imply disappearance of the prior grain boundaries. This seems to occur in a final step. Micro-XRD studies also show a contraction of the fuel lattice in the rim zone, reflecting mainly the release of accumulated stresses during irradiation, via reordering of defects and defect complexes, including sub-grain formation and displacement of Xe traps. The lattice contraction is not measurable when the fraction of restructured areas is low and the prior grain structure still remains. Nevertheless, in such a case, even the Xe signal by EPMA is observed to decrease, anticipating the displacement of Xe inside the grains, probably towards cavities. However, the quantitative proportion of Xe in matrix and pores can not be given by EPMA. This is confirmed by TEM examinations, showing still plenty of gas bubbles inside restructured grains, in spite of the low Xe signal detected by EPMA. An alternative determination therefore appears necessary. The fission gas release (FGR) behaviour of the rim zone seems then to depend basically on the efficiency of gas retention in its porosity. The closed character of these pores and the low percolation probability derived from the high pore to grain size ratio anticipate a low incidence of open porosity. Also, mechanical tests suggest a low pore interconnection probability by microcracking. However, at very high local burn-ups (>150 GWd/tM), too high porosity values are determined compared to the values derived from immersion density and solid swelling, suggesting the potential existence of open channels. Also, abnormally high porosity values by quantitative metallography might arise from grain pullout during sample preparation. Here, a rough estimation of the release

  18. Structure and Chromosomal Organization of Yeast Genes Regulated by Topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ricky S; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Roca, Joaquim

    2018-01-03

    Cellular DNA topoisomerases (topo I and topo II) are highly conserved enzymes that regulate the topology of DNA during normal genome transactions, such as DNA transcription and replication. In budding yeast, topo I is dispensable whereas topo II is essential, suggesting fundamental and exclusive roles for topo II, which might include the functions of the topo IIa and topo IIb isoforms found in mammalian cells. In this review, we discuss major findings of the structure and chromosomal organization of genes regulated by topo II in budding yeast. Experimental data was derived from short (10 min) and long term (120 min) responses to topo II inactivation in top-2 ts mutants. First, we discuss how short term responses reveal a subset of yeast genes that are regulated by topo II depending on their promoter architecture. These short term responses also uncovered topo II regulation of transcription across multi-gene clusters, plausibly by common DNA topology management. Finally, we examine the effects of deactivated topo II on the elongation of RNA transcripts. Each study provides an insight into the particular chromatin structure that interacts with the activity of topo II. These findings are of notable clinical interest as numerous anti-cancer therapies interfere with topo II activity.

  19. Synthesis, crystal structures and properties of new homoleptic Ni(II)/Pd(II) β-oxodithioester chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Chote L.; Manar, Krishna K.; Yadav, Manoj K.; Tiwari, Neeraj; Singh, Rakesh K.; Drew, Michael G. B.; Singh, Nanhai

    2018-05-01

    Six new cis-chelate complexes, [M(L)2] (L = methyl-3-hydroxy-3-(furyl)-2-propenedithioate L1, M = Ni(II) 1, Pd(II) 4; methyl-3-hydroxy-3-(thiophenyl)-2-propenedithioate L2, M = Ni(II) 2, Pd(II) 5 and methyl-3-hydroxy-3-(phenyl)-2-propenedithioate L3, M = Ni(II) 3, Pd(II) 6 have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, spectroscopy (IR, UV-Vis., 1H and 13C{1H} NMR). The structures of 2-6 have been revealed by X-ray crystallography. In all the crystal structures, the metal has four-coordinate slightly distorted square planar geometry with a cis-configuration of the ligands. Anti-leishmanial properties of the complexes have been studied; 2, 3 and 6 showed potential anti-promastigote and anti-amastigote activities with IC50 values of 1.70 ± 0.50, 1.62 ± 0.19, 9.20 ± 2.16 μg/mL and IC50 2.50 ± 0.10, 2.05 ± 0.40, 12.84 ± 3.46 μg/mL respectively. Cytotoxicity assays on these complexes showed toxicity on the promastigotes but less toxicity against RAW 264.7 cell lines at different concentrations. Palladium complexes 4, 5 and 6 show luminescent characteristics in CH2Cl2 solution at room temperature. Complexes 1-6 are weakly conducting (σrt = 10-4-10-6 S cm-1, Ea = 0.19-1.13 eV) but show semiconducting behavior in the solid phase.

  20. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans-Georg; Meyer, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic) PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups. PMID:23385233

  1. Syntheses, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties of copper(II)-tetracyanometallate(II) complexes with nicotinamide and isonicotinamide ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayın, Elvan; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Hökelek, Tuncer

    2015-09-01

    Four new one dimensional (1D) cyanide complexes, namely {[Cu(NH3)4(μ-na)][M‧(CN)4]}n and {[Cu(NH3)2(ina)2M‧(μ-CN)2(CN)2]}n (M‧(II) = Pd (1 and 3) or Pt (2 and 4), na:nicotinamide and ina:isonicotinamide) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental, spectral (FT-IR and Raman), and thermal (TG, DTG and DTA) analyses. The crystal structures of complexes 1-3 have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. In complexes 1 and 2, na ligand is coordinated to the adjacent Cu(II) ions as a bridging ligand, giving rise to 1D linear cationic chain and the [M‧(CN)4]2- anionic complex acts as a counter ion. Complexes 3 and 4 are also 1D linear chain in which two cyanide ligands bridged neighboring M‧(II) and Cu(II) ions, while ina ligand is coordinated Cu(II) ion through nitrogen atom of pyridine ring. In the complexes, the Cu(II) ions adopt distorted octahedral geometries, while M‧(II) ions are four coordinated with four carbon atoms from cyanide ligands in square-planar geometries. The adjacent chains are further stacked through intermolecular hydrogen bond, Nsbnd Hṡṡṡπ, Csbnd H⋯M‧ and M‧⋯π interactions to form 3D supramolecular networks. Vibration assignments are given for all the observed bands. In addition, thermal stabilities of the compounds are also discussed.

  2. A new photoactive Ru(II)tris(2,2'-bipyridine) templated Zn(II) benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate metal organic framework: structure and photophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Christi L; Wojtas, Lukasz; Gao, Wen-Yang; Ma, Shengqian; Larsen, Randy W

    2015-03-28

    It has now been demonstrated that Ru(ii)tris(2,2'-bipyridine) (RuBpy) can be utilized to template the formation of new metal organic framework (MOF) materials containing crystallographically resolved RuBpy clusters with unique photophysical properties. Two such materials, RWLC-1 and RWLC-2, have now been reported from our laboratory and are composed of RuBpy encapsulated in MOFs composed of Zn(ii) ions and 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene ligands (C. L. Whittington, L. Wojtas and R. W. Larsen, Inorg. Chem., 2014, 53, 160-166). Here, a third RuBpy templated photoactive MOF is described (RWLC-3) that is derived from the reaction between Zn(ii) ions and 1,4-dicarboxybenzene in the presence of RuBpy. Single Crystal X-ray diffraction studies determined the position of RuBpy cations within the crystal lattice. The RWLC-3 structure is described as a 2-fold interpenetrated pillared honeycomb network (bnb) containing crystallographically resolved RuBpy clusters. The two bnb networks are weakly interconnected. The encapsulated RuBpy exhibits two emission decay lifetimes (τ-fast = 120 ns, τ-slow = 453 ns) and a bathochromic shift in the steady state emission spectrum relative to RuBpy in ethanol.

  3. Amelotin Gene Structure and Expression during Enamel Formation in the Opossum Monodelphis domestica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasse, Barbara; Liu, Xi; Corre, Erwan; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is an ameloblast-secreted protein that belongs to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein family, which also includes the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelin. Although AMTN is supposed to play an important role in enamel formation, data were long limited to the rodents, in which it is expressed during the maturation stage. Recent comparative studies in sauropsids and amphibians revealed that (i) AMTN was expressed earlier, i.e. as soon as ameloblasts are depositing the enamel matrix, and (ii) AMTN structure was different, a change which mostly resulted from an intraexonic splicing in the large exon 8 of an ancestral mammal. The present study was performed to know whether the differences in AMTN structure and expression in rodents compared to non-mammalian tetrapods dated back to an early ancestral mammal or were acquired later in mammalian evolution. We sequenced, assembled and screened the jaw transcriptome of a neonate opossum Monodelphis domestica, a marsupial. We found two AMTN transcripts. Variant 1, representing 70.8% of AMTN transcripts, displayed the structure known in rodents, whereas variant 2 (29.2%) exhibited the nonmammalian tetrapod structure. Then, we studied AMTN expression during amelogenesis in a neonate specimen. We obtained similar data as those reported in rodents. These findings indicate that more than 180 million years ago, before the divergence of marsupials and placentals, changes occurred in AMTN function and structure. The spatiotemporal expression was delayed to the maturation stage of amelogenesis and the intraexonic splicing gave rise to isoform 1, encoded by variant 1 and lacking the RGD motif. The ancestral isoform 2, housing the RGD, was initially conserved, as demonstrated here in a marsupial, then secondarily lost in the placental lineages. These findings bring new elements towards our understanding of the non-prismatic to prismatic enamel transition that occurred at the onset of

  4. Amelotin Gene Structure and Expression during Enamel Formation in the Opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gasse

    Full Text Available Amelotin (AMTN is an ameloblast-secreted protein that belongs to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein family, which also includes the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelin. Although AMTN is supposed to play an important role in enamel formation, data were long limited to the rodents, in which it is expressed during the maturation stage. Recent comparative studies in sauropsids and amphibians revealed that (i AMTN was expressed earlier, i.e. as soon as ameloblasts are depositing the enamel matrix, and (ii AMTN structure was different, a change which mostly resulted from an intraexonic splicing in the large exon 8 of an ancestral mammal. The present study was performed to know whether the differences in AMTN structure and expression in rodents compared to non-mammalian tetrapods dated back to an early ancestral mammal or were acquired later in mammalian evolution. We sequenced, assembled and screened the jaw transcriptome of a neonate opossum Monodelphis domestica, a marsupial. We found two AMTN transcripts. Variant 1, representing 70.8% of AMTN transcripts, displayed the structure known in rodents, whereas variant 2 (29.2% exhibited the nonmammalian tetrapod structure. Then, we studied AMTN expression during amelogenesis in a neonate specimen. We obtained similar data as those reported in rodents. These findings indicate that more than 180 million years ago, before the divergence of marsupials and placentals, changes occurred in AMTN function and structure. The spatiotemporal expression was delayed to the maturation stage of amelogenesis and the intraexonic splicing gave rise to isoform 1, encoded by variant 1 and lacking the RGD motif. The ancestral isoform 2, housing the RGD, was initially conserved, as demonstrated here in a marsupial, then secondarily lost in the placental lineages. These findings bring new elements towards our understanding of the non-prismatic to prismatic enamel transition that occurred at

  5. New Cu (II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes of chalcone derivatives: Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, electrochemical properties and DFT computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabti, Salima; Djedouani, Amel; Aggoun, Djouhra; Warad, Ismail; Rahmouni, Samra; Romdhane, Samir; Fouzi, Hosni

    2018-03-01

    The reaction of nickel(II), copper(II) and cobalt(II) with 4-hydroxy-3-[(2E)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)prop-2-enoyl]-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one (HL) leads to a series of new complexes: Ni(L)2(NH3), Cu(L)2(DMF)2 and Co(L)2(H2O). The crystal structure of the Cu(L)2(DMF)2 complex have been determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The Cu(II) lying on an inversion centre is coordinated to six oxygen atoms forming an octahedral elongated. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior of the metal complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode (GC) in CH3CN solutions, showing the quasi-reversible redox process ascribed to the reduction of the MII/MI couples. The X-ray single crystal structure data of the complex was matched excellently with the optimized monomer structure of the desired compound; Hirschfeld surface analysis supported the packed crystal lattice 3D network intermolecular forces. HOMO/LUMO energy level and the global reactivity descriptors quantum parameters are also calculated. The electrophilic and nucleophilic potions in the complex surface are theoretically evaluated by molecular electrostatic potential and Mulliken atomic charges analysis.

  6. Importance of intrinsic properties of dense caseinate dispersions for structure formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manski, J.M.; Riemsdijk, van L.E.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Rheological measurements of dense calcium caseinate and sodium caseinate dispersions (15%) provided insight into the factors determining shear-induced structure formation in caseinates. Calcium caseinate at a sufficiently high concentration (30%) was shown to form highly anisotropic structures

  7. New manganese (II) structures derived from 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures and magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, D.; Tedesco, J.C.D.; Pedro, S.S.; Cruz, C.; Reis, M.S.; Brandão, P.

    2014-01-01

    One novel coordination polymer [Mn 2 (μ-2,6-DCBA) 3 (μ 2 -CH 3 CO 2 ) 2 (2H 2 O)]·2H 2 O (2,6-DCBA = 2,6-dichlorobenzoato) (compound 1) has been synthesized by self-assembly of bridging ligand 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acid and manganese acetate tetrahydrate. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that this compound crystallizes in space group P2 1 /c with a = 10.1547(7), b = 24.5829(2), c = 12.6606(2) Å, β = 93.707(3), V = 3153.9(3) Å 3 and Z = 4. The Mn(II) ions are connected by 2,6-DCBA and acetate group in μ-bridging mode to form 1D chains. Two water molecules are in the inter-layer space forming strong hydrogen bonds originating 2D layer structure. The preparation of this compound is very sensitive to the synthesis conditions, mainly to the solution pH and solvent yielding other two compounds 2 and 3. In compound 1 Mn(II) atoms in octahedral coordination are arranged in a zig–zag chain, with a trimeric structure repeated periodically along the chain, giving two exchange parameters: J 1 related to a syn–syn bond; and J 2 related to a bond of type anti–anti. A theoretical model was developed and then fitted to the magnetic susceptibility data, revealing an antiferromagnetic arrangement along the chain

  8. Formation of hydrogen bonds precedes the rate-limiting formation of persistent structure in the folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, K; Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J

    2000-01-01

    A burst phase in the early folding of the four-helix two-state folder protein acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) has been detected using quenched-flow in combination with site-specific NMR-detected hydrogen exchange. Several of the burst phase structures coincide with a structure consisting...... of eight conserved hydrophobic residues at the interface between the two N and C-terminal helices. Previous mutation studies have shown that the formation of this structure is rate limiting for the final folding of ACBP. The burst phase structures observed in ACBP are different from the previously reported...

  9. Syntheses, Crystal Structures and Thermal Behaviors of Two Supramolecular Salamo-Type Cobalt(II and Zinc(II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the syntheses of two new complexes, [Co(L1(H2O2] (1 and [{Zn(L2(μ-OAcZn(n-PrOH}2] (2, from asymmetric halogen-substituted Salamo-type ligands H2L1 and H3L2, respectively. Investigation of the crystal structure of complex 1 reveals that the complex includes one Co(II ion, one (L12− unit and two coordinated water molecules. Complex 1 shows slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry, forming an infinite 2D supramolecular structure by intermolecular hydrogen bond and π–π stacking interactions. Complex 2 contains four Zn(IIions, two completely deprotonated (L23− moieties, two coordinated μ-OAc− ions and n-propanol molecules. The Zn(II ions in complex 2 display slightly distorted trigonal bipyramidal or square pyramidal geometries.

  10. A study on complex formation of cadmium(II) ions, 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Haruo; Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro

    1984-01-01

    In the potentiometric titration of the solution containing a cadmium(II) ion and an amino acid, white precipitates often appear in the test solution, and they disturb the emf measurements. Such precipitates were formes in the solutions, pH ranging 7.5--8.5, during the course of titrations of the test solutions containing cadmium(II) ion and amino acid such as glycine, α-alanine. 2-aminobutanoic acid, 3-aminobutanoic acid, 4-aminobutanoic acid, 2-aminopentanoic acid, 5-aminopentanoic acid, 2-aminohexanoic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, or glutamine. The identification of the precipitates obtained from the solutions containing cadmium(II) ion and L-aspartic acid, 4-aminobutanoic acid, or 6-aminohexanoic acid were carried out by both of elemental analysis and the infrared spectroscopy. These results indicated that the precipitate obtained from the solution containing cadmium(II) ion and L-aspartic acid was 1:1 cadmium(II)-L-aspartic acid complex and did not contain any cadmium(II) hydroxide, and other two precipitates were mostly cadmium(II) hydroxide and contained a little cadmium(II)-amino acid complexes. (author)

  11. The environment and star formation of H II region Sh2-163: a multi-wavelength study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Naiping; Wang, Jun-Jie; Li, Nan

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the environment of H II region Sh2-163 and search for evidence of triggered star formation in this region, we performed a multi-wavelength study of this H II region. Most of our data were taken from large-scale surveys: 2MASS, CGPS, MSX and SCUBA. We also made CO molecular line observations, using the 13.7-m telescope. The ionized region of Sh2-163 is detected by both the optical and radio continuum observations. Sh2-163 is partially bordered by an arc-like photodissociation region (PDR), which is coincident with the strongest optical and radio emissions, indicating interactions between the H II region and the surrounding interstellar medium. Two molecular clouds were discovered on the border of the PDR. The morphology of these two clouds suggests they are compressed by the expansion of Sh2-163. In cloud A, we found two molecular clumps. And it seems star formation in clump A2 is much more active than in clump A1. In cloud B, we found new outflow activities and massive star(s) are forming inside. Using 2MASS photometry, we tried to search for embedded young stellar object (YSO) candidates in this region. The very good agreement between CO emission, infrared shell and YSOs suggest that it is probably a star formation region triggered by the expansion of Sh2-163. We also found the most likely massive protostar related to IRAS 23314+6033.

  12. Crystal structure of bis(N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylguanidinium tetrachloridocuprate(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamadou Ndiaye

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the structure of the title salt, (C5H14N32[CuCl4], the CuII atom in the anion lies on a twofold rotation axis. The tetrachloridocuprate(II anion adopts a flattened tetrahedral coordination environment and interacts electrostatically with the tetramethylguanidinium cation. The crystal packing is additionally consolidated through N—H...Cl and C—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional network structure.

  13. Fibre structure of decametric type II radio bursts as a manifestation of emission propagation effects in a disturbed near-solar plasma

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Afanasiev

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the fine structure of solar decametric type II radio bursts in the form of drifting narrowband fibres on the dynamic spectrum. Observations show that this structure appears in those events where there is a coronal mass ejection (CME) traveling in the near-solar space ahead of the shock wave responsible for the radio burst. The diversity in observed morphology of fibres and values of their parameters implies that the fibres may be caused by different formation mechanisms. ...

  14. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  15. Refractory Coated/Lined Low Density Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses the development of refractory coated or lined low density structures applicable for advanced future propulsion system technologies. The...

  16. Formation of coherent structures in a class of realistic 3D unsteady flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, M.F.M.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Klapp, J.; Medina, A.; Cros, A.; Vargas, C.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of coherent structures in three-dimensional (3D) unsteady laminar flows in a cylindrical cavity is reviewed. The discussion concentrates on two main topics: the role of symmetries and fluid inertia in the formation of coherent structures and the ramifications for the Lagrangian

  17. Structural diversity and fluorescence properties of three 2-sulfoterephthalate Cd{sup II}/Zn{sup II} coordination polymers employing 1,4-bisbenzimidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yixia, E-mail: renyixia1@163.com; Chai, Hongmei; Tang, Long; Hou, Xiangyang; Wang, Jijiang

    2016-02-15

    Three novel coordination polymers, namely, [Cd(2-Hstp)(1,4-bbi)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd{sub 1.5}(2-stp)(1,4-bbi)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·H{sub 2}O (2) and [Zn{sub 2}(2-stp)(μ{sub 2}-OH)(1,4-bbi){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O)]·6H{sub 2}O (3) (2-H{sub 3}stp is equal to 2-sulfoterephthalate and 1,4-bisbenzimidazole is equal to 1,4-bbi), have been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction. The structural analyses show that 1 and 2 possess different structural features despite the same raw materials, which are 1D chain structure featuring 6-member-water H-bonds cluster and 3D bbi-pillared wavy-like layer framework, respectively. As changing the metal ion to zinc ion, 3 exhibits 3D stp-pillared layer architecture, which discovers the effect of the central metal ions on the formation of metal–organic frameworks. The fluorescence studies show that the emissions of the coordination polymers are attributed to the ligand π–π* transition, which means they could be potential fluorescence materials. - Graphical abstract: Three new Cd{sup II}/Zn{sup II} 2-sulfoterephthalate (2-H{sub 3}stp) complexes with 1,4-bisbenzimidazole (1,4-bbi) are described. Complex 1 exhibits one-dimensional chain-like structure, 2 is a three-dimensional bbi-pillared wavy-like layer framework, while 3 is a three-dimensional stp-pillared layer architecture. Fluorescence spectra exhibit the π–π* transition of two organic ligands. - Highlights: • Three Cd{sup II}/Mn{sup II} 2-sulfoterephthalate complexes containing 1,4-bisbenzimidazole. • Different structural features despite the same raw materials for 1 and 2. • Fluorescence spectra exhibit the π–π* transition of organic ligands.

  18. Experimental and modeling investigation on structure H hydrate formation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazraeno, M. Seyfi; Varaminian, F.; Vafaie sefti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Applying affinity model for the formation kinetics of sH hydrate and two stage kinetics. • Performing the experiments of hydrate formation of sH with MCP. • A unique path for the SH hydrate formation. - Abstract: In this work, the kinetics of crystal H hydrate and two stage kinetics formation is modeled by using the chemical affinity model for the first time. The basic idea is that there is a unique path for each experiment by which the crystallization process decays the affinity. The experiments were performed at constant temperatures of 274.15, 275.15, 275.65, 276.15 and 277.15 K. The initial pressure of each experiment is up to 25 bar above equilibrium pressure of sI. Methylcyclohexane (MCH), methylcyclopentane (MCP) and tert-butyl methyl ether (TBME) are used as sH former and methane is used as a help gas. The parameters of the affinity model (A r and t k ) are determined and the results show that the parameter of (A r )/(RT) has not a constant value when temperature changes in each group of experiments. The results indicate that this model can predict experimental data very well at several conditions

  19. SPITZER ANALYSIS OF H II REGION COMPLEXES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS: DETERMINING A SUITABLE MONOCHROMATIC OBSCURED STAR FORMATION INDICATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, B.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Babler, B.; Bracker, S.; Meade, M.; Block, M.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Misselt, K.; Bolatto, A. D.; Carlson, L. R.; Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T.; Indebetouw, R.; Madden, S. C.; Oey, M. S.; Oliveira, J. M.; Vijh, U. P.

    2010-01-01

    H II regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. To study the H II regions, we compute the bolometric infrared flux, or total infrared (TIR), by integrating the flux from 8 to 500 μm. The TIR provides a measure of the obscured star formation because the UV photons from hot young stars are absorbed by dust and re-emitted across the mid-to-far-infrared (IR) spectrum. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the TIR and produces an accurate obscured SFR over large spatial scales. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) H II region complexes using the Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 8 μm) and MIPS (24, 70, 160 μm) bands. Ultraviolet rocket data (1500 and 1900 A) and SHASSA Hα data are also included. All data are convolved to the MIPS 160 μm resolution (40 arcsec full width at half-maximum), and apertures have a minimum radius of 35''. The IRAC, MIPS, UV, and Hα spatial analysis are compared with the spatial analysis of the TIR. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC H II region spectral energy distributions (SEDs) peak around 70 μm at all radii, from ∼10 to ∼400 pc from the central ionizing sources. As a result, we find the following: the sizes of H II regions as probed by 70 μm are approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (∼70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70 μm flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70 μm ∼ 0.45TIR); the 1σ standard deviation of the 70 μm fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05-0.12 out to ∼220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160 μm normalized fluxes (0.12-0.52); and these results are the same for the LMC and the

  20. Crystal structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin II at 1.27 A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Tani, Fumito; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → X-ray crystallographic structure of sweet-tasting protein, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. → The overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to that of thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the Cα atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. → The side chain of two critical residues, 67 and 82, for sweetness was modeled in two alternative conformations. → The flexibility and fluctuation of side chains at 67 and 82 seems to be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, elicits a sweet taste sensation at 50 nM. Here the X-ray crystallographic structure of one of its variants, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. Overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the Cα atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. Furthermore, the side chain of residue 67 in thaumatin II is highly disordered. Since residue 67 is one of two residues critical to the sweetness of thaumatin, the present results suggested that the critical positive charges at positions 67 and 82 are disordered and the flexibility and fluctuation of these side chains would be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors.

  1. Crystal structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin II at 1.27 A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Tetsuya, E-mail: t2masuda@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ohta, Keisuke; Tani, Fumito [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kitabatake, Naofumi [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} X-ray crystallographic structure of sweet-tasting protein, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. {yields} The overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to that of thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the C{alpha} atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. {yields} The side chain of two critical residues, 67 and 82, for sweetness was modeled in two alternative conformations. {yields} The flexibility and fluctuation of side chains at 67 and 82 seems to be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, elicits a sweet taste sensation at 50 nM. Here the X-ray crystallographic structure of one of its variants, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. Overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the C{alpha} atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. Furthermore, the side chain of residue 67 in thaumatin II is highly disordered. Since residue 67 is one of two residues critical to the sweetness of thaumatin, the present results suggested that the critical positive charges at positions 67 and 82 are disordered and the flexibility and fluctuation of these side chains would be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors.

  2. Surface Structures Formed by a Copper(II Complex of Alkyl-Derivatized Indigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Honda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Assembled structures of dyes have great influence on their coloring function. For example, metal ions added in the dyeing process are known to prevent fading of color. Thus, we have investigated the influence of an addition of copper(II ion on the surface structure of alkyl-derivatized indigo. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM analysis revealed that the copper(II complexes of indigo formed orderly lamellar structures on a HOPG substrate. These lamellar structures of the complexes are found to be more stable than those of alkyl-derivatized indigos alone. Furthermore, 2D chirality was observed.

  3. Star Formation Histories of the LEGUS Dwarf Galaxies. II. Spatially Resolved Star Formation History of the Magellanic Irregular NGC 4449

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, E.; Cignoni, M.; Aloisi, A.; Tosi, M.; Calzetti, D.; Lee, J. C.; Adamo, A.; Annibali, F.; Dale, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Hunter, D. A.; Sabbi, E.; Smith, L. J.; Thilker, D. A.; Ubeda, L.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2018-04-01

    We present a detailed study of the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449 based on both archival and new photometric data from the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3. Thanks to its proximity (D = 3.82 ± 0.27 Mpc), we reach stars 3 mag fainter than the tip of the red giant branch in the F814W filter. The recovered star formation history (SFH) spans the whole Hubble time, but due to the age–metallicity degeneracy of the red giant branch stars, it is robust only over the lookback time reached by our photometry, i.e., ∼3 Gyr. The most recent peak of star formation (SF) is around 10 Myr ago. The average surface density SF rate over the whole galaxy lifetime is 0.01 M ⊙ yr‑1 kpc‑2. From our study, it emerges that NGC 4449 has experienced a fairly continuous SF regime in the last 1 Gyr, with peaks and dips whose SF rates differ only by a factor of a few. The very complex and disturbed morphology of NGC 4449 makes it an interesting galaxy for studies of the relationship between interactions and starbursts, and our detailed and spatially resolved analysis of its SFH does indeed provide some hints on the connection between these two phenomena in this peculiar dwarf galaxy. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  4. Influence of Exciplex formation on the electroluminescent properties of dimeric Zn (II) bis-2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl) benzoxazole complex and monomeric Zn (II) 2-(1'-hydroxynaphthyl) benzothiazole complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Sattey; Anand, R. S.; Manoharan, S. Sundar

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we present the factors affecting electroluminescent properties of Zinc complexes of oxazole & thiazole derivatives. Electroluminescent spectra of the Zinc (II) complex of bis-[2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl) benzoxazole], [Zn (HPBO)2]2 and 2-(1'-hydroxynaphthyl) benzothiazole [Zn (HNBT)2] show unusual broadening and shows structural and photophysical similarity with [Zn (HPBT)2]2, a dimeric complex. The [Zn (HPBO)2]2 complex as an emissive layer in the device structure ITO /PEDOT:PSS /TPD (30nm) /[Zn (HPBO)2]2 (60nm) /BCP (6nm) /Ca (3nm) /Al (200nm) shows a broad bluish green emission, with a full width at half maxima (FWHM1˜70nm). The EL spectra is much broader compared to the PL spectra because of exciplex formation at the interfacial region between the emissive layer (EML) & hole transport layer (HTL). We also show the device performance of Zinc 2-(1'-hydroxynaphthyl) benzothiazole [Zn (HNBT)2] complex as emissive layer. Distinctly this device shows a broad greenish yellow emission with a peak maxima at 535nm and 690nm, owing to the exciplex formation between electron transport layer (ETL) and emissive layer (EML), which is in sharp contrast to the exciplex formation across the HTL-EML interface observed for the [Zn (HPBO)2]2 complex.

  5. Towards an Effective THeory Of Structure formation (ETHOS)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Although there is substantial gravitational evidence for the existence of dark matter, its particle nature remains one of the biggest mysteries in modern physics. The favourite theoretical model, Cold Dark Matter (CDM), assumes that non-gravitational dark matter interactions are irrelevant for galaxy formation and evolution. Surprisingly, current astronomical observations allow significant departures from the CDM hypothesis that have a relevant impact on our understanding of how galaxies form and evolve. Moreover, the observed properties of the smallest galaxies have been a consistent challenge for the CDM model. In this talk, I will argue that to explain galaxy formation and evolution in the broadest sense, an effective dark matter theory must contain a wider range of dark matter particle physics. I will describe the first steps we have taken towards developing ETHOS and present some of its applications.

  6. NMR structures of anti-HIV D-peptides derived from the N-terminus of viral chemokine vMIP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Mayuko; Liu Dongxiang; Kumar, Santosh; Huang Ziwei

    2005-01-01

    The viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has unique biological activities in that it blocks the cell entry by several different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains via chemokine receptors including CXCR4 and CCR5. In this paper, we report the solution structure of all-D-amino acid peptides derived from the N-terminus of vMIP-II, which have been shown to have strong CXCR4 binding activity and potently inhibit HIV-1 entry via CXCR4, by using long mixing time two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiments. Both of all-D-peptides vMIP-II (1-10) and vMIP-II (1-21), which are designated as DV3 and DV1, respectively, have higher CXCR4 binding ability than their L-peptide counterparts. They are partially structured in aqueous solution, displaying a turn-like structure over residues 5-8. The small temperature coefficients of His-6 amide proton for both peptides also suggest the formation of a small hydrophobic pocket centered on His-6. The structural features of DV3 are very similar to the reported solution structure of all-L-peptide vMIP-II (1-10) [M.P. Crump, E. Elisseeva, J. Gong, I. Clark-Lewis, B.D. Sykes, Structure/function of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II (1-71) and the antagonist N-terminal segment (1-10), FEBS Lett. 489 (2001) 171], which is consistent with the notion that D- and L-enantiomeric peptides can adopt mirror image conformations. The NMR structures of the D-peptides provide a structural basis to understand their mechanism of action and design new peptidomimetic analogs to further explore the structure-activity relationship of D-peptide ligand binding to CXCR4

  7. Formation of diapiric structure in the deformation zone, central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    serpentinite layer existing near the base of the crust that is interpreted to have been formed at mid-ocean ... Keywords. Diffusive plate boundary; deformation zone; diapiric structure; serpentinized peridotites; crustal structure; ... calculated by applying Eotvos correction and nor- ..... trend of the basement and flat Moho, and.

  8. Molecular structure and DFT investigations on new cobalt(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion process was demonstrated.9 Late-transition metals, especially Ni, Pd ..... in table S2 (Supplementary Information). Most of the ... to molecular system because of atomic charges affect ... structure, acidity–basicity behavior and other proper-.

  9. Poverty and Family Structure - Phase II | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Understanding the dynamics of change in family structure is critical in poverty diagnosis, ... And, how could public social security be conceived to protect the most vulnerable? ... IDRC invites applications for the IDRC Research Awards 2019.

  10. Structural Integrity Inspection and Visualization System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the successful feasibility demonstration in Phase I, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to continue the development of a novel Structural Integrity...

  11. New Analysis and Theory of Deployable Folded Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recently developed mathematical folding theory has great value for deployable space structures and in situ manufacture of large beams, panels and cylinders. The...

  12. Syntheses, structures and properties of two dinuclear mercury(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 8 August 2013; revised 9 December 2013; accepted 22 ... Structures of both the compounds are solved by X-ray diffraction measurements. ... Elemental analyses (carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen) ..... Verschoor G C 1984 J. Chem.

  13. Quantifiable and Reliable Structural Health Management Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under Project Constellation, NASA is developing a new generation of spacecraft for human spaceflight. A significant percentage of the structures used in these...

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Transport and Structural Formation in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    1999-06-01

    The book under review is one of a series of monographs on plasma physics published by the Institute of Physics under the editorship of Peter Stott and Hans Wilhelmsson. It is nicely produced and is aimed at research workers and advanced students of both laboratory (i.e. tokamak plasmas) and astrophysical plasma physics. The authors are prolific contributors to the subject of plasma turbulence and transport with a well-defined message: ``The authors' view is that the plasma structure, fluctuations and turbulent transport are continually regulating each other and, in addition, that the structural formation and structural transition of plasmas are typical of the physics of far from equilibrium systems. The book presents and explains why the plasma inhomogeneity is the ordering parameter governing transport and how self-sustained fluctuations can be driven through subcritical excitation even beyond linear instability''. This point of view is expounded in 24 chapters, including topics such as transport phenomena in toroidal plasmas (Chapters 2-4), low frequency modes and instabilities of confined systems (Chapters 5-7), renormalization (Chapter 8), self-sustained turbulence due to the current diffusive mode and resistive effects (Chapters 9-11), subcritical turbulence and numerical simulations (Chapters 12-14), scale invariance arguments (Chapter 15), electric field effects (Chapters 17-21) and self-organized dynamics (Chapter 22). The material is essentially drawn from the authors' many and varied original contributions to the plasma turbulence and transport literature. Whatever view one might have about the merits of this work, there is little doubt in this reviewer's mind that it is indeed thought-provoking and presents a worthy intellectual challenge to plasma theorists and experimentalists alike. The authors take a consistent stance and discuss the issues from their own standpoint. They observe that the plasmas one encounters in practice (for definiteness, the

  15. Rational assembly of Pb(II)/Cd(II)/Mn(II) coordination polymers based on flexible V-shaped dicarboxylate ligand: Syntheses, helical structures and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gao-Shan [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Liu, Chong-Bo, E-mail: cbliu@nchu.edu.cn [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Liu, Hong [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Robbins, Julianne; Zhang, Z. John [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Yin, Hong-Shan [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Wen, Hui-Liang [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Wang, Yu-Hua [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Six new coordination polymers, namely, [Pb(L)(H{sub 2}O)] (1), [Pb(L)(phen)] (2), [Pb{sub 2}(L){sub 2}(4,4′-bipy){sub 0.5}] (3), [Cd(L)(phen)] (4), [Cd(L)(4,4′-bipy)]·H{sub 2}O (5) and [Mn(L)(4,4′-bipy)]·H{sub 2}O (6) have been synthesized by the hydrothermal reaction of 2,2′-[hexafluoroisopropylidenebis(p-phenyleneoxy)]diacetic acid (H{sub 2}L) with Pb(II)/Cd(II)/Mn(II) in the presence of ancillary ligands 4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bipy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). Complexes 1 and 4–6 exhibit 2-D structures, and complexes 2–3 display 3-D frameworks, of which L{sup 2−} ligands join metal ions to single-stranded helical chains of 1, 3–6 and double-stranded helical chains of 2. Complexes 2 and 3 also contain double-stranded Metal–O helices. Topology analysis reveals that complexes 1 and 4 both represent 4-connected sql net, 2 represents 6-connected pcu net, 3 exhibits a novel (3,12)-connected net, while 5 and 6 display (3,5)-connected gek1 net. The six complexes exhibit two kinds of inorganic–organic connectivities: I{sup 0}O{sup 2} for 1, 4–6, and I{sup 1}O{sup 2} for 2–3. The photoluminescent properties of 4–5 and the magnetic properties of 6 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Six new Pb(II)/Cd(II)/Mn(II) coordination polymers with helical structures based on flexible V-shaped dicarboxylate ligand have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Photoluminescent and magnetic properties have been investigated. - Highlights: • Six novel M(II) coordination polymers with 2,2′-[hexafluoroisopropylidenebis(p-phenyleneoxy)]diacetic acid and N-donor ligands. • Complexes 1–6 show diverse intriguing helical characters. • The luminescent properties of complexes 1–5 were investigated. • Complex 6 shows antiferromagnetic coupling.

  16. Soviet and American Airwomen During World War II: A Comparison of Their Formation, Treatment and Dismissal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Myers, Beth

    2003-01-01

    .... World War II provides an interesting setting to study women and warfare because the belligerent countries mobilized millions of women for the war effort, both in civilian and military capacities...

  17. Large Format LW Type-II SLS FPAs for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposes to develop high performance (low dark current, high quantum efficiency, and low NEdT) infrared epitaxy materials based on Type II Strained...

  18. Pathological involvement of chymase-dependent angiotensin II formation in the development of cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hidenori Urata

    2000-01-01

    Summary Chymase is a potent and specific angiotensin II (Ang II)-forming enzyme in vitro. There is also strong evidence to suggest its importance in vivo. Recent clinical studies have suggested that high serum cholesterol levels are associated with increased vascular chymase activity and this may assist in the development of atherosclerosis. This clinical finding has been reproduced in hamster models. Studies with transgenic mice overexpressing the human chymase gene suggest a direct associat...

  19. Crystal structures of copper(II) chloride, copper(II) bromide, and copper(II) nitrate complexes with pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Jeanneau, E.; Bairac, N. N.; Bocelli, G.; Poirier, D.; Roy, J.; Gulea, A. P.

    2008-09-01

    The crystal structures of chloro-(2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper dimethyl sulfoxide solvate ( I), bromo-(2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper ( II), and (2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper(II) nitrate dimethyl sulfoxide solvate ( III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. In the crystals, complexes I and II form centrosymmetric dimers in which the thiosemicarbazone sulfur atom serves as a bridge and occupies the fifth coordination site of the copper atom of the neighboring complex related to the initial complex through the center of symmetry. In both cases, the coordination polyhedron of the complexing ion is a distorted tetragonal bipyramid. Complex III in the crystal structure forms polymer chains in which the copper atom of one complex forms the coordination bond with the thicarbamide nitrogen atom of the neighboring complex. In this structure, the coordination polyhedron of the central atom is an elongated tetragonal bipyramid. It is established that complexes I III at a concentration of 10-5 mol/l selectively inhibit the growth of 60 to 90 percent of the cancer tumor cells of the human myeloid leukemia (HL-60).

  20. Crystal structures of copper(II) chloride, copper(II) bromide, and copper(II) nitrate complexes with pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Jeanneau, E.; Bairac, N. N.; Bocelli, G.; Poirier, D.; Roy, J.; Gulea, A. P.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structures of chloro-(2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper dimethyl sulfoxide solvate (I), bromo-(2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper (II), and (2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper(II) nitrate dimethyl sulfoxide solvate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. In the crystals, complexes I and II form centrosymmetric dimers in which the thiosemicarbazone sulfur atom serves as a bridge and occupies the fifth coordination site of the copper atom of the neighboring complex related to the initial complex through the center of symmetry. In both cases, the coordination polyhedron of the complexing ion is a distorted tetragonal bipyramid. Complex III in the crystal structure forms polymer chains in which the copper atom of one complex forms the coordination bond with the thicarbamide nitrogen atom of the neighboring complex. In this structure, the coordination polyhedron of the central atom is an elongated tetragonal bipyramid. It is established that complexes I-III at a concentration of 10 -5 mol/l selectively inhibit the growth of 60 to 90 percent of the cancer tumor cells of the human myeloid leukemia (HL-60).

  1. Crystal structures of copper(II) chloride, copper(II) bromide, and copper(II) nitrate complexes with pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumakov, Yu. M., E-mail: chumakov.xray@phys.asm.md [Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Institute of Applied Physics (Moldova, Republic of); Tsapkov, V. I. [State University of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Jeanneau, E. [Universite Claude Bernard, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces (France); Bairac, N. N. [State University of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Bocelli, G. [National Research Council (IMEM-CNR), Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism (Italy); Poirier, D.; Roy, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ) (Canada); Gulea, A. P. [State University of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The crystal structures of chloro-(2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper dimethyl sulfoxide solvate (I), bromo-(2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper (II), and (2-formylpyridinethiosemicarbazono)copper(II) nitrate dimethyl sulfoxide solvate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. In the crystals, complexes I and II form centrosymmetric dimers in which the thiosemicarbazone sulfur atom serves as a bridge and occupies the fifth coordination site of the copper atom of the neighboring complex related to the initial complex through the center of symmetry. In both cases, the coordination polyhedron of the complexing ion is a distorted tetragonal bipyramid. Complex III in the crystal structure forms polymer chains in which the copper atom of one complex forms the coordination bond with the thicarbamide nitrogen atom of the neighboring complex. In this structure, the coordination polyhedron of the central atom is an elongated tetragonal bipyramid. It is established that complexes I-III at a concentration of 10{sup -5} mol/l selectively inhibit the growth of 60 to 90 percent of the cancer tumor cells of the human myeloid leukemia (HL-60).

  2. FORMATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL AND ECONOMIC INTEGRATED STRUCTURES IN THE ALUMINUM INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Kazbekova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the theoretical foundations of economic efficiency of production and integrated structures formation. Their advantages are demonstrated by the example of the formation of vertically integrated structures in the aluminium industry in the framework created by smelting aluminium cluster inKazakhstan. Also examines the valuable experience gained in the organization of such structures in theRussian Federationin recent years

  3. Formation of Hg(II) Tetrathiolate Complexes with Cysteine at Neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Thomas; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2016-04-01

    Mercury(II) ions precipitate from aqueous cysteine (H 2 Cys) solutions containing H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 2.0 as Hg( S -HCys) 2 . In absence of additional cysteine, the precipitate dissolves at pH ~12 with the [Hg( S,N -Cys) 2 ] 2- complex dominating. With excess cysteine (H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 4.0), higher complexes form and the precipitate dissolves at lower pH values. Previously, we found that tetrathiolate [Hg( S -Cys) 4 ] 6- complexes form at pH = 11.0; in this work we extend the investigation to pH values of physiological interest. We examined two series of Hg(II)-cysteine solutions in which C Hg(II) varied between 8 - 9 mM and 80 - 100 mM, respectively, with H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratios from 4 to ~20. The solutions were prepared in the pH range 7.1 - 8.8, at the pH at which the initial Hg( S -HCys) 2 precipitate dissolved. The variations in the Hg(II) speciation were followed by 199 Hg NMR, X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Our results show that in the dilute solutions ( C Hg(II) = 8 - 9 mM), mixtures of di-, tri- (major) and tetrathiolate complexes exist at moderate cysteine excess ( C H2Cys ~ 0.16 M) at pH 7.1. In the more concentrated solutions ( C Hg(II) = 80 - 100 mM) with high cysteine excess ( C H2Cys > 0.9 M), tetrathiolate [Hg( S -cysteinate) 4 ] m -6 ( m = 0 - 4) complexes dominate in the pH range 7.3 - 7.8, with lower charge than for the [Hg( S -Cys) 4 ] 6- complex due to protonation of some ( m ) of the amino groups of the coordinated cysteine ligands. The results of this investigation could provide a key to the mechanism of biosorption and accumulation of Hg(II) ions in biological / environmental systems.

  4. STAR FORMATION AND FEEDBACK IN SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS. II. RESOLUTION EFFECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Charlotte R.; Quinn, Thomas; Bellovary, Jillian; Stinson, Gregory; Wadsley, James

    2010-01-01

    We examine the effect of mass and force resolution on a specific star formation (SF) recipe using a set of N-body/smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies. Our simulations span halo masses from 10 9 to 10 13 M sun , more than 4 orders of magnitude in mass resolution, and 2 orders of magnitude in the gravitational softening length, ε, representing the force resolution. We examine the total global SF rate, the SF history, and the quantity of stellar feedback and compare the disk structure of the galaxies. Based on our analysis, we recommend using at least 10 4 particles each for the dark matter (DM) and gas component and a force resolution of ε ∼ 10 -3 R vir when studying global SF and feedback. When the spatial distribution of stars is important, the number of gas and DM particles must be increased to at least 10 5 of each. Low-mass resolution simulations with fixed softening lengths show particularly weak stellar disks due to two-body heating. While decreasing spatial resolution in low-mass resolution simulations limits two-body effects, density and potential gradients cannot be sustained. Regardless of the softening, low-mass resolution simulations contain fewer high density regions where SF may occur. Galaxies of approximately 10 10 M sun display unique sensitivity to both mass and force resolution. This mass of galaxy has a shallow potential and is on the verge of forming a disk. The combination of these factors gives this galaxy the potential for strong gas outflows driven by supernova feedback and makes it particularly sensitive to any changes to the simulation parameters.

  5. Structure-preserving algorithms for oscillatory differential equations II

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xinyuan; Shi, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book describes a variety of highly effective and efficient structure-preserving algorithms for second-order oscillatory differential equations. Such systems arise in many branches of science and engineering, and the examples in the book include systems from quantum physics, celestial mechanics and electronics. To accurately simulate the true behavior of such systems, a numerical algorithm must preserve as much as possible their key structural properties: time-reversibility, oscillation, symplecticity, and energy and momentum conservation. The book describes novel advances in RKN methods, ERKN methods, Filon-type asymptotic methods, AVF methods, and trigonometric Fourier collocation methods.  The accuracy and efficiency of each of these algorithms are tested via careful numerical simulations, and their structure-preserving properties are rigorously established by theoretical analysis. The book also gives insights into the practical implementation of the methods. This book is intended for engineers and sc...

  6. Structure formation of 5083 alloy during friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikina, A. A.; Kolubaev, A. V.; Sizova, O. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Filippov, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of structures obtained by friction stir welding and sliding friction of 5083 Al alloy. Optical and electron microscopy reveals identical fine-grained structures with a grain size of ˜5 µm both in the weld nugget zone and subsurface layer in friction independently of the initial grain size of the alloy. It has been suggested that the grain boundary sliding is responsible for the specific material flow pattern in both techniques considered.

  7. Regulatory effects of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    RNAs, which play significant roles in many fundamental biological processes of life, fold into sophisticated and precise structures. RNA folding is a dynamic and intricate process, which conformation transition of coding and noncoding RNAs form the primary elements of genetic regulation. The cellular environment contains various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that potentially affect RNA folding in vivo, and experimental and theoretical evidence increasingly indicates that the highly flexible features of the RNA structure are affected by these factors, which include the flanking sequence context, physiochemical conditions, cis RNA-RNA interactions, and RNA interactions with other molecules. Furthermore, distinct RNA structures have been identified that govern almost all steps of biological processes in cells, including transcriptional activation and termination, transcriptional mutagenesis, 5'-capping, splicing, 3'-polyadenylation, mRNA export and localization, and translation. Here, we briefly summarize the dynamic and complex features of RNA folding along with a wide variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect RNA folding. We then provide several examples to elaborate RNA structure-mediated regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we illustrate the regulatory roles of RNA structure and discuss advances pertaining to RNA structure in plants. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:562-574. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1350 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Electronic Structure of Rare-Earth Metals. II. Positron Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R. W.; Mackintosh, Allan

    1968-01-01

    of Loucks shows that the independent-particle model gives a good first approximation to the angular distribution, although correlation effects probably smear out some of the structure. The angular distributions from the heavy rare-earth metals are very similar to that from Y and can be understood....... In the spiral phase of Ho, the structure in the c-axis distribution is much reduced, indicating that the Fermi surface is substantially modified by the magnetic ordering, as expected. The photon distribution from the equiatomic Ho-Er alloy is very similar to those from the constituent metals, although...

  9. Structural equations for Killing tensors of order two. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, I.; Malhiot, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    In a preceding paper, a new form of the structural equations for any Killing tensor of order two have been derived; these equations constitute a system analogous to the Killing vector equations Nabla/sub alpha/ K/sub beta/ = ω/sub alpha beta/ = -ω/sub beta alpha/ and Nabla/sub gamma/ ω/sub alpha beta = R/sub alpha beta gamma delta/ K/sup delta/. The first integrability condition for the Killing tensor structural equations is now derived. The structural equations and the integrability condition have forms which can readily be expressed in terms of a null tetrad to furnish a Killing tensor parallel of the Newman--Penrose equations; this is briefly described. The integrability condition implies the new result, for any given space--time, that the dimension of the set of second-order Killing tensors attains its maximum possible value of 50 only if the space--time is of constant curvature. Potential applications of the structural equations are discussed

  10. Crystal structure of cis-tetraaquadichloridocobalt(II sulfolane disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhamed Boudraa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [CoCl2(H2O4]·2C4H8SO2, the CoII cation is located on the twofold rotation axis and is coordinated by four water molecules and two adjacent chloride ligands in a slightly distorted octahedral coordination environment. The cisoid angles are in the range 83.27 (5–99.66 (2°. The three transoid angles deviate significantly from the ideal linear angle. The crystal packing can be described as a linear arrangement of complex units along c formed by bifurcated O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds between two water molecules from one complex unit towards one chloride ligand of the neighbouring complex. Two solvent molecules per complex are attached to this infinite chain via O—H...O hydrogen bonds in which water molecules act as the hydrogen-bond donor and sulfolane O atoms as the hydrogen-bond acceptor sites.

  11. Structure and Formation of Elliptical and Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Fisher, David B.; Cornell, Mark E.; Bender, Ralf

    2009-05-01

    New surface photometry of all known elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster is combined with published data to derive composite profiles of brightness, ellipticity, position angle, isophote shape, and color over large radius ranges. These provide enough leverage to show that Sérsic log I vprop r 1/n functions fit the brightness profiles I(r) of nearly all ellipticals remarkably well over large dynamic ranges. Therefore, we can confidently identify departures from these profiles that are diagnostic of galaxy formation. Two kinds of departures are seen at small radii. All 10 of our ellipticals with total absolute magnitudes MVT 4 uncorrelated with MVT . They also are α-element enhanced, implying short star-formation timescales. And their stellar populations have a variety of ages but mostly are very old. Extra light ellipticals generally rotate rapidly, are more isotropic than core Es, and have disky isophotes. We show that they have n sime 3 ± 1 almost uncorrelated with MVT and younger and less α-enhanced stellar populations. These are new clues to galaxy formation. We suggest that extra light ellipticals got their low Sérsic indices by forming in relatively few binary mergers, whereas giant ellipticals have n > 4 because they formed in larger numbers of mergers of more galaxies at once plus later heating during hierarchical clustering. We confirm that core Es contain X-ray-emitting gas whereas extra light Es generally do not. This leads us to suggest why the E-E dichotomy arose. If energy feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) requires a "working surface" of hot gas, then this is present in core galaxies but absent in extra light galaxies. We suggest that AGN energy feedback is a strong function of galaxy mass: it is weak enough in small Es not to prevent merger starbursts but strong enough in giant Es and their progenitors to make dry mergers dry and to protect old stellar populations from late star formation. Finally, we verify that there is a strong

  12. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 3-72, Morelia, Michoacán 58089 (Mexico)

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  13. MASS TRANSPORT AND TURBULENCE IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISK GALAXIES. II. THE EFFECTS OF STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J. [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1205 W. Clark St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Krumholz, Mark R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Forbes, John C., E-mail: ngoldbau@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre Q parameters to ∼1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies’ star formation rates by a factor of ∼5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular interstellar medium. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the rate of inward mass transport. Nevertheless, we find that, even with feedback included, our galactic disks self-regulate to Q ∼ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to supply a substantial fraction of the inner disk star formation. We argue that gravitational instability is therefore likely to be the dominant source of turbulence and transport in galactic disks, and that it is responsible for fueling star formation in the inner parts of galactic disks over cosmological times.

  14. Structural studies on a non-toxic homologue of type II RIPs from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural studies on a non-toxic homologue of type II RIPs from bitter gourd: Molecular basis of non-toxicity, conformational selection and glycan structure. MS accepted http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci. THYAGESHWAR CHANDRAN, ALOK SHARMA and M VIJAYAN. J. Biosci. 40(5), October 2015, 929–941, © Indian Academy of ...

  15. Catecholase activity of dicopper(II)-bispidine complexes: stabilities and structures of intermediates, kinetics and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Karin; Comba, Peter; Daubinet, André; Fuchs, Alexander; Wadepohl, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism for the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (dtbc) with dioxygen to the corresponding quinone (dtbq), catalyzed by bispidine-dicopper complexes (bispidines are various mono- and dinucleating derivatives of 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane with bis-tertiary-amine-bispyridyl or bis-tertiary-amine-trispyridyl donor sets), is proposed on the basis of (1) the stoichiometry of the reaction as well as the stabilities and structures [X-ray, density functional theory (B3LYP, TZV)] of the bispidine-dicopper(II)-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorcatechol intermediates, (2) formation kinetics and structures (molecular mechanics, MOMEC) of the end-on peroxo-dicopper(II) complexes and (3) kinetics of the stoichiometric (anaerobic) and catalytic (aerobic) copper-complex-assisted oxidation of dtbc. This involves (1) the oxidation of the dicopper(I) complexes with dioxygen to the corresponding end-on peroxo-dicopper(II) complexes, (2) coordination of dtbc as a bridging ligand upon liberation of H(2)O(2) and (3) intramolecular electron transfer to produce dtbq, which is liberated, and the dicopper(I) catalyst. Although the bispidine complexes have reactivities comparable to those of recently published catalysts with macrocyclic ligands, which seem to reproduce the enzyme-catalyzed process in various reaction sequences, a strikingly different oxidation mechanism is derived from the bispidine-dicopper-catalyzed reaction.

  16. Shock-wave structure formation in a dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popel', S.I.; Golub', A.P.; Loseva, T.V.; Bingkhem, R.; Benkadda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Nonstationary problem on evolution perturbation and its transformation into nonlinear wave structure is considered. The method developed permits finding solution to the system of nonlinear evolution equations describing dust particles with variable charge, Boltzmann electron and inertia ions. An accurate stationary solution as ion-sonic wave structures explained by anomalous dissipation due to electric discharge of dust particles was found. Evolution of two types of initial perturbations was studied, i.e.: soliton and immobile region with increased density of ions - a step. Soliton evolution in plasma with variable charge of dust particles results in the appearance on nonstationary shock-wave structure, whereas the step evolution gives rise to appearance of a shock wave similar to the stationary one along with rarefaction wave [ru

  17. I. Structural studies of termite defense secretions. II. Structural studies of natural products of marine nudibranchs. [Kempene, tridachione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solheim, B.A.

    1977-12-01

    Three families of termites have the ability to produce a sticky secretion that envelopes and immobilizes the enemy. In the family Termitidae the secretion contains the diterpenoid hydrocarbons, kempene I and kempene II. The molecular structure of kempene II from the termite, Nasutitermes kempae, is described in detail. Another species of termite, Cubitermes umbratus, contained the diterpenoid hydrocarbon biflora-4,10-19,15-triene in the secretion and this compound is described. Studies were also conducted on the mucous secretion of the pedal gland of the marine nudibranch, Tidachiella diomedea. Tridachione, a substituted ..gamma..-pyrone, was isolated in the pure state and its molecular structure is described in detail. (HLW)

  18. Spectrophotometric Determination of Metoprolol Tartrate in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms on Complex Formation with Cu(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Cesme

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new, simple, sensitive and accurate spectrophotometric method has been developed for the assay of metoprolol tartrate (MPT, which is based on the complexation of drug with copper(II [Cu(II] at pH 6.0, using Britton-Robinson buffer solution, to produce a blue adduct. The latter has a maximum absorbance at 675 nm and obeys Beer’s law within the concentration range 8.5-70 mg/mL. Regression analysis of the calibration data showed a good correlation coefficient (r = 0.998 with a limit of detection of 5.56 mg/mL. The proposed procedure has been successfully applied to the determination of this drug in its tablets. In addition, the spectral data and stability constant for the binuclear copper(II complex of MPT (Cu2MPT2Cl2 have been reported.

  19. Electric Field Structures in Thin Films: Formation and Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassidy, Andrew; Plekan, Oksana; Balog, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A newly discovered class of molecular materials, so-called “spontelectrics”, display spontaneous electric fields. Here we show that the novel properties of spontelectrics can be used to create composite spontelectrics, illustrating how electric fields in solid films may be structured on the nanoscale...... by combining layers of different spontelectric materials. This is demonstrated using the spontelectric materials nitrous oxide, toluene, isoprene, isopentane, and CF2Cl2. These yield a variety of tailored electric field structures, with individual layers harboring fields between 107 and 108 V/m. Fields may...

  20. Superconducting tunneling with the tunneling Hamiltonian. II. Subgap harmonic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of superconducting tunneling without the tunneling Hamiltonian is extended to treat superconductor/insulator/superconductor junctions in which the transmission coefficient of the insulating barrier approaches unity. The solution for the current in such junctions is obtained by solving the problem of a particle hopping in a one-dimensional lattice of sites, with forward and reverse transfer integrals that depend on the site. The results are applied to the problem of subgap harmonic structure in superconducting tunneling. The time-dependent current at finite voltage through a junction exhibiting subgap structure is found to have terms that oscillate at all integer multiples of the Josephson frequency, n(2eV/h). The amplitudes of these new, and as yet unmeasured, ac current contributions as a function of voltage are predicted

  1. Structure of dichloro(4-hydroxy-L-proline)cadmium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, Yasuhiko; Inomata, Yoshie; Takeuchi, Toshio [Jochi Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology; Shimoi, Mamoru; Ouchi, Akira

    1982-10-01

    An X-ray diffraction study of the title complex has been carried out. The crystal is monoclinic, with the space group P2/sub 1/; Z = 2; a = 8.196(4), b = 7.275(3), c = 7.740(4) A, beta = 103.73(4)/sup 0/. Full-matrix least-squares refinements have led to the final R value of 0.030. The structure consists of one-demensional polymers bridged by chlorine atoms and a carboxyl group. Four chlorine atoms coordinate to a cadmium atom and form a square plane. The planes extend in the direction of the b axis like an infinite folding screen, sharing opposite edges. From the trough positions in the zigzag structure, the carboxyl oxygen atoms of 4-hydroxy-L-proline coordinate forkedly to two cadmium atoms. The ligand is a switter ion in the complex.

  2. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Georg Braun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO, molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness < 10 nm result from an interplay between dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  3. Effects of nitrogen annealing on surface structure, silicide formation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of nitrogen annealing on structural and magnetic properties of Co/Si (100) up to 700◦C has been studied in this ... are dictated by uniformity of interdiffusion parallel to inter- ..... AFM images confirmed increase in the nanocrystalline.

  4. Autonomous Supervisory Engine for Multi-Spacecraft Formation Flying, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this project is to develop an onboard, autonomous Multi-spacecraft Supervisory Engine (MSE) for formation-flying guidance, navigation and control...

  5. Structure and decomposition of the silver formate Ag(HCO{sub 2})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzan, Anna N., E-mail: anna_puzan@mail.ru; Baumer, Vyacheslav N.; Mateychenko, Pavel V.

    2017-02-15

    Crystal structure of the silver formate Ag(HCO{sub 2}) has been determined (orthorhombic, sp.gr. Pccn, a=7.1199(5), b=10.3737(4), c=6.4701(3)Å, V=477.88(4) Å{sup 3}, Z=8). The structure contains isolated formate ions and the pairs Ag{sub 2}{sup 2+} which form the layers in (001) planes (the shortest Ag–Ag distances is 2.919 in the pair and 3.421 and 3.716 Å between the nearest Ag atoms of adjacent pairs). Silver formate is unstable compound which decompose spontaneously vs time. Decomposition was studied using Rietveld analysis of the powder diffraction patterns. It was concluded that the diffusion of Ag atoms leads to the formation of plate-like metal particles as nuclei in the (100) planes which settle parallel to (001) planes of the silver formate matrix. - Highlights: • Silver formate Ag(HCO{sub 2}) was synthesized and characterized. • Layered packing of Ag-Ag pairs in the structure was found. • Decomposition of Ag(HCO{sub 2}) and formation of metal phase were studied. • Rietveld-refined micro-structural characteristics during decomposition reveal the space relationship between the matrix structure and forming Ag phase REPLACE with: Space relationship between the matrix structure and forming Ag phase.

  6. Structure and decomposition of the silver formate Ag(HCO2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puzan, Anna N.; Baumer, Vyacheslav N.; Mateychenko, Pavel V.

    2017-01-01

    Crystal structure of the silver formate Ag(HCO 2 ) has been determined (orthorhombic, sp.gr. Pccn, a=7.1199(5), b=10.3737(4), c=6.4701(3)Å, V=477.88(4) Å 3 , Z=8). The structure contains isolated formate ions and the pairs Ag 2 2+ which form the layers in (001) planes (the shortest Ag–Ag distances is 2.919 in the pair and 3.421 and 3.716 Å between the nearest Ag atoms of adjacent pairs). Silver formate is unstable compound which decompose spontaneously vs time. Decomposition was studied using Rietveld analysis of the powder diffraction patterns. It was concluded that the diffusion of Ag atoms leads to the formation of plate-like metal particles as nuclei in the (100) planes which settle parallel to (001) planes of the silver formate matrix. - Highlights: • Silver formate Ag(HCO 2 ) was synthesized and characterized. • Layered packing of Ag-Ag pairs in the structure was found. • Decomposition of Ag(HCO 2 ) and formation of metal phase were studied. • Rietveld-refined micro-structural characteristics during decomposition reveal the space relationship between the matrix structure and forming Ag phase REPLACE with: Space relationship between the matrix structure and forming Ag phase.

  7. Synthesis and structural characterization of nickel(II), cobalt(II), Zinc(II), manganese(II), cadmium(II) and uranium(VI) complexes of α-oximinoacetoacet-o/p-anisidide thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, P.S.; Patel, M.M.; Ray, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    A few metal complexes of α-oximinoacetoacet-o/p-anisidide thiosemicarbazones (OAOATS)/(OAPATS) with Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), Hg(II), Cd(II) and UO 2 (II) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity, differential scanning calorimetry study, thermogravimetric analyses and infrared and electronic spectral measurements in conjunction with magnetic susceptibility measurements at room temperature. They have also been tested for their antimicrobial activities. (author). 24 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Salt-modulated structure formation in a dense calcium caseinate system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabowska, K.J.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    A 30 wt% calcium caseinate dispersion can be transformed in an anisotropic and fibrous structure by applying well-defined flow and enzymatic gelation. The formation of an anisotropic structure is thought to be due to the micellar structure of the caseinate and the mild adhesion between the micelles

  9. Solvation structure determination of nickel(II) ion in six nitriles using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Yasuhiro; Funahashi, Shigenobu

    1997-01-01

    The solvation structures of the nickel(II) ion in six nitriles have been determined using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The coordination number and the Ni-N bond length are 6 and 206.9 ± 0.6 pm in acetonitrile, 5.9 ± 0.2 and 206.9 ± 0.6 pm in propionitrile, 6.0 ± 0.2 and 206.8 ± 0.6 pm in butyronitrile, 6.0 ± 0.2 and 206.8 ± 0.6 pm in isobutyronitrile, 6.0 ± 0.2 and 206.8 ± 0.6 pm in valeronitrile, and 6.0 ± 0.2 and 206.5 ± 0.7 pm in benzonitrile, respectively. The structure parameters around the nickel(II) ion in all the nitriles are not affected by the bulkiness of the nitrile molecules. On the basis of the obtained structure parameters, we have discussed the structural characteristics around the nickel(II) ion with nitrogen and oxygen donor solvents and the reaction mechanisms for nitrile exchange on the nickel(II) ion. (author)

  10. A steady-state study on the formation of Compounds II and III of myeloperoxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogland, H.; Dekker, H. L.; van Riel, C.; van Kuilenburg, A.; Muijsers, A. O.; Wever, R.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction between native myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide, yielding Compound II, was investigated using the stopped-flow technique. The pH dependence of the apparent second-order rate constant showed the existence of a protonatable group on the enzyme with a pKa of 4.9. This group is

  11. Co(II) and Cd(II) Complexes Derived from Heterocyclic Schiff-Bases: Synthesis, Structural Characterisation, and Biological Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Riyadh M.; Yousif, Enaam I.; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J.

    2013-01-01

    New monomeric cobalt and cadmium complexes with Schiff-bases, namely, N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]furan-2-carbohydrazide (L1) and N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]thiophene-2-carbohydrazide (L2) are reported. Schiff-base ligands L1 and L2 were derived from condensation of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (iso-vanillin) with furan-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide and thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide, respectively. Complexes of the general formula [M(L)2]Cl2 (where M = Co(II) or Cd(II), L = L1 or L2) have been obtained from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligands. The ligands and their metal complexes were characterised by spectroscopic methods (FTIR, UV-Vis, 1H, and 13C NMR spectra), elemental analysis, metal content, magnetic measurement, and conductance. These studies revealed the formation of four-coordinate complexes in which the geometry about metal ion is tetrahedral. Biological activity of the ligands and their metal complexes against gram positive bacterial strain Bacillus (G+) and gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas (G−) revealed that the metal complexes become less resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligands. PMID:24027449

  12. Submarine slope failures due to pipe structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, Judith; Berndt, Christian; Rüpke, Lars; Krastel, Sebastian; Gross, Felix; Geissler, Wolfram H

    2018-02-19

    There is a strong spatial correlation between submarine slope failures and the occurrence of gas hydrates. This has been attributed to the dynamic nature of gas hydrate systems and the potential reduction of slope stability due to bottom water warming or sea level drop. However, 30 years of research into this process found no solid supporting evidence. Here we present new reflection seismic data from the Arctic Ocean and numerical modelling results supporting a different link between hydrates and slope stability. Hydrates reduce sediment permeability and cause build-up of overpressure at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. Resulting hydro-fracturing forms pipe structures as pathways for overpressured fluids to migrate upward. Where these pipe structures reach shallow permeable beds, this overpressure transfers laterally and destabilises the slope. This process reconciles the spatial correlation of submarine landslides and gas hydrate, and it is independent of environmental change and water depth.

  13. Pulsed Laser Interactions with Silicon Nano structures in Emitter Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huat, V.L.C.; Leong, C.S.; Kamaruzzaman Sopian, Saleem Hussain Zaidi

    2015-01-01

    Silicon wafer thinning is now approaching fundamental limits for wafer thickness owing to thermal expansion mismatch between Al and Si, reduced yields in wet-chemical processing as a result of fragility, and reduced optical absorption. An alternate manufacturing approach is needed to eliminate current manufacturing issues. In recent years, pulsed lasers have become readily available and costs have been significantly reduced. Pulsed laser interactions with silicon, in terms of micromachining, diffusions, and edge isolation, are well known, and have become industrial manufacturing tools. In this paper, pulsed laser interactions with silicon nano structures were identified as the most desirable solution for the fundamental limitations discussed above. Silicon nano structures have the capability for extremely high absorption that significantly reduces requirements for laser power, as well as thermal shock to the thinner wafer. Laser-assisted crystallization, in the presence of doping materials, leads to nano structure profiles that are highly desirable for sunlight absorption. The objective of this paper is the replacement of high temperature POCl_3 diffusion by laser-assisted phosphorus layers. With these improvements, complete low-temperature processing of thinner wafers was achievable with 3.7 % efficiency. Two-dimensional laser scanning was proved to be able to form uniformly annealed surfaces with higher fill factor and open-circuit voltage. (author)

  14. Coupled and extended quintessence: Theoretical differences and structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettorino, Valeria; Baccigalupi, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The case of a coupling between dark energy and matter [coupled quintessence (CQ)] or gravity [extended quintessence (EQ)] has recently attracted a deep interest and has been widely investigated both in the Einstein and in the Jordan frames (EF, JF), within scalar-tensor theories. Focusing on the simplest models proposed so far, in this paper we study the relation existing between the two scenarios, isolating the Weyl scaling which allows one to express them in the EF and JF. Moreover, we perform a comparative study of the behavior of linear perturbations in both scenarios, which turn out to behave in a markedly different way. In particular, while the clustering is enhanced in the considered CQ models with respect to the corresponding quintessence ones where the coupling is absent and to the ordinary cosmologies with a cosmological constant and cold dark matter (ΛCDM), structures in EQ models may grow slower. This is likely to have direct consequences on the inner properties of nonlinear structures, like cluster concentration, as well as on the weak lensing shear on large scales. Finally, we specialize our study for interfacing linear dynamics and N-body simulations in these cosmologies, giving a recipe for the corrections to be included in N-body codes in order to take into account the modifications to the expansion rate, growth of structures, and strength of gravity

  15. Photoionization-regulated star formation and the structure of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the rate of low-mass star formation in Galactic molecular clouds and for the influence of this star formation on the structure and evolution of the clouds is presented. The rate of energy injection by newly formed stars is estimated, and the effect of this energy injection on the size of the cloud is determined. It is shown that the observed rate of star formation appears adequate to support the observed clouds against gravitational collapse. The rate of photoionization-regulated star formation is estimated and it is shown to be in agreement with estimates of the observed rate of star formation if the observed molecular cloud parameters are used. The mean cloud extinction and the Galactic star formation rate per unit mass of molecular gas are predicted theoretically from the condition that photionization-regulated star formation be in equilibrium. A simple model for the evolution of isolated molecular clouds is developed.

  16. Exogenous surfactant application in a rat lung ischemia reperfusion injury model: effects on edema formation and alveolar type II cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic exogenous surfactant therapy is a promising way to attenuate the ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury associated with lung transplantation and thereby to decrease the clinical occurrence of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, there is little information on the mode by which exogenous surfactant attenuates I/R injury of the lung. We hypothesized that exogenous surfactant may act by limiting pulmonary edema formation and by enhancing alveolar type II cell and lamellar body preservation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of exogenous surfactant therapy on the formation of pulmonary edema in different lung compartments and on the ultrastructure of the surfactant producing alveolar epithelial type II cells. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to a control, Celsior (CE or Celsior + surfactant (CE+S group (n = 5 each. In both Celsior groups, the lungs were flush-perfused with Celsior and subsequently exposed to 4 h of extracorporeal ischemia at 4°C and 50 min of reperfusion at 37°C. The CE+S group received an intratracheal bolus of a modified natural bovine surfactant at a dosage of 50 mg/kg body weight before flush perfusion. After reperfusion (Celsior groups or immediately after sacrifice (Control, the lungs were fixed by vascular perfusion and processed for light and electron microscopy. Stereology was used to quantify edematous changes as well as alterations of the alveolar epithelial type II cells. Results Surfactant treatment decreased the intraalveolar edema formation (mean (coefficient of variation: CE: 160 mm3 (0.61 vs. CE+S: 4 mm3 (0.75; p 3 (0.90 vs. CE+S: 0 mm3; p 3 (0.39 vs. CE+S: 268 mm3 (0.43; p 3(0.10 and CE+S (481 μm3(0.10 compared with controls (323 μm3(0.07; p Conclusion Intratracheal surfactant application before I/R significantly reduces the intraalveolar edema formation and development of atelectases but leads to an increased development of

  17. Crystal chemical analysis of formation of solid solutions on the basis of compounds with garnet structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'micheva, G.M.; Kozlikin, S.N.

    1989-01-01

    Crystal chemical formulas permitting to evaluate the character of changes in interatomic distances during isomorphous substitution and, hence, the probability of formation of internal solid solutions and successive isomorphous substitution, are presented. The possibility of formation of introduction solid solutions is considered, using as an example Sc, Y oxides, rare earths with garnet structure

  18. Importance of intrinsic properties of dense caseinate dispersions for structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Julita M; van Riemsdijk, Lieke E; van der Goot, Atze J; Boom, Remko M

    2007-11-01

    Rheological measurements of dense calcium caseinate and sodium caseinate dispersions (> or =15%) provided insight into the factors determining shear-induced structure formation in caseinates. Calcium caseinate at a sufficiently high concentration (30%) was shown to form highly anisotropic structures during shearing and concurrent enzymatic cross-linking. In contrast, sodium caseinate formed isotropic structures using similar processing conditions. The main difference between the two types of caseinates is the counterion present, and as a consequence, the size of structural elements and their interactions. The rheological behavior of calcium caseinate and sodium caseinate reflected these differences, yielding non-monotonic and shear thinning flow behavior for calcium caseinate whereas sodium caseinate behaved only slightly shear thinning. It appears that the intrinsic properties of the dense caseinate dispersions, which are reflected in their rheological behavior, affect the structure formation that was found after applying shear. Therefore, rheological measurements are useful to obtain an indication of the structure formation potential of caseinate dispersions.

  19. Formation and structure of V-Zr amorphous alloy thin films

    KAUST Repository

    King, Daniel J M; Middleburgh, Simon C.; Liu, A. C Y; Tahini, Hassan Ali; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Cortie, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    . Atomic-scale modelling was used to investigate the enthalpies of formation of the various competing structures. The calculations confirmed that an amorphous solid solution would be significantly more stable than a random body-centred solid solution

  20. Canine hippocampal formation composited into three-dimensional structure using MPRAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Ae; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Lee, Min-Su; Lee, In-Hye; Lee, Ah-Ra; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Young-Bo; Cho, Zang-Hee; Eom, Ki-Dong

    2010-07-01

    This study was performed to anatomically illustrate the living canine hippocampal formation in three-dimensions (3D), and to evaluate its relationship to surrounding brain structures. Three normal beagle dogs were scanned on a MR scanner with inversion recovery segmented 3D gradient echo sequence (known as MP-RAGE: Magnetization Prepared Rapid Gradient Echo). The MRI data was manually segmented and reconstructed into a 3D model using the 3D slicer software tool. From the 3D model, the spatial relationships between hippocampal formation and surrounding structures were evaluated. With the increased spatial resolution and contrast of the MPRAGE, the canine hippocampal formation was easily depicted. The reconstructed 3D image allows easy understanding of the hippocampal contour and demonstrates the structural relationship of the hippocampal formation to surrounding structures in vivo.

  1. Structure of odd-A Pm nuclei (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piiparinen, M.; Kortelahti, M.; Pakkanen, A.; Komppa, T.; Komu, R.

    1977-12-01

    The level structures of 141 Pm and 145 Pm were studied by methods of in-beam γ-ray and electron spectroscopy using the reactions 142 Nd(p,2n) 141 Pm, 141 Pr( 3 He,3n) 141 Pm and 146 Nd(p,2n) 145 Pm. Nineteen new levels with spins up to (19/2) were observed in 141 Pm and twenty-two new levels with spins up to 15/2 in 145 Pm. In both nuclei, a group of positive-parity levels have been identified which can be interpreted as members of multiplets of d 5 / 2 and g 7 / 2 protons coupled to the quadrupole vibrations of the core. Transition probabilities of the decay modes of isomeric h 11 / 2 states have been determined. (author)

  2. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-06-03

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV).

  3. Study of complex formation of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailova, M.M.; Egorova, L.A.; Khamidov, B.O.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to study of complex formation of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel. The condition of cobalt in various rate of oxidation in acrylamide aqueous solutions was studied. The concentration conditions of stability of system Co(II)-Co(III) were defined. The composition of coordination compounds of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel was determined.

  4. Formation and structure of food bodies in Cordia nodosa (Boraginaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pascal-Jean; Belin-Depoux, Monique; Dejean, Alain

    2005-07-01

    Cordia nodosa Lamark (Boraginaceae) is a myrmecophyte (i.e., plants housing ants in hollow structures) that provisions associated ants with food bodies (FBs) produced 24 h a day. Distributed over all the young parts of the plants, they induce ants to forage continually and so to protect the plants. Metabolites are stored in the inner cells of C. nodosa FBs as they form. In addition the peripheral cells have an extrafloral nectary-like function and secrete a substance that covers the FBs. The amalgam of these two functions, distinct in other known cases, is discussed taking into account the origin of FBs and extrafloral nectaries.

  5. Comparing M31 and Milky Way satellites: The extended star formation histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Vía Láctea s/n., E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bernard, Edouard J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Boylan-Kolchin, Michael [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Cassisi, Santi [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy); Cole, Andrew A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Irwin, Mike [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Universit de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universit, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Mayer, Lucio [Institut für Theoretische Physik, University of Zurich, Zürich (Switzerland); Navarro, Julio F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; M{sub V} = –12.0; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; M{sub V} = –7.5; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ∼5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of Co(II)- picolinate complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamer, Ömer, E-mail: omertamer@sakarya.edu.tr; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2015-11-15

    A cobalt(II) complex of picolinate was synthesized, and its structure was fully characterized by the applying of X-ray diffraction method as well as FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV–vis spectroscopies. In order to both support the experimental results and convert study to more advanced level, density functional theory calculations were performed by using B3LYP level. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis shows that cobalt(II) ion was located to the center of distorted octahedral geometry. The C=O, C=C and C=N stretching vibrations were found as highly active and strong peaks, inducing the molecular charge transfer within Co(II) complex. The small energy gap between frontier molecular orbital energies was another indicator of molecular charge transfer interactions within Co(II) complex. The nonlinear optical properties of Co(II) complex were investigated at DFT/B3LYP level, and the hypepolarizability parameter was found to be decreased due to the presence of inversion symmetry. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was performed to investigate molecular stability, hyperconjugative interactions, intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and bond strength for Co(II) complex. Finally, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and spin density distributions for Co(II) complex were evaluated. - Highlights: • Co(II) complex of picolinate was prepared. • Its FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV–vis spectra were measured. • DFT calculations were performed to support experimental results. • Small HOMO-LUMO energy gap is an indicator of molecular charge transfer. • Spin density localized on Co(II) as well as O and N atoms.

  7. Other Species in the Aqueous Environment of a Peptide Can Invert its Intrinsic Solvated Polyproline II/Beta Propensity: Implications for Amyloid Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkin, Noemi G; Krimm, Samuel

    2016-02-02

    As we have previously shown, the predominance of the polyproline II conformation in the circular dichroism spectra of aqueous polypeptides is related to its lower energy than that of the beta conformation. In order to test whether this is still the case in the presence of additional components in the medium, we have calculated the energy difference between these two conformations in an alanine-dipeptide/twelve-water system without and with the addition of an HCl molecule. We find in the latter case that the beta conformer is of lower energy than the polyproline II. Energy profiles near the minima in both cases also permit conclusions about the relative entropies of these structures. These results emphasize the importance of considering the peptide-plus-medium state as the relevant entity in determining the structural properties of such systems. Such an inversion could be relevant to the formation of amyloid and could thus lead to new strategies for studying its role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolution, Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Krasiński, Andrzej; Hellaby, Charles; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle

    2009-10-01

    As the structures in our Universe are mapped out on ever larger scales, and with increasing detail, the use of inhomogeneous models is becoming an essential tool for analyzing and understanding them. This book reviews a number of important developments in the application of inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's field equations to cosmology. It shows how inhomogeneous models can be employed to study the evolution of structures such as galaxy clusters and galaxies with central black holes, and to account for cosmological observations like supernovae dimming, the cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations or the dependence of the Hubble parameter on redshift within classical general relativity. Whatever 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' turn out to be, inhomogeneities exist on many scales and need to be investigated with all appropriate methods. This book is of great value to all astrophysicists and researchers working in cosmology, from graduate students to academic researchers. - Presents inhomogeneous cosmological models, allowing readers to familiarise themselves with basic properties of these models - Shows how inhomogeneous models can be used to analyse cosmological observations such as supernovae, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillations - Reviews important developments in the application of inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's field equations to cosmology

  9. Pathological involvement of chymase-dependent angiotensin II formation in the development of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Urata

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Chymase is a potent and specific angiotensin II (Ang II-forming enzyme in vitro. There is also strong evidence to suggest its importance in vivo. Recent clinical studies have suggested that high serum cholesterol levels are associated with increased vascular chymase activity and this may assist in the development of atherosclerosis. This clinical finding has been reproduced in hamster models. Studies with transgenic mice overexpressing the human chymase gene suggest a direct association between vascular chymase upregulation and atherogenesis. There is also increased chymase activity following various cardiac diseases such as myocardial ischaemia, volume overload cardiac failure, cardiomyopathy and viral myocarditis, suggesting that increased cardiac chymase activity appears to be involved in cardiac remodelling.

  10. Pathological involvement of chymase-dependent angiotensin II formation in the development of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Urata

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Chymase is a potent and specific angiotensin II (Ang II-forming enzyme in vitro. There is also strong evidence to suggest its importance in vivo. Recent clinical studies have suggested that high serum cholesterol levels are associated with increased vascular chymase activity and this may assist in the development of atherosclerosis. This clinical finding has been reproduced in hamster models. Studies with transgenic mice overexpressing the human chymase gene suggest a direct association between vascular chymase upregulation and atherogenesis. There is also increased chymase activity following various cardiac diseases such as myocardial ischaemia, volume overload cardiac failure, cardiomyopathy and viral myocarditis, suggesting that increased cardiac chymase activity appears to be involved in cardiac remodelling.

  11. Electron internal transport barrier formation and dynamics in the plasma core of the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Krupnik, L [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Dreval, N [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Melnikov, A [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation); Khrebtov, S M [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Hidalgo, C [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Milligen, B van [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Castejon, F [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); AscasIbar, E [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Eliseev, L [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation); Chmyga, A A [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Komarov, A D [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Kozachok, A S [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Tereshin, V [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2004-01-01

    The influence of magnetic topology on the formation of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) has been studied experimentally in electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the stellarator TJ-II. e-ITB formation is characterized by an increase in core electron temperature and plasma potential. The positive radial electric field increases by a factor of 3 in the central plasma region when an e-ITB forms. The experiments reported demonstrate that the formation of an e-ITB depends on the magnetic configuration. Calculations of the modification of the rotational transform due to plasma current lead to the interpretation that the formation of an e-ITB can be triggered by positioning a low order rational surface close to the plasma core region. In configurations without any central low order rational, no barrier is formed for any accessible value of heating power. Different mechanisms associated with neoclassical/turbulent bifurcations and kinetic effects are put forward to explain the impact of magnetic topology on radial electric fields and confinement.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xuebao; Zhang, Kezhong

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes) or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes). Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper fu...

  13. Origin and structures of solar eruptions II: Magnetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Cheng, Xin; Ding, MingDe

    2017-07-01

    The topology and dynamics of the three-dimensional magnetic field in the solar atmosphere govern various solar eruptive phenomena and activities, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and filaments/prominences. We have to observe and model the vector magnetic field to understand the structures and physical mechanisms of these solar activities. Vector magnetic fields on the photosphere are routinely observed via the polarized light, and inferred with the inversion of Stokes profiles. To analyze these vector magnetic fields, we need first to remove the 180° ambiguity of the transverse components and correct the projection effect. Then, the vector magnetic field can be served as the boundary conditions for a force-free field modeling after a proper preprocessing. The photospheric velocity field can also be derived from a time sequence of vector magnetic fields. Three-dimensional magnetic field could be derived and studied with theoretical force-free field models, numerical nonlinear force-free field models, magnetohydrostatic models, and magnetohydrodynamic models. Magnetic energy can be computed with three-dimensional magnetic field models or a time series of vector magnetic field. The magnetic topology is analyzed by pinpointing the positions of magnetic null points, bald patches, and quasi-separatrix layers. As a well conserved physical quantity, magnetic helicity can be computed with various methods, such as the finite volume method, discrete flux tube method, and helicity flux integration method. This quantity serves as a promising parameter characterizing the activity level of solar active regions.

  14. M(II)-dipyridylamide-based coordination frameworks (M=Mn, Co, Ni): Structural transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Biing-Chiau; Selvam, TamilSelvi; Tsai, Miao-Hsin

    2016-11-15

    A series of 1-D double-zigzag (([M(papx){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}){sub n}; M=Mn, x=s (1), x=o (3); M=Co, x=s (4), x=o (5); M=Ni, x=s (6), x=o (7)) and 2-D polyrotaxane ([Mn(paps){sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sub n} (2)) frameworks were synthesized by reactions of M(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} (M=Mn, Co, and Ni) with papx (paps, N,N’-bis(pyridylcarbonyl)-4,4’-diaminodiphenylthioether; papo, N,N’-bis(pyridylcarbonyl)-4,4’-diaminodiphenyl ether), which have been isolated and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. Based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) experiments, heating the double-zigzag frameworks underwent structural transformation to give the respective polyrotaxane ones. Moreover, grinding the solid samples of the respective polyrotaxanes in the presence of moisture also resulted in the total conversion to the original double-zigzag frameworks. In this study, we have successfully extended studies to Mn{sup II}, Co{sup II}, and Ni{sup II} frameworks from the previous Zn{sup II}, Cd{sup II}, and Cu{sup II} ones, and interestingly such structural transformation is able to be proven experimentally by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies as well. - Graphical abstract: 1-D double-zigzag and 2-D polyrotaxane frameworks of M(II)-papx (x=s, o; M=Mn, Co, Ni) frameworks can be interconverted by heating and grinding in the presence of moiture, and such structural transformation has be proven experimentally by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  15. Structure and Function of Cu(I)- and Zn(II)-ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitsel, Oleg; Grønberg, Christina; Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Copper and zinc are micronutrients essential for the function of many enzymes while also being toxic at elevated concentrations. Cu(I)- and Zn(II)-transporting P-type ATPases of subclass 1B are of key importance for the homeostasis of these transition metals, allowing ion transport across cellular...... membranes at the expense of ATP. Recent biochemical studies and crystal structures have significantly improved our understanding of the transport mechanisms of these proteins, but many details about their structure and function remain elusive. Here we compare the Cu(I)- and Zn(II)-ATPases, scrutinizing...

  16. Towards a 'standard model' of large scale structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Q.

    1994-01-01

    We explore constraints on inflationary models employing data on large scale structure mainly from COBE temperature anisotropies and IRAS selected galaxy surveys. In models where the tensor contribution to the COBE signal is negligible, we find that the spectral index of density fluctuations n must exceed 0.7. Furthermore the COBE signal cannot be dominated by the tensor component, implying n > 0.85 in such models. The data favors cold plus hot dark matter models with n equal or close to unity and Ω HDM ∼ 0.2 - 0.35. Realistic grand unified theories, including supersymmetric versions, which produce inflation with these properties are presented. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs

  17. Structural characterization of casein micelles: shape changes during film formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, R; Kulozik, U; Vendrely, C

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of size-fractionation by centrifugation on the film structure of casein micelles. Fractionated casein micelles in solution were asymmetrically distributed with a small distribution width as measured by dynamic light scattering. Films prepared from the size-fractionated samples showed a smooth surface in optical microscopy images and a homogeneous microstructure in atomic force micrographs. The nano- and microstructure of casein films was probed by micro-beam grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (μGISAXS). Compared to the solution measurements, the sizes determined in the film were larger and broadly distributed. The measured GISAXS patterns clearly deviate from those simulated for a sphere and suggest a deformation of the casein micelles in the film. (paper)

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FORMATION OF FILTER PAPER USING THE BARTLETT SPECTRUM OF THE FIBER STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lehmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation index of filter paper is one of the most important characteristics used in industrial quality control. Its estimation is often based on subjective comparison chart rating or, even more objective, on the power spectrum of the paper structure observed on a transmission light table. It is shown that paper formation can be modeled as Gaussian random fields with a well defined class of correlation functions, and a formation index can be derived from the density of the Bartlett spectrum estimated from image data. More precisely, the formation index is the mean of the Bessel transform of the correlation taken for wave lengths between 2 and 5 mm.

  19. Modelling dewatering behaviour through an understanding of solids formation processes. Part II--solids separation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustan, A C; Cohen, B; Petrie, J G

    2005-05-30

    An understanding of the mechanisms which control solids formation can provide information on the characteristics of the solids which are formed. The nature of the solids formed in turn impacts on dewatering behaviour. The 'upstream' solids formation determines a set of suspension characteristics: solids concentration, particle size distribution, solution ionic strength and electrostatic surface potential. These characteristics together define the suspension's rheological properties. However, the complicated interdependence of these has precluded the prediction of suspension rheology from such a fundamental description of suspension characteristics. Recent shear yield stress models, applied in this study to compressive yield, significantly reduce the empiricism required for the description of compressive rheology. Suspension compressibility and permeability uniquely define the dewatering behaviour, described in terms of settling, filtration and mechanical expression. These modes of dewatering may be described in terms of the same fundamental suspension mechanics model. In this way, it is possible to link dynamically the processes of solids formation and dewatering of the resultant suspension. This, ultimately, opens the door to improved operability of these processes. In part I of this paper we introduced an integrated system model for solids formation and dewatering. This model was demonstrated for the upstream processes using experimental data. In this current paper models of colloidal interactions and dewatering are presented and compared to experimental results from batch filtration tests. A novel approach to predicting suspension compressibility and permeability using a single test configuration is presented and tested.

  20. Droplet formation in microfluidic T-junction generators operating in the transitional regime. II. Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glawdel, Tomasz; Elbuken, Caglar; Ren, Carolyn L

    2012-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part study on the generation of droplets at a microfluidic T-junction operating in the transition regime. In the preceding paper [Phys. Rev. E 85, 016322 (2012)], we presented our experimental observations of droplet formation and decomposed the process into three sequential stages defined as the lag, filling, and necking stages. Here we develop a model that describes the performance of microfluidic T-junction generators working in the squeezing to transition regimes where confinement of the droplet dominates the formation process. The model incorporates a detailed geometric description of the drop shape during the formation process combined with a force balance and necking criteria to define the droplet size, production rate, and spacing. The model inherently captures the influence of the intersection geometry, including the channel width ratio and height-to-width ratio, capillary number, and flow ratio, on the performance of the generator. The model is validated by comparing it to speed videos of the formation process for several T-junction geometries across a range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios.

  1. Formation and Transformation of Iron Oxide-Kaolinite Associations in the Presence of Iron(II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, S.Y.; Liu, F.; Feng, X.H.; Tan, W.F.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxide-kaolinite associations are important components of tropical and subtropical soils and have significant influence on the physical and chemical properties of soils. In this study, the formation and transformation of Fe oxide-kaolinite associations as a function of pH, temperature, and time

  2. Structural modification of silicon during the formation process of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Palma, R.J.; Pascual, L.; Landa-Canovas, A.R.; Herrero, P.; Martinez-Duart, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Direct examination of porous silicon (PS) by the use of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) allowed us to perform a deep insight into the formation mechanisms of this material. In particular, the structure of the PS/Si interface and that of the silicon nanocrystals that compose porous silicon were analyzed in detail. Furthermore, image processing was used to study in detail the structure of PS. The mechanism of PS formation and lattice matching between the PS layer and the Si substrate is analyzed and discussed. Finally, a formation mechanism for PS based on the experimental observations is proposed

  3. Evidence of the layer structure formation of chitosan microtubes by the Liesegang ring mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicheva, T. S.; Gegel, N. O.; Shipovskaya, A. B.

    2018-04-01

    In the work, an experiment was performed to simulate the process of chitosan microtube formation through the interphase polysalt -> polybase chemical reaction, on the one hand, and the formation of spatially separated structures under the conditions of reactive diffusion of one of the components, on the other hand. The formation of alternating dark and light bands or concentric rings of the chitosan polybase as a result of the polymer-analogous transformation is visualized by optical microscopy. The results obtained confirm our assumption that the layered structure of our chitosan microtubes is formed according to the Liesegang reaction mechanism.

  4. THE X-FACTOR IN GALAXIES. II. THE MOLECULAR-HYDROGEN-STAR-FORMATION RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmann, Robert; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2012-10-08

    There is ample observational evidence that the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Sigma_SFR, is closely correlated with the surface density of molecular hydrogen, Sigma_H2. This empirical relation holds both for galaxy-wide averages and for individual >=kpc sized patches of the interstellar medium (ISM), but appears to degrade substantially at a sub-kpc scale. Identifying the physical mechanisms that determine the scale-dependent properties of the observed Sigma_H2-Sigma_SFR relation remains a challenge from a theoretical perspective. To address this question, we analyze the slope and scatter of the Sigma_H2-Sigma_SFR relation using a set of cosmological, galaxy formation simulations with a peak resolution of ~100 pc. These simulations include a chemical network for molecular hydrogen, a model for the CO emission, and a simple, stochastic prescription for star formation that operates on ~100 pc scales. Specifically, star formation is modeled as a Poisson process in which the average SFR is directly proportional to the present mass of H2. The predictions of our numerical model are in good agreement with the observed Kennicutt-Schmidt and Sigma_H2-Sigma_SFR relations. We show that observations based on CO emission are ill suited to reliably measure the slope of the latter relation at low (<20 M_sun pc^-2) H2 surface densities on sub-kpc scales. Our models also predict that the inferred Sigma_H2-Sigma_SFR relation steepens at high H2 surface densities as a result of the surface density dependence of the CO/H2 conversion factor. Finally, we show that on sub-kpc scales most of the scatter in the relation is a consequence of discreteness effects in the star formation process. In contrast, variations of the CO/H2 conversion factor are responsible for most of the scatter measured on super-kpc scales.

  5. Two-dimensional layer architecture assembled by Keggin polyoxotungstate, Cu(II)-EDTA complex and sodium linker: Synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong; Xu Lin; Gao Guanggang; Li Fengyan; Yang Yanyan; Li Zhikui; Sun Yu

    2007-01-01

    Reaction of Keggin polyoxotungstate with copper(II)-EDTA (EDTA=ethylenediamine tetraacetate) complex under mild conditions led to the formation of hybrid inorganic-organic compounds Na 4 (OH)[(Cu 2 EDTA)PW 12 O 40 ].17H 2 O (1) and Na 4 [(Cu 2 EDTA)SiW 12 O 40 ].19H 2 O (2). The single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal their two structural features: (1) one-dimensional chain structure consisting of Keggin polyoxotungstate and copper(II)-EDTA complex; (2) Two-dimensional layer architecture assembled by the one-dimensional chain structure and sodium linker. The results of magnetic measurements in the temperature range 300-2 K indicated the existence of ferromagnetic exchange interactions between the Cu II ions for both compounds. In addition, TGA analysis, IR spectra, and electrochemical properties were also investigated to well characterize these two compounds. - Graphical abstract: Two new polyoxometalate-based hybrids, Na 4 (OH)[Cu 2 (EDTA)PW 12 O 40 ].17H 2 O (1) and Na 4 [Cu 2 (EDTA)SiW 12 O 40 ].19H 2 O (2), have been synthesized and structurally characterized, which consist of one-dimensional chain structure assembled by Keggin polyoxotungstate and copper(II)-EDTA complex. The chains are further connected to form two-dimensional layer architecture assembled by the one-dimensional chain structure and sodium linker

  6. Quark approach to Santilli's conjecture on hadronic structure - II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Animalu, A.O.E.

    1982-08-01

    In this paper, we continue an earlier investigation of an exactly soluble relativistic Bohr-type model of the internal structure of the proton (three-quark baryon system) and the pion (quark-antiquark meson system), based on a realization of Santilli's conjecture that the hadronic constituents are extended (non-pointlike) objects. The model is abstracted from an expansion of a Yukawa-type potential between the valence quarks and a massive core, in which the meson or gluon exchange term has the effect of reducing the effective Bohr radius for binding to a value less than the radius of the strong charge sphere (or Compton wavelength) of each constituent, so that appreciable overlap of charge volumes occurs, to within a typical distance of order 0.25F or 1/(800 MeV) in qqq-system, and order 1/(1200 MeV) in qq-bar-system, which are comparable to gluon masses, msub(G) approx.= 800 to 1200 MeV, required by the lattice QCD and the MIT Bag Model. Based on the assumptions that the ground state of the proton has 1s 2 2s valence quark configuration, the non-strange quark mass is msub(p)/3, and the dimensionless strong coupling constant of the Yukawa-type potential is g 2 =1, the mass of the proton core is determined self-consistently to be 2470 MeV, exactly balancing the quark binding energy so that the valence quarks appear free. The model correctly predicts the masses of the well-known resonant states of the proton with Jsup(P)=1/2 + as excited states associated with the configuration 1s2s 2 and predicts an upper bound (spectroscopic limit) for the mass of the excited states of the proton in ns 2 ms configuration, as n→infinity and m→infinity, to be 3409 MeV. Based on a generalization of the model to qq-bar-systems, an upper bound (spectroscopic limit) for the mass of qq-bar in ns 2 configuration, as n→infinity, is found to be 3096 MeV, which is the mass of the J/psi-meson. The relation of the model to violation of time-reversal invariance (T-symmetry) by non

  7. Syntheses, structures, and properties of imidazolate-bridged Cu(II)-Cu(II) and Cu(II)-Zn(II) dinuclear complexes of a single macrocyclic ligand with two hydroxyethyl pendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongfeng; Li, Shuan; Yang, Dexi; Yu, Jiuhong; Huang, Jin; Li, Yizhi; Tang, Wenxia

    2003-09-22

    The imidazolate-bridged homodinuclear Cu(II)-Cu(II) complex, [(CuimCu)L]ClO(4).0.5H(2)O (1), and heterodinuclear Cu(II)-Zn(II) complex, [(CuimZnL(-)(2H))(CuimZnL(-)(H))](ClO(4))(3) (2), of a single macrocyclic ligand with two hydroxyethyl pendants, L (L = 3,6,9,16,19,22-hexaaza-6,19-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)tricyclo[22,2,2,2(11,14)]triaconta-1,11,13,24,27,29-hexaene), have been synthesized as possible models for copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu(2),Zn(2)-SOD). Their crystal structures analyzed by X-ray diffraction methods have shown that the structures of the two complexes are markedly different. Complex 1 crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, containing an imidazolate-bridged dicopper(II) [Cu-im-Cu](3+) core, in which the two copper(II) ions are pentacoordinated by virtue of an N4O environment with a Cu.Cu distance of 5.999(2) A, adopting the geometry of distorted trigonal bipyramid and tetragonal pyramid, respectively. Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic system, containing two similar Cu-im-Zn cores in the asymmetric unit, in which both the Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions are pentacoordinated in a distorted trigonal bipyramid geometry, with the Cu.Zn distance of 5.950(1)/5.939(1) A, respectively. Interestingly, the macrocyclic ligand with two arms possesses a chairlike (anti) conformation in complex 1, but a boatlike (syn) conformation in complex 2. Magnetic measurements and ESR spectroscopy of complex 1 have revealed the presence of an antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the two Cu(II) ions. The ESR spectrum of the Cu(II)-Zn(II) heterodinuclear complex 2 displayed a typical signal for mononuclear trigonal bipyramidal Cu(II) complexes. From pH-dependent ESR and electronic spectroscopic studies, the imidazolate bridges in the two complexes have been found to be stable over broad pH ranges. The cyclic voltammograms of the two complexes have been investigated. Both of the two complexes can catalyze the dismutation of superoxide and show rather high activity.

  8. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    , assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well...... of inhibitors. The profile of the nonlinear growth was concentration-dependent but also dependent on the stirring rate. ISP type III HPLC12 decreased the growth rate of methane hydrate during the linear growth period by 17−75% at concentrations of 0.01−0.1 wt % (0.014−0.14 mM) while ISP from Tenebrio molitor...... and PVP decreased the growth rate by 30% and 39% at concentrations of 0.004 wt % (0.005 mM) and 0.1 wt % (0.1 mM), respectively. Considering the low concentration of Tenebrio molitor ISP used, these results indicate that ISP from Tenebrio molitor is the most effective hydrate inhibitor among those...

  9. Simulations of structure formation in interacting dark energy cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The evidence in favor of a dark energy component dominating the Universe, and driving its presently accelerated expansion, has progressively grown during the last decade of cosmological observations. If this dark energy is given by a dynamic scalar field, it may also have a direct interaction with other matter fields in the Universe, in particular with cold dark matter. Such interaction would imprint new features on the cosmological background evolution as well as on the growth of cosmic structure, like an additional long-range fifth-force between massive particles, or a variation in time of the dark matter particle mass. We present here the implementation of these new physical effects in the N-body code GADGET-2, and we discuss the outcomes of a series of high-resolution N-body simulations for a selected family of interacting dark energy models. We interestingly find, in contrast with previous claims, that the inner overdensity of dark matter halos decreases in these models with respect to ΛCDM, and consistently halo concentrations show a progressive reduction for increasing couplings. Furthermore, the coupling induces a bias in the overdensities of cold dark matter and baryons that determines a decrease of the halo baryon fraction below its cosmological value. These results go in the direction of alleviating tensions between astrophysical observations and the predictions of the ΛCDM model on small scales, thereby opening new room for coupled dark energy models as an alternative to the cosmological constant.

  10. Inflation and large scale structure formation after COBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, R.K.; Shafi, Q.

    1992-06-01

    The simplest realizations of the new inflationary scenario typically give rise to primordial density fluctuations which deviate logarithmically from the scale free Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum. We consider a number of such examples and, in each case we normalize the amplitude of the fluctuations with the recent COBE measurement of the microwave background anisotropy. The predictions for the bulk velocities as well as anisotropies on smaller (1-2 degrees) angular scales are compared with the Harrison-Zeldovich case. Deviations from the latter range from a few to about 15 percent. We also estimate the redshift beyond which the quasars would not be expected to be seen. The inflationary quasar cutoff redshifts can vary by as much as 25% from the Harrison-Zeldovich case. We find that the inflationary scenario provides a good starting point for a theory of large scale structure in the universe provided the dark matter is a combination of cold plus (10-30%) hot components. (author). 27 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Structure formation constraints on Sommerfeld-enhanced dark matter annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T.

    2012-01-01

    We study the growth of cosmic structure in a ΛCDM universe under the assumption that dark matter self-annihilates with an averaged cross section times relative velocity that grows with the scale factor, an increase known as Sommerfeld-enhancement. Such an evolution is expected in models in which a light force carrier in the dark sector enhances the annihilation cross section of dark matter particles, and has been invoked, for instance, to explain anomalies in cosmic ray spectra reported in the past. In order to make our results as general as possible, we assume that dark matter annihilates into a relativistic species that only interacts gravitationally with the standard model. This assumption also allows us to test whether the additional relativistic species mildly favored by cosmic-microwave background data could originate from dark matter annihilation. We do not find evidence for Sommerfeld-enhanced dark matter annihilation and derive the corresponding upper limits on the annihilation cross-section

  12. Food structure: Its formation and relationships with other properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joardder, Mohammad U H; Kumar, Chandan; Karim, M A

    2017-04-13

    Food materials are complex in nature as it has heterogeneous, amorphous, hygroscopic and porous properties. During processing, microstructure of food materials changes which significantly affects other properties of food. An appropriate understanding of the microstructure of the raw food material and its evolution during processing is critical in order to understand and accurately describe dehydration processes and quality anticipation. This review critically assesses the factors that influence the modification of microstructure in the course of drying of fruits and vegetables. The effect of simultaneous heat and mass transfer on microstructure in various drying methods is investigated. Effects of changes in microstructure on other functional properties of dried foods are discussed. After an extensive review of the literature, it is found that development of food structure significantly depends on fresh food properties and process parameters. Also, modification of microstructure influences the other properties of final product. An enhanced understanding of the relationships between food microstructure, drying process parameters and final product quality will facilitate the energy efficient optimum design of the food processor in order to achieve high-quality food.

  13. Double-stranded DNA translocase activity of transcription factor TFIIH and the mechanism of RNA polymerase II open complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, James; Tomko, Eric; Galburt, Eric; Hahn, Steven

    2015-03-31

    Formation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) open complex (OC) requires DNA unwinding mediated by the transcription factor TFIIH helicase-related subunit XPB/Ssl2. Because XPB/Ssl2 binds DNA downstream from the location of DNA unwinding, it cannot function using a conventional helicase mechanism. Here we show that yeast TFIIH contains an Ssl2-dependent double-stranded DNA translocase activity. Ssl2 tracks along one DNA strand in the 5' → 3' direction, implying it uses the nontemplate promoter strand to reel downstream DNA into the Pol II cleft, creating torsional strain and leading to DNA unwinding. Analysis of the Ssl2 and DNA-dependent ATPase activity of TFIIH suggests that Ssl2 has a processivity of approximately one DNA turn, consistent with the length of DNA unwound during transcription initiation. Our results can explain why maintaining the OC requires continuous ATP hydrolysis and the function of TFIIH in promoter escape. Our results also suggest that XPB/Ssl2 uses this translocase mechanism during DNA repair rather than physically wedging open damaged DNA.

  14. Urotensin II increases foam cell formation by repressing ABCA1 expression through the ERK/NF-κB pathway in THP-1 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Wu, Jian-Feng [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Tang, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Min; Li, Yuan [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Chen, Kong; Zeng, Meng-Ya [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Yao, Feng; Xie, Wei [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Zheng, Xi-Long [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1 (Canada); Zeng, Gao-Feng, E-mail: qichingnudou@tom.com [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Tang, Chao-Ke, E-mail: tangchaoke@qq.com [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • U II reduces cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages. • U II decreases the expression of ABCA1. • Inhibition of the ERK/NF-κB pathway reduces U II effects on ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. - Abstract: Objective: Foam cell formation in the arterial wall plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Recent studies showed that Urotensin II (U II) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of human U II on ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and the underlying mechanism in THP-1 macrophages. Methods and results: Cultured THP-1 macrophages were treated with U II, followed by measuring the intracellular lipid contents, cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 levels. The results showed that U II dramatically decreased ABCA1 levels and impaired cholesterol efflux. However, the effects of U II on ABCA1 protein expression and cellular cholesterol efflux were partially reversed by inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, suggesting the potential roles of ERK1/2 and NF-κB in ABCA1 expression, respectively. Conclusion: Our current data indicate that U II may have promoting effects on the progression of atherosclerosis, likely through suppressing ABCA1 expression via activation of the ERK/NF-κB pathway and reducing cholesterol efflux to promote macrophage foam cell formation.

  15. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF ALLOYS ON IRON BASIS AFTER LASER ALLOYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Diachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to investigations on influence of laser treatment regimes of gas-thermal and adhesive coatings from self-fluxing powders on iron basis and after melting with modifying plaster on their roughness and phase composition. One of mathematical planning methods that is a complete factor experiment method has been used for investigation of parameters’ influence on micro-geometry of coatings. The executed investigations have made it possible to observe a general regularity which does not depend on a type of alloying plaster: while increasing speed of laser beam relatively to treated part, beam diameter value of Ra parameter is becoming less. Decrease in height of surface irregularities in case of increasing laser beam speed is related with intensification of evaporation processes. An increase in beam diameter diminishes Ra parameter of the surface. This is due to the fact that decrease in power density occurs at high rate of beam defocusing. Overlapping coefficient does not exert a pronounced effect on Ra parameter of fused coatings. While increasing the speed of laser beam relatively to the part structure is transferred from dendrite into supersaturated one with carbide and boride precipitations. It has been established that technological parameters of laser treatment and particularly speed of laser beam influence on coating composition. While increasing the speed up to v5 = 5 × 10–3 m/s amount of chromium has become larger by 1.5-fold that resulted in increase of micro-hardness of the coating from 9.5–10.1 GPa up to 11.04–15.50 GPa.

  16. The structure of the local interstellar medium. VI. New Mg II, Fe II, and Mn II observations toward stars within 100 pc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malamut, Craig; Redfield, Seth; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze high-resolution spectra obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope toward 34 nearby stars (≤100 pc) to record Mg II, Fe II, and Mn II absorption due to the local interstellar medium (LISM). Observations span the entire sky, probing previously unobserved regions of the LISM. The heavy ions studied in this survey produce narrow absorption features that facilitate the identification of multiple interstellar components. We detected one to six individual absorption components along any given sight line, and the number of absorbers roughly correlates with the pathlength. This high-resolution near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectroscopic survey was specifically designed for sight lines with existing far-UV (FUV) observations. The FUV spectra include many intrinsically broad absorption lines (i.e., of low atomic mass ions) and are often observed at medium resolution. The LISM NUV narrow-line absorption component structure presented here can be used to more accurately interpret the archival FUV observations. As an example of this synergy, we present a new analysis of the temperature and turbulence along the line of sight toward ε Ind. The new observations of LISM velocity structure are also critical in the interpretation of astrospheric absorption derived from fitting the saturated H I Lyα profile. As an example, we reanalyze the spectrum of λ And and find that this star likely does have an astrosphere. Two stars in the sample that have circumstellar disks (49 Cet and HD141569) show evidence for absorption due to disk gas. Finally, the substantially increased number of sight lines is used to test and refine the three-dimensional kinematic model of the LISM and search for previously unidentified clouds within the Local Bubble. We find that every prediction made by the Redfield and Linsky kinematic model of the LISM is confirmed by an observed component in the new lines of sight.

  17. Dwarf galaxies with ionizing radiation feedback. II. Spatially resolved star formation relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Krumholz, Mark R.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Abel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spatially resolved star formation relation using a galactic disk formed in a comprehensive high-resolution (3.8 pc) simulation. Our new implementation of stellar feedback includes ionizing radiation as well as supernova explosions, and we handle ionizing radiation by solving the radiative transfer equation rather than by a subgrid model. Photoheating by stellar radiation stabilizes gas against Jeans fragmentation, reducing the star formation rate (SFR). Because we have self-consistently calculated the location of ionized gas, we are able to make simulated, spatially resolved observations of star formation tracers, such as Hα emission. We can also observe how stellar feedback manifests itself in the correlation between ionized and molecular gas. Applying our techniques to the disk in a galactic halo of 2.3 × 10 11 M ☉ , we find that the correlation between SFR density (estimated from mock Hα emission) and H 2 density shows large scatter, especially at high resolutions of ≲75 pc that are comparable to the size of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). This is because an aperture of GMC size captures only particular stages of GMC evolution and because Hα traces hot gas around star-forming regions and is displaced from the H 2 peaks themselves. By examining the evolving environment around star clusters, we speculate that the breakdown of the traditional star formation laws of the Kennicutt-Schmidt type at small scales is further aided by a combination of stars drifting from their birthplaces and molecular clouds being dispersed via stellar feedback.

  18. On the formation of Mg II h and k lines in solar prominences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heinzel, Petr; Vial, J. C.; Anzer, U.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 564, April (2014), A132/1-A132/10 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0906; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/2463; GA ČR GA205/09/1705 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : line: profiles * line: formation * Sun: filaments, prominences Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  19. Dwarf galaxies with ionizing radiation feedback. II. Spatially resolved star formation relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Krumholz, Mark R.; Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Abel, Tom

    2013-11-15

    AWe investigate the spatially resolved star formation relation using a galactic disk formed in a comprehensive high-resolution (3.8 pc) simulation. Our new implementation of stellar feedback includes ionizing radiation as well as supernova explosions, and we handle ionizing radiation by solving the radiative transfer equation rather than by a subgrid model. Photoheating by stellar radiation stabilizes gas against Jeans fragmentation, reducing the star formation rate (SFR). Because we have self-consistently calculated the location of ionized gas, we are able to make simulated, spatially resolved observations of star formation tracers, such as Hα emission. We can also observe how stellar feedback manifests itself in the correlation between ionized and molecular gas. Applying our techniques to the disk in a galactic halo of 2.3 × 1011 M , we find that the correlation between SFR density (estimated from mock Hα emission) and H2 density shows large scatter, especially at high resolutions of ≲ 75 pc that are comparable to the size of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). This is because an aperture of GMC size captures only particular stages of GMC evolution and because Hα traces hot gas around star-forming regions and is displaced from the H2 peaks themselves. By examining the evolving environment around star clusters, we speculate that the breakdown of the traditional star formation laws of the Kennicutt-Schmidt type at small scales is further aided by a combination of stars drifting from their birthplaces and molecular clouds being dispersed via stellar feedback.

  20. Formation flying for electric sails in displaced orbits. Part II: Distributed coordinated control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Mengali, Giovanni; Quarta, Alessandro A.; Yuan, Jianping

    2017-09-01

    We analyze a cooperative control framework for electric sail formation flying around a heliocentric displaced orbit, aiming at observing the polar region of a celestial body. The chief spacecraft is assumed to move along an elliptic displaced orbit, while each deputy spacecraft adjusts its thrust vector (that is, both its sail attitude and characteristic acceleration) in order to track a prescribed relative trajectory. The relative motion of the electric sail formation system is formulated in the chief rotating frame, where the control inputs of each deputy are the relative sail attitude angles and the relative lightness number with respect to those of the chief. The information exchange among the spacecraft, characterized by the communication topology, is represented by a weighted graph. Two typical cases, according to whether the communication graph is directed or undirected, are discussed. For each case, a distributed coordinated control law is designed in such a way that each deputy not only tracks the chief state, but also makes full use of information from its neighbors, thus increasing the redundancy and robustness of the formation system in case of failure among the communication links. Illustrative examples show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  1. UNDERSTANDING COMPACT OBJECT FORMATION AND NATAL KICKS. II. THE CASE OF XTE J1118 + 480

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragos, T.; Willems, B.; Kalogera, V.; Ivanova, N.; Rockefeller, G.; Fryer, C. L.; Young, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of proper motions have been measured for Galactic X-ray binaries. When supplemented with accurate determinations of the component masses, orbital period, and donor effective temperature, these kinematical constraints harbor a wealth of information on the system's past evolution. Here, we consider all this available information to reconstruct the full evolutionary history of the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1118 + 480, assuming that the system originated in the Galactic disk and the donor has solar metallicity. This analysis accounts for four evolutionary phases: mass transfer through the ongoing X-ray phase, tidal evolution before the onset of Roche lobe overflow, motion through the Galactic potential after the formation of the black hole, and binary orbital dynamics due to explosive mass loss and possibly a black hole natal kick at the time of core collapse. We find that right after black hole formation, the system consists of a ≅6.0-10.0 M sun black hole and a ≅1.0-1.6 M sun main-sequence star. We also find that that an asymmetric natal kick is not only plausible but required for the formation of this system, and derive a lower and upper limit on the black hole natal kick velocity magnitude of 80 km s -1 and 310 km s -1 , respectively.

  2. Formation of Radio Type II Bursts During a Multiple Coronal Mass Ejection Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamadani, Firas; Pohjolainen, Silja; Valtonen, Eino

    2017-12-01

    We study the solar event on 27 September 2001 that consisted of three consecutive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) originating from the same active region, which were associated with several periods of radio type II burst emission at decameter-hectometer (DH) wavelengths. Our analysis shows that the first radio burst originated from a low-density environment, formed in the wake of the first, slow CME. The frequency-drift of the burst suggests a low-speed burst driver, or that the shock was not propagating along the large density gradient. There is also evidence of band-splitting within this emission lane. The origin of the first shock remains unclear, as several alternative scenarios exist. The second shock showed separate periods of enhanced radio emission. This shock could have originated from a CME bow shock, caused by the fast and accelerating second or third CME. However, a shock at CME flanks is also possible, as the density depletion caused by the three CMEs would have affected the emission frequencies and hence the radio source heights could have been lower than usual. The last type II burst period showed enhanced emission in a wider bandwidth, which was most probably due to the CME-CME interaction. Only one shock that could reliably be associated with the investigated CMEs was observed to arrive near Earth.

  3. Nonlinear Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Structures Interations (NANSI) Methodology for Ballute/Inflatable Aeroelasticity in Hypersonic Atmospheric Entry, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA proposes a phase II effort to fully develop a comprehensive methodology for aeroelastic predictions of the nonlinear aerodynamic/aerothermodynamic - structure...

  4. Glass formation via structural fragmentation of a 2D coordination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeyama, D; Funnell, N P; Cliffe, M J; Hill, J A; Goodwin, A L; Hijikata, Y; Itakura, T; Okubo, T; Horike, S; Kitagawa, S

    2015-08-18

    The structure of a glass obtained by the melt quenching of a two-dimensional (2D) coordination network was examined. X-ray analyses disclosed a 2D-to-0D structural transformation before and after glass formation. The mechanism is unique to coordination compounds, as it is characterized by labile and flexible coordination bonds.

  5. The formation of a core-periphery structure in heterogeneous financial networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, M.; in 't Veld, D.; Hommes, C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent empirical evidence suggests that financial networks exhibit a core-periphery network structure. This paper aims at giving an explanation for the emergence of such a structure using network formation theory. We propose a simple model of the overnight interbank lending market, in which banks

  6. PECULIARITIES OF FORMATION OF CORPORATE STRUCTURES IN THE HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM OF THE REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg A. Donichev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the research results of formation and functioning of corporate structures of the regional heat power engineering. A geometrical model of interactions between hierarchy levels of this structure is proposed. The role of the government in an improvement of the effectiveness of the heat supply system of regions is proved.

  7. Materials science in microelectronics II the effects of structure on properties in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Machlin, Eugene

    2005-01-01

    The subject matter of thin-films - which play a key role in microelectronics - divides naturally into two headings: the processing / structure relationship, and the structure / properties relationship. Part II of 'Materials Science in Microelectronics' focuses on the latter of these relationships, examining the effect of structure on the following: Electrical properties Magnetic properties Optical properties Mechanical properties Mass transport properties Interface and junction properties Defects and properties Captures the importance of thin films to microelectronic development Examines the cause / effect relationship of structure on thin film properties.

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of solid-phase reactions of formation of yttrium ferrite with garnet structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashchenko, V P; Yakushevskaya, F T; Chalyi, V P

    1977-04-01

    The perovskite phase is formed in the process of ferrogarnet formation both from the mixture of Y and Fe oxides and from mutually precipitated carbonates. The amount of the perovskite phase decreases with increasing duration of annealing. The process of the ferritoformation in the investigated systems can be presented as isovalent cationic substitution on the basis of the crystalline structure of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with the formation of the perovskite structure. When the Fe concentration in orthoferrite increases, the phase with a garnet structure is formed.

  9. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability

  10. PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. Lipids in the Structure of Photosystem I, Photosystem II and the Cytochrome b6f Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina; Guskov, Albert; Krauss, Norbert; Wada, Hajime; Murata, Norio

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes the data accumulated in the last decade regarding the specific function of lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis, based on crystal structures of at least 3.0 Å resolution of the main photosynthetic membrane protein—pigment complexes, photosystem I, photosystem II and cytochrome

  12. Conditions for the formation of pure birnessite during the oxidation of Mn(II) cations in aqueous alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boumaiza, Hella [Laboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux et Catalyse, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université El Manar (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); Département de Génie Biologique et Chimique, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées et de Technologies (INSAT), Université de Carthage, Tunis (Tunisia); Coustel, Romain [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); Medjahdi, Ghouti [Institut Jean Lamour, Centre de Compétences Rayons X et Spectroscopie (X-Gamma), UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine (France); Ruby, Christian, E-mail: Christian.ruby@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME)-UMR 7564, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); and others

    2017-04-15

    Birnessite was synthetized through redox reaction by mixing MnO{sub 4}{sup -}, Mn{sup 2+} and OH{sup -} solutions. The Mn(VII): Mn(II) ratio of 0.33 was chosen and three methods were used consisting in a quick mixing under vigorous stirring of two of the three reagents and then on the dropwise addition of the third one. The obtained solids were characterized by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopies. Their average oxidation states were determined from ICP and CEC measurements while their surface properties were investigated by XPS. This study provides an increased understanding of the importance of dissolved oxygen in the formation of birnessite and hausmannite and shows the ways to obtain pure birnessite. The role of counter-ion ie. Na{sup +} or K{sup +} was also examined. - Graphical abstract: Pathways of birnessite formation. - Highlights: • Pure birnessite is prepared through a redox reaction. • Hausmannite formation is prevented by controlling dissolved O2. • The employed counterion influences the purity of birnessite. • Initial Mn(OH){sub 2} is oxidized by both MnO{sub 4}{sup -} and dissolved O{sub 2}.

  13. Investigations of the role of nonlinear couplings in structure formation and transport regulation in plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christopher George

    Studies of nonlinear couplings and dynamics in plasma turbulence are presented. Particular areas of focus are analytic studies of coherent structure formation in electron temperature gradient turbulence, measurement of nonlinear energy transfer in simulations of plasma turbulence, and bispectral analysis of experimental and computational data. The motivation for these works has been to develop and expand the existing theories of plasma transport, and verify the nonlinear predictions of those theories in simulation and experiment. In Chapter II, we study electromagnetic secondary instabilities of electron temperature gradient turbulence. The growth rate for zonal flow generation via modulational instability of electromagnetic ETG turbulence is calculated, as well as that for zonal (magnetic) field generation. In Chapter III, the stability and saturation of streamers in ETG turbulence is considered, and shown to depend sensitively upon geometry and the damping rates of the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. Requirements for a credible theory of streamer transport are presented. In addition, a self-consistent model for interactions between ETG and ITG (ion temperature gradient) turbulence is presented. In Chapter IV, the nonlinear transfer of kinetic and internal energy is measured in simulations of plasma turbulence. The regulation of turbulence by radial decorrelation due to zonal flows and generation of zonal flows via the Reynolds stress are explicitly demonstrated, and shown to be symmetric facets of a single nonlinear process. Novel nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows are discussed. In Chapter V, measurements of fluctuation bicoherence in the edge of the DIII-D tokamak are presented. It is shown that the bicoherence increases transiently before a L-H transition, and decays to its initial value after the barrier has formed. The increase in bicoherence is localized to the region where the transport barrier forms, and shows strong coupling between well

  14. Structural and Molecular Properties of Insect Type II Motor Axon Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Stocker

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparison between the axon terminals of octopaminergic efferent dorsal or ventral unpaired median neurons in either desert locusts (Schistocerca gregaria or fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster across skeletal muscles reveals many similarities. In both species the octopaminergic axon forms beaded fibers where the boutons or varicosities form type II terminals in contrast to the neuromuscular junction (NMJ or type I terminals. These type II terminals are immunopositive for both tyramine and octopamine and, in contrast to the type I terminals, which possess clear synaptic vesicles, only contain dense core vesicles. These dense core vesicles contain octopamine as shown by immunogold methods. With respect to the cytomatrix and active zone peptides the type II terminals exhibit active zone-like accumulations of the scaffold protein Bruchpilot (BRP only sparsely in contrast to the many accumulations of BRP identifying active zones of NMJ type I terminals. In the fruit fly larva marked dynamic changes of octopaminergic fibers have been reported after short starvation which not only affects the formation of new branches (“synaptopods” but also affects the type I terminals or NMJs via octopamine-signaling (Koon et al., 2011. Our starvation experiments of Drosophila-larvae revealed a time-dependency of the formation of additional branches. Whereas after 2 h of starvation we find a decrease in “synaptopods”, the increase is significant after 6 h of starvation. In addition, we provide evidence that the release of octopamine from dendritic and/or axonal type II terminals uses a similar synaptic machinery to glutamate release from type I terminals of excitatory motor neurons. Indeed, blocking this canonical synaptic release machinery via RNAi induced downregulation of BRP in neurons with type II terminals leads to flight performance deficits similar to those observed for octopamine mutants or flies lacking this class of neurons (Brembs et al., 2007.

  15. Theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and exchange interactions in Cu(II)Pc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Fisher, A. J.; Harrison, N. M.; Wang, Hai; Wu, Zhenlin; Gardener, Jules; Heutz, Sandrine; Jones, Tim; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2012-12-01

    We calculate the electronic structure and exchange interactions in a copper(II)phthalocyanine (Cu(II)Pc) crystal as a one-dimensional molecular chain using hybrid exchange density functional theory (DFT). In addition, the intermolecular exchange interactions are also calculated in a molecular dimer using Green's function perturbation theory (GFPT) to illustrate the underlying physics. We find that the exchange interactions depend strongly on the stacking angle, but weakly on the sliding angle (defined in the text). The hybrid DFT calculations also provide an insight into the electronic structure of the Cu(II)Pc molecular chain and demonstrate that on-site electron correlations have a significant effect on the nature of the ground state, the band gap and magnetic excitations. The exchange interactions predicted by our DFT calculations and GFPT calculations agree qualitatively with the recent experimental results on newly found η-Cu(II)Pc and the previous results for the α- and β-phases. This work provides a reliable theoretical basis for the further application of Cu(II)Pc to molecular spintronics and organic-based quantum information processing.

  16. Correlation of reactivity with structural factors in a series of Fe(II) substituted cobalt ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sileo, Elsa E.; Garcia Rodenas, Luis; Paiva-Santos, Carlos O.; Stephens, Peter W.; Morando, Pedro J.; Blesa, Miguel A.

    2006-01-01

    A series of powdered cobalt ferrites, Co x Fe 3- x O 4 with 0.66≤x II , were synthesized by a mild procedure, and their Fe and Co site occupancies and structural characteristics were explored using X-ray anomalous scattering and the Rietveld refinement method. The dissolution kinetics, measured in 0.1 M oxalic acid aqueous solution at 70 deg. C, indicate in all cases the operation of a contracting volume rate law. The specific rates increased with the Fe II content following approximately a second-order polynomial expression. This result suggests that the transfer of Fe III controls the dissolution rate, and that the leaching of a first layer of ions Co II and Fe II leaves exposed a surface enriched in slower dissolving octahedral Fe III ions. Within this model, inner vicinal lattice Fe II accelerates the rate of Fe III transfer via internal electron hopping. A chain mechanism, involving successive electron transfers, fits the data very well. - Graphical abstract: The electron exchange between octahedral Fe II and Fe III ions has important consequences on the specific dissolution rates. Display Omitted

  17. The Process of Word Formation and Phrase Structure of Android Application Names

    OpenAIRE

    Handayani, Heny

    2013-01-01

    Android is an operating system for mobile device, such as smartphones and tablet computers that was developed by Google. In this era, android is a popular operating system that is searched by people because of necessary of information. The process and structure of android application names are interesting to be analyzed since they have different structure of words in general. The purpose research is to describe and explain which word formation processes and phrase structure that are commonly ...

  18. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  19. Thermodynamics of mixed-ligand complex formation of mercury (II) ethylenediaminetetraacetate with amino acids in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyreu, Dmitrii, E-mail: pyreu@mail.ru [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State University, Ermak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Kozlovskii, Eugenii [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State University, Ermak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, Matvei; Kumeev, Roman [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable mixed ligand complexes of HgEdta with amino acids at physiological pH value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermodynamic and NMR data evident the ambidentate coordination mode of arginine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of the guanidinic group of Arg in coordination process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binuclear complexes (HgEdta){sub 2}L with the bridging function of amino acid. - Abstract: The mixed-ligand complex formation in the systems Hg{sup 2+} - Edta{sup 4-} - L{sup -}(L = Arg, Orn, Ser) has been studied by means of calorimetry, pH-potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and the ionic strength of I = 0.5 (KNO{sub 3}). The thermodynamic parameters of formation of the HgEdtaL, HgEdtaHL and (HgEdta){sub 2}L complexes have been determined. The most probable coordination mode for the complexone and the amino acid in the mixed-ligand complexes was discussed.

  20. The formation of dissipative structures in polymers as a model of synergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanchich Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synergetic is an interdisciplinary area and describes the emergence of various kinds of structures, using the representation of the natural sciences. In this paper we studied the conditions for the appearance of thermodynamically stable amorphous-crystalline supramolecular structures on the basis of practical importance for the production of heat-resistant high-strength polymer fibers semi-rigid systems. It is found that in the process of structure formation in the coagulation of the polymer from solutions having supramolecular structures area a definite geometric shape and dimensions. Pattern formation in such systems can simulate the processes studied synergy. This is occurring in the process of self-organization of dissipative structures, transitions from one structure to another. This most discussed matter of self-organization on the “optical” scale level, are observed spherulites have a “correct” form and certain geometric dimensions comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Previously, this polymer does not crystallize at all considered. It is shown that for the study of supramolecular structures are the most convenient and informative experimental approaches are polarization-optical methods, which are directly “tuned” to the optical anisotropy of the structure and morphology. The great advantage of these methods is also possible to study the kinetics of structure formation processes without interfering the system under study.

  1. Preliminary Guideline for the High Temperature Structure Integrity Assessment Procedure Part II. High Temperature Structural Integrity Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. G.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. H

    2007-02-15

    A high temperature structural integrity assessment belongs to the Part II of a whole preliminary guideline for the high temperature structure. The main contents of this guideline are the evaluation procedures of the creep-fatigue crack initiation and growth in high temperature condition, the high temperature LBB evaluation procedure, and the inelastic evaluations of the welded joints in SFR structures. The methodologies for the proper inelastic analysis of an SFR structures in high temperatures are explained and the guidelines of inelastic analysis options using ANSYS and ABAQUS are suggested. In addition, user guidelines for the developed NONSTA code are included. This guidelines need to be continuously revised to improve the applicability to the design and analysis of the SFR structures.

  2. Orientational structure formation of silk fibroin with anisotropic properties in solutions; Orientastionnoe strukturoobrazovanie fibroina shelka s anizotropnymi svojstvami v rastvorakh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholmuminov, A A [AS RU, Institute of Polymer Chemistry and Physics, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2008-06-15

    Key words:silk fibroin, dissolution, solution's model systems, gelation, orientational crystallization, optical polarization, longitudinal stream, {alpha} - {beta} transition, structure formation, phase transformations, relaxation, anisotropy of swelling and desorption, thermo- and biodegradation. Subjects of the inquiry: silk fibroin is the main subject of investigation. Fibroin's solutions were obtained on the base of water and organic solvents, containing salts. Comparative investigations were carried out by using biosolution - secretion of silkworm, solutions of silk sericin, cotton cellulose, methylcellulose, polystyrene and (co) polycrylonitrile. Aim of the inquiry: the elucidation of the regularities of silk fibroin anisotropic structures formation in the direct generation of orientational ordering in solutions taking into account of influences of its the molecular structures, configuration information, {alpha} - {beta} conformational transformations, and development jointly using polarization-optical and hydrodynamic methods to control of structure formation. And also definition of possibility fields for use biopolymers anisotropic structure formation principles. Method of inquiry: birefringence, dispersion optical rotation, circular dichroism, polarization- ultramicroscope, ultracentrifuge, viscosimetry, potentiometry, differential thermal analysis, chromatography, x-ray analysis, spectroscopy. The results achieved and their novelty: the physical regularity amorphous-crystalline fibroin dissolutions in salt-containing solvents based on chains melting, distribution and redistribution were recognized; fibroin statistical parameters, molecular-mass and conformational characteristics were established; It was shown that fibroin molecules turned into fully uncoiled and oriented state with the breakdown decay of {alpha}-spiral chain sections by I type phase transition mechanism, but in oriented state with {alpha}-spiral conservation by II type transition; the

  3. Television Format As a Site of Cultural Negotiation: Studying the Structures, Agencies and Practices of Format Adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keinonen, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    abstractDespite the growing number of publications on television formats, specific theorisations regarding formats and format adaptation, in particular, are still rare. In this article, I introduce a synthesizing approach for studying format appropriation. Drawing on format study, media industry

  4. Thermal-structural response of EBR-II major components under reactor operational transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Lee, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, the LMFBR safety research has been focused primarily on severe but highly unlikely accident, such as hypothetical-core-disruptive accidents (HCDA's), and not enough attention has been given to accident prevention, which is less severe but more likely sequence. The objective of the EBR-II operational reliability testing (ORT) is to demonstrate that the reactor can be designed and operated to prevent accident. A series of mild duty cycles and overpower transients were designed for accident prevention tests. An assessment of the EBR-II major plant components has been performed to assure structural integrity of the reactor plant for the ORT program. In this paper, the thermal-structural response and structural evaluation of the reactor vessel, the reactor-vessel cover, the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and the superheater are presented

  5. Synthesis and crystal structure of two lead (II) complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivera, Fiorella L.; Santillan, Guillermo A.

    2012-01-01

    Two coordination complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of lead nitrate (II) with 1,10-phenanthroline in methanol/water. The crystals of these complexes were obtained by using the diffusion method and structurally characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. Both complexes crystallized in the monoclinic space group P2 1 /c. The analysis by crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that in both complexes the coordination around the lead (II) ion is a distorted octahedral structure where the ion is bonded to the heterocyclic nitrogen atoms of chelating ligand 1,10-phenanthroline, three oxygen atoms of three nitrate groups and one oxygen from the water molecule. The difference between the complexes lies in the way of nitrate ion in presence of carboxylic acid aromatics. In addition, the crystal structure of complexes can be regarded as a 3D coordination polymer through Pb-O weak interactions, hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking interactions. (author).

  6. S-Substituted cysteine derivatives and thiosulfinate formation in Petiveria alliacea-part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubec, Roman; Kim, Seokwon; Musah, Rabi A

    2002-11-01

    Three cysteine derivatives, (R)-S-(2-hydroxyethyl)cysteine, together with (R(S)R(C))- and (S(S)R(C))-S-(2-hydroxyethyl)cysteine sulfoxides, have been isolated from the roots of Petiveria alliacea. Furthermore, three additional amino acids, S-methyl-, S-ethyl-, and S-propylcysteine derivatives, were detected. They were present only in trace amounts (<3 microg g(-1) fr. wt), precluding determination of their absolute configurations and oxidation states. In addition, four thiosulfinates, S-(2-hydroxyethyl) (2-hydroxyethane)-, S-(2-hydroxyethyl) phenylmethane-, S-benzyl (2-hydroxyethane)- and S-benzyl phenylmethanethiosulfinates, have been found in a homogenate of the roots. The formation pathways of various benzyl/phenyl-containing compounds previously found in the plant were also discussed.

  7. Copper(II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chemsci

    structural similarities to the natural hexaazamacrocyclic complexes such as heme in human red blood cell, chlorophyll A and B, and vitamin B12.1 ...... and phenolic contents of medicinal plants used by the. Venda people for conditions related ...

  8. MAPPING THE SHORES OF THE BROWN DWARF DESERT. II. MULTIPLE STAR FORMATION IN TAURUS-AURIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Martinache, Frantz; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted a high-resolution imaging study of the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region in order to characterize the primordial outcome of multiple star formation and the extent of the brown dwarf desert. Our survey identified 16 new binary companions to primary stars with masses of 0.25-2.5 M sun , raising the total number of binary pairs (including components of high-order multiples) with separations of 3-5000 AU to 90. We find that ∼2/3-3/4 of all Taurus members are multiple systems of two or more stars, while the other ∼1/4-1/3 appear to have formed as single stars; the distribution of high-order multiplicity suggests that fragmentation into a wide binary has no impact on the subsequent probability that either component will fragment again. The separation distribution for solar-type stars (0.7-2.5 M sun ) is nearly log-flat over separations of 3-5000 AU, but lower-mass stars (0.25-0.7 M sun ) show a paucity of binary companions with separations of ∼>200 AU. Across this full mass range, companion masses are well described with a linear-flat function; all system mass ratios (q = M B /M A ) are equally probable, apparently including substellar companions. Our results are broadly consistent with the two expected modes of binary formation (free-fall fragmentation on large scales and disk fragmentation on small scales), but the distributions provide some clues as to the epochs at which the companions are likely to form.

  9. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction analysis of SIMQUAKE II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, D.K.; Isenberg, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes an analytic method for modeling of soil-structure interaction (SSI) for nuclear power plants in earthquakes and discusses its application to SSI analyses of SIMQUAKE II. The method is general and can be used to simulate a three-dimensional structural geometry, nonlinear site characteristics and arbitrary input ground shaking. The analytic approach uses the soil island concept to reduce SSI models to manageable size and cost. Nonlinear constitutive behavior of the soil is represented by the nonlinear, kinematic cap model. In addition, a debonding-rebonding soil-structure interface model is utilized to represent nonlinear effects which singificantly alter structural response in the SIMQUAKE tests. STEALTH, an explicit finite difference code, is used to perform the dynamic, soil-structure interaction analyses. Several two-dimensional posttest SSI analyses of model containment structures in SIMQUAKE II are performed and results compared with measured data. These analyses qualify the analytic method. They also show the importance of including debonding-rebonding at the soil-structure interface. Sensitivity of structural response to compaction characteristics of backfill material is indicated

  10. Synthesis and Crystal Structures of Luminescent Mononuclear Ni(ii and Cd(ii Complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Tocana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New supramolecular systems of Ni(II and Cd(II with 1,10-phenanthroline constructed by non-covalent interactions have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry. The smaller nickel(II ion forms a cis complex with outer-sphere perchlorates, while the cadmium(II ion forms a trans complex involving inner-sphere perchlorates. Both compoundsrevealintraligand-basedluminescentproperties.

  11. Star Formation Histories of the LEGUS Dwarf Galaxies. I. Recent History of NGC 1705, NGC 4449, and Holmberg II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cignoni, M.; Sacchi, E.; Aloisi, A.; Tosi, M.; Calzetti, D.; Lee, J. C.; Sabbi, E.; Adamo, A.; Cook, D. O.; Dale, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Hunter, D. A.; Johnson, K. E.; Messa, M.; Smith, L. J.; Thilker, D. A.; Ubeda, L.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2018-03-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope observations from the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey to reconstruct the recent star formation histories (SFHs) of three actively star-forming dwarf galaxies, NGC 4449, Holmberg II, and NGC 1705, from their UV color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs). We apply a CMD fitting technique using two independent sets of stellar isochrones, PARSEC-COLIBRI and MIST, to assess the uncertainties related to stellar evolution modeling. Irrespective of the adopted stellar models, all three dwarfs are found to have had almost constant star formation rates (SFRs) in the last 100–200 Myr, with modest enhancements (a factor of ∼2) above the 100 Myr averaged SFR. Significant differences among the three dwarfs are found in terms of the overall SFR, the timing of the most recent peak, and the SFR/area. The initial mass function of NGC 1705 and Holmberg II is consistent with a Salpeter slope down to ≈5 M ⊙, whereas it is slightly flatter, s = ‑2.0, in NGC 4449. The SFHs derived with the two different sets of stellar models are consistent with each other, except for some quantitative details, attributable to their input assumptions. They also share the drawback that all synthetic diagrams predict a clear separation in color between the upper main-sequence and helium-burning stars, which is not apparent in the data. Since neither differential reddening, which is significant in NGC 4449, nor unresolved binaries appear to be sufficient to fill the gap, we suggest this calls for a revision of both sets of stellar evolutionary tracks. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under NASA Contract NAS 5-26555.

  12. Synthesis, molecular structure, biological properties and molecular docking studies on Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes containing bipyridine-azide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Jayamani, Arumugam; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi

    2015-01-07

    Metal complexes of the type Mn(bpy)2(N3)2 (1), Co(bpy)2(N3)2·3H2O (2) and Zn2(bpy)2(N3)4 (3) (Where bpy = 2,2-bipyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectral (FT-IR, UV-vis) studies. The structure of complexes (1-3) have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and the configuration of ligand-coordinated metal(II) ion was well described as distorted octahedral coordination geometry for Mn(II), Co(II) and distorted square pyramidal geometry for Zn(II) complexes. DNA binding interaction of these complexes (1-3) were investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence circular dichroism spectral and molecular docking studies. The intrinsic binding constants Kb of complexes 1, 2 and 3 with CT-DNA obtained from UV-vis absorption studies were 8.37 × 10(4), 2.23 × 10(5) and 5.52 × 10(4) M(-1) respectively. The results indicated that the three complexes are able to bind to DNA with different binding affinity, in the order 2 > 1 > 3. Complexes (1-3) exhibit a good binding propensity to bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins having relatively high binding constant values. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes 1-3 promote the cleavage ability of the pBR322 plasmid DNA in the presence of the reducing agent 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) but with different cleavage mechanisms: the complex 3 cleaves DNA via hydrolytic pathway (T4 DNA ligase assay), while the DNA cleavage by complexes 1 and 2 follows oxidative pathway. The chemical nuclease activity follows the order: 2 > 1 > 3. The effects of various activators were also investigated and the nuclease activity efficacy followed the order MPA > GSH > H2O2 > Asc. The cytotoxicity studies of complexes 1-3 were tested in vitro on breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and they found to be active. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Analysis of a Mark II containment structure for hydrodynamic loads in suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedrosian, B.

    1978-01-01

    During pressure-relief modes of BWR plant operation forcing signals are introduced into the suppression pool at discrete locations: exit nozzles of SRV discharge pipes (quenchers or ramsheads). These forcing signals are transmitted through the water of the suppression pool and, after reaching the pool boundaries, act as loadings on the containment structure wetted perimeter. The response of the containment structure is influenced by the presence of water as it interacts with the structure during application of the load. An adequate analysis must account for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) effects. This paper presents an exact formulation for solving the problem. FSI effects may become significant for a given geometry if the time history of loading and the dynamic properties of the coupled fluid-structure system satisfy a defined (system related) relationship. Results of analyses and parametric/sensitivity studies performed for the steel containment structure of an 1100 Mwe BWR nuclear plant of Mark II configuration are presented. (Author)

  14. STRUCTURAL STUDY OF BIS(2,6-BIS(PYRAZOL-3-YLPYRIDINENICKEL(II BY CALORIMETRY AND EXAFS SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian H Sugiyarto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this work is to reveal the complex formation of 2,6-bis(pyrazol-3-ylpyridine, bpp, with nickel(II perchlorate in DMF by calorimetric stepwise complex formation and then followed by EXAFS spectrometry. It was found that the complex formation follows two stepwise pathways namely the formation of mono pyrazolyl-pyridine, [Ni(DMF3 bpp]2+, and bis pyrazolyl-pyridine, [Ni(bpp2]2+;  the formation constants being  log β1 = 6.57, and log β2 = 5.02, and the total value of log β  = 11.58. The final formation of six-coordinated compound was confirmed by EXAFS analysis with the mean Ni-Nbpp bond length of 2.0646(0.0014 Å.   Keywords: nickel(II, bpp, EXAFS

  15. REM sleep enhancement and behavioral cataplexy following orexin (hypocretin)-II receptor antisense perfusion in the pontine reticular formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, M M; Ramesh, V; Cape, E G; Winston, S; Strecker, R E; McCarley, R W

    1999-01-01

    Orexin (hypocretin)-containing neurons of the hypothalamus project to brainstem sites that are involved in the neural control of REM sleep, including the locus coeruleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, the cholinergic zone of the mesopontine tegmentum, and the pontine reticular formation (PRF). Orexin knockout mice exhibit narcolepsy/cataplexy, and a mutant and defective gene for the orexin type II receptor is present in dogs with an inherited form of narcolepsy/cataplexy. However, the physiological systems mediating these effects have not been described. We reasoned that, since the effector neurons for the majority of REM sleep signs, including muscle atonia, were located in the PRF, this region was likely implicated in the production of these orexin-related abnormalities. To test this possibility, we used microdialysis perfusion of orexin type II receptor antisense in the PRF of rats. Ten to 24 hours after antisense perfusion, REM sleep increased two- to three-fold during both the light period (quiescent phase) and the dark period (active phase), and infrared video showed episodes of behavioral cataplexy. Moreover, preliminary data indicated no REM-related effects following perfusion with nonsense DNA, or when perfusion sites were outside the PRF. More work is needed to provide precise localization of the most effective site of orexin-induced inhibition of REM sleep phenomena.

  16. Permian plants from the Chutani Formation (Titicaca Group, Northern Altiplano of Bolivia: II. The morphogenus Glossopteris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Iannuzzi

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Fossil plants belonging to the morphogenera Glossopteris, Pecopteris and Asterotheca were collected from the upper part of the Chutani Formation (Titicaca Group, near the town of San Pablo de Tiquina, on the southeastern shore of Lake Titicaca (northern Altiplano, Bolivia. This paper presents the first description of specimens of the morphogenus Glossopteris from Bolivia. The Bolivian specimens of Glossopteris consist of poorly-preserved impressions, although they present the diagnostic features of this morphogenus. They are fragments of leaves with secondary veins of taeniopterid-type, typical of glossopterids from Late Permian deposits of Gondwana. The only species of Pecopteris confirmed in the first part of this study, i.e. P. dolianitii Rösler and Rohn (see Vieira et al. 2004, was previously reported from the Late Permian beds of the Rio do Rasto and Estrada Nova formations in the Paraná Basin (southern Brazil. Therefore, a Late Permian age is proposed for the fossil plant-bearing beds of the Chutani Formation based on the analyzed assemblage. The phytogeographic implications of this new find are briefly analyzed.Plantas fósseis, pertencentes aos morfo-gêneros Glossopteris, Pecopteris e Asterotheca, foram coletadas na porção superior da seção aflorante da Formação Chutani, próxima ao povoado de San Pablo de Tiquina, sudeste do lago Titicaca (Altiplano norte, Bolívia. Este trabalho apresenta a primeira descrição de espécimes do morfo-gênero Glossopteris provenientes da Bolívia. Os espécimes estudados de Glossopteris consistem em impressões foliares pobremente preservadas nas quais feições diagnósticas estão presentes. Os fragmentos foliares apresentam venação secundária do tipo teniopteróide, uma característica típica de glossopterídeas encontradas em depósitos do Permiano Superior do Gondwana. Por sua vez, a única espécie de Pecopteris confirmada para estes níveis da Formação Chutani, i.e. P. dolianitii

  17. Temperature and emission-line structure at the edges of H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, D.C.V.

    1975-01-01

    Models of ionization fronts located at the edges of expanding H ii regions are presented. These fronts are of the weak D-type and are preceded by shocks in the H i clouds. Since the energy input time is smaller than the cooling time, the gas is found to heat up to a high temperature immediately following ionization. At the trailing edge of the front, the temperature decreases and the ionized gas merges with the main bulk of the nebula where the physical processes are in equilibrium. The emission in O ii and N ii lines is greatly enhanced because of the high temperature at the front. The emission in these and other important lines is calculated and compared with Hβ. Effects of different velocities of flow, of different exciting stars, and of different gas densities on the structure of the fronts are also investigated

  18. A test of star formation laws in disk galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-01-01

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, Σ g , and molecular, Σ H2 , gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σ sfr , of the molecular-rich (Σ H2 ≥ Σ HI /2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a 'Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)' law, Σ sfr =A g Σ g,2 1.5 ; a 'Constant Molecular' law, Σ sfr = A H2 Σ H2,2 ; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz and McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson (KMT09); a 'Gas-Ω' law, Σ sfr =B Ω Σ g Ω; and a shear-driven 'giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision' law, Σ sfr = B CC Σ g Ω(1-0.7β), where β ≡ d ln v circ /d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to β), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  19. Numerical modeling of formation of helical structures in reversed-field-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, N.; Ichiguchi, K.; Todo, Y.; Sanpei, A.; Oki, K.; Masamune, S.; Himura, H.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) simulations have been executed for the low-aspect-ratio reversed-field-pinch (RFP) plasma to reveal the physical mechanism of the formation processes of helical structures. The simulation results show a clear formation of n=4 structure as a result of dominant growth of resistive modes, where n represents the toroidal mode number. The resultant relaxed helical state consists of a unique bean-shaped and hollow pressure profile in the poloidal cross section for both cases of resonant and non-resonant triggering instability modes. The results are partially comparable to the experimental observations. The physical mechanisms of those processes are examined. (author)

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF STRUCTURE FORMATION IN COOKED SAUSAGE PRODUCTS USING SONOCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Yevtushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the features of formation of sausage product structure in the process of cooking. It is shown that the viscosity of sausage meat varies in a complex manner and has three characteristic areas. The characteristic parameters that determine the formation of the structure of sausages for each area were found. It is established that the use of the cavitation brine gives the finished product a gentle consistence, elasticity and distinct taste that makes it more preferable for the consumer.

  1. Plasma turbulence. Structure formation, selection rule, dynamic response and dynamics transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Sanae I.

    2010-01-01

    The five-year project of Grant-in-Aid for Specially Promoted Research entitled general research on the structure formation and selection rule in plasma turbulence had brought many outcomes. Based on these outcomes, the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) program entitled general research on dynamic response and dynamic transport in plasma turbulence has started. In the present paper, the state-of-the-art of the research activities on the structure formation, selection rule and dynamics in plasma turbulence are reviewed with reference to outcomes of these projects. (author)

  2. In situ transmission electron microscope observation of the formation of fuzzy structures on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M; Watanabe, T; Nagashima, H; Nishijima, D; Doerner, R P; Krasheninnikov, S I; Sagara, A; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the formation processes of tungsten nano-structures, so called fuzz, in situ transmission electron microscope observations during helium ion irradiation and high temperature annealing have been performed. The irradiation with 3 keV He + from room temperature to 1273 K is found to cause high-density helium bubbles in tungsten with no significant change in the surface structure. At higher temperatures, surface morphology changes were observed even without helium irradiation due probably to surface diffusion of tungsten atoms driven by surface tension. It is clearly shown that this morphology change is enhanced with helium irradiation, i.e. the formation of helium bubbles. (paper)

  3. World War II and other historical influences on the formation of the Ergonomics Research Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterson, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    Little has been written about wartime ergonomics and the role this played in prompting the need for a society dedicated to ergonomics within the UK, namely the formation of the Ergonomics Research Society (ERS) in early 1950. This article aims to fill this gap in our understanding of the history of ergonomics in the UK and provide further details of the types of research undertaken by wartime research groups and committees such as the Institute of Aviation Medicine, Medical Research Council Applied Psychology Unit and the Flying Personnel Research Committee. In addition, the role of societal developments such as wartime links with the USA, the post-war drive to increase productivity and collaboration with industry and the recommendations of government committees in stimulating the work of the ERS are described in detail. This article also offers some reflection on present-day ergonomics in the UK and how this contrasts with the past. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This article will provide practitioners with a historical perspective on the development of ergonomics from its roots in the Second World War. These developments shed light on current trends and challenges within the discipline as a whole.

  4. FORMATION OF TOILET HABITS IN CHILDREN IN MOSCOW. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY RESULTS. PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Karkashadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the first Russian study of toilet habits formation in children have been obtained. The article was planned to be published in 2 subsequent parts due to the extensiveness of the material. This article is the 2nd part*. It presents and comments on the remaining part of results in the form of the connection between main parameters and characteristics of toilet habits training processes and physiological, psychological and social factors; it also presents the discussion and conclusions. Comparative data (with foreign studies is given. A multitude of both physiological and social factors affect the process of children’s toilet habits training. The following physiological factors have been revealed: stool frequency, physiological involuntary night urination, peculiarities of falling asleep and pernicious habits – processes, which reflect the intestinal motility regulation and defecation states, urination control and neuropsychic activity. The selected training strategy and tactics, style of communication with a child also affect the training process. The most influential family-social factors in terms of toilet habits training processes are: two- or one-parent family, mother’s education and twins in the family. 

  5. Formation of the Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxysulphate green rust during marine corrosion of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refait, Ph.; Memet, J.-B.; Bon, C.; Sabot, R.; Genin, J.-M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Rust layers formed on steel sheet piles immersed 1 m above the mud line for 25 years were analysed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and elemental X-ray mappings (Fe, S, O). They consist of three main strata, the inner one mainly composed of magnetite, the intermediate one of iron(III) oxyhydroxides and the outer one of hydroxysulphate green rust GR(SO 4 2- ). Simulations of GRs formation in solutions having large [Cl - ]/[SO 4 2- ] ratios revealed that the hydroxysulphate GR(SO 4 2- ) was obtained instead of the hydroxychloride GR(Cl - ), as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy analyses. Measurements of the [S], [Fe] and [Cl] concentrations allowed us to establish that GR(SO 4 2- ) formed along with a drastic impoverishment of the solution in sulphate ions; the [Cl - ]/[SO 4 2- ] ratio increased from 12 to 240. The GR, acting like a 'sulphate pump', may favour the colonisation of the rust layers by sulphate reducing bacteria

  6. Synthesis and Crystal Structures of Ni(II)/(III) and Zn(II) Complexes with Schiff Base Ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Bon Kweon

    2013-01-01

    Coordination polymers are of great interest due to their intriguing structural motifs and potential applications in optical, electronic, magnetic, and porous materials. The most commonly used strategy for designing such materials relies on the utilization of multidentate N- or Odonor ligands which have the capacity to bridge between metal centers to form polymeric structures. The Schiff bases with N,O,S donor atoms are an useful source as they are readily available and easily form stable complexes with most transition metal ions. Schiff bases are also important intermediates in synthesis of some bioactive compounds and are potent anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anticancer and antiviral compounds. In this work, the Schiff bases, Hapb and Hbpb, derived from 2-acetylpyridene or 2-benzoylpyridine and benzhydrazide were taken as trifunctional (N,N,O) monobasic ligand (Scheme 1). This ligand is of important because the π-delocalization of charge and the configurational flexibility of their molecular chain can give rise to a great variety of coordination modes. Although many metal.Schiff base complexes have been reported, the 1D, 2D, and 3D networks of coordination polymers linked through the bridging of ligands such as dicyanamide, N(CN) 2 - as coligand have been little published. In the process of working to extend the dimensionality of the metal-Schiff base complexes using benzilic acid as a bridging ligand, we obtained three simple metal (II)/(III) complexes of acetylpyridine/2-benzoyl pyridine based benzhydrazide ligand. Therefore, we report here the synthesis and crystal structures of the complexes

  7. Enhancement of CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratios and star formation efficiencies in supergiant H II regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Rie E.; Espada, Daniel; Komugi, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Kosuke; Kawabe, Ryohei [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kohno, Kotaro [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Tosaki, Tomoka [Joetsu University of Education, Yamayashiki-machi, Joetsu, Niigata 943-8512 (Japan); Hirota, Akihiko; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1805 (Japan); Okumura, Sachiko K. [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Japan Woman' s University, Mejirodai 2-8-1, Bunkyo, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan); Kuno, Nario [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Onodera, Sachiko [Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Kaneko, Hiroyuki, E-mail: rie.miura@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Meisei University, Hino, Tokyo 191-8506 (Japan)

    2014-06-20

    We present evidence that super giant H II regions (GHRs) and other disk regions of the nearby spiral galaxy, M33, occupy distinct locations in the correlation between molecular gas, Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, and the star formation rate surface density, Σ{sub SFR}. This result is based on wide-field and high-sensitivity CO(3-2) observations at 100 pc resolution. Star formation efficiencies (SFEs), defined as Σ{sub SFR}/Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, in GHRs are found to be ∼1 dex higher than in other disk regions. The CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) integrated intensity ratio, R {sub 3-2/1-0}, is also higher than the average over the disk. Such high SFEs and R {sub 3-2/1-0} can reach the values found in starburst galaxies, which suggests that GHRs may be the elements building up a larger-scale starburst region. Three possible contributions to high SFEs in GHRs are investigated: (1) the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor, (2) the dense gas fraction traced by R {sub 3-2/1-0}, and (3) the initial mass function (IMF). We conclude that these starburst-like properties in GHRs can be interpreted by a combination of both a top-heavy IMF and a high dense gas fraction, but not by changes in the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor.

  8. SGC method for predicting the standard enthalpy of formation of pure compounds from their molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albahri, Tareq A.; Aljasmi, Abdulla F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • ΔH° f is predicted from the molecular structure of the compounds alone. • ANN-SGC model predicts ΔH° f with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. • ANN-MNLR model predicts ΔH° f with a correlation coefficient of 0.90. • Better definition of the atom-type molecular groups is presented. • The method is better than others in terms of combined simplicity, accuracy and generality. - Abstract: A theoretical method for predicting the standard enthalpy of formation of pure compounds from various chemical families is presented. Back propagation artificial neural networks were used to investigate several structural group contribution (SGC) methods available in literature. The networks were used to probe the structural groups that have significant contribution to the overall enthalpy of formation property of pure compounds and arrive at the set of groups that can best represent the enthalpy of formation for about 584 substances. The 51 atom-type structural groups listed provide better definitions of group contributions than others in the literature. The proposed method can predict the standard enthalpy of formation of pure compounds with an AAD of 11.38 kJ/mol and a correlation coefficient of 0.9934 from only their molecular structure. The results are further compared with those of the traditional SGC method based on MNLR as well as other methods in the literature

  9. Thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation in the junctionless hairpin ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Neil A; Hoogstraten, Charles G

    2017-09-01

    The hairpin ribozyme consists of two RNA internal loops that interact to form the catalytically active structure. This docking transition is a rare example of intermolecular formation of RNA tertiary structure without coupling to helix annealing. We have used temperature-dependent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to characterize the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation for the junctionless form of the ribozyme, in which loops A and B reside on separate molecules. We find docking to be strongly enthalpy-driven and to be accompanied by substantial activation barriers for association and dissociation, consistent with the structural reorganization of both internal loops upon complex formation. Comparisons with the parallel analysis of a ribozyme variant carrying a 2'-O-methyl modification at the self-cleavage site and with published data in other systems reveal a surprising diversity of thermodynamic signatures, emphasizing the delicate balance of contributions to the free energy of formation of RNA tertiary structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. By-products formation during degradation of isoproturon in aqueous solution. II: Chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascolo, G; Lopez, A; James, H; Fielding, M

    2001-05-01

    After a previous study in which the considered oxidant was ozone (Part I), a laboratory investigation has been carried out to study the degradation of the herbicide isoproturon during its reaction with another oxidant, i.e. chlorine, in aqueous solution (Part II; this paper). The specific aim was to identify the by-products formed. The effects of pH and the presence of bromide ions were studied. Reactions have been carried out at room temperature, in phosphate buffered aqueous solutions, at four pHs (6, 7, 8 and 9). By-products identification was first performed using relatively high initial reagent concentrations which were analytically convenient ([isoproturon] = 40 mg/l, [HClO + ClO-] = 160 mg Cl/l, [Br-] = 80 mg/l). In follow-up studies, the by-products identified during this preliminary step were searched for when using concentration values closer to those actually encountered at real water treatment plants ([isoproturon] = 0.4 and 0.004 mg/l, [HClO + ClO-] = 1.6 mg Cl/l, [Br-] = 0.8 and 0.008 mg/l). Under all of the studied conditions, the results showed that isoproturon is completely degraded and that it decays much faster in the presence of bromide. The pH has a negligible influence when bromide ions are absent. On the contrary, if bromide ions are present, the isoproturon decay is slower at higher pH values. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analyses have led to the identification of several by-products as a result of simultaneous oxidation and substitution reactions, both occurring on the aromatic ring of the herbicide. However, the more abundant by-products are those resulting from the oxidation of the isoproturon aromatic ring. As far as halogenated by-products are concerned, the higher the bromide ion concentration the higher the ratio of brominated to chlorinated by-products. On the basis of the analytical results, a pathway for isoproturon degradation under the studied conditions is proposed.

  11. Microsized structures assisted nanostructure formation on ZnSe wafer by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shutong; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2014-01-01

    Micro/nano patterning of ZnSe wafer is demonstrated by femtosecond laser irradiation through a diffracting pinhole. The irradiation results obtained at fluences above the ablation threshold are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microsized structure with low spatial frequency has a good agreement with Fresnel diffraction theory. Laser induced periodic surface structures and laser-induced periodic curvelet surface structures with high spatial frequency have been found on the surfaces of microsized structures, such as spikes and valleys. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the valley and the incident laser pulse

  12. Structural and IR-spectroscopic characterization of cadmium and lead(II) acesulfamates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echeverria, Gustavo A.; Piro, Oscar E. [Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica y Inst. IFLP (CONICET- CCT-La Plata); Parajon-Costa, Beatriz S.; Baran, Enrique J. [Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Centro de Quimica Inorganica (CEQUINOR/CONICET- CCT-La Plata)

    2017-07-01

    Cadmium and lead(II) acesulfamate, Cd(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}NO{sub 4}S){sub 2} . 2H{sub 2}O and Pb(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}NO{sub 4}S){sub 2}, were prepared by the reaction of acesulfamic acid and the respective metal carbonates in aqueous solution, and characterized by elemental analysis. Their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The Cd(II) compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c with Z=4 and the corresponding Pb(II) salt in the triclinic space group P anti 1 with Z=2. In both salts, acesulfamate acts both as a bi-dentate ligand through its nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen atoms and also as a mono-dentate ligand through this same oxygen atom, giving rise to polymeric structures; in the Pb(II) salt the ligand also binds the cation through its sulfoxido oxygen atoms. The FTIR spectra of the compounds were recorded and are briefly discussed. Some comparisons with other related acesulfamate and saccharinate complexes are made.

  13. ROTATING STARS AND THE FORMATION OF BIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULAE. II. TIDAL SPIN-UP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Segura, G. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Km. 103 Carr. Tijuana-Ensenada, 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Villaver, E. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Manchado, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Via Láctea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Langer, N. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Yoon, S.-C., E-mail: ggs@astrosen.unam.mx [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-01

    We present new binary stellar evolution models that include the effects of tidal forces, rotation, and magnetic torques with the goal of testing planetary nebulae (PNs) shaping via binary interaction. We explore whether tidal interaction with a companion can spin-up the asymptotic giant brach (AGB) envelope. To do so, we have selected binary systems with main-sequence masses of 2.5 M {sub ⊙} and 0.8 M {sub ⊙} and evolve them allowing initial separations of 5, 6, 7, and 8 au. The binary stellar evolution models have been computed all the way to the PNs formation phase or until Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) is reached, whatever happens first. We show that with initial separations of 7 and 8 au, the binary avoids entering into RLOF, and the AGB star reaches moderate rotational velocities at the surface (∼3.5 and ∼2 km s{sup −1}, respectively) during the inter-pulse phases, but after the thermal pulses it drops to a final rotational velocity of only ∼0.03 km s{sup −1}. For the closest binary separations explored, 5 and 6 au, the AGB star reaches rotational velocities of ∼6 and ∼4 km s{sup −1}, respectively, when the RLOF is initiated. We conclude that the detached binary models that avoid entering the RLOF phase during the AGB will not shape bipolar PNs, since the acquired angular momentum is lost via the wind during the last two thermal pulses. This study rules out tidal spin-up in non-contact binaries as a sufficient condition to form bipolar PNs.

  14. A Cultural Psychological Approach to Analyze Intercultural Learning: Potential and Limits of the Structure Formation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Weidemann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the huge interest in sojourner adjustment, there is still a lack of qualitative as well as of longitudinal research that would offer more detailed insights into intercultural learning processes during overseas stays. The present study aims to partly fill that gap by documenting changes in knowledge structures and general living experiences of fifteen German sojourners in Taiwan in a longitudinal, cultural-psychological study. As part of a multimethod design a structure formation technique was used to document subjective theories on giving/losing face and their changes over time. In a second step results from this study are compared to knowledge-structures of seven long-term German residents in Taiwan, and implications for the conceptualization of intercultural learning will be proposed. Finally, results from both studies serve to discuss the potential and limits of structure formation techniques in the field of intercultural communication research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901435

  15. Evaluation of the NCPDP Structured and Codified Sig Format for e-prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hangsheng; Burkhart, Q; Bell, Douglas S

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of the structure and code sets specified in the National Council for Prescription Drug Programs Structured and Codified Sig Format to represent ambulatory electronic prescriptions. We parsed the Sig strings from a sample of 20,161 de-identified ambulatory e-prescriptions into variables representing the fields of the Structured and Codified Sig Format. A stratified random sample of these representations was then reviewed by a group of experts. For codified Sig fields, we attempted to map the actual words used by prescribers to the equivalent terms in the designated terminology. Proportion of prescriptions that the Format could fully represent; proportion of terms used that could be mapped to the designated terminology. The fields defined in the Format could fully represent 95% of Sigs (95% CI 93% to 97%), but ambiguities were identified, particularly in representing multiple-step instructions. The terms used by prescribers could be codified for only 60% of dose delivery methods, 84% of dose forms, 82% of vehicles, 95% of routes, 70% of sites, 33% of administration timings, and 93% of indications. The findings are based on a retrospective sample of ambulatory prescriptions derived mostly from primary care physicians. The fields defined in the Format could represent most of the patient instructions in a large prescription sample, but prior to its mandatory adoption, further work is needed to ensure that potential ambiguities are addressed and that a complete set of terms is available for the codified fields.

  16. Diastereoselective formation of metallamacrocyclic (arene)Ru(II) and CpRh(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehaire, Marie-Line; Scopelliti, Rosario; Herdeis, Lorenz; Polborn, Kurt; Mayer, Peter; Severin, Kay

    2004-03-08

    The reaction of [(arene)RuCl(2)](2) (arene = cymene, 1,3,5-C(6)H(3)Me(3)) and [CpRhCl(2)](2) half-sandwich complexes with tridentate heterocyclic ligands in the presence of base has been investigated. In all cases, the chloro-ligands were substituted to give metallacyclic products with ring sizes between 4 and 18 atoms. The cyclization occurs in a highly diastereoselective fashion with chiral recognition between the different metal fragments. The complexes were comprehensively characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, and single crystal X-ray crystallography. For 2-hydroxy-nicotinic acid and 2-amino-nicotinic acid, dinuclear structures were obtained (15-17) whereas for 2,3-dihydroxyquinoline, 2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline, and 6-methyl-2,3-phenazinediol, trimeric assemblies were found (19-22), and for 4-imidazolecarboxylic acid, a tetrameric assembly (18) was found.

  17. Model tool to describe chemical structures in XML format utilizing structural fragments and chemical ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Alain, Krief; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2010-05-24

    We have developed a model structure-editing tool, ChemEd, programmed in JAVA, which allows drawing chemical structures on a graphical user interface (GUI) by selecting appropriate structural fragments defined in a fragment library. The terms representing the structural fragments are organized in fragment ontology to provide a conceptual support. ChemEd describes the chemical structure in an XML document (ChemFul) with rich semantics explicitly encoding the details of the chemical bonding, the hybridization status, and the electron environment around each atom. The document can be further processed through suitable algorithms and with the support of external chemical ontologies to generate understandable reports about the functional groups present in the structure and their specific environment.

  18. Structure and properties of dichloro(L-proline)cadmium(II) hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, Yasuhiko; Inomata, Yoshie; Takeuchi, Toshio [Jochi Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1983-07-01

    An X-ray diffraction study of the title complex has been carried out. The crystal is orthorhombic, with the space group P2/sub 1/2/sub 1/2/sub 1/; Z=4, a=10.021(3), b=13.562(4), c=7.298(3) A. Block-diagonal least-squares refinements have led to the final R value of 0.035. The structure is very similar to that of dichloro(4-hydroxy-L-proline) cadmium(II), which has a one-dimensional polymer bridged by chlorine atoms and a carboxyl group like an infinite folding screen. The thermal behavior is, however, different from that of dichloro(4-hydroxy-L-proline) cadmium(II). The difference is likely to be due to a difference of the crystal structure, whether it contains intermolecular hydrogen bonds or not.

  19. DISSECTING GALAXY FORMATION. II. COMPARING SUBSTRUCTURE IN PURE DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Shlosman, Isaac; Heller, Clayton; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    We compare the substructure evolution in pure dark matter (DM) halos with those in the presence of baryons, hereafter PDM and BDM models, respectively. The prime halos have been analyzed in the previous work. Models have been evolved from identical initial conditions which have been constructed by means of the constrained realization method. The BDM model includes star formation and feedback from stellar evolution onto the gas. A comprehensive catalog of subhalo populations has been compiled and individual and statistical properties of subhalos analyzed, including their orbital differences. We find that subhalo population mass functions in PDM and BDM are consistent with a single power law, M α sbh , for each of the models in the mass range of ∼2 x 10 8 M sun -2 x 10 11 M sun . However, we detect a nonnegligible shift between these functions, the time-averaged α ∼ -0.86 for the PDM and -0.98 for the BDM models. Overall, α appears to be a nearly constant in time, with variations of ±15%. Second, we find that the radial mass distribution of subhalo populations can be approximated by a power law, R γ sbh with a steepening that occurs at the radius of a maximal circular velocity, R vmax , in the prime halos. Here we find that γ sbh ∼ -1.5 for the PDM and -1 for the BDM models, when averaged over time inside R vmax . The slope is steeper outside this region and approaches -3. We detect little spatial bias (less than 10%) between the subhalo populations and the DM distribution of the main halos. Also, the subhalo population exhibits much less triaxiality in the presence of baryons, in tandem with the shape of the prime halo. Finally, we find that, counter-intuitively, the BDM population is depleted at a faster rate than the PDM one within the central 30 kpc of the prime halo. The reason for this is that although the baryons provide a substantial glue to the subhalos, the main halo exhibits the same trend. This assures a more efficient tidal disruption of the

  20. Amyloid fibril formation from sequences of a natural beta-structured fibrous protein, the adenovirus fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; Schoehn, Guy; Forge, Vincent; Forsyth, V Trevor; Riekel, Christian; Hernandez, Jean-François; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Mitraki, Anna

    2005-01-28

    Amyloid fibrils are fibrous beta-structures that derive from abnormal folding and assembly of peptides and proteins. Despite a wealth of structural studies on amyloids, the nature of the amyloid structure remains elusive; possible connections to natural, beta-structured fibrous motifs have been suggested. In this work we focus on understanding amyloid structure and formation from sequences of a natural, beta-structured fibrous protein. We show that short peptides (25 to 6 amino acids) corresponding to repetitive sequences from the adenovirus fiber shaft have an intrinsic capacity to form amyloid fibrils as judged by electron microscopy, Congo Red binding, infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray fiber diffraction. In the presence of the globular C-terminal domain of the protein that acts as a trimerization motif, the shaft sequences adopt a triple-stranded, beta-fibrous motif. We discuss the possible structure and arrangement of these sequences within the amyloid fibril, as compared with the one adopted within the native structure. A 6-amino acid peptide, corresponding to the last beta-strand of the shaft, was found to be sufficient to form amyloid fibrils. Structural analysis of these amyloid fibrils suggests that perpendicular stacking of beta-strand repeat units is an underlying common feature of amyloid formation.

  1. LIGHT BRIDGE IN A DEVELOPING ACTIVE REGION. II. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF FLUX EMERGENCE AND LIGHT BRIDGE FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Katsukawa, Yukio; Cheung, Mark C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Light bridges, the bright structure dividing umbrae in sunspot regions, show various activity events. In Paper I, we reported on an analysis of multi-wavelength observations of a light bridge in a developing active region (AR) and concluded that the activity events are caused by magnetic reconnection driven by magnetconvective evolution. The aim of this second paper is to investigate the detailed magnetic and velocity structures and the formation mechanism of light bridges. For this purpose, we analyze numerical simulation data from a radiative magnetohydrodynamics model of an emerging AR. We find that a weakly magnetized plasma upflow in the near-surface layers of the convection zone is entrained between the emerging magnetic bundles that appear as pores at the solar surface. This convective upflow continuously transports horizontal fields to the surface layer and creates a light bridge structure. Due to the magnetic shear between the horizontal fields of the bridge and the vertical fields of the ambient pores, an elongated cusp-shaped current layer is formed above the bridge, which may be favorable for magnetic reconnection. The striking correspondence between the observational results of Paper I and the numerical results of this paper provides a consistent physical picture of light bridges. The dynamic activity phenomena occur as a natural result of the bridge formation and its convective nature, which has much in common with those of umbral dots and penumbral filaments

  2. How relevant are assembled equilibrium samples in understanding structure formation during lipid digestion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Stephanie; Salentinig, Stefan; Hawley, Adrian; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-10-01

    Lipid-based formulations are gaining interest for use as drug delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drug compounds. During digestion, the lipolysis products self-assemble with endogenous surfactants in the gastrointestinal tract to form colloidal structures, enabling enhanced drug solubilisation. Although earlier studies in the literature focus on assembled equilibrium systems, little is known about structure formation under dynamic lipolysis conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the likely colloidal structure formation in the small intestine after the ingestion of lipids, under equilibrium and dynamic conditions. The structural aspects were studied using small angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering, and were found to depend on lipid composition, lipid chain length, prandial state and emulsification. Incorporation of phospholipids and lipolysis products into bile salt micelles resulted in swelling of the structure. At insufficient bile salt concentrations, a co-existing lamellar phase was observed, due to a reduction in the solubilisation capacity for lipolysis products. Emulsification accelerated the rate of lipolysis and structure formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mononuclear mercury(II) complexes containing bipyridine derivatives and thiocyanate ligands: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure determination, and luminescent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Vahid; Alizadeh, Robabeh; Alavije, Hanieh Soleimani; Heydari, Samira Fadaei; Abafat, Marzieh

    2017-08-01

    A series of mercury(II) complexes, [Hg(Nsbnd N)(SCN)2] (Nsbnd N is 4,4‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine in 1, 5,5‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine in 2, 6,6‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine in 3 and 6-methyl-2,2‧-bipyridine in 4), were prepared from the reactions of Hg(SCN)2 with mentioned ligands in methanol. Suitable crystals of these complexes were obtained for X-ray diffraction measurement by methanol diffusion into a DMSO solution. The four complexes were thoroughly characterized by spectral methods (IR, UV-Vis, 13C{1H}NMR, 1H NMR and luminescence), elemental analysis (CHNS) and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The X-ray structural analysis indicated that in the structures of these complexes, the mercury(II) cation is four-coordinated in a distorted tetrahedral configuration by two S atoms from two thiocyanate anions and two N atoms from one chelating 2,2‧-bipyridine derivative ligand. Also, in these complexes intermolecular interactions, for example Csbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds (in 1-4), Csbnd H⋯S hydrogen bonds (in 1, 2 and 4), π … π interactions (in 2-4), Hg⋯N interactions (in 2) and S⋯S interactions (in 4), are effective in the stabilization of the crystal structures and the formation of the 3D supramolecular complexes. Furthermore, the luminescence spectra of the title complexes show that the intensity of their emission bands are stronger than the emission bands for the free bipyridine derivative ligands.

  4. Four Mixed-Ligand Zn(II Three-Dimensional Metal-Organic Frameworks: Synthesis, Structural Diversity, and Photoluminescent Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Assemblies of four three-dimensional (3D mixed-ligand coordination polymers (CPs having formulas, {[Zn2(bdc2(4-bpdh]·C2H5OH·2H2O}n (1, [Zn(bdc(4-bpdh]n (2, {[Zn2(bdc2(4-bpdh2]·(4-bpdh}n (3, and {[Zn(bdc(4-bpdh]·C2H5OH}n (4 (bdc2− = dianion of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 4-bpdh = 2,5-bis(4-pyridyl-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction method. Structural determination reveals that the coordination numbers (geometry of Zn(II ions in 1, 2, 3, and 4 are five (distorted square-pyramidal (SP, six (distorted octahedral (Oh, five (trigonal-bipyramidal (TBP, and four (tetrahedral (Td, respectively, and are bridged by 4-bpdh with bis-monodentate coordination mode and bdc2− ligands with bis-bidentate in 1, chelating/bidentate in 2, bis-monodentate and bis-bidentate in 3, and bis-monodentate in 4, to generate two-fold interpenetrating 3D cube-like metal-organic framework (MOF with pcu topology, non-interpenetrating 3D MOF, two-fold interpenetrating 3D rectangular-box-like MOF with pcu topology and five-fold interpenetrating diamondoid-like MOF with dia topology, respectively. These different intriguing architectures indicate that the coordination numbers and geometries of Zn(II ions, coordination modes of bdc2− ligand, and guest molecules play important roles in the construction of MOFs and the formation of the structural topologies and interpenetrations. Thermal stabilities, and photoluminescence study of 1–4 were also studied in detail. The complexes exhibit ligands based photoluminescence properties at room temperature.

  5. PRE-RIFT COMPRESSIONAL STRUCTURES AS A CONTROL ON PASSIVE MARGIN FORMATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Petersen, Kenni Dinesen

    Passive margins are commonly separated into volcanic and non-volcanic modes, each with a distinct formation mechanism and structure. Both form the transition from continental to oceanic crust. Large amounts of geophysical data at passive margins show that the tapering continental crust is often u...

  6. MMTF-An efficient file format for the transmission, visualization, and analysis of macromolecular structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Bradley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in experimental techniques have led to a rapid growth in complexity, size, and number of macromolecular structures that are made available through the Protein Data Bank. This creates a challenge for macromolecular visualization and analysis. Macromolecular structure files, such as PDB or PDBx/mmCIF files can be slow to transfer, parse, and hard to incorporate into third-party software tools. Here, we present a new binary and compressed data representation, the MacroMolecular Transmission Format, MMTF, as well as software implementations in several languages that have been developed around it, which address these issues. We describe the new format and its APIs and demonstrate that it is several times faster to parse, and about a quarter of the file size of the current standard format, PDBx/mmCIF. As a consequence of the new data representation, it is now possible to visualize structures with millions of atoms in a web browser, keep the whole PDB archive in memory or parse it within few minutes on average computers, which opens up a new way of thinking how to design and implement efficient algorithms in structural bioinformatics. The PDB archive is available in MMTF file format through web services and data that are updated on a weekly basis.

  7. Fibronectin alters the rate of formation and structure of the fibrin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy

    2014-01-10

    Plasma fibronectin is a vital component of the fibrin clot; however its role on clot structure is not clearly understood. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of fibronectin on the kinetics of formation, structural characteristics and composition of reconstituted fibrin clots or fibrin matrices. Fibrin matrices were formed by adding thrombin to 1, 2 or 4 mg/ml fibrinogen supplemented with 0-0.4 mg/ml fibronectin. The rate of fibrin matrix formation was then monitored by measuring light absorbance properties at different time points. Confocal microscopy of fluorescein conjugated fibrinogen was used to visualize the structural characteristics of fibrin matrices. The amount of fibronectin in fibrin matrices was determined through electrophoresis and immunoblotting of solubilized matrices. Fibronectin concentration positively correlated with the initial rate of fibrin matrix formation and with steady state light absorbance values of fibrin matrices. An increase in fibronectin concentration resulted in thinner and denser fibers in the fibrin matrices. Electrophoresis and immunoblotting showed that fibronectin was covalently and non-covalently bound to fibrin matrices and in the form of high molecular weight multimers. The formation of fibronectin multimers was attributed to cross-linking of fibronectin by trace amounts Factor XIIIa. These findings are novel because they link results from light absorbance studies to microcopy analyses and demonstrate an influence of fibronectin on fibrin matrix structural characteristics. This data is important in developing therapies that destabilize fibrin clots. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Cucurbit[8]uril templated supramolecular ring structure formation and protein assembly modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, M.; Wijnands, S.P.W.; van Dongen, J.L.J.; Brunsveld, L.; Dankers, P.Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of Phe-Gly-Gly (FGG)-tagged proteins and bivalent FGG-tagged penta(ethylene glycol) as guest molecules with cucurbit[8]uril (Q8) hosts is studied to modulate the supramolecular assembly process. Ring structure formation of the bivalent guest molecule with Q8 leads to enhanced binding

  9. A virtual structure approach to formation control of unicycle mobile robots using mutual coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadowska, A.D.; van den Broek, T.H.A.; Huijberts, H.J.C.; Wouw, van de N.; Kostic, D.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the formation control problem for unicycle mobile robots is studied. A distributed virtual structure control strategy with mutual coupling between the robots is proposed. The rationale behind the introduction of the coupling terms is the fact that these introduce additional

  10. Structural and quantitative aspects of radical formation after heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusemund, B; Hoffmann, A K; Weiland, B; Huettermann, J [Klinikum Homburg (Germany). Fachrichtung Biophysik

    1997-09-01

    In this report the authors present a summary of their recent attempts aiming at clarifying some basic structural and quantitative aspects of free radical formation in DNA constituents and in DNA as well as of product analysis from nucleotide model compounds. (orig./MG)

  11. The impact of structural and contextual factors on trust formation in product development teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dayan, M.; Benedetto, Di A.C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines antecedents of trust formation in new product development (NPD) teams and the effects of trust on NPD team performance. A theoretical framework relating structural and contextual factors to interpersonal trust and project outcomes was built, including task complexity as a

  12. Hierarchical formation of large scale structures of the Universe: observations and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurogordato, Sophie

    2003-01-01

    In this report for an Accreditation to Supervise Research (HDR), the author proposes an overview of her research works in cosmology. These works notably addressed the large scale distribution of the Universe (with constraints on the scenario of formation, and on the bias relationship, and the structuring of clusters), the analysis of galaxy clusters during coalescence, mass distribution within relaxed clusters [fr

  13. Complexation of 1,3-dimorpholinopropane with Hg(II) and Zn(II) salts: Synthese, crystal structures and antibacterial studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goudarziafshar, H.; Yousefi, S.; Abbasityula, Y.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav; Rezaeivala, M.; Özbek, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 6 (2015), s. 1076-1084 ISSN 1001-4861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : crystal structure * 1,3-dimorpholinopropane * antibacterial activity * Hg(II) complex * Zn(II) complex Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.488, year: 2015

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure of and DFT calculations on bisglycinato-bis[p-(hydroxymethylpyridine]nickel(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FANG FANG JIAN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between mIn tA new Ni(II complex of bisglycinato-bis[p-(hydroxylmethylpy-ridine] was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV–Vis spectroscopy and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis. The thermal stability of the title complex was also determined. The complex adopts a distorted octahedral geometry and possesses inversion symmetry with the Ni(II ion as the center of inversion. Density function theory (DFT calculations of the structure, electronic absorption spectra, electron structure and natural population analysis (NPA at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory were performed. The predicted geometric parameters and electronic spectra were compared with the experimental values and they supported each other. The NPA results indicate that the electronic transitions were mainly derived from the contribution of an intra-ligand (IL transition, a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT transition and a d-d transition. The electron structure calculations suggest that the central Ni(II ion uses its 4s and 3d orbitals to form covalent bonds with coordinated N and O atoms. The calculated bond orders are also consistent with the thermal decomposition results. Based on vibrational analysis, the thermodynamic properties of the title complex were predicted and the correlative equations between these thermodynamic properties and temperature are also reported.

  15. Structure, magnetic properties, polarized neutron diffraction, and theoretical study of a copper(II) cubane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Christophe; Chumakov, Yurii; Jeanneau, Erwann; Luneau, Dominique; Neugebauer, Petr; Barra, Anne-Laure; Gillon, Béatrice; Goujon, Antoine; Cousson, Alain; Tercero, Javier; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports the synthesis, X-ray and neutron diffraction crystal structures, magnetic properties, high field-high frequency EPR (HF-EPR), spin density and theoretical description of the tetranuclear CuII complex [Cu4L4] with cubane-like structure (LH2=1,1,1-trifluoro-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-5-aza-hept-3-en-2-one). The simulation of the magnetic behavior gives a predominant ferromagnetic interaction J1 (+30.5 cm(-1)) and a weak antiferromagnetic interaction J2 (-5.5 cm(-1)), which correspond to short and long Cu-Cu distances, respectively, as evidence from the crystal structure [see formulate in text]. It is in agreement with DFT calculations and with the saturation magnetization value of an S=2 ground spin state. HF-EPR measurements at low temperatures (5 to 30 K) provide evidence for a negative axial zero-field splitting parameter D (-0.25+/-0.01 cm(-1)) plus a small rhombic term E (0.025+/-0.001 cm(-1), E/D = 0.1). The experimental spin distribution from polarized neutron diffraction is mainly located in the basal plane of the CuII ion with a distortion of yz-type for one CuII ion. Delocalization on the ligand (L) is observed but to a smaller extent than expected from DFT calculations.

  16. Analysis of crack-formation in the shielding concrete of a TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsbauer, H.; Maydl, P.

    1978-01-01

    Within a short time after the start-up of the reactor several cracks appeared at the concrete surface and the number and width of the cracks had grown till now. Experimental and theoretical analysis were made in order to investigate the origin of the cracks and to prevent further crack increase. Crack movement was measured by inductive gages and simultaneously the temperature of the cooling water in the reactor tank at the top and at the bottom as well as the air and the concrete temperature were recorded. The calculations of the thermal stresses were made in two independent ways: 1. Analytically, simulating the shielding concrete as an infinite hollow cylinder of constant thickness and 2. Using the Finite Element method, for a better description of the geometry. It was concluded that the cracks of the shielding concrete are exclusively caused by the thermal stresses. The thermal insulation at the lower part of the shielding is not effective. The structural system of the shielding concrete as a monolithic block without joints produces automatically tensile stresses

  17. EGCG Inhibited Lipofuscin Formation Based on Intercepting Amyloidogenic β-Sheet-Rich Structure Conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Cai

    Full Text Available Lipofuscin (LF is formed during lipid peroxidation and sugar glycosylation by carbonyl-amino crosslinks with biomacrolecules, and accumulates slowly within postmitotic cells. The environmental pollution, modern dietary culture and lifestyle changes have been found to be the major sources of reactive carbonyl compounds in vivo. Irreversible carbonyl-amino crosslinks induced by carbonyl stress are essentially toxiferous for aging-related functional losses in modern society. Results show that (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, the main polyphenol in green tea, can neutralize the carbonyl-amino cross-linking reaction and inhibit LF formation, but the underlying mechanism is unknown.We explored the mechanism of the neutralization process from protein, cell, and animal levels using spectrofluorometry, infrared spectroscopy, conformation antibodies, and electron microscopy. LF demonstrated an amyloidogenic β-sheet-rich with antiparallel structure, which accelerated the carbonyl-amino crosslinks formation and disrupted proteolysis in both PC12 cells and D-galactose (D-gal-induced brain aging mice models. Additionally, EGCG effectively inhibited the formation of the amyloidogenic β-sheet-rich structure of LF, and prevented its conversion into toxic and on-pathway aggregation intermediates, thereby cutting off the carbonyl-amino crosslinks.Our study indicated that the amyloidogenic β-sheet structure of LF may be the core driving force for carbonyl-amino crosslinks further formation, which mediates the formation of amyloid fibrils from native state of biomacrolecules. That EGCG exhibits anti-amyloidogenic β-sheet-rich structure properties to prevent the LF formation represents a novel strategy to impede the development of degenerative processes caused by ageing or stress-induced premature senescence in modern environments.

  18. Formation, atomic structure, and electronic properties of GaSb quantum dots in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timm, R.

    2007-12-14

    In this work, cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used for the first time to study the shape, size, strain, chemical composition, and electronic properties of capped GaSb/GaAs QDs at the atomic scale. By evaluating such structural results on a variety of nanostructures built using different epitaxy methods and growth conditions, details on the underlying QD formation processes can be revealed. A cross-over from flat quantum wells (QWs) to optically active QDs can be observed in samples grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with increasing amount of GaSb, including self-assembled Sb accumulations within a still two-dimensional layer and tiny three-dimensional GaSb islands probably acting as precursor structures. The QWs consist of significantly intermixed material with stoichiometries of maximally 50% GaSb, additionally exhibiting small gaps filled with GaAs. A higher GaSb content up to nearly pure material is found in the QDs, being characterized by small sizes of up to 8 nm baselength and about 2 nm height. In spite of the intermixing, all nanostructures have rather abrupt interfaces, and no significant Sb segregation in growth direction is observed. This changes completely when molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used as growth method, in which case individual Sb atoms are found to be distributed over several nm above the nanostructures. Massive group-V atomic exchange processes are causing this strong inter-mixing and Sb segregation during GaAs overgrowth. In combination with the large strain inherent to GaSb/GaAs QDs, this segregation upon overgrowth is assumed to be the reason for a unique structural phenomenon: All MBE-grown QDs, independent of the amount of deposited GaSb, exhibit a ring structure, consisting of a ring body of high GaSb content and a more or less extended central gap filled with GaAs. These rings have formed in a self-assembled way even when the initial GaSb layer was overgrown considerably fast

  19. Density perturbations for running vacuum: a successful approach to structure formation and to the σ8-tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Valent, Adrià; Peracaula, Joan Solà

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that dynamical dark energy (DDE) provides a better fit to the rising affluence of modern cosmological observations than the concordance model (ΛCDM) with a rigid cosmological constant, Λ. Such is the case with the running vacuum models (RVMs) and to some extent also with a simple XCDM parametrization. Apart from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, the most crucial datasets potentially carrying the DDE signature are: i) baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), and ii) direct large scale structure (LSS) formation data (i.e. the observations on f(z)σ8(z) at different redshifts). As it turns out, analyses mainly focusing on CMB and with insufficient BAO+LSS input, or those just making use of gravitational weak-lensing data for the description of structure formation, generally fail to capture the DDE signature, whereas the few existing studies using a rich set of CMB+BAO+LSS data (see in particular Solà, Gómez-Valent & de Cruz Pérez 2015, 2017; and Zhao et al. 2017) do converge to the remarkable conclusion that DDE might well be encoded in the current cosmological observations. Being the issue so pressing, here we explain both analytically and numerically the origin of the possible hints of DDE in the context of RVMs, which arise at a significance level of 3 - 4σ. By performing a detailed study on the matter and vacuum perturbations within the RVMs, and comparing with the XCDM, we show why the running vacuum fully relaxes the existing σ8-tension and accounts for the LSS formation data much better than the concordance model.

  20. Ultra-Lightweight Nanocomposite Foams and Sandwich Structures for Space Structures Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space structures that are ultra-lightweight, and have gas barrier property, space durability, radiation resistance, EMI shielding, and high impact resistance are...

  1. Four thiophene-pyridyl-amide-based Zn{sup II}/Cd{sup II} coordination polymers: Assembly, structures, photocatalytic properties and fluorescent recognition for Fe{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wu, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Guo-Cheng; Li, Qiao-Min; Lin, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xiang

    2017-05-15

    By tuning metal ions and combining with different dicarboxylates, four new semi-rigid thiophene-bis-pyridyl-bis-amide-based coordination polymers, namely, [Zn(3-bptpa)(1,3-BDC)]·DMA·2H{sub 2}O (1), [Zn(3-bptpa)(5-MIP)] (2), [Cd(3-bptpa)(1,3-BDC)]·2H{sub 2}O (3) and [Cd(3-bptpa)(5-MIP)]·4H{sub 2}O (4) (3-bptpa=N,N′-bis(pyridine-3-yl)thiophene-2,5-dicarboxamide, 1,3-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 5-H{sub 2}MIP=5-methylisophthalic acid, DMA=N,N-dimethylacetamide), were solvothermally/hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR spectra, UV–vis diffuse-reflectance spectra (DRS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermal gravimetric analyses (TG). The structural analysis reveals that Zn-complexes 1 and 2 are similar 2D networks. While Cd-complexes 3 and 4 exhibit similar 2-fold interpenetrating 3D α-Po frameworks with the (4{sup 12}·6{sup 3}) topology. The photocatalytic properties for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under ultraviolet light irradiation of the title complexes have been investigated in detail. Furthermore, the luminescent sensing behaviors for metal cations of 1–4 have been studied, the results indicate that 3 is an excellent fluorescent probe, with high sensitivity, selectivity, and simple regeneration, for environmentally relevant Fe{sup 3+} ions. - Graphical abstract: Four Zn{sup II}/Cd{sup II} coordination polymers with a thiophene-pyridyl-amide ligand have been prepared. The photocatalytic activities and fluorescent sensing properties for metal ions of the title complexes have been investigated. - Highlights: • Four coordination polymers with thiophene-pyridyl-amide ligands have been obtained. • The central metal ions play an important role in the formation of the frameworks. • The photoluminescent sensing and the photocatalytic properties have been investigated.

  2. Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Aggarwal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3−, respectively. The reaction follows a ping-pong mechanism, in which the rate-limiting step is the transfer of a proton from the zinc-bound solvent (OH−/H2O in/out of the active site via His64, which is widely believed to be the proton-shuttling residue. The decreased catalytic activity (∼20-fold lower with respect to the wild type of a variant of CA II in which His64 is replaced with Ala (H64A CA II can be enhanced by exogenous proton donors/acceptors, usually derivatives of imidazoles and pyridines, to almost the wild-type level. X-ray crystal structures of H64A CA II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole have been determined and reveal multiple binding sites. Two of these imidazole binding sites have been identified that mimic the positions of the `in' and `out' rotamers of His64 in wild-type CA II, while another directly inhibits catalysis by displacing the zinc-bound solvent. The data presented here not only corroborate the importance of the imidazole side chain of His64 in proton transfer during CA catalysis, but also provide a complete structural understanding of the mechanism by which imidazoles enhance (and inhibit when used at higher concentrations the activity of H64A CA II.

  3. A temperature-dependent theory for HeII: Application to the liquid structure factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Ghassib, H.B.

    1981-08-01

    A temperature-dependent theory is presented for HeII, which is based on both a gauge-theoretic formulation as well as a mean-field (Hartree) approach. A simple model calculation is then performed within this framework for the liquid structure factor of the system. In particular, explicit expressions are obtained for the low-momentum-transfer and low-temperature limits, which seem to conform with the available experimental data. Further, the curvature of the structure factor is predicted, under these circumstances, to be only mildly dependent on temperature. Throughout, we compare and contrast with other theoretical attempts, including Feynman's. (author)

  4. Equilibrium vortex structures of type-II/1 superconducting films with washboard pinning landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, C. A.; Xu, X. B.; Xu, X. N.; Wang, Z. H.; Gu, M.

    2018-05-01

    We numerically study the equilibrium vortex structures of type-II/1 superconducting films with a periodic quasi-one-dimensional corrugated substrate. We show as a function of substrate period and pinning strength that, the vortex system displays a variety of vortex phases including arrays consisted of vortex clumps with different morphologies, ordered vortex stripes parallel and perpendicular to pinning troughs, and ordered one-dimensional vortex chains. Our simulations are helpful in understanding the structural modulations for extensive systems with both competing interactions and competing periodicities.

  5. OR TEP-II: a FORTRAN Thermal-Ellipsoid Plot Program for crystal structure illustrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.K.

    1976-03-01

    A computer program is described for drawing crystal structure illustrations using a mechanical plotter. Ball-and-stick type illustrations of a quality suitable for publication are produced with either spheres or thermal-motion probability ellipsoids on the atomic sites. The program can produce stereoscopic pairs of illustrations which aid in the visualization of complex packing arrangements of atoms and thermal motion patterns. Interatomic distances, bond angles, and principal axes of thermal motion are also calculated to aid the structural study. The most recent version of the program, OR TEP-II, has a hidden-line-elimination feature to omit those portions of atoms or bonds behind other atoms or bonds

  6. Concept and structure of instrumentation and control of the Atucha II nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, D.; Roca, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The general structure of instrumentation and control of Atucha II nuclear power plant as well as the technologies used, are described: concepts of functional decentralization and physical centralization; concept of functional group and functional complex; description of the technologies used (physical support) in the project of plant instrumentation and control; description of the different automation levels on the basis of concepts of control interface, automatism, regulation, group and subgroup controls; principles of signal conditioning; concept of announcement of alarms and state: supervisory computer, description of HAS (Hard wired Alarm System) and CAS (Computer Alarm System); application of the above mentioned structure to the project of another type of plants. (Author)

  7. OR TEP-II: a FORTRAN Thermal-Ellipsoid Plot Program for crystal structure illustrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.K.

    1976-03-01

    A computer program is described for drawing crystal structure illustrations using a mechanical plotter. Ball-and-stick type illustrations of a quality suitable for publication are produced with either spheres or thermal-motion probability ellipsoids on the atomic sites. The program can produce stereoscopic pairs of illustrations which aid in the visualization of complex packing arrangements of atoms and thermal motion patterns. Interatomic distances, bond angles, and principal axes of thermal motion are also calculated to aid the structural study. The most recent version of the program, OR TEP-II, has a hidden-line-elimination feature to omit those portions of atoms or bonds behind other atoms or bonds.

  8. Structure of a Complete Mediator-RNA Polymerase II Pre-Initiation Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J; Trnka, Michael J; Bushnell, David A; Davis, Ralph E; Mattei, Pierre-Jean; Burlingame, Alma L; Kornberg, Roger D

    2016-09-08

    A complete, 52-protein, 2.5 million dalton, Mediator-RNA polymerase II pre-initiation complex (Med-PIC) was assembled and analyzed by cryo-electron microscopy and by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry. The resulting complete Med-PIC structure reveals two components of functional significance, absent from previous structures, a protein kinase complex and the Mediator-activator interaction region. It thereby shows how the kinase and its target, the C-terminal domain of the polymerase, control Med-PIC interaction and transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electronic structure and electric fields gradients of crystalline Sn(II) and Sn(IV) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, J.; Guenzburger, D.

    1991-01-01

    The electronic structures of clusters representing crystalline compounds of Sn(II) and Sn(IV) were investigated, employing the first-principles Discrete Variational method and Local Density theory. Densities of states and related parameters were obtained and compared with experimental measurements and with results from band structure calculations. Effects of cluster size and of cluster truncated bonds are discussed. Electric field gradients at the Sn nucleus were calculated; results are analysed in terms of charge distribution and chemical bonding in the crystals. (author)

  10. More Than Filaments and Cores: Statistical Study of Structure Formation and Dynamics in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, How-Huan; Goodman, Alyssa

    2018-01-01

    In the past decade, multiple attempts at understanding the connection between filaments and star forming cores have been made using observations across the entire epectrum. However, the filaments and the cores are usually treated as predefined--and well-defined--entities, instead of structures that often come at different sizes, shapes, with substantially different dynamics, and inter-connected at different scales. In my dissertation, I present an array of studies using different statistical methods, including the dendrogram and the probability distribution function (PDF), of structures at different size scales within nearby molecular clouds. These structures are identified using observations of different density tracers, and where possible, in the multi-dimensional parameter space of key dynamic properties--the LSR velocity, the velocity dispersion, and the column density. The goal is to give an overview of structure formation in nearby star-forming clouds, as well as of the dynamics in these structures. I find that the overall statistical properties of a larger structure is often the summation/superposition of sub-structures within, and that there could be significant variations due to local physical processes. I also find that the star formation process within molecular clouds could in fact take place in a non-monolithic manner, connecting potentially merging and/or transient structures, at different scales.

  11. Soft sediment deformation structures in the Maastrichtian Ajali Formation Western Flank of Anambra Basin, Southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabode, Solomon Ojo

    2014-01-01

    Soft sediment deformation structures were recognized in the Maastrichtian shallow marine wave to tide influenced regressive sediments of Ajali Formation in the western flank of Anambra basin, southern Nigerian. The soft sediment deformation structures were in association with cross bedded sands, clay and silt and show different morphological types. Two main types recognised are plastic deformations represented by different types of recumbent folds and injection structure represented by clastic dykes. Other structures in association with the plastic deformation structures include distorted convolute lamination, subsidence lobes, pillars, cusps and sand balls. These structures are interpreted to have been formed by liquefaction and fluidization mechanisms. The driving forces inferred include gravitational instabilities and hydraulic processes. Facies analysis, detailed morphologic study of the soft sediment deformation structures and previous tectonic history of the basin indicate that the main trigger agent for deformation is earthquake shock. The soft sediment deformation structures recognised in the western part of Anambra basin provide a continuous record of the tectonic processes that acted on the regressive Ajali Formation during the Maastrichtian.

  12. Improvement of the excavation damaged zone in saliferous formations. Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Simo Kuate, E.; Borstel, L. von; Engelhardt, H.J.

    2016-01-15

    In Germany, salt formations are considered to be suitable to host a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. However, local stress changes adjacent to man-made openings lead to the evolution of an excavation damaged zone (EDZ) during and after excavation. Such an EDZ can have a major impact on the operation of a radioactive waste repository since it represents a region where progressive failure occurs. This decreases the material strength and thus increases the permeability of the originally tight host rock. The objective of this investigation is determined by the need to develop a modeling strategy that can be applied to simulate the permeability increase due to mechanical deterioration of rock salt, in particular that occurring in the EDZ. The identification of material parameters is often conducted by back-calculation of laboratory experiments. However, standard laboratory tests, e.g. compression tests, are only applicable to provide information about the macroscopic deformation. For this purpose, further laboratory tests were conducted to derive material parameters used in the constitutive models. Combined acoustic emission and uniaxial compression tests as well as microstructural analyses were carried out to dissolve the macroscopic behavior micromechanically. The information obtained was then used for parameter identification utilizing optimization methods. The objective was to identify the best estimate of the micro-parameter values that can be applied to simulate the laboratory results performed. To make a qualitative comparison between the numerical analysis and the acoustic emission (AE) testing, the onset of failure at contacts was equated with events detected by AE testing. The onset of failure is identified at stress levels above 3 MPa. The number of tensile fractures increases continuously and the maximum is reached between 10 and 12 MPa axial stress. At the beginning of loading, tensile fractures appear more frequently than shear fractures

  13. Coordination structure of adsorbed Zn(II) at Water-TiO2 interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, G.; Pan, G.; Zhang, M.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2011-01-15

    The local structure of aqueous metal ions on solid surfaces is central to understanding many chemical and biological processes in soil and aquatic environments. Here, the local coordination structure of hydrated Zn(II) at water-TiO{sub 2} interfaces was identified by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A nonintegral coordination number of average {approx}4.5 O atoms around a central Zn atom was obtained by EXAFS analysis. DFT calculations indicated that this coordination structure was consistent with the mixture of 4-coordinated bidentate binuclear (BB) and 5-coordinated bidentate mononuclear (BM) metastable equilibrium adsorption (MEA) states. The BB complex has 4-coordinated Zn, while the monodentate mononuclear (MM) complex has 6-coordinated Zn, and a 5-coordinated adsorbed Zn was found in the BM adsorption mode. DFT calculated energies showed that the lower-coordinated BB and BM modes were thermodynamically more favorable than the higher-coordinated MM MEA state. The experimentally observed XANES fingerprinting provided additional direct spectral evidence of 4- and 5-coordinated Zn-O modes. The overall spectral and computational evidence indicated that Zn(II) can occur in 4-, 5-, and 6-oxygen coordinated sites in different MEA states due to steric hindrance effects, and the coexistence of different MEA states formed the multiple coordination environments.

  14. An Overview of Materials Structures for Extreme Environments Efforts for 2015 SBIR Phases I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2017-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for Agency projects. This report highlights innovative SBIR 2015 Phase I and II projects that specifically address areas in Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments, one of six core competencies at NASA Glenn Research Center. Each article describes an innovation, defines its technical objective, and highlights NASA applications as well as commercial and industrial applications. Ten technologies are featured: metamaterials-inspired aerospace structures, metallic joining to advanced ceramic composites, multifunctional polyolefin matrix composite structures, integrated reacting fluid dynamics and predictive materials degradation models for propulsion system conditions, lightweight inflatable structural airlock (LISA), copolymer materials for fused deposition modeling 3-D printing of nonstandard plastics, Type II strained layer superlattice materials development for space-based focal plane array applications, hydrogenous polymer-regolith composites for radiation-shielding materials, a ceramic matrix composite environmental barrier coating durability model, and advanced composite truss printing for large solar array structures. This report serves as an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, program managers, and other personnel to learn about innovations in this technology area as well as possibilities for collaboration with innovative small businesses that could benefit NASA programs and projects.

  15. Comparison of Solar Fine Structure Observed Simultaneously in Lyα and Mg II h

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, D.; Sukhorukov, A. V.; De Pontieu, B.; Leenaarts, J.; Bethge, C.; Winebarger, A.; Auchère, F.; Bando, T.; Ishikawa, R.; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Narukage, N.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) observed the Sun in H I Lyα during a suborbital rocket flight on 2015 September 3. The Interface Region Imaging Telescope (IRIS) coordinated with the CLASP observations and recorded nearly simultaneous and co-spatial observations in the Mg II h and k lines. The Mg II h and Lyα lines are important transitions, energetically and diagnostically, in the chromosphere. The canonical solar atmosphere model predicts that these lines form in close proximity to each other and so we expect that the line profiles will exhibit similar variability. In this analysis, we present these coordinated observations and discuss how the two profiles compare over a region of quiet Sun at viewing angles that approach the limb. In addition to the observations, we synthesize both line profiles using a 3D radiation-MHD simulation. In the observations, we find that the peak width and the peak intensities are well correlated between the lines. For the simulation, we do not find the same relationship. We have attempted to mitigate the instrumental differences between IRIS and CLASP and to reproduce the instrumental factors in the synthetic profiles. The model indicates that formation heights of the lines differ in a somewhat regular fashion related to magnetic geometry. This variation explains to some degree the lack of correlation, observed and synthesized, between Mg II and Lyα. Our analysis will aid in the definition of future observatories that aim to link dynamics in the chromosphere and transition region.

  16. Comparison of Solar Fine Structure Observed Simultaneously in Ly α and Mg ii h

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmit, D. [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Suite 209, Petaluma, CA 94952 (United States); Sukhorukov, A. V.; Leenaarts, J. [Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); De Pontieu, B. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3176 Porter Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Bethge, C.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Auchère, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishikawa, R. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Bueno, J. Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2017-10-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) observed the Sun in H i Ly α during a suborbital rocket flight on 2015 September 3. The Interface Region Imaging Telescope ( IRIS ) coordinated with the CLASP observations and recorded nearly simultaneous and co-spatial observations in the Mg ii h and k lines. The Mg ii h and Ly α lines are important transitions, energetically and diagnostically, in the chromosphere. The canonical solar atmosphere model predicts that these lines form in close proximity to each other and so we expect that the line profiles will exhibit similar variability. In this analysis, we present these coordinated observations and discuss how the two profiles compare over a region of quiet Sun at viewing angles that approach the limb. In addition to the observations, we synthesize both line profiles using a 3D radiation-MHD simulation. In the observations, we find that the peak width and the peak intensities are well correlated between the lines. For the simulation, we do not find the same relationship. We have attempted to mitigate the instrumental differences between IRIS and CLASP and to reproduce the instrumental factors in the synthetic profiles. The model indicates that formation heights of the lines differ in a somewhat regular fashion related to magnetic geometry. This variation explains to some degree the lack of correlation, observed and synthesized, between Mg ii and Ly α . Our analysis will aid in the definition of future observatories that aim to link dynamics in the chromosphere and transition region.

  17. A 3D complex containing novel 2D CuII-azido layers: Structure, magnetic properties and effects of “Non-innocent” reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xue-Miao; Guo, Qian; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Fu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    A novel copper-azido coordination polymer, [Cu 2 (N 3 ) 3 (L)] n (1, HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction with “Non-innocent” reagent in the aqueous solution. In the reaction system, Cu II ions are avoided to reduce to Cu I ions due to the existence of Nd III . It is found that the complex is a 3D structure based on two double EO azido bridged trimmers and octahedron Cu II ions, in which the azide ligands take on EO and μ 1,1,3 mode to form Cu II -azido 2D layers, furthermore L ligands pillar 2D layers into an infinite 3D framework with the Schläfli symbol of {4;6 2 }4{4 2 ;6 12 ;8 10 ;10 4 }{4 2 ;6 4 }. Magnetic studies revealed that the interactions between the Cu II ions in the trimmer are ferromagnetic for the Cu–N–Cu angle nearly 98°, while the interactions between the trimmer and octahedron Cu II ion are antiferromgantic and result in an antiferromagnetic state. - Graphical abstract: A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu II -azido layers, [Cu 2 (N 3 ) 3 (L)] n (HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), was synthesized by hydrothermal reaction and exhibit interesting structure and magnetic properties. Highlights: ► “Non-innocent” reagents plays a key role in the process of formation of this complex. ► 2D layer is formed only by Cu II ions and azido ligands. ► Pyrazine-2-carboxylate ligands reinforce 2D layers and pillar them into an infinite 3D framework. ► Magnetic study indicates that alternating FM–AF coupling exists in the complex.

  18. Residue Phe112 of the Human-Type Corrinoid Adenosyltransferase (PduO) Enzyme of Lactobacillus reuteri Is Critical to the Formation of the Four-Coordinate Co(II) Corrinoid Substrate and to the Activity of the Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mera, Paola E.; St. Maurice, Martin; Rayment, Ivan; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; UW

    2009-06-08

    ATP:Corrinoid adenosyltransferases (ACAs) catalyze the transfer of the adenosyl moiety from ATP to cob(I)alamin via a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate. At present, it is unknown how ACAs promote the formation of the four-coordinate corrinoid species needed for activity. The published high-resolution crystal structure of the ACA from Lactobacillus reuteri (LrPduO) in complex with ATP and cob(II)alamin shows that the environment around the alpha face of the corrin ring consists of bulky hydrophobic residues. To understand how these residues promote the generation of the four-coordinate cob(II)alamin, variants of the human-type ACA enzyme from L. reuteri (LrPduO) were kinetically and structurally characterized. These studies revealed that residue Phe112 is critical in the displacement of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) from its coordination bond with the Co ion of the ring, resulting in the formation of the four-coordinate species. An F112A substitution resulted in a 80% drop in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The explanation for this loss of activity was obtained from the crystal structure of the mutant protein, which showed cob(II)alamin bound in the active site with DMB coordinated to the cobalt ion. The crystal structure of an LrPduO(F112H) variant showed a DMB-off/His-on interaction between the corrinoid and the enzyme, whose catalytic efficiency was 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild-type protein. The analysis of the kinetic parameters of LrPduO(F112H) suggests that the F112H substitution negatively impacts product release. Substitutions of other hydrophobic residues in the Cbl binding pocket did not result in significant defects in catalytic efficiency in vitro; however, none of the variant enzymes analyzed in this work supported AdoCbl biosynthesis in vivo.

  19. Formation of a stable oligomer of beta-2 microglobulin requires only transient encounter with Cu(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Matthew F; Miranker, Andrew D

    2007-03-16

    Beta-2 Microglobulin (beta2m) is a small, globular protein, with high solubility under conditions comparable to human serum. A complication of hemodialysis in renal failure patients is the deposition of unmodified beta2m as amyloid fibers. In vitro, exposure of beta2m to equimolar Cu(2+) under near-physiological conditions can result in self-association leading to amyloid fiber formation. Previously, we have shown that the early steps in this process involve a catalyzed structural rearrangement followed by formation of discrete oligomers. These oligomers, however, have a continued requirement for Cu(2+) while mature fibers are resistant to addition of metal chelate. Here, we report that the transition from Cu(2+) dependent to chelate resistant states occurs in the context of small oligomers, dimeric to hexameric in size. These species require Cu(2+) to form, but once generated, do not need metal cation for stability. Importantly, this transition occurs gradually over several days and the resulting oligomers are isolatable and kinetically stable on timescales exceeding weeks. In addition, formation is enhanced by levels of urea similar to those found in hemodialysis patients. Our results are consistent with our hypothesis that transient encounter of full-length wild-type beta2m with transition metal cation at the dialysis membrane interface is causal to dialysis related amyloidosis.

  20. Kinetics and equilibria for the formation of a new DNA metal-intercalator: the cyclic polyamine Neotrien/copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biver, Tarita; Secco, Fernando; Tinè, Maria Rosaria; Venturini, Marcella

    2004-01-01

    A study has been performed of the kinetics and equilibria involved in complex formation between the macrocyclic polyamine 2,5,8,11-tetraaza[12]-[12](2,9)[1,10]-phenanthrolinophane (Neotrien) and Cu(II) in acidic aqueous solution and ionic strength 0.5 M (NaCl), by means of the stopped-flow method and UV spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric titrations and kinetic experiments revealed that the binding of Cu(II) to Neotrien gives rise to several 1:1 complexes differing in their degree of protonation. Under the experimental hydrogen ion concentration range investigated, complexation occurs by two parallel paths: (a) M2+ + (H4L)4+ (MH4L)6+ and (b) M2+ + (H3L)3+ (MH3L)5+. The rate constants values found for complex formation, by paths (a) and (b), are much lower than the values expected from water exchange at copper(II) and other amine/Cu(II) complexation kinetic constants. Kinetic experiments at different NaCl concentrations indicated that this finding was not due to chloride ion competition in complex formation with Neotrien, but it was related to a ring rigidity effect. As the phenanthroline moiety could, in principle, interact with nucleic acids by intercalation or external binding, some preliminary measurements concerned with the possible interactions occurring between the Cu(II)/Neotrien complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have also been carried out. The absorption spectra of the Cu(II)/Neotrien complex change upon addition of CT-DNA at pH 7.0, revealing the occurrence of complex-nucleic acid interactions. Moreover, fluorescence titrations, carried out by adding the Cu(II)/Neotrien complex to CT-DNA, previously saturated with ethidium bromide (EB), show that the Cu(II)/Neotrien complex is able to displace EB from DNA, suggesting the complex is able to intercalate into the polynucleotide and then to cleave the phosphodiester bond of DNA.

  1. Soft-Sediment Deformation Structures Interpreted as Seismites in the Kolankaya Formation, Denizli Basin (SW Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Savaş; Özkul, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The NW-trending Denizli basin of the SW Turkey is one of the neotectonic grabens in the Aegean extensional province. It is bounded by normal faults on both southern and northern margins. The basin is filled by Neogene and Quaternary terrestrial deposits. Late Miocene- Late Pliocene aged Kolankaya formation crops out along the NW trending Karakova uplift in the Denizli basin. It is a typical fluviolacustrine succession that thickens and coarsens upward, comprising poorly consolidated sand, gravelly sand, siltstone and marl. Various soft-sediment deformation structures occur in the formation, especially in fine- to medium grained sands, silts and marls: load structures, flame structures, clastic dikes (sand and gravely-sand dike), disturbed layers, laminated convolute beds, slumps and synsedimentary faulting. The deformation mechanism and driving force for the soft-sediment deformation are related essentially to gravitational instability, dewatering, liquefaction-liquidization, and brittle deformation. Field data and the wide lateral extent of the structures as well as regional geological data show that most of the deformation is related to seismicity and the structures are interpreted as seismites. The existence of seismites in the Kolankaya Formation is evidence for continuing tectonic activity in the study area during the Neogene and is consistent with the occurrence of the paleoearthquakes of magnitude >5. PMID:25152909

  2. Structure formation in fibrous materials based on poly-3-hydroxybutyrate for traumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Sklyanchuk, E. D.; Staroverova, O. V.; Abbasov, T. A.; Guryev, V. V.; Akatov, V. S.; Fadeyeva, I. S.; Fesenko, N. I.; Filatov, Yu. N.; Iordanskii, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    The paper reviews the structure formation of fibrous materials based on poly-3-hydroxybutyrate depending on parameters of electrospinning and characteristics of polymer solution. Fiber structure was studied by DSC, ESR and SEM. The molecular weight affects the diameter and uniformity of the fiber. An electromechanical impact leads to an orientation of crystalline structure in the fiber. The design of an artificial bioresorbable implant based on nano- and microfibers of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate is created. Dynamics of growth of mesenchymal stem cells on poly-3-hydroxybutyrate scaffolds is studied. Successful field tests of implants of the Achilles tendon in Wistar rats are conducted.

  3. Regularities of structure formation on different stages of WC-Co hard alloys fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyavskij, K S

    1987-03-01

    Some regularities of structural transformations in powder products of the hard alloys fabrication have been formulated on the basis of results of the author works and other native and foreign reseachers. New data confirming the influene of technological prehistory of carbide powder on the mechanism of its particle grinding as well as the influence of the structural-energy state of WC powder on the course of the WC-Co alloy structure formation processes are given. Some possibilities for the application in practice of the regularities studied are considered.

  4. Formation of cross-cutting structures with different porosity on thick silicon wafers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera A. Yuzova

    2017-06-01

    The second type pass-through structures include a macroporous silicon layer with a thickness of 250 μm which interlock in the depth of the silicon wafer to form a cavity with a size of 4–8 μm. For the formation of the second type structures we only used the first one of the abovementioned stages, the etching time being longer, i.e. 210 min. All the etching procedures were carried out in a cooling chamber at 5 °C. The developed technology will provided for easier and more reliable formation of the monolithic structures of membrane-electrode assembly micro fuel cells.

  5. Formation of Outburst Structure in Hot Dip Galvannealed Coatings on IF Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollárová, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Outburst structure in two industrially produced hot dip galvanized interstitial free steel sheets for automotive industry after additional annealing has been examined. Ti IF steel was found to form weak outburst structure in the early stage of annealing, followed by frontal growth of Fe-Zn phases during further heating. The high reactivity of this steel was confirmed by rapid G-phase formation. Under the same conditions, Ti-Nb-P IF steel exhibited frontal growth of Fe-Zn compounds without G-phase formation due to relatively high phosphorous content, which is known as inhibitor of Fe-Zn reaction, but simultaneously significant occurrence of undesired outburst structures was recorded. It was assumed that the phosphorous content was insufficient and/or ferrite grain was very fine.

  6. Syntheses, structural characterization and spectroscopic studies of cadmium(II)-metal(II) cyanide complexes with 4-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaağaç, Dursun; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Şenyel, Mustafa; Hökelek, Tuncer

    2017-02-01

    Three new cadmium(II)-metal(II) cyanide complexes, [Cd(4aepy)2(H2O)2][Ni(CN)4] (1), [Cd(4aepy)2(H2O)2][Pd(CN)4] (2) and [Cd(4aepy)2(H2O)2][Pt(CN)4] (3) [4aepy = 4-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine], have been synthesized and characterized by elemental, thermal, FT-IR and Raman spectral analyses. The crystal structures of 1 and 2 have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique, in which they crystallize in the monoclinic system and C2/c space group. The M(II) [M(II) = Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II)] ions are coordinated with the carbon atoms of the four cyanide groups in the square planar geometries and the [M(CN)4]2- ions act as counter ions. The Cd(II) ions display an N4O2 coordination sphere with a distorted octahedral geometry, the nitrogen donors belonging to four molecules of the organic 4aepy that act as unidentate ligands and two oxygen atoms from aqua ligands. 3D supramolecular structures of 1 and 2 were occurred by M⋯π and hydrogen bonding (Nsbnd H⋯N and Osbnd H⋯N) interactions. Vibrational assignments of all the observed bands were given and the spectral properties were also supported the crystal structures of the complexes. A possible decompositions of the complexes were investigated in the temperature range 30-800 °C in the static atmosphere.

  7. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P; Barkley, Robert M; Jones, David N M; Hankin, Joseph A; Murphy, Robert C

    2018-04-23

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H] - ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H] - and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H 2 O-CO 2 ] - and [M-H-H 2 O] - displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H 2 O] - ion from LTB 4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H 2 O] - product ions from LTB 4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P.; Barkley, Robert M.; Jones, David N. M.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2018-04-01

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H]- ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H]- and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H2O-CO2]- and [M-H-H2O]- displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H2O]- ion from LTB4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H2O]- product ions from LTB4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. EMBEDDED PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AROUND (SUB-)SOLAR STARS. II. DISK MASSES, SIZES, DENSITIES, TEMPERATURES, AND THE PLANET FORMATION PERSPECTIVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2011-01-01

    We present basic properties of protostellar disks in the embedded phase of star formation (EPSF), which is difficult to probe observationally using available observational facilities. We use numerical hydrodynamics simulations of cloud core collapse and focus on disks formed around stars in the 0.03-1.0 M sun mass range. Our obtained disk masses scale near-linearly with the stellar mass. The mean and median disk masses in the Class 0 and I phases (M mean d,C0 = 0.12 M sun , M mdn d,C0 = 0.09 M sun and M mean d,CI = 0.18 M sun , M mdn d,CI = 0.15 M sun , respectively) are greater than those inferred from observations by (at least) a factor of 2-3. We demonstrate that this disagreement may (in part) be caused by the optically thick inner regions of protostellar disks, which do not contribute to millimeter dust flux. We find that disk masses and surface densities start to systematically exceed that of the minimum mass solar nebular for objects with stellar mass as low as M * = 0.05-0.1 M sun . Concurrently, disk radii start to grow beyond 100 AU, making gravitational fragmentation in the disk outer regions possible. Large disk masses, surface densities, and sizes suggest that giant planets may start forming as early as in the EPSF, either by means of core accretion (inner disk regions) or direct gravitational instability (outer disk regions), thus breaking a longstanding stereotype that the planet formation process begins in the Class II phase.

  10. Exact calculation of loop formation probability identifies folding motifs in RNA secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloma, Michael F.; Mathews, David H.

    2016-01-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction is widely used to analyze RNA sequences. In an RNA partition function calculation, free energy nearest neighbor parameters are used in a dynamic programming algorithm to estimate statistical properties of the secondary structure ensemble. Previously, partition functions have largely been used to estimate the probability that a given pair of nucleotides form a base pair, the conditional stacking probability, the accessibility to binding of a continuous stretch of nucleotides, or a representative sample of RNA structures. Here it is demonstrated that an RNA partition function can also be used to calculate the exact probability of formation of hairpin loops, internal loops, bulge loops, or multibranch loops at a given position. This calculation can also be used to estimate the probability of formation of specific helices. Benchmarking on a set of RNA sequences with known secondary structures indicated that loops that were calculated to be more probable were more likely to be present in the known structure than less probable loops. Furthermore, highly probable loops are more likely to be in the known structure than the set of loops predicted in the lowest free energy structures. PMID:27852924

  11. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.; Treffry, A.; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M.; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits 'ferroxidase' activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial 'burst', the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported

  12. Role of 3d electrons in formation of ionic-covalent bonds in II-VI based ternary compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Iwanowski, R.J.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1997-01-01

    In the II-VI compounds doped with transition metals (diluted magnetic semiconductors) a substitution of cation by the introduced magnetic ion leads to hybridization of its 3d states with the sp states of the host semiconductor. The degree of hybridization of the 3d states and its interaction with the host material band states has been a subject of numerous discussions. Inner shell absorption spectroscopy provides very useful means of electronic structure analysis in a wide variety of systems. Due to its selectivity for atomic species and the selection rules for electron transitions, the soft X-ray absorption technique offers quite unique opportunity to measure directly the site-selective local density of the unoccupied d states in the compounds studied. Results are reported for ZnS compounds with Mn, Fe, Co or Ni substitutions for Zn

  13. Mechanism of the formation of silver-sheathed HTSC ceramics and its fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinova, Yu.V.; Sudareva, S.V.; Krinitsina, T.P.; Romanov, E.P.; Akimov, I.I.

    2005-01-01

    Electron microscopical data are reported which point to the fact that two mechanisms of formation of main superconducting phase 2223 in Bi,Pb-2223/Ag exist: liquid phase mechanism and solid-phase one. Along crystallite boundaries the spherical outlined by Ag interlayers are observed. These are former eutectic liquid droplets of ∼ 2223 composition from which Ag is liberated on solidification. In the initial stage of phase formation inside of a 2212 phase the platelets of phase 2223 are found out with the same orientation as the matrix (a solid-phase mechanism). Certain relationships of structure to superconducting properties are shown [ru

  14. The role of chemical admixtures in the formation of the structure of cement stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopov Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sulfates and carbonates of potassium and sodium on the character of the formation of the microstructure of cement stone was studied. The role of cations in the structure formation of cement stone is shown. The efficiency of chemical additives, hardening accelerators, was estimated from the ratio of the volumes of gel and capillary micropores. The ratio of gel and capillary pores allows to determine the efficiency coefficient of the action of chemical additives. It is shown that the potassium carbonate for Portland cement is the most effective additive for hardening in terms of microstructure modification, and potassium sulfate for slag Portland cement.

  15. STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROCESS OF BUSINESS ENGLISH SKILLS FORMATION IN FUTURE DOCTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Людмила Русалкіна

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the structure and organization of medical students’ business English teaching process. The main attention is spared to the problem of creation of the experimental model of future doctors’ business English skills formation. The suggested model is aimed at productive mastering of lexical and grammar communicative skills, at formation of business English communicative abilities of students-medics; it has communicative direction and is professionally oriented. The exercises correspond to English language knowledge of the future doctors and are set in sequence of increasing complexity.

  16. Anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)–organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Li-Wei [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chih-Min [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China); Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 107, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yen-Hsiang [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 242, Taiwan (China); Lee, Sheng-Long [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Kuang-Lieh [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-15

    A Cd(II)–organic framework {[Cd_2(tpim)_4(SO_4)(H_2O)_2]·(SO_4)·21H_2O}{sub n} (1) was synthesized by reacting CdSO{sub 4}·8/3H{sub 2}O and 2,4,5-tri(4-pyridyl)imidazole (tpim) under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 adopts a layered structure in which the [Cd(tpim){sub 2}]{sub n} chains are linked by sulfate anions. These 2D layers are further packed into a 3D supramolecular framework via π–π interactions. The structure contains two types of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions, i.e., bridging SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions, the latter of which are included in the large channels of the framework. Compound 1 exhibits interesting anion exchange behavior. In the presence of SCN{sup −} anions, both the bridging and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions in 1 were completely exchanged by SCN{sup −} ligands to form a 1D species [Cd(tpim){sub 2}(SCN){sub 2}] (1A), in which the SCN{sup –} moieties function as a monodentate ligand. On the other hand, when compound 1 was ion exchanged with N{sub 3}{sup −} anions in aqueous solution, the bridging SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} moieties remained intact, and only the free guest SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} were replaced by N{sub 3}{sup −} anions. The gas adsorption behavior of the activated compound 1 was also investigated. - Highlights: • An interesting anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)–organic framework is reported. • The sulfate-incorporated 2D layer compound exhibits very different anion exchange behavior with respect to SCN{sup −} and N{sub 3}{sup −}. • Both the bridging and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions in the 2D structure were completely exchanged by SCN{sup −} ligands, resulting in the formation of a 1D species. However, in the case of N{sub 3}{sup −} anions, only the free guest SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in the structure was replaced.

  17. STRUCTURAL MODIFICATION OF NEW FORMATIONS IN CEMENT MATRIX USING CARBON NANOTUBE DISPERSIONS AND NANOSILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex nanodispersed systems with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodispersed silica have a significant impact on the processes of hydration, hardening and strength gain of construction composites predetermining their durability. While using a scanning electron microscope with an attachment for X-ray microanalysis and a device for infrared spectral analysis investigations have shown that the main effect of the cement matrix modification in the case of adding complex nanodispersed systems is provided by direct influence of hydration processes with subsequent crystallization of new formations. It has been noted that while adding carbon nanotube dispersion and nanosized silica a binding matrix is structured in the form of an extremely dense shell from crystalline hydrate new formations on the surface of solid phases that provides strong binding matrix in cement concrete. The addition effect of carbon nanotubes has been analyzed and quantitatively assessed through an investigation for every case of one sample with nanotubes and one sample without them with the help of a nanoindenter and scanning electron microscope. It is necessary to solve rather complicated challenging task in order to assess quantitatively the addition effect of CNT on material characteristics at a micromechanical level. At the same time it is possible to investigate surface of a concrete sample with one-micron resolution. In this case it is necessary to prepare samples for nanoindentation with exclusion of all CNT defectable effects that have been shown by a SEM. So in this case more adequate method for assessment must be a picoindenter , which combines a test method for nanoindentation with an optical SEM potential. Such equipment is in the stage of in-situ testing process at the Vienna University of Technology. The investigation is based on the fact that the main modification effect of mineral binding matrix while using incorporated complex nanodispersed systems and

  18. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  19. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  20. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.