WorldWideScience

Sample records for structure dispersion curves

  1. First principles electronic band structure and phonon dispersion curves for zinc blend beryllium chalcogenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabhi, Shweta, E-mail: venu.mankad@gmail.com; Mankad, Venu, E-mail: venu.mankad@gmail.com; Jha, Prafulla K., E-mail: venu.mankad@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Maharaja Krishnakumasinhji Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar-364001 (India)

    2014-04-24

    A detailed theoretical study of structural, electronic and Vibrational properties of BeX compound is presented by performing ab-initio calculations based on density-functional theory using the Espresso package. The calculated value of lattice constant and bulk modulus are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data and agree reasonably well. BeX (X = S,Se,Te) compounds in the ZB phase are indirect wide band gap semiconductors with an ionic contribution. The phonon dispersion curves are represented which shows that these compounds are dynamically stable in ZB phase.

  2. Deep structure of the Alborz Mountains by joint inversion of P receiver functions and dispersion curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastgoo, Mehdi; Rahimi, Habib; Motaghi, Khalil; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Romanelli, Fabio; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2018-04-01

    The Alborz Mountains represent a tectonically and seismically active convergent boundary in the Arabia - Eurasia collision zone, in western Asia. The orogenic belt has undergone a long-lasted tectono-magmatic history since the Cretaceous. The relationship between shallow and deep structures in this complex tectonic domain is not straightforward. We present a 2D velocity model constructed by the assemblage of 1D shear wave velocity (Vs) models from 26 seismic stations, mainly distributed along the southern flank of the Alborz Mountains. The shear wave velocity structure has been estimated beneath each station using joint inversion of P-waves receiver functions and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. A substantiation of the Vs inversion results sits on the modeling of Bouguer gravity anomaly data. Our velocity and density models show low velocity/density anomalies in uppermost mantle of western and central Alborz at a depth range of ∼50-100 km. In deeper parts of the uppermost mantle (depth range of 100-150 km), a high velocity/density anomaly is located beneath most of the Mountain range. The spatial pattern of these low and high velocity/density structures in the upper mantle is interpreted as the result of post collisional delamination of lower part of the western and central Alborz lithosphere.

  3. Using Floquet periodicity to easily calculate dispersion curves and wave structures of homogeneous waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoda, Christopher; Rose, Joseph; Shokouhi, Parisa; Lissenden, Clifford

    2018-04-01

    Dispersion curves are essential to any guided-wave-related project. The Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method has become the conventional way to compute dispersion curves for homogeneous waveguides. However, only recently has a general SAFE formulation for commercial and open-source software become available, meaning that until now SAFE analyses have been variable and more time consuming than desirable. Likewise, the Floquet boundary conditions enable analysis of waveguides with periodicity and have been an integral part of the development of metamaterials. In fact, we have found the use of Floquet boundary conditions to be an extremely powerful tool for homogeneous waveguides, too. The nuances of using periodic boundary conditions for homogeneous waveguides that do not exhibit periodicity are discussed. Comparisons between this method and SAFE are made for selected homogeneous waveguide applications. The COMSOL Multiphysics software is used for the results shown, but any standard finite element software that can implement Floquet periodicity (user-defined or built-in) should suffice. Finally, we identify a number of complex waveguides for which dispersion curves can be found with relative ease by using the periodicity inherent to the Floquet boundary conditions.

  4. Phonon dispersion curves for CsCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, N.K.; Singh, Preeti; Rini, E.G.; Galgale, Jyostna; Singh, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for the present work was gained from the recent publication on phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) of CsCN from the neutron scattering technique. We have applied the extended three-body force shell model (ETSM) by incorporating the effect of coupling between the translation modes and the orientation of cyanide molecules for the description of phonon dispersion curves of CsCN between the temperatures 195 and 295 K. Our results on PDCs in symmetric direction are in good agreement with the experimental data measured with inelastic neutron scattering technique. (author)

  5. Theoretical Magnon Dispersion Curves for Gd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Harmon, B. N.; Freeman, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The magnon dispersion curve of Gd metal has been determined from first principles by use of augmented-plane-wave energy bands and wave functions. The exchange matrix elements I(k⃗, k⃗′) between the 4f electrons and the conduction electrons from the first six energy bands were calculated under...

  6. Spatially varying dispersion to model breakthrough curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangquan

    2011-01-01

    Often the water flowing in a karst conduit is a combination of contaminated water entering at a sinkhole and cleaner water released from the limestone matrix. Transport processes in the conduit are controlled by advection, mixing (dilution and dispersion), and retention-release. In this article, a karst transport model considering advection, spatially varying dispersion, and dilution (from matrix seepage) is developed. Two approximate Green's functions are obtained using transformation of variables, respectively, for the initial-value problem and for the boundary-value problem. A numerical example illustrates that mixing associated with strong spatially varying conduit dispersion can cause strong skewness and long tailing in spring breakthrough curves. Comparison of the predicted breakthrough curve against that measured from a dye-tracing experiment between Ames Sink and Indian Spring, Northwest Florida, shows that the conduit dispersivity can be as large as 400 m. Such a large number is believed to imply strong solute interaction between the conduit and the matrix and/or multiple flow paths in a conduit network. It is concluded that Taylor dispersion is not dominant in transport in a karst conduit, and the complicated retention-release process between mobile- and immobile waters may be described by strong spatially varying conduit dispersion. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  7. NOISY DISPERSION CURVE PICKING (NDCP): a Matlab friendly suite package for fully control dispersion curve picking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, I.; Calo, M.; Ramos, V.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a Matlab suite package (NDCP, Noisy Dispersion Curve Picking) that allows a full control over parameters to identify correctly group velocity dispersion curves in two types of datasets: correlograms between two stations or surface wave records from earthquakes. Using the frequency-time analysis (FTAN), the procedure to obtain the dispersion curves from records with a high noise level becomes difficult, and sometimes, the picked curve result in a misinterpreted character. For correlogram functions, obtained with cross-correlation of noise records or earthquake's coda, a non-homogeneous noise sources distribution yield to a non-symmetric Green's function (GF); to retrieve the complete information contained in there, NDCP allows to pick the dispersion curve in the time domain both in the causal and non-causal part of the GF. Then the picked dispersion curve is displayed on the FTAN diagram to in order to check if it matches with the maximum of the signal energy avoiding confusion with overtones or spike of noise. To illustrate how NDCP performs, we show exemple using: i) local correlograms functions obtained from sensors deployed into a volcanic caldera (Los Humeros, in Puebla, Mexico), ii) regional correlograms functions between two stations of the National Seismological Service (SSN, Servicio Sismológico Nacional in Spanish), and iii) surface wave seismic record for an earthquake located in the Pacific Ocean coast of Mexico and recorded by the SSN. This work is supported by the GEMEX project (Geothermal Europe-Mexico consortium).

  8. Parametric study of guided waves dispersion curves for composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predoi, Mihai Valentin; Petre, Cristian Cǎtǎlin; Kettani, Mounsif Ech Cherif El; Leduc, Damien

    2018-02-01

    Nondestructive testing of composite panels benefit from the relatively long range propagation of guided waves in sandwich structures. The guided waves are sensitive to delamination, air bubbles inclusions and cracks and can thus bring information about hidden defects in the composite panel. The preliminary data in all such inspections is represented by the dispersion curves, representing the dependency of the phase/group velocity on the frequency for the propagating modes. In fact, all modes are more or less attenuated, so it is even more important to compute the dispersion curves, which provide also the modal attenuation as function of frequency. Another important aspect is the sensitivity of the dispersion curves on each of the elastic constant of the composite, which are orthotropic in most cases. All these aspects are investigated in the present work, based on our specially developed finite element numerical model implemented in Comsol, which has several advantages over existing methods. The dispersion curves and modal displacements are computed for an example of composite plate. Comparison with literature data validates the accuracy of our results.

  9. Phonon dispersion curves of fcc La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stassis, C.; Loong, C.; Zarestky, J.

    1982-01-01

    Large single crystals of fcc La were grown in situ and were used to study the lattice dynamics of this phase of La by coherent inelastic neutron scattering. The phonon dispersion curves have been measured along the [xi00], [xixi0], [xixixi], and [0xi1] symmetry directions at 660 and 1100 K. The T[xixixi] branch exhibits anomalous dispersion for xi>0.25 and, in addition, close to the zone boundary, the phonon frequencies of this branch decrease with decreasing temperature. This soft-mode behavior may be related to the #betta→α# transformation in La, an assumption supported by recent band-theoretical calculations of the generalized susceptibility of fcc La. At X the frequencies of the L[xi00] branch are considerably lower than those of the corresponding branch of #betta#-Ce; a similar but not as pronounced effect is observed for the frequencies of the L[xixixi] branch close to the point L. Since the calculated generalized susceptibility of fcc La exhibits strong peaks at X and L, these anomalies may be due to the renormalization of the phonon frequencies by virtual fbold-arrow-left-rightd transitions to the unoccupied 4f level in La. The data were used to evaluate the elastic constants, the phonon density of states, and the lattice specific heat at constant pressure C/sub P//sup

  10. Utilization of multimode Love wave dispersion curve inversion for geotechnical site investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamimu, La; Nawawi, Mohd; Safani, Jamhir

    2011-01-01

    Inversion codes based on a modified genetic algorithm (GA) have been developed to invert multimode Love wave dispersion curves. The multimode Love wave dispersion curves were synthesized from the profile representing shear-wave velocity reversal using a full SH (shear horizontal) waveform. In this study, we used a frequency–slowness transform to extract the dispersion curve from the full SH waveform. Dispersion curves overlain in dispersion images were picked manually. These curves were then inverted using the modified GA. To assess the accuracy of the inversion results, differences between the true and inverted shear-wave velocity profile were quantified in terms of shear-wave velocity and thickness errors, E S and E H . Our numerical modeling showed that the inversion of multimode dispersion curves can significantly provide the better assessment of a shear-wave velocity structure, especially with a velocity reversal profile at typical geotechnical site investigations. This approach has been applied on field data acquired at a site in Niigata prefecture, Japan. In these field data, our inversion results show good agreement between the calculated and experimental dispersion curves and accurately detect low velocity layer targets

  11. Phonon dispersion curves of BCC Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuki, J.; Stassis, C.; Zarestky, J.

    1985-01-01

    Ba, as well as Sr and Ca, is a divalent alkaline earth metal. At room temperature and ambient pressure, the structure of Ba is bcc, whereas that of Sr and Ca is fcc. Under pressure, the bcc phase of Ba transforms to an hcp structure at 55 kbar. Also, at 37 kbar Ba becomes a superconductor with T/sub c/ = 0.06 K. These properties are highly dependent on the position of the d bands relative to the Fermi level. Experimental investigation of the elastic and lattice dynamical properties of these metals has been hindered by difficulties in growing single crystals. However, recently the authors were able to grow several single crystals of bcc Ba of sufficient volume for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Some of the results are summarized here

  12. Complexity of Curved Glass Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosić, T.; Svetel, I.; Cekić, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Despite the increasing number of research on the architectural structures of curvilinear forms and technological and practical improvement of the glass production observed over recent years, there is still a lack of comprehensive codes and standards, recommendations and experience data linked to real-life curved glass structures applications regarding design, manufacture, use, performance and economy. However, more and more complex buildings and structures with the large areas of glass envelope geometrically complex shape are built every year. The aim of the presented research is to collect data on the existing design philosophy on curved glass structure cases. The investigation includes a survey about how architects and engineers deal with different design aspects of curved glass structures with a special focus on the design and construction process, glass types and structural and fixing systems. The current paper gives a brief overview of the survey findings.

  13. Curved Folded Plate Timber Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Buri, Hans Ulrich; Stotz, Ivo; Weinand, Yves

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the development of a Curved Origami Prototype made with timber panels. In the last fifteen years the timber industry has developed new, large size, timber panels. Composition and dimensions of these panels and the possibility of milling them with Computer Numerical Controlled machines shows great potential for folded plate structures. To generate the form of these structures we were inspired by Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding. Common paper tessellations are c...

  14. Theoretical Aspects of Phonon Dispersion Curves for Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, W.

    1965-01-01

    Reasonably complete knowledge of the phonon dispersion curves for at least a dozen metallic elements and intermetallic compounds has now been obtained from neutron inelastic scattering experiments. The results have one feature in common: when analysed in terms of interatomic force constants they reveal the presence of comparatively long-range forces extending over several atomic spacings. The results for lead are particularly interesting; it did not prove possible to fit them by a force-constant model, but the dispersion curves for wave vectors in symmetry directions when analysed in terms of force constants between planes of atoms showed an oscillatory interatomic potential extending over distances of more than 20Å. This review is concerned with recent theoretical work which has a bearing on the calculation of phonon dispersion curves for metals and the explanation of the long range of the interatomic potential. The best hope at present for a general treatment of atomic interaction in metals appears to lie in the ''method of neutral pseudo-atoms'', (a description recently coined by Ziman). This approximate theory is outlined and its relevance to Kohn anomalies in phonon dispersion curves is discussed. Experimental data for sodium is consistent with the theory, and the interatomic potential in sodium varies periodically in a distance π/k F , where fik F is the Fermi momentum, as has already been demonstrated by Koenig in a different way. More exact calculations have been made for sodium by Toya and by Sham. The relationship between the different methods and other work of a more general character such as that of Harrison are discussed. (author) [fr

  15. Wave equation dispersion inversion using a difference approximation to the dispersion-curve misfit gradient

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2016-07-26

    We present a surface-wave inversion method that inverts for the S-wave velocity from the Rayleigh wave dispersion curve using a difference approximation to the gradient of the misfit function. We call this wave equation inversion of skeletonized surface waves because the skeletonized dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave is inverted using finite-difference solutions to the multi-dimensional elastic wave equation. The best match between the predicted and observed dispersion curves provides the optimal S-wave velocity model. Our method can invert for lateral velocity variations and also can mitigate the local minimum problem in full waveform inversion with a reasonable computation cost for simple models. Results with synthetic and field data illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Determination of Dispersion Curves for Composite Materials with the Use of Stiffness Matrix Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barski Marek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Elastic waves used in Structural Health Monitoring systems have strongly dispersive character. Therefore it is necessary to determine the appropriate dispersion curves in order to proper interpretation of a received dynamic response of an analyzed structure. The shape of dispersion curves as well as number of wave modes depends on mechanical properties of layers and frequency of an excited signal. In the current work, the relatively new approach is utilized, namely stiffness matrix method. In contrast to transfer matrix method or global matrix method, this algorithm is considered as numerically unconditionally stable and as effective as transfer matrix approach. However, it will be demonstrated that in the case of hybrid composites, where mechanical properties of particular layers differ significantly, obtaining results could be difficult. The theoretical relationships are presented for the composite plate of arbitrary stacking sequence and arbitrary direction of elastic waves propagation. As a numerical example, the dispersion curves are estimated for the lamina, which is made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin. It is assumed that elastic waves travel in the parallel, perpendicular and arbitrary direction to the fibers in lamina. Next, the dispersion curves are determined for the following laminate [0°, 90°, 0°, 90°, 0°, 90°, 0°, 90°] and hybrid [Al, 90°, 0°, 90°, 0°, 90°, 0°], where Al is the aluminum alloy PA38 and the rest of layers are made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin.

  17. DNA fingerprinting validates seed dispersal curves from observational studies in the neotropical legume parkia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Eckhard W; Lüttmann, Kathrin; Michalczyk, Inga M; Saboya, Pedro Pablo Pinedo; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Bialozyt, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Determining the distances over which seeds are dispersed is a crucial component for examining spatial patterns of seed dispersal and their consequences for plant reproductive success and population structure. However, following the fate of individual seeds after removal from the source tree till deposition at a distant place is generally extremely difficult. Here we provide a comparison of observationally and genetically determined seed dispersal distances and dispersal curves in a Neotropical animal-plant system. In a field study on the dispersal of seeds of three Parkia (Fabaceae) species by two Neotropical primate species, Saguinus fuscicollis and Saguinus mystax, in Peruvian Amazonia, we observationally determined dispersal distances. These dispersal distances were then validated through DNA fingerprinting, by matching DNA from the maternally derived seed coat to DNA from potential source trees. We found that dispersal distances are strongly right-skewed, and that distributions obtained through observational and genetic methods and fitted distributions do not differ significantly from each other. Our study showed that seed dispersal distances can be reliably estimated through observational methods when a strict criterion for inclusion of seeds is observed. Furthermore, dispersal distances produced by the two primate species indicated that these primates fulfil one of the criteria for efficient seed dispersers. Finally, our study demonstrated that DNA extraction methods so far employed for temperate plant species can be successfully used for hard-seeded tropical plants.

  18. DNA Fingerprinting Validates Seed Dispersal Curves from Observational Studies in the Neotropical Legume Parkia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Eckhard W.; Lüttmann, Kathrin; Michalczyk, Inga M.; Saboya, Pedro Pablo Pinedo; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Bialozyt, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background Determining the distances over which seeds are dispersed is a crucial component for examining spatial patterns of seed dispersal and their consequences for plant reproductive success and population structure. However, following the fate of individual seeds after removal from the source tree till deposition at a distant place is generally extremely difficult. Here we provide a comparison of observationally and genetically determined seed dispersal distances and dispersal curves in a Neotropical animal-plant system. Methodology/Principal Findings In a field study on the dispersal of seeds of three Parkia (Fabaceae) species by two Neotropical primate species, Saguinus fuscicollis and Saguinus mystax, in Peruvian Amazonia, we observationally determined dispersal distances. These dispersal distances were then validated through DNA fingerprinting, by matching DNA from the maternally derived seed coat to DNA from potential source trees. We found that dispersal distances are strongly right-skewed, and that distributions obtained through observational and genetic methods and fitted distributions do not differ significantly from each other. Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that seed dispersal distances can be reliably estimated through observational methods when a strict criterion for inclusion of seeds is observed. Furthermore, dispersal distances produced by the two primate species indicated that these primates fulfil one of the criteria for efficient seed dispersers. Finally, our study demonstrated that DNA extraction methods so far employed for temperate plant species can be successfully used for hard-seeded tropical plants. PMID:22514748

  19. Wave equation dispersion inversion using a difference approximation to the dispersion-curve misfit gradient

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong; Schuster, Gerard T.; Liu, Yike; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    We present a surface-wave inversion method that inverts for the S-wave velocity from the Rayleigh wave dispersion curve using a difference approximation to the gradient of the misfit function. We call this wave equation inversion of skeletonized

  20. Holomorphic curves in exploded manifolds: Kuranishi structure

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Brett

    2013-01-01

    This paper constructs a Kuranishi structure for the moduli stack of holomorphic curves in exploded manifolds. To avoid some technicalities of abstract Kuranishi structures, we embed our Kuranishi structure inside a moduli stack of curves. The construction also works for the moduli stack of holomorphic curves in any compact symplectic manifold.

  1. Ablation front rayleigh taylor dispersion curve in indirect drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budil, K.S.; Lasinski, B.; Edwards, M.J.; Wan, A.S.; Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Suter, L.; Stry, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, which occurs when a lower-density fluid accelerates a higher-density layer, is common in nature. At an ablation front a sharp reduction in the growth rate of the instability at short wave-lengths can occur, in marked contrast to the classical case where growth rates are highest at the shortest wavelengths. Theoretical and numerical investigations of the ablative RT instability are numerous and differ considerably on the level of stabilization expected. We present here the results of a series of laser experiments designed to probe the roll-over and cutoff region of the ablation-front RT dispersion curve in indirect drive. Aluminum foils with imposed sinusoidal perturbations ranging in wavelength from 10 to 70 pm were ablatively accelerated with a radiation drive generated in a gold cylindrical hohlraum. A strong shock wave compresses the package followed by an ∼2 ns period of roughly constant acceleration and the experiment is diagnosed via face-on radiography. Perturbations with wavelengths (ge) 20 (micro)m experienced substantial growth during the acceleration phase while shorter wavelengths showed a sharp drop off in overall growth. These experimental results compared favorably to calculations with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code, however, the growth is significantly affected by the rippled shock launched by the drive. We performed numerical simulations to elucidate the influence of the rippled shock wave on the eventual growth of the perturbations, allowing comparisons to the analytic model developed by Betti et al. This combination of experiments, simulations and analytic modeling illustrates the qualitative simplicity yet quantitative complexity of the compressible RT instability. We have measured the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) dispersion curve for a radiatively-driven sample in a series of experiments on the Nova laser facility. Planar aluminum foils were ablatively-accelerated and the subsequent perturbation growth was

  2. Dispersion curve estimation via a spatial covariance method with ultrasonic wavefield imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, See Yenn; Todd, Michael D

    2018-05-01

    Numerous Lamb wave dispersion curve estimation methods have been developed to support damage detection and localization strategies in non-destructive evaluation/structural health monitoring (NDE/SHM) applications. In this paper, the covariance matrix is used to extract features from an ultrasonic wavefield imaging (UWI) scan in order to estimate the phase and group velocities of S0 and A0 modes. A laser ultrasonic interrogation method based on a Q-switched laser scanning system was used to interrogate full-field ultrasonic signals in a 2-mm aluminum plate at five different frequencies. These full-field ultrasonic signals were processed in three-dimensional space-time domain. Then, the time-dependent covariance matrices of the UWI were obtained based on the vector variables in Cartesian and polar coordinate spaces for all time samples. A spatial covariance map was constructed to show spatial correlations within the full wavefield. It was observed that the variances may be used as a feature for S0 and A0 mode properties. The phase velocity and the group velocity were found using a variance map and an enveloped variance map, respectively, at five different frequencies. This facilitated the estimation of Lamb wave dispersion curves. The estimated dispersion curves of the S0 and A0 modes showed good agreement with the theoretical dispersion curves. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dispersion Differences and Consistency of Artificial Periodic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhi-Bao; Lin, Wen-Kai; Shi, Zhi-Fei

    2017-10-01

    Dispersion differences and consistency of artificial periodic structures, including phononic crystals, elastic metamaterials, as well as periodic structures composited of phononic crystals and elastic metamaterials, are investigated in this paper. By developing a K(ω) method, complex dispersion relations and group/phase velocity curves of both the single-mechanism periodic structures and the mixing-mechanism periodic structures are calculated at first, from which dispersion differences of artificial periodic structures are discussed. Then, based on a unified formulation, dispersion consistency of artificial periodic structures is investigated. Through a comprehensive comparison study, the correctness for the unified formulation is verified. Mathematical derivations of the unified formulation for different artificial periodic structures are presented. Furthermore, physical meanings of the unified formulation are discussed in the energy-state space.

  4. Residual Structures in Latent Growth Curve Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2010-01-01

    Several alternatives are available for specifying the residual structure in latent growth curve modeling. Two specifications involve uncorrelated residuals and represent the most commonly used residual structures. The first, building on repeated measures analysis of variance and common specifications in multilevel models, forces residual variances…

  5. On Phonons in Simple Metals II. Calculated Dispersion Curves In Aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Westin, A [Dept. of Theore tical Physics, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1969-07-15

    The real part of the dynamical matrix, derived earlier in a weak local potential ion-electron interaction model of the metal, is investigated in the case of aluminium. It is shown that the free electron, or Lindhard, dielectric function leads to a picture of the metal which is inconsistent with the dHvA observations of the Fermi surface. By adjusting one parameter, however, the experimental phonon frequencies are reproduced satisfactorily. Even some simple structure in the derivative d{omega}/dq can be reproduced in this way. Although corrections to the Lindhard dielectric matrix give no essential contributions to the dynamical matrix, the first order corrections, which are the most important, can explain the observed Fermi surface. Much of the observed structure in the phonon dispersion curves seems also to be due to these non-diagonal terms in the dielectric matrix.

  6. Lamb wave extraction of dispersion curves in micro/nano-plates using couple stress theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrati, Behnam; Yaghootian, Amin; Ghanbar Zadeh, Afshin; Mohammad-Sedighi, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, Lamb wave propagation in a homogeneous and isotropic non-classical micro/nano-plates is investigated. To consider the effect of material microstructure on the wave propagation, three size-dependent models namely indeterminate-, modified- and consistent couple stress theories are used to extract the dispersion equations. In the mentioned theories, a parameter called 'characteristic length' is used to consider the size of material microstructure in the governing equations. To generalize the parametric studies and examine the effect of thickness, propagation wavelength, and characteristic length on the behavior of miniature plate structures, the governing equations are nondimensionalized by defining appropriate dimensionless parameters. Then the dispersion curves for phase and group velocities are plotted in terms of a wide frequency-thickness range to study the lamb waves propagation considering microstructure effects in very high frequencies. According to the illustrated results, it was observed that the couple stress theories in the Cosserat type material predict more rigidity than the classical theory; so that in a plate with constant thickness, by increasing the thickness to characteristic length ratio, the results approach to the classical theory, and by reducing this ratio, wave propagation speed in the plate is significantly increased. In addition, it is demonstrated that for high-frequency Lamb waves, it converges to dispersive Rayleigh wave velocity.

  7. A numerical study of wave dispersion curves in cylindrical rods with circular cross-section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsamos G.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a finite element approach for modeling longitudinal wave propagation in thick cylindrical rods with circular cross-section. The formulation is based on simple time domain response of the structure to a properly chosen excitation, and is calculated with an explicit finite element solver. The proposed post-treatment procedure identifies the wavenumber for each mode of wave propagation at the desired frequency. The procedure is implemented and integrated in an efficient way in the explicit finite element code Europlexus. The numerical results are compared to the analytical ones obtained from the solution of the Pochhammer — Chree equation, which provides the dispersion curves for wavetrains in solid cylinders of infinite length.

  8. Structural properties of the Hugoniot curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaisse, F.

    2002-01-01

    This report is devoted to the structural properties analysis of the HUGONIOT curve, independently of the equation of state (E 0 S) display. The general properties so coming out are applied to the shock waves interacting studies. When phase transitions are present we investigate the splitting of shock waves and also the rarefaction waves. To end with, we present the shock instabilities and the non-uniqueness of solutions when specific E 0 S are present. (author)

  9. Sabot Front Borerider Stiffness vs. Dispersion: Finding the Knee in the Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. Hathaway

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the design of armor piercing, fin-stabilized, discarding sabot projectiles, the radial stiffness of the sabot front borerider has a significant impact on the projectile's dispersion and is, therefore, an important design consideration. Whether designing a new projectile or trying to improve an existing design, projectile designers can achieve front borerider stiffness without understanding its affect on dispersion characteristics. There is a knee in the stiffness vs. dispersion curve at which a change in the sabot front borerider stiffness will have a significant impact on dispersion or no impact at all depending on whether the stiffness is increased or decreased. The subject of this paper is an analytical approach to quantitatively determine the knee in the curve. Results from using this approach on the M865 APFSDS projectile are also presented.

  10. Electron conductance in curved quantum structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Gravesen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    is computationally fast and provides direct (geometrical) parameter insight as regards the determination of the electron transmission coefficient. We present, as a case study, calculations of the electron conductivity of a helically shaped quantum-wire structure and discuss the influence of the quantum......A differential-geometry analysis is employed to investigate the transmission of electrons through a curved quantum-wire structure. Although the problem is a three-dimensional spatial problem, the Schrodinger equation can be separated into three general coordinates. Hence, the proposed method...

  11. Multimodal determination of Rayleigh dispersion and attenuation curves using the circle fit method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verachtert, R.; Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2018-03-01

    This paper introduces the circle fit method for the determination of multi-modal Rayleigh dispersion and attenuation curves as part of a Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) experiment. The wave field is transformed to the frequency-wavenumber (fk) domain using a discretized Hankel transform. In a Nyquist plot of the fk-spectrum, displaying the imaginary part against the real part, the Rayleigh wave modes correspond to circles. The experimental Rayleigh dispersion and attenuation curves are derived from the angular sweep of the central angle of these circles. The method can also be applied to the analytical fk-spectrum of the Green's function of a layered half-space in order to compute dispersion and attenuation curves, as an alternative to solving an eigenvalue problem. A MASW experiment is subsequently simulated for a site with a regular velocity profile and a site with a soft layer trapped between two stiffer layers. The performance of the circle fit method to determine the dispersion and attenuation curves is compared with the peak picking method and the half-power bandwidth method. The circle fit method is found to be the most accurate and robust method for the determination of the dispersion curves. When determining attenuation curves, the circle fit method and half-power bandwidth method are accurate if the mode exhibits a sharp peak in the fk-spectrum. Furthermore, simulated and theoretical attenuation curves determined with the circle fit method agree very well. A similar correspondence is not obtained when using the half-power bandwidth method. Finally, the circle fit method is applied to measurement data obtained for a MASW experiment at a site in Heverlee, Belgium. In order to validate the soil profile obtained from the inversion procedure, force-velocity transfer functions were computed and found in good correspondence with the experimental transfer functions, especially in the frequency range between 5 and 80 Hz.

  12. Phonon dispersion curves determination in (delta)-phase Pu-Ga alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J; Clatterbuck, D; Occelli, F; Farber, D; Schwartz, A; Wall, M; Boro, C; Krisch, M; Beraud, A; Chiang, T; Xu, R; Hong, H; Zschack, P; Tamura, N

    2006-02-07

    We have designed and successfully employed a novel microbeam on large grain sample concept to conduct high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HRIXS) experiments to map the full phonon dispersion curves of an fcc {delta}-phase Pu-Ga alloy. This approach obviates experimental difficulties with conventional inelastic neutron scattering due to the high absorption cross section of the common {sup 239}Pu isotope and the non-availability of large (mm size) single crystal materials for Pu and its alloys. A classical Born von-Karman force constant model was used to model the experimental results, and no less than 4th nearest neighbor interactions had to be included to account for the observation. Several unusual features including, a large elastic anisotropy, a small shear elastic modulus, (C{sub 11}-C{sub 12})/2, a Kohn-like anomaly in the T{sub 1}[011] branch, and a pronounced softening of the T[111] branch towards the L point in the Brillouin are found. These features may be related to the phase transitions of plutonium and to strong coupling between the crystal structure and the 5f valence instabilities. Our results represent the first full phonon dispersions ever obtained for any Pu-bearing material, thus ending a 40-year quest for this fundamental data. The phonon data also provide a critical test for theoretical treatments of highly correlated 5f electron systems as exemplified by recent dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations for {delta}-plutonium. We also conducted thermal diffuse scattering experiments to study the T(111) dispersion at low temperatures with an attempt to gain insight into bending of the T(111) branch in relationship to the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation.

  13. Presheaves of Superselection Structures in Curved Spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, Ezio

    2015-04-01

    We show that superselection structures on curved spacetimes that are expected to describe quantum charges affected by the underlying geometry are categories of sections of presheaves of symmetric tensor categories. When an embedding functor is given, the superselection structure is a Tannaka-type dual of a locally constant group bundle, which hence becomes a natural candidate for the role of the gauge group. Indeed, we show that any locally constant group bundle (with suitable structure group) acts on a net of C* algebras fulfilling normal commutation relations on an arbitrary spacetime. We also give examples of gerbes of C* algebras, defined by Wightman fields and constructed using projective representations of the fundamental group of the spacetime, which we propose as solutions for the problem that existence and uniqueness of the embedding functor are not guaranteed.

  14. Three-dimensional charge dispersion curves from interactions of 11--29 GeV protons with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental nuclear charge dispersion curves from interactions of 11--29 Gev protons with 238 U have been used in the construction of three-dimensional charge dispersion curves. They show the yield variation with mass number A. Neutron-deficient products are distributed over the entire mass range with a peak at A near 87, while the yield of neutron-excessive products is distributed only in the relatively narrow mass region between A=70 and A=150 and has a maximum around A=115. An isobaric yield curve has been obtained by summing up each of the charge dispersion curves and shows a peak, rather than the flat top, in the mass region A=80 to 140 reported previously. The mass yield curves of neutron-excessive and neutron-deficient products are obtained by a decomposition of the charge dispersion curve with two Gaussians, and the mechanism of formation is suggested

  15. Structural investigation of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasoiu, M.; Ishchenko, L.A.; Stolyar, S.V.; Iskhakov, R.S.; Rajkher, Yu.L.; Kuklin, A.I.; Solov'ev, D.V.; Arzumanyan, G.M.; Kurkin, T.S.; Aranghel, D.

    2010-01-01

    Structural properties of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles produced by bacteria Klebsiella oxytoca are investigated. Investigations of morphology and size of particles dispersed in water by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed. By model calculations followed by fitting procedure the structural parameters of a cylinder of radius R = (4.87 ± 0.02) nm and height L = (2.12 ± 0.04) nm are obtained

  16. Electromagnetic and structural interaction analysis of curved shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, T.; Niho, T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a finite element formulation of the eddy current and structure coupled problem for curved shell structures. Coupling terms produced by curved geometry as well as flat plate geometry were obtained. Both matrix equations for eddy current and structure were solved simultaneously using coupling sub-matrices. TEAM Workshop bench mark problem 16 was solved to verify the formulation and the computer code. Agreement with experimental results was very good for such plate problem. A coupled problem for cylindrical shell structure was also analyzed. Influence of each coupling term was examined. The next topic is the eigenvalues of the coupled equations. Although the coupled matrix equations are not symmetric, symmetry was obtained by introducing a symmetrizing variable. The eigenvalues of the coupled matrix equations are different from those obtained from the uncoupled equations because of the influence of the coupling sub-matrix components. Some parameters obtained by the eigenvalue analysis have characteristics of parameters which indicate the intensity of electromagnetic structural coupling effect. (author)

  17. Structural Acoustic Physics Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 12,236 19 September 2017 Structural Acoustic Physics -Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells Rachel E. Hesse...SUBTITLE Structural Acoustic Physics -Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...study was to use physics -based modeling (PBM) to investigate wave propagations through curved shells that are subjected to acoustic excitation. An

  18. Compositional Variation of the Phonon Dispersion Curves of bcc Fe-Ga Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarestky, Jerel L.; Garlea, Vasile O.; Lograsso, Tom; Schlagel, D.L.; Stassis, C.

    2005-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering techniques have been used to measure the phonon dispersion curves of bcc Fe1-xGax x=10.8, 13.3, 16.0, 22.5 alloys as a function of Ga concentration. The phonon frequencies of every branch were found to decrease significantly with increasing Ga concentration. The softening was most pronounced for the T2 0 branch and, to a lesser extent, the L branch in the vicinity of = 2 3. The concentration dependence of the shear elastic constant C =1/2 C11-C12 , calculated from the slope of the T2 0 branch, was found to agree with the results of sound velocity measurements. For the higher concentration sample measured, 22.5 at. % Ga, new branches appeared, an effect associated with the increase in the number of atoms per unit cell.

  19. A method for the measurement of dispersion curves of circumferential guided waves radiating from curved shells: experimental validation and application to a femoral neck mimicking phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauleau, Pierre; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Chekroun, Mathieu; Cassereau, Didier; Laugier, Pascal; Prada, Claire; Grimal, Quentin

    2016-07-01

    Our long-term goal is to develop an ultrasonic method to characterize the thickness, stiffness and porosity of the cortical shell of the femoral neck, which could enhance hip fracture risk prediction. To this purpose, we proposed to adapt a technique based on the measurement of guided waves. We previously evidenced the feasibility of measuring circumferential guided waves in a bone-mimicking phantom of a circular cross-section of even thickness. The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of the complex geometry of the femoral neck on the measurement of guided waves. Two phantoms of an elliptical cross-section and one phantom of a realistic cross-section were investigated. A 128-element array was used to record the inter-element response matrix of these waveguides. This experiment was simulated using a custom-made hybrid code. The response matrices were analyzed using a technique based on the physics of wave propagation. This method yields portions of dispersion curves of the waveguides which were compared to reference dispersion curves. For the elliptical phantoms, three portions of dispersion curves were determined with a good agreement between experiment, simulation and theory. The method was thus validated. The characteristic dimensions of the shell were found to influence the identification of the circumferential wave signals. The method was then applied to the signals backscattered by the superior half of constant thickness of the realistic phantom. A cut-off frequency and some portions of modes were measured, with a good agreement with the theoretical curves of a plate waveguide. We also observed that the method cannot be applied directly to the signals backscattered by the lower half of varying thicknesses of the phantom. The proposed approach could then be considered to evaluate the properties of the superior part of the femoral neck, which is known to be a clinically relevant site.

  20. Modeling of Triangular Lattice Space Structures with Curved Battens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzikang; Wang, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Techniques for simulating an assembly process of lattice structures with curved battens were developed. The shape of the curved battens, the tension in the diagonals, and the compression in the battens were predicted for the assembled model. To be able to perform the assembly simulation, a cable-pulley element was implemented, and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed. Three types of finite element models were created from assembled lattice structures for studying the effects of design and modeling variations on the load carrying capability. Discrepancies in the predictions from these models were discussed. The effects of diagonal constraint failure were also studied.

  1. Neurovascular Structures at Risk With Curved Retrograde TTC Fusion Nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesar Netto, Cesar; Johannesmeyer, David; Cone, Brent; Araoye, Ibukunoluwa; Hudson, Parke William; Sahranavard, Bahman; Johnson, Michael; Shah, Ashish

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of iatrogenic injury to plantar neurovascular structures of the foot during insertion of a curved retrograde tibiotalocalcaneal (TTC) fusion nail. Ten below-knee thawed fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens underwent curved retrograde nailing of the ankle. The shortest distance between the nail and the main plantar neurovascular branches and injured structures were recorded during dissection. We also evaluated the relative position of these structures along 2 lines (AB, connecting the calcaneus to the first metatarsal, and BC, connecting the first and fifth metatarsal). The lateral plantar artery was found to be in direct contact with the nail 70% of the time, with a macroscopic laceration 30% of the time. The Baxter nerve was injured 20% of the time, as was the lateral plantar nerve. The medial plantar artery and nerve were never injured. The most proximal structure to cross line AB was the Baxter nerve followed by the lateral plantar artery, the nail, the lateral plantar nerve, and the medial plantar nerve. Our cadaveric anatomic study found that the most common structures at risk for iatrogenic injury by lateral curved retrograde TTC fusion nails were the lateral plantar artery and nerve, and the Baxter nerve. Determination of a true neurovascular safe zone is challenging and therefore warrants careful operative dissection to minimize neurovascular injuries.

  2. Plant functional connectivity – integrating landscape structure and effective dispersal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auffret, Alistair G.; Rico, Yessica; Bullock, James M.; Hooftman, Danny A.P.; Pakeman, Robin J.; Soons, Merel B.; Suárez-Esteban, Alberto; Traveset, Anna; Wagner, Helene H.; Cousins, Sara A.O.

    2017-01-01

    Dispersal is essential for species to survive the threats of habitat destruction and climate change. Combining descriptions of dispersal ability with those of landscape structure, the concept of functional connectivity has been popular for understanding and predicting species’ spatial responses to

  3. A theoretical study of interaction effects on the remanence curves of particulate dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, M.; Chantrell, R. W.; Wohlfarth, E. P.

    1990-05-01

    The remanence curves of strongly interacting fine-particle systems are investigated theoretically. It is shown that the Henkel plot of the dc demagnetisation remanence vs. the isothermal remanence is a useful representation of interactions. The form of the plot is found to be a reflection of the magnetic and physical microstructure of the material, which is consistent with experimental data. The relationship between the Henkel plot and the noise of a particulate recording medium, another property dependent on the microstructure, is also considered. The Interaction Field Factor (IFF), a single parameter characterising the non-linearity of the Henkel plot, is also investigated. The results are consistent with a previous experimental study. Finally, the effect of interactions on the Switching Field Distribution are investigated.

  4. Some results of a numerical calculation of plasma dispersion curves including collisions; Quelques resultats de calcul de courbes de dispersion avec collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepechinsky, D; Parlange, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Dispersion curves including the effect of collisions have been calculated with a 7090 IBM computer for several types of laboratory hydrogen plasmas; Te = Ti = 1 eV; Te = 1 eV, Ti = 0,1 eV; Te = 10 eV, Ti = 2 eV; Te = 50 eV, Ti 10 eV, with neutral gas pressures of 10{sup -1}, 10{sup -3} and 10{sup -4} mmHg and electron densities of 10{sup 10}, 10{sup 13} and eventually 10{sup 15} el/cc. The corresponding collision frequencies with neutrals and between electrons and ions have been derived using appropriate relationships The dispersion equations used correspond to the macroscopic treatment. The real and imaginary parts of the wave number K are presented as a function of real values of the frequency {omega}, for electrostatic and electromagnetic waves and for e.m. waves propagating parallel to a permanent magnetic field of 500 gauss and 12.5 Kgauss. (authors) [French] Des courbes de dispersion tenant compte de l'effet des collisions ont ete calculees a l'aide d'un ordinateur IBM 7090 pour differents types de plasmas d'hydrogene se presentant au laboratoire; les temperatures electroniques et ioniques envisagees ont ete les suivantes: Te = Ti = 1 Ev; Te = 1 eV, Ti 0,1 eV; Te = 10 eV, Ti = 2 eV; Te = 50 eV, Ti = 10 eV; les pressions de neutres - de 10{sup -1}, 10{sup -3} et 10{sup -4} mmHg; les densites electroniques - de 10{sup 10}, 10{sup 13} et eventuellement de 10{sup 15} el/cc. Les frequences de collision avec les neutres et entre electrons et ions ont ete evaluees en fonction de ces donnees. Les equations, de dispersion utilisees correspondant au traitement macroscopique. On presente les valeurs des parties reelle et imaginaire du nombre d'ondes K en fonction de valeurs reelles de la frequence {omega} pour les ondes electrostatiques et electromagnetiques et pour les ondes e.m. se propageant parallelement a un champ magnetique permanent de 500 gauss et de 12,5 kgauss. (auteurs)

  5. Pharmaceutical grade phyllosilicate dispersions: the influence of shear history on floc structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viseras, C; Meeten, G H; Lopez-Galindo, A

    1999-05-10

    The effect of mixing conditions on the flow curves of some clay-water dispersions was studied. Two Spanish fibrous phyllosilicates (sepiolite from Vicálvaro and palygorskite from Turón) and a commercial bentonite (Bentopharm Copyright, UK) were selected as model clays. The disperse systems were made up using a rotor-stator mixer working at two different mixing rates (1000 and 8000 rpm), for periods of 1 and 10 min. Rheological measurements were taken and the corresponding flow curves obtained immediately after interposition and then after a period of 24 h under low shear caused by a roller apparatus. Aqueous sepiolite dispersions showed the highest viscosity and were easily interposed, whereas palygorskite dispersions were more difficult to obtain, resulting in low to medium viscosity gels. Bentonite dispersions provided medium viscosity systems, which greatly increased their viscosity after the low shear treatment (as a result of swelling), whereas the viscosity of the fibrous clays stayed at approximately the same values or even decreased. A linear relation was found between mixing energy and apparent viscosity in the bentonite systems, while apparent viscosity in the sepiolite samples was related to mixing power, with minor influence of mixing times. All the systems studied had thixotropic behaviour, changing from clearly positive to even negative thixotropy in some palygorskite systems. Finally, we studied the effect of drastic pH changes on the system structure. Results showed that rheological properties were highly sensitive to pH in the fibrous dispersions, but less sensitive behaviour was found in the laminar clay systems. Copyright.

  6. Equivalent distributed capacitance model of oxide traps on frequency dispersion of C-V curve for MOS capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Han-Han; Xu, Jing-Ping; Liu, Lu; Lai, Pui-To; Tang, Wing-Man

    2016-11-01

    An equivalent distributed capacitance model is established by considering only the gate oxide-trap capacitance to explain the frequency dispersion in the C-V curve of MOS capacitors measured for a frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The proposed model is based on the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the charging/discharging effects of the oxide traps induced by a small ac signal. The validity of the proposed model is confirmed by the good agreement between the simulated results and experimental data. Simulations indicate that the capacitance dispersion of an MOS capacitor under accumulation and near flatband is mainly caused by traps adjacent to the oxide/semiconductor interface, with negligible effects from the traps far from the interface, and the relevant distance from the interface at which the traps can still contribute to the gate capacitance is also discussed. In addition, by excluding the negligible effect of oxide-trap conductance, the model avoids the use of imaginary numbers and complex calculations, and thus is simple and intuitive. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176100 and 61274112), the University Development Fund of the University of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. 00600009), and the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China (Grant No. 1-ZVB1).

  7. Equivalent distributed capacitance model of oxide traps on frequency dispersion of C – V curve for MOS capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Han-Han; Xu Jing-Ping; Liu Lu; Lai Pui-To; Tang Wing-Man

    2016-01-01

    An equivalent distributed capacitance model is established by considering only the gate oxide-trap capacitance to explain the frequency dispersion in the C – V curve of MOS capacitors measured for a frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The proposed model is based on the Fermi–Dirac statistics and the charging/discharging effects of the oxide traps induced by a small ac signal. The validity of the proposed model is confirmed by the good agreement between the simulated results and experimental data. Simulations indicate that the capacitance dispersion of an MOS capacitor under accumulation and near flatband is mainly caused by traps adjacent to the oxide/semiconductor interface, with negligible effects from the traps far from the interface, and the relevant distance from the interface at which the traps can still contribute to the gate capacitance is also discussed. In addition, by excluding the negligible effect of oxide-trap conductance, the model avoids the use of imaginary numbers and complex calculations, and thus is simple and intuitive. (paper)

  8. Reinforcement Toolbox, a Parametric Reinforcement Modelling Tool for Curved Surface Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauppe, J.; Rolvink, A.; Coenders, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a computational strategy and parametric modelling toolbox which aim at enhancing the design- and production process of reinforcement in freeform curved surface structures. The computational strategy encompasses the necessary steps of raising an architectural curved surface model

  9. Monte-Carlo simulation of dispersion fuel meat structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2003-01-01

    Under the irradiation conditions in research reactors, the inter-diffusion occurs at the fuel particle and matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. Because of the inter-diffusion reaction, the U 3 Al 7 Si 2 layer is formed around each U 3 Si 2 particle. The layer thickness grows up with irradiation duration and fission density. The formation of resultant layer causes the consumption of U 3 Si 2 fuel and aluminum matrix. This process leads to the evolution of geometrical structure of fuel meat. According to the stochastic locations of particles in dispersion, the authors developed a simulation method for the evolution of the fuel meat structure by utilizing Monte-Carlo method. Every particle is characterized by its diameter and location. The parameters of meat structure include particle size distribution, as-fabricated fuel volume fraction, resultant layer thickness, layer volume fraction, U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, aluminum volume fraction, contiguity probability and inter-linkage fraction of particles. Particularly for the dispersion with as-fabricated fuel volume fraction of 43% and particle sizes in a well-defined normal distribution, more than 13000 sampling particles are simulated in the meat volume of 6 mm x 6 mm x 0.5 mm. The meat structure parameters are calculated as functions of layer thickness in the range from 0-16 μm. (authors)

  10. Electronic structure of graphene beyond the linear dispersion regime

    OpenAIRE

    POWER, STEPHEN; FERREIRA, MAURO

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Among the many interesting features displayed by graphene, one of the most attractive is the simplicity with which its electronic structure can be described. The study of its physical properties is significantly simplified by the linear dispersion relation of electrons in a narrow range around the Fermi level. Unfortunately, the mathematical simplicity of graphene electrons is limited only to this narrow energy region and is not very practical when dealing with problems that invo...

  11. Diffraction anomalous fine structure using X-ray anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Yuji; Kuwajima, Shuichiro

    1998-01-01

    A use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effects for structure investigation has recently been developed by using synchrotron radiation. One of the interesting method is the observation of anomalous fine structure which arise on diffraction intensity in energy region of incident X-ray at and higher than absorption edge. The phenomenon is so called Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS). DAFS originates in the same physical process an that of EXAFS: namely photoelectric effect at the corresponding atom and the interaction of photoelectron waves between the atom and neighboring atoms. In contrast with EXAFS, the method is available for only the crystalline materials, but shows effective advantages of the structure investigations by a use of diffraction: one is the site selectivity and the other is space selectivity. In the present study, demonstrations of a use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effect for the superstructure determination will be given for the case of PbZrO 3 , then recent trial investigations of DAFS in particular on the superlattice reflections will be introduced. In addition, we discuss about Forbidden Reflection near Edge Diffraction (FRED) which is more recently investigated as a new method of the structure analysis. (author)

  12. Theoretical Aspects of Phonon Dispersion Curves for Metals; Aspects Theoriques des Courbes de Dispersion des Phonons pour les Metaux; Teoreticheskie aspekty fononnykh dispersionnykh krivykh dlya metallov; Aspectos Teoricos de las Curvas de Dispersion Fononica en Metales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, W. [Department of Natural Philosophy, University of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1965-04-15

    Reasonably complete knowledge of the phonon dispersion curves for at least a dozen metallic elements and intermetallic compounds has now been obtained from neutron inelastic scattering experiments. The results have one feature in common: when analysed in terms of interatomic force constants they reveal the presence of comparatively long-range forces extending over several atomic spacings. The results for lead are particularly interesting; it did not prove possible to fit them by a force-constant model, but the dispersion curves for wave vectors in symmetry directions when analysed in terms of force constants between planes of atoms showed an oscillatory interatomic potential extending over distances of more than 20A. This review is concerned with recent theoretical work which has a bearing on the calculation of phonon dispersion curves for metals and the explanation of the long range of the interatomic potential. The best hope at present for a general treatment of atomic interaction in metals appears to lie in the ''method of neutral pseudo-atoms'', (a description recently coined by Ziman). This approximate theory is outlined and its relevance to Kohn anomalies in phonon dispersion curves is discussed. Experimental data for sodium is consistent with the theory, and the interatomic potential in sodium varies periodically in a distance {pi}/k{sub F}, where fik{sub F} is the Fermi momentum, as has already been demonstrated by Koenig in a different way. More exact calculations have been made for sodium by Toya and by Sham. The relationship between the different methods and other work of a more general character such as that of Harrison are discussed. (author) [French] A la suite d'experiences de dispersion inelastique des neutrons, on a maintenant une connaissance assez complete des courbes de dispersion des phonons pour une douzaine de metaux et de composes intermetalliques au moins. Les resultats presentent le caractere commun suivant: si on les analyse en fonction

  13. Structure factors and phonon dispersion in liquid Li0.61Na0.39 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratap, Arun; Lad, Kirit N.; Raval, K.G.

    2004-01-01

    The phonon spectra for liquid Li and Na have been computed through the phenomenological model of Bhatia and Singh for disordered systems like liquids and glasses and the obtained results have been compared with the available data obtained by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) experiments. The effective pair potentials and their space derivatives are important ingredients in the computation of the dispersion curves. The pair potentials are obtained using the pseudo-potential theory. The empty core model proposed by Ashcroft is widely used for pseudo-potential calculations for alkali metals. But, it is thought to be unsuitable for Li because of its simple 1s electronic structure. However, it can be used with an additional term known as Born-Mayer (BM) core term. The influence of the BM core term on the phonon dispersion is discussed. The same pseudo-potential formalism has been employed to obtain the dispersion relation in liquid Li 0.61 Na 0.39 alloy. Apart from the phonon spectra, the Ashcroft-Langreth structure factors in the alloy are derived in the Percus-Yevick approximation. (author)

  14. Simultaneous realization of slow and fast acoustic waves using a fractal structure of Koch curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jin; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-Yi; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Wei-Wei

    2018-01-24

    An acoustic metamaterial based on a fractal structure, the Koch curve, is designed to simultaneously realize slow and fast acoustic waves. Owing to the multiple transmitting paths in the structure resembling the Koch curve, the acoustic waves travelling along different paths interfere with each other. Therefore, slow waves are created on the basis of the resonance of a Koch-curve-shaped loop, and meanwhile, fast waves even with negative group velocities are obtained due to the destructive interference of two acoustic waves with opposite phases. Thus, the transmission of acoustic wave can be freely manipulated with the Koch-curve shaped structure.

  15. Evolution of dispersion fuel meat structure caused by interface reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2000-01-01

    In reactor operation, the resultant layers are formed by interdiffusion at the fuel particle-matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. This results in the evolution of meat structure. On the basis of Monte-Carlo method, the author developed simulation method of fuel meat, and simulated the stochastic space locations of spherical fuel particles in the meat. The fuel volume fraction is 43%, and the particles are in definite size distribution. For the 13551 simulated particle samples, the evolution of meat structure is calculated with layer thickness ranging from 0 to 16 μm. The parameters of meat structure include the U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, resultant layer volume fraction, Al matrix volume fraction, particle contact probability and overlap degree as functions of layer thickness

  16. Effects of sub-domain structure on initial magnetization curve and domain size distribution of stacked media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Kumagai, S.; Sugita, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, in order to confirm the sub-domain structure in stacked media demagnetized with in-plane field, initial magnetization curves and magnetic domain size distribution were investigated. Both experimental and simulation results showed that an initial magnetization curve for the medium demagnetized with in-plane field (MDI) initially rose faster than that for the medium demagnetized with perpendicular field (MDP). It is inferred that this is because the MDI has a larger number of domain walls than the MDP due to the existence of the sub-domains, resulting in an increase in the probability of domain wall motion. Dispersion of domain size for the MDI was larger than that for the MDP. This is because sub-domains are formed not only inside the domain but also at the domain boundary region, and they change the position of the domain boundary to affect the domain size. - Highlights: • An initial magnetization curve for MDI initially rose faster than that for MDP. • Dispersion of domain size for the MDI was larger than that for the MDP. • Experimental and simulation results can be explained by existence of sub-domains

  17. Structure and osmotic pressure of ionic microgel dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedrick, Mary M. [Department of Physics, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108-6050 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108-6050 (United States); Chung, Jun Kyung; Denton, Alan R., E-mail: alan.denton@ndsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108-6050 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels—soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model’s limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions.

  18. Structure and osmotic pressure of ionic microgel dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrick, Mary M.; Chung, Jun Kyung; Denton, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels—soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model’s limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions

  19. Instanton geometry and quantum A∞ structure on the elliptic curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, M.; Lerche, W.; Nemeschansky, D.

    2006-03-01

    We first determine and then study the complete set of non-vanishing A-model correlation functions associated with the 'long-diagonal branes' on the elliptic curve. We verify that they satisfy the relevant A ∞ consistency relations at both classical and quantum levels. In particular we find that the A ∞ relation for the annulus provides a reconstruction of annulus instantons out of disk instantons. We note in passing that the naive application of the Cardy-constraint does not hold for our correlators, confirming expectations. Moreover, we analyze various analytical properties of the correlators, including instanton flops and the mixing of correlators with different numbers of legs under monodromy. The classical and quantum A ∞ relations turn out to be compatible with such homotopy transformations. They lead to a non-invariance of the effective action under modular transformations, unless compensated by suitable contact terms which amount to redefinitions of the tachyon fields. (orig.)

  20. On the Structure of Holographic Polymer-dispersed Polyethylene Glycol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnkrant, M.; McWilliams, H.; Li, C.; Natarajan, L.; Tondiglia, V.; Sutherland, R.; Lloyd, P.; Bunning, T.

    2006-01-01

    Holographic polymerization (H-P) has been used to fabricate polymer-dispersed liquid crystals and pattern inert nanoparticles. In this article, one-dimensional grating structures of Norland resin and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were achieved using the H-P technique. Both reflection and transmission grating structures were fabricated. The optical properties of the reflection grating structures (also known as Bragg reflectors, BRs) are thermosensitive, which is attributed to the formation and crystallization of PEG crystals. The thermal switching temperature of the BR can be tuned by using different molecular weight PEG samples. The hierarchical structure and morphology of the BR were studied using synchrotron X-ray, polarized light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. PEG crystals were found to be confined in ∼60 nm thick layers in the BR. Upon crystallization, the PEG lamellae were parallel to the BR surfaces and PEG chains were parallel to the BR normal, resembling the confined crystallization behavior of polyethylene oxide (PEO) in PEO-block-polystyrene (PEO-b-PS) block copolymers. This observation suggests that the tethering effect in the block copolymer systems does not play a major role in PEG chain orientation in the confined nanoenvironment

  1. Effects of mistuning and matrix structure on the topology of frequency response curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Dare

    1989-01-01

    The stability of a frequency response curve under mild perturbations of the system's matrix is investigated. Using recent developments in the theory of singularities of differentiable maps, it is shown that the stability of a response curve depends on the structure of the system's matrix. In particular, the frequency response curves of a cylic system are shown to be unstable. Consequently, slight parameter variations engendered by mistuning will induce a significant difference in the topology of the forced response curves, if the mistuning transformation crosses the bifurcation set.

  2. Computing dispersion curves of elastic/viscoelastic transversely-isotropic bone plates coupled with soft tissue and marrow using semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Tran, Tho N H T; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Naili, Salah; Le, Lawrence H

    2017-08-01

    We present a semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) scheme for accurately computing the velocity dispersion and attenuation in a trilayered system consisting of a transversely-isotropic (TI) cortical bone plate sandwiched between the soft tissue and marrow layers. The soft tissue and marrow are mimicked by two fluid layers of finite thickness. A Kelvin-Voigt model accounts for the absorption of all three biological domains. The simulated dispersion curves are validated by the results from the commercial software DISPERSE and published literature. Finally, the algorithm is applied to a viscoelastic trilayered TI bone model to interpret the guided modes of an ex-vivo experimental data set from a bone phantom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental study on the dispersion properties of cusptron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, J.Y.; Crosby, H.; Jablon, D.G.; Krall, A.D.; Namkung, W.

    1984-01-01

    One of the promising devices that generates high frequency microwaves is the cusptron, where the fast rotating electron beam interacts with the high muthal (iota>1) waveguide mode, thereby producing multiples of the cyclotron frequency (iotaω/sub c/). In order to encourage the chosen azimuthal perturbation, it is necessary to structure the wall in a magnetron-like shape. In particular, the authors consider the structure where the outer wall is radially cut out to make multiple vane-like resonators. With these interruptions, it obvious that there exist strong couplings among the muthal space harmonics, iota n in the cusptron device. The mode is characterized by the axial wave number, k, the primary azimuthal mode number iota, which indicates the phase difference between adjacent segments, and whether it is TE or TM. Recently, a rigorous numerical method has been devised to determine the cusptron structure. This method uses the orthonormal mode expansions both in the interaction space and the resonators to assure the point-by-point match of the fields. The method also finds the distribution of the harmonics iota n as well, that serves as a signature of the particular mode. In the present study, the authors experimentally investigate the dispersion characteristics of the cusptron, and compare the results with the theory

  4. Geometric Structure of 3D Spinal Curves: Plane Regions and Connecting Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthonnaud, E.; Hilmi, R.; Dimnet, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new study of the geometric structure of 3D spinal curves. The spine is considered as an heterogeneous beam, compound of vertebrae and intervertebral discs. The spine is modeled as a deformable wire along which vertebrae are beads rotating about the wire. 3D spinal curves are compound of plane regions connected together by zones of transition. The 3D spinal curve is uniquely flexed along the plane regions. The angular offsets between adjacent regions are concentrated at level of the middle zones of transition, so illustrating the heterogeneity of the spinal geometric structure. The plane regions along the 3D spinal curve must satisfy two criteria: (i) a criterion of minimum distance between the curve and the regional plane and (ii) a criterion controlling that the curve is continuously plane at the level of the region. The geometric structure of each 3D spinal curve is characterized by the sizes and orientations of regional planes, by the parameters representing flexed regions and by the sizes and functions of zones of transition. Spinal curves of asymptomatic subjects show three plane regions corresponding to spinal curvatures: lumbar, thoracic and cervical curvatures. In some scoliotic spines, four plane regions may be detected. PMID:25031873

  5. Thermo-Electro-Mechanical Analysis of a Curved Functionally Graded Piezoelectric Actuator with Sandwich Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Jiang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the problem of a curved functionally graded piezoelectric (FGP actuator with sandwich structure under electrical and thermal loads is investigated. The middle layer in the sandwich structure is functionally graded with the piezoelectric coefficient g31 varying continuously along the radial direction of the curved actuator. Based on the theory of linear piezoelectricity, analytical solutions are obtained by using Airy stress function to examine the effects of material gradient and heat conduction on the performance of the curved actuator. It is found that the material gradient and thermal load have significant influence on the electroelastic fields and the mechanical response of the curved FGP actuator. Without the sacrifice of actuation deflection, smaller internal stresses are generated by using the sandwich actuator with functionally graded piezoelectric layer instead of the conventional bimorph actuator. This work is very helpful for the design and application of curved piezoelectric actuators under thermal environment.

  6. Thermo-Electro-Mechanical Analysis of a Curved Functionally Graded Piezoelectric Actuator with Sandwich Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi; Zaman, Mostafa; Jiang, Liying

    2011-12-12

    In this work, the problem of a curved functionally graded piezoelectric (FGP) actuator with sandwich structure under electrical and thermal loads is investigated. The middle layer in the sandwich structure is functionally graded with the piezoelectric coefficient g 31 varying continuously along the radial direction of the curved actuator. Based on the theory of linear piezoelectricity, analytical solutions are obtained by using Airy stress function to examine the effects of material gradient and heat conduction on the performance of the curved actuator. It is found that the material gradient and thermal load have significant influence on the electroelastic fields and the mechanical response of the curved FGP actuator. Without the sacrifice of actuation deflection, smaller internal stresses are generated by using the sandwich actuator with functionally graded piezoelectric layer instead of the conventional bimorph actuator. This work is very helpful for the design and application of curved piezoelectric actuators under thermal environment.

  7. Latent factor structure of a behavioral economic marijuana demand curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Elizabeth R; Farris, Samantha G; MacKillop, James; Metrik, Jane

    2017-08-01

    Drug demand, or relative value, can be assessed via analysis of behavioral economic purchase task performance. Five demand indices are typically obtained from drug purchase tasks. The goal of this research was to determine whether metrics of marijuana reinforcement from a marijuana purchase task (MPT) exhibit a latent factor structure that efficiently characterizes marijuana demand. Participants were regular marijuana users (n = 99; 37.4% female, 71.5% marijuana use days [5 days/week], 15.2% cannabis dependent) who completed study assessments, including the MPT, during a baseline session. Principal component analysis was used to examine the latent structure underlying MPT indices. Concurrent validity was assessed via examination of relationships between latent factors and marijuana use, past quit attempts, and marijuana expectancies. A two-factor solution was confirmed as the best fitting structure, accounting for 88.5% of the overall variance. Factor 1 (65.8% variance) reflected "Persistence," indicating sensitivity to escalating marijuana price, which comprised four MPT indices (elasticity, O max , P max , and breakpoint). Factor 2 (22.7% variance) reflected "Amplitude," indicating the amount consumed at unrestricted price (intensity). Persistence factor scores were associated with fewer past marijuana quit attempts and lower expectancies of negative use outcomes. Amplitude factor scores were associated with more frequent use, dependence symptoms, craving severity, and positive marijuana outcome expectancies. Consistent with research on alcohol and cigarette purchase tasks, the MPT can be characterized with a latent two-factor structure. Thus, demand for marijuana appears to encompass distinct dimensions of price sensitivity and volumetric consumption, with differential relations to other aspects of marijuana motivation.

  8. Structure in the interstellar polarization curve and the nature of the polarizing grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolstencroft, R.D.; Smith, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    At this workshop the emphasis is on divining the nature of the interstellar grains by using infrared spectral features as the principal diagnostic. Nevertheless other approaches are also contributing to an understanding of the grains and deserve some attention. This paper describes the structure recently found in the interstellar polarization curve, and discusses its relation to the structure seen in the extinction curve and the nature of the grains producing the spectral features. (author)

  9. Imaging the Earth's anisotropic structure with Bayesian Inversion of fundamental and higher mode surface-wave dispersion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenna, Matteo; Lebedev, Sergei; Celli, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    We develop a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion of fundamental and higher mode phase-velocity curves for radially and azimuthally anisotropic structure of the crust and upper mantle. In the inversions of Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves for radially anisotropic structure, we obtain probabilistic 1D radially anisotropic shear-velocity profiles of the isotropic average Vs and anisotropy (or Vsv and Vsh) as functions of depth. In the inversions for azimuthal anisotropy, Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves at different azimuths are inverted for the vertically polarized shear-velocity structure (Vsv) and the 2-phi component of azimuthal anisotropy. The strength and originality of the method is in its fully non-linear approach. Each model realization is computed using exact forward calculations. The uncertainty of the models is a part of the output. In the inversions for azimuthal anisotropy, in particular, the computation of the forward problem is performed separately at different azimuths, with no linear approximations on the relation of the Earth's elastic parameters to surface wave phase velocities. The computations are performed in parallel in order reduce the computing time. We compare inversions of the fundamental mode phase-velocity curves alone with inversions that also include overtones. The addition of higher modes enhances the resolving power of the anisotropic structure of the deep upper mantle. We apply the inversion method to phase-velocity curves in a few regions, including the Hangai dome region in Mongolia. Our models provide constraints on the Moho depth, the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary, and the alignment of the anisotropic fabric and the direction of current and past flow, from the crust down to the deep asthenosphere.

  10. Global structure of curves from generalized unitarity cut of three-loop diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Huang, Rijun; Mehta, Dhagash; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the global structure of algebraic curves defined by generalized unitarity cut of four-dimensional three-loop diagrams with eleven propagators. The global structure is a topological invariant that is characterized by the geometric genus of the algebraic curve. We use the Riemann-Hurwitz formula to compute the geometric genus of algebraic curves with the help of techniques involving convex hull polytopes and numerical algebraic geometry. Some interesting properties of genus for arbitrary loop orders are also explored where computing the genus serves as an initial step for integral or integrand reduction of three-loop amplitudes via an algebraic geometric approach.

  11. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Feng, Zongcai; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained

  12. One-baryon spectrum and analytical properties of one-baryon dispersion curves in 3 + 1 dimensional strongly coupled lattice QCD with three flavors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A.; O’Carroll, Michael; Valencia Alvites, José C.

    2016-01-01

    Considering a 3 + 1 dimensional lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) model defined with the improved Wilson action, three flavors, and 4 × 4 Dirac spin matrices, in the strong coupling regime, we reanalyze the question of the existence of the eightfold way baryons and complete our previous work where the existence of isospin octet baryons was rigorously solved. Here, we show the existence of isospin decuplet baryons which are associated with isolated dispersion curves in the subspace of the underlying quantum mechanical Hilbert space with vectors constructed with an odd number of fermion and antifermion basic quark and antiquark fields. Moreover, smoothness properties for these curves are obtained. The present work deals with a case for which the traditional method to solve the implicit equation for the dispersion curves, based on the use of the analytic implicit function theorem, cannot be applied. We do not have only one but two solutions for each one-baryon decuplet sector with fixed spin third component. Instead, we apply the Weierstrass preparation theorem, which also provides a general method for the general degenerate case. This work is completed by analyzing a spectral representation for the two-baryon correlations and providing the leading behaviors of the field strength normalization and the mass of the spectral contributions with more than one-particle. These are needed results for a rigorous analysis of the two-baryon and meson-baryon particle spectra.

  13. One-baryon spectrum and analytical properties of one-baryon dispersion curves in 3 + 1 dimensional strongly coupled lattice QCD with three flavors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A., E-mail: veiga@icmc.usp.br; O’Carroll, Michael, E-mail: michaelocarroll@gmail.com; Valencia Alvites, José C., E-mail: cien.mat@hotmail.com [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada e Estatística, ICMC, USP-São Carlos, C.P. 668, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Considering a 3 + 1 dimensional lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) model defined with the improved Wilson action, three flavors, and 4 × 4 Dirac spin matrices, in the strong coupling regime, we reanalyze the question of the existence of the eightfold way baryons and complete our previous work where the existence of isospin octet baryons was rigorously solved. Here, we show the existence of isospin decuplet baryons which are associated with isolated dispersion curves in the subspace of the underlying quantum mechanical Hilbert space with vectors constructed with an odd number of fermion and antifermion basic quark and antiquark fields. Moreover, smoothness properties for these curves are obtained. The present work deals with a case for which the traditional method to solve the implicit equation for the dispersion curves, based on the use of the analytic implicit function theorem, cannot be applied. We do not have only one but two solutions for each one-baryon decuplet sector with fixed spin third component. Instead, we apply the Weierstrass preparation theorem, which also provides a general method for the general degenerate case. This work is completed by analyzing a spectral representation for the two-baryon correlations and providing the leading behaviors of the field strength normalization and the mass of the spectral contributions with more than one-particle. These are needed results for a rigorous analysis of the two-baryon and meson-baryon particle spectra.

  14. Spin structures on algebraic curves and their applications in string theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, F.

    1990-01-01

    The free fields on a Riemann surface carrying spin structures live on an unramified r-covering of the surface itself. When the surface is represented as an algebraic curve related to the vanishing of the Weierstrass polynomial, its r-coverings are algebraic curves as well. We construct explicitly the Weierstrass polynomial associated to the r-coverings of an algebraic curve. Using standard techniques of algebraic geometry it is then possible to solve the inverse Jacobi problem for the odd spin structures. As an application we derive the partition functions of bosonic string theories in many examples, including two general curves of genus three and four. The partition functions are explicitly expressed in terms of branch points apart from a factor which is essentially a theta constant. 53 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  15. Dispersion Curves for Phonons in Diamond; Courbes de Dispersion des Phonons dans le Diamant; Krivye dispersii dlya fononov v almaze; Curvas de Dispersion de los Fonones en el Diamante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, J. L.; Wenzel, R. G.; Yarnell, J. L. [Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1965-04-15

    A three-axis neutron diffraction spectrometer at the Los Alamos Omega West Reactor has been used to measure the dispersion curves for phonons propagating in the [100] and [111] directions in diamond. All measurements were made at room temperature. The sample was a type Ha brown industrial diamond weighing 242.8 carats (48.56 g). A neutron diffraction study showed it to consist of a large single crystal with a mosaic spread of - 1 Degree-Sign full width at half maximum, plus two small regions misoriented by 3 and 5 Degree-Sign . The spectrometer was programmed for ''constant-Q'' operation. In all cases, the energy of the incident neutrons was fixed and the scattered neutrons lost energy. Sufficient intensity at an incident energy high enough to excite the optical modes of diamond was obtained by the use of the (1122) reflection of a beryllium monochromator. Uncertainties in the measured frequencies are estimated to be of the order of 2-3%. The most striking result of these measurements is the verification of the predictions, based on infrared absorption and specific heat data, that diamond is not homologous to silicon and germanium. The lack of homology is manifested principally in the behaviour of the transverse branches. The transverse acoustic branches are relatively much higher in diamond than in silicon and germanium. The transverse optical branches are relatively lower, so that in diamond the highest branch is the longitudinal optical rather than the transverse optical. Frequencies at the zone boundaries are in reasonable agreement with those predicted from infrared absorption data, although the identification of the polarizations is different. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont utilise un spectrometre triaxial pour la diffraction des neutrons produits par le reacteur Omega West de Los Alamos en vue de determiner plusieurs courbes de dispersion des phonons se deplacant dans des directions de symetrie a l'interieur du, diamant. Toutes les mesures ont ete

  16. Crustal structure of northern Egypt from joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Hegazi, Mona; Gaber, Hanan; Korrat, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we used a combined inversion of body wave receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements to provide constraints on the crustal structure of northern Egypt. The two techniques are complementary to each other: receiver functions (RFs) are sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrasts, while surface wave dispersion (SWD) measurements are sensitive to finite variations of shear-wave velocity with depth. A database of 122 teleseismic events digitally recorded by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN) stations has been used as well. To enhance the resulting RFs at each ENSN station, the H-k stacking method was applied. A joint inversion process between the resulting receiver functions and the surface wave dispersion curves was applied as well. We have produced three averaged velocity structure models for distinct geographic and tectonic provinces namely Sinai, eastern desert, and western desert from east to the west respectively. These models will deeply help in estimation the epicenter distance of earthquake, focal mechanism solutions, and earthquake hazard analysis in northern Egypt. An obvious image of the subsurface structure has been determined which shows that generally the crustal structure of northern Egypt consists of three layers covered with a sequence of sediments that differs in thickness from across the region except in the Sharm area where the sedimentary cover is absent. The obtained results indicate that crustal thickness differs from east to west and reaches its maximum value of about 36 km at Siwa station (SWA) in the western desert and its minimum value of about 28 km at Sharm station (SHR) of the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula. The Vp/Vs ratio varies between 1.71 and 2.07 in northern Egypt. Generally, the high values (1.93) of (Vp/Vs) at SWA station may reflect the well-known rich aquifer with fully saturated sediments of the Swia Oasis in the Western Desert. Moreover, the highest value (2.07) of (Vp/Vs) at

  17. Crustal structure of northern Egypt from joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Hegazi, Mona; Gaber, Hanan; Korrat, Ibrahim

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we used a combined inversion of body wave receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements to provide constraints on the crustal structure of northern Egypt. The two techniques are complementary to each other: receiver functions (RFs) are sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrasts, while surface wave dispersion (SWD) measurements are sensitive to finite variations of shear-wave velocity with depth. A database of 122 teleseismic events digitally recorded by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN) stations has been used as well. To enhance the resulting RFs at each ENSN station, the H-k stacking method was applied. A joint inversion process between the resulting receiver functions and the surface wave dispersion curves was applied as well. We have produced three averaged velocity structure models for distinct geographic and tectonic provinces namely Sinai, eastern desert, and western desert from east to the west respectively. These models will deeply help in estimation the epicenter distance of earthquake, focal mechanism solutions, and earthquake hazard analysis in northern Egypt. An obvious image of the subsurface structure has been determined which shows that generally the crustal structure of northern Egypt consists of three layers covered with a sequence of sediments that differs in thickness from across the region except in the Sharm area where the sedimentary cover is absent. The obtained results indicate that crustal thickness differs from east to west and reaches its maximum value of about 36 km at Siwa station (SWA) in the western desert and its minimum value of about 28 km at Sharm station (SHR) of the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula. The Vp/Vs ratio varies between 1.71 and 2.07 in northern Egypt. Generally, the high values (1.93) of (Vp/Vs) at SWA station may reflect the well-known rich aquifer with fully saturated sediments of the Swia Oasis in the Western Desert. Moreover, the highest value (2.07) of (Vp/Vs) at

  18. Importance of intrinsic properties of dense caseinate dispersions for structure formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manski, J.M.; Riemsdijk, van L.E.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Rheological measurements of dense calcium caseinate and sodium caseinate dispersions (15%) provided insight into the factors determining shear-induced structure formation in caseinates. Calcium caseinate at a sufficiently high concentration (30%) was shown to form highly anisotropic structures

  19. An investigation on vulnerability assessment of steel structures with thin steel shear wall through development of fragility curves

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Gerami; Saeed Ghaffari; Amir Mahdi Heidari Tafreshi

    2017-01-01

    Fragility curves play an important role in damage assessment of buildings. Probability of damage induction to the structure against seismic events can be investigated upon generation of afore mentioned curves. In current research 360 time history analyses have been carried out on structures of 3, 10 and 20 story height and subsequently fragility curves have been adopted. The curves are developed based on two indices of inter story drifts and equivalent strip axial strains of the shear wall. T...

  20. Multilayer networks reveal the spatial structure of seed-dispersal interactions across the Great Rift landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timóteo, Sérgio; Correia, Marta; Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Freitas, Helena; Heleno, Ruben

    2018-01-10

    Species interaction networks are traditionally explored as discrete entities with well-defined spatial borders, an oversimplification likely impairing their applicability. Using a multilayer network approach, explicitly accounting for inter-habitat connectivity, we investigate the spatial structure of seed-dispersal networks across the Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique. We show that the overall seed-dispersal network is composed by spatially explicit communities of dispersers spanning across habitats, functionally linking the landscape mosaic. Inter-habitat connectivity determines spatial structure, which cannot be accurately described with standard monolayer approaches either splitting or merging habitats. Multilayer modularity cannot be predicted by null models randomizing either interactions within each habitat or those linking habitats; however, as habitat connectivity increases, random processes become more important for overall structure. The importance of dispersers for the overall network structure is captured by multilayer versatility but not by standard metrics. Highly versatile species disperse many plant species across multiple habitats, being critical to landscape functional cohesion.

  1. Rayleigh Wave Dispersion Due to Spatial (FEM) Discretization of a thin Elastic Solid Having Non-Curved Boundary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brepta, R.; Valeš, F.; Červ, Jan; Tikal, B.

    1996-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (1996), s. 1233-1244 ISSN 0045-7949 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/93/1195 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : thin elastic body * Rayleigh waves * grid dispersion Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.254, year: 1996 http://apps.isiknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=UA&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=1&SID=U2EJknka3H@mKemE37@&page=1&doc=1&colname=WOS

  2. Determination of the fine structure in the ionization plots obtained from a mass spectrometer with a large energy dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deruaz, Daniel.

    1974-01-01

    The precise determination of ionization potentials, fragment ion appearance potentials and different excited state levels of the positive ions formed, together with phenomena due to an electron impact, were studied from ionization efficiency curves obtained by mass spectrometry. A standard ion source and an analytical method of electron energy dispersion reduction were used to study fine structures of ionization efficiency curves. Since the mass spectrometer was not adapted for the acquisition of ionization efficiency curve data an electronic system was designed to record these curves automatically. A precise stepwise potential variation of 45+-0.04mV was obtained, and for each step an intensity proportional to the number of ions created by the fragment considered, the additional gain being 4.4 and the linearity greater than 1% over a 13-volt region. Before each set of measurements the scattering was determined by calculation of the second derivative of a logistic function deduced from the cubic regression of the experimental helium function ionization efficiency curve values. The precision, given by the variance analysis SNEDECOR F test, is higher than 1/1000. For each series of recordings the numerical values were processed by a computer to raise by twenty the signal to noise ratio and calculate the ionization efficiency curve values by the energy difference method and the iterative unfolding method. In this way a high sensitivity was obtained for the determination of the curves near the ionization threshold, and a precision below 50MeV (at least equivalent to that given by ionization cells with quasi-monoenergetic electron beams) for the values of the ionization potentials, the appearance potentials and the excited state energy levels. In order to judge the reliability of the technique the ionization potentials of a set of eleven complex molecules were determined and compared with the results obtained by photoionization and photoelectron spectrometry [fr

  3. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves as Probes of Magnetospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The large number of gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope since its launch in 2008 dwarfs the handful that were previously known. The variety of observed light curves makes possible a tomography of both the ensemble-averaged field structure and the high-energy emission regions of a pulsar magnetosphere. Fitting the gamma-ray pulsar light curves with model magnetospheres and emission models has revealed that most of the high-energy emission, and the particles acceleration, takes place near or beyond the light cylinder, near the current sheet. As pulsar magnetosphere models become more sophisticated, it is possible to probe magnetic field structure and emission that are self-consistently determined. Light curve modeling will continue to be a powerful tool for constraining the pulsar magnetosphere physics.

  4. Rigidity percolation in dispersions with a structured viscoelastic matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, M.W.L.; Michels, M.A.J.; Vellinga, W.P.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with rigidity percolation in composite materials consisting of a dispersion of mineral particles in a microstructured viscoelastic matrix. The viscoelastic matrix in this specific case is a hydrocarbon refinery residue. In a set of model random composites the mean interparticle

  5. Long wave dispersion relations for surface waves in a magnetically structured atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, I.C.; Roberts, B.

    1983-01-01

    A means of obtaining approximate dispersion relations for long wavelength magnetoacoustic surface waves propagating in a magnetically structured atmosphere is presented. A general dispersion relation applying to a wide range of magnetic profiles is obtained, and illustrated for the special cases of a single interface and a magnetic slab. In the slab geometry, for example, the dispersion relation contains both the even (sausage) and odd (kink) modes in one formalism

  6. Acoustic phonon dispersion of CoSi2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, L.; Rumyantsev, A.Yu.; Ivanov, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The acoustical phonon dispersion curves of CoSi 2 are measured at room temperature along the main symmetry directions by means of coherent one-phonon scattering of thermal neutrons. The dispersion curves are compared with those of Ge, Si, and the fluorite structure types as CaF 2 and UO 2 . From the slope of the phonon dispersion curves at the GAMMA-point the elastic constants have been obtained

  7. Uncertainty Estimation of Shear-wave Velocity Structure from Bayesian Inversion of Microtremor Array Dispersion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosso, S. E.; Molnar, S.; Cassidy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data is applied, with evaluation of data errors and model parameterization, to produce the most-probable shear-wave velocity (VS) profile together with quantitative uncertainty estimates. Generally, the most important property characterizing earthquake site response is the subsurface VS structure. The microtremor array method determines phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh surface waves from multi-instrument recordings of urban noise. Inversion of dispersion curves for VS structure is a non-unique and nonlinear problem such that meaningful evaluation of confidence intervals is required. Quantitative uncertainty estimation requires not only a nonlinear inversion approach that samples models proportional to their probability, but also rigorous estimation of the data error statistics and an appropriate model parameterization. A Bayesian formulation represents the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the posterior probability density (PPD) of the geophysical model parameters. Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods are used with an efficient implementation of Metropolis-Hastings sampling to provide an unbiased sample from the PPD to compute parameter uncertainties and inter-relationships. Nonparametric estimation of a data error covariance matrix from residual analysis is applied with rigorous a posteriori statistical tests to validate the covariance estimate and the assumption of a Gaussian error distribution. The most appropriate model parameterization is determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), which provides the simplest model consistent with the resolving power of the data. Parameter uncertainties are found to be under-estimated when data error correlations are neglected and when compressional-wave velocity and/or density (nuisance) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in

  8. Photonic Band Structure of Dispersive Metamaterials Formulated as a Hermitian Eigenvalue Problem

    KAUST Repository

    Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2010-01-01

    We formulate the photonic band structure calculation of any lossless dispersive photonic crystal and optical metamaterial as a Hermitian eigenvalue problem. We further show that the eigenmodes of such lossless systems provide an orthonormal basis, which can be used to rigorously describe the behavior of lossy dispersive systems in general. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  9. Photonic Band Structure of Dispersive Metamaterials Formulated as a Hermitian Eigenvalue Problem

    KAUST Repository

    Raman, Aaswath

    2010-02-26

    We formulate the photonic band structure calculation of any lossless dispersive photonic crystal and optical metamaterial as a Hermitian eigenvalue problem. We further show that the eigenmodes of such lossless systems provide an orthonormal basis, which can be used to rigorously describe the behavior of lossy dispersive systems in general. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  10. Fish dispersal in a seasonal wetland: influence of anthropogenic structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hohausová, Eva; Lavoy, R. J.; Allen, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2010), s. 682-694 ISSN 1323-1650. [Behaviour and Ecology of Freshwater Fish. Silkeborg, 22.08.2004-26.08.2004] Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ME 659 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : fish dispersal speed * sedentary and non-migratory species * minimum passage depth * freshwater marsh Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2010

  11. Parabolic section and distance excess of space curves applied to protein structure classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Karlsson, Per W.

    2008-01-01

    Proteins are long chain molecules that fold up into beautiful and complicated three-dimensional structures before fulfilling their biological functions in the living organisms. With the aim of providing an efficient tool for describing the proteins' native folds, we present a global geometric mea...... measure of a space curve. This geometric measure allows us to define descriptors of protein structures that quantify how parallel the secondary structure elements of a protein are. These descriptors are C-2 in deformations of the protein structure, are evaluated very fast and reliably...

  12. Absorbed impact energy and mode of fracture: A statistical description of the micro-structural dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontikis, V., E-mail: Vassilis.Pontikis@cea.f [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, IRAMIS, Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, CNRS UMR 7642, Ecole Polytechnique, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Gorse, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, IRAMIS, Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, CNRS UMR 7642, Ecole Polytechnique, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2009-10-01

    A statistical model is proposed to account for the influence of the dispersion of the microstructure on the ductile-to-brittle transition in body centered cubic (bcc) metals and their alloys. In this model, the dispersion of the microstructure is expressed via a normal distribution of transition temperatures whereas a simple relation exists between the values of absorbed, lower and upper shelf energies, the ductile area fraction and the distribution parameters. It is shown that via an appropriate renormalization of energies and temperatures, experimental data for different materials and ageing conditions align all together on a master curve, guaranteeing thereby the effectiveness of the proposed statistical description.

  13. Absorbed impact energy and mode of fracture: A statistical description of the micro-structural dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontikis, V.; Gorse, D.

    2009-01-01

    A statistical model is proposed to account for the influence of the dispersion of the microstructure on the ductile-to-brittle transition in body centered cubic (bcc) metals and their alloys. In this model, the dispersion of the microstructure is expressed via a normal distribution of transition temperatures whereas a simple relation exists between the values of absorbed, lower and upper shelf energies, the ductile area fraction and the distribution parameters. It is shown that via an appropriate renormalization of energies and temperatures, experimental data for different materials and ageing conditions align all together on a master curve, guaranteeing thereby the effectiveness of the proposed statistical description.

  14. Dispersal Ability Determines the Role of Environmental, Spatial and Temporal Drivers of Metacommunity Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padial, André A.; Ceschin, Fernanda; Declerck, Steven A. J.; De Meester, Luc; Bonecker, Cláudia C.; Lansac-Tôha, Fabio A.; Rodrigues, Liliana; Rodrigues, Luzia C.; Train, Sueli; Velho, Luiz F. M.; Bini, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, community ecologists are focusing on the relative importance of local environmental factors and proxies to dispersal limitation to explain spatial variation in community structure. Albeit less explored, temporal processes may also be important in explaining species composition variation in

  15. Secondary flow structures under stent-induced perturbations for cardiovascular flow in a curved artery model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, Autumn L.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Shu Fangjun; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary flows within curved arteries with unsteady forcing result from amplified centrifugal instabilities and are expected to be driven by the rapid accelerations and decelerations inherent in physiological waveforms. These secondary flows may also affect the function of curved arteries through pro-atherogenic wall shear stresses, platelet residence time and other vascular response mechanisms. Planar PIV measurements were performed under multi-harmonic non-zero-mean and physiological carotid artery waveforms at various locations in a rigid bent-pipe curved artery model. Results revealed symmetric counter-rotating vortex pairs that developed during the acceleration phases of both multi-harmonic and physiological waveforms. An idealized stent model was placed upstream of the bend, which initiated flow perturbations under physiological inflow conditions. Changes in the secondary flow structures were observed during the systolic deceleration phase (t/T ≈ 0.20–0.50). Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis of the flow morphologies under unsteady conditions indicated similarities in the coherent secondary-flow structures and correlation with phase-averaged velocity fields. A regime map was created that characterizes the kaleidoscope of vortical secondary flows with multiple vortex pairs and interesting secondary flow morphologies. This regime map in the curved artery model was created by plotting the secondary Reynolds number against another dimensionless acceleration-based parameter marking numbered regions of vortex pairs.

  16. Secondary flow structures under stent-induced perturbations for cardiovascular flow in a curved artery model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, Autumn L.; Bulusu, Kartik V. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, 801 22nd Street, NW., Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Shu Fangjun [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New Mexico State University, MSC 3450, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Plesniak, Michael W., E-mail: plesniak@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, 801 22nd Street, NW., Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Secondary flows within curved arteries with unsteady forcing result from amplified centrifugal instabilities and are expected to be driven by the rapid accelerations and decelerations inherent in physiological waveforms. These secondary flows may also affect the function of curved arteries through pro-atherogenic wall shear stresses, platelet residence time and other vascular response mechanisms. Planar PIV measurements were performed under multi-harmonic non-zero-mean and physiological carotid artery waveforms at various locations in a rigid bent-pipe curved artery model. Results revealed symmetric counter-rotating vortex pairs that developed during the acceleration phases of both multi-harmonic and physiological waveforms. An idealized stent model was placed upstream of the bend, which initiated flow perturbations under physiological inflow conditions. Changes in the secondary flow structures were observed during the systolic deceleration phase (t/T Almost-Equal-To 0.20-0.50). Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis of the flow morphologies under unsteady conditions indicated similarities in the coherent secondary-flow structures and correlation with phase-averaged velocity fields. A regime map was created that characterizes the kaleidoscope of vortical secondary flows with multiple vortex pairs and interesting secondary flow morphologies. This regime map in the curved artery model was created by plotting the secondary Reynolds number against another dimensionless acceleration-based parameter marking numbered regions of vortex pairs.

  17. Implication of Broadband Dispersion Measurements in Constraining Upper Mantle Velocity Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuponiyi, A.; Kao, H.; Cassidy, J. F.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Dosso, S. E.; Gosselin, J. M.; Spence, G.

    2017-12-01

    Dispersion measurements from earthquake (EQ) data are traditionally inverted to obtain 1-D shear-wave velocity models, which provide information on deep earth structures. However, in many cases, EQ-derived dispersion measurements lack short-period information, which theoretically should provide details of shallow structures. We show that in at least some cases short-period information, such as can be obtained from ambient seismic noise (ASN) processing, must be combined with EQ dispersion measurements to properly constrain deeper (e.g. upper-mantle) structures. To verify this, synthetic dispersion data are generated using hypothetical velocity models under four scenarios: EQ only (with and without deep low-velocity layers) and combined EQ and ASN data (with and without deep low-velocity layers). The now "broadband" dispersion data are inverted using a trans-dimensional Bayesian framework with the aim of recovering the initial velocity models and assessing uncertainties. Our results show that the deep low-velocity layer could only be recovered from the inversion of the combined ASN-EQ dispersion measurements. Given this result, we proceed to describe a method for obtaining reliable broadband dispersion measurements from both ASN and EQ and show examples for real data. The implication of this study in the characterization of lithospheric and upper mantle structures, such as the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB), is also discussed.

  18. Structural habitat predicts functional dispersal habitat of a large carnivore: how leopards change spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattebert, Julien; Robinson, Hugh S; Balme, Guy; Slotow, Rob; Hunter, Luke

    2015-10-01

    Natal dispersal promotes inter-population linkage, and is key to spatial distribution of populations. Degradation of suitable landscape structures beyond the specific threshold of an individual's ability to disperse can therefore lead to disruption of functional landscape connectivity and impact metapopulation function. Because it ignores behavioral responses of individuals, structural connectivity is easier to assess than functional connectivity and is often used as a surrogate for landscape connectivity modeling. However using structural resource selection models as surrogate for modeling functional connectivity through dispersal could be erroneous. We tested how well a second-order resource selection function (RSF) models (structural connectivity), based on GPS telemetry data from resident adult leopard (Panthera pardus L.), could predict subadult habitat use during dispersal (functional connectivity). We created eight non-exclusive subsets of the subadult data based on differing definitions of dispersal to assess the predictive ability of our adult-based RSF model extrapolated over a broader landscape. Dispersing leopards used habitats in accordance with adult selection patterns, regardless of the definition of dispersal considered. We demonstrate that, for a wide-ranging apex carnivore, functional connectivity through natal dispersal corresponds to structural connectivity as modeled by a second-order RSF. Mapping of the adult-based habitat classes provides direct visualization of the potential linkages between populations, without the need to model paths between a priori starting and destination points. The use of such landscape scale RSFs may provide insight into predicting suitable dispersal habitat peninsulas in human-dominated landscapes where mitigation of human-wildlife conflict should be focused. We recommend the use of second-order RSFs for landscape conservation planning and propose a similar approach to the conservation of other wide-ranging large

  19. Importance of intrinsic properties of dense caseinate dispersions for structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Julita M; van Riemsdijk, Lieke E; van der Goot, Atze J; Boom, Remko M

    2007-11-01

    Rheological measurements of dense calcium caseinate and sodium caseinate dispersions (> or =15%) provided insight into the factors determining shear-induced structure formation in caseinates. Calcium caseinate at a sufficiently high concentration (30%) was shown to form highly anisotropic structures during shearing and concurrent enzymatic cross-linking. In contrast, sodium caseinate formed isotropic structures using similar processing conditions. The main difference between the two types of caseinates is the counterion present, and as a consequence, the size of structural elements and their interactions. The rheological behavior of calcium caseinate and sodium caseinate reflected these differences, yielding non-monotonic and shear thinning flow behavior for calcium caseinate whereas sodium caseinate behaved only slightly shear thinning. It appears that the intrinsic properties of the dense caseinate dispersions, which are reflected in their rheological behavior, affect the structure formation that was found after applying shear. Therefore, rheological measurements are useful to obtain an indication of the structure formation potential of caseinate dispersions.

  20. Structural properties of the Hugoniot curve; Proprietes structurales de la courte d'Hugoniot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaisse, F

    2002-07-01

    This report is devoted to the structural properties analysis of the HUGONIOT curve, independently of the equation of state (E 0 S) display. The general properties so coming out are applied to the shock waves interacting studies. When phase transitions are present we investigate the splitting of shock waves and also the rarefaction waves. To end with, we present the shock instabilities and the non-uniqueness of solutions when specific E 0 S are present. (author)

  1. Modified Displacement Transfer Functions for Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures with Varying Curvatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2014-01-01

    To eliminate the need to use finite-element modeling for structure shape predictions, a new method was invented. This method is to use the Displacement Transfer Functions to transform the measured surface strains into deflections for mapping out overall structural deformed shapes. The Displacement Transfer Functions are expressed in terms of rectilinearly distributed surface strains, and contain no material properties. This report is to apply the patented method to the shape predictions of non-symmetrically loaded slender curved structures with different curvatures up to a full circle. Because the measured surface strains are not available, finite-element analysis had to be used to analytically generate the surface strains. Previously formulated straight-beam Displacement Transfer Functions were modified by introducing the curvature-effect correction terms. Through single-point or dual-point collocations with finite-elementgenerated deflection curves, functional forms of the curvature-effect correction terms were empirically established. The resulting modified Displacement Transfer Functions can then provide quite accurate shape predictions. Also, the uniform straight-beam Displacement Transfer Function was applied to the shape predictions of a section-cut of a generic capsule (GC) outer curved sandwich wall. The resulting GC shape predictions are quite accurate in partial regions where the radius of curvature does not change sharply.

  2. Statistically generated weighted curve fit of residual functions for modal analysis of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookout, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    A statistically generated weighting function for a second-order polynomial curve fit of residual functions has been developed. The residual flexibility test method, from which a residual function is generated, is a procedure for modal testing large structures in an external constraint-free environment to measure the effects of higher order modes and interface stiffness. This test method is applicable to structures with distinct degree-of-freedom interfaces to other system components. A theoretical residual function in the displacement/force domain has the characteristics of a relatively flat line in the lower frequencies and a slight upward curvature in the higher frequency range. In the test residual function, the above-mentioned characteristics can be seen in the data, but due to the present limitations in the modal parameter evaluation (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of test data, the residual function has regions of ragged data. A second order polynomial curve fit is required to obtain the residual flexibility term. A weighting function of the data is generated by examining the variances between neighboring data points. From a weighted second-order polynomial curve fit, an accurate residual flexibility value can be obtained. The residual flexibility value and free-free modes from testing are used to improve a mathematical model of the structure. The residual flexibility modal test method is applied to a straight beam with a trunnion appendage and a space shuttle payload pallet simulator.

  3. STRUCTURAL APPROACH TO THE MATHEMATICAL DESCRIPTION AND COMPUTER VISUALIZATION OF PLANE KINEMATIC CURVES FOR THE DISPLAY OF GEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana TRETYAK

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The structural approach stated in this paper allows to simulate the different plane kinematic curves without their concrete analytic equations. The summarized unified mapping system for rack gearing is used. The examples of plane kinematic curves received by the structural method on computer are adduced.

  4. An investigation on vulnerability assessment of steel structures with thin steel shear wall through development of fragility curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Gerami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fragility curves play an important role in damage assessment of buildings. Probability of damage induction to the structure against seismic events can be investigated upon generation of afore mentioned curves. In current research 360 time history analyses have been carried out on structures of 3, 10 and 20 story height and subsequently fragility curves have been adopted. The curves are developed based on two indices of inter story drifts and equivalent strip axial strains of the shear wall. Time history analysis is carried out in Perform 3d considering 10 far field seismograms and 10 near fields. Analysis of low height structures revealed that they are more vulnerable in accelerations lower than 0.8 g in near field earthquakes because of higher mode effects. Upon the generated fragility curves it was observed that middle and high structures have more acceptable performance and lower damage levels compared to low height structures in both near and far field seismic hazards.

  5. Two Aspects of the Simplex Model: Goodness of Fit to Linear Growth Curve Structures and the Analysis of Mean Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandys, Frantisek; Dolan, Conor V.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Studied the conditions under which the quasi-Markov simplex model fits a linear growth curve covariance structure and determined when the model is rejected. Presents a quasi-Markov simplex model with structured means and gives an example. (SLD)

  6. Development of structural vulnerability curve associated with high magnitude torrent occurrences in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing-Yuen Chow, Candace; Bründl, Michael; Keiler, Margreth

    2017-04-01

    In mountain regions, high economic losses have increased significantly in the past decades due to severe hazard processes, in spite of notable investments in hazard management. Assessing the vulnerability of built structures to high magnitude torrent events is a part of consequence analysis, where hazard intensity is related to the degree of loss sustained. While vulnerability curves have been developed for different countries, the presented work contributes new data from Swiss-based case studies that address a known gap associated with the consequences of high magnitude events. Data for this stage of the investigation communicates the degree of loss associated with affected structures and has been provided by local authorities dealing with natural hazards (e.g. Amt für Wald des Kantons Bern (KAWA) and cantonal insurance providers). Information used for the empirical quantification of vulnerability to torrent processes is derived from detailed post-event documentation and the loss database and verified with field visits. Building the initial database supports data sharing and the systematic inclusion of additional case studies as they become available. The collection of this new data is fundamental to the development of a local vulnerability curve based on observed sediment deposition heights, a proxy for describing hazard intensity. The result will then be compared to curves derived from Austrian and Italian datasets.

  7. Frequency Dispersion of the Impedance of Capacitor Structures with Asymmetrically Connected Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'yanov, O. A.; Ivanov, I. O.

    2018-01-01

    A method to estimate the frequency dispersion of the impedance of capacitance structures with asymmetric opposite connection of electrodes is considered. The proposed equations are used to derive exact solutions for spatially nonuniform distributions of potential and current. The solutions are in agreement with the results of the 3D simulation using the COMSOL Multiphysics software. The frequency dispersion of the impedance must be taken into account in the development of modern capacitors needed for construction of efficient energy storages.

  8. Influence of fluid structure upon the shape of RTD curve at a sugar crystallizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, J.; Borroto, J.I.; Leclerc, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of fluid structure over the shape of the RTD curve at a pilot sugar crystallizer has been tested by the radiotracer method. For Newtonian pure molasses B sugar fluid the pattern flux was close to a perfect mixing cells with backmixing model with a back flow-rate ratio lower than one. In the case of molasses B transformed to a non-Newtonian fluid the pattern flux approaches the same model but with extreme values of the back flow-rate ration (higher than one). A direct relationship was founded between the back flow rate ratio and the flow index of the tested fluids, showing that a special attention has to be pay during data processing of the RTD curves for non-Newtonian fluids. (author)

  9. Slurry dispersion state as a parameter to control internal structure of alumina green compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, M.; Shui, A.; Tanaka, S.; Uchida, N.; Uematsu, K. [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The dispersion state of slurry must be controlled to produce granules with appropriated properties for pressing. In this study dispersion state of alumina slurry is changed to form granules with different morphology, deformation property and packing density, and the influence on the internal structure of green compact are presented. Novel methods applying liquid immersion technique coupled with different type of microscopy were used to characterize the internal structures of green compacts. Two types of granules were obtained: dimpled, hard and dense granule, and spherical, soft and loose granule. The respective internal structures of green compacts were totally different. (orig.)

  10. Fabricating small-scale, curved, polymeric structures with convex and concave menisci through interfacial free energy equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Matsuura, Koji; Wang, I-Jan; Kuroda, Yuka; LeDuc, Philip R; Naruse, Keiji

    2009-11-21

    Polymeric curved structures are widely used in imaging systems including optical fibers and microfluidic channels. Here, we demonstrate that small-scale, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based, curved structures can be fabricated through controlling interfacial free energy equilibrium. Resultant structures have a smooth, symmetric, curved surface, and may be convex or concave in form based on surface tension balance. Their curvatures are controlled by surface characteristics (i.e., hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity) of the molds and semi-liquid PDMS. In addition, these structures are shown to be biocompatible for cell culture. Our system provides a simple, efficient and economical method for generating integrateable optical components without costly fabrication facilities.

  11. Statistical evaluation of low cycle loading curves parameters for structural materials by mechanical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daunys, Mykolas; Sniuolis, Raimondas

    2006-01-01

    About 300 welded joint materials that are used in nuclear power energy were tested under monotonous tension and low cycle loading in Kaunas University of Technology together with St. Peterburg Central Research Institute of Structural Materials in 1970-2000. The main mechanical, low cycle loading and fracture characteristics of base metals, weld metals and some heat-affected zones of welded joints metals were determined during these experiments. Analytical dependences of low cycle fatigue parameters on mechanical characteristics of structural materials were proposed on the basis of a large number of experimental data, obtained by the same methods and testing equipment. When these dependences are used, expensive low cycle fatigue tests may be omitted and it is possible to compute low cycle loading curves parameters and lifetime for structural materials according to the main mechanical characteristics given in technical manuals. Dependences of low cycle loading curves parameters on mechanical characteristics for several groups of structural materials used in Russian nuclear power energy are obtained by statistical methods and proposed in this paper

  12. A novel structure of photonic crystal fibre for dispersion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhavi Waghmare

    2017-10-23

    Oct 23, 2017 ... The application of broadband is investigated using a design model based on combi- nation of modal ... 178.98–202.56 THz with the design of equiangular spiral ... The biggest advantage of using this novel structure over.

  13. Flow-induced structuring of dense protein dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manski, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Both health and sustainability are drivers for the increased interest in the creation of novel foods comprising a high protein content. The key challenge is the formation of an attractive, stable and palatable food texture, which is mainly determined by the food structure. In this research, new

  14. Lack of sex-biased dispersal promotes fine-scale genetic structure in alpine ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretchen H. Roffler; Sandra L. Talbot; Gordon Luikart; George K. Sage; Kristy L. Pilgrim; Layne G. Adams; Michael K. Schwartz

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patterns of fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations can advance understanding of critical ecological processes such as dispersal and gene flow across heterogeneous landscapes. Alpine ungulates generally exhibit high levels of genetic structure due to female philopatry and patchy configuration of mountain habitats. We assessed the spatial scale...

  15. Structural diversity of solid dispersions of acetylsalicylic acid as seen by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policianova, Olivia; Brus, Jiri; Hruby, Martin; Urbanova, Martina; Zhigunov, Alexander; Kredatusova, Jana; Kobera, Libor

    2014-02-03

    Solid dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients are of increasing interest due to their versatile use. In the present study polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-metacrylamide] (pHPMA), poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOx), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), each in three Mw, were used to demonstrate structural diversity of solid dispersions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used as a model drug. Four distinct types of the solid dispersions of ASA were created using a freeze-drying method: (i) crystalline solid dispersions containing nanocrystalline ASA in a crystalline PEG matrix; (ii) amorphous glass suspensions with large ASA crystallites embedded in amorphous pHPMA; (iii) solid solutions with molecularly dispersed ASA in rigid amorphous PVP; and (iv) nanoheterogeneous solid solutions/suspensions containing nanosized ASA clusters dispersed in a semiflexible matrix of PEOx. The obtained structural data confirmed that the type of solid dispersion can be primarily controlled by the chemical constitutions of the applied polymers, while the molecular weight of the polymers had no detectable impact. The molecular structure of the prepared dispersions was characterized using solid-state NMR, wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). By applying various (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H correlation experiments combined with T1((1)H) and T1ρ((1)H) relaxation data, the extent of the molecular mixing was determined over a wide range of distances, from intimate intermolecular contacts (0.1-0.5 nm) up to the phase-separated nanodomains reaching ca. 500 nm. Hydrogen-bond interactions between ASA and polymers were probed by the analysis of (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR spectra combined with the measurements of (1)H-(15)N dipolar profiles. Overall potentialities and limitations of individual experimental techniques were thoroughly evaluated.

  16. Polaritons dispersion in a composite ferrite-semiconductor structure near gyrotropic-nihility state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuz, Vladimir R.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of polaritons in a ferrite-semiconductor structure which is influenced by an external static magnetic field, the gyrotropic-nihility can be identified from the dispersion equation related to bulk polaritons as a particular extreme state, at which the longitudinal component of the corresponding constitutive tensor and bulk constant simultaneously acquire zero. Near the frequency of the gyrotropic-nihility state, the conditions of branches merging of bulk polaritons, as well as an anomalous dispersion of bulk and surface polaritons are found and discussed. - Highlights: • Gyrotropic-nihility state is identified from the dispersion equation related to bulk polaritons in a magnetic-semiconductor superlattice. • The conditions of branches merging of bulk polaritons are found. • An anomalous dispersion of bulk and surface polaritons is found and discussed.

  17. Polaritons dispersion in a composite ferrite-semiconductor structure near gyrotropic-nihility state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuz, Vladimir R., E-mail: tvr@rian.kharkov.ua

    2016-12-01

    In the context of polaritons in a ferrite-semiconductor structure which is influenced by an external static magnetic field, the gyrotropic-nihility can be identified from the dispersion equation related to bulk polaritons as a particular extreme state, at which the longitudinal component of the corresponding constitutive tensor and bulk constant simultaneously acquire zero. Near the frequency of the gyrotropic-nihility state, the conditions of branches merging of bulk polaritons, as well as an anomalous dispersion of bulk and surface polaritons are found and discussed. - Highlights: • Gyrotropic-nihility state is identified from the dispersion equation related to bulk polaritons in a magnetic-semiconductor superlattice. • The conditions of branches merging of bulk polaritons are found. • An anomalous dispersion of bulk and surface polaritons is found and discussed.

  18. Dissecting the structure of surface stabilizer on the dispersion of inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yong; Yu, Zongzhi; Zheng, Junping, E-mail: jpzheng@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin University, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2017-03-15

    Dispersing inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is a key requirement for a great variety of products and processes, including carriers in drug delivery or fillers in polymers. To be highly functional in the final product, inorganic particles are required to be finely dispersed in nanoscale. In this study, silica was selected as a representative inorganic particle. Surface stabilizers with different chain length and charged group were designed to reveal the influence of electrostatic and van der Waals forces between silica and stabilizer on the dispersion of silica particles in aqueous medium. Results showed surface stabilizer with longer alkyl chain and charged group exerted best ability to deaggregate silica, leading to a hydrodynamic size of 51.1 nm. Surface stabilizer designing with rational structure is a promising solution for deagglomerating and reducing process time and energy. Giving the designability and adaptability of surface stabilizer, this method is of potential for dispersion of other inorganic nanoparticles.

  19. Dissecting the structure of surface stabilizer on the dispersion of inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Yu, Zongzhi; Zheng, Junping

    2017-03-01

    Dispersing inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is a key requirement for a great variety of products and processes, including carriers in drug delivery or fillers in polymers. To be highly functional in the final product, inorganic particles are required to be finely dispersed in nanoscale. In this study, silica was selected as a representative inorganic particle. Surface stabilizers with different chain length and charged group were designed to reveal the influence of electrostatic and van der Waals forces between silica and stabilizer on the dispersion of silica particles in aqueous medium. Results showed surface stabilizer with longer alkyl chain and charged group exerted best ability to deaggregate silica, leading to a hydrodynamic size of 51.1 nm. Surface stabilizer designing with rational structure is a promising solution for deagglomerating and reducing process time and energy. Giving the designability and adaptability of surface stabilizer, this method is of potential for dispersion of other inorganic nanoparticles.

  20. Study of the dissolution velocity of dispersed solid particles. Development of a calculation method for analyzing the kinetic curves. Extension to the study of composed kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorda, Michel.

    1976-01-01

    The dissolution of a solid in an aqueous phase is studied, the solid consisting of dispersed particles. A continuous colorimetric analysis method is developed to study the dissolution process and a two-parameter optimization method is established to investigate the kinetic curves obtained. This method is based on the differential equation dx/dt=K(1-x)sup(n). (n being the decrease in the dissolution velocity when the dissolved part increases and K a velocity parameter). The dissolution of SO 4 Cu and MnO 4 K in water and UO 3 in SO 4 H 2 is discussed. It is shown that the dissolution velocity of UO 3 is proportional to the concentration of the H + ions in the solution as far as this one is not higher than 0.25N. The study of the temperature dependence of the UO 3 dissolution reaction shows that a transition phase takes place from 25 to 65 0 C between a phase in which the dissolution is controlled by the diffusion of the H + ions and the chemical reaction at the interface and a phase in which the kinetics is only controlled by the diffusion [fr

  1. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  2. Analysis in temporal regime of dispersive invisible structures designed from transformation optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralak, B.; Arismendi, G.; Avril, B.; Diatta, A.; Guenneau, S.

    2016-03-01

    A simple invisible structure made of two anisotropic homogeneous layers is analyzed theoretically in temporal regime. The frequency dispersion is introduced and analytic expression of the transient part of the field is derived for large times when the structure is illuminated by a causal excitation. This expression shows that the limiting amplitude principle applies with transient fields decaying as the power -3 /4 of the time. The quality of the cloak is then reduced at short times and remains preserved at large times. The one-dimensional theoretical analysis is supplemented with full-wave numerical simulations in two-dimensional situations which confirm the effect of dispersion.

  3. A structure study of copper oxide for monolayer dispersion of anatase supported

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zi Fenlan; Yu Xiaofeng; Guo Hongyou; Cai Xiaohai; Yang Pengcheng; Wu Nianzu; Xie Yaning; Zang Jing; Hu Tiandou

    2002-01-01

    The monolayer dispersion of copper oxide on the surface of anatase and its effect on the properties have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS). XPS results give an utmost dispersion capacity of 7.2 mg/gTiO 2 . Strong interactions between copper oxide and anatase can be seen from EXAFS results. The structure of the supported CuO species is strongly dependent on the amount of CuO loading. When the content of CuO loading is below the utmost dispersion capacity, the surface of CuO/TiO 2 is dominated by the highly dispersed CuO species having no -Cu-O-Cu- chains. The copper ion is located in an octahedral coordination environment, and the Cu-O coordination distance is much longer than that in pure crystalline CuO. When CuO loading is exceeds the utmost dispersion capacity, crystalline CuO is formed on the surface of CuO/TiO 2 . From the result of the structure study, it is Cu-O octahedral coordination and coordination distance change in comparison with pure crystalline CuO on the surface CuO/TiO 2 that have catalytic activity

  4. Spatial structures of the environment and of dispersal impact species distribution in competitive metacommunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Dexiecuo; Gravel, Dominique; Chu, Chengjin; Wang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The correspondence between species distribution and the environment depends on species' ability to track favorable environmental conditions (via dispersal) and to maintain competitive hierarchy against the constant influx of migrants (mass effect) and demographic stochasticity (ecological drift). Here we report a simulation study of the influence of landscape structure on species distribution. We consider lottery competition for space in a spatially heterogeneous environment, where the landscape is represented as a network of localities connected by dispersal. We quantified the contribution of neutrality and species sorting to their spatial distribution. We found that neutrality increases and the strength of species-sorting decreases with the centrality of a community in the landscape when the average dispersal among communities is low, whereas the opposite was found at elevated dispersal. We also found that the strength of species-sorting increases with environmental heterogeneity. Our results illustrate that spatial structure of the environment and of dispersal must be taken into account for understanding species distribution. We stress the importance of spatial geographic structure on the relative importance of niche vs. neutral processes in controlling community dynamics.

  5. Spatial structures of the environment and of dispersal impact species distribution in competitive metacommunities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexiecuo Ai

    Full Text Available The correspondence between species distribution and the environment depends on species' ability to track favorable environmental conditions (via dispersal and to maintain competitive hierarchy against the constant influx of migrants (mass effect and demographic stochasticity (ecological drift. Here we report a simulation study of the influence of landscape structure on species distribution. We consider lottery competition for space in a spatially heterogeneous environment, where the landscape is represented as a network of localities connected by dispersal. We quantified the contribution of neutrality and species sorting to their spatial distribution. We found that neutrality increases and the strength of species-sorting decreases with the centrality of a community in the landscape when the average dispersal among communities is low, whereas the opposite was found at elevated dispersal. We also found that the strength of species-sorting increases with environmental heterogeneity. Our results illustrate that spatial structure of the environment and of dispersal must be taken into account for understanding species distribution. We stress the importance of spatial geographic structure on the relative importance of niche vs. neutral processes in controlling community dynamics.

  6. Structure evaluation of cast dispersive AlSi-CrxCy composites

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cholewa

    2008-01-01

    In this work author showed the diversification of structure for cast dispersive AlSi-CrxCy composites. Wide possibilities of properties control and optimization were described, through microstructure of the matrix and the transition zone shaping. Utility castings were prepared with use of traditional casting techniques, ceramic and metal moulds. The influence of technological conditions and cooling rate ion the composite structure was studied. The main factor of structural changes was the dif...

  7. Influence of variations in creep curve on creep behavior of a high-temperature structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Kazuhiko

    1986-01-01

    It is one of the key issues for a high-temperature structural design guideline to evaluate the influence of variations in creep curve on the creep behavior of a high-temperature structure. In the present paper, a comparative evaluation was made to clarify such influence. Additional consideration was given to the influence of the relationship between creep rupture life and minimum creep rate, i.e., the Monkman-Grant's relationship, on the creep damage evaluation. The consideration suggested that the Monkman-Grant's relationship be taken into account in evaluating the creep damage behavior, especially the creep damage variations. However, it was clarified that the application of the creep damage evaluation rule of ASME B and P.V. Code Case N-47 to the ''standard case'' which was predicted from the average creep property would predict the creep damage on the safe side. (orig./GL)

  8. Bifurcation structure of localized states in the Lugiato-Lefever equation with anomalous dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Gomila, D.; Gelens, L.; Knobloch, E.

    2018-04-01

    The origin, stability, and bifurcation structure of different types of bright localized structures described by the Lugiato-Lefever equation are studied. This mean field model describes the nonlinear dynamics of light circulating in fiber cavities and microresonators. In the case of anomalous group velocity dispersion and low values of the intracavity phase detuning these bright states are organized in a homoclinic snaking bifurcation structure. We describe how this bifurcation structure is destroyed when the detuning is increased across a critical value, and determine how a bifurcation structure known as foliated snaking emerges.

  9. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  10. Mapping the Extinction Curve in 3D: Structure on Kiloparsec Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlafly, E. F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Peek, J. E. G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Finkbeiner, D. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Green, G. M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics and Astrophysics Building, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Near-infrared spectroscopy from APOGEE and wide-field optical photometry from Pan-STARRS1 have recently made precise measurements of the shape of the extinction curve possible for tens of thousands of stars, parameterized by R ( V ). These measurements revealed structures in R ( V ) with large angular scales, which are challenging to explain in existing dust paradigms. In this work, we combine three-dimensional maps of dust column density with R ( V ) measurements to constrain the three-dimensional distribution of R ( V ) in the Milky Way. We find that the variations in R ( V ) are correlated on kiloparsec scales. In particular, most of the dust within one kiloparsec in the outer Galaxy, including many local molecular clouds (Orion, Taurus, Perseus, California, and Cepheus), has a significantly lower R ( V ) than more distant dust in the Milky Way. These results provide new input to models of dust evolution and processing, and complicate the application of locally derived extinction curves to more distant regions of the Milky Way and to other galaxies.

  11. Experimental Visualization of the Flow Structure for Jet in Crossflow with a Curved Hole Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yu Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of a hole curvature on the flow structure and characteristics downstream of JICF (jet in cross-Flow by means of smoke visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV. The experiment was performed in a low speed wind tunnel with Reynolds numbers of about 480 and 1000, based on the hole diameter and main flow speed. Two geometries were tested: a circular hole with 90° curvature and a circular straight hole for comparison, under blowing ratios 0.5 and 1.0. The measurements were done in the symmetric plane and four cross-sections. The results show that the curved hole could decrease the mixing behavior of jet flow with the main flow as the hole leading edge also increases the chance of transportingthecoolant to the wall surface and the transverse coverage. The curved hole shows a high potential to increase the cooling effectiveness once it is applied to the turbine blades.

  12. On the relationship between magnetostatic wave energy and dispersion characteristics in ferrite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashkovsky, Anatolii V; Lock, Edwin H

    2011-01-01

    The energy and dispersion characteristics of a dipole spin wave in a ferrite-dielectric-metal structure are calculated. An analysis of spin wave dispersion characteristics with extreme points demonstrates how fundamental relationships among the propagation constant, phase and group velocities, Poynting vector, and power flux manifest themselves when the wavenumber changes near these points. A comparison of magnetostatic approximation results with calculations using Maxwell's equations shows the inadequacy of the magnetostatic approximation formulas currently used for calculating the Poynting vector and power flux of dipole spin waves. A correct alternative is proposed. (methodological notes)

  13. Anomalous behavior of the structural relaxation dispersion function of a carborane-containing siloxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlus, Sebastian; Paluch, Marian; Ziolo, Jerzy [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, Katowice 40-007 (Poland); Kolel-Veetil, Manoj K [Chemistry Division, Code 6127, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5342 (United States)

    2010-10-20

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopic investigations of a vinyl-terminated carboranylenesiloxane, VCS, were performed at ambient and elevated pressures. At a constant structural relaxation time, results show that the structural relaxation dispersion function of VCS narrows with both increasing pressure and temperature. This narrowing is substantial in the case of pressurization and, consequently, the breakdown of the temperature-pressure superposition rule is observed. The interpretation of this breakdown is presented.

  14. Coherent structural trapping through wave packet dispersion during photoinduced spin state switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Hartsock, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The description of ultrafast nonadiabatic chemical dynamics during molecular photo-transformations remains challenging because electronic and nuclear configurations impact each other and cannot be treated independently. Here we gain experimental insights, beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation...... is distinguished from the structural trapping dynamics, which launches a coherent oscillating wave packet (265 fs period), clearly identified as molecular breathing. Throughout the structural trapping, the dispersion of the wave packet along the reaction coordinate reveals details of intramolecular vibronic...

  15. Validation of experimental molecular crystal structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streek, Jacco van de; Neumann, Marcus A.

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of a dispersion-corrected density functional theory method is validated against 241 experimental organic crystal structures from Acta Cryst. Section E. This paper describes the validation of a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (d-DFT) method for the purpose of assessing the correctness of experimental organic crystal structures and enhancing the information content of purely experimental data. 241 experimental organic crystal structures from the August 2008 issue of Acta Cryst. Section E were energy-minimized in full, including unit-cell parameters. The differences between the experimental and the minimized crystal structures were subjected to statistical analysis. The r.m.s. Cartesian displacement excluding H atoms upon energy minimization with flexible unit-cell parameters is selected as a pertinent indicator of the correctness of a crystal structure. All 241 experimental crystal structures are reproduced very well: the average r.m.s. Cartesian displacement for the 241 crystal structures, including 16 disordered structures, is only 0.095 Å (0.084 Å for the 225 ordered structures). R.m.s. Cartesian displacements above 0.25 Å either indicate incorrect experimental crystal structures or reveal interesting structural features such as exceptionally large temperature effects, incorrectly modelled disorder or symmetry breaking H atoms. After validation, the method is applied to nine examples that are known to be ambiguous or subtly incorrect

  16. Effect of Particle Damping on an Acoustically Excited Curved Vehicle Panel Structure with varied Equipment Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, David; Smith, Andrew; Knight, Brent; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Craigmyle, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Particle dampers provide a mechanism for diverting energy away from resonant structural vibrations. This experimental study provides data from trials to determine how effective use of these dampers might be for equipment mounted to a curved orthogrid vehicle panel. Trends for damping are examined for variations in damper fill level, component mass, and excitation energy. A significant response reduction at the component level would suggest that comparatively small, thoughtfully placed, particle dampers might be advantageously used in vehicle design. The results of this test will be compared with baseline acoustic response tests and other follow-on testing involving a range of isolation and damping methods. Instrumentation consisting of accelerometers, microphones, and still photography data will be collected to correlate with the analytical results.

  17. Chromatic dispersion compensation and Coherent Direct-Sequence OCDMA operation on a single super structured FBG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baños, Rocío; Pastor, Daniel; Amaya, Waldimar; Garcia-Munoz, Victor

    2012-06-18

    We have proposed, fabricated and demonstrated experimentally a set of Coherent Direct Sequence-OCDMA en/decoders based on Super Structured Fiber Bragg Gratings (SSFBGs) which are able to compensate the fiber chromatic dispersion at the same time that they perform the en/decoding task. The proposed devices avoid the use of additional dispersion compensation stages reducing system complexity and losses. This performance was evaluated for 5.4, 11.4 and 16.8 km of SSMF. The twofold performance was verified in Low Reflectivity regime employing only one GVD compensating device at decoder or sharing out the function between encoder and decoder devices. Shared functionality requires shorter SSFBGs designs and also provides added flexibility to the optical network design. Moreover, dispersion compensated en/decoders were also designed into the High Reflectivity regime employing synthesis methods achieving more than 9 dB reduction of insertion loss for each device.

  18. Structure and crystallinity of water dispersible photoactive nanoparticles for organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Emil Bøje Lind; Pedersen, M.C.; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose

    2015-01-01

    Water based inks would be a strong advantage for large scale production of organic photovoltaic devices. Formation of water dispersible nanoparticles produced by the Landfester method is a promising route to achieve such inks. We provide new insights into the key ink properties of poly(3-hexylthi......Water based inks would be a strong advantage for large scale production of organic photovoltaic devices. Formation of water dispersible nanoparticles produced by the Landfester method is a promising route to achieve such inks. We provide new insights into the key ink properties of poly(3......-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) nanoparticles such as the internal structure and crystallinity of the dispersed nanoparticles and the previously unreported drastic changes that occur when the inks are cast into a film. We observe through transmission electron...

  19. Structure evaluation of cast dispersive AlSi-CrxCy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work author showed the diversification of structure for cast dispersive AlSi-CrxCy composites. Wide possibilities of properties control and optimization were described, through microstructure of the matrix and the transition zone shaping. Utility castings were prepared with use of traditional casting techniques, ceramic and metal moulds. The influence of technological conditions and cooling rate ion the composite structure was studied. The main factor of structural changes was the diffusion at matrix – reinforcement interface. Divers structure was observed in particle close neighborhood. Possibilities of diffusion control were indicated through application of factors assisting the crystallization.

  20. Dispersal Ability Determines the Role of Environmental, Spatial and Temporal Drivers of Metacommunity Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padial, André A.; Ceschin, Fernanda; Declerck, Steven A. J.; De Meester, Luc; Bonecker, Cláudia C.; Lansac-Tôha, Fabio A.; Rodrigues, Liliana; Rodrigues, Luzia C.; Train, Sueli; Velho, Luiz F. M.; Bini, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, community ecologists are focusing on the relative importance of local environmental factors and proxies to dispersal limitation to explain spatial variation in community structure. Albeit less explored, temporal processes may also be important in explaining species composition variation in metacommunities occupying dynamic systems. We aimed to evaluate the relative role of environmental, spatial and temporal variables on the metacommunity structure of different organism groups in the Upper Paraná River floodplain (Brazil). We used data on macrophytes, fish, benthic macroinvertebrates, zooplankton, periphyton, and phytoplankton collected in up to 36 habitats during a total of eight sampling campaigns over two years. According to variation partitioning results, the importance of predictors varied among biological groups. Spatial predictors were particularly important for organisms with comparatively lower dispersal ability, such as aquatic macrophytes and fish. On the other hand, environmental predictors were particularly important for organisms with high dispersal ability, such as microalgae, indicating the importance of species sorting processes in shaping the community structure of these organisms. The importance of watercourse distances increased when spatial variables were the main predictors of metacommunity structure. The contribution of temporal predictors was low. Our results emphasize the strength of a trait-based analysis and of better defining spatial variables. More importantly, they supported the view that “all-or- nothing” interpretations on the mechanisms structuring metacommunities are rather the exception than the rule. PMID:25340577

  1. Population genetic structure and long-distance dispersal of a recently expanding migratory bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Raül; Song, Gang; Navarro, Joan; Zhang, Ruiying; Symes, Craig T; Forero, Manuela G; Lei, Fumin

    2016-06-01

    Long-distance dispersal events and their derivable increases of genetic diversity have been highlighted as important ecological and evolutionary determinants that improve performances of range-expanding species. In the context of global environmental change, specific dispersal strategies have to be understood and foreseen if we like to prevent general biodiversity impoverishment or the spread of allochthonous diseases. We explored the genetic structure and potential population mixing on the recently range-expanding European bee-eater Merops apiaster. In addition, the species is suspected of harbouring and disseminating the most relevant disease for bees and apiculture, Nosema microsporidia. In agreement with complementary ringing recovery data and morphometric measurements, genetic results on two mitochondrial genes and 12 microsatellites showed a reasonably well-structured population partitioning along its breeding distribution. Microsatellite results indicated that not only did a few birds recently disperse long distance during their return migrations and change their natal breeding areas, but also that a group of allochthonous birds together founded a new colony. Although we did not provide evidence on the direct implication of birds in the widespread of Nosema parasites, our finding on the long-distance dispersal of bird flocks between remote breeding colonies adds concern about the role of European bee-eaters in the spread of such disease at a large, inter-continental scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimates of the topographic uplift of the Southern African Plateau from the African Superswell through petrologically-consistent thermo-chemical modelling of the geoid, SHF, Rayleigh and Love dispersion curves and MT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan G.; Afonso, Juan Carlos; Fullea, Javier

    2015-04-01

    The deep mantle African Superswell is thought to cause up to 500 m of the uplift of the Southern African Plateau. We investigate this phenomenon through stochastic thermo-chemical inversion modelling of the geoid, surface heat flow, Rayleigh and Love dispersion curves and MT data, in a manner that is fully petrologically-consistent. We invert for a three layer crustal velocity, density and thermal structure, but assume the resistivity layering (based on prior inversion of the MT data alone). Inversions are performed using an improved Delayed Rejection and Adaptive Metropolis (DRAM) type Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. We demonstrate that a single layer lithosphere can fit most of the data, but not the MT responses. We further demonstrate that modelling the seismic data alone, without the constraint of requiring reasonable oxide chemistry or of fitting the geoid, permits wildly acceptable elevations and with very poorly defined lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). We parameterise the lithosphere into three layers, and bound the permitted oxide chemistry of each layer consistent with known chemical layering. We find acceptable models, from 5 million tested in each case, that fit all responses and yield a posteriori elevation distributions centred on 900-950 m, suggesting dynamic support from the lower mantle of some 400 m.

  3. Extreme genetic structure in a social bird species despite high dispersal capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinha, Francisco; Dávila, José A; Bastos, Estela; Cabral, João A; Frías, Óscar; González, José L; Travassos, Paulo; Carvalho, Diogo; Milá, Borja; Blanco, Guillermo

    2017-05-01

    Social barriers have been shown to reduce gene flow and contribute to genetic structure among populations in species with high cognitive capacity and complex societies, such as cetaceans, apes and humans. In birds, high dispersal capacity is thought to prevent population divergence unless major geographical or habitat barriers induce isolation patterns by dispersal, colonization or adaptation limitation. We report that Iberian populations of the red-billed chough, a social, gregarious corvid with high dispersal capacity, show a striking degree of genetic structure composed of at least 15 distinct genetic units. Monitoring of marked individuals over 30 years revealed that long-distance movements over hundreds of kilometres are common, yet recruitment into breeding populations is infrequent and highly philopatric. Genetic differentiation is weakly related to geographical distance, and habitat types used are overall qualitatively similar among regions and regularly shared by individuals of different populations, so that genetic structure is unlikely to be due solely to isolation by distance or isolation by adaptation. Moreover, most population nuclei showed relatively high levels of genetic diversity, suggesting a limited role for genetic drift in significantly differentiating populations. We propose that social mechanisms may underlie this unprecedented level of genetic structure in birds through a pattern of isolation by social barriers not yet described, which may have driven this remarkable population divergence in the absence of geographical and environmental barriers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Split-field FDTD method for oblique incidence study of periodic dispersive metallic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baida, F I; Belkhir, A

    2009-08-15

    The study of periodic structures illuminated by a normally incident plane wave is a simple task that can be numerically simulated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. On the contrary, for off-normal incidence, a widely modified algorithm must be developed in order to bypass the frequency dependence appearing in the periodic boundary conditions. After recently implementing this FDTD algorithm for pure dielectric materials, we here extend it to the study of metallic structures where dispersion can be described by analytical models. The accuracy of our code is demonstrated through comparisons with already-published results in the case of 1D and 3D structures.

  5. To curve or not to curve? The effect of college science grading policies on implicit theories of intelligence, perceived classroom goal structures, and self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, James M.

    There is currently a shortage of students graduating with STEM (science, technology, engineering, or mathematics) degrees, particularly women and students of color. Approximately half of students who begin a STEM major eventually switch out. Many switchers cite the competitiveness, grading curves, and weed-out culture of introductory STEM classes as reasons for the switch. Variables known to influence resilience include a student's implicit theory of intelligence and achievement goal orientation. Incremental theory (belief that intelligence is malleable) and mastery goals (pursuit of increased competence) are more adaptive in challenging classroom contexts. This dissertation investigates the role that college science grading policies and messages about the importance of effort play in shaping both implicit theories and achievement goal orientation. College students (N = 425) were randomly assigned to read one of three grading scenarios: (1) a "mastery" scenario, which used criterion-referenced grading, permitted tests to be retaken, and included a strong effort message; (2) a "norm" scenario, which used norm-referenced grading (grading on the curve); or (3) an "effort" scenario, which combined a strong effort message with the norm-referenced policies. The dependent variables included implicit theories of intelligence, perceived classroom goal structure, and self-efficacy. A different sample of students (N = 15) were randomly assigned a scenario to read, asked to verbalize their thoughts, and responded to questions in a semi-structured interview. Results showed that students reading the mastery scenario were more likely to endorse an incremental theory of intelligence, perceived greater mastery goal structure, and had higher self-efficacy. The effort message had no effect on self-efficacy, implicit theory, and most of the goal structure measures. The interviews revealed that it was the retake policy in the mastery scenario and the competitive atmosphere in the norm

  6. A setup for probing ultra-short soft X-ray diffraction by means of curved multilayer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, D., E-mail: ksenzov@physik.uni-siegen.de [Solid State Physics Group, University of Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Schlemper, Ch.; Davtyan, A. [Solid State Physics Group, University of Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Bajt, S. [Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Schaefers, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Str.15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Pietsch, U. [Solid State Physics Group, University of Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2011-10-01

    We propose an experimental setup allowing for measurement of the whole diffraction curve of a Bragg peak by single pulse exposure where a bended sample is illuminated by a set of parallel pencil beams under locally different angles of incidence. The feasibility is demonstrated probing the 1st order Bragg peak of Ru/B{sub 4}C multilayers for photon energies close to Boron K-edge. The evaluated optical parameters recorded from bent sample under fixed sample setting equals those obtained from a flat sample using angular dispersive recording. Subsequently our scheme is appropriate for solid state experiment using at high intense femtosecond pulses provided by free-electron laser sources.

  7. Structures of the particles of the condensed dispersed phase in solid fuel combustion products plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaryan, A.A.; Chernyshev, A.V.; Nefedov, A.P.; Petrov, O.F.; Fortov, V.E.; Mikhailov, Yu.M.; Mintsev, V.B.

    2000-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of a type of dusty plasma which has been least studied--the plasma of solid fuel combustion products--were presented. Experiments to determine the parameters of the plasma of the combustion products of synthetic solid fuels with various compositions together with simultaneous diagnostics of the degree of ordering of the structures of the particles of the dispersed condensed phase were performed. The measurements showed that the charge composition of the plasma of the solid fuels combustion products depends strongly on the easily ionized alkali-metal impurities which are always present in synthetic fuel in one or another amount. An ordered arrangement of the particles of a condensed dispersed phase in structures that form in a boundary region between the high-temperature and condensation zones was observed for samples of aluminum-coated solid fuels with a low content of alkali-metal impurities

  8. Use of structure-activity landscape index curves and curve integrals to evaluate the performance of multiple machine learning prediction models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeDonne Norman C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard approaches to address the performance of predictive models that used common statistical measurements for the entire data set provide an overview of the average performance of the models across the entire predictive space, but give little insight into applicability of the model across the prediction space. Guha and Van Drie recently proposed the use of structure-activity landscape index (SALI curves via the SALI curve integral (SCI as a means to map the predictive power of computational models within the predictive space. This approach evaluates model performance by assessing the accuracy of pairwise predictions, comparing compound pairs in a manner similar to that done by medicinal chemists. Results The SALI approach was used to evaluate the performance of continuous prediction models for MDR1-MDCK in vitro efflux potential. Efflux models were built with ADMET Predictor neural net, support vector machine, kernel partial least squares, and multiple linear regression engines, as well as SIMCA-P+ partial least squares, and random forest from Pipeline Pilot as implemented by AstraZeneca, using molecular descriptors from SimulationsPlus and AstraZeneca. Conclusion The results indicate that the choice of training sets used to build the prediction models is of great importance in the resulting model quality and that the SCI values calculated for these models were very similar to their Kendall τ values, leading to our suggestion of an approach to use this SALI/SCI paradigm to evaluate predictive model performance that will allow more informed decisions regarding model utility. The use of SALI graphs and curves provides an additional level of quality assessment for predictive models.

  9. Use of structure-activity landscape index curves and curve integrals to evaluate the performance of multiple machine learning prediction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledonne, Norman C; Rissolo, Kevin; Bulgarelli, James; Tini, Leonard

    2011-02-07

    Standard approaches to address the performance of predictive models that used common statistical measurements for the entire data set provide an overview of the average performance of the models across the entire predictive space, but give little insight into applicability of the model across the prediction space. Guha and Van Drie recently proposed the use of structure-activity landscape index (SALI) curves via the SALI curve integral (SCI) as a means to map the predictive power of computational models within the predictive space. This approach evaluates model performance by assessing the accuracy of pairwise predictions, comparing compound pairs in a manner similar to that done by medicinal chemists. The SALI approach was used to evaluate the performance of continuous prediction models for MDR1-MDCK in vitro efflux potential. Efflux models were built with ADMET Predictor neural net, support vector machine, kernel partial least squares, and multiple linear regression engines, as well as SIMCA-P+ partial least squares, and random forest from Pipeline Pilot as implemented by AstraZeneca, using molecular descriptors from SimulationsPlus and AstraZeneca. The results indicate that the choice of training sets used to build the prediction models is of great importance in the resulting model quality and that the SCI values calculated for these models were very similar to their Kendall τ values, leading to our suggestion of an approach to use this SALI/SCI paradigm to evaluate predictive model performance that will allow more informed decisions regarding model utility. The use of SALI graphs and curves provides an additional level of quality assessment for predictive models.

  10. Constructing a Multiple Covalent Interface and Isolating a Dispersed Structure in Silica/Rubber Nanocomposites with Excellent Dynamic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Junchi; Han, Dongli; Zhao, Suhe; Ye, Xin; Wang, Yiqing; Wu, Youping; Dong, Dong; Liu, Jun; Wu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Liqun

    2018-06-13

    Realizing and manipulating a fine dispersion of silica nanoparticles (NPs) in the polymer matrix is always a great challenge. In this work, we first successfully synthesized N, N'-bis[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl-isopropanol]-propane-1,3-diamine (TSPD), which was a new interface modifier, aiming to promote the dispersion of silica NPs. Through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, and mass spectroscopy, we verified that TSPD contains together six ethoxy groups at its two ends. Then, we used this TSPD to modify the pure silica NPs, and this modified silica was abbreviated as D-MS, which is realized by the thermal gravimetric analysis examination, scanning electron microscopy analysis, and dynamic light scattering results. It was clearly observed that D-MS NPs are connected to one another but are not conglutinated tightly, exhibiting a novel predispersed structure with around 1-2 nm certain extent of interparticle distance. Next, we fabricated the following four elastomer nanocomposites such as pure silica/natural rubber (NR) composite (PS-NR), D-MS/NR composite (DMS-NR), bis-(γ-triethoxysilylpropyl)-tetrasulfide (TESPT)-modified silica/NR composite (TS-NR), and TESPT-modified D-MS/NR composite (T&DMS-NR) and found that the Payne effect is the smallest for T&DMS-NR via the combination use of the D-MS and the traditional coupling agent TESPT, which is attributed to its best dispersion state evidenced by the transmission electron microscopy results. Moreover, by measuring a series of other important mechanical performances such as the stress-strain curve, the dynamic strain dependence of the loss factor, and the heat build-up, we concluded that the T&DMS-NR system greatly exceeds those of the three other rubber composites. In general, this new approach provides a good opportunity to prepare a silica/rubber composite with excellent properties in mechanical strength and dynamic behavior by tailoring the fine dispersion of NPs.

  11. Genetic algorithm using independent component analysis in x-ray reflectivity curve fitting of periodic layer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiilikainen, J; Bosund, V; Tilli, J-M; Sormunen, J; Mattila, M; Hakkarainen, T; Lipsanen, H

    2007-01-01

    A novel genetic algorithm (GA) utilizing independent component analysis (ICA) was developed for x-ray reflectivity (XRR) curve fitting. EFICA was used to reduce mutual information, or interparameter dependences, during the combinatorial phase. The performance of the new algorithm was studied by fitting trial XRR curves to target curves which were computed using realistic multilayer models. The median convergence properties of conventional GA, GA using principal component analysis and the novel GA were compared. GA using ICA was found to outperform the other methods with problems having 41 parameters or more to be fitted without additional XRR curve calculations. The computational complexity of the conventional methods was linear but the novel method had a quadratic computational complexity due to the applied ICA method which sets a practical limit for the dimensionality of the problem to be solved. However, the novel algorithm had the best capability to extend the fitting analysis based on Parratt's formalism to multiperiodic layer structures

  12. Extension of Ko Straight-Beam Displacement Theory to Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2011-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory originally developed for shape predictions of straight beams is extended to shape predictions of curved beams. The surface strains needed for shape predictions were analytically generated from finite-element nodal stress outputs. With the aid of finite-element displacement outputs, mathematical functional forms for curvature-effect correction terms are established and incorporated into straight-beam deflection equations for shape predictions of both cantilever and two-point supported curved beams. The newly established deflection equations for cantilever curved beams could provide quite accurate shape predictions for different cantilever curved beams, including the quarter-circle cantilever beam. Furthermore, the newly formulated deflection equations for two-point supported curved beams could provide accurate shape predictions for a range of two-point supported curved beams, including the full-circular ring. Accuracy of the newly developed curved-beam deflection equations is validated through shape prediction analysis of curved beams embedded in the windward shallow spherical shell of a generic crew exploration vehicle. A single-point collocation method for optimization of shape predictions is discussed in detail

  13. Intramolecular BSSE and dispersion affect the structure of a dipeptide conformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Rabia; Khan, Afsar; van Mourik, Tanja

    2018-05-01

    B3LYP and MP2 calculations with the commonly-used 6-31+G(d) basis set predict qualitatively different structures for the Tyr-Gly conformer book1, which is the most stable conformer identified in a previous study. The structures differ mainly in the ψtyr Ramachandran angle (138° in the B3LYP structure and 120° in the MP2 structure). The causes for the discrepant structures are attributed to missing dispersion in the B3LYP calculations and large intramolecular BSSE in the MP2 calculations. The correct ψtyr value is estimated to be 130°. The MP2/6-31+G(d) profile identified an additional conformer, not present on the B3LYP surface, with a ψtyr value of 96° and a more folded structure. This minimum is, however, likely an artefact of large intramolecular BSSE values. We recommend the use of basis sets of at least quadruple-zeta quality in density functional theory (DFT), DFTaugmented with an empirical dispersion term (DFT-D) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2 ) calculations in cases where intramolecular BSSE is expected to be large.

  14. Is cancer a pure growth curve or does it follow a kinetics of dynamical structural transformation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Maraelys Morales; Joa, Javier Antonio González; Cabrales, Luis Enrique Bergues; Pupo, Ana Elisa Bergues; Schneider, Baruch; Kondakci, Suleyman; Ciria, Héctor Manuel Camué; Reyes, Juan Bory; Jarque, Manuel Verdecia; Mateus, Miguel Angel O'Farril; González, Tamara Rubio; Brooks, Soraida Candida Acosta; Cáceres, José Luis Hernández; González, Gustavo Victoriano Sierra

    2017-03-07

    Unperturbed tumor growth kinetics is one of the more studied cancer topics; however, it is poorly understood. Mathematical modeling is a useful tool to elucidate new mechanisms involved in tumor growth kinetics, which can be relevant to understand cancer genesis and select the most suitable treatment. The classical Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami as well as the modified Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami models to describe unperturbed fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumor growth are used and compared with the Gompertz modified and Logistic models. Viable tumor cells (1×10 5 ) are inoculated to 28 BALB/c male mice. Modified Gompertz, Logistic, Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami classical and modified Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami models fit well to the experimental data and agree with one another. A jump in the time behaviors of the instantaneous slopes of classical and modified Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami models and high values of these instantaneous slopes at very early stages of tumor growth kinetics are observed. The modified Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation can be used to describe unperturbed fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumor growth. It reveals that diffusion-controlled nucleation/growth and impingement mechanisms are involved in tumor growth kinetics. On the other hand, tumor development kinetics reveals dynamical structural transformations rather than a pure growth curve. Tumor fractal property prevails during entire TGK.

  15. Thermoluminescence response and glow curve structure of Sc2TiO5 ß-irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, I.C.; Brown, F.; Durán-Muñoz, H.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Durán-Torres, B.; Alvarez-Montaño, V.E.

    2014-01-01

    Discandium titanate (Sc 2 TiO 5 ) powder was synthesized in order to analyze its thermoluminescence (TL) response. The TL glow curve structure shows two peaks: at 453–433 K and at 590–553 K. The TL beta dose–response has a linear behavior over the dose range 50–500 Gy. The T stop preheat method shows five glow peaks that were taken into account to calculate the kinetic parameters using the CGCD procedure. TL results support the possible use of Sc 2 TiO 5 as a new phosphor in high ß-dose dosimetry. - Highlights: • Discandium titanate was synthesized, and its TL properties were analyzed. • The beta dose–response has a linear behavior on the dose range 50–500 Gy. • The kinetic parameters were obtained by the CGCD procedure. • Results support the possible use of Sc 2 TiO 5 as a new phosphor for ß-dose dosimetry

  16. Structural modeling of age specific fertility curves in Peninsular Malaysia: An approach of Lee Carter method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafiah, Hazlenah; Jemain, Abdul Aziz

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, the study of fertility has been getting a lot of attention among research abroad following fear of deterioration of fertility led by the rapid economy development. Hence, this study examines the feasibility of developing fertility forecasts based on age structure. Lee Carter model (1992) is applied in this study as it is an established and widely used model in analysing demographic aspects. A singular value decomposition approach is incorporated with an ARIMA model to estimate age specific fertility rates in Peninsular Malaysia over the period 1958-2007. Residual plots is used to measure the goodness of fit of the model. Fertility index forecast using random walk drift is then utilised to predict the future age specific fertility. Results indicate that the proposed model provides a relatively good and reasonable data fitting. In addition, there is an apparent and continuous decline in age specific fertility curves in the next 10 years, particularly among mothers' in their early 20's and 40's. The study on the fertility is vital in order to maintain a balance between the population growth and the provision of facilities related resources.

  17. Effects of weak nonlinearity on dispersion relations and frequency band-gaps of periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2015-01-01

    of these for nonlinear problems is impossible or cumbersome, since Floquet theory is applicable for linear systems only. Thus the nonlinear effects for periodic structures are not yet fully uncovered, while at the same time applica-tions may demand effects of nonlinearity on structural response to be accounted for....... The present work deals with analytically predicting dynamic responses for nonlinear continuous elastic periodic structures. Specifically, the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion re-lation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam performing bending os-cillations are analyzed......The analysis of the behaviour of linear periodic structures can be traced back over 300 years, to Sir Isaac Newton, and still attracts much attention. An essential feature of periodic struc-tures is the presence of frequency band-gaps, i.e. frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate...

  18. Application of Master Curve Methodology for Structural Integrity Assessments of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradj [Det Norske Veritas, Stockholm (Sweden); Wallin, Kim [VTT, Esbo (Finland)

    2005-10-15

    The objective was to perform an in-depth investigation of the Master Curve methodology and also based on this method develop a procedure for fracture assessments of nuclear components. The project has sufficiently illustrated the capabilities of the Master Curve methodology for fracture assessments of nuclear components. Within the scope of this work, the theoretical background of the methodology and its validation on small and large specimens has been studied and presented to a sufficiently large extent, as well as the correlations between the charpy-V data and the Master Curve T{sub 0} reference temperature in the evaluation of fracture toughness. The work gives a comprehensive report of the background theory and the different applications of the Master Curve methodology. The main results of the work have shown that the cleavage fracture toughness is characterized by a large amount of statistical scatter in the transition region, it is specimen size dependent and it should be treated statistically rather than deterministically. The Master Curve methodology is able to make use of statistical data in a consistent way. Furthermore, the Master Curve methodology provides a more precise prediction of the fracture toughness of embrittled materials in comparison with the ASME K{sub IC} reference curve, which often gives over-conservative results. The suggested procedure in this study, concerning the application of the Master Curve method in fracture assessments of ferritic steels in the transition region and the low shelf regions, is valid for the temperatures range T{sub 0}-50{<=}T{<=}T{sub 0}+50 deg C. If only approximate information is required, the Master Curve may well be extrapolated outside this temperature range. The suggested procedure has also been illustrated for some examples.

  19. Structure investigation of metal ions clustering in dehydrated gel using x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Soejima, Y; Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Nakamura, A; Hiramatsu, N; Hara, K

    2003-01-01

    The structure of copper ion clusters in dehydrated N-isopropylacrylamide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gel has been studied by means of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. In order to distinguish the intensity scattered by Cu ions, the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect around the Cu K absorption edge has been coupled with SAXS. It is found that the dispersion effect dependent on the incident X-ray energy is remarkable only at the momentum transfer q = 0.031 A sup - sup 1 , where a SAXS peak is observed. The results indicate that copper ions form clusters in the dehydrated gel, and that the mean size of clusters is the same as that of SA clusters produced by microphase separation. It is therefore naturally presumed that copper ions are adsorbed into the SA molecules. On the basis of the presumption, a mechanism is proposed for microphase-separation and clustering of Cu ions.

  20. Influence of dispersing technique and irradiation on the structure of polyethylene in polypropylene matrix in a wide temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, E.M.; Kuptsov, S.A.; Kuz'min, N.N.; Pavlov, S.A.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Neftekhimicheskogo Sinteza)

    1988-01-01

    The structure of PE dispersed into PP matrix through solution or melt has been studied by X-ray analysis method. In oriented composition melting of HDPE after action of ionizing irradiation is accompanied by transition of some crystallites into pseudohexagonal modification. The fraction of transformed chains depends on the irradiation dose, dispersion method and conditions of orientation

  1. Pierce-type dispersion relation for an intense relativistic electron beam interacting with a slow-wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.

    1994-01-01

    A Pierce-type dispersion relation is derived for the interaction of an intense relativistic electron beam with a cylindrical slow-wave structure of arbitrary corrugation depth. It is shown that near a resonance, the Pierce parameter can be expressed in terms of the vacuum dispersion function and the beam current. The dispersion relation is valid in both the low-current (Compton) regime and the high-current (Raman) regime. The dispersion characteristics of the interaction, such as the linear instability growth rate and bandwidth, are analyzed for both regimes

  2. Larval dispersal in three coral reef decapod species: Influence of larval duration on the metapopulation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Hidalgo, Jorge; Allende-Arandía, Eugenia; Hermoso-Salazar, Margarita

    2018-01-01

    Most coral-associated decapod species have non-migratory adult populations and depend on their planktonic larvae for dispersal. This study examined the metapopulation structure of three decapod species with different pelagic larval duration (PLD) from twelve coral reef complexes of the Gulf of Mexico. The dispersion of larvae was analyzed through the use of a realistic numerical simulation of the Gulf of Mexico with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model. To study the transport and dispersion of particles in near-surface waters, a particle-tracking subroutine was run using as input the currents from the model. The simulation consisted of the launch of 100 passive particles (virtual larvae) every 24 hours from each reef throughout five years, and tracked for as long as 210 days. Results indicated that species with a short PLD, Mithraculus sculptus (PLD 8‒13 days), had a weak connection among the reefs, but higher self-recruitment, especially on the narrow western shelf. The species with a longer PLD, Dromia erythropus (28‒30 days), had a stronger connection among neighboring reefs (< 300 km). Finally, the species with an even longer PLD, Stenopus hispidus (123‒210 days), had a wider potential distribution than the other species. Circulation on synoptic, seasonal and interannual scales had differential effects on the larval dispersal of each species. The metapopulation structure of M. sculptus and D. erythropus seemed to combine features of the non-equilibrium and the patchy models, whereas that of S. hispidus presumably fit to a patchy model. These findings support previous observations that indicate that species with longer PLD tend to occupy larger areas than species with short PLD, although recruitment of juveniles to the adult populations will also depend on other factors, such as the availability of suitable habitats and the ability to colonize them. PMID:29558478

  3. Validation of experimental molecular crystal structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Streek, Jacco; Neumann, Marcus A

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the validation of a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (d-DFT) method for the purpose of assessing the correctness of experimental organic crystal structures and enhancing the information content of purely experimental data. 241 experimental organic crystal structures from the August 2008 issue of Acta Cryst. Section E were energy-minimized in full, including unit-cell parameters. The differences between the experimental and the minimized crystal structures were subjected to statistical analysis. The r.m.s. Cartesian displacement excluding H atoms upon energy minimization with flexible unit-cell parameters is selected as a pertinent indicator of the correctness of a crystal structure. All 241 experimental crystal structures are reproduced very well: the average r.m.s. Cartesian displacement for the 241 crystal structures, including 16 disordered structures, is only 0.095 Å (0.084 Å for the 225 ordered structures). R.m.s. Cartesian displacements above 0.25 A either indicate incorrect experimental crystal structures or reveal interesting structural features such as exceptionally large temperature effects, incorrectly modelled disorder or symmetry breaking H atoms. After validation, the method is applied to nine examples that are known to be ambiguous or subtly incorrect.

  4. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Michioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the additional structure. When the source height is equivalent to the reactor building height, the additional structure enhances both the vertical and horizontal gas dispersion widths and decreases the ground gas concentration, and it means that the additional structure does not decrease the effective stack height. When the source height is larger than the reactor height, the additional structures might affect the effective stack height. As the distance between the source and the additional structure decreases, or as the height of the additional structure increases, the structure has a larger effect on the effective stack height.

  5. Application and validation of the notch master curve in medium and high strength structural steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicero, Sergio; Garcia, Tiberio [Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Madrazo, Virginia [PCTCAN, Santander (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    This paper applies and validates the Notch master curve in two ferritic steels with medium (steel S460M) and high (steel S690Q) strength. The Notch master curve is an engineering tool that allows the fracture resistance of notched ferritic steels operating within their corresponding ductile-to-brittle transition zone to be estimated. It combines the Master curve and the Theory of critical distances in order to take into account the temperature and the notch effect respectively, assuming that both effects are independent. The results, derived from 168 fracture tests on notched specimens, demonstrate the capability of the Notch master curve for the prediction of the fracture resistance of medium and high strength ferritic steels operating within their ductile-to-brittle transition zone and containing notches.

  6. Lack of sex-biased dispersal promotes fine-scale genetic structure in alpine ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Luikart, Gordon; Sage, George K.; Pilgrim, Kristy L.; Adams, Layne G.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patterns of fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations can advance understanding of critical ecological processes such as dispersal and gene flow across heterogeneous landscapes. Alpine ungulates generally exhibit high levels of genetic structure due to female philopatry and patchy configuration of mountain habitats. We assessed the spatial scale of genetic structure and the amount of gene flow in 301 Dall’s sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) at the landscape level using 15 nuclear microsatellites and 473 base pairs of the mitochondrial (mtDNA) control region. Dall’s sheep exhibited significant genetic structure within contiguous mountain ranges, but mtDNA structure occurred at a broader geographic scale than nuclear DNA within the study area, and mtDNA structure for other North American mountain sheep populations. No evidence of male-mediated gene flow or greater philopatry of females was observed; there was little difference between markers with different modes of inheritance (pairwise nuclear DNA F ST = 0.004–0.325; mtDNA F ST = 0.009–0.544), and males were no more likely than females to be recent immigrants. Historical patterns based on mtDNA indicate separate northern and southern lineages and a pattern of expansion following regional glacial retreat. Boundaries of genetic clusters aligned geographically with prominent mountain ranges, icefields, and major river valleys based on Bayesian and hierarchical modeling of microsatellite and mtDNA data. Our results suggest that fine-scale genetic structure in Dall’s sheep is influenced by limited dispersal, and structure may be weaker in populations occurring near ancestral levels of density and distribution in continuous habitats compared to other alpine ungulates that have experienced declines and marked habitat fragmentation.

  7. Production of Curved Precast Concrete Elements for Shell Structures and Free-form Architecture using the Flexible Mould Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H.R.; Grünewald, S.; Eigenraam, P.; Raghunath, P.; Kok, M.A.D.

    2014-01-01

    Free-form buildings tend to be expensive. By optimizing the production process, economical and well-performing precast concrete structures can be manufactured. In this paper, a method is presented that allows producing highly accurate double curved-elements without the need for milling two expensive

  8. Optimum conditions for the determination of ionization potentials, appearance potentials and fine structure in ionization efficiency curves using edd technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, Ezzat T.; El-Kholy, S.B.; Zahran, Nagwa F.

    1978-01-01

    The optimum conditions for determining ionization potentials as well as fine structure in electron impact ionization efficiency curves are studied using energy distribution difference technique. Applying these conditions to Ar + , Kr + , CO + 2 and N + from N 2 , very good agreement is obtained when compared with results determined by other techniques including UV spectroscopy. The merits and limitation of the technique are also discussed

  9. Accurate structures and energetics of neutral-framework zeotypes from dispersion-corrected DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael; Angel, Ross J.

    2017-05-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations incorporating a pairwise dispersion correction were employed to optimize the structures of various neutral-framework compounds with zeolite topologies. The calculations used the PBE functional for solids (PBEsol) in combination with two different dispersion correction schemes, the D2 correction devised by Grimme and the TS correction of Tkatchenko and Scheffler. In the first part of the study, a benchmarking of the DFT-optimized structures against experimental crystal structure data was carried out, considering a total of 14 structures (8 all-silica zeolites, 4 aluminophosphate zeotypes, and 2 dense phases). Both PBEsol-D2 and PBEsol-TS showed an excellent performance, improving significantly over the best-performing approach identified in a previous study (PBE-TS). The temperature dependence of lattice parameters and bond lengths was assessed for those zeotypes where the available experimental data permitted such an analysis. In most instances, the agreement between DFT and experiment improved when the experimental data were corrected for the effects of thermal motion and when low-temperature structure data rather than room-temperature structure data were used as a reference. In the second part, a benchmarking against experimental enthalpies of transition (with respect to α-quartz) was carried out for 16 all-silica zeolites. Excellent agreement was obtained with the PBEsol-D2 functional, with the overall error being in the same range as the experimental uncertainty. Altogether, PBEsol-D2 can be recommended as a computationally efficient DFT approach that simultaneously delivers accurate structures and energetics of neutral-framework zeotypes.

  10. Soil-Structure Interaction Effect on Fragility Curve of 3D Models of Concrete Moment-Resisting Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Anvarsamarin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the probabilistic generation of collapse fragility curves for evaluating the performance of 3D, reinforced concrete (RC moment-resisting building models, considering soil-structure interaction (SSI by concentration on seismic uncertainties. It considers collapse as the loss of lateral load-resisting capacity of the building structures due to severe ground shaking and consequent large interstory drifts intensified by P-Δ effects as well as the strength and stiffness deterioration of their lateral load carrying systems. The estimation of the collapse performance of structures requires the relation between the intensity measure (IM and the probability of collapse that is determined using the generated collapse fragility curves. Considering a number of 6-, 12-, and 18-story, 3D, RC moment-resisting buildings, two scalar IMs are employed to estimate their collapse fragility curve. On the other hand, the effect of the site soil type on the collapse fragility curves was taken into account by considering the soil-structure interaction. According to the obtained results, adopting the average of spectral acceleration (Saavg intensity measure is more efficient in capturing the effect of the inherent uncertainties of the strong ground motions on the structural response parameters. In addition, considering the SSI for soil type D with shear-wave velocity of 180 m/s to 360 m/s reduces the median of intensity measure (IM = Sa(T1 of fragility curve in 6-, 12-, and 18-story buildings by 4.92%, 22.26%, and 23.03%, respectively.

  11. Bifurcation structure of parameter plane for a family of unimodal piecewise smooth maps: Border-collision bifurcation curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushko, Iryna; Agliari, Anna; Gardini, Laura

    2006-01-01

    We study the structure of the 2D bifurcation diagram for a two-parameter family of piecewise smooth unimodal maps f with one break point. Analysing the parameters of the normal form for the border-collision bifurcation of an attracting n-cycle of the map f, we describe the possible kinds of dynamics associated with such a bifurcation. Emergence and role of border-collision bifurcation curves in the 2D bifurcation plane are studied. Particular attention is paid also to the curves of homoclinic bifurcations giving rise to the band merging of pieces of cyclic chaotic intervals

  12. Dispersion corrected hartree-fock and density functional theory for organic crystal structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We present and evaluate dispersion corrected Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) based quantum chemical methods for organic crystal structure prediction. The necessity of correcting for missing long-range electron correlation, also known as van der Waals (vdW) interaction, is pointed out and some methodological issues such as inclusion of three-body dispersion terms are discussed. One of the most efficient and widely used methods is the semi-classical dispersion correction D3. Its applicability for the calculation of sublimation energies is investigated for the benchmark set X23 consisting of 23 small organic crystals. For PBE-D3 the mean absolute deviation (MAD) is below the estimated experimental uncertainty of 1.3 kcal/mol. For two larger π-systems, the equilibrium crystal geometry is investigated and very good agreement with experimental data is found. Since these calculations are carried out with huge plane-wave basis sets they are rather time consuming and routinely applicable only to systems with less than about 200 atoms in the unit cell. Aiming at crystal structure prediction, which involves screening of many structures, a pre-sorting with faster methods is mandatory. Small, atom-centered basis sets can speed up the computation significantly but they suffer greatly from basis set errors. We present the recently developed geometrical counterpoise correction gCP. It is a fast semi-empirical method which corrects for most of the inter- and intramolecular basis set superposition error. For HF calculations with nearly minimal basis sets, we additionally correct for short-range basis incompleteness. We combine all three terms in the HF-3c denoted scheme which performs very well for the X23 sublimation energies with an MAD of only 1.5 kcal/mol, which is close to the huge basis set DFT-D3 result.

  13. High pressure and temperature structure of liquid and solid Cd: implications for the melting curve of Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, S V; Williams, Q; Geballe, Z M; Godwal, B K; Jeanloz, R; Kalkan, B

    2014-01-01

    The structure of cadmium was characterized in both the solid and liquid forms at pressures to 10 GPa using in situ x-ray diffraction measurements in a resistively heated diamond anvil cell. The distorted hexagonal structure of solid cadmium persists at high pressures and temperatures, with anomalously large c/a ratio of Cd becoming larger as the melting curve is approached. The measured structure factor S(Q) for the melt reveals that the cadmium atoms are spaced about 0.6 Angstroms apart. The melt structure remains notably constant with increasing pressure, with the first peak in the structure factor remaining mildly asymmetric, in accord with the persistence of an anisotropic bonding environment within the liquid. Evolution of powder diffraction patterns up to the temperature of melting revealed the stability of the ambient-pressure hcp structure up to a pressure of 10 GPa. The melting curve has a positive Clausius–Clapeyron slope, and its slope is in good agreement with data from other techniques. We find deviations in the melting curve from Lindemann law type behavior for pressures above 1 GPa. (paper)

  14. Dispersion Corrected Structural Properties and Quasiparticle Band Gaps of Several Organic Energetic Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appalakondaiah, S; Vaitheeswaran, G; Lebègue, S

    2015-06-18

    We have performed ab initio calculations for a series of energetic solids to explore their structural and electronic properties. To evaluate the ground state volume of these molecular solids, different dispersion correction methods were accounted in DFT, namely the Tkatchenko-Scheffler method (with and without self-consistent screening), Grimme's methods (D2, D3(BJ)), and the vdW-DF method. Our results reveal that dispersion correction methods are essential in understanding these complex structures with van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. The calculated ground state volumes and bulk moduli show that the performance of each method is not unique, and therefore a careful examination is mandatory for interpreting theoretical predictions. This work also emphasizes the importance of quasiparticle calculations in predicting the band gap, which is obtained here with the GW approximation. We find that the obtained band gaps are ranging from 4 to 7 eV for the different compounds, indicating their insulating nature. In addition, we show the essential role of quasiparticle band structure calculations to correlate the gap with the energetic properties.

  15. Dielectric Dispersion Studies Indicate Change in Structure of Water by Potentised Homeopathic Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Response of living bodies to different vastly `diluted' homeopathic medicines are different (rejecting the sceptic's view of `placebo' effect), though they are chemically same. Till now there is no satisfactory answer to how one such medicine differs from another in terms of scientifically measurable parameters. This paper tries to address this basic issue by taking two medicines of the same potency and two different potencies of the same medicine, namely, Arnica Mont 30c, 200c and Anacardium Orient 30c, 200c. These potencies are well above the Avogadro limit. The investigation reported here proceeds with the concept of `induced molecular structure' advanced by a number of scientists. Dielectric dispersion is used as the tool for experimental verification. It is based on the fact that when the exciting frequency of applied electric field equals the characteristic frequency, then macromolecules resonate leading to anomalous dielectric dispersion associated with sharp increase in dielectric loss, the resonance frequencies being different for macromolecules of different structures or dimensions. The results suggest that medicine- and potency-specific attributes are acquired by the vehicle (i.e. water) in the form of macromolecules generated by the potentization process of homeopathy making one medicine structurally different from another.

  16. Growth Curve and Structural Equation Modeling : Topics from the Indian Statistical Institute

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book describes some recent trends in GCM research on different subject areas, both theoretical and applied. This includes tools and possibilities for further work through new techniques and modification of existing ones. A growth curve is an empirical model of the evolution of a quantity over time. Growth curves in longitudinal studies are used in disciplines including biology, statistics, population studies, economics, biological sciences, sociology, nano-biotechnology, and fluid mechanics. The volume includes original studies, theoretical findings and case studies from a wide range of applied work. This volume builds on presentations from a GCM workshop held at the Indian Statistical Institute, Giridih, January 18-19, 2014. This book follows the volume Advances in Growth Curve Models, published by Springer in 2013. The results have meaningful application in health care, prediction of crop yield, child nutrition, poverty measurements, estimation of growth rate, and other research areas.

  17. Dispersal, mating events and fine-scale genetic structure in the lesser flat-headed bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panyu Hua

    Full Text Available Population genetic structure has important consequences in evolutionary processes and conservation genetics in animals. Fine-scale population genetic structure depends on the pattern of landscape, the permanent movement of individuals, and the dispersal of their genes during temporary mating events. The lesser flat-headed bat (Tylonycteris pachypus is a nonmigratory Asian bat species that roosts in small groups within the internodes of bamboo stems and the habitats are fragmented. Our previous parentage analyses revealed considerable extra-group mating in this species. To assess the spatial limits and sex-biased nature of gene flow in the same population, we used 20 microsatellite loci and mtDNA sequencing of the ND2 gene to quantify genetic structure among 54 groups of adult flat-headed bats, at nine localities in South China. AMOVA and F(ST estimates revealed significant genetic differentiation among localities. Alternatively, the pairwise F(ST values among roosting groups appeared to be related to the incidence of associated extra-group breeding, suggesting the impact of mating events on fine-scale genetic structure. Global spatial autocorrelation analyses showed positive genetic correlation for up to 3 km, indicating the role of fragmented habitat and the specialized social organization as a barrier in the movement of individuals among bamboo forests. The male-biased dispersal pattern resulted in weaker spatial genetic structure between localities among males than among females, and fine-scale analyses supported that relatedness levels within internodes were higher among females than among males. Finally, only females were more related to their same sex roost mates than to individuals from neighbouring roosts, suggestive of natal philopatry in females.

  18. Dispersal, mating events and fine-scale genetic structure in the lesser flat-headed bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Panyu; Zhang, Libiao; Guo, Tingting; Flanders, Jon; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-01-01

    Population genetic structure has important consequences in evolutionary processes and conservation genetics in animals. Fine-scale population genetic structure depends on the pattern of landscape, the permanent movement of individuals, and the dispersal of their genes during temporary mating events. The lesser flat-headed bat (Tylonycteris pachypus) is a nonmigratory Asian bat species that roosts in small groups within the internodes of bamboo stems and the habitats are fragmented. Our previous parentage analyses revealed considerable extra-group mating in this species. To assess the spatial limits and sex-biased nature of gene flow in the same population, we used 20 microsatellite loci and mtDNA sequencing of the ND2 gene to quantify genetic structure among 54 groups of adult flat-headed bats, at nine localities in South China. AMOVA and F(ST) estimates revealed significant genetic differentiation among localities. Alternatively, the pairwise F(ST) values among roosting groups appeared to be related to the incidence of associated extra-group breeding, suggesting the impact of mating events on fine-scale genetic structure. Global spatial autocorrelation analyses showed positive genetic correlation for up to 3 km, indicating the role of fragmented habitat and the specialized social organization as a barrier in the movement of individuals among bamboo forests. The male-biased dispersal pattern resulted in weaker spatial genetic structure between localities among males than among females, and fine-scale analyses supported that relatedness levels within internodes were higher among females than among males. Finally, only females were more related to their same sex roost mates than to individuals from neighbouring roosts, suggestive of natal philopatry in females.

  19. Structural characterization of the phospholipid stabilizer layer at the solid-liquid interface of dispersed triglyceride nanocrystals with small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiele, Martin; Schindler, Torben; Unruh, Tobias; Busch, Sebastian; Morhenn, Humphrey; Westermann, Martin; Steiniger, Frank; Radulescu, Aurel; Lindner, Peter; Schweins, Ralf; Boesecke, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Dispersions of crystalline nanoparticles with at least one sufficiently large unit cell dimension can give rise to Bragg reflections in the small-angle scattering range. If the nanocrystals possess only a small number of unit cells along these particular crystallographic directions, the corresponding Bragg reflections will be broadened. In a previous study of phospholipid stabilized dispersions of β-tripalmitin platelets [Unruh, J. Appl. Crystallogr.JACGAR0021-889810.1107/S0021889807044378 40, 1008 (2007)], the x-ray powder pattern simulation analysis (XPPSA) was developed. The XPPSA method facilitates the interpretation of the rather complicated small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) curves of such dispersions of nanocrystals. The XPPSA method yields the distribution function of the platelet thicknesses and facilitates a structural characterization of the phospholipid stabilizer layer at the solid-liquid interface between the nanocrystals and the dispersion medium from the shape of the broadened 001 Bragg reflection. In this contribution an improved and extended version of the XPPSA method is presented. The SAXS and small-angle neutron scattering patterns of dilute phospholipid stabilized tripalmitin dispersions can be reproduced on the basis of a consistent simulation model for the particles and their phospholipid stabilizer layer on an absolute scale. The results indicate a surprisingly flat arrangement of the phospholipid molecules in the stabilizer layer with a total thickness of only 12 Å. The stabilizer layer can be modeled by an inner shell for the fatty acid chains and an outer shell including the head groups and additional water. The experiments support a dense packing of the phospholipid molecules on the nanocrystal surfaces rather than isolated phospholipid domains.

  20. Formation of Lamellar Structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthening Layers in Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Yang, Jae-Ho; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yoon-Soo [Hanbat National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is one of the leading organizations for developing ATF claddings. One concept is to form an oxidation-resistant layer on Zr cladding surface. The other is to increase high-temperature mechanical strength of Zr tube. The oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) zirconium was proposed to increase the strength of the Zr-based alloy up to high temperatures. According to our previous investigations, the tensile strength of Zircaloy-4 was increased by up to 20% with the formation of a thin dispersed oxide layer with a thickness less than 10% of that of the Zircaloy-4 substrate. However, the tensile elongation of the samples decreased drastically. The brittle fracture was a major concern in development of the ODS Zircaloy-4. In this study, a lamellar structure of ODS layer was formed to increase ductility of the ODS Zircaloy-4. The mechanical properties were varied depending on the structure of ODS layer. For example, the partial formation of ODS layer with the thickness of 10% to the substrate thickness induced the increase in tensile strength up to about 20% than fresh Zircaloy-4.

  1. Wavelength dispersive X-ray absorption fine structure imaging by parametric X-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Manabu; Sakai, Takeshi; Sato, Isamu; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nogami, Kyoko; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Ken; Nakao, Keisuke

    2008-01-01

    The parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) generator system at Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA) in Nihon University is a monochromatic and coherent X-ray source with horizontal wavelength dispersion. The energy definition of the X-rays, which depends on the horizontal size of the incident electron beam on the generator target crystal, has been investigated experimentally by measuring the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra on Cu and CuO associated with conventional X-ray absorption imaging technique. The result demonstrated the controllability of the spectrum resolution of XANES by adjusting of the horizontal electron beam size on the target crystal. The XANES spectra were obtained with energy resolution of several eV at the narrowest case, which is in qualitative agreement with the energy definition of the PXR X-rays evaluated from geometrical consideration. The result also suggested that the wavelength dispersive X-ray absorption fine structure measurement associated with imaging technique is one of the promising applications of PXR. (author)

  2. The missing part of seed dispersal networks: structure and robustness of bat-fruit interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Ribeiro Mello

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutualistic networks are crucial to the maintenance of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, what we know about seed dispersal networks is based only on bird-fruit interactions. Therefore, we aimed at filling part of this gap by investigating bat-fruit networks. It is known from population studies that: (i some bat species depend more on fruits than others, and (ii that some specialized frugivorous bats prefer particular plant genera. We tested whether those preferences affected the structure and robustness of the whole network and the functional roles of species. Nine bat-fruit datasets from the literature were analyzed and all networks showed lower complementary specialization (H(2' = 0.37±0.10, mean ± SD and similar nestedness (NODF = 0.56±0.12 than pollination networks. All networks were modular (M = 0.32±0.07, and had on average four cohesive subgroups (modules of tightly connected bats and plants. The composition of those modules followed the genus-genus associations observed at population level (Artibeus-Ficus, Carollia-Piper, and Sturnira-Solanum, although a few of those plant genera were dispersed also by other bats. Bat-fruit networks showed high robustness to simulated cumulative removals of both bats (R = 0.55±0.10 and plants (R = 0.68±0.09. Primary frugivores interacted with a larger proportion of the plants available and also occupied more central positions; furthermore, their extinction caused larger changes in network structure. We conclude that bat-fruit networks are highly cohesive and robust mutualistic systems, in which redundancy is high within modules, although modules are complementary to each other. Dietary specialization seems to be an important structuring factor that affects the topology, the guild structure and functional roles in bat-fruit networks.

  3. Lagrangian Curves on Spectral Curves of Monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilfoyle, Brendan; Khalid, Madeeha; Ramon Mari, Jose J.

    2010-01-01

    We study Lagrangian points on smooth holomorphic curves in TP 1 equipped with a natural neutral Kaehler structure, and prove that they must form real curves. By virtue of the identification of TP 1 with the space LE 3 of oriented affine lines in Euclidean 3-space, these Lagrangian curves give rise to ruled surfaces in E 3 , which we prove have zero Gauss curvature. Each ruled surface is shown to be the tangent lines to a curve in E 3 , called the edge of regression of the ruled surface. We give an alternative characterization of these curves as the points in E 3 where the number of oriented lines in the complex curve Σ that pass through the point is less than the degree of Σ. We then apply these results to the spectral curves of certain monopoles and construct the ruled surfaces and edges of regression generated by the Lagrangian curves.

  4. Dispersal capacity and genetic structure of Arapaima gigas on different geographic scales using microsatellite markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Araripe

    Full Text Available Despite the ecological and economic importance of the Arapaima gigas (Cuvier 1817, few data about its dispersal capacity are available. The present study was based on the analysis of microsatellite markers in order to estimate the dispersal capacity of the species on fine, meso, and large geographic scales. For this, 561 specimens obtained from stocks separated by distances of up to 25 km (fine scale, 100 km (meso scale, and 1300-2300 km (large scale were analyzed. The fine scale analysis indicated a marked genetic similarity between lakes, with low genetic differentiation, and significant differences between only a few pairs of sites. Low to moderate genetic differentiation was observed between pairs of sites on a meso scale (100 km, which could be explained by the distances between sites. By contrast, major genetic differentiation was recorded in the large scale analysis, that is, between stocks separated by distances of over 1300 km, with the analysis indicating that differentiation was not related solely to distance. The genetic structuring analysis indicated the presence of two stocks, one represented by the arapaimas of the Mamirauá Reserve, and the other by those of Santarém and Tucuruí. The dispersal of arapaimas over short distances indicates a process of lateral migration within the várzea floodplains, which may be the principal factor determining the considerable homogeneity observed among the várzea lakes. The populations separated by distances of approximately 100 km were characterized by reduced genetic differentiation, which was associated with the geographic distances between sites. Populations separated by distances of over 1300 km were characterized by a high degree of genetic differentiation, which may be related primarily to historical bottlenecks in population size and the sedentary behavior of the species. Evidence was found of asymmetric gene flow, resulting in increasing genetic variability in the population of the

  5. Dispersal capacity and genetic structure of Arapaima gigas on different geographic scales using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araripe, Juliana; do Rêgo, Péricles Sena; Queiroz, Helder; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of the Arapaima gigas (Cuvier 1817), few data about its dispersal capacity are available. The present study was based on the analysis of microsatellite markers in order to estimate the dispersal capacity of the species on fine, meso, and large geographic scales. For this, 561 specimens obtained from stocks separated by distances of up to 25 km (fine scale), 100 km (meso scale), and 1300-2300 km (large scale) were analyzed. The fine scale analysis indicated a marked genetic similarity between lakes, with low genetic differentiation, and significant differences between only a few pairs of sites. Low to moderate genetic differentiation was observed between pairs of sites on a meso scale (100 km), which could be explained by the distances between sites. By contrast, major genetic differentiation was recorded in the large scale analysis, that is, between stocks separated by distances of over 1300 km, with the analysis indicating that differentiation was not related solely to distance. The genetic structuring analysis indicated the presence of two stocks, one represented by the arapaimas of the Mamirauá Reserve, and the other by those of Santarém and Tucuruí. The dispersal of arapaimas over short distances indicates a process of lateral migration within the várzea floodplains, which may be the principal factor determining the considerable homogeneity observed among the várzea lakes. The populations separated by distances of approximately 100 km were characterized by reduced genetic differentiation, which was associated with the geographic distances between sites. Populations separated by distances of over 1300 km were characterized by a high degree of genetic differentiation, which may be related primarily to historical bottlenecks in population size and the sedentary behavior of the species. Evidence was found of asymmetric gene flow, resulting in increasing genetic variability in the population of the Mamirau

  6. A Comparative Study of Dispersion Characteristics Determination of a Trapezoidally Corrugated Slow Wave Structure Using Different Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, Md. Ghulam; Sagor, Rakibul Hasan; Amin, Md. Ruhul

    2016-01-01

    The linear dispersion relation of a trapezoidally corrugated slow wave structure (TCSWS) is analyzed and presented. The size parameters of the TCSWS are chosen in such a way that they operate in the x-band frequency range. The dispersion relation is solved by utilizing the Rayleigh–Fourier method by expressing the radial function in terms of the Fourier series. A highly accurate synthetic technique is also applied to determine the complete dispersion characteristics from experimentally measured resonances (cold test). Periodic structures resonate at specific frequencies when the terminals are shorted appropriately. The dispersion characteristics obtained from numerical calculation, synthetic technique and cold test are compared, and an excellent agreement is achieved. (paper)

  7. A catalogue of masses, structural parameters and velocity dispersion profiles of 112 Milky Way globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardt, H.; Hilker, M.

    2018-05-01

    We have determined masses, stellar mass functions and structural parameters of 112 Milky Way globular clusters by fitting a large set of N-body simulations to their velocity dispersion and surface density profiles. The velocity dispersion profiles were calculated based on a combination of more than 15,000 high-precision radial velocities which we derived from archival ESO/VLT and Keck spectra together with ˜20, 000 published radial velocities from the literature. Our fits also include the stellar mass functions of the globular clusters, which are available for 47 clusters in our sample, allowing us to self-consistently take the effects of mass segregation and ongoing cluster dissolution into account. We confirm the strong correlation between the global mass functions of globular clusters and their relaxation times recently found by Sollima & Baumgardt (2017). We also find a correlation of the escape velocity from the centre of a globular cluster and the fraction of first generation stars (FG) in the cluster recently derived for 57 globular clusters by Milone et al. (2017), but no correlation between the FG star fraction and the global mass function of a globular cluster. This could indicate that the ability of a globular cluster to keep the wind ejecta from the polluting star(s) is the crucial parameter determining the presence and fraction of second generation stars and not its later dynamical mass loss.

  8. Magnetic structures and magnon dispersion of LaSrFeO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, N.; Ulbrich, H.; Braden, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany); Sidis, Y.; Cousson, A. [LLB, Saclay (France)

    2012-07-01

    We have conducted an extensive study on the single-layered perovskite LaSrFeO{sub 4}, a transition metal oxide of the Ruddelsden-Poppers series. This system orders antiferromagnetically at T{sub N}=380 K and undergoes two further magnetic phase transitions at 90 K and 30 K whose nature is still unclear. Our neutron diffraction experiments shed some light on this open issue: We have observed that there is no significant difference between the three magnetic structures. Although, the presence of four magnetic domains renders it impossible to determine the Fe moment direction within the basal plane using unpolarized neutrons. Hence, we conclude that the transitions must be connected to a spin reorientation within the basal plane. Additionally, we have investigated the magnon dispersion along two main symmetry directions. We find that the dispersions are well described by a Heisenberg antiferromagnet Hamiltonian including isotropic nearest and next-nearest neighbour interaction as well as an effective magnetic anisotropy field. The resulting values fit well into the series of the isostructural homologues. In LaSrFeO{sub 4} the Fe ions nominally present a three-valent 3d{sup 5} state yielding S=2.5 and L=0. However, the results of our neutron study give rise to the assumption of a non-quenched orbital moment.

  9. Structure and morphology of dispersed lanthanum powders and compact specimens of them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strashinskaya, L.V.; Dudnik, E.M.; Kopylova, L.I.; Savvakin, G.I.

    1986-01-01

    In this work a comparative electron microscopic investigation was made of the structure of dispersed LaB 6 powders. Specimens were prepared from the original and shock-wavetreated LaB 6 powders by hot-pressing. The compaction was done in such a manner that the coarser grains are surrounded by finer grains and all of the grains are rounded. Dispersion of LaB 6 powder by a shock wave leads to a decrease in the residual porosity of hot pressed specimens as the result of an increase in the quantity of finer fraction (1-2 um) in the mixture, i.e., better compaction, and the coarser grains are as immersed in a dense ''matrix'' of the finer ones. To obtain compact porosity-free parts of ultradispersed powders it is necessary to have a purer original material and to adopt special methods of forming which would make it possible to realize the potential reserves of activity of these powders in sintering. Illustrations and table are shown

  10. Secondary flow vortical structures in a 180∘ elastic curved vessel with torsion under steady and pulsatile inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2018-01-01

    Secondary flow structures in a 180∘ curved pipe model of an artery are studied using particle image velocimetry. Both steady and pulsatile inflow conditions are investigated. In planar curved pipes with steady flow, multiple (two, four, six) vortices are detected. For pulsatile flow, various pairs of vortices, i.e., Dean, deformed-Dean, Lyne-type, and split-Dean, are present in the cross section of the pipe at 90∘ into the bend. The effects of nonplanar curvature (torsion) and vessel dilatation on these vortical structures are studied. Torsion distorts the symmetric secondary flows (which exist in planar curvatures) and can result in formation of more complex vortical structures. For example, the split-Dean and Lyne-type vortices with same rotation direction originating from opposite sides of the cross section tend to merge together in pulsatile flow. The vortical structures in elastic vessels with dilatation (0.61%-3.23%) are also investigated and the results are compared with rigid model results. It was found that the secondary flow structures in rigid and elastic models are similar, and hence the local compliance of the vessel does not affect the morphology of secondary flow structures.

  11. Secondary flow structures in a 180∘ elastic curved vessel with torsion under steady and pulsatile inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Secondary flow vortical structures were investigated in an elastic 180° curved pipe with and without torsion under steady and pulsatile flow using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The elastic thin-walled curved pipes were constructed using Sylgard 184, and inserted into a bath of refractive index matched fluid to perform PIV. A vortex identification method was employed to identify various vortical structures in the flow. The secondary flow structures in the planar compliant model with dilatation of 0.61%-3.23% under pulsatile flow rate were compared with the rigid vessel model results, and it was found that local vessel compliance has a negligible effect on secondary flow morphology. The secondary flow structures were found to be more sensitive to out of plane curvature (torsion) than to vessel compliance. Torsion distorts the symmetry of secondary flow and results in more complex vortical structures in both steady and pulsatile flows. In high Re number steady flow with torsion, a single dominant vortical structure can be detected at the middle of the 90° cross section. In pulsatile flow with torsion, the split-Dean and Lyne-type vortices with same rotation direction originating from opposite sides of the cross section tend to merge together. supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  12. The development of an expert system for finding fragility curves of building structural systems in the preliminary design stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, L.Y.; Okrent, D.

    1987-01-01

    This research is a starting point for the development of an expert system for determining seismic fragility curves of structural systems in a nuclear power plant or conventional building at the preliminary design stage. The resulting system assists an engineer with moderate engineering background and limited reliability knowledge to analyze the failure functions of building structures. It simulates the performance of an expert in identifying the potential failure modes and their variabilities for a structure of interest. On reviewing the methodology of seismic fragility evaluation for existing building structures in the nuclear power plant industry, one finds that the investigation process starts with the identification of critical components or substructures, whose failures result in the functional failure of safety related equipment or the failure of structural integrity itself, and follows with complicated numerical analyses to estimate the capacity functions associated with the limit states of these components or substructures

  13. The rheology of concentrated dispersions: structure changes and shear thickening in experiments and computer simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, W.H.; Laven, J.; Stein, H.N.; Moldenaers, P.; Keunings, R.

    1992-01-01

    The flow-induced changes in the microstructure and rheol. of very concd., shear thickening dispersions are studied. Results obtained for polystyrene sphere dispersions are compared with previous data and computer simulations to give better insight into the processes occurring in the dispersions. [on

  14. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Wentuo; Kimura, Akihiko; Tsuda, Naoto; Serizawa, Hisashi; Chen, Dongsheng; Je, Hwanil; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Ha, Yoosung; Morisada, Yoshiaki; Noto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  15. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wentuo, E-mail: hanwentuo@hotmail.com [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tsuda, Naoto [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Serizawa, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Chen, Dongsheng [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ha, Yoosung [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Noto, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  16. Validation of molecular crystal structures from powder diffraction data with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Streek, Jacco; Neumann, Marcus A

    2014-01-01

    In 2010 we energy-minimized 225 high-quality single-crystal (SX) structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) to establish a quantitative benchmark. For the current paper, 215 organic crystal structures determined from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data and published...

  17. STRUCTURAL MODIFICATION OF NEW FORMATIONS IN CEMENT MATRIX USING CARBON NANOTUBE DISPERSIONS AND NANOSILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex nanodispersed systems with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodispersed silica have a significant impact on the processes of hydration, hardening and strength gain of construction composites predetermining their durability. While using a scanning electron microscope with an attachment for X-ray microanalysis and a device for infrared spectral analysis investigations have shown that the main effect of the cement matrix modification in the case of adding complex nanodispersed systems is provided by direct influence of hydration processes with subsequent crystallization of new formations. It has been noted that while adding carbon nanotube dispersion and nanosized silica a binding matrix is structured in the form of an extremely dense shell from crystalline hydrate new formations on the surface of solid phases that provides strong binding matrix in cement concrete. The addition effect of carbon nanotubes has been analyzed and quantitatively assessed through an investigation for every case of one sample with nanotubes and one sample without them with the help of a nanoindenter and scanning electron microscope. It is necessary to solve rather complicated challenging task in order to assess quantitatively the addition effect of CNT on material characteristics at a micromechanical level. At the same time it is possible to investigate surface of a concrete sample with one-micron resolution. In this case it is necessary to prepare samples for nanoindentation with exclusion of all CNT defectable effects that have been shown by a SEM. So in this case more adequate method for assessment must be a picoindenter , which combines a test method for nanoindentation with an optical SEM potential. Such equipment is in the stage of in-situ testing process at the Vienna University of Technology. The investigation is based on the fact that the main modification effect of mineral binding matrix while using incorporated complex nanodispersed systems and

  18. Microsphere Wetting, Meniscus Structure, and Capillary Interactions on a Curved Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Dinsmore, Anthony; Hoagland, David; Russell, Thomas

    A small spherical microparticle on a cylindrically curved liquid interface locally induces a quadrupolar interface deformation to maintain a constant contact angle about its wetted periphery. Measured by optical profilometry, this deformation was compared to a recent theoretical expression, and good agreement was noted for contact line shape, particle vertical position, and deformation vs. (distance, angle, particle size, interfacial curvature). Interface quadrupoles lead to particle capillary interactions in analogy to 2D electrostatic quadrupoles, and as one consequence, spheres on a cylindrical interface assemble tetragonally, i.e., into a square lattice. This assembly was monitored in the optical microscope, with particles interacting as predicted, into a square lattice aligned with the underlying cylindrical axis. These particles and assemblies were driven to the middle of the curved interface by capillary interaction with pinned liquid contact lines on each side of the liquid cylindrical section used in the experiments. These phenomena can inform the directed interfacial assembly of micro-sized spherical objects, with potential application in fabrication of functional devices and materials, encapsulation, and emulsification.

  19. On the calculation of the structure of charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions using density-dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castañeda-Priego, R; Lobaskin, V; Mixteco-Sánchez, J C; Rojas-Ochoa, L F; Linse, P

    2012-01-01

    The structure of charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions has been studied through a one-component model using a Yukawa potential with density-dependent parameters examined with integral equation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Partial thermodynamic consistency was guaranteed by considering the osmotic pressure of the dispersion from the approximate mean-field renormalized jellium and Poisson-Boltzmann cell models. The colloidal structures could be accurately described by the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Rogers-Young closure by using the osmotic pressure from the renormalized jellium model. Although we explicitly show that the correct effective pair-potential obtained from the inverse Monte Carlo method deviates from the Yukawa shape, the osmotic pressure constraint allows us to have a good description of the colloidal structure without losing information on the system thermodynamics. Our findings are corroborated by primitive model simulations of salt-free colloidal dispersions. (paper)

  20. Prediction of the soil water retention curve for structured soil from saturation to oven-dryness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    2017-01-01

    . Independently measured SWRCs for 171 undisturbed soil samples with organic matter contents that ranged from 3 to 14% were used for model validation. The results indicate that consideration of the silt and organic matter fractions, in addition to the clay fraction, improved predictions for the dry-end SWRC......The soil water retention curve (SWRC) is the most fundamental soil hydraulic function required for modelling soil–plant–atmospheric water flow and transport processes. The SWRC is intimately linked to the distribution of the size of pores, the composition of the solid phase and the soil specific...... surface area. Detailed measurement of the SWRC is impractical in many cases because of the excessively long equilibration times inherent to most standard methods, especially for fine textured soil. Consequently, it is more efficient to predict the SWRCbased on easy-to-measure basic soil properties...

  1. Imprints of the quasar structure in time-delay light curves: Microlensing-aided reverberation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluse, D.; Tewes, M.

    2014-11-01

    The advent of large area photometric surveys has raised a great deal of interest in the possibility of using broadband photometric data, instead of spectra, to measure the size of the broad line region of active galactic nuclei. We describe here a new method that uses time-delay lensed quasars where one or several images are affected by microlensing due to stars in the lensing galaxy. Because microlensing decreases (or increases) the flux of the continuum compared to the broad line region, it changes the contrast between these two emission components. We show that this effect can be used to effectively disentangle the intrinsic variability of those two regions, offering the opportunity to perform reverberation mapping based on single-band photometric data. Based on simulated light curves generated using a damped random walk model of quasar variability, we show that measurement of the size of the broad line region can be achieved using this method, provided one spectrum has been obtained independently during the monitoring. This method is complementary to photometric reverberation mapping and could also be extended to multi-band data. Because the effect described above produces a variability pattern in difference light curves between pairs of lensed images that is correlated with the time-lagged continuum variability, it can potentially produce systematic errors in measurement of time delays between pairs of lensed images. Simple simulations indicate that time-delay measurement techniques that use a sufficiently flexible model for the extrinsic variability are not affected by this effect and produce accurate time delays.

  2. Mass and energy dispersive recoil spectrometry of GaAs structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, M.

    1994-01-01

    Mass and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry (RS) using heavy ions at energies of about 0.2Α-0.8Α MeV has attracted much interest recently due to its potential for separately and unambiguously generating information on isotopic depth distributions. The principal advantages of mass and energy dispersive RS are that both light and heavy elements can be separately studied simultaneously and problems caused by chemical matrix effects are avoided since the technique is based on high energy nucleus-nucleus scattering. In order to elucidate reactions taking place in various GaAs structures, Time of flight-Energy (ToF-E) RS was developed to allow Ga and As to be studied separately down to depths of about 500-800 nm with a depth resolution of about 16 nm at the surface. This was shown in a study of an Al x Ga 1-x As quantum-well structure. The benefits of using ToF-E RS on GaAs structures were further demonstrated in studies of Co/GaAs and CoSi 2 /GaAs reactions, as well as in a study of the composition of MOCVD grown Al x Ga 1-x As. Most recoil measurements employed 127 I at energies of about 50-90 MeV as projectiles. The recoil detector telescope consisted of a silicon energy detector and two carbon foil time pick-off detectors separated by a variable flight length of 213.5-961 mm. The reactions taking place between various thin films and GaAs were also studied using complementary techniques such as XRD, XPS and SEM. Co was found to react extensively with GaAs, already at about 300 degrees C, making it unsuitable as a contact material. Thin films of Co and Si were found to react extensively with each other and to form CoSi 2 at 500 degrees C and above. CoSi 2 , a low resistivity silicide, turned out to be stable on GaAs, at least up to 700 degrees C. Considerable grain growth could cause problems, however, in the use of CoSi 2 -contacts. 112 refs, figs, tabs

  3. The impact of mating systems and dispersal on fine-scale genetic structure at maternally, paternally and biparentally inherited markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Robyn E; Banks, Sam C; Peakall, Rod

    2018-01-01

    For decades, studies have focused on how dispersal and mating systems influence genetic structure across populations or social groups. However, we still lack a thorough understanding of how these processes and their interaction shape spatial genetic patterns over a finer scale (tens-hundreds of metres). Using uniparentally inherited markers may help answer these questions, yet their potential has not been fully explored. Here, we use individual-level simulations to investigate the effects of dispersal and mating system on fine-scale genetic structure at autosomal, mitochondrial and Y chromosome markers. Using genetic spatial autocorrelation analysis, we found that dispersal was the major driver of fine-scale genetic structure across maternally, paternally and biparentally inherited markers. However, when dispersal was restricted (mean distance = 100 m), variation in mating behaviour created strong differences in the comparative level of structure detected at maternally and paternally inherited markers. Promiscuity reduced spatial genetic structure at Y chromosome loci (relative to monogamy), whereas structure increased under polygyny. In contrast, mitochondrial and autosomal markers were robust to differences in the specific mating system, although genetic structure increased across all markers when reproductive success was skewed towards fewer individuals. Comparing males and females at Y chromosome vs. mitochondrial markers, respectively, revealed that some mating systems can generate similar patterns to those expected under sex-biased dispersal. This demonstrates the need for caution when inferring ecological and behavioural processes from genetic results. Comparing patterns between the sexes, across a range of marker types, may help us tease apart the processes shaping fine-scale genetic structure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA paradox: sex-specific genetic structure in a marine mussel – despite maternal inheritance and passive dispersal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teske Peter R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When genetic structure is identified using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, but no structure is identified using biparentally-inherited nuclear DNA, the discordance is often attributed to differences in dispersal potential between the sexes. Results We sampled the intertidal rocky shore mussel Perna perna in a South African bay and along the nearby open coast, and sequenced maternally-inherited mtDNA (there is no evidence for paternally-inherited mtDNA in this species and a biparentally-inherited marker. By treating males and females as different populations, we identified significant genetic structure on the basis of mtDNA data in the females only. Conclusions This is the first study to report sex-specific differences in genetic structure based on matrilineally-inherited mtDNA in a passively dispersing species that lacks social structure or sexual dimorphism. The observed pattern most likely stems from females being more vulnerable to selection in habitats from which they did not originate, which also manifests itself in a male-biased sex ratio. Our results have three important implications for the interpretation of population genetic data. First, even when mtDNA is inherited exclusively in the female line, it also contains information about males. For that reason, using it to identify sex-specific differences in genetic structure by contrasting it with biparentally-inherited markers is problematic. Second, the fact that sex-specific differences were found in a passively dispersing species in which sex-biased dispersal is unlikely highlights the fact that significant genetic structure is not necessarily a function of low dispersal potential or physical barriers. Third, even though mtDNA is typically used to study historical demographic processes, it also contains information about contemporary processes. Higher survival rates of males in non-native habitats can erase the genetic structure present in their mothers within a single

  5. Computed and experimental interactions between eddy structure and dispersed particles in developing free shear layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Keller, J.O.; Ellzey, J.; Hubbard, G.; Daily, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    We are investigating the interactive process between turbulent flow and dispersed phase particles. We are focusing on the mechanisms that appear to result in a reduction of local turbulent intensity and a corresponding reduction in wall heat transfer and subsequent wall erosion in turbulent solid propellant combustion flow. We apply computational simulations and physical experiments specialized to a developing free shear layer over a rearward facing step and over a parallel splitter plate. The flow configuration evolves in a two-dimensional, steady, combustion and non-combustion turbulent free shear mixing region, with and without particle additives. The computational simulations combine three basic components: gas phase Navier-Stokes solutions, Lagrange particle field solutions and a Monte Carlo technique for the random encounters, forces and accelerations between the two fields. We concentrate here on relatively large sized additive particles (of the order of tens of microns to 100 microns mean diameter). We examine their apparent influence in breaking up the larger, energy bearing eddy structures into smaller structures which are more readily dissipated

  6. Impact of curved shaped energy dissipaters downstream of head structures on both water energy dissipation and irrigation water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashour Mohamed A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Using energy dissipaters on the soled aprons downstream of head structures is the main technique for accelerating hydraulic jump formation and dissipating a great amount of the residual harmful kinetic energy occurring downstream of head structures. In this paper, an experimental study was conducted to investigate some untested shapes of curved dissipaters with different angles of curvature and arrangements from two points of view. The first is to examine its efficiency in dissipating the kinetic water energy. The second is to examine the most effective shape and arrangement obtained from the aforementioned step in enriching the flow with dissolved oxygen for enhancement of the irrigation water quality. The study was held in the irrigation and hydraulic laboratory of the Civil Department, Faculty of Engineering, Assiut University, using a movable bed tilting channel 20 m long, 30 cm wide, and 50 cm high, using 21 types of curved dissipaters with different arrangements. A total of 660 runs were carried out. Results were analysed, tabulated and graphically presented, and new formulas were introduced to estimate the energy dissipation ratio, as well as the DO concentrations. Results in general showed that the dissipater performance is more tangible in dissipating the residual energy when the curvature is in the opposite direction to that of the flow. Also, the energy loss ratio increases with an increase in curvature angle (θ, until it reaches (θ = 120°, then it decreases again. The study also showed that using three rows of dissipaters give nearly the same effect as using four rows, concerning both the relative energy dissipation and dissolved oxygen content. So, it is recommended to use three rows of the curved dissipater with the angle of curvature (θ = 120° in the opposite direction to that of the flow to obtain the maximum percentage of water energy dissipation downstream of head structures, and maximum dissolved oxygen content too

  7. Structure in the early afterglow light curve of the gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Makoto; Kato, Taichi; Ishioka, Ryoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Monard, Berto; Nogami, Daisaku; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Sugie, Atsushi; Takahashi, Susumu

    2003-06-19

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are energetic explosions that for 0.01-100 s are the brightest gamma-ray sources in the sky. Observations of the early evolution of afterglows are expected to provide clues about the nature of the bursts, but their rapid fading has hampered such studies; some recent rapid localizations of bursts have improved the situation. Here we report an early detection of the very bright afterglow of the burst of 29 March 2003 (GRB030329). Our data show that, even early in the afterglow phase, the light curve shows unexpectedly complicated structures superimposed on the fading background.

  8. Bioaccessibility of nutrients and micronutrients from dispersed food systems: impact of the multiscale bulk and interfacial structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marze, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Many food systems are dispersed systems, that is, they possess at least two immiscible phases. This is generally due to the coexistence of domains with different physicochemical properties separated by many interfaces which control the apparent thermodynamic equilibrium. This feature was and is still largely studied to design pharmaceutical delivery systems. In food science, the recent intensification of in vitro digestion tests to complement the in vivo ones holds promises in the identification of the key parameters controlling the bioaccessibility of nutrients and micronutrients. In this review, we present the developments of in vitro digestion tests for dispersed food systems (mainly emulsions, dispersions and gels). We especially highlight the evidences detailing the roles of the constituting multiscale structures. In a perspective section, we show the potential of structured interfaces to allow controlled bioaccessibility.

  9. Solid dispersions of Myricetin with enhanced solubility: Formulation, characterization and crystal structure of stability-impeding Myricetin monohydrate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureşan-Pop, M.; Pop, M. M.; Borodi, G.; Todea, M.; Nagy-Simon, T.; Simon, S.

    2017-08-01

    Three solid dispersion forms of Myricetin combined with the Polyvinylpyrrolidone were successfully prepared by spray drying method, and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and optical microscopy. Zeta potential measurements provided indications on solid dispersions stability in aqueous suspension related to their storage at elevated temperature and relative humidity, which depends on the Myricetin load. By increase of Myricetin load, the stability of the solid dispersion is impeded due to growth of Myricetin monohydrate crystals. The amorphous dispersions with 10% and 50% Myricetin load are stable and, compared to pure Myricetin, their aqueous solubility is enhanced by a factor of 47 and 13, respectively. The dispersion with 80% Myricetin load is unstable on storage, and this behavior acts in conjunction with the development of Myricetin monohydrate crystals. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction results obtained for Myricetin monohydrate reveal a structure of an infinite 2D network of hydrogen-bonded molecules involving all six hydroxyl groups of Myricetin. The water molecules are positioned in between the infinite chains, and contribute via H-bonds to robust crystal packing. The calculated needle-like morphology of monohydrate form is in agreement with the optical microscopy results. The study shows that the solid amorphous dispersions with up to 50% Myricetin load are a viable option for achieving substantial solubility improvement of Myricetin, and supports their potential use in pharmaceutical applications.

  10. Instanton geometry and quantum A{sub {infinity}} structure on the elliptic curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Lerche, W. [European Lab. for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Nemeschansky, D. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2006-03-15

    We first determine and then study the complete set of non-vanishing A-model correlation functions associated with the 'long-diagonal branes' on the elliptic curve. We verify that they satisfy the relevant A{sub {infinity}} consistency relations at both classical and quantum levels. In particular we find that the A{sub {infinity}} relation for the annulus provides a reconstruction of annulus instantons out of disk instantons. We note in passing that the naive application of the Cardy-constraint does not hold for our correlators, confirming expectations. Moreover, we analyze various analytical properties of the correlators, including instanton flops and the mixing of correlators with different numbers of legs under monodromy. The classical and quantum A{sub {infinity}} relations turn out to be compatible with such homotopy transformations. They lead to a non-invariance of the effective action under modular transformations, unless compensated by suitable contact terms which amount to redefinitions of the tachyon fields. (orig.)

  11. A new topology for curved space--time which incorporates the causal, differential, and conformal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawking, S.W.; King, A.R.; McCarthy, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A new topology is proposed for strongly causal space--times. Unlike the standard manifold topology (which merely characterizes continuity properties), the new topology determines the causal, differential, and conformal structures of space--time. The topology is more appealing, physical, and manageable than the topology previously proposed by Zeeman for Minkowski space. It thus seems that many calculations involving the above structures may be made purely topological

  12. Experimental analysis on stress wave in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yun Ho; Ham, Hyo Sick

    1998-01-01

    The guided wave propagation in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures is experimentally explored based on theoretical dispersion curves. It turns out that proper selection of incident angle and frequency is critical for guided wave generation in multi-layered structures. Theoretical dispersion curves greatly depend on adhesive zone thickness, layer thickness and material properties. It was possible to determine the adhesive zone thickness of an inhomogeneous multi-layered structure by monitoring experimentally the change of dispersion curves.

  13. Limited gene dispersal and spatial genetic structure as stabilizing factors in an ant-plant mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malé, P-J G; Leroy, C; Humblot, P; Dejean, A; Quilichini, A; Orivel, J

    2016-12-01

    Comparative studies of the population genetics of closely associated species are necessary to properly understand the evolution of these relationships because gene flow between populations affects the partners' evolutionary potential at the local scale. As a consequence (at least for antagonistic interactions), asymmetries in the strength of the genetic structures of the partner populations can result in one partner having a co-evolutionary advantage. Here, we assess the population genetic structure of partners engaged in a species-specific and obligatory mutualism: the Neotropical ant-plant, Hirtella physophora, and its ant associate, Allomerus decemarticulatus. Although the ant cannot complete its life cycle elsewhere than on H. physophora and the plant cannot live for long without the protection provided by A. decemarticulatus, these species also have antagonistic interactions: the ants have been shown to benefit from castrating their host plant and the plant is able to retaliate against too virulent ant colonies. We found similar short dispersal distances for both partners, resulting in the local transmission of the association and, thus, inbred populations in which too virulent castrating ants face the risk of local extinction due to the absence of H. physophora offspring. On the other hand, we show that the plant populations probably experienced greater gene flow than did the ant populations, thus enhancing the evolutionary potential of the plants. We conclude that such levels of spatial structure in the partners' populations can increase the stability of the mutualistic relationship. Indeed, the local transmission of the association enables partial alignments of the partners' interests, and population connectivity allows the plant retaliation mechanisms to be locally adapted to the castration behaviour of their symbionts. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Characterizing dispersal patterns in a threatened seabird with limited genetic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Laurie A.; Palsboll, Per J.; Beissinger, Steven R.; Harvey, James T.; Berube, Martine; Raphael, Martin G.; Nelson, S. Kim; Golightly, Richard T.; Mcfarlane-Tranquilla, Laura; Newman, Scott H.; Peery, M. Zachariah

    2009-01-01

    Genetic assignment methods provide an appealing approach for characterizing dispersal patterns on ecological time scales, but require sufficient genetic differentiation to accurately identify migrants and a large enough sample size of migrants to, for example, compare dispersal between sexes or age

  15. Fine-scale population genetic structure and short-range sex-biased dispersal in a solitary carnivore, Lutra lutra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Quaglietta, L.; Fonseca, V. C.; Hájková, Petra; Mira, A.; Boitani, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 3 (2013), s. 561-571 ISSN 0022-2372 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : conservation genetics * dispersal distances * Eurasian otter * isolation by distance * radiotracking * restricted gene flow * spatial relatedness structure * spatiotemporal scale Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.225, year: 2013

  16. Roles of dispersal, stochasticity, and nonlinear dynamics in the spatial structuring of seasonal natural enemy-victim populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick C. Tobin; Ottar N. Bjornstad

    2005-01-01

    Natural enemy-victim systems may exhibit a range of dynamic space-time patterns. We used a theoretical framework to study spatiotemporal structuring in a transient natural enemy-victim system subject to differential rates of dispersal, stochastic forcing, and nonlinear dynamics. Highly mobile natural enemies that attacked less mobile victims were locally spatially...

  17. The influence of food abundance, food dispersion and habitat structure on territory selection and size of an Afrotropical terrestrial insectivore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Newmark, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Most tropical insectivorous birds, unlike their temperate counterparts, hold and defend a feeding and breeding territory year-around. However, our understanding of ecological factors influencing territory selection and size in tropical insectivores is limited. Here we examine three prominent hypotheses relating food abundance, food dispersion (spatial arrangement of food items), and habitat structure to territoriality in the Usambara Thrush Turdus roehli. We first compared leaf-litter macro-invertebrate abundance and dispersion, and habitat structure between territories and random sites. We then examined the relation between these same ecological factors and territory size. Invertebrate abundance and dispersion were sparsely and evenly distributed across our study system and did not vary between territories and random sites. In contrast, habitat structure did vary between territories and random sites indicating the Usambara Thrush selects territories with open understorey and closed overstorey habitat. Invertebrate abundance and dispersion within territories of the Usambara Thrush were not associated with habitat structure. We believe the most likely explanation for the Usambara Thrush’s preference for open understorey and closed overstorey habitat relates to foraging behavior. Using information-theoretic model selection we found that invertebrate abundance was the highest-ranked predictor of territory size and was inversely related, consistent with food value theory of territoriality.

  18. Sex-biased dispersal creates spatial genetic structure in a parthenogenetic ant with a dependent-lineage reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, A; Bauman, D; Darras, H; Aron, S

    2017-10-01

    Reproduction and dispersal are key aspects of species life history that influence spatial genetic structure in populations. Several ant species in the genus Cataglyphis have evolved a unique breeding system in which new reproductives (that is, queens and males) are produced asexually by parthenogenesis; in contrast, non-reproductives (that is, workers) are produced via sexual reproduction by mates from distinct genetic lineages. We investigated how these two coexisting reproductive methods affect population-level spatial genetic structure using the ant Cataglyphis mauritanica as a model. We obtained genotypes for queens and their male mates from 338 colonies, and we found that the two lineages present in the study population occurred with equal frequency. Furthermore, analysis of spatial genetic structure revealed strong sex-biased dispersal. Because queens were produced by parthenogenesis and because they dispersed over short distances, there was an extreme level of spatial structuring: a mosaic of patches composed of clonal queens was formed. Males, on the other hand, dispersed over several hundred metres and, thus, across patches, ensuring successful interlineage mating.

  19. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were...

  20. Effects of growth curve plasticity on size-structured population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lai; Lin, Zhigui; Pedersen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The physiological-structured population models assume that a fixed fraction of energy intake is utilized for individual growth and maintenance while the remaining for adult fertility. The assumption results in two concerns: energy loss for juveniles and a reproduction dilemma for adults. The dile...

  1. Inaccuracy of reference curves used in the structures design by creep rupture indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, P.R.G.; Silveira, T.L. da; Monteiro, S.N.; Rio de Janeiro Univ.

    1980-01-01

    The majority of Project Codes considers explicity rupture as one of the critereas for the extinction of the life of structures which operate at high temperatures. The modifications of the materials deformation and fracture mechanisms, are discussed. Their effects on the creep rupture indices used on projects are also considered in terms of parametric methods. (Author) [pt

  2. Bridging Three Orders of Magnitude: Multiple Scattered Waves Sense Fractal Microscopic Structures via Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Simon A.; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Nordsletten, David; Michler, Christian; Juge, Lauriane; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bilston, Lynne; Guzina, Bojan; Holm, Sverre; Sinkus, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Wave scattering provides profound insight into the structure of matter. Typically, the ability to sense microstructure is determined by the ratio of scatterer size to probing wavelength. Here, we address the question of whether macroscopic waves can report back the presence and distribution of microscopic scatterers despite several orders of magnitude difference in scale between wavelength and scatterer size. In our analysis, monosized hard scatterers 5 μ m in radius are immersed in lossless gelatin phantoms to investigate the effect of multiple reflections on the propagation of shear waves with millimeter wavelength. Steady-state monochromatic waves are imaged in situ via magnetic resonance imaging, enabling quantification of the phase velocity at a voxel size big enough to contain thousands of individual scatterers, but small enough to resolve the wavelength. We show in theory, experiments, and simulations that the resulting coherent superposition of multiple reflections gives rise to power-law dispersion at the macroscopic scale if the scatterer distribution exhibits apparent fractality over an effective length scale that is comparable to the probing wavelength. Since apparent fractality is naturally present in any random medium, microstructure can thereby leave its fingerprint on the macroscopically quantifiable power-law exponent. Our results are generic to wave phenomena and carry great potential for sensing microstructure that exhibits intrinsic fractality, such as, for instance, vasculature.

  3. Exploring how organic matter controls structural transformations in natural aquatic nanocolloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen M; Jarvie, Helen P

    2012-07-03

    The response of the dispersion nanostructure of surface river bed sediment to the controlled removal and readdition of natural organic matter (NOM), in the absence and presence of background electrolyte, was examined using the technique of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Partial NOM removal induced aggregation of the mineral particles, but more extensive NOM removal restored colloidal stability. When peat humic acid (PHA) was added to a NOM-deficient sediment concentration-related structural transformations were observed: at 255 mg/L PHA aggregation of the nanocolloid was actually enhanced, but at 380 mg/L PHA disaggregation and colloidal stability were promoted. The addition of 2 mM CaCl(2) induced mild aggregation in the native sediment but not in sediments with added PHA, suggesting that the native NOM and the PHA respond differently to changes in ionic strength. A first attempt at using SANS to directly characterize the thickness and coverage of an adsorbed PHA layer in a natural nanocolloid is also presented. The results are discussed in the context of a hierarchical aquatic colloidal nanostructure, and the implications for contemporary studies of the role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in sustaining the transport of colloidal iron in upland catchments.

  4. Damage Curves of a Nuclear Reactor Structure exposed to Air Blast Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandys, I.; Ornai, D.; Ronen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) radiological hazards due to accidental failure or deliberated attacks are of most concern due to their destructive and global consequences: large area contaminations, injuries, exposure to ionizing radiation (which can cause death or illness, depends on the levels of exposure), loss of lives of both humans and animals, and severe damage to the environment. Prevention of such consequences is of a global importance and it has led to the definition of safety & design guidelines, and regulations by various authorities such as IAEA, U.S. NRC, etc. The guidelines define general requirements for the integrity of a NPP’s physical barriers (such as protective walls) when challenged by external events, for example human induced explosion. A more specific relation to the design of a NPP is that its structures and equipment (reactor building, fuel building, safeguards building, diesel-generator building, pumping station, nuclear auxiliaries building, and effluent treatment building) must function properly: shutdown the reactor, removal of decayed heat, storage of spent fuel, and treatment and containment of radioactive effluents) under external explosion. It requires that the NPP’s structures and equipment resistance to external explosion should be analyzed and verified. The air blast loading created by external explosion, as well as its effects & consequences on different kinds of structures are described in the literature. Structural elements response to the air blast can be analyzed in general by a Single Degree of Freedom (SDOF) system that converts a distributed mass, loads, and resistance to concentrated mass, force, and stiffness located at a representative point of the structure's element where the displacements are the highest one. Proper shielding should be designed if the explosion blast effects are greater than the resistance capacity.External explosion effects should be considered within the Screening Distance Value (SDV) of the NPP

  5. Study on evaluation methods for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Tao, X.; Kayen, R.; Shi, H.; Yan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic is the key step for detecting S-wave velocity structure. By comparing the dispersion curves directly with the spectra analysis of surface waves (SASW) method, rather than comparing the S-wave velocity structure, the validity and precision of microtremor-array method (MAM) can be evaluated more objectively. The results from the China - US joint surface wave investigation in 26 sites in Tangshan, China, show that the MAM has the same precision with SASW method in 83% of the 26 sites. The MAM is valid for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic testing and has great application potentiality for site S-wave velocity structure detection.

  6. Phonon dispersion in vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.S.; Rumiantsev, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Phonon dispersion curves in Vanadium metal are investigated by neutron inelastic scattering using three-axis spectrometers. Due to extremely low coherent scattering amplitude of neutrons in natural isotope mixture of vanadium the phonon frequencies could be determined in the energy range below about 15 meV. Several phonon groups were measured with the polarised neutron scattering set-up. It is demonstrated that the intensity of coherent inelastic scattering observed in the non-spin-flip channel vanishes in the spin-flip channel. The phonon density of states is measured on a single crystal keeping the momentum transfer equal to a vector of reciprocal lattice where the coherent inelastic scattering is suppressed. Phonon dispersion curves in vanadium, as measured by neutron and earlier by X-ray scattering, are described in frames of a charge-fluctuation model involving monopolar and dipolar degrees of freedom. The model parameters are compared for different transition metals with body-centred cubic-structure. (author)

  7. Regulatory design for RES-E support mechanisms: Learning curves, market structure, and burden-sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batlle, C.; Pérez-Arriaga, I.J.; Zambrano-Barragán, P.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from relevant experiences in power systems around the world, this paper offers a review of existing policy support mechanisms for RES-E, with a detailed analysis of their regulatory implications. While recent studies provide an account of current RES-E support systems, in this paper we focus on some of the impacts these mechanisms have on the overall energy market structure and its performance. Given the rising importance of RES-E in systems everywhere, these impacts should no longer be overlooked. - Highlights: ► This paper offers a critical review of RES-E support mechanisms and their regulatory implications. ► The discussion focuses on how the different schemes impact the performance of the energy markets. ► We propose to redesign of current RES-E mechanisms to optimize incentives and market performance. ► Our recommendation is also to gradually move from price-based mechanisms to auctions.

  8. Structural Change, Economic Growth and the Environmental Kuznets Curve. A Theoretical Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Groot, H.L.F.

    1999-01-01

    The question of whether economic growth will ultimately resolve environmental problems has recently been discussed in a mainly empirical literature. One of the mechanisms that can explain the finding of an inverted U-shaped relationship between income and emissions relies on the changes in the sectoral composition of economies associated with economic growth. This paper develops a multi-sector general-equilibrium model to study the dynamic relationships between technological progress, economic development, the sectoral composition of economies and emissions. In the model, structural change is the outcome of a complex interplay between factors of demand and supply, and results from both differences in technological progress on a sectoral level and from differences in income elasticities of demand for different goods. We will derive under what conditions such changes can give rise to a hump-shaped relationship between per capita income and emissions. 39 refs

  9. Ultrahighly Dispersed Titanium Oxide on Silica : Effect of Precursors on the Structure and Photocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida , S.; Takenaka , S.; Tanaka , T.; Funabiki , T.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of precursor on the dispersion and catalytic performance of titanium oxide supported on silica has ben investigated. The catalysts were prepared by a simple impregnation method with three kinds of titanium complexes of different ligands (bis(isopropyato)-bis(pivaroylmethanato) : DPM, acetylacetonato : ACAC, tetrakis(isopropylato) : IPRO) with the aim of preparing ultrahighly dispersed titanium oxide on silica. The XAFS study revealed that titanium species in the catalyst prepared f...

  10. Influence of dopants on the glow curve structure and energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knezevic, Z.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Lee, J.I.; Kim, J.L.; Music, S.

    2011-01-01

    LiF thermoluminescent material doped with Mg, Cu and Si recently developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has shown very good dosimetric properties. Since the thermoluminescence in LiF was found to be dependent on the proper combination of dopants, the investigation of the concentration and type of dopants is very important in developing and characterisation of new TL materials. The aim of this work was to determine the influence of type and concentration of activators on the glow curve structure, sensitivity, reproducibility and on the photon energy response of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detectors. The energy response was studied in air and on the ISO water phantom in the range of mean photon energies between 33 keV and 164 keV. The morphology and local chemical composition of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detectors were examined using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The results show that type and concentration of activators influence the glow curve and sensitivity. Different dopant concentrations did not show influence on the photon energy response. The sensitivity of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detector with dopant concentration of Mg = 0.35 mol%, Cu = 0.025 mol% and Si = 0.9 mol% was very high (up to 65 times higher than that of TLD-100). The photon energy response of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detectors containing all three dopants in various concentrations is in accordance with the IAEA recommendations for individual monitoring.

  11. Influence of dopants on the glow curve structure and energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, Z., E-mail: zknez@irb.h [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Lee, J.I.; Kim, J.L. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105 Yuseong, Daejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Music, S. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-03-15

    LiF thermoluminescent material doped with Mg, Cu and Si recently developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has shown very good dosimetric properties. Since the thermoluminescence in LiF was found to be dependent on the proper combination of dopants, the investigation of the concentration and type of dopants is very important in developing and characterisation of new TL materials. The aim of this work was to determine the influence of type and concentration of activators on the glow curve structure, sensitivity, reproducibility and on the photon energy response of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detectors. The energy response was studied in air and on the ISO water phantom in the range of mean photon energies between 33 keV and 164 keV. The morphology and local chemical composition of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detectors were examined using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The results show that type and concentration of activators influence the glow curve and sensitivity. Different dopant concentrations did not show influence on the photon energy response. The sensitivity of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detector with dopant concentration of Mg = 0.35 mol%, Cu = 0.025 mol% and Si = 0.9 mol% was very high (up to 65 times higher than that of TLD-100). The photon energy response of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si detectors containing all three dopants in various concentrations is in accordance with the IAEA recommendations for individual monitoring.

  12. Determination of the structure factors of a LiF powder sample by the energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, R.; Ahtee, A.; Paakkari, T.

    1977-01-01

    The structure factors of a LiF powder sample were determined by energy dispersive x-ray diffraction in the range 9 to 25 keV, with the use of a Si(Li) solid state detector, following the method applied on GaP. Since the absorption coefficient of LiF is small at high energy, a fraction of the incident x-rays penetrates through the sample and does not contribute to the diffraction. This effect was taken into account in the determination of the structure factors. Then the structure factors generally agree, within the limit of 5 % error, with those obtained by the usual angle dispersive method, if the penetrated part of the incident beam is less than 40 %. (author)

  13. Structural, microstructural and electrochemical properties of dispersed-type polymer nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Anil; Sharma, A. L.

    2018-01-01

    Free-standing solid polymer nanocomposite (PEO-PVC)  +  LiPF6-TiO2 films have been prepared through a standard solution-cast technique. The improvement in structural, microstructural and electrochemical properties has been observed on the dispersion of nanofiller in polymer salt complex. X-ray diffraction studies clearly reflect the formation of complex formation, as no corresponding salt peak appeared in the diffractograms. The Fourier transform infrared analysis suggested clear and convincing evidence of polymer-ion, ion-ion and polymer-ion-nanofiller interaction. The highest ionic conductivity of the prepared solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) films is ~5  ×  10-5 S cm-1 for 7 wt.% TiO2. The linear sweep voltammetry provides the electrochemical stability window of the prepared SPE films, about ~3.5 V. The ion transference number has been estimated, t ion  =  0.99 through the DC polarization technique. Dielectric spectroscopic studies were performed to understand the ion transport process in polymer electrolytes. All solid polymer electrolytes possess good thermal stability up to 300 °C. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis confirms the decrease of the melting temperature and signal of glass transition temperature with the addition of nanofiller, which indicates the decrease of crystallinity of the polymer matrix. An absolute correlation between diffusion coefficient (D), ion mobility (µ), number density (n), double-layer capacitance (C dl), glass transition temperature, melting temperature (T m), free ion area (%) and conductivity (σ) has been observed. A convincing model to study the role of nanofiller in a polymer salt complex has been proposed, which supports the experimental findings. The prepared polymer electrolyte system with significant ionic conductivity, high ionic transference number, and good thermal and voltage stability could be suggested as a potential candidate as electrolyte cum separator for the fabrication of a

  14. Validation of molecular crystal structures from powder diffraction data with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streek, Jacco van de; Neumann, Marcus A.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of 215 experimental organic crystal structures from powder diffraction data is validated against a dispersion-corrected density functional theory method. In 2010 we energy-minimized 225 high-quality single-crystal (SX) structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) to establish a quantitative benchmark. For the current paper, 215 organic crystal structures determined from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data and published in an IUCr journal were energy-minimized with DFT-D and compared to the SX benchmark. The on average slightly less accurate atomic coordinates of XRPD structures do lead to systematically higher root mean square Cartesian displacement (RMSCD) values upon energy minimization than for SX structures, but the RMSCD value is still a good indicator for the detection of structures that deserve a closer look. The upper RMSCD limit for a correct structure must be increased from 0.25 Å for SX structures to 0.35 Å for XRPD structures; the grey area must be extended from 0.30 to 0.40 Å. Based on the energy minimizations, three structures are re-refined to give more precise atomic coordinates. For six structures our calculations provide the missing positions for the H atoms, for five structures they provide corrected positions for some H atoms. Seven crystal structures showed a minor error for a non-H atom. For five structures the energy minimizations suggest a higher space-group symmetry. For the 225 SX structures, the only deviations observed upon energy minimization were three minor H-atom related issues. Preferred orientation is the most important cause of problems. A preferred-orientation correction is the only correction where the experimental data are modified to fit the model. We conclude that molecular crystal structures determined from powder diffraction data that are published in IUCr journals are of high quality, with less than 4% containing an error in a non-H atom

  15. Dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator based channel drop filter using two-dimensional photonic crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar, E-mail: mayurchhipa1@gmail.com [Deptt. of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Government Engineering College Ajmer Rajasthan INDIA (India); Dusad, Lalit Kumar [Rajasthan Technical University Kota, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper channel drop filter (CDF) is designed using dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR). The photonic band gap (PBG) is calculated by plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the photonic crystal (PhC) based on two dimensional (2D) square lattice periodic arrays of silicon (Si) rods in air structure have been investigated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20 respectively with lattice constant 0.540 nm and rod radius r = 0.1 µm. The channel drop filter has been optimized for telecommunication wavelengths λ = 1.591 µm with refractive indices 3.533. In the designed structure further analysis is also done by changing whole rods refractive index and it has been observed that this filter may be used for filtering several other channels also. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm{sup 2}.

  16. Should I stay or should I go? Dispersal and population structure in small, isolated desert populations of West African crocodiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Velo-Antón

    Full Text Available The maintenance of both spatial and genetic connectivity is paramount to the long-term persistence of small, isolated populations living in environments with extreme climates. We aim to identify the distribution of genetic diversity and assess population sub-structuring and dispersal across dwarfed desert populations of Crocodylus suchus, which occur in isolated groups, usually less than five individuals, along the mountains of Mauritania (West Africa. We used both invasive and non-invasive sampling methods and a combination of mitochondrial DNA (12 S and ND4 and microsatellite markers (32 loci and a subset of 12 loci. Our results showed high genetic differentiation and geographic structure in Mauritanian populations of C. suchus. We identified a metapopulation system acting within four river sub-basins (high gene flow and absence of genetic structure and considerable genetic differentiation between sub-basins (FST range: 0.12-0.24 with rare dispersal events. Effective population sizes tend to be low within sub-basins while genetic diversity is maintained. Our study suggests that hydrographic networks (temporal connections along seasonal rivers during rainy periods allow C. suchus to disperse and maintain metapopulation dynamics within sub-basins, which attenuate the loss of genetic diversity and the risk of extinction. We highlight the need of hydrographic conservation to protect vulnerable crocodiles isolated in small water bodies. We propose C. suchus as an umbrella species in Mauritania based on ecological affinities shared with other water-dependent species in desert environments.

  17. Population Structure and Dispersal Patterns within and between Atlantic and Mediterranean Populations of a Large-Range Pelagic Seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovart, Meritxell; Thibault, Jean-Claude; Igual, José Manuel; Bauzà-Ribot, Maria del Mar; Rabouam, Corinne; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal is critically linked to the demographic and evolutionary trajectories of populations, but in most seabird species it may be difficult to estimate. Using molecular tools, we explored population structure and the spatial dispersal pattern of a highly pelagic but philopatric seabird, the Cory's shearwater Calonectris diomedea. Microsatellite fragments were analysed from samples collected across almost the entire breeding range of the species. To help disentangle the taxonomic status of the two subspecies described, the Atlantic form C. d. borealis and the Mediterranean form C. d. diomedea, we analysed genetic divergence between subspecies and quantified both historical and recent migration rates between the Mediterranean and Atlantic basins. We also searched for evidence of isolation by distance (IBD) and addressed spatial patterns of gene flow. We found a low genetic structure in the Mediterranean basin. Conversely, strong genetic differentiation appeared in the Atlantic basin. Even if the species was mostly philopatric (97%), results suggest recent dispersal between basins, especially from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean (aprox. 10% of migrants/generation across the last two generations). Long-term gene flow analyses also suggested an historical exchange between basins (about 70 breeders/generation). Spatial analysis of genetic variation indicates that distance is not the main factor in shaping genetic structure in this species. Given our results we recommend gathering more data before concluded whether these taxa should be treated as two species or subspecies. PMID:23950986

  18. Structural diversity of solid dispersions of acetylsalicylic acid as seen by solid-state NMR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Policianová, Olivia; Brus, Jiří; Hrubý, Martin; Urbanová, Martina; Zhigunov, Alexander; Kredatusová, Jana; Kobera, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2014), s. 516-530 ISSN 1543-8384 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP106/11/P426 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : solid dispersions * acetylsalicylic acid * polymers Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 4.384, year: 2014

  19. Structure and Stability of Molecular Crystals with Many-Body Dispersion-Inclusive Density Functional Tight Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Majid; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Maurer, Reinhard J; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2018-01-18

    Accurate prediction of structure and stability of molecular crystals is crucial in materials science and requires reliable modeling of long-range dispersion interactions. Semiempirical electronic structure methods are computationally more efficient than their ab initio counterparts, allowing structure sampling with significant speedups. We combine the Tkatchenko-Scheffler van der Waals method (TS) and the many-body dispersion method (MBD) with third-order density functional tight-binding (DFTB3) via a charge population-based method. We find an overall good performance for the X23 benchmark database of molecular crystals, despite an underestimation of crystal volume that can be traced to the DFTB parametrization. We achieve accurate lattice energy predictions with DFT+MBD energetics on top of vdW-inclusive DFTB3 structures, resulting in a speedup of up to 3000 times compared with a full DFT treatment. This suggests that vdW-inclusive DFTB3 can serve as a viable structural prescreening tool in crystal structure prediction.

  20. Structure of magnetic particles studied by small angle neutron scattering. [Magnetic colloid particles in stable liquid dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebula, D J; Charles, S W; Popplewell, J

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this note is to show how the use of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can provide fundamental information on the structure of magnetic colloid particles in stable liquid dispersion. A more detailed account elaborating the use of the technique to provide fundamental information on interactions will appear later. This contribution contains some principal results on particle structure. The technique of SANS provides a very sensitive means of measuring particle size by measuring the scattered neutron intensity, I(Q), as a function of scattered wave vector, Q.

  1. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure in predominantly selfing plants with limited seed dispersal: A rule or exception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Volis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene flow at a fine scale is still poorly understood despite its recognized importance for plant population demographic and genetic processes. We tested the hypothesis that intensity of gene flow will be lower and strength of spatial genetic structure (SGS will be higher in more peripheral populations because of lower population density. The study was performed on the predominantly selfing Avena sterilis and included: (1 direct measurement of dispersal in a controlled environment; and (2 analyses of SGS in three natural populations, sampled in linear transects at fixed increasing inter-plant distances. We found that in A. sterilis major seed dispersal is by gravity in close (less than 2 m vicinity of the mother plant, with a minor additional effect of wind. Analysis of SGS with six nuclear SSRs revealed a significant autocorrelation for the distance class of 1 m only in the most peripheral desert population, while in the two core populations with Mediterranean conditions, no genetic structure was found. Our results support the hypothesis that intensity of SGS increases from the species core to periphery as a result of decreased within-population gene flow related to low plant density. Our findings also show that predominant self-pollination and highly localized seed dispersal lead to SGS at a very fine scale, but only if plant density is not too high.

  2. Reproducibility of aluminum foam properties: Effect of precursor distribution on the structural anisotropy and the collapse stress and its dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosko, M.; Simancik, F.; Florek, R.

    2010-01-01

    The porous structure of aluminum foam manufactured through the foaming of precursors containing blowing agent is stochastic in nature, usually with a random distribution of pores of different size and shape, creating difficulties in the modeling and prediction of foam properties. In this study, the effect of the initial location of the precursor material in the mold on the foam structure and compression behavior was investigated. Structural characterization showed that the porosity distribution, surface skin thickness and pore orientation was affected by the location of the precursors in the mold and by the extrusion direction of the precursors. Moreover, compression tests demonstrated a significant effect of the structural anisotropy on the collapse stress and its dispersion. The collapse stress of the foam increased if the loading was performed parallel to the thicker surface skin or parallel to the preferential pore orientation, leading to a 20% difference in collapse stress. The dispersion of the collapse stress could be significantly decreased if the loading was performed with regard to the structural anisotropy.

  3. Rainbows without unicorns: metric structures in theories with modified dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Iarley P.; Loret, Niccolo; Nettel, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Rainbow metrics are a widely used approach to the metric formalism for theories with modified dispersion relations. They have had a huge success in the quantum gravity phenomenology literature, since they allow one to introduce momentum-dependent space-time metrics into the description of systems with a modified dispersion relation. In this paper, we introduce the reader to some realizations of this general idea: the original rainbow metrics proposal, the momentum-space-inspired metric and a Finsler geometry approach. As the main result of this work we also present an alternative definition of a four-velocity dependent metric which allows one to handle the massless limit. This paper aims to highlight some of their properties and how to properly describe their relativistic realizations. (orig.)

  4. Rainbows without unicorns: metric structures in theories with modified dispersion relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Iarley P.; Loret, Niccoló; Nettel, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    Rainbow metrics are a widely used approach to the metric formalism for theories with modified dispersion relations. They have had a huge success in the quantum gravity phenomenology literature, since they allow one to introduce momentum-dependent space-time metrics into the description of systems with a modified dispersion relation. In this paper, we introduce the reader to some realizations of this general idea: the original rainbow metrics proposal, the momentum-space-inspired metric and a Finsler geometry approach. As the main result of this work we also present an alternative definition of a four-velocity dependent metric which allows one to handle the massless limit. This paper aims to highlight some of their properties and how to properly describe their relativistic realizations.

  5. Rainbows without unicorns: metric structures in theories with modified dispersion relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Iarley P. [Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); ICRANet, Pescara (Italy); CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasilia (Brazil); Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); INFN Sezione Roma 1 (Italy); Loret, Niccolo [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Division of Theoretical Physics, Zagreb (Croatia); Nettel, Francisco [Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Mexico (Mexico); INFN Sezione Roma 1 (Italy)

    2017-07-15

    Rainbow metrics are a widely used approach to the metric formalism for theories with modified dispersion relations. They have had a huge success in the quantum gravity phenomenology literature, since they allow one to introduce momentum-dependent space-time metrics into the description of systems with a modified dispersion relation. In this paper, we introduce the reader to some realizations of this general idea: the original rainbow metrics proposal, the momentum-space-inspired metric and a Finsler geometry approach. As the main result of this work we also present an alternative definition of a four-velocity dependent metric which allows one to handle the massless limit. This paper aims to highlight some of their properties and how to properly describe their relativistic realizations. (orig.)

  6. Changing of the electron structure of dispersed iron oxide during interaction with amines and borofluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobert, H.; Arnold, D.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of chemisorption on the surface of iron oxide was studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy performed on samples of iron oxide finely dispersed in SiO 2 . It was found from Moessbauer spectra that the interaction of the oxide with amines resulted in a reversible electron transition from the amine to the adsorbent. The interaction with BF 3 brought about an irreversible electron transition from iron to boron. (A.K.)

  7. Study of structure and potential energy curve for ground state X1Σ+ of LaF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Linhong; Shang Rencheng

    2002-01-01

    The equilibrium geometry, harmonic frequency and dissociation energy of the molecule LaF have been calculated on several kinds of computation levels with energy-consistent relativistic effective core potentials and valence basis sets including polarization functions 4f2g and diffuse functions 1s1p1d. The possible electronic state and its reasonable dissociation limit for the ground state of LaF are determined based on Atomic and Molecular Reaction Statics (AMRS). The potential energy curve scan for the ground state X 1 Σ + has been carried out with B3LYP method of density functional theory. Murrell-Sorbie analytic potential energy function and its Dunham expansion around equilibrium position have been also derived with a nonlinear least-square fit. The calculated spectroscopic constants are in good agreement with the experimental results of vibrational spectra. The analytical function obtained here is of great realistic importance due to its use in calculating fine transitional structure of vibrational spectra and the reaction dynamic process between atoms and molecules

  8. The influence of selected containment structures on debris dispersal and transport following high pressure melt ejection from the reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1988-09-01

    High pressure expulsion of molten core debris from the reactor pressure vessel may result in dispersal of the debris from the reactor cavity. In most plants, the cavity exits into the containment such that the debris impinges on structures. Retention of the debris on the structures may affect the further transport of the debris throughout the containment. Two tests were done with scaled structural shapes placed at the exit of 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion cavity. The results show that the debris does not adhere significantly to structures. The lack of retention is attributed to splashing from the surface and reentrainment in the gas flowing over the surface. These processes are shown to be applicable to reactor scale. A third experiment was done to simulate the annular gap between the reactor vessel and cavity wall. Debris collection showed that the fraction of debris exiting through the gap was greater than the gap-to-total flow area ratio. Film records indicate that dispersal was primarily by entrainment of the molten debris in the cavity. 29 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs

  9. Validation of molecular crystal structures from powder diffraction data with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Streek, Jacco; Neumann, Marcus A

    2014-12-01

    In 2010 we energy-minimized 225 high-quality single-crystal (SX) structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) to establish a quantitative benchmark. For the current paper, 215 organic crystal structures determined from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data and published in an IUCr journal were energy-minimized with DFT-D and compared to the SX benchmark. The on average slightly less accurate atomic coordinates of XRPD structures do lead to systematically higher root mean square Cartesian displacement (RMSCD) values upon energy minimization than for SX structures, but the RMSCD value is still a good indicator for the detection of structures that deserve a closer look. The upper RMSCD limit for a correct structure must be increased from 0.25 Å for SX structures to 0.35 Å for XRPD structures; the grey area must be extended from 0.30 to 0.40 Å. Based on the energy minimizations, three structures are re-refined to give more precise atomic coordinates. For six structures our calculations provide the missing positions for the H atoms, for five structures they provide corrected positions for some H atoms. Seven crystal structures showed a minor error for a non-H atom. For five structures the energy minimizations suggest a higher space-group symmetry. For the 225 SX structures, the only deviations observed upon energy minimization were three minor H-atom related issues. Preferred orientation is the most important cause of problems. A preferred-orientation correction is the only correction where the experimental data are modified to fit the model. We conclude that molecular crystal structures determined from powder diffraction data that are published in IUCr journals are of high quality, with less than 4% containing an error in a non-H atom.

  10. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  11. Modeling the Dispersibility of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hayriye; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of physico-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes, including behavior in organic solvents is very important for design, manufacturing and utilizing of their counterparts with improved properties. In the present study a quantitative structure-activity/property relationship (QSAR/QSPR) approach was applied to predict the dispersibility of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in various organic solvents. A number of additive descriptors and quantum-chemical descriptors were calculated and utilized to build QSAR models. The best predictability is shown by a 4-variable model. The model showed statistically good results (R2training = 0.797, Q2 = 0.665, R2test = 0.807), with high internal and external correlation coefficients. Presence of the X0Av descriptor and its negative term suggest that small size solvents have better SWCNTs solubility. Mass weighted descriptor ATS6m also indicates that heavier solvents (and small in size) most probably are better solvents for SWCNTs. The presence of the Dipole Z descriptor indicates that higher polarizability of the solvent molecule increases the solubility. The developed model and contributed descriptors can help to understand the mechanism of the dispersion process and predictorganic solvents that improve the dispersibility of SWNTs. PMID:28347035

  12. Modeling the Dispersibility of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Yilmaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of physico-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes, including behavior in organic solvents is very important for design, manufacturing and utilizing of their counterparts with improved properties. In the present study a quantitative structure-activity/property relationship (QSAR/QSPR approach was applied to predict the dispersibility of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs in various organic solvents. A number of additive descriptors and quantum-chemical descriptors were calculated and utilized to build QSAR models. The best predictability is shown by a 4-variable model. The model showed statistically good results (R2training = 0.797, Q2 = 0.665, R2test = 0.807, with high internal and external correlation coefficients. Presence of the X0Av descriptor and its negative term suggest that small size solvents have better SWCNTs solubility. Mass weighted descriptor ATS6m also indicates that heavier solvents (and small in size most probably are better solvents for SWCNTs. The presence of the Dipole Z descriptor indicates that higher polarizability of the solvent molecule increases the solubility. The developed model and contributed descriptors can help to understand the mechanism of the dispersion process and predictorganic solvents that improve the dispersibility of SWNTs.

  13. Asymmetric transmission in prisms using structures and materials with isotropic-type dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Funda Tamara; Serebryannikov, Andriy E; Cakmak, A Ozgur; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2015-09-21

    It is demonstrated that strong asymmetry in transmission can be obtained at the Gaussian beam illumination for a single prism based on a photonic crystal (PhC) with isotropic-type dispersion, as well as for its analog made of a homogeneous material. Asymmetric transmission can be realized with the aid of refraction at a proper orientation of the interfaces and wedges of the prism, whereas neither contribution of higher diffraction orders nor anisotropic-type dispersion is required. Furthermore, incidence toward a prism wedge can be used for one of two opposite directions in order to obtain asymmetry. Thus, asymmetric transmission is a general property of the prism configurations, which can be obtained by using simple geometries and quite conventional materials. The obtained results show that strong asymmetry can be achieved in PhC prisms with (nearly) circular shape of equifrequency dispersion contours, in both cases associated with the index of refraction 01. For the comparison purposes, results are also presented for solid uniform non-magnetic prisms made of a material with the same value of n. It is shown in zero-loss approximation that the PhC prism and the ultralow-index material prism (01. Possible contributions of scattering on the individual rods and diffraction on the wedge to the resulting mechanism are discussed. Analogs of unidirectional splitting and unidirectional deflection regimes, which are known from the studies of PhC gratings, are obtained in PhC prisms and solid uniform prisms, i.e. without higher diffraction orders.

  14. On the Role of London Dispersion Forces in Biomolecular Structure Determination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Michal; Kubař, T.; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 24 (2011), s. 8038-8046 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GAP208/11/0295 Grant - others:Korea Science and Ingineering Foundation(KR) R32-2008-000-10180-0; European Scince Found(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : dispersion interaction * DNA * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  15. Radiation Stability of Nanoclusters in Nano-structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain, Alicia G.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana; Shutthanandan, V.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered candidates for nuclear fission and fusion applications at high temperature and dose. The complex oxide nanoclusters in these alloys provide high-temperature strength and are expected to afford better radiation resistance. Proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiations have been performed to evaluate cluster stability in 14YWT and 9CrODS steel under a range of irradiation conditions. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used in this work to analyze the evolution of the oxide population.

  16. Genetic structure, diversity, and interisland dispersal in the endangered Mariana Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus guami)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Haig, Susan M.; Takano, Leilani L.; Garcia, Karla

    2015-01-01

    The Mariana Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus guami) is a highly endangered taxon, with fewer than 300 individuals estimated to occur in the wild. The subspecies is believed to have undergone population declines attributable to loss of wetland habitats on its native islands in the Mariana Islands. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (control region and ND2 genes) and nuclear microsatellite loci in Mariana Common Moorhens from Guam and Saipan, the two most distal islands inhabited by the subspecies. Our analyses revealed similar nuclear genetic diversity and effective population size estimates on Saipan and Guam. Birds from Guam and Saipan were genetically differentiated (microsatellites: FST = 0.152; control region: FST = 0.736; ND2: FST= 0.390); however, assignment tests revealed the presence of first-generation dispersers from Guam onto Saipan (1 of 27 sampled birds) and from Saipan onto Guam (2 of 28 sampled birds), suggesting the capability for long-distance interpopulation movements within the subspecies. The observed dispersal rate was consistent with long-term estimates of effective numbers of migrants per generation between islands, indicating that movement between islands has been an ongoing process in this system. Despite known population declines, bottleneck tests revealed no signature of historical bottleneck events, suggesting that the magnitude of past population declines may have been comparatively small relative to the severity of declines that can be detected using genetic data.

  17. Dispersive Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model: Band structure and quantum chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei

    2017-11-01

    The Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model is a concrete model for a non-Fermi liquid with maximally chaotic behavior in (0 +1 ) dimensions. In order to gain some insights into real materials in higher dimensions where fermions could hop between different sites, here we consider coupling a SYK lattice by constant hopping. We call this the dispersive SYK model. Focusing on (1 +1 ) -dimensional homogeneous hopping, by either tuning the temperature or the relative strength of the random interaction (hopping) and constant hopping, we find a crossover between a dispersive metal to an incoherent metal, where the dynamic exponent z changes from 1 to ∞ . We study the crossover by calculating the spectral function, charge density correlator, and the Lyapunov exponent. We further find the Lyapunov exponent becomes larger when the chemical potential is tuned to approach a van Hove singularity because of the large density of states near the Fermi surface. The effect of the topological nontrivial bands is also discussed.

  18. Ab initio study of the RbSr electronic structure: Potential energy curves, transition dipole moments, and permanent electric dipole moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pototschnig, Johann V., E-mail: johann.pototschnig@tugraz.at; Krois, Günter; Lackner, Florian; Ernst, Wolfgang E., E-mail: wolfgang.ernst@tugraz.at [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2014-12-21

    Excited states and the ground state of the diatomic molecule RbSr were calculated by post Hartree-Fock molecular orbital theory up to 22 000 cm{sup −1}. We applied a multireference configuration interaction calculation based on multiconfigurational self-consistent field wave functions. Both methods made use of effective core potentials and core polarization potentials. Potential energy curves, transition dipole moments, and permanent electric dipole moments were determined for RbSr and could be compared with other recent calculations. We found a good agreement with experimental spectra, which have been obtained recently by helium nanodroplet isolation spectroscopy. For the lowest two asymptotes (Rb (5s {sup 2}S) + Sr (5s4d {sup 3}P°) and Rb (5p {sup 2}P°) + Sr (5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S)), which exhibit a significant spin-orbit coupling, we included relativistic effects by two approaches, one applying the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian to the multireference configuration interaction wave functions, the other combining a spin-orbit Hamiltonian and multireference configuration interaction potential energy curves. Using the results for the relativistic potential energy curves that correspond to the Rb (5s {sup 2}S) + Sr (5s4d {sup 3}P°) asymptote, we have simulated dispersed fluorescence spectra as they were recently measured in our lab. The comparison with experimental data allows to benchmark both methods and demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling has to be included for the lowest states of RbSr.

  19. Ab initio study of the RbSr electronic structure: potential energy curves, transition dipole moments, and permanent electric dipole moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototschnig, Johann V; Krois, Günter; Lackner, Florian; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2014-12-21

    Excited states and the ground state of the diatomic molecule RbSr were calculated by post Hartree-Fock molecular orbital theory up to 22 000 cm(-1). We applied a multireference configuration interaction calculation based on multiconfigurational self-consistent field wave functions. Both methods made use of effective core potentials and core polarization potentials. Potential energy curves, transition dipole moments, and permanent electric dipole moments were determined for RbSr and could be compared with other recent calculations. We found a good agreement with experimental spectra, which have been obtained recently by helium nanodroplet isolation spectroscopy. For the lowest two asymptotes (Rb (5s (2)S) + Sr (5s4d (3)P°) and Rb (5p (2)P°) + Sr (5s(2) (1)S)), which exhibit a significant spin-orbit coupling, we included relativistic effects by two approaches, one applying the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian to the multireference configuration interaction wave functions, the other combining a spin-orbit Hamiltonian and multireference configuration interaction potential energy curves. Using the results for the relativistic potential energy curves that correspond to the Rb (5s (2)S) + Sr (5s4d (3)P°) asymptote, we have simulated dispersed fluorescence spectra as they were recently measured in our lab. The comparison with experimental data allows to benchmark both methods and demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling has to be included for the lowest states of RbSr.

  20. Skeletonized wave equation of surface wave dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We present the theory for wave equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. Similar to wave-equation travel

  1. Characterisation of a complex thin walled structure fabricated by selective laser melting using a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegelein, Thomas, E-mail: t.boegelein@liv.ac.uk; Louvis, Eleftherios; Dawson, Karl; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Jones, Andy R.

    2016-02-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys exhibit superior mechanical and physical properties due to the presence of nanoscopic Y(Al, Ti) oxide precipitates, but their manufacturing process is complex. The present study is aimed at further investigation of the application of an alternative, Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique, Selective Laser Melting (SLM), to the production of consolidated ODS alloy components. Mechanically alloyed PM2000 (ODS-FeCrAl) powders have been consolidated and a fine dispersion of Y-containing precipitates were observed in an as built thin-walled component, but these particles were typically poly-crystalline and contained a variety of elements including O, Al, Ti, Cr and Fe. Application of post-build heat treatments resulted in the modification of particle structures and compositions; in the annealed condition most precipitates were transformed to single crystal yttrium aluminium oxides. During the annealing treatment, precipitate distributions homogenised and localised variations in number density were diminished. The resulting volume fractions of those precipitates were 25–40% lower than have been reported in conventionally processed PM2000, which was attributed to Y-rich slag-like surface features and inclusions formed during SLM. - Highlights: • A wall structure was grown from ODS steel powder using selective laser melting. • A fine dispersion of nano-precipitates was apparent in as-build material. • Precipitates were multi-phased containing several elements, e.g. O, Ti, Al, Fe, Cr, Y. • Post-build annealing changed those into typically single-crystalline Y–Al–O. • The anneal also reduced and stabilised the volume fraction of precipitates to ~ 0.006.

  2. Impact factors on the structuration and the rheological behavior of the clay-water system for smectite dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paumier, S.

    2007-11-01

    Smectite are swelling clays widely used in industry. Their mechanical properties are unequal according to their mineralogical and physico-chemical characteristics. The aim of this study is to improve the knowledge of the interlayer cation impact on the structure built by the smectite-water system according to the concentration. Homo-ionic (Na + et Ca 2+ ) and bi-ionic systems are observed. This study cross checks mineralogical methods, physicochemical analysis and broad range of rheometric tests. At low concentration (less than 60 g/l) the calcium dispersions are shear thinning and few viscous due to the layer association in huge deformable flocks. The sodium smectite layers are dispersed; the dispersions are highly viscous. The lowest viscosity is detected for mix of 20 % of sodium smectite and 80 % of calcium smectite. At higher concentration (60 to 100 g/l), the yield stress and viscoelastic properties are studied by creep-recovery tests, oscillatory tests and imposed shear step. At the liquid state, the flow is first heterogeneous with a shear banding effect then homogeneous. The results make it possible to define the concentration area characteristic of each mechanical behavior (viscosity, shear thinning and yield stress) according to the saturation cation. The thixotropic properties are characterized with de-structuring-restructuring tests. Two kinetics are determined. Finally we realize a data base with 12 natural and industrial bentonite. The rheograms would be efficient to differentiate the natural calcium bentonite (Newtonian law), natural sodium bentonite (Herschel-Bulkley law) and activated calcium bentonite (Bingham law). (author)

  3. Fracture mechanism of a dispersion-hardened molybdenum alloy with strong structural interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, A.D.; Malashenko, I.S.; Moiseev, V.F.; Pechkovskij, Eh.P.; Sul'zhenko, V.K.; Trefilov, V.I.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Ehlektrosvarki)

    1978-01-01

    Fracture mechanism in the two-phase Mo-15wt.%Nb-3.5 vol.% TiN alloy known to be of ''brittle matrix-strong interfaces'' type has been investigated depending on tensile test temperature. Several temperature intervals of fracture have been found, each of them having its own peculiarities. A scheme is suggested for fracture mechanism changes in dispersion-hardened alloys with strong interfaces. At low test temperatures brittle cleavage fracture takes place. With temperature increase fracture mechanisms change in the following way: brittle intergranular fracture; fracture of ''microvoid coalescence'' type; fracture typical for reinforced materials with ductile matrix; intergran laru fracture. Particles of strengthening phase have been shown to play different roles depending on the test temperature in the fracture of the alloys studied

  4. Exchange-Hole Dipole Dispersion Model for Accurate Energy Ranking in Molecular Crystal Structure Prediction II: Nonplanar Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittleton, Sarah R; Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Johnson, Erin R

    2017-11-14

    The crystal structure prediction (CSP) of a given compound from its molecular diagram is a fundamental challenge in computational chemistry with implications in relevant technological fields. A key component of CSP is the method to calculate the lattice energy of a crystal, which allows the ranking of candidate structures. This work is the second part of our investigation to assess the potential of the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion model for crystal structure prediction. In this article, we study the relatively large, nonplanar, mostly flexible molecules in the first five blind tests held by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. Four of the seven experimental structures are predicted as the energy minimum, and thermal effects are demonstrated to have a large impact on the ranking of at least another compound. As in the first part of this series, delocalization error affects the results for a single crystal (compound X), in this case by detrimentally overstabilizing the π-conjugated conformation of the monomer. Overall, B86bPBE-XDM correctly predicts 16 of the 21 compounds in the five blind tests, a result similar to the one obtained using the best CSP method available to date (dispersion-corrected PW91 by Neumann et al.). Perhaps more importantly, the systems for which B86bPBE-XDM fails to predict the experimental structure as the energy minimum are mostly the same as with Neumann's method, which suggests that similar difficulties (absence of vibrational free energy corrections, delocalization error,...) are not limited to B86bPBE-XDM but affect GGA-based DFT-methods in general. Our work confirms B86bPBE-XDM as an excellent option for crystal energy ranking in CSP and offers a guide to identify crystals (organic salts, conjugated flexible systems) where difficulties may appear.

  5. Limited Pollen Dispersal Contributes to Population Genetic Structure but Not Local Adaptation in Quercus oleoides Forests of Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas John Deacon

    Full Text Available Quercus oleoides Cham. and Schlect., tropical live oak, is a species of conservation importance in its southern range limit of northwestern Costa Rica. It occurs in high-density stands across a fragmented landscape spanning a contrasting elevation and precipitation gradient. We examined genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure in this geographically isolated and genetically distinct population. We characterized population genetic diversity at 11 nuclear microsatellite loci in 260 individuals from 13 sites. We monitored flowering time at 10 sites, and characterized the local environment in order to compare observed spatial genetic structure to hypotheses of isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment. Finally, we quantified pollen dispersal distances and tested for local adaptation through a reciprocal transplant experiment in order to experimentally address these hypotheses.High genetic diversity is maintained in the population and the genetic variation is significantly structured among sampled sites. We identified 5 distinct genetic clusters and average pollen dispersal predominately occurred over short distances. Differences among sites in flowering phenology and environmental factors, however, were not strictly associated with genetic differentiation. Growth and survival of upland and lowland progeny in their native and foreign environments was expected to exhibit evidence of local adaptation due to the more extreme dry season in the lowlands. Seedlings planted in the lowland garden experienced much higher mortality than seedlings in the upland garden, but we did not identify evidence for local adaptation.Overall, this study indicates that the Costa Rican Q. oleoides population has a rich population genetic history. Despite environmental heterogeneity and habitat fragmentation, isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment alone do not explain spatial genetic structure. These results add to studies of genetic structure by

  6. Limited Pollen Dispersal Contributes to Population Genetic Structure but Not Local Adaptation in Quercus oleoides Forests of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Nicholas John; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    Quercus oleoides Cham. and Schlect., tropical live oak, is a species of conservation importance in its southern range limit of northwestern Costa Rica. It occurs in high-density stands across a fragmented landscape spanning a contrasting elevation and precipitation gradient. We examined genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure in this geographically isolated and genetically distinct population. We characterized population genetic diversity at 11 nuclear microsatellite loci in 260 individuals from 13 sites. We monitored flowering time at 10 sites, and characterized the local environment in order to compare observed spatial genetic structure to hypotheses of isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment. Finally, we quantified pollen dispersal distances and tested for local adaptation through a reciprocal transplant experiment in order to experimentally address these hypotheses. High genetic diversity is maintained in the population and the genetic variation is significantly structured among sampled sites. We identified 5 distinct genetic clusters and average pollen dispersal predominately occurred over short distances. Differences among sites in flowering phenology and environmental factors, however, were not strictly associated with genetic differentiation. Growth and survival of upland and lowland progeny in their native and foreign environments was expected to exhibit evidence of local adaptation due to the more extreme dry season in the lowlands. Seedlings planted in the lowland garden experienced much higher mortality than seedlings in the upland garden, but we did not identify evidence for local adaptation. Overall, this study indicates that the Costa Rican Q. oleoides population has a rich population genetic history. Despite environmental heterogeneity and habitat fragmentation, isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment alone do not explain spatial genetic structure. These results add to studies of genetic structure by examining a common

  7. Surface structural, morphological, and catalytic studies of homogeneously dispersed anisotropic Ag nanostructures within mesoporous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sareen, Shweta [Thapar University, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India); Mutreja, Vishal [Maharishi Markandeshwar University, Department of Chemistry (India); Pal, Bonamali; Singh, Satnam, E-mail: ssingh@thapar.edu [Thapar University, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highly dispersed anisotropic Ag nanostructures were synthesized within the channels of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS)-modified mesoporous SBA-15 for catalyzing the reduction of p-dinitrobenzene, p-nitrophenol, and p-nitroacetophenone, respectively. A green templating process without involving any reducing agent, by varying the amount (1–10 wt.%) of Ag loading followed by calcination at 350 °C under H{sub 2} led to change in the morphology of Ag nanoparticles from nanospheres (~7–8 nm) to nanorods (aspect ratio ~12–30 nm) without any deformation in mesoporous sieves. In comparison to white bare SBA-15, gray-colored samples were formed with Ag impregnation exhibiting absorption bands at 484 and 840 nm indicating the formation of anisotropic Ag nanostructures within mesoporous matrix. TEM and FE-SEM micrographs confirmed the presence of evenly dispersed Ag nanostructures within as well as on the surface of mesoporous matrix. AFM studies indicated a small decrease in the average roughness of SBA-15 from 20.59 to 19.21 nm for 4 wt.% Ag/m-SBA-15, illustrating the encapsulation of majority of Ag nanoparticles in the siliceous matrix and presence of small amount of Ag nanoparticles on the mesoporous support. Moreover, due to plugging of mesopores with Ag, a significant decrease in surface area from 680 m{sup 2}/g of SBA-15 to 385 m{sup 2}/g was observed. The Ag-impregnated SBA-15 catalyst displayed superior catalytic activity than did bare SBA-15 with 4 wt.% Ag-loaded catalyst exhibiting optimum activity for selective reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol (100 %), p-nitroacetophenone to p-aminoacetophenone (100 %), and p-dinitrobenzene to p-nitroaniline (87 %), with a small amount of p-phenylenediamine formation.

  8. The influences of soil and nearby structures on dispersion characteristics of wave propagating along buried plastic pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyong; Jiang, J.; Parr, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Water loss in distribution systems is a global problem for the water industry and governments. According to the international water supply association (IWSA), as a result of leaks from distribution pipes, 20% to 30% of water is lost while in transit from treatment plants to consumers. Although governments have tried to push the water industry to reduce the water leaks, a lot of experts have pointed out that a wide use of plastic pipes instead of metal pipes in recent years has caused difficulties in the detection of leaks using current acoustic technology. Leaks from plastic pipes are much quieter than traditional metal pipes and comparing to metal pipes the plastic pipes have very different coupling characteristics with soil, water and surrounding structures, such as other pipes, road surface and building foundations. The dispersion characteristics of wave propagating along buried plastic pipes are investigated in this paper using finite element and boundary element based models. Both empty and water- filled pipes were considered. Influences from nearby pipes and building foundations were carefully studied. The results showed that soil condition and nearby structures have significant influences on the dispersion characteristics of wave propagating along buried plastic pipes.

  9. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Takenobu Michioka; Koichi Sada; Kazuki Okabayashi

    2016-01-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking) on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the...

  10. A microstructural analysis of isoprenol ether-based polycarboxylates and the impact of structural motifs on the dispersing effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plank, Johann; Li, Huiqun; Ilg, Manuel; Pickelmann, Julia; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Yao, Yan; Wang, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    Generally, polycarboxylate superplasticizers (PCEs) are synthesized via aqueous free radical copolymerization. The conditions during copolymerization such as relative reactivity and feeding mode and ratio of monomers can cause different monomer sequences in the final product. In this study, the sequence of monomers in PCE polymers synthesized from acrylic acid and isoprenyloxy polyethylene glycol (IPEG) macromonomer was characterized by 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Three different triads of monomer sequences (EAE, AAE and AAA; E = ether, A = acid monomer) were detected. It was found that IPEG PCEs predominantly contain the structural motifs of AAE and EAE, and less of AAA. Higher additions of acrylic acid do not incorporate into the structure of PCE, but convert to HMW polyacrylate as by-product instead. A PCE with optimal dispersing effectiveness was achieved at high contents of IPEG macromonomer, a molecular weight (M w ) around 40,000 Da and narrow molecular weight distribution.

  11. Weakly nonlinear dispersion and stop-band effects for periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    of frequency band-gaps, i.e. frequency ranges in which elastic waves cannot propagate. Most existing analytical methods in the field are based on Floquet theory [1]; e.g. this holds for the classical Hill’s method of infinite determinants [1,2], and themethod of space-harmonics [3]. However, application...... of these methods for studying nonlinear problems isimpossible or cumbersome, since Floquet theory is applicable only for linear systems. Thus the nonlinear effects for periodic structures are not yet fully uncovered, while at the same time applications may demand effects of nonlinearity on structural response...... to be accounted for.The paper deals with analytically predicting dynamic response for nonlinear elastic structures with a continuous periodic variation in structural properties. Specifically, for a Bernoulli-Euler beam with aspatially continuous modulation of structural properties in the axial direction...

  12. The Dispersion of Fast Radio Bursts from a Structured Intergalactic Medium at Redshifts z < 1.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, Charles W.

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the sources of free electrons that produce the large dispersion measures, {DM}≈ 300{--}1600 (in units of cm‑3 pc), observed toward fast radio bursts (FRBs). Individual galaxies typically produce {DM}∼ 25{--}60 {{cm}}-3 {pc} from ionized gas in their disk, disk-halo interface, and circumgalactic medium. Toward an FRB source at redshift z, a homogeneous intergalactic medium (IGM) containing a fraction {f}{IGM} of cosmological baryons will produce {DM}=(935 {{cm}}-3 {pc}){f}{IGM} {h}70-1I(z), where I{(z)=(2/3{{{Ω }}}m)[\\{{{{Ω }}}m(1+z)}3+{{{Ω }}}{{Λ }}\\}{}1/2-1]. A structured IGM of photoionized Lyα absorbers in the cosmic web produces similar dispersion, modeled from the observed distribution, {f}b(N,z), of H I (Lyα-forest) absorbers in column density and redshift with ionization corrections and scaling relations from cosmological simulations. An analytic formula for DM(z) applied to observed FRB dispersions suggests that {z}{FRB}≈ 0.2{--}1.5 for an IGM containing a significant baryon fraction, {f}{IGM}=0.6+/- 0.1. Future surveys of the statistical distribution, DM(z), of FRBs identified with specific galaxies and redshifts can be used to calibrate the IGM baryon fraction and distribution of Lyα absorbers. Fluctuations in DM at the level ±10 cm‑3 pc will arise from filaments and voids in the cosmic web.

  13. Dispersal patterns of endemic alpine butterflies with contrasting population structures: Erebia epiphron and E-sudetica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuras, T.; Beneš, Jiří; Fric, Zdeněk; Konvička, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 45, - (2003), s. 115-123 ISSN 1438-3896 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Metapopulation structure, fragmented landscapes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.967, year: 2003

  14. The formation and evolution of layered structures in porous media: effects of porosity and mechanical dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoofs, Stan; Trompert, Ron A.; Hansen, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    Horizontally layered structures can develop in porous or partially molten environments, such as hydrothermal systems, magmatic intrusions and the early Earth's mantle. The porosity f of these natural environments is typically small. Since dissolved chemical elements unlike heat cannot diffuse

  15. Dispersal and population structure of a New World predator, the army ant Eciton burchellii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berghoff, S M; Kronauer, D J C; Edwards, K J

    2008-01-01

    barriers, which might have severe impacts on population structure and lead to population decline. Using nuclear microsatellite markers and mitochondrial sequences, we investigated genetic differentiation in a fragmented population in the Panama Canal area. While nuclear markers showed little...

  16. Structure and performance of cationic assembly dispersed in amphoteric surfactants solution as a shampoo for hair damaged by coloring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Yasuo; Nishida, Yuichi; Isoda, Masanori; Yamagata, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Naoki; Takada, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, hair coloring gains popularity as a trend of consumer's hair care. This coloring frequently damages hair. In response to this, a new shampoo-base was developed for repairing hair damaged by coloring. The new shampoo-base was prepared by dispersing cationic assembly in a solution of amphoteric surfactants. The mixture of behenyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C22TAC) and behenyl alcohol (C22OH) was applied as the cationic assembly, which are dispersed in amido propyl betaine laurate (LPB) solution. LPB, which behaves as an amphoteric surfactant, was used as the wash-base. It was verified from the results on the measurements of DSC, calorimeter polarization, cryo-SEM and X-ray diffraction that the cationic assembly has a crystalline structure in the LPB solution. The new shampoo-base was highly efficient to change the color-damaged hair from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The friction level of the hair washed with the new shampoo-base recovered to the same state as that of healthy hair. The exfoliation of cuticle was reduced after washing with the new shampoo-base.

  17. Effect of dispersion capability of organoclay on cellular structure and physical properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposite foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Jui-Ming; Chang, Kung-Chin; Peng, Chih-Wei; Lai, Mei-Chun; Hung, Chih-Bing; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Hwang, Shyh-Shin; Lin, Hong-Ru

    2009-01-01

    In this study, PMMA/clay nanocomposite (PCN) materials with two kinds of organoclay were prepared via in situ bulk polymerization. The as-prepared PCN materials were then characterized by Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). WAXRD and TEM analysis revealed that combination of both intercalated and exfoliated nanocomposites was formed and the silicate layers of the clay were uniformly dispersed at a nanometer scale in PMMA matrix. The molecular weights of PMMA extracted from PCN materials and bulk PMMA were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) with THF used as the eluant. The PCN materials were used to produce foams by a batch process in an autoclave using nitrogen as foaming agent. The cellular structure analysis of foams was examined by SEM. The effect of dispersion capability of organoclay on the dielectric and thermal transport properties of PCN materials and foams and mechanical properties of PCN foams were investigated by LCR meter, transient plane source (TPS) technique and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), respectively.

  18. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Katz, Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  19. Validation of missed space-group symmetry in X-ray powder diffraction structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempler, Daniela; Schmidt, Martin U.; Van De Streek, Jacco

    2017-01-01

    More than 600 molecular crystal structures with correct, incorrect and uncertain space-group symmetry were energy-minimized with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D, PBE-D3). For the purpose of determining the correct space-group symmetry the required tolerance on the atomic...... with missed symmetry were investigated by dispersion-corrected density functional theory. In 98.5% of the cases the correct space group is found....

  20. Effects of the dispersity of anthracite on the rearrangement of its structure during thermal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialkov, A.S.; Chuparova, L.D.; Abramov, A.V.; Kirilin, N.S.; Yurkovskii, I.M.; Suslina, V.I.; Semenov, M.V.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of the fineness of anthracite on the reorganization of its structure and on the adsorption of the binder is studied. The adsorption properties of Donetsk anthracite milled to a specific surface of 1.8 m/sup 2//g, 4.5 m/sup 2//g and 18.0 m/sup 2//g were measured. It was demonstrated that in order to obtain a composition based on anthracite with a highly ordered structure, the starting material should be ground to a specific surface area of 14 m/sup 2//g. Anthracite ground to a fineness of more than 20 m/sup 2//g proved to be less structured during transformation into thermographite. (9 refs.)

  1. Defining the Structural Basis for Allosteric Product Release from E. coli Dihydrofolate Reductase Using NMR Relaxation Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyen, David; Fenwick, R Bryn; Aoto, Phillip C; Stanfield, Robyn L; Wilson, Ian A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2017-08-16

    The rate-determining step in the catalytic cycle of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase is tetrahydrofolate (THF) product release, which can occur via an allosteric or an intrinsic pathway. The allosteric pathway, which becomes accessible when the reduced cofactor NADPH is bound, involves transient sampling of a higher energy conformational state, greatly increasing the product dissociation rate as compared to the intrinsic pathway that obtains when NADPH is absent. Although the kinetics of this process are known, the enzyme structure and the THF product conformation in the transiently formed excited state remain elusive. Here, we use side-chain proton NMR relaxation dispersion measurements, X-ray crystallography, and structure-based chemical shift predictions to explore the structural basis of allosteric product release. In the excited state of the E:THF:NADPH product release complex, the reduced nicotinamide ring of the cofactor transiently enters the active site where it displaces the pterin ring of the THF product. The p-aminobenzoyl-l-glutamate tail of THF remains weakly bound in a widened binding cleft. Thus, through transient entry of the nicotinamide ring into the active site, the NADPH cofactor remodels the enzyme structure and the conformation of the THF to form a weakly populated excited state that is poised for rapid product release.

  2. Structure and dynamics of concentrated dispersions of polystyrene latex spheres in glycerol: Static and dynamic x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumma, D.; Lurio, L. B.; Borthwick, M. A.; Falus, P.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements are applied to characterize the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions between 2.7% and 52%. The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior. The short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient, which are based on a hard-sphere model [C. W. J. Beenakker and P. Mazur, Physica A 126, 349 (1984)]. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. Our measurements are parametrized in terms of a viscoelastic model for the intermediate scattering function [W. Hess and R. Klein, Adv. Phys. 32, 173 (1983)]. Within this framework, two relaxation modes are predicted to contribute to the decay of the dynamic structure factor, with mode amplitudes depending on both wave vector and volume fraction. Our measurements indicate that, for particle volume fractions smaller than about 0.30, the intermediate scattering function is well described in terms of single-exponential decays, whereas a double-mode structure becomes apparent for more concentrated systems

  3. Body size and dispersal mode as key traits determining metacommunity structure of aquatic organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bie, T.; De Meester, L.; Brendonck, L.; Martens, K.; Goddeeris, B.; Ercken, D.; Hampel, H.; Denys, L.; Vanhecke, L.; Van der Gucht, K.; Van Wichelen, J.; Vyverman, W.; Declerck, S.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Relationships between traits of organisms and the structure of their metacommunities have so far mainly been explored with meta-analyses. We compared metacommunities of a wide variety of aquatic organism groups (12 groups, ranging from bacteria to fish) in the same set of 99 ponds to minimise biases

  4. Strong population genetic structure and larval dispersal capability of the burrowing ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The burrowing ghost shrimp, Neotrypaea californiensis, is a vital member of the estuarine benthic community. Dense populations of shrimp are found in the major estuaries of Washington and Oregon. Our study determines the genetic structure of shrimp populations in order to gain ...

  5. Separate effects tests to determine the thermal dispersion in structured pebble beds in the PBMR HPTU test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toit, C.G. du, E-mail: jat.dutoit@nwu.ac.za; Rousseau, P.G.; Kgame, T.L.

    2014-05-01

    Thermal-fluid simulations are used extensively to predict the maximum fuel temperatures, flows, pressure drops and thermal capacitance of pebble bed gas cooled reactors in support of the reactor safety case. The PBMR company developed the HTTF test facility in cooperation with M-Tech Industrial (Pty) Ltd. and the North-West University in South Africa to conduct comprehensive separate effects tests as well as integrated effects tests to study the different thermal-fluid phenomena. This paper describes the separate effects tests that were conducted to determine the effect of the porous structure on the fluid effective thermal conductivity due to the thermal dispersion. It also presents the methodology applied in the data analysis to derive the resultant values of the effective thermal conductivity and its associated uncertainty.

  6. Effects of confinement and external fields on structure and transport in colloidal dispersions in reduced dimensionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, D; Virnau, P; Binder, K; Deutschländer, S; Siems, U; Franzrahe, K; Henseler, P; Keim, P; Schwierz, N; Maret, G; Nielaba, P

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we focus on low-dimensional colloidal model systems, via simulation studies and also some complementary experiments, in order to elucidate the interplay between phase behavior, geometric structures and transport properties. In particular, we try to investigate the (nonlinear!) response of these very soft colloidal systems to various perturbations: uniform and uniaxial pressure, laser fields, shear due to moving boundaries and randomly quenched disorder. We study ordering phenomena on surfaces or in monolayers by Monte Carlo computer simulations of binary hard-disk mixtures, the influence of a substrate being modeled by an external potential. Weak external fields allow a controlled tuning of the miscibility of the mixture. We discuss the laser induced de-mixing for the three different possible couplings to the external potential. The structural behavior of hard spheres interacting with repulsive screened Coulomb or dipolar interaction in 2D and 3D narrow constrictions is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. Due to misfits between multiples of the lattice parameter and the channel widths, a variety of ordered and disordered lattice structures have been observed. The resulting local lattice structures and defect probabilities are studied for various cross sections. The influence of a self-organized order within the system is reflected in the velocity of the particles and their diffusive behavior. Additionally, in an experimental system of dipolar colloidal particles confined by gravity on a solid substrate we investigate the effect of pinning on the dynamics of a two-dimensional colloidal liquid. This work contains sections reviewing previous work by the authors as well as new, unpublished results. Among the latter are detailed studies of the phase boundaries of the de-mixing regime in binary systems in external light fields, configurations for shear induced effects at structured walls, studies on the effect of confinement on the structures

  7. Dispersed free phytosterols as structuring agents in lipid systems with reduced saturated fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoi, K.R.R.; Basso, R.C.; Buscato, M.H.M.; Cardoso, L.P.; Kieckbusch, T.G.; Ribeiro, A.P.B.

    2017-01-01

    The negative effects of trans fatty acids and saturated fatty acids in food have been widely discussed and this has led to progressive changes in the legislation of many countries. The use of structuring agents or crystallization modifiers, as specific triacylglycerol and minor lipids have been indicated as the only viable alternative for obtaining low saturated fats with properties which are compatible with food application. In this context, phytosterols, natural products with hypocholesterolemic action, and hard fat-crystallization modulators, present a new option for structuring lipid matrices. This work characterized the effects of fully hydrogenated soybean oil and free phytosterols on the physical properties and crystallization behavior of palm oil and canola oil blends for the development of zero trans-fat bases with low levels of saturated fatty acids. The systems were evaluated for chemical composition, atherogenic index, solid fat profiles, microstructure, consistency, thermal behavior and polymorphism. [es

  8. Design of airborne imaging spectrometer based on curved prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Xiangli, Bin; Zhou, Jinsong; Wei, Xiaoxiao

    2011-11-01

    A novel moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer spreading from visible wavelength to near infrared wavelength range with a spectral resolution of 10 nm, which combines curved prisms with the Offner configuration, is introduced. Compared to conventional imaging spectrometers based on dispersive prism or diffractive grating, this design possesses characteristics of small size, compact structure, low mass as well as little spectral line curve (smile) and spectral band curve (keystone or frown). Besides, the usage of compound curved prisms with two or more different materials can greatly reduce the nonlinearity inevitably brought by prismatic dispersion. The utilization ratio of light radiation is much higher than imaging spectrometer of the same type based on combination of diffractive grating and concentric optics. In this paper, the Seidel aberration theory of curved prism and the optical principles of Offner configuration are illuminated firstly. Then the optical design layout of the spectrometer is presented, and the performance evaluation of this design, including spot diagram and MTF, is analyzed. To step further, several types of telescope matching this system are provided. This work provides an innovational perspective upon optical system design of airborne spectral imagers; therefore, it can offer theoretic guide for imaging spectrometer of the same kind.

  9. Effects of air pollution on thermal structure and dispersion in an urban planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The short-term effects of urbanization and air pollution on the transport processes in the urban planetary boundary layer (PBL) are studied. The investigation makes use of an unsteady two-dimensional transport model which has been developed by Viskanta et al., (1976). The model predicts pollutant concentrations and temperature in the PBL. The potential effects of urbanization and air pollution on the thermal structure in the urban PBL are considered, taking into account the results of numerical simulations modeling the St. Louis, Missouri metropolitan area.

  10. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes and dispersed nanodiamond novel hybrids: Microscopic structure evolution, physical properties, and radiation resilience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Farmer, J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the structure and physical properties of novel hybrids of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and ultradispersed diamond (UDD) forming nanocomposite ensemble that were subjected to 50, 100, and 10 3 kGy gamma ray doses and characterized using various analytical tools to investigate hierarchical defects evolution. This work is prompted by recent work on single-walled CNTs and UDD ensemble [Gupta et al., J. Appl. Phys. 107, 104308 (2010)] where radiation-induced microscopic defects seem to be stabilized by UDD. The present experiments show similar effects where these hybrids display only a minimal structural modification under the maximum dose. Quantitative analyses of multiwavelength Raman spectra revealed lattice defects induced by irradiation assessed through the variation in prominent D, G, and 2D bands. A minimal change in the position of D, G, and 2D bands and a marginal increase in intensity of the defect-induced double resonant Raman scattered D and 2D bands are some of the implications suggesting the radiation coupling. The in-plane correlation length (L a ) was also determined following Tunistra-Koenig relation from the ratio of D to G band (I D /I G ) besides microscopic stress. However, we also suggest the following taking into account of intrinsic defects of the constituents: (a) charge transfer arising at the interface due to the difference in electronegativity of MWCNT C sp 2 and UDD core (C sp 3 ) leading to phonon and electron energy renormalization; (b) misorientation of C sp 2 at the interface of MWCNT and UDD shell (C sp 2 ) resulting in structural disorder; (c) softening or violation of the q∼0 selection rule leading to D band broadening and a minimal change in G band intensity; and (d) normalized intensity of D and G bands with 2D band help to distinguish defect-induced double resonance phenomena. The MWCNT when combined with nanodiamond showed a slight decrease in their conductance further affected by irradiation pointing at

  11. Structural characterization of dispersed metal catalysts. Progress report, September 1, 1982-August 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reucroft, P.J.; De Angelis, R.J.; Bentley, J.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy characterization techniques have been developed to investigate the structural features of small metal particles (50 to 100 angstroms) in porous media. In the first phase of the project, bright and dark field imaging techniques have been emphasized with EDAX characterization. High quality images have been obtained in both bright field and dark field and earlier characterization studies on three catalyst systems have been confirmed and extended. Particle size growth (sintering) at low temperatures is much greater in the Au/SiO 2 system, indicating a weak metal-support interaction. A more uniform and generally smaller particle size distribution is observed in Ni/MgSiO 3 compared to Ni/SiO 2 . The nickel particles in Ni/SiO 2 show contrast effects which indicate that the particles contain faults or twins

  12. Electrical Characterization of Gold-DNA-Gold Structures in Presence of an External Magnetic Field by Means of I-V Curve Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Haliza Abd Majid

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an experimental study of gold-DNA-gold structures in the presence and absence of external magnetic fields with strengths less than 1,200.00 mT. The DNA strands, extracted by standard method were used to fabricate a Metal-DNA-Metal (MDM structure. Its electric behavior when subjected to a magnetic field was studied through its current-voltage (I-V curve. Acquisition of the I-V curve demonstrated that DNA as a semiconductor exhibits diode behavior in the MDM structure. The current versus magnetic field strength followed a decreasing trend because of a diminished mobility in the presence of a low magnetic field. This made clear that an externally imposed magnetic field would boost resistance of the MDM structure up to 1,000.00 mT and for higher magnetic field strengths we can observe an increase in potential barrier in MDM junction. The magnetic sensitivity indicates the promise of using MDM structures as potential magnetic sensors.

  13. Recent divergence, intercontinental dispersal and shared polymorphism are shaping the genetic structure of amphi-Atlantic peatmoss populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szövényi, P; Terracciano, S; Ricca, M; Giordano, S; Shaw, A J

    2008-12-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that recent long-distance dispersal may have been important in the evolution of intercontinental distribution ranges of bryophytes. However, the absolute rate of intercontinental migration and its relative role in the development of certain distribution ranges is still poorly understood. To this end, the genetic structure of intercontinental populations of six peatmoss species showing an amphi-Atlantic distribution was investigated using microsatellite markers. Methods relying on the coalescent were applied (IM and MIGRATE) to understand the evolution of this distribution pattern in peatmosses. Intercontinental populations of the six peatmoss species were weakly albeit significantly differentiated (average F(ST) = 0.104). This suggests that the North Atlantic Ocean is acting as a barrier to gene flow even in bryophytes adapted to long-range dispersal. The im analysis suggested a relatively recent split of intercontinental populations dating back to the last two glacial periods (9000-289,000 years ago). In contrast to previous hypotheses, analyses indicated that both ongoing migration and ancestral polymorphism are important in explaining the intercontinental genetic similarity of peatmoss populations, but their relative contribution varies with species. Migration rates were significantly asymmetric towards America suggesting differential extinction of genotypes on the two continents or invasion of the American continent by European lineages. These results indicate that low genetic divergence of amphi-Atlantic populations is a general pattern across numerous flowering plants and bryophytes. However, in bryophytes, ongoing intercontinental gene flow and retained shared ancestral polymorphism must both be considered to explain the genetic similarity of intercontinental populations.

  14. Selectively dispersed isotope labeling for protein structure determination by magic angle spinning NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, Matthew T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Belenky, Marina [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Sivertsen, Astrid C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory (United States); Griffin, Robert G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Herzfeld, Judith, E-mail: herzfeld@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The power of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy derives from its site-specific access to chemical, structural and dynamic information. However, the corresponding multiplicity of interactions can be difficult to tease apart. Complimentary approaches involve spectral editing on the one hand and selective isotope substitution on the other. Here we present a new 'redox' approach to the latter: acetate is chosen as the sole carbon source for the extreme oxidation numbers of its two carbons. Consistent with conventional anabolic pathways for the amino acids, [1-{sup 13}C] acetate does not label {alpha} carbons, labels other aliphatic carbons and the aromatic carbons very selectively, and labels the carboxyl carbons heavily. The benefits of this labeling scheme are exemplified by magic angle spinning spectra of microcrystalline immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1): the elimination of most J-couplings and one- and two-bond dipolar couplings provides narrow signals and long-range, intra- and inter-residue, recoupling essential for distance constraints. Inverse redox labeling, from [2-{sup 13}C] acetate, is also expected to be useful: although it retains one-bond couplings in the sidechains, the removal of CA-CO coupling in the backbone should improve the resolution of NCACX spectra.

  15. Numerical study of the effects of Planetary Boundary Layer structure on the pollutant dispersion within built-up areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Liu, Shuhua; Zheng, Yijia; Wang, Shu; Liu, Zhenxin; Zhang, Bihui

    2015-06-01

    The effects of different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) structures on pollutant dispersion processes within two idealized street canyon configurations and a realistic urban area were numerically examined by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. The boundary conditions of different PBL structures/conditions were provided by simulations of the Weather Researching and Forecasting model. The simulated results of the idealized 2D and 3D street canyon experiments showed that the increment of PBL instability favored the downward transport of momentum from the upper flow above the roof to the pedestrian level within the street canyon. As a result, the flow and turbulent fields within the street canyon under the more unstable PBL condition are stronger. Therefore, more pollutants within the street canyon would be removed by the stronger advection and turbulent diffusion processes under the unstable PBL condition. On the contrary, more pollutants would be concentrated in the street canyon under the stable PBL condition. In addition, the simulations of the realistic building cluster experiments showed that the density of buildings was a crucial factor determining the dynamic effects of the PBL structure on the flow patterns. The momentum field within a denser building configuration was mostly transported from the upper flow, and was more sensitive to the PBL structures than that of the sparser building configuration. Finally, it was recommended to use the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) PBL scheme, which can explicitly output the needed turbulent variables, to provide the boundary conditions to the CFD simulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Structure of long terminal repeats of transcriptionally active and inactive copies of Drosophila mobile dispersed genetic elements mdg3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhumagaliev, E.B.; Mazo, A.N.; Baev, A.A. Jr.; Gorelova, T.V.; Arkhipova, I.R.; Shuppe, N.G.; Il'in, Yu.V.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have determined the nucleotide sequences of long terminal repeats (LTRS) and adjacent regions in the transcribed and nontranscribed variants of the mobile dispersed gene mdg3. In its main characteristics the mdg3 is similar to other mdg. Its integration into chromosomal DNA brings about duplication of the 4 bp of the host DNA, no specificity of the mdg integration at the nucleotide level being detected. The mdg3 is flanked by a 5 bp inverted repeat. The variations in the length of the LTR in different mdg copies is mainly due to duplication of certain sequences in the U3 and R regions. mdg3 copies with a LTR length of 267 bp are the most abundant and are completely conservative in their primary structure. They are transcribed in the cells of the 67J25D culture, but not transcribed in the K/sub c/ line, where another mdg3 variant with a LTR length of 293 bp is transcriptionally active. The SI mapping of transcription initiation and termination sites has shown that in both mdg3 variants they are localized in the same LTR regions, and that the LTR itself has a characteristic U3-R-U5 structure-like retroviral LTRs. The possible factors involved in the regulation of mdg transcription are discussed

  17. Niche conservatism and dispersal limitation cause large-scale phylogenetic structure in the New World palm flora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Svenning, J.-C.; Baker, William J.

    similarity decays after speciation depends on the rates of niche evolution and dispersal. If dispersal is slow compared to the tempo of lineage diversification, distributions change little during clade diversification. Phylogenetic niche conservatism precludes distributional shifts in environmental space......, and to the degree that distributions are limited by the niche, also in geographic space. Using phylogenetic turnover methods, we simultaneously analysed the distributions of all New World palms (n=547) and inferred to which degree phylogenetic niche conservatism and dispersal limitation, respectively, caused...

  18. Modeling of Rayleigh wave dispersion in Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Badal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase and group velocities of 15–70 s Rayleigh waves propagating across the Iberian Peninsula have been transformed into local dispersion curves by linear inversion of travel times. The procedure permits that the waveform dispersion to be obtained as a continuous period-dependent velocity function at grid points belonging to the area probed by the waves, thus providing phase- and group-velocity contour maps for several periods within the interval of interest. The regionalization process rests on a homogeneous initial data set in which the number of observations remains almost constant for all periods of reference. Damped least-squares inversion of the local dispersion curves for shear-wave velocity structure is performed to obtain depth-dependent S-wave velocity profiles at the grid points covering the model region. The reliability of the results should improve significantly owing to the use of phase and group velocities simultaneously. On this basis, we have built horizontal depth sections that give an updated view of the seismic velocity structure of the peninsula at lithospheric and upper mantle depths (20–200 km. After averaging all the pure-path S-wave velocities previously determined at each grid point, the velocity-depth models so obtained for major tectonic units allow the comparison between the Hercynian basement and other areas of Mesozoic folding and Tertiary basins.

  19. Evidence of non-coincidence of normalized sigmoidal curves of two different structural properties for two-state protein folding/unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Khan, Md. Khurshid Alam; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ahmad, Faizan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-coincidence of normalized sigmoidal curves of two different structural properties is consistence with the two-state protein folding/unfolding. ► DSC measurements of denaturation show a two-state behavior of g-cyt-c at pH 6.0. ► Urea-induced denaturation of g-cyt-c is a variable two- state process at pH 6.0. ► GdmCl-induced denaturation of g-cyt-c is a fixed two- state process at pH 6.0. -- Abstract: In practice, the observation of non-coincidence of normalized sigmoidal transition curves measured by two different structural properties constitutes a proof of existence of thermodynamically stable intermediate(s) on the folding ↔ unfolding pathway of a protein. Here we give first experimental evidence that this non-coincidence is also observed for a two-state protein denaturation. Proof of this evidence comes from our studies of denaturation of goat cytochrome-c (g-cyt-c) at pH 6.0. These studies involve differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements in the absence of urea and measurements of urea-induced denaturation curves monitored by observing changes in absorbance at 405, 530, and 695 nm and circular dichroism (CD) at 222, 405, and 416 nm. DSC measurements showed that denaturation of the protein is a two-state process, for calorimetric and van’t Hoff enthalpy changes are, within experimental errors, identical. Normalization of urea-induced denaturation curves monitored by optical properties leads to noncoincident sigmoidal curves. Heat-induced transition of g-cyt-c in the presence of different urea concentrations was monitored by CD at 222 nm and absorption at 405 nm. It was observed that these two different structural probes gave not only identical values of T m (transition temperature), ΔH m (change in enthalpy at T m ) and ΔC p (constant-pressure heat capacity change), but these thermodynamic parameters in the absence of urea are also in agreement with those obtained from DSC measurements

  20. Flight Morphology, Compound Eye Structure and Dispersal in the Bog and the Cranberry Fritillary Butterflies: An Inter- and Intraspecific Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlure, Camille; Schtickzelle, Nicolas; Van Dyck, Hans; Seymoure, Brett; Rutowski, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Understanding dispersal is of prime importance in conservation and population biology. Individual traits related to motion and navigation during dispersal may differ: (1) among species differing in habitat distribution, which in turn, may lead to interspecific differences in the potential for and costs of dispersal, (2) among populations of a species that experiences different levels of habitat fragmentation; (3) among individuals differing in their dispersal strategy and (4) between the sexes due to sexual differences in behaviour and dispersal tendencies. In butterflies, the visual system plays a central role in dispersal, but exactly how the visual system is related to dispersal has received far less attention than flight morphology. We studied two butterfly species to explore the relationships between flight and eye morphology, and dispersal. We predicted interspecific, intraspecific and intersexual differences for both flight and eye morphology relative to i) species-specific habitat distribution, ii) variation in dispersal strategy within each species and iii) behavioural differences between sexes. However, we did not investigate for potential population differences. We found: (1) sexual differences that presumably reflect different demands on both male and female visual and flight systems, (2) a higher wing loading (i.e. a proxy for flight performance), larger eyes and larger facet sizes in the frontal and lateral region of the eye (i.e. better navigation capacities) in the species inhabiting naturally fragmented habitat compared to the species inhabiting rather continuous habitat, and (3) larger facets in the frontal region in dispersers compared to residents within a species. Hence, dispersers may have similar locomotory capacity but potentially better navigation capacity. Dispersal ecology and evolution have attracted much attention, but there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms of dispersal. Unfortunately, for many species

  1. Life-stage differences in spatial genetic structure in an irruptive forest insect: implications for dispersal and spatial synchrony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick M.A. James; Barry Cooke; Bryan M.T. Brunet; Lisa M. Lumley; Felix A.H. Sperling; Marie-Josee Fortin; Vanessa S. Quinn; Brian R. Sturtevant

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal determines the flux of individuals, energy and information and is therefore a key determinant of ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Yet, it remains difficult to quantify its importance relative to other factors. This is particularly true in cyclic populations in which demography, drift and dispersal contribute to spatio-temporal variability in genetic...

  2. Dispersal limitation of Tillandsia species correlates with rain and host structure in a central Mexican tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoriano-Romero, Elizabeth; Valencia-Díaz, Susana; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo; Flores-Palacios, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Seed dispersal permits the colonization of favorable habitats and generation of new populations, facilitating escape from habitats that are in decline. There is little experimental evidence of the factors that limit epiphyte dispersion towards their hosts. In a tropical dry forest in central Mexico, we monitored the phenology of dispersion of epiphyte species of the genus Tillandsia; we tested experimentally whether precipitation could cause failures in seed dispersal and whether seed capture differs among vertical strata and between host species with high (Bursera copallifera) and low (Conzattia multiflora) epiphyte loads. With the exception of one species that presents late dispersion and low abundance, all of the species disperse prior to the onset of the rainy season. However, early rains immobilize the seeds, affecting up to 24% of the fruits in species with late dispersion. We observed that Tillandsia seeds reach both Bursera and Conzattia hosts, but found that adherence to the host is 4-5 times higher in Bursera. Furthermore, seeds liberated from Bursera travel shorter distances and up to half may remain within the same crown, while the highest seed capture takes place in the upper strata of the trees. We conclude that dispersion of Tillandsia seeds is limited by early rains and by the capture of seeds within the trees where populations concentrate. This pattern of capture also helps to explain the high concentrations of epiphytes in certain hosts, while trees with few epiphytes can be simultaneously considered deficient receivers and efficient exporters of seeds.

  3. Dispersal limitation of Tillandsia species correlates with rain and host structure in a central Mexican tropical dry forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Victoriano-Romero

    Full Text Available Seed dispersal permits the colonization of favorable habitats and generation of new populations, facilitating escape from habitats that are in decline. There is little experimental evidence of the factors that limit epiphyte dispersion towards their hosts. In a tropical dry forest in central Mexico, we monitored the phenology of dispersion of epiphyte species of the genus Tillandsia; we tested experimentally whether precipitation could cause failures in seed dispersal and whether seed capture differs among vertical strata and between host species with high (Bursera copallifera and low (Conzattia multiflora epiphyte loads. With the exception of one species that presents late dispersion and low abundance, all of the species disperse prior to the onset of the rainy season. However, early rains immobilize the seeds, affecting up to 24% of the fruits in species with late dispersion. We observed that Tillandsia seeds reach both Bursera and Conzattia hosts, but found that adherence to the host is 4-5 times higher in Bursera. Furthermore, seeds liberated from Bursera travel shorter distances and up to half may remain within the same crown, while the highest seed capture takes place in the upper strata of the trees. We conclude that dispersion of Tillandsia seeds is limited by early rains and by the capture of seeds within the trees where populations concentrate. This pattern of capture also helps to explain the high concentrations of epiphytes in certain hosts, while trees with few epiphytes can be simultaneously considered deficient receivers and efficient exporters of seeds.

  4. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The majority of oxide nanoparticles were identified to be orthorhombic YAlO3. During hot consolidation and extrusion, they develop a coherent interface and a near cuboid-on-cube orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix in the material. After annealing at 1200 °C for 1 h, however, the orientation relationship between the oxide nanoparticles and the matrix becomes arbitrary, and their interface mostly incoherent. Annealing at 1300 °C leads to considerable coarsening of oxide nanoparticles, and a new orientation relationship of pseudo-cube-on-cube between oxide nanoparticles and ferrite matrix develops. The reason for the developing interfaces and orientation relationships between oxide nanoparticles and ferrite matrix under different conditions is discussed.

  5. In Situ Structure-Function Studies of Oxide Supported Rhodium Catalysts by Combined Energy Dispersive XAFS and DRIFTS Spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, John; Dent, Andrew J.; Diaz-Moreno, Sofia; Fiddy, Steven G.; Jyoti, Bhrat; Tromp, Moniek; Newton, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    The techniques of energy dispersive EXAFS (EDE), diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and mass spectrometry (MS) have been combined to study the structure and function of an oxide supported metal catalyst, namely 5 wt% Rh/Al2O3. Using a FreLoN camera as the EDE detector and a rapid-scanning IR spectrometer, experiments could be performed with a repetition rate of 50 ms. The results show that the nature of the rhodium centers is a function of the partial pressures of the reacting gases (CO and NO) and also temperature. This combination of gases oxidizes metallic rhodium particles to Rh(CO)2 at room temperature. The proportion of the rhodium adopting this site increases as the temperature is raised (up to 450 K). Above that temperature the dicarbonyl decomposes and the metal reclusters. Once this condition is met, catalysis ensues. Gas switching techniques show that at 573 K with NO in excess, the clusters can be oxidized rapidly to afford a linear nitrosyl complex; re-exposure to CO also promotes reclustering and the CO adopts terminal (atop) and bridging (2-fold) sites

  6. [P wave dispersion increased in childhood depending on blood pressure, weight, height, and cardiac structure and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-González, Elibet; González-Rodríguez, Emilio; Llanes-Camacho, María Del Carmen; Garí-Llanes, Merlin; García-Nóbrega, Yosvany; García-Sáez, Julieta

    2014-01-01

    Increased P wave dispersion are identified as a predictor of atrial fibrillation. There are associations between hypertension, P wave dispersion, constitutional and echocardiographic variables. These relationships have been scarcely studied in pediatrics. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between P wave dispersion, blood pressure, echocardiographic and constitutional variables, and determine the most influential variables on P wave dispersion increases in pediatrics. In the frame of the PROCDEC II project, children from 8 to 11 years old, without known heart conditions were studied. Arterial blood pressure was measured in all the children; a 12-lead surface electrocardiogram and an echocardiogram were done as well. Left ventricular mass index mean values for normotensive (25.91±5.96g/m(2.7)) and hypertensive (30.34±8.48g/m(2.7)) showed significant differences P=.000. When we add prehypertensive and hypertensive there are 50.38% with normal left ventricular mass index and P wave dispersion was increased versus 13.36% of normotensive. Multiple regression demonstrated that the mean blood pressure, duration of A wave of mitral inflow, weight and height have a value of r=0.88 as related to P wave dispersion. P wave dispersion is increased in pre- and hypertensive children compared to normotensive. There are pre- and hypertensive patients with normal left ventricular mass index and increased P wave dispersion. Mean arterial pressure, duration of the A wave of mitral inflow, weight and height are the variables with the highest influence on increased P wave dispersion. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of KLi molecule: Adiabatic and diabatic potential energy curves and dipole moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardouri, Riadh; Habli, Héla; Oujia, Brahim; Gadéa, Florent Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We present the resulting 12 1 Σ + diabatic potential energy curves where they are labeled D 1 for the ionic Li − K + and D 2 to D 12 for other. Highlights: ► Our ab initio study has been conducted for 48 electronic states of LiK molecule. ► We use pseudo-potential for the core and large basis sets for the Rydberg states. ► The calculations rely on ab initio pseudo-potential and full valence CI approaches. ► Diabatic potentials are analyzed, revealing the strong imprint of the ionic 1 Σ + state. - Abstract: For all states dissociating below the ionic limit Li − K + , we perform an adiabatic and diabatic study for 1 Σ + electronic states dissociating into K (4s, 4p, 4d, 5s, 5p, 5d, 6s) + Li (2s, 2p, 3s). Furthermore, we present the adiabatic results for the 1–11 3 Σ, 1–8 1,3 Π and 1–4 1,3 Δ states. The present calculations on the KLi molecule are complementary to previous theoretical work on this system, including recently observed electronic states that had not been calculated previously. The calculations rely on an ab initio pseudo-potential, Core Polarization Potential operators for the core–valence correlation and full valence CI approaches, combined to an efficient diabatization procedure. For the low-lying states, our spectroscopic constants and vibrational level spacing are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Diabatic potentials and permanent dipole moments are analyzed, revealing the strong imprint of the ionic state in the 1 Σ + adiabatic states.

  8. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of KLi molecule: Adiabatic and diabatic potential energy curves and dipole moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dardouri, Riadh, E-mail: dardouririad@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, Avenue de l' Environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Habli, Hela [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, Avenue de l' Environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Oujia, Brahim; Gadea, Florent Xavier [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantique, UMR 5626 du CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2012-05-03

    Graphical abstract: We present the resulting 12 {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} diabatic potential energy curves where they are labeled D{sub 1} for the ionic Li{sup -}K{sup +} and D{sub 2} to D{sub 12} for other. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our ab initio study has been conducted for 48 electronic states of LiK molecule. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use pseudo-potential for the core and large basis sets for the Rydberg states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculations rely on ab initio pseudo-potential and full valence CI approaches. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diabatic potentials are analyzed, revealing the strong imprint of the ionic {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} state. - Abstract: For all states dissociating below the ionic limit Li{sup -}K{sup +}, we perform an adiabatic and diabatic study for {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} electronic states dissociating into K (4s, 4p, 4d, 5s, 5p, 5d, 6s) + Li (2s, 2p, 3s). Furthermore, we present the adiabatic results for the 1-11 {sup 3}{Sigma}, 1-8 {sup 1,3}{Pi} and 1-4 {sup 1,3}{Delta} states. The present calculations on the KLi molecule are complementary to previous theoretical work on this system, including recently observed electronic states that had not been calculated previously. The calculations rely on an ab initio pseudo-potential, Core Polarization Potential operators for the core-valence correlation and full valence CI approaches, combined to an efficient diabatization procedure. For the low-lying states, our spectroscopic constants and vibrational level spacing are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Diabatic potentials and permanent dipole moments are analyzed, revealing the strong imprint of the ionic state in the {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} adiabatic states.

  9. Structural properties of small Lin (n = 5-8) atomic clusters via ab initio random structure searching: A look into the role of different implementations of long-range dispersion corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putungan, Darwin Barayang; Lin, Shi-Hsin

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we looked into the lowest energy structures of small lithium clusters (Lin, n = 5, 6, 7, 8) utilizing conventional PBE exchange-correlation functional, PBE with D2 dispersion correction and PBE with Tkatchenko and Scheffler (TS) dispersion correction, and searched using ab initio random structure searching. Results show that in general, dispersion-corrected PBE obtained similar lowest minima structures as those obtained via conventional PBE regardless of the type of implementation, although both D2 and TS found several high-energy isomers that conventional PBE did not arrive at, with TS in general giving more structures per energy range that could be attributed to its environment-dependent implementation. Moreover, D2 and TS dispersion corrections found a lowest energy geometry for Li8 cluster that is in agreement with the structure obtained via the typical benchmarking method diffusion Monte Carlo in a recent work. It is thus suggested that for much larger lithium clusters, utilization of dispersion correction could be of help in searching for lowest energy minima that is in close agreement with that of diffusion Monte Carlo results, but computationally inexpensive.

  10. Master curves for the sulphur assisted crosslinking reaction of natural rubber in the presence of nano- and nano-structured sp2 carbon allotropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Musto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, master curves are reported for the crosslinking of a diene rubber with a sulphur based system in the presence of either nano- or nano-structured carbon allotropes, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT, a nanosized graphite with high surface area (HSAG and carbon black (CB. Poly(1,4-cis-isoprene from Hevea Brasiliensis was the diene rubber and crosslinking was performed in temperatures ranging from 151 to 180 °C, with carbon allotropes below and above their percolation threshold. Such carbon allotropes were characterized by different aspect ratio, surface area and pH. However, in the crosslinking reaction, they revealed common behaviour. In fact, the specific interfacial area could be used to correlate crosslinking parameters, such as induction time (ts1 and activation energy (Ea calculated by applying the autocatalytic model. Monotonous decrease of ts1 and increase of Ea were observed, with points lying on master curves, regardless of the nature of the carbon allotropes. Remarkable differences were however observed in the structure of the crosslinking network: when the carbon allotrope was above the percolation threshold much larger crosslinking density was obtained in the presence of CNT whereas composites based on HSAG became soluble in hydrocarbon solvent, after the reaction with a thiol. Proposed explanation of these results is based on the reactivity of carbon allotropes with sulphur and sulphur based compounds, demonstrated through the reaction of 1-dodecanethiol and sulphur with CNT and HSAG and with a model substrate such as anthracene.

  11. Lithospheric Structure of the Arabian Shield from the Joint Inversion of Receiver Function and Surface-Wave Dispersion Observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julia, Jordi; Ammon, Charles J; Herrimann, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    .... Receiver functions are primarily sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrasts and vertical travel times and surface-wave dispersion measurements are sensitive to vertical shear-wave velocity averages...

  12. Lithospheric Structure of the Arabian Shield From the Joint Inversion of Receiver Function and Surface-Wave Dispersion Observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrmann, Robert B; Julia, Jordi; Ammon, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    .... Receiver functions are primarily sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrast and vertical travel times and surface-wave dispersion measurements are sensitive to vertical shear-wave velocity averages...

  13. Impact of molecular structure on the lubricant squeeze-out between curved surfaces with long range elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartaglino, Ugo; Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Persson, B N J

    2006-01-01

    layers develop in the lubricant film when the width is of the order of a few atomic diameters. The branched isobutane forms more disordered structures which permit it to stay liquidlike at smaller surface separations. During squeezing the solvation forces show oscillations corresponding to the width...... of a molecule. At low speeds (interfacial) squeezing velocity in most practical applications is very low when the lubricant layer has molecular thickness, one expects n-butane to be a better boundary lubricant than...

  14. Demonstration of NonLinear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction and Applicability to New System Fragility Seismic Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology

    2014-09-01

    Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility). SPRAs are performed by convolving the seismic hazard (the frequency of certain magnitude events) with the seismic fragility (the conditional probability of failure of a structure, system, or component given the occurrence of earthquake ground motion). In this calculation, there are three main pieces to seismic risk quantification, 1) seismic hazard and nuclear power plants (NPPs) response to the hazard, fragility or capacity of structures, systems and components (SSC), and systems analysis. Figure 1 provides a high level overview of the risk quantification process. The focus of this research is on understanding and removing conservatism (when possible) in the quantification of seismic risk at NPPs.

  15. Improving structural stability of water-dispersed MCM-41 silica nanoparticles through post-synthesis pH aging process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varache, Mathieu; Bezverkhyy, Igor [UMR 6303 CNRS-Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (France); Bouyer, Florence [Inserm U866, Equipe Chimiothérapie, métabolisme des lipides et réponse immunitaire anti-tumorale (France); Chassagnon, Rémi; Baras, Florence; Bouyer, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.bouyer@u-bourgogne.fr [UMR 6303 CNRS-Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (France)

    2015-09-15

    The colloidal and structural stabilities of MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are of great importance in order to prepare optimal nanovectors. In this paper, MSNs (approximatively 160 nm in diameter) were synthesized using n-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a template and tetraethyl orthosilicate as a silica source under high N{sub 2} flow (MSN/N{sub 2}) to obtain stable dispersions in water. The degradation of the porous nanoparticles was investigated by immersion in water. The morphology and the porous structure were studied by TEM, XRD, N{sub 2} sorption, and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and were compared to that of MSNs prepared in ambient air (MSN/air). The volumetric properties of the MSN/N{sub 2} after 1 day in water were drastically more decreased than MSN/air (a pore volume decrease of 85 % for MSN/N{sub 2} and 59 % for MSN/air) and the 2D-hexagonal porous structure was totally lost. Furthermore, synthesizing MSNs under a high N{sub 2} flow leads to a decrease in the synthesis yield (45 % MSN/N{sub 2} and 75 % for MSN/air). The lower structural stability of the MSN/N{sub 2} is explained by the lower polycondensation degree of the MSN/N{sub 2} observed by {sup 29}Si MAS NMR (Q{sup 4}/Q{sup 3} = 0.86 for MSN/N{sub 2} and 1.61 for MSN/air) and the lower silica molar ratio in the nanomaterials (SiO{sub 2}/CTA = 3.9 for MSN/N{sub 2} 7.1 for MSN/air). This allows for enhanced solubilization of silica in water. Four strategies were hence evaluated in order to reinforce the porous structure of the MSNs. Among them, the most efficient route was based on a pH adjustment of the colloidal suspension (pH 7.5) after 2 h of synthesis without any purification and while keeping a N{sub 2} static atmosphere (called MSN/N{sub 2}/7.5). After 1 day in water, the volumetric and structural properties of MSN/N{sub 2}/7.5 were similar to that obtained for MSN/air. The improvement of the stability arose as a result of the increase in the silica condensation (Q{sup 4

  16. Hydrodynamic disperser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulatov, A.I.; Chernov, V.S.; Prokopov, L.I.; Proselkov, Yu.M.; Tikhonov, Yu.P.

    1980-01-15

    A hydrodynamic disperser is suggested which contains a housing, slit nozzles installed on a circular base arranged opposite from each other, resonators secured opposite the nozzle and outlet sleeve. In order to improve the effectiveness of dispersion by throttling the flow, each resonator is made in the form of a crimped plate with crimpings that decrease in height in a direction towards the nozzle.

  17. Optimized nonlinear inversion of surface-wave dispersion data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raykova, Reneta B.

    2014-01-01

    A new code for inversion of surface wave dispersion data is developed to obtain Earth’s crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. The author developed Optimized Non–Linear Inversion ( ONLI ) software, based on Monte-Carlo search. The values of S–wave velocity VS and thickness h for a number of horizontal homogeneous layers are parameterized. Velocity of P–wave VP and density ρ of relevant layers are calculated by empirical or theoretical relations. ONLI explores parameters space in two modes, selective and full search, and the main innovation of software is evaluation of tested models. Theoretical dispersion curves are calculated if tested model satisfied specific conditions only, reducing considerably the computation time. A number of tests explored impact of parameterization and proved the ability of ONLI approach to deal successfully with non–uniqueness of inversion problem. Key words: Earth’s structure, surface–wave dispersion, non–linear inversion, software

  18. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Texas-Gulf of Mexico margin from joint inversion of Ps and Sp receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, M.; Pulliam, J.; Sen, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic structure beneath Texas Gulf Coast Plain (GCP) is determined via velocity analysis of stacked common conversion point (CCP) Ps and Sp receiver functions and surface wave dispersion. The GCP is a portion of a ocean-continental transition zone, or 'passive margin', where seismic imaging of lithospheric Earth structure via passive seismic techniques has been rare. Seismic data from a temporary array of 22 broadband stations, spaced 16-20 km apart, on a ~380-km-long profile from Matagorda Island, a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico, to Johnson City, Texas were employed to construct a coherent image of the crust and uppermost mantle. CCP stacking was applied to data from teleseismic earthquakes to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios of converted phases, such as Ps phases. An inaccurate velocity model, used for time-to-depth conversion in CCP stacking, may produce higher errors, especially in a region of substantial lateral velocity variations. An accurate velocity model is therefore essential to constructing high quality depth-domain images. To find accurate velocity P- and S-wave models, we applied a joint modeling approach that searches for best-fitting models via simulated annealing. This joint inversion approach, which we call 'multi objective optimization in seismology' (MOOS), simultaneously models Ps receiver functions, Sp receiver functions and group velocity surface wave dispersion curves after assigning relative weights for each objective function. Weights are computed from the standard deviations of the data. Statistical tools such as the posterior parameter correlation matrix and posterior probability density (PPD) function are used to evaluate the constraints that each data type places on model parameters. They allow us to identify portions of the model that are well or poorly constrained.

  19. In situ generation of highly dispersed metal nanoparticles on two-dimensional layered SiO2 by topotactic structure conversion and their superior catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Jia, Da-Shuang; Zhou, Yue; Hao, Jiang; Liang, Yu; Cui, Zhi-Min; Song, Wei-Guo

    2018-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles such as Ag, Cu and Fe are effective catalysts for many reactions, whereas a facile method to prepare metal nanoparticles with high uniformed dispersion is still desirable. Herein, the topotactic structure conversion of layered silicate, RUB-15, was utilized to support metal nanoparticles. Through simple ion-exchange and following calcination step, metal nanoparticles were generated in situ inside the interlayer space of layered silica, and the topotactic structure conversion process assured nano-sized and highly uniformed dispersion of metal nanoparticles. The obtained Ag/SiO2 composite showed superior catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and methylene blue (MB), with a rate constant as high as 0.0607 s-1 and 0.0778 s-1. The simple and universal synthesis method as well as high activity of the product composite endow the strategy good application prospect.

  20. Phylogeographic Structure in Penguin Ticks across an Ocean Basin Indicates Allopatric Divergence and Rare Trans-Oceanic Dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Katherine L; Banks, Sam C; Fraser, Ceridwen I

    2015-01-01

    The association of ticks (Acarina) and seabirds provides an intriguing system for assessing the influence of long-distance dispersal on the evolution of parasitic species. Recent research has focused on host-parasite evolutionary relationships and dispersal capacity of ticks parasitising flighted seabirds. Evolutionary research on the ticks of non-flighted seabirds is, in contrast, scarce. We conducted the first phylogeographic investigation of a hard tick species (Ixodes eudyptidis) that parasitises the Little Blue Penguin (Eudyptula minor). Using one nuclear (28S) and two mitochondrial (COI and 16S) markers, we assessed genetic diversity among several populations in Australia and a single population on the South Island of New Zealand. Our results reveal two deeply divergent lineages, possibly representing different species: one comprising all New Zealand samples and some from Australia, and the other representing all other samples from Australian sites. No significant population differentiation was observed among any Australian sites from within each major clade, even those separated by hundreds of kilometres of coastline. In contrast, the New Zealand population was significantly different to all samples from Australia. Our phylogenetic results suggest that the New Zealand and Australian populations are effectively isolated from each other; although rare long-distance dispersal events must occur, these are insufficient to maintain trans-Tasman gene flow. Despite the evidence for limited dispersal of penguin ticks between Australia and New Zealand, we found no evidence to suggest that ticks are unable to disperse shorter distances at sea with their hosts, with no pattern of population differentiation found among Australian sites. Our results suggest that terrestrial seabird parasites may be quite capable of short-distance movements, but only sporadic longer-distance (trans-oceanic) dispersal.

  1. Q-mode curve resolution of UV-vis spectra for structural transformation studies of anthocyanins in acidic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, Paulo Henrique; Scarminio, Ieda Spacino

    2007-01-01

    Chemometric analysis of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra for pH values 1.0, 3.3, 5.3, and 6.9 was used to investigate the kinetics and the structural transformations of anthocyanins in extracts of calyces of hibiscus flowers of the Hibiscus acetosella Welw. ex Finicius for the first time. Six different species were detected: the quinoidal base (A), the flavylium cation (AH + ), the pseudobase or carbinol pseudobase (B), cis-chalcone (C C ), trans-chalcone (C t ), and ionized cis-chalcone (C C - ). Four equilibrium constant values were calculated using relative concentrations, hydration, pK h =2.60+/-0.01, tautomeric, K T =0.14+/-0.01, acid-base, pK a =4.24+/-0.04, and ionization of the cis-chalcone, pK C C =8.74+/-1.5x10 -2 . The calculated protonation rate of the tautomers is K H + =0.08+/-7.6x10 -3 . These constants are in excellent agreement with those measured previously in salt form. From a kinetic viewpoint, the situation encountered is interesting since the reported investigation is limited to visible light absorption in acid medium. These models have not been reported in the literature

  2. Q-mode curve resolution of UV-vis spectra for structural transformation studies of anthocyanins in acidic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco, Paulo Henrique [Laboratorio de Quimiometria em Ciencias Naturais, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Caixa Postal 6001, CEP 86051-970 Londrina, Parana (Brazil); Scarminio, Ieda Spacino [Laboratorio de Quimiometria em Ciencias Naturais, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Caixa Postal 6001, CEP 86051-970 Londrina, Parana (Brazil)]. E-mail: ieda@qui.uel.br

    2007-01-30

    Chemometric analysis of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra for pH values 1.0, 3.3, 5.3, and 6.9 was used to investigate the kinetics and the structural transformations of anthocyanins in extracts of calyces of hibiscus flowers of the Hibiscus acetosella Welw. ex Finicius for the first time. Six different species were detected: the quinoidal base (A), the flavylium cation (AH{sup +}), the pseudobase or carbinol pseudobase (B), cis-chalcone (C{sub C}), trans-chalcone (C{sub t}), and ionized cis-chalcone (C{sub C}{sup -}). Four equilibrium constant values were calculated using relative concentrations, hydration, pK{sub h}=2.60+/-0.01, tautomeric, K{sub T}=0.14+/-0.01, acid-base, pK{sub a}=4.24+/-0.04, and ionization of the cis-chalcone, pK{sub C{sub C}}=8.74+/-1.5x10{sup -2}. The calculated protonation rate of the tautomers is K{sub H{sup +}}=0.08+/-7.6x10{sup -3}. These constants are in excellent agreement with those measured previously in salt form. From a kinetic viewpoint, the situation encountered is interesting since the reported investigation is limited to visible light absorption in acid medium. These models have not been reported in the literature.

  3. Study of neutron shell structure of even-even 40-56Ca isotopes by the dispersive optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalova, O.V.; Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Ermakova, T.A.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Romanovskij, E.A.; Spasskaya, T.I.; Timokhina, T.P.

    2005-01-01

    The single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of the bound neutron states in 40,42,44,46,48 Ca isotopes were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data. The results were analyzed by the dispersive optical model and a good agreement was achieved. The dispersive optical potential was extrapolated to unstable 50,52,54,56 Ca nuclei. The calculated single-particle energies of the bound neutron states in unstable Ca isotopes were compared with the nuclear shell-model calculations, which predicted new magic number N = 34 for nuclei with Z = 20 [ru

  4. Population size, center-periphery, and seed dispersers' effects on the genetic diversity and population structure of the Mediterranean relict shrub Cneorum tricoccon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Nogal, Ana; Matesanz, Silvia; García-Fernández, Alfredo; Traveset, Anna; Valladares, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    The effect of population size on population genetic diversity and structure has rarely been studied jointly with other factors such as the position of a population within the species' distribution range or the presence of mutualistic partners influencing dispersal. Understanding these determining factors for genetic variation is critical for conservation of relict plants that are generally suffering from genetic deterioration. Working with 16 populations of the vulnerable relict shrub Cneorum tricoccon throughout the majority of its western Mediterranean distribution range, and using nine polymorphic microsatellite markers, we examined the effects of periphery (peripheral vs. central), population size (large vs. small), and seed disperser (introduced carnivores vs. endemic lizards) on the genetic diversity and population structure of the species. Contrasting genetic variation ( H E : 0.04-0.476) was found across populations. Peripheral populations showed lower genetic diversity, but this was dependent on population size. Large peripheral populations showed high levels of genetic diversity, whereas small central populations were less diverse. Significant isolation by distance was detected, indicating that the effect of long-distance gene flow is limited relative to that of genetic drift, probably due to high selfing rates ( F IS  = 0.155-0.887), restricted pollen flow, and ineffective seed dispersal. Bayesian clustering also supported the strong population differentiation and highly fragmented structure. Contrary to expectations, the type of disperser showed no significant effect on either population genetic diversity or structure. Our results challenge the idea of an effect of periphery per se that can be mainly explained by population size, drawing attention to the need of integrative approaches considering different determinants of genetic variation. Furthermore, the very low genetic diversity observed in several small populations and the strong among

  5. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  6. Spatio-temporal Genetic Structure of a Tropical Bee Species Suggests High Dispersal Over a Fragmented Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suni, Sevan S; Bronstein, Judith L; Brosi, Berry J

    2014-03-01

    Habitat destruction threatens biodiversity by reducing the amount of available resources and connectivity among geographic areas. For organisms living in fragmented habitats, population persistence may depend on dispersal, which maintains gene flow among fragments and can prevent inbreeding within them. It is centrally important to understand patterns of dispersal for bees living in fragmented areas given the importance of pollination systems and recently documented declines in bee populations. We used population and landscape genetic techniques to characterize patterns of dispersal over a large fragmented area in southern Costa Rica for the orchid bee species Euglossa championi . First, we estimated levels of genetic differentiation among forest fragments as φ pt , an analog to the traditional summary statistic F st , as well as two statistics that may more adequately represent levels of differentiation, G ' st and D est . Second, we used a Bayesian approach to determine the number and composition of genetic groups in our sample. Third we investigated how genetic differentiation changes with distance. Fourth, we determined the extent to which deforested areas restrict dispersal. Finally, we estimated the extent to which there were temporal differences in allele frequencies within the same forest fragments. Within years we found low levels of differentiation even over 80 km, and no effect of land use type on level of genetic differentiation. However, we found significant genetic differentiation between years. Taken together our results suggest that there are high levels of gene flow over this geographic area, and that individuals show low site fidelity over time.

  7. RNA-TVcurve: a Web server for RNA secondary structure comparison based on a multi-scale similarity of its triple vector curve representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Shi, Xiaohu; Liang, Yanchun; Xie, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Ma, Qin

    2017-01-21

    RNAs have been found to carry diverse functionalities in nature. Inferring the similarity between two given RNAs is a fundamental step to understand and interpret their functional relationship. The majority of functional RNAs show conserved secondary structures, rather than sequence conservation. Those algorithms relying on sequence-based features usually have limitations in their prediction performance. Hence, integrating RNA structure features is very critical for RNA analysis. Existing algorithms mainly fall into two categories: alignment-based and alignment-free. The alignment-free algorithms of RNA comparison usually have lower time complexity than alignment-based algorithms. An alignment-free RNA comparison algorithm was proposed, in which novel numerical representations RNA-TVcurve (triple vector curve representation) of RNA sequence and corresponding secondary structure features are provided. Then a multi-scale similarity score of two given RNAs was designed based on wavelet decomposition of their numerical representation. In support of RNA mutation and phylogenetic analysis, a web server (RNA-TVcurve) was designed based on this alignment-free RNA comparison algorithm. It provides three functional modules: 1) visualization of numerical representation of RNA secondary structure; 2) detection of single-point mutation based on secondary structure; and 3) comparison of pairwise and multiple RNA secondary structures. The inputs of the web server require RNA primary sequences, while corresponding secondary structures are optional. For the primary sequences alone, the web server can compute the secondary structures using free energy minimization algorithm in terms of RNAfold tool from Vienna RNA package. RNA-TVcurve is the first integrated web server, based on an alignment-free method, to deliver a suite of RNA analysis functions, including visualization, mutation analysis and multiple RNAs structure comparison. The comparison results with two popular RNA

  8. Platinum-TM (TM = Fe, Co) alloy nanoparticles dispersed nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube) hybrid structure cathode electrocatalysts for high performance PEMFC applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayan, B P; Ramaprabhu, S

    2013-06-07

    The efforts to push proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for commercial applications are being undertaken globally. In PEMFC, the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) at the cathode can be improved by the alloying of platinum with 3d-transition metals (TM = Fe, Co, etc.) and with nitrogen doping, and in the present work we have combined both of these aspects. We describe a facile method for the synthesis of a nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)) hybrid structure (N-(G-MWNTs)) by the uniform coating of a nitrogen containing polymer over the surface of the hybrid structure (positively surface charged rGO-negatively surface charged MWNTs) followed by the pyrolysis of these (rGO-MWNTs) hybrid structure-polymer composites. The N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure is used as a catalyst support for the dispersion of platinum (Pt), platinum-iron (Pt3Fe) and platinum-cobalt (Pt3Co) alloy nanoparticles. The PEMFC performances of Pt-TM alloy nanoparticle dispersed N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure electrocatalysts are 5.0 times higher than that of commercial Pt-C electrocatalysts along with very good stability under acidic environment conditions. This work demonstrates a considerable improvement in performance compared to existing cathode electrocatalysts being used in PEMFC and can be extended to the synthesis of metal, metal oxides or metal alloy nanoparticle decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanostructures for various electrochemical energy applications.

  9. Dispersion of nano-silica in monomer casting nylon6 and its effect on the structure and properties of composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available To promote dispersion of nano-silica in monomer casting nylon6 (MC nylon6, nano-silica was dispersed in melted caprolactam with the assistance of ultrasound, anionic polymerization was then initiated to form silica/MC nylon6 in-situ nanocomposites. It was found that hydrogen bonds were formed between nano-silica and caprolactam, in the meantime, ultrasound helped to break the nanoparticles aggregations into smaller ones or even mono-dispersing particles. Therefore, the agglomerated nanoparticles were pulled apart and stabilized by caprolactam. Additionally, the rapid anionic polymerization of caprolactam also contributed to the avoidance of re-agglomeration and deposition of nanoparticles during the polymerization process, leading to the uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. Mechanical tests indicated that the silica/MC nylon6 in-situ nanocomposites prepared according to the above strategy were simultaneously toughened, strengthened and stiffened. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results showed that thermal stability of nanocomposites was notably improved compared to neat MC nylon6.

  10. A note on families of fragility curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, S.; Bier, V.M.; Bley, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    In the quantitative assessment of seismic risk, uncertainty in the fragility of a structural component is usually expressed by putting forth a family of fragility curves, with probability serving as the parameter of the family. Commonly, a lognormal shape is used both for the individual curves and for the expression of uncertainty over the family. A so-called composite single curve can also be drawn and used for purposes of approximation. This composite curve is often regarded as equivalent to the mean curve of the family. The equality seems intuitively reasonable, but according to the authors has never been proven. The paper presented proves this equivalence hypothesis mathematically. Moreover, the authors show that this equivalence hypothesis between fragility curves is itself equivalent to an identity property of the standard normal probability curve. Thus, in the course of proving the fragility curve hypothesis, the authors have also proved a rather obscure, but interesting and perhaps previously unrecognized, property of the standard normal curve

  11. Hierarchical structures and phase nucleation and growth during pressure-induced crystallization of polypropylene containing dispersion of nanoclay: The impact on physical and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, R.D.K.; Yuan, Q.; Chen, J.; Yang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the evolution of structure and phases during pressure-induced crystallization of polymers containing dispersion of nanoparticles, in the pressure range of 0.1-200 MPa. The model material for nanoparticles is nanoclay and the model polymer is polypropylene, which can potentially form several crystalline phases. While the phase selection in polypropylene is dictated by pressure and temperature, however, the introduction of nanoparticles alters the nucleation and growth of phases via nanoparticle interface driven evolution. To delineate and separate the effects of applied crystallization pressure from nanoparticle effects, a relative comparison is made between neat polypropylene and polypropylene containing dispersion of nanoclay under similar experimental conditions. The significant finding is that nanoclay interacts with the host polypropylene in a manner such that it alters the structural morphology of α- and γ-crystals of polypropylene. Furthermore, nanoclay promotes the formation of γ-phase at ambient pressure suggesting its role as structure and morphology director in the stabilization of the less accessible γ-phase, and with the possibility of epitaxial growth that enhances toughness. The equilibrium melting point measurements point to thermodynamic interaction between nanoclay and polypropylene, which is supported by the change in glass transition temperature. Thus, the two components, nanoclay and pressure, together provide a unique opportunity to tune hierarchical structures and phase evolution, which has significant implication on physico-chemical and mechanical properties.

  12. ECM using Edwards curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Daniel J.; Birkner, Peter; Lange, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    -arithmetic level are as follows: (1) use Edwards curves instead of Montgomery curves; (2) use extended Edwards coordinates; (3) use signed-sliding-window addition-subtraction chains; (4) batch primes to increase the window size; (5) choose curves with small parameters and base points; (6) choose curves with large...

  13. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil

  14. Multiple-geographic-scale genetic structure of two mangrove tree species: the roles of mating system, hybridization, limited dispersal and extrinsic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo M Mori

    Full Text Available Mangrove plants comprise a unique group of organisms that grow within the intertidal zones of tropical and subtropical regions and whose distributions are influenced by both biotic and abiotic factors. To understand how these extrinsic and intrinsic processes influence a more fundamental level of the biological hierarchy of mangroves, we studied the genetic diversity of two Neotropical mangrove trees, Avicenniagerminans and A. schaueriana, using microsatellites markers. As reported for other sea-dispersed species, there was a strong differentiation between A. germinans and A. schaueriana populations sampled north and south of the northeastern extremity of South America, likely due to the influence of marine superficial currents. Moreover, we observed fine-scale genetic structures even when no obvious physical barriers were present, indicating pollen and propagule dispersal limitation, which could be explained by isolation-by-distance coupled with mating system differences. We report the first evidence of ongoing hybridization between Avicennia species and that these hybrids are fertile, although this interspecific crossing has not contributed to an increase in the genetic diversity the populations where A. germinans and A. schaueriana hybridize. These findings highlight the complex interplay between intrinsic and extrinsic factors that shape the distribution of the genetic diversity in these sea-dispersed colonizer species.

  15. Design of sustained-release nitrendipine microspheres having solid dispersion structure by quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Fude; Yang, Mingshi; Jiang, Yanyan

    2003-01-01

    crystallization technique, i.e. quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion method. The factors of effect on micromeritic properties and release profiles of the resultant microspheres were investigated. And the bioavailability of nitrendipine microspheres was evaluated in six healthy dogs. The results showed...... that the particle size of microspheres was determined mainly by the agitation speed. The dissolution rate of nitrendipine from microspheres was enhanced significantly with increasing the amount of dispersing agents, and sustained by adding retarding agents. The release rate of microspheres could be controlled...

  16. Climate oscillations, glacial refugia, and dispersal ability: factors influencing the genetic structure of the least salmonfly, Pteronarcella badia (Plecoptera), in Western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproul, John S; Houston, Derek D; Nelson, C Riley; Evans, R Paul; Crandall, Keith A; Shiozawa, Dennis K

    2015-12-12

    Phylogeographic studies of aquatic insects provide valuable insights into mechanisms that shape the genetic structure of communities, yet studies that include broad geographic areas are uncommon for this group. We conducted a broad scale phylogeographic analysis of the least salmonfly Pteronarcella badia (Plecoptera) across western North America. We tested hypotheses related to mode of dispersal and the influence of historic climate oscillations on population genetic structure. In order to generate a larger mitochondrial data set, we used 454 sequencing to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome in the early stages of the project. Our analysis revealed high levels of population structure with several deeply divergent clades present across the sample area. Evidence from five mitochondrial genes and one nuclear locus identified a potentially cryptic lineage in the Pacific Northwest. Gene flow estimates and geographic clade distributions suggest that overland flight during the winged adult stage is an important dispersal mechanism for this taxon. We found evidence of multiple glacial refugia across the species distribution and signs of secondary contact within and among major clades. This study provides a basis for future studies of aquatic insect phylogeography at the inter-basin scale in western North America. Our findings add to an understanding of the role of historical climate isolations in shaping assemblages of aquatic insects in this region. We identified several geographic areas that may have historical importance for other aquatic organisms with similar distributions and dispersal strategies as P. badia. This work adds to the ever-growing list of studies that highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing in a phylogenetic context to improve molecular data sets from understudied groups.

  17. Influence of applied compressive stress on the hysteresis curves and magnetic domain structure of grain-oriented transverse Fe-3%Si steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevertov, O; Schäfer, R

    2012-01-01

    The influence of an applied compressive stress on the hysteresis curve and domain structure in conventional (1 1 0) [0 0 1] Fe-3%Si steel cut transverse to the rolling direction is studied. Quasistatic hysteresis loops under compressive stress up to 75 MPa were measured. The magnetic domains and magnetization processes were observed by longitudinal Kerr microscopy at different levels of stress. It is shown that the bulk hysteresis loop can be described with a good accuracy by the action of an effective field, which is the product of the stress and a function of magnetization. Domain observations have shown that the reasons for the effective field are demagnetizing fields due to the disappearance of supplementary domains along [0 1 0] and [1 0 0] at low fields and different domain systems in different grains at moderate fields. The latter are caused by differences in grain sensitivity to stress depending on the degree of misorientation. A decrease in the effective field above 1 T is connected with a transformation of all grains into the same domain system—the column pattern. (paper)

  18. Community structure, dispersal ability and functional profiling of microbiome existing in fat body and ovary of the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Yu, Na; Xu, Xi-Xia; Liu, Ze-Wen

    2018-02-09

    The endosymbionts play vital roles in growth, development and reproduction in insects. Yeast-like endosymbionts (YLSs) have been well studied in Nilaparvata lugens (N. lugens), but little is known about the tissue-specific bacterial microbiomes, especially on the microbial intersection among internal tissues. Here, the correlation of microbial composition, structure, dispersal ability and functional profiling were illuminated in two tissues, the fat body and ovary in N. lugens. A total of 11 phyla and 105 genera were captured from all samples; Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were the most predominant and accounted for more than 99% in all samples. However, the relative abundance of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria was significantly different in ovary and fat body through Fisher's Least Significant Difference test. Microbial diversity but not the richness index in the two tissues exhibited significant difference. Furthermore, the microbial community structure of the ovary and fat body were primarily determined by tissue quality. Firmicutes showed strong dispersal ability between ovary and fat body based on the quantitative null model assessing, indicating the frequent interaction of these microbiomes in the two tissues. In addition, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways of microbial participation were delineated. The ten most abundant pathways counted for over 46% of the annotation and were shared between the two tissues, mainly containing Energy Metabolism and Amino Acid Metabolism/Biosynthesis. The results will provide insights into the correlation of microbial community structure between ovary and fat body of N. lugens. © 2018 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. Validation of missed space-group symmetry in X-ray powder diffraction structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempler, Daniela; Schmidt, Martin U; van de Streek, Jacco

    2017-08-01

    More than 600 molecular crystal structures with correct, incorrect and uncertain space-group symmetry were energy-minimized with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D, PBE-D3). For the purpose of determining the correct space-group symmetry the required tolerance on the atomic coordinates of all non-H atoms is established to be 0.2 Å. For 98.5% of 200 molecular crystal structures published with missed symmetry, the correct space group is identified; there are no false positives. Very small, very symmetrical molecules can end up in artificially high space groups upon energy minimization, although this is easily detected through visual inspection. If the space group of a crystal structure determined from powder diffraction data is ambiguous, energy minimization with DFT-D provides a fast and reliable method to select the correct space group.

  20. Development of a High-Order Navier-Stokes Solver Using Flux Reconstruction to Simulate Three-Dimensional Vortex Structures in a Curved Artery Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher

    shear stress is both oscillatory and multidirectional. Also, the combined effect of curvature and pulsatility in cardiovascular flows produces unsteady vortices. The aim of this research as it relates to cardiovascular fluid dynamics is to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of vortical structures generated by secondary flows, as well as to assess the correlation between multiple vortex pairs and wall shear stress. We use a physiologically (pulsatile) relevant flow rate and generate results using both fully developed and uniform entrance conditions, the latter being motivated by the fact that flow upstream of a curved artery may not have sufficient straight entrance length to become fully developed. Under the two pulsatile inflow conditions, we characterize the morphology and evolution of various vortex pairs and their subsequent effect on relevant haemodynamic wall shear stress metrics.

  1. A new model of dispersion for metals leading to a more accurate modeling of plasmonic structures using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vial, A.; Dridi, M.; Cunff, L. le [Universite de Technologie de Troyes, Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS UMR 6279, Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, 12, rue Marie Curie, BP-2060, Troyes Cedex (France); Laroche, T. [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut FEMTO-ST, CNRS UMR 6174, Departement de Physique et de Metrologie des Oscillateurs, Besancon Cedex (France)

    2011-06-15

    We present FDTD simulations results obtained using the Drude critical points model. This model enables spectroscopic studies of metallic structures over wider wavelength ranges than usually used, and it facilitates the study of structures made of several metals. (orig.)

  2. Genetic structure and seed-mediated dispersal rates of an endangered shrub in a fragmented landscape: a case study for Juniperus communis in northwestern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaenssens Sandy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population extinction risk in a fragmented landscape is related to the differential ability of the species to spread its genes across the landscape. The impact of landscape fragmentation on plant population dynamics will therefore vary across different spatial scales. We quantified successful seed-mediated dispersal of the dioecious shrub Juniperus communis in a fragmented landscape across northwestern Europe by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP markers. Furthermore we investigated the genetic diversity and structure on two spatial scales: across northwestern Europe and across Flanders (northern Belgium. We also studied whether seed viability and populations size were correlated with genetic diversity. Results Unexpectedly, estimated seed-mediated dispersal rates were quite high and ranged between 3% and 14%. No population differentiation and no spatial genetic structure were detected on the local, Flemish scale. A significant low to moderate genetic differentiation between populations was detected at the regional, northwest European scale (PhiPT = 0.10. In general, geographically nearby populations were also genetically related. High levels of within-population genetic diversity were detected but no correlation was found between any genetic diversity parameter and population size or seed viability. Conclusions In northwestern Europe, landscape fragmentation has lead to a weak isolation-by-distance pattern but not to genetic impoverishment of common juniper. Substantial rates of successful migration by seed-mediated gene flow indicate a high dispersal ability which could enable Juniperus communis to naturally colonize suitable habitats. However, it is not clear whether the observed levels of migration will suffice to counterbalance the effects of genetic drift in small populations on the long run.

  3. Effect of Nanocomposite Structures on Fracture Behavior of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Different Dispersion Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of organic modifier and processing method on morphology and mechanical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites were investigated. In this study, the preparation of nanocomposites by exfoliation-adsorption method involved an ultrasonic mixing procedure, and mechanical blending was used for in situ intercalative polymerization. The microstructure study revealed that the organoclay, which was ultrasonically mixed with the epoxy, partially exfoliated and intercalated. In contrast, organoclay remained in phase-separated and flocculated state after the mechanical blending process. Tensile stiffness increased significantly for the nanocomposite prepared by ultrasonic dispersion method through realizing the reinforcing potential of exfoliated silicate layers. Nanocomposites with exfoliated and intercalated nanoclay morphology were ineffective in enhancing the fracture toughness whereas nanocomposites with phase-separated and flocculated morphology have improved crack resistance predominantly by crack deflecting and pinning mechanisms.

  4. Isotope, scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive spectrometer studies of heterogeneous zircons from radioactive granites in the Grenville structural province, Quebec and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimsaite, J.

    1981-01-01

    Heterogeneous zircons yielded discordant Pb-U, Pb-Th, and 207 Pb- 206 Pb isotopic ages. Most data points fall below the concordia curve, implying losses of daughter elements, bqt they define a discordia line that intersects the concordia at approximately 90 Ma and 1020 Ma. To obtain evidence for mobilization of U and radiogenic Pb, zircon grains were studied using a scanning electron microscope coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer. High magnification backscattered and secondary electron images of the zircon revealed narrow fractures, zoning and diverse mineral inclusions. Three groups of mineral inclusions observed were: 1) those predating zoned zircon and apparently serving as a nucleus; 2) uraninite, feldspar, and apatite associated with the growth and zoning of the host zircon; and 3) fracture-fillings that postdate crystallization of the host zircon. The U- and Pb-rich inclusions incorporated into the zircon grains during and after its crystallization markedly affect isotopic ages of the host zircon. Migration of Pb and U have occurred along fractures in zircon. Zircon, uraninite, and other associated minerals have decomposed and complex reactions have taken place between the liberated Zr, U, Th and other elements to produce overgrowths on mineral grains and unidentified Zr-bearing material in fractures

  5. Contractibility of curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Charatonik

    1991-11-01

    Full Text Available Results concerning contractibility of curves (equivalently: of dendroids are collected and discussed in the paper. Interrelations tetween various conditions which are either sufficient or necessary for a curve to be contractible are studied.

  6. Progress in urban dispersion studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The present Study addresses recent achievements in better representation Of the urban area structure in meteorology and dispersion parameterisations. The setup and Main Outcome of several recent dispersion experiments in Urban areas and their use in model validation are discussed. The maximum con...

  7. Dispersion relations of the acoustic modes in divalent liquid metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Collective dynamics in liquid Ca and liquid Cd was studied by inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS. Using our experimental technique to prepare proper sample cells and high performance of an IXS beamline (BL35XU at SPring-8 in Japan, the dynamic structure factor with reasonable statistics was obtained for these divalent liquid metals. For both liquids, the dynamic structure factor at low Q exhibits a central peak with a shoulder or small hump clearly visible on each side, and the inelastic excitation energy determined using the model function composed of Lorentzian and the damped harmonic oscillator function disperses with increasing Q. The dispersion curves of these liquids were compared with that of the longitudinal acoustic phonon in each crystalline phase. From these results, clear difference in the interatomic interaction be- tween liquid Ca and liquid Cd was inferred.

  8. Dopant activation mechanism of Bi wire-δ-doping into Si crystal, investigated with wavelength dispersive fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Koichi; Kirkham, Christopher; Shimomura, Masaru; Nitta, Kiyofumi; Uruga, Tomoya; Terada, Yasuko; Nittoh, Koh-Ichi; Bowler, David R; Miki, Kazushi

    2017-04-20

    We successfully characterized the local structures of Bi atoms in a wire-δ-doped layer (1/8 ML) in a Si crystal, using wavelength dispersive fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure at the beamline BL37XU, in SPring-8, with the help of density functional theory calculations. It was found that the burial of Bi nanolines on the Si(0 0 1) surface, via growth of Si capping layer at 400 °C by molecular beam epitaxy, reduced the Bi-Si bond length from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] Å. We infer that following epitaxial growth the Bi-Bi dimers of the nanoline are broken, and the Bi atoms are located at substitutional sites within the Si crystal, leading to the shorter Bi-Si bond lengths.

  9. Power forward curves: a managerial perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagarajan, Shankar

    1999-01-01

    This chapter concentrates on managerial application of power forward curves, and examines the determinants of electricity prices such as transmission constraints, its inability to be stored in a conventional way, its seasonality and weather dependence, the generation stack, and the swing risk. The electricity forward curve, classical arbitrage, constructing a forward curve, volatilities, and electricity forward curve models such as the jump-diffusion model, the mean-reverting heteroscedastic volatility model, and an econometric model of forward prices are examined. A managerial perspective of the applications of the forward curve is presented covering plant valuation, capital budgeting, performance measurement, product pricing and structuring, asset optimisation, valuation of transmission options, and risk management

  10. Redox biotransformation and delivery of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics: How interpretable structure-activity relationships of lethality using electrophilicity and the London formula for dispersion interaction work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Siu-Kwong

    2017-03-30

    Quantum chemical methods and molecular mechanics approaches face a lot of challenges in drug metabolism study because of their either insufficient accuracy or huge computational cost, or lack of clear molecular level pictures for building computational models. Low-cost QSAR methods can often be carried out even though molecular level pictures are not well defined; however, they show difficulty in identifying the mechanisms of drug metabolism and delineating the effects of chemical structures on drug toxicity because a certain amount of molecular descriptors are difficult to be interpreted. In order to make a breakthrough, it was proposed that mechanistically interpretable molecular descriptors were used to correlate with biological activity to establish structure-activity plots. The mechanistically interpretable molecular descriptors used in this study include electrophilicity and the mathematical function in the London formula for dispersion interaction, and they were calculated using quantum chemical methods. The biological activity is the lethality of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics denoted as log LD50, which were obtained by intraperitoneal injection into mice. The results reveal that the plots for electrophilicity, which can be interpreted as redox reactivity of anthracyclines, can describe oxidative degradation for detoxification and reductive bioactivation for toxicity induction. The plots for the dispersion interaction function, which represent the attraction between anthracyclines and biomolecules, can describe efflux from and influx into target cells of toxicity. The plots can also identify three structural scaffolds of anthracyclines that have different metabolic pathways, resulting in their different toxicity behavior. This structure-dependent toxicity behavior revealed in the plots can provide perspectives on design of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. A DGTD method for the numerical modeling of the interaction of light with nanometer scale metallic structures taking into account non-local dispersion effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Nikolai [Inria, 2004 Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex (France); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Schlossgartenstr. 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Scheid, Claire [Inria, 2004 Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex (France); University of Nice – Sophia Antipolis, Mathematics laboratory, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice, Cedex 02 (France); Lanteri, Stéphane, E-mail: Stephane.Lanteri@inria.fr [Inria, 2004 Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex (France); Moreau, Antoine [Institut Pascal, Université Blaise Pascal, 24, avenue des Landais, 63171 Aubière Cedex (France); Viquerat, Jonathan [Inria, 2004 Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex (France)

    2016-07-01

    The interaction of light with metallic nanostructures is increasingly attracting interest because of numerous potential applications. Sub-wavelength metallic structures, when illuminated with a frequency close to the plasma frequency of the metal, present resonances that cause extreme local field enhancements. Exploiting the latter in applications of interest requires a detailed knowledge about the occurring fields which can actually not be obtained analytically. For the latter mentioned reason, numerical tools are thus an absolute necessity. The insight they provide is very often the only way to get a deep enough understanding of the very rich physics at play. For the numerical modeling of light-structure interaction on the nanoscale, the choice of an appropriate material model is a crucial point. Approaches that are adopted in a first instance are based on local (i.e. with no interaction between electrons) dispersive models, e.g. Drude or Drude–Lorentz models. From the mathematical point of view, when a time-domain modeling is considered, these models lead to an additional system of ordinary differential equations coupled to Maxwell's equations. However, recent experiments have shown that the repulsive interaction between electrons inside the metal makes the response of metals intrinsically non-local and that this effect cannot generally be overlooked. Technological achievements have enabled the consideration of metallic structures in a regime where such non-localities have a significant influence on the structures' optical response. This leads to an additional, in general non-linear, system of partial differential equations which is, when coupled to Maxwell's equations, significantly more difficult to treat. Nevertheless, dealing with a linearized non-local dispersion model already opens the route to numerous practical applications of plasmonics. In this work, we present a Discontinuous Galerkin Time-Domain (DGTD) method able to solve the system

  12. Influence of Cd-content on structural and optical dispersion characteristics of nanocrystalline Zn1−xCdxS (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.9) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farag, A.A.M.; Abdel Rafea, M.; Roushdy, N.; El-Shazly, O.; El-Wahidy, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Highly uniform and good adhesion of nanocrystalline Zn 1−x Cd x S films were synthesized. • Small magnitude of optical electronegativity was calculated. • Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility and molar polarizability were considered. - Abstract: Low cost dip coating technique was successfully used to deposit highly uniform and good adhesive nanocrystalline Zn 1−x Cd x S (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.9) thin films. The surface morphology and crystalline structural characteristics of Zn 1−x Cd x S were achieved by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. Transmission spectra show red shifting of absorption edge as the Cd content increased. The optical constants were accurately determined by using reflectance and transmittance spectra. The effect of Cd-content on refractive index, extinction index and other optical dispersion parameters were also investigated. The dispersion of the refractive index was discussed in terms of single oscillator model. In addition, the ratio of free carrier concentration to its effective mass was estimated. The calculated value of oscillator energy E o obeys the empirical relation (E o ≈ 2 E g ), obtained from single oscillator model. Small magnitude of optical electronegativity (χ ∗ ) for Zn 1−x Cd x S (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.9) thin films and relatively high refractive index can be attributed to covalent nature, in agreement with β value, obtained from dispersion energy analysis. Moreover, molar polarizability and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility were also considered

  13. Crystal structure determination of solar cell materials: Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films using X-ray anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroshi; Fukano, Tatsuo; Ohta, Shingo; Seno, Yoshiki; Katagiri, Hironori; Jimbo, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 thin films as a solar cell material were synthesized. ► The wavelength dependences of the diffraction intensity were measured. ► The crystal structures were clearly identified as kesterite structure for all samples. ► Crystal structure analysis revealed that the atomic compositions were Cu/(Zn + Sn) = 0.97 and Zn/Sn = 1.42 for the sample synthesized using stoichiometric amount of starting materials. - Abstract: The crystal structure of Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 (CZTS) thin films fabricated by vapor-phase sulfurization was determined using X-ray anomalous dispersion. High statistic synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction data were collected from very small amounts of powder. By analyzing the wavelength dependencies of the diffraction peak intensities, the crystal structure was clearly identified as kesterite. Rietveld analysis revealed that the atomic composition deviated from stoichiometric composition, and the compositions were Cu/(Zn + Sn) = 0.97, and Zn/Sn = 1.42.

  14. Effect of dissipative processes on the dispersion and instability of drift waves in a fine-stratified semiconductor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgakov, A. A.; Shramkova, O. V.

    2006-01-01

    The damping of waves of the charge carrier density in a periodic semiconductor structure in an external electric field is investigated under the assumption that the period of the structure is much smaller than the electromagnetic radiation wavelength. The threshold conditions for the instability of carrier density waves propagating obliquely to the direction of the electric current are obtained. The existence of a resistive instability that can develop at drift velocities both higher and lower than the plasmon phase velocity is predicted

  15. Effect of dissipative processes on the dispersion and instability of drift waves in a fine-stratified semiconductor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgakov, A.A.; Shramkova, O.V.

    2006-01-01

    In terms of the assumption that the structure period is essentially shorter than the electromagnetic radiation wavelength one considers attenuation of waves of carrier concentration in a periodic semiconducting structure within an external electric field resulting in drift of different sign carriers. One determined conditions of occurrence of instability of carrier concentration waves propagating orthogonally to current direction. One predicts a resistive instability occurrence of which does not require increase of drift velocity in contrast to phase velocity of a plasmon [ru

  16. Double-helical - ladder structural transition in the B-DNA is induced by a loss of dispersion energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Jiří; Kabeláč, Martin; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 47 (2008), s. 16055-16059 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR IAA400550808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : B-DNA * double-helical structure * ladder-like structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.091, year: 2008

  17. Effect of Nano-TiC Dispersed Particles and Electro-Codeposition Parameters on Morphology and Structure of Hybrid Ni/TiC Nanocomposite Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benea, Lidia; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-06

    This research work describes the effect of dispersed titanium carbide (TiC) nanoparticles into nickel plating bath on Ni/TiC nanostructured composite layers obtained by electro-codeposition. The surface morphology of Ni/TiC nanostructured composite layers was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The composition of coatings and the incorporation percentage of TiC nanoparticles into Ni matrix were studied and estimated by using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) has been applied in order to investigate the phase structure as well as the corresponding relative texture coefficients of the composite layers. The results show that the concentration of nano-TiC particles added in the nickel electrolyte affects the inclusion percentage of TiC into Ni/TiC nano strucured layers, as well as the corresponding morphology, relative texture coefficients and thickness indicating an increasing tendency with the increasing concentration of nano-TiC concentration. By increasing the amount of TiC nanoparticles in the electrolyte, their incorporation into nickel matrix also increases. The hybrid Ni/nano-TiC composite layers obtained revealed a higher roughness and higher hardness; therefore, these layers are promising superhydrophobic surfaces for special application and could be more resistant to wear than the pure Ni layers.

  18. Effect of Nano-TiC Dispersed Particles and Electro-Codeposition Parameters on Morphology and Structure of Hybrid Ni/TiC Nanocomposite Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Benea

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research work describes the effect of dispersed titanium carbide (TiC nanoparticles into nickel plating bath on Ni/TiC nanostructured composite layers obtained by electro-codeposition. The surface morphology of Ni/TiC nanostructured composite layers was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The composition of coatings and the incorporation percentage of TiC nanoparticles into Ni matrix were studied and estimated by using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. X-ray diffractometer (XRD has been applied in order to investigate the phase structure as well as the corresponding relative texture coefficients of the composite layers. The results show that the concentration of nano-TiC particles added in the nickel electrolyte affects the inclusion percentage of TiC into Ni/TiC nano strucured layers, as well as the corresponding morphology, relative texture coefficients and thickness indicating an increasing tendency with the increasing concentration of nano-TiC concentration. By increasing the amount of TiC nanoparticles in the electrolyte, their incorporation into nickel matrix also increases. The hybrid Ni/nano-TiC composite layers obtained revealed a higher roughness and higher hardness; therefore, these layers are promising superhydrophobic surfaces for special application and could be more resistant to wear than the pure Ni layers.

  19. The amorphous solid dispersion of the poorly soluble ABT-102 forms nano/microparticulate structures in aqueous medium: impact on solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank KJ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kerstin J Frank,1,3 Ulrich Westedt,2 Karin M Rosenblatt,2 Peter Hölig,2 Jörg Rosenberg,2 Markus Mägerlein,2 Gert Fricker,3 Martin Brandl11Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 2Abbott GmbH and Co. KG, Ludwigshafen, Germany; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs are a promising formulation approach for poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs, because they ideally enhance both dissolution rate and solubility. However, the mechanism behind this is not understood in detail. In the present study, we investigated the supramolecular and the nano/microparticulate structures that emerge spontaneously upon dispersion of an ASD in aqueous medium and elucidated their influence on solubility. The ASD, prepared by hot melt extrusion, contained the poorly soluble ABT-102 (solubility in buffer, 0.05 µg/mL, a hydrophilic polymer, and three surfactants. The apparent solubility of ABT-102 from the ASD-formulation was enhanced up to 200 times in comparison to crystalline ABT-102. At the same time, the molecular solubility, as assessed by inverse equilibrium dialysis, was enhanced two times. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation in combination with a multiangle light-scattering detector, an ultraviolet detector, and a refractometer enabled us to separate and identify the various supramolecular assemblies that were present in the aqueous dispersions of the API-free ASD (placebo and of binary/ternary blends of the ingredients. Thus, the supramolecular assemblies with a molar mass between 20,000 and 90,000 could be assigned to the polyvinylpyrrolidone/vinyl acetate 64, while two other kinds of assemblies were assigned to different surfactant assemblies (micelles. The amount of ABT-102 remaining associated with each of the assemblies upon fractionation was quantified offline with high

  20. Structural analysis of platinum-palladium nanoparticles dispersed on titanium dioxide to evaluate cyclo-olefines reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, N., E-mail: necastillo@yahoo.co [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Edificio B, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Depto. de Fisica, Av. IPN 2508, C.P. 07360, Mexico DF (Mexico); Perez, R. [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Morelos, 62251 Cuernavaca Morelos (Mexico); Martinez-Ortiz, M.J.; Diaz-Barriga, L. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional - ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, 07738 Mexico DF (Mexico); Garcia, L. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional - ESIT, UPALM, 07738 Mexico DF (Mexico); Conde-Gallardo, A. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Depto. de Fisica, Av. IPN 2508, C.P. 07360, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2010-04-16

    Structural and chemical properties were correlated to explain catalytic behavior of Pt-Pd/TiO{sub 2} in a cyclo-olefin reaction. Bimetallic nanoparticles supported on TiO{sub 2} were prepared by wetness impregnation techniques at different concentrations of Pt and Pd {approx}1 metallic wt%. The physicochemical properties of these metallic nanoparticles supported on TiO{sub 2} were characterized by N{sub 2} physisorption (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller-BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The relationship between chemical composition, physicochemical properties and particle size on the cyclo-olefin reaction was then studied. XRD and TEM results show that these nanoparticles are composed of Pt-Pd with FFC structure (a = 0.389-0.391 nm) supported on TiO{sub 2} (anatase-like structure), and the materials present tetragonal structure nanoparticles (a = 0.37842, b = 0.37842, c = 0.95146 nm). Samples with higher contents of platinum and particle sizes of 4.2 nm show the highest catalytic conversion in cyclo-olefins reaction. Finally, structural examinations of Pt{sub x}-Pd{sub (1-x)}/TiO{sub 2} based system was then conducted to study the effects of metals on the nanostructure of the materials.

  1. Structural analysis of platinum-palladium nanoparticles dispersed on titanium dioxide to evaluate cyclo-olefines reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, N.; Perez, R.; Martinez-Ortiz, M.J.; Diaz-Barriga, L.; Garcia, L.; Conde-Gallardo, A.

    2010-01-01

    Structural and chemical properties were correlated to explain catalytic behavior of Pt-Pd/TiO 2 in a cyclo-olefin reaction. Bimetallic nanoparticles supported on TiO 2 were prepared by wetness impregnation techniques at different concentrations of Pt and Pd ∼1 metallic wt%. The physicochemical properties of these metallic nanoparticles supported on TiO 2 were characterized by N 2 physisorption (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller-BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The relationship between chemical composition, physicochemical properties and particle size on the cyclo-olefin reaction was then studied. XRD and TEM results show that these nanoparticles are composed of Pt-Pd with FFC structure (a = 0.389-0.391 nm) supported on TiO 2 (anatase-like structure), and the materials present tetragonal structure nanoparticles (a = 0.37842, b = 0.37842, c = 0.95146 nm). Samples with higher contents of platinum and particle sizes of 4.2 nm show the highest catalytic conversion in cyclo-olefins reaction. Finally, structural examinations of Pt x -Pd (1-x) /TiO 2 based system was then conducted to study the effects of metals on the nanostructure of the materials.

  2. Technological Progress and the Future of Kuznets Curve's

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Inyong; Kim, Hyunho; Yamamura, Eiji

    2008-01-01

    We use OECD members' data to ascertain that new-born technological inventions increase the degree of inequality but that this declines as the technology disperses into the overall economy (e.g., Galor and Tsiddon, 1997; Weil, 2005). Therefore, we show explicitly that Kuznets curve does not converge to a single inverted U-curve but fluctuates through technological progress as a sine curve.

  3. Analytical Estimates of the Dispersion Curve in Planar Ionization Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Trueba, Jose L.; Betelu, Santiago; Fontelos, Marco A.

    2009-01-01

    Fingers from ionization fronts for a hydrodynamic plasma model result from a balance between impact ionization and electron diffusion in a non-attaching gas. An analytical estimation of the size of the fingers and its dependence on both the electric field and electron diffusion coefficient can be done when the diffusion is low and the electric field is strong.

  4. On the effect of damping on dispersion curves in plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manconia, Elisabetta; Sorokin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study on quantitative prediction and understanding of time-harmonic wave characteristics in damped plates. Material dissipation is modelled by using complex-valued velocities of free dilatation and shear waves in an unbounded volume. As a numerical example, solution...

  5. Dispersion strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scattergood, R.O.; Das, E.S.P.

    1976-01-01

    Using digital computer-based methods, models for dispersion strengthening can now be developed which take into account many of the important effects that have been neglected in the past. In particular, the self interaction of a dislocation can be treated, and a computer simulation method was developed to determine the flow stress of a random distribution of circular, impenetrable obstacles, taking into account all such interactions. The flow stress values depended on the obstacle sizes and spacings, over and above the usual 1/L dependence where L is the average obstacle spacing. From an analysis of the results, it was found that the main effects of the self interactions can be captured in a line tension analogue in which the obstacles appear to be penetrable

  6. Vertex algebras and algebraic curves

    CERN Document Server

    Frenkel, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Vertex algebras are algebraic objects that encapsulate the concept of operator product expansion from two-dimensional conformal field theory. Vertex algebras are fast becoming ubiquitous in many areas of modern mathematics, with applications to representation theory, algebraic geometry, the theory of finite groups, modular functions, topology, integrable systems, and combinatorics. This book is an introduction to the theory of vertex algebras with a particular emphasis on the relationship with the geometry of algebraic curves. The notion of a vertex algebra is introduced in a coordinate-independent way, so that vertex operators become well defined on arbitrary smooth algebraic curves, possibly equipped with additional data, such as a vector bundle. Vertex algebras then appear as the algebraic objects encoding the geometric structure of various moduli spaces associated with algebraic curves. Therefore they may be used to give a geometric interpretation of various questions of representation theory. The book co...

  7. Molecular structure of sodium lignosulfonate from different sources and their properties as dispersant of TiO2 slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haifeng Zhou; Dongjie Yang; Junyong Zhu

    2016-01-01

    The molecular structure and properties of four sodium lignosulfates (LSs) derived from pulping or bioethanol production were evaluated and compared. SXP and SAL were produced by sulfite pulping and sulfonation reaction of lignin from alkali pulping of poplar, respectively. LS-180 and LS-150 were from sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (...

  8. Gravity flow and solute dispersion in variably saturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumahor, Samuel K.; de Rooij, Gerrit H.; Vogel, Hans-Joerg

    2014-05-01

    Solute dispersion in porous media depends on the structure of the velocity field at the pore scale. Hence, dispersion is expected to change with water content and with mean flow velocity. We performed laboratory experiments using a column of repacked fine-grained quartz sand (0.1-0.3 mm grain size) with a porous plate at the bottom to controle the water potential at the lower boundary. We established gravity flow conditions - i.e. constant matric potential and water content throughout the column - for a number of different irrigation rates. We measured breakthrough curves during unit gradient flow for an inert tracer which could be described by the convection-dispersion equation. As the soil water content decreased we observed an initially gradual increase in dispersivity followed by an abrupt increase below a threshold water content (0.19) and pressure head (-38 hPa). This phenomena can be explained by the geometry of phase distribution which was simulated based on Xray-CT images of the porous structure.

  9. Influence of applied compressive stress on the hysteresis curves and magnetic domain structure of grain-oriented transverse Fe–3%Si steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perevertov, Oleksiy; Schäfer, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 13 (2012), "135001-1"-"135001-11" ISSN 0022-3727 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100100906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : hysteresis curve * magnetic domains * compressive stress * goss steel * effective field Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.528, year: 2012

  10. JUMPING THE CURVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Pellissier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the notion ofjump ing the curve,following from Handy 's S-curve onto a new curve with new rules policies and procedures. . It claims that the curve does not generally lie in wait but has to be invented by leadership. The focus of this paper is the identification (mathematically and inferentially ofthat point in time, known as the cusp in catastrophe theory, when it is time to change - pro-actively, pre-actively or reactively. These three scenarios are addressed separately and discussed in terms ofthe relevance ofeach.

  11. Determination of dispersity of crushed granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dejun; Fan Xianhua; Zhang Yingjie; Yao Jun; Zhou Duo; Wang Yong

    2004-01-01

    The experimental crushed granite column breakthrough curves, using 99 Tc as spike tracer and 3 H as invariant tracer, are analyzed by different linear regression techniques. Dispersity of crushed granite and retardation factor of 99 TcO 4 - on the crushed granite are determined simultaneously by one linear regression technique. Dispersity of crushed granite is also obtained with 3 H as invariant tracer by the other linear regression technique. The dispersities found by spike source and invariant source methods are compared. The experimental results show that the dispersity found by spike source method is close to that found by invariant source method. It indicates that dispersity is only the characteristic of dispersion medium

  12. Determination of dispersity of crushed granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental crushed granite column breakthrough curves, using 99 Tc as spike tracer and 3 H as invariant tracer, were analyzed by different linear regression techniques. Dispersity of crushed granite and the retardation factor of 99 TcO 4 - on the crushed granite were determined simultaneously by one linear regression. Dispersity of crushed granite was also obtained with 3 H as invariant tracer by the other linear regression. The dispersities found by spike source and invariant source methods are compared. Experimental results show that the dispersity found by the spike source method is close to that found by the invariant source method. This indicates that dispersity is only a characteristic of the dispersion medium. (author)

  13. Crossover from disordered to core-shell structures of nano-oxide Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersed particles in Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M. P.; Wang, L. M.; Gao, F., E-mail: gaofeium@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Lu, C. Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110819 (China); Lu, Z. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110819 (China); Shao, L. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Molecular dynamic simulations of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in bcc Fe and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations were used to understand the structure of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-clusters in an oxide dispersion strengthened steel matrix. The study showed that Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-clusters below 2 nm were completely disordered. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-clusters above 2 nm, however, form a core-shell structure, with a shell thickness of 0.5–0.7 nm that is independent of nano-cluster size. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-clusters were surrounded by off-lattice Fe atoms, further increasing the stability of these nano-clusters. TEM was used to corroborate our simulation results and showed a crossover from a disordered nano-cluster to a core-shell structure.

  14. Hydrodynamic dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryce, M.H.L.

    1985-01-01

    A dominant mechanism contributing to hydrodynamic dispersion in fluid flow through rocks is variation of travel speeds within the channels carrying the fluid, whether these be interstices between grains, in granular rocks, or cracks in fractured crystalline rocks. The complex interconnections of the channels ensure a mixing of those parts of the fluid which travel more slowly and those which travel faster. On a macroscopic scale this can be treated statistically in terms of the distribution of times taken by a particle of fluid to move from one surface of constant hydraulic potential to another, lower, potential. The distributions in the individual channels are such that very long travel times make a very important contribution. Indeed, while the mean travel time is related to distance by a well-defined transport speed, the mean square is effectively infinite. This results in an asymmetrical plume which differs markedly from a gaussian shape. The distribution of microscopic travel times is related to the distribution of apertures in the interstices, or in the microcracks, which in turn are affected in a complex way by the stresses acting on the rock matrix

  15. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  16. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth's atmosphere.

  17. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Wesley Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dolence, Joshua C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  18. Image scaling curve generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of generating an image scaling curve, where local saliency is detected in a received image. The detected local saliency is then accumulated in the first direction. A final scaling curve is derived from the detected local saliency and the image is then

  19. Image scaling curve generation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of generating an image scaling curve, where local saliency is detected in a received image. The detected local saliency is then accumulated in the first direction. A final scaling curve is derived from the detected local saliency and the image is then

  20. Tempo curves considered harmful

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desain, P.; Honing, H.

    1993-01-01

    In the literature of musicology, computer music research and the psychology of music, timing or tempo measurements are mostly presented in the form of continuous curves. The notion of these tempo curves is dangerous, despite its widespread use, because it lulls its users into the false impression

  1. The curve shortening problem

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Kai-Seng

    2001-01-01

    Although research in curve shortening flow has been very active for nearly 20 years, the results of those efforts have remained scattered throughout the literature. For the first time, The Curve Shortening Problem collects and illuminates those results in a comprehensive, rigorous, and self-contained account of the fundamental results.The authors present a complete treatment of the Gage-Hamilton theorem, a clear, detailed exposition of Grayson''s convexity theorem, a systematic discussion of invariant solutions, applications to the existence of simple closed geodesics on a surface, and a new, almost convexity theorem for the generalized curve shortening problem.Many questions regarding curve shortening remain outstanding. With its careful exposition and complete guide to the literature, The Curve Shortening Problem provides not only an outstanding starting point for graduate students and new investigations, but a superb reference that presents intriguing new results for those already active in the field.

  2. The Koch curve as a smooth manifold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, Marcelo; Sniatycki, Jedrzej

    2008-01-01

    We show that there exists a homeomorphism between the closed interval [0,1] is contained in R and the Koch curve endowed with the subset topology of R 2 . We use this homeomorphism to endow the Koch curve with the structure of a smooth manifold with boundary

  3. High-field magnetization curve of random-anisotropy amorphous magnet: Observation of a crossover and link to structural short-range order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, J.; Amaral, V. S.; Barbara, B.

    1991-08-01

    High-field magnetization curves of the series of amorphous alloys DyxGd1-xNi have been measured up to 15 tesla and interpreted in the framework of the theory of Chudnovsky et al. The results show several features (high-field crossovers, correlation volume of local-anisotropy directions, ferromagnetic correlation length) all consistent with each other and in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  4. High-field magnetization curve of random-anisotropy amorphous magnet: Observation of a crossover and link to structural short-range order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, J.; Amaral, V.S.; Barbara, B.

    1991-01-01

    High-field magnetization curves of the series of amorphous alloys Dy x Gd 1-x Ni have been measured up to 15 tesla and interpreted in the framework of the theory of Chudnovsky et al. The results show several features (high-field crossovers, correlation volume of local-anisotropy directions, ferromagnetic correlation length) all consistent with each other and in agreement with theoretical predictions

  5. Relationships between population density, fine-scale genetic structure, mating system and pollen dispersal in a timber tree from African rainforests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duminil, J; Daïnou, K; Kaviriri, D K; Gillet, P; Loo, J; Doucet, J-L; Hardy, O J

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the reduction of population density and/or the environmental changes it induces, selective logging could affect the demography, reproductive biology and evolutionary potential of forest trees. This is particularly relevant in tropical forests where natural population densities can be low and isolated trees may be subject to outcross pollen limitation and/or produce low-quality selfed seeds that exhibit inbreeding depression. Comparing reproductive biology processes and genetic diversity of populations at different densities can provide indirect evidence of the potential impacts of logging. Here, we analysed patterns of genetic diversity, mating system and gene flow in three Central African populations of the self-compatible legume timber species Erythrophleum suaveolens with contrasting densities (0.11, 0.68 and 1.72 adults per ha). The comparison of inbreeding levels among cohorts suggests that selfing is detrimental as inbred individuals are eliminated between seedling and adult stages. Levels of genetic diversity, selfing rates (∼16%) and patterns of spatial genetic structure (Sp ∼0.006) were similar in all three populations. However, the extent of gene dispersal differed markedly among populations: the average distance of pollen dispersal increased with decreasing density (from 200 m in the high-density population to 1000 m in the low-density one). Overall, our results suggest that the reproductive biology and genetic diversity of the species are not affected by current logging practices. However, further investigations need to be conducted in low-density populations to evaluate (1) whether pollen limitation may reduce seed production and (2) the regeneration potential of the species.

  6. Observation of energy-time dispersed ion structures in the magnetosheath by CLUSTER: possible signatures of transient acceleration processes at shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Louarn

    Full Text Available We analyse energy-time dispersed ion signatures that have been observed by CLUSTER in the dayside magnetosheath. These events are characterized by sudden increases in the ion flux at energies larger than 10 keV. The high energy ions (30 keV are first detected, with the transition to the low energy ions (5 keV lasting about 100 s. These injections are often associated with transient plasma structures of a few minutes in duration, characterized by a hotter, less dense plasma and a diverted flow velocity, thus presenting similarities with "hot flow anomalies". They also involve modifications of the magnetic field direction, suggesting that the shock interacts with a solar wind discontinuity at the time of the event. The injections can originate from the magnetosphere or the shock region. Studying in detail a particular event, we discuss this last hypothesis. We show that the observed energy/time dispersion can be explained by combining a time-of-flight effect with a drift of the source of energetic particles along the shock. We propose that the acceleration results from a Fermi process linked to the interaction of the discontinuity with a quasi-perpendicular shock. This model explains the observed pitch-angle selection of the accelerated particles. The Fermi process acting on the beam of ions reflected from the shock appears to be sufficiently efficient to accelerate over short time scales (less than 30 s particles at energies above 30 keV.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar-wind-magnetosphere interaction; magnetosheath – Space plasma physics (shock waves

  7. Relationships between population density, fine-scale genetic structure, mating system and pollen dispersal in a timber tree from African rainforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duminil, J; Daïnou, K; Kaviriri, D K; Gillet, P; Loo, J; Doucet, J-L; Hardy, O J

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the reduction of population density and/or the environmental changes it induces, selective logging could affect the demography, reproductive biology and evolutionary potential of forest trees. This is particularly relevant in tropical forests where natural population densities can be low and isolated trees may be subject to outcross pollen limitation and/or produce low-quality selfed seeds that exhibit inbreeding depression. Comparing reproductive biology processes and genetic diversity of populations at different densities can provide indirect evidence of the potential impacts of logging. Here, we analysed patterns of genetic diversity, mating system and gene flow in three Central African populations of the self-compatible legume timber species Erythrophleum suaveolens with contrasting densities (0.11, 0.68 and 1.72 adults per ha). The comparison of inbreeding levels among cohorts suggests that selfing is detrimental as inbred individuals are eliminated between seedling and adult stages. Levels of genetic diversity, selfing rates (∼16%) and patterns of spatial genetic structure (Sp ∼0.006) were similar in all three populations. However, the extent of gene dispersal differed markedly among populations: the average distance of pollen dispersal increased with decreasing density (from 200 m in the high-density population to 1000 m in the low-density one). Overall, our results suggest that the reproductive biology and genetic diversity of the species are not affected by current logging practices. However, further investigations need to be conducted in low-density populations to evaluate (1) whether pollen limitation may reduce seed production and (2) the regeneration potential of the species. PMID:26696137

  8. Phonon dispersion relations for caesium thiocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irving, M.A.; Smith, T.F.; Elcombe, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Room temperature phonon dispersion relations for frequencies below 2 THz have been measured, along the three orthorhombic axes and selected diagonal directions by neutron inelastic scattering, for caesium thiocyanate. These curves, which represent 13 acoustic modes and 11 optic modes of vibration, do not agree with the dispersion behaviour calculated from the rigid-ion model developed by Ti and Ra to describe their Raman scattering observations

  9. Dynamic Properties of Glass-Formers Governed by the Frequency Dispersion of the Structural α-Relaxation: Examples from Prilocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarowska, Z; Rams-Baron, M; Knapik, J; Ngai, K L; Kruk, D; Paluch, M

    2015-10-01

    General and fundamental properties of glass-formers of various chemical bonding and physical structures have been found in the recent past. These important findings should be key to gain basic understanding of the dynamics at all time scales leading to glass transition. However, the entirety of these general properties has not been found in a single glass-former. For others to appreciate the importance of these properties, they need to collect the supporting experimental data from different glass-formers scattered over many publications. This hurdle may account for the current lack of universal recognition of the importance of these general properties by the research community. In this paper we present experimental studies of the dynamic processes over a broad range of time scales of a single glass-former, prilocaine. Practically the entire collection of fundamental properties has been found in this system. The advance should heighten the awareness of the importance of these properties in anyone's effort to solve the glass transition problem.

  10. Learning Curve? Which One?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Prochno

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning curves have been studied for a long time. These studies provided strong support to the hypothesis that, as organizations produce more of a product, unit costs of production decrease at a decreasing rate (see Argote, 1999 for a comprehensive review of learning curve studies. But the organizational mechanisms that lead to these results are still underexplored. We know some drivers of learning curves (ADLER; CLARK, 1991; LAPRE et al., 2000, but we still lack a more detailed view of the organizational processes behind those curves. Through an ethnographic study, I bring a comprehensive account of the first year of operations of a new automotive plant, describing what was taking place on in the assembly area during the most relevant shifts of the learning curve. The emphasis is then on how learning occurs in that setting. My analysis suggests that the overall learning curve is in fact the result of an integration process that puts together several individual ongoing learning curves in different areas throughout the organization. In the end, I propose a model to understand the evolution of these learning processes and their supporting organizational mechanisms.

  11. The crime kuznets curve

    OpenAIRE

    Buonanno, Paolo; Fergusson, Leopoldo; Vargas, Juan Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We document the existence of a Crime Kuznets Curve in US states since the 1970s. As income levels have risen, crime has followed an inverted U-shaped pattern, first increasing and then dropping. The Crime Kuznets Curve is not explained by income inequality. In fact, we show that during the sample period inequality has risen monotonically with income, ruling out the traditional Kuznets Curve. Our finding is robust to adding a large set of controls that are used in the literature to explain the...

  12. Bond yield curve construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kožul Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the broadest sense, yield curve indicates the market's view of the evolution of interest rates over time. However, given that cost of borrowing it closely linked to creditworthiness (ability to repay, different yield curves will apply to different currencies, market sectors, or even individual issuers. As government borrowing is indicative of interest rate levels available to other market players in a particular country, and considering that bond issuance still remains the dominant form of sovereign debt, this paper describes yield curve construction using bonds. The relationship between zero-coupon yield, par yield and yield to maturity is given and their usage in determining curve discount factors is described. Their usage in deriving forward rates and pricing related derivative instruments is also discussed.

  13. SRHA calibration curve

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — an UV calibration curve for SRHA quantitation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Chang, X., and D. Bouchard. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled...

  14. Bragg Curve Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhn, C.R.

    1981-05-01

    An alternative utilization is presented for the gaseous ionization chamber in the detection of energetic heavy ions, which is called Bragg Curve Spectroscopy (BCS). Conceptually, BCS involves using the maximum data available from the Bragg curve of the stopping heavy ion (HI) for purposes of identifying the particle and measuring its energy. A detector has been designed that measures the Bragg curve with high precision. From the Bragg curve the range from the length of the track, the total energy from the integral of the specific ionization over the track, the dE/dx from the specific ionization at the beginning of the track, and the Bragg peak from the maximum of the specific ionization of the HI are determined. This last signal measures the atomic number, Z, of the HI unambiguously

  15. ROBUST DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutawanir Darwis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Empirical decline curve analysis of oil production data gives reasonable answer in hyperbolic type curves situations; however the methodology has limitations in fitting real historical production data in present of unusual observations due to the effect of the treatment to the well in order to increase production capacity. The development ofrobust least squares offers new possibilities in better fitting production data using declinecurve analysis by down weighting the unusual observations. This paper proposes a robustleast squares fitting lmRobMM approach to estimate the decline rate of daily production data and compares the results with reservoir simulation results. For case study, we usethe oil production data at TBA Field West Java. The results demonstrated that theapproach is suitable for decline curve fitting and offers a new insight in decline curve analysis in the present of unusual observations.

  16. Silicon supported lipid-DNA thin film structures at varying temperature studied by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and neutron reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenici, F; Castellano, C; Dell'Unto, F; Albinati, A; Congiu, A

    2011-11-01

    Non-viral gene transfection by means of lipid-based nanosystems, such as solid supported lipid assemblies, is often limited due to their lack of stability and the consequent loss of efficiency. Therefore not only a detailed thermo-lyotropic study of these DNA-lipid complexes is necessary to understand their interaction mechanisms, but it can also be considered as a first step in conceiving and developing new transfection biosystems. The aim of our study is a structural characterization of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC)-dimethyl-dioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDAB)-DNA complex at varying temperature using the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD) and neutron reflectivity (NR) techniques. We have shown the formation of a novel thermo-lyotropic structure of DOPC/DDAB thin film self-organized in multi-lamellar planes on (100)-oriented silicon support by spin coating, thus enlightening its ability to include DNA strands. Our NR measurements indicate that the DOPC/DDAB/DNA complex forms temperature-dependent structures. At 65°C and relative humidity of 100% DNA fragments are buried between single lamellar leaflets constituting the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayers. This finding supports the consistency of the hydrophobic interaction model, which implies that the coupling between lipid tails and hypo-hydrated DNA single strands could be the driving force of DNA-lipid complexation. Upon cooling to 25°C, EDXD analysis points out that full-hydrated DOPC-DDAB-DNA can switch in a different metastable complex supposed to be driven by lipid heads-DNA electrostatic interaction. Thermotropic response analysis also clarifies that DOPC has a pivotal role in promoting the formation of our observed thermophylic silicon supported lipids-DNA assembly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct phase selection of initial phases from single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) for the improvement of electron density and ab initio structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chung-De; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Chiang, Hsin-Lin; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-01-01

    A novel direct phase-selection method to select optimized phases from the ambiguous phases of a subset of reflections to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases has been developed. With the improved phases, the completeness of built residues of protein molecules is enhanced for efficient structure determination. Optimization of the initial phasing has been a decisive factor in the success of the subsequent electron-density modification, model building and structure determination of biological macromolecules using the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method. Two possible phase solutions (ϕ 1 and ϕ 2 ) generated from two symmetric phase triangles in the Harker construction for the SAD method cause the well known phase ambiguity. A novel direct phase-selection method utilizing the θ DS list as a criterion to select optimized phases ϕ am from ϕ 1 or ϕ 2 of a subset of reflections with a high percentage of correct phases to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases ϕ SAD has been developed. Based on this work, reflections with an angle θ DS in the range 35–145° are selected for an optimized improvement, where θ DS is the angle between the initial phase ϕ SAD and a preliminary density-modification (DM) phase ϕ DM NHL . The results show that utilizing the additional direct phase-selection step prior to simple solvent flattening without phase combination using existing DM programs, such as RESOLVE or DM from CCP4, significantly improves the final phases in terms of increased correlation coefficients of electron-density maps and diminished mean phase errors. With the improved phases and density maps from the direct phase-selection method, the completeness of residues of protein molecules built with main chains and side chains is enhanced for efficient structure determination

  18. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  19. Power Curve Measurements FGW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Federici, Paolo

    This report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given turbine in a chosen period. The measurements are carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 Ed. 1 and FGW Teil 2.......This report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given turbine in a chosen period. The measurements are carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 Ed. 1 and FGW Teil 2....

  20. Curves and Abelian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, Valery; Clemens, C Herbert; Beauville, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    This book is devoted to recent progress in the study of curves and abelian varieties. It discusses both classical aspects of this deep and beautiful subject as well as two important new developments, tropical geometry and the theory of log schemes. In addition to original research articles, this book contains three surveys devoted to singularities of theta divisors, of compactified Jacobians of singular curves, and of "strange duality" among moduli spaces of vector bundles on algebraic varieties.

  1. Mode Identification of Guided Waves in a Curved Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Heung-Seop; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Kim, Jae-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave technique has been widely employed for the long range inspection of structures such as plates and pipes because it has the ability to propagate over long distances. In the nuclear power field, there recently appeared a need for on-line nondestructive monitoring which can be employed during the operation stage of power plants. As ultrasonic guided waves have shown promise for on-line monitoring of power plants, a lot of work has been done in the institutes and universities on this matter. In the case of detecting defects in simple straight pipes, the dispersion curves obtained from the modeling processes are closely akin to the experimental results. But the modeling of wave propagation in some structures, such as an elbow region of a pipe, is not practical due to elbow echo and unpredictable interface conditions. This paper presents an experimental approach to identify the most dominant modes of guided waves in a curved region of a pipe, which is a key factor in detecting flaws in a pipe

  2. Dispersion of complex dielectric constant and electronic characteristics of the compounds Nb-Al and Nb-Ge with A15 structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmichev, N.D.; Levchenko, I.S.; Motulevich, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that the dispersions of complex dielectric constant of the compounds Nb-Al and Nb-Ge with A15 structure, used for determination of electronic characteristics and their variations with temperature, are measured in the 0.177-3.1 eV spectral interval at 295 and 670 K. The squares of the plasma frequencies ω 2 p of conduction electrons are obtained. In both compounds ω 2 p ∼ 19 eV 2 , which is 3.2 times less than for niobium. In this spectral interval, Nb-Al has four interband transition zones at 0.2, 0.35, 1.45, and 3.1 eV, while Nb-Ge has five such bands: 0.21, 0.32, 0.48, 0.95 and 2.0 eV. As the temperature increases ω 2 p of conduction electrons increases somewhat more than for usual metals (in both compounds), and the decrease in the analogous characteristic in the long-wave band for Nb-Ge is unusually great, preserving the sum of the changes, and there is also a significant decrease in the width of the long-wave band. These anomalies can be explained by thermal transfer of electrons from the base state of the long-wave band to the conduction band

  3. Skeletonized wave equation of surface wave dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-09-06

    We present the theory for wave equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. Similar to wave-equation travel-time inversion, the complicated surface-wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the (kx,ω) domain. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2D or 3D velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is less prone to the cycle skipping problems of full waveform inversion (FWI). The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can accurately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distribution in laterally heterogeneous media.

  4. Nest suitability, fine-scale population structure and male-mediated dispersal of a solitary ground nesting bee in an urban landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uribe, Margarita M; Morreale, Stephen J; Santiago, Christine K; Danforth, Bryan N

    2015-01-01

    Bees are the primary pollinators of flowering plants in almost all ecosystems. Worldwide declines in bee populations have raised awareness about the importance of their ecological role in maintaining ecosystem functioning. The naturally strong philopatric behavior that some bee species show can be detrimental to population viability through increased probability of inbreeding. Furthermore, bee populations found in human-altered landscapes, such as urban areas, can experience lower levels of gene flow and effective population sizes, increasing potential for inbreeding depression in wild bee populations. In this study, we investigated the fine-scale population structure of the solitary bee Colletes inaequalis in an urbanized landscape. First, we developed a predictive spatial model to detect suitable nesting habitat for this ground nesting bee and to inform our field search for nests. We genotyped 18 microsatellites in 548 female individuals collected from nest aggregations throughout the study area. Genetic relatedness estimates revealed that genetic similarity among individuals was slightly greater within nest aggregations than among randomly chosen individuals. However, genetic structure among nest aggregations was low (Nei's GST = 0.011). Reconstruction of parental genotypes revealed greater genetic relatedness among females than among males within nest aggregations, suggesting male-mediated dispersal as a potentially important mechanism of population connectivity and inbreeding avoidance. Size of nesting patch was positively correlated with effective population size, but not with other estimators of genetic diversity. We detected a positive trend between geographic distance and genetic differentiation between nest aggregations. Our landscape genetic models suggest that increased urbanization is likely associated with higher levels of inbreeding. Overall, these findings emphasize the importance of density and distribution of suitable nesting patches for enhancing

  5. Direct phase selection of initial phases from single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) for the improvement of electron density and ab initio structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-De; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Chiang, Hsin-Lin; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-01

    Optimization of the initial phasing has been a decisive factor in the success of the subsequent electron-density modification, model building and structure determination of biological macromolecules using the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method. Two possible phase solutions (φ1 and φ2) generated from two symmetric phase triangles in the Harker construction for the SAD method cause the well known phase ambiguity. A novel direct phase-selection method utilizing the θ(DS) list as a criterion to select optimized phases φ(am) from φ1 or φ2 of a subset of reflections with a high percentage of correct phases to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases φ(SAD) has been developed. Based on this work, reflections with an angle θ(DS) in the range 35-145° are selected for an optimized improvement, where θ(DS) is the angle between the initial phase φ(SAD) and a preliminary density-modification (DM) phase φ(DM)(NHL). The results show that utilizing the additional direct phase-selection step prior to simple solvent flattening without phase combination using existing DM programs, such as RESOLVE or DM from CCP4, significantly improves the final phases in terms of increased correlation coefficients of electron-density maps and diminished mean phase errors. With the improved phases and density maps from the direct phase-selection method, the completeness of residues of protein molecules built with main chains and side chains is enhanced for efficient structure determination.

  6. Nest suitability, fine-scale population structure and male-mediated dispersal of a solitary ground nesting bee in an urban landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita M López-Uribe

    Full Text Available Bees are the primary pollinators of flowering plants in almost all ecosystems. Worldwide declines in bee populations have raised awareness about the importance of their ecological role in maintaining ecosystem functioning. The naturally strong philopatric behavior that some bee species show can be detrimental to population viability through increased probability of inbreeding. Furthermore, bee populations found in human-altered landscapes, such as urban areas, can experience lower levels of gene flow and effective population sizes, increasing potential for inbreeding depression in wild bee populations. In this study, we investigated the fine-scale population structure of the solitary bee Colletes inaequalis in an urbanized landscape. First, we developed a predictive spatial model to detect suitable nesting habitat for this ground nesting bee and to inform our field search for nests. We genotyped 18 microsatellites in 548 female individuals collected from nest aggregations throughout the study area. Genetic relatedness estimates revealed that genetic similarity among individuals was slightly greater within nest aggregations than among randomly chosen individuals. However, genetic structure among nest aggregations was low (Nei's GST = 0.011. Reconstruction of parental genotypes revealed greater genetic relatedness among females than among males within nest aggregations, suggesting male-mediated dispersal as a potentially important mechanism of population connectivity and inbreeding avoidance. Size of nesting patch was positively correlated with effective population size, but not with other estimators of genetic diversity. We detected a positive trend between geographic distance and genetic differentiation between nest aggregations. Our landscape genetic models suggest that increased urbanization is likely associated with higher levels of inbreeding. Overall, these findings emphasize the importance of density and distribution of suitable nesting

  7. Approximation by planar elastic curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Gravesen, Jens; Nørbjerg, Toke Bjerge

    2016-01-01

    We give an algorithm for approximating a given plane curve segment by a planar elastic curve. The method depends on an analytic representation of the space of elastic curve segments, together with a geometric method for obtaining a good initial guess for the approximating curve. A gradient......-driven optimization is then used to find the approximating elastic curve....

  8. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  9. Measurement and analysis of field-induced crystallographic texture using curved position-sensitive diffraction detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simons, Hugh; Daniels, John E.; Studer, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines measurement and analysis methodologies created for determining the structural responses of electroceramics to an electric field. A sample stage is developed to apply electric fields to ceramic materials at elevated temperatures during neutron diffraction experiments. The tested...... employing a curved positive sensitive detector. Methodologies are proposed to account for the geometrical effects when vector fields are applied to textured materials with angularly dispersive detector geometries. Representative results are presented for the ferroelectric (Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-6%BaTiO3 (BNT-6BT...

  10. Power Curve Measurements REWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Vesth, Allan

    This report describes the power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine in a chosen period. The measurements were carried out following the measurement procedure in the draft of IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2 [1], with some deviations mostly regarding uncertainty calculation. Here, the refere......This report describes the power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine in a chosen period. The measurements were carried out following the measurement procedure in the draft of IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2 [1], with some deviations mostly regarding uncertainty calculation. Here......, the reference wind speed used in the power curve is the equivalent wind speed obtained from lidar measurements at several heights between lower and upper blade tip, in combination with a hub height meteorological mast. The measurements have been performed using DTU’s measurement equipment, the analysis...

  11. Curved electromagnetic missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, J.M.; Shen, H.M.; Wu, T.T.

    1989-01-01

    Transient electromagnetic fields can exhibit interesting behavior in the limit of great distances from their sources. In situations of finite total radiated energy, the energy reaching a distant receiver can decrease with distance much more slowly than the usual r - 2 . Cases of such slow decrease have been referred to as electromagnetic missiles. All of the wide variety of known missiles propagate in essentially straight lines. A sketch is presented here of a missile that can follow a path that is strongly curved. An example of a curved electromagnetic missile is explicitly constructed and some of its properties are discussed. References to details available elsewhere are given

  12. Algebraic curves and cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Murty, V Kumar

    2010-01-01

    It is by now a well-known paradigm that public-key cryptosystems can be built using finite Abelian groups and that algebraic geometry provides a supply of such groups through Abelian varieties over finite fields. Of special interest are the Abelian varieties that are Jacobians of algebraic curves. All of the articles in this volume are centered on the theme of point counting and explicit arithmetic on the Jacobians of curves over finite fields. The topics covered include Schoof's \\ell-adic point counting algorithm, the p-adic algorithms of Kedlaya and Denef-Vercauteren, explicit arithmetic on

  13. IGMtransmission: Transmission curve computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher M.; Meiksin, Avery; Stock, David

    2015-04-01

    IGMtransmission is a Java graphical user interface that implements Monte Carlo simulations to compute the corrections to colors of high-redshift galaxies due to intergalactic attenuation based on current models of the Intergalactic Medium. The effects of absorption due to neutral hydrogen are considered, with particular attention to the stochastic effects of Lyman Limit Systems. Attenuation curves are produced, as well as colors for a wide range of filter responses and model galaxy spectra. Photometric filters are included for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Keck telescope, the Mt. Palomar 200-inch, the SUBARU telescope and UKIRT; alternative filter response curves and spectra may be readily uploaded.

  14. Natal dispersal and personalities in great tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemanse, NJ; Both, C; van Noordwijk, AJ; Rutten, AL; Drent, PJ; Noordwijk, Arie J. van; Drent, Piet J.

    2003-01-01

    Dispersal is a major determinant of the dynamics and genetic structure of populations, and its consequences depend not only on average dispersal rates and distances, but also on the characteristics of dispersing and philopatric individuals. We investigated whether natal dispersal correlated with a

  15. TRANSBOUNDARY POLLUTION AND THE KUZNET'S CURVE IN THE GLOBAL COMMONS

    OpenAIRE

    Hauer, Grant; Runge, C. Ford

    2000-01-01

    Recent empirical work suggests an inverted U-shaped relationship between pollution and national income (the environmental Kuznet's curve). This work has typically ignored the fact that pollutants are dispersed to varying degrees. This study shows how varying levels of spatial pollution dispersion (or "publicness") can affect pollution-income relationships. A public goods model captures the idea of the "global commons" with two pollutants. The model suggests that no refutable hypotheses are po...

  16. Elementary particles in curved spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, I.

    2004-01-01

    The theories in particle physics are developed currently, in Minkowski space-time starting from the Poincare group. A physical theory in flat space can be seen as the limit of a more general physical theory in a curved space. At the present time, a theory of particles in curved space does not exist, and thus the only possibility is to extend the existent theories in these spaces. A formidable obstacle to the extension of physical models is the absence of groups of motion in more general Riemann spaces. A space of constant curvature has a group of motion that, although differs from that of a flat space, has the same number of parameters and could permit some generalisations. In this contribution we try to investigate some physical implications of the presumable existence of elementary particles in curved space. In de Sitter space (dS) the invariant rest mass is a combination of the Poincare rest mass and the generalised angular momentum of a particle and it permits to establish a correlation with the vacuum energy and with the cosmological constant. The consequences are significant because in an experiment the local structure of space-time departs from the Minkowski space and becomes a dS or AdS space-time. Discrete symmetry characteristics of the dS/AdS group suggest some arguments for the possible existence of the 'mirror matter'. (author)

  17. EFFECT OF VARIOUS POROUS STRUCTURES ON THE SHLIOMIS MODEL BASED FERROFLUID LUBRICATION OF THE FILM SQUEEZED BETWEEN ROTATING ROUGH CURVED CIRCULAR PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimit R Patel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Efforts have been made to analyze the Shliomis model based ferrofluid lubrication of a squeeze film between rotating rough curved circular plates where the upper plate has a porous facing. Different models of porosity are treated. The stochastic modeling of Christensen and Tonder has been employed to evaluate the effect of surface roughness. The related stochastically averaged Reynolds type equation is numerically solved to obtain the pressure distribution, leading to the calculation of load carrying capacity. The results presented in graphical form establish that the Kozeny-Carman model is more favorable as compared to the Irmay one from the design point of view. It is observed that the Shliomis model based ferrofluid lubrication performs relatively better than the Neuringer-Rosensweig one. Although the bearing suffers due to transverse surface roughness, with a suitable choice of curvature parameters and rotational ratio, the negative effect of porosity and standard deviation can be minimized by the ferrofluid lubrication at least in the case of negatively skewed roughness.

  18. Learning from uncertain curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallasto, Anton; Feragen, Aasa

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a novel framework for statistical analysis of populations of nondegenerate Gaussian processes (GPs), which are natural representations of uncertain curves. This allows inherent variation or uncertainty in function-valued data to be properly incorporated in the population analysis. Us...

  19. Power Curve Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federici, Paolo; Kock, Carsten Weber

    This report describes the power curve measurements performed with a nacelle LIDAR on a given wind turbine in a wind farm and during a chosen measurement period. The measurements and analysis are carried out in accordance to the guidelines in the procedure “DTU Wind Energy-E-0019” [1]. The reporting...

  20. Power Curve Measurements, FGW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Allan; Kock, Carsten Weber

    The report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. A site calibration has been carried out; see Ref. [2], and the measured flow correction factors for different wind directions are used in the present...... analyze of power performance of the turbine....

  1. Power Curve Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federici, Paolo; Vesth, Allan

    The report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. A site calibration has been carried out; see Ref. [2], and the measured flow correction factors for different wind directions are used in the present...... analyze of power performance of the turbine....

  2. Power Curve Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    The report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. A site calibration has been carried out; see Ref. [2], and the measured flow correction factors for different wind directions are used in the present...... analyze of power performance of the turbine...

  3. Carbon Lorenz Curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, L.F.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073642398

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across

  4. The Axial Curve Rotator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Walter M.

    This document contains detailed directions for constructing a device that mechanically produces the three-dimensional shape resulting from the rotation of any algebraic line or curve around either axis on the coordinate plant. The device was developed in response to student difficulty in visualizing, and thus grasping the mathematical principles…

  5. Nacelle lidar power curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report describes the power curve measurements performed with a nacelle LIDAR on a given wind turbine in a wind farm and during a chosen measurement period. The measurements and analysis are carried out in accordance to the guidelines in the procedure “DTU Wind Energy-E-0019” [1]. The reporting...

  6. Power curve report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Allan; Kock, Carsten Weber

    The report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. A site calibration has been carried out; see Ref. [2], and the measured flow correction factors for different wind directions are used in the present...

  7. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  8. ECM using Edwards curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, D.J.; Birkner, P.; Lange, T.; Peters, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces EECM-MPFQ, a fast implementation of the elliptic-curve method of factoring integers. EECM-MPFQ uses fewer modular multiplications than the well-known GMP-ECM software, takes less time than GMP-ECM, and finds more primes than GMP-ECM. The main improvements above the

  9. Power Curve Measurements FGW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federici, Paolo; Kock, Carsten Weber

    The report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. A site calibration has been carried out; see Ref. [2], and the measured flow correction factors for different wind directions are used in the present...... analyze of power performance of the turbine...

  10. Hierarchical Models for Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the Optical and Near Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Kaisey; Narayan, G.; Kirshner, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    I have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova optical and near infrared light curves. Since the near infrared light curves are excellent standard candles and are less sensitive to dust extinction and reddening, the combination of near infrared and optical data better constrains the host galaxy extinction and improves the precision of distance predictions to SN Ia. A hierarchical probabilistic model coherently accounts for multiple random and uncertain effects, including photometric error, intrinsic supernova light curve variations and correlations across phase and wavelength, dust extinction and reddening, peculiar velocity dispersion and distances. An improved BayeSN MCMC code is implemented for computing probabilistic inferences for individual supernovae and the SN Ia and host galaxy dust populations. I use this hierarchical model to analyze nearby Type Ia supernovae with optical and near infared data from the PAIRITEL, CfA3, and CSP samples and the literature. Using cross-validation to test the robustness of the model predictions, I find that the rms Hubble diagram scatter of predicted distance moduli is 0.11 mag for SN with optical and near infrared data versus 0.15 mag for SN with only optical data. Accounting for the dispersion expected from random peculiar velocities, the rms intrinsic prediction error is 0.08-0.10 mag for SN with both optical and near infrared light curves. I discuss results for the inferred intrinsic correlation structures of the optical-NIR SN Ia light curves and the host galaxy dust distribution captured by the hierarchical model. The continued observation and analysis of Type Ia SN in the optical and near infrared is important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  11. Morse theory on timelike and causal curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everson, J.; Talbot, C.J.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the set of timelike curves in a globally hyperbolic space-time manifold can be given the structure of a Hilbert manifold under a suitable definition of 'timelike.' The causal curves are the topological closure of this manifold. The Lorentzian energy (corresponding to Milnor's energy, except that the Lorentzian inner product is used) is shown to be a Morse function for the space of causal curves. A fixed end point index theorem is obtained in which a lower bound for the index of the Hessian of the Lorentzian energy is given in terms of the sum of the orders of the conjugate points between the end points. (author)

  12. Experimental and theoretical studies on the vibrational structure on disperse vanadium and titanium oxide; Experimentelle und theoretische Untersuchungen zur Schwingungsstruktur an dispersem Vanadium- und Titanoxid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsche, David

    2014-10-20

    identified as a V=O stretch vibrations, where the difference is caused by the phase shift between the anchoring V-O-Si vibration. By combining results from spectroscopy and simulations the surface structure of vanadia and titania species could described in detail. Under highly dispersed conditions the surface structure can not be completely described by an isolated, trigrafted species as has been traditionally proposed in the literature. Instead, the vanadia and titania surface species can oligomerize even under highly dispersed conditions. The present study shows that the assignment of Raman bands is much more complex than previously assumed. Based on a pure spectroscopic or theoretical study an unambiguous assignment of the Raman bands ist not possible. However, by combining theoretical and spectroscopic approaches, the present study succeeded in developing a more detailed picture of the surface species under hydrated and dehydrated conditions and deepening the understanding of the vibrational structure of silica supported vanadia and titania surface species.

  13. Influence of mesh structure on 2D full shallow water equations and SCS Curve Number simulation of rainfall/runoff events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; García-Navarro, Pilar; Murillo, Javier

    2012-07-01

    SummaryHydrological simulation of rain-runoff processes is often performed with lumped models which rely on calibration to generate storm hydrographs and study catchment response to rain. In this paper, a distributed, physically-based numerical model is used for runoff simulation in a mountain catchment. This approach offers two advantages. The first is that by using shallow-water equations for runoff flow, there is less freedom to calibrate routing parameters (as compared to, for example, synthetic hydrograph methods). The second, is that spatial distributions of water depth and velocity can be obtained. Furthermore, interactions among the various hydrological processes can be modeled in a physically-based approach which may depend on transient and spatially distributed factors. On the other hand, the undertaken numerical approach relies on accurate terrain representation and mesh selection, which also affects significantly the computational cost of the simulations. Hence, we investigate the response of a gauged catchment with this distributed approach. The methodology consists of analyzing the effects that the mesh has on the simulations by using a range of meshes. Next, friction is applied to the model and the response to variations and interaction with the mesh is studied. Finally, a first approach with the well-known SCS Curve Number method is studied to evaluate its behavior when coupled with a shallow-water model for runoff flow. The results show that mesh selection is of great importance, since it may affect the results in a magnitude as large as physical factors, such as friction. Furthermore, results proved to be less sensitive to roughness spatial distribution than to mesh properties. Finally, the results indicate that SCS-CN may not be suitable for simulating hydrological processes together with a shallow-water model.

  14. A double perturbation method of postbuckling analysis in 2D curved beams for assembly of 3D ribbon-shaped structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhichao; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yihui

    2018-02-01

    Mechanically-guided 3D assembly based on controlled, compressive buckling represents a promising, emerging approach for forming complex 3D mesostructures in advanced materials. Due to the versatile applicability to a broad set of material types (including device-grade single-crystal silicon) over length scales from nanometers to centimeters, a wide range of novel applications have been demonstrated in soft electronic systems, interactive bio-interfaces as well as tunable electromagnetic devices. Previously reported 3D designs relied mainly on finite element analyses (FEA) as a guide, but the massive numerical simulations and computational efforts necessary to obtain the assembly parameters for a targeted 3D geometry prevent rapid exploration of engineering options. A systematic understanding of the relationship between a 3D shape and the associated parameters for assembly requires the development of a general theory for the postbuckling process. In this paper, a double perturbation method is established for the postbuckling analyses of planar curved beams, of direct relevance to the assembly of ribbon-shaped 3D mesostructures. By introducing two perturbation parameters related to the initial configuration and the deformation, the highly nonlinear governing equations can be transformed into a series of solvable, linear equations that give analytic solutions to the displacements and curvatures during postbuckling. Systematic analyses of postbuckling in three representative ribbon shapes (sinusoidal, polynomial and arc configurations) illustrate the validity of theoretical method, through comparisons to the results of experiment and FEA. These results shed light on the relationship between the important deformation quantities (e.g., mode ratio and maximum strain) and the assembly parameters (e.g., initial configuration and the applied strain). This double perturbation method provides an attractive route to the inverse design of ribbon-shaped 3D geometries, as

  15. Curved twistor spaces and H-space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tod, K.P.

    1980-01-01

    The curved twistor space construction of Penrose for anti-self-dual solutions to the Einstein vacuum equations is described. Curved twistor spaces are defined and it is shown with the aid of an example how to obtain them by deforming the complex structure of regions of flat twistor space. The connection of this procedure with Newman's H-space construction via asymptotic twistor space is outlined. (Auth.)

  16. The Effect of Velocity Correlation on the Spatial Evolution of Breakthrough Curves in Heterogeneous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoudieh, A.; Dentz, M.; Le Borgne, T.

    2017-12-01

    In heterogeneous media, the velocity distribution and the spatial correlation structure of velocity for solute particles determine the breakthrough curves and how they evolve as one moves away from the solute source. The ability to predict such evolution can help relating the spatio-statistical hydraulic properties of the media to the transport behavior and travel time distributions. While commonly used non-local transport models such as anomalous dispersion and classical continuous time random walk (CTRW) can reproduce breakthrough curve successfully by adjusting the model parameter values, they lack the ability to relate model parameters to the spatio-statistical properties of the media. This in turns limits the transferability of these models. In the research to be presented, we express concentration or flux of solutes as a distribution over their velocity. We then derive an integrodifferential equation that governs the evolution of the particle distribution over velocity at given times and locations for a particle ensemble, based on a presumed velocity correlation structure and an ergodic cross-sectional velocity distribution. This way, the spatial evolution of breakthrough curves away from the source is predicted based on cross-sectional velocity distribution and the connectivity, which is expressed by the velocity transition probability density. The transition probability is specified via a copula function that can help construct a joint distribution with a given correlation and given marginal velocities. Using this approach, we analyze the breakthrough curves depending on the velocity distribution and correlation properties. The model shows how the solute transport behavior evolves from ballistic transport at small spatial scales to Fickian dispersion at large length scales relative to the velocity correlation length.

  17. Codes and curves

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Judy L

    2000-01-01

    When information is transmitted, errors are likely to occur. Coding theory examines efficient ways of packaging data so that these errors can be detected, or even corrected. The traditional tools of coding theory have come from combinatorics and group theory. Lately, however, coding theorists have added techniques from algebraic geometry to their toolboxes. In particular, by re-interpreting the Reed-Solomon codes, one can see how to define new codes based on divisors on algebraic curves. For instance, using modular curves over finite fields, Tsfasman, Vladut, and Zink showed that one can define a sequence of codes with asymptotically better parameters than any previously known codes. This monograph is based on a series of lectures the author gave as part of the IAS/PCMI program on arithmetic algebraic geometry. Here, the reader is introduced to the exciting field of algebraic geometric coding theory. Presenting the material in the same conversational tone of the lectures, the author covers linear codes, inclu...

  18. Carbon Lorenz Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, L. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across countries. These tools allow policy-makers and the general public to grasp at a single glance the impact of conventional distribution rules such as equal caps or grandfathering, or more sophisticated ones, on the distribution of greenhouse gas emissions. Second, using the Samuelson rule for the optimal provision of a public good, the Pareto-optimal distribution of carbon emissions is compared with the distribution that follows if countries follow Nash-Cournot abatement strategies. It is shown that the Pareto-optimal distribution under the Samuelson rule can be approximated by the equal cap division, represented by the diagonal in the Lorenz curve diagram.

  19. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke and fumes, in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of

  20. Dynamics of curved fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Pelce, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in the understanding of interface dynamics of various systems: hydrodynamics, crystal growth, chemical reactions, and combustion. Dynamics of Curved Fronts is an important contribution to this field and will be an indispensable reference work for researchers and graduate students in physics, applied mathematics, and chemical engineering. The book consist of a 100 page introduction by the editor and 33 seminal articles from various disciplines.

  1. International Wage Curves

    OpenAIRE

    David G. Blanchflower; Andrew J. Oswald

    1992-01-01

    The paper provides evidence for the existence of a negatively sloped locus linking the level of pay to the rate of regional (or industry) unemployment. This "wage curve" is estimated using microeconomic data for Britain, the US, Canada, Korea, Austria, Italy, Holland, Switzerland, Norway, and Germany, The average unemployment elasticity of pay is approximately -0.1. The paper sets out a multi-region efficiency wage model and argues that its predictions are consistent with the data.

  2. Anatomical curve identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer expression of shape. This is explored in the context of identifying the boundary of breasts from an image of the female torso and the boundary of the lips from a facial image. The curves of interest are characterised by ridges or valleys. Key issues in estimation are the ability to navigate across the anatomical surface in three-dimensions, the ability to recognise the relevant boundary and the need to assess the evidence for the presence of the surface feature of interest. The first issue is addressed by the use of principal curves, as an extension of principal components, the second by suitable assessment of curvature and the third by change-point detection. P-spline smoothing is used as an integral part of the methods but adaptations are made to the specific anatomical features of interest. After estimation of the boundary curves, the intermediate surfaces of the anatomical feature of interest can be characterised by surface interpolation. This allows shape variation to be explored using standard methods such as principal components. These tools are applied to a collection of images of women where one breast has been reconstructed after mastectomy and where interest lies in shape differences between the reconstructed and unreconstructed breasts. They are also applied to a collection of lip images where possible differences in shape between males and females are of interest. PMID:26041943

  3. Estimating Corporate Yield Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Antionio Diaz; Frank Skinner

    2001-01-01

    This paper represents the first study of retail deposit spreads of UK financial institutions using stochastic interest rate modelling and the market comparable approach. By replicating quoted fixed deposit rates using the Black Derman and Toy (1990) stochastic interest rate model, we find that the spread between fixed and variable rates of interest can be modeled (and priced) using an interest rate swap analogy. We also find that we can estimate an individual bank deposit yield curve as a spr...

  4. LCC: Light Curves Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Light Curves Classifier uses data mining and machine learning to obtain and classify desired objects. This task can be accomplished by attributes of light curves or any time series, including shapes, histograms, or variograms, or by other available information about the inspected objects, such as color indices, temperatures, and abundances. After specifying features which describe the objects to be searched, the software trains on a given training sample, and can then be used for unsupervised clustering for visualizing the natural separation of the sample. The package can be also used for automatic tuning parameters of used methods (for example, number of hidden neurons or binning ratio). Trained classifiers can be used for filtering outputs from astronomical databases or data stored locally. The Light Curve Classifier can also be used for simple downloading of light curves and all available information of queried stars. It natively can connect to OgleII, OgleIII, ASAS, CoRoT, Kepler, Catalina and MACHO, and new connectors or descriptors can be implemented. In addition to direct usage of the package and command line UI, the program can be used through a web interface. Users can create jobs for ”training” methods on given objects, querying databases and filtering outputs by trained filters. Preimplemented descriptors, classifier and connectors can be picked by simple clicks and their parameters can be tuned by giving ranges of these values. All combinations are then calculated and the best one is used for creating the filter. Natural separation of the data can be visualized by unsupervised clustering.

  5. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. For continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the, clinical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects. of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration

  6. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage (typically 80%) of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. Alternatively, for continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the classical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration

  7. Seed Dispersal Anachronisms: Rethinking the Fruits Extinct Megafauna Ate

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Paulo R.; Galetti, Mauro; Jordano, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Background: Some neotropical, fleshy-fruited plants have fruits structurally similar to paleotropical fruits dispersed by megafauna (mammals .103 kg), yet these dispersers were extinct in South America 10–15 Kyr BP. Anachronic dispersal systems are best explained by interactions with extinct animals and show impaired dispersal resulting in altered seed dispersal dynamics. Methodology/Principal Findings: We introduce an operational definition of megafaunal fruits and perform a comparativ...

  8. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  9. Dispersion and current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boelskifte, S.

    1986-04-01

    A model for the simulation of particle movements in water should incorporate the mutual distance dependent correlation. As long as reliable data are given accessible a model can be created of the dispersion in a given area from a statistical description of turbulence. Current measurements have been performed in an area north of the Swedish nuclear power plant Barsebaeck, and statistical time series analysis have made it possible to estimate multivariate autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) models for these data using the Box-Jenkins method. The correlation structure for the area has been investigated in detail. Transport and dispersion models for the marine environment are used in estimating doses to the population from the aquatic food chain. Some of these models are described with special emphasis on the time and length scales they cover. Furthermore, to illustrate the background of the simulation model, short introductuions are given to health physics, time series analysis, and turbulence theory. Analysis of the simulation model shows the relative importance of the different parameters. The model can be expanded to conditional simulation, where the current measurements are used directly to simulate the movement of one of the particles. Results from the model are also compared to results from a sampling of bioindicators (Fucus vesiculosus) along the Danish coast. The reliability of bioindicators in this kind of experiment is discussed. (author)

  10. Clock synchronization and dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo; Wong, Franco N C

    2002-01-01

    We present a method to defeat effects of dispersion of timing signals when synchronizing clocks. It is based on the recently proposed 'conveyor belt synchronization' scheme and on the quantum dispersion cancellation effect

  11. Dispersion and Solvation Effects on the Structure and Dynamics of N719 Adsorbed to Anatase Titania (101) Surfaces in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids: An ab Initio Molecular Simulation Study

    KAUST Repository

    Byrne, Aaron

    2015-12-24

    Ab initio, density functional theory (DFT)-based molecular dynamics (MD) has been carried out to investigate the effect of explicit solvation on the dynamical and structural properties of a [bmim][NTf2] room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), solvating a N719 sensitizing dye adsorbed onto an anatase titania (101) surface. The effect of explicit dispersion on the properties of this dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) interface has also been studied. Upon inclusion of dispersion interactions in simulations of the solvated system, the average separation between the cations and anions decreases by 0.6 Å; the mean distance between the cations and the surface decreases by about 0.5 Å; and the layering of the RTIL is significantly altered in the first layer surrounding the dye, with the cation being on average 1.5 Å further from the center of the dye. Inclusion of dispersion effects when a solvent is not explicitly included (to dampen longer-range interactions) can result in unphysical "kinking" of the adsorbed dye\\'s configuration. The inclusion of solvent shifts the HOMO and LUMO levels of the titania surface by +3 eV. At this interface, the interplay between the effects of dispersion and solvation combines in ways that are often subtle, such as enhancement or inhibition of specific vibrational modes. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  12. Dispersing powders in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, RD

    1988-01-01

    This book provides powder technologists with laboratory procedures for selecting dispersing agents and preparing stable dispersions that can then be used in particle size characterization instruments. Its broader goal is to introduce industrial chemists and engineers to the phenomena, terminology, physical principles, and chemical considerations involved in preparing and handling dispersions on a commercial scale. The book introduces novices to: - industrial problems due to improper degree of dispersion; - the nomenclature used in describing particles; - the basic physica

  13. RMS fatigue curves for random vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenneman, B.; Talley, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue usage factors for deterministic or constant amplitude vibration stresses may be calculated with well known procedures and fatigue curves given in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. However, some phenomena produce nondeterministic cyclic stresses which can only be described and analyzed with statistical concepts and methods. Such stresses may be caused by turbulent fluid flow over a structure. Previous methods for solving this statistical fatigue problem are often difficult to use and may yield inaccurate results. Two such methods examined herein are Crandall's method and the ''3sigma'' method. The objective of this paper is to provide a method for creating ''RMS fatigue curves'' which accurately incorporate the requisite statistical information. These curves are given and may be used by analysts with the same ease and in the same manner as the ASME fatigue curves

  14. 基于平面离散曲线序列的三维几何结构识别%3D Geometrical Structure Recognition from Planar Discrete Curve Series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯兰芳; 惠延波; 卢秉恒

    2002-01-01

    提出了一种由分层离散曲线序列识别物体三维特征的方法,定义了一些能够表达平面曲线基本特性的特征,设计了用于识别物体三维结构的特征函数,基于这些特征函数,物体被分解为柱体、锥体和曲线体的组合.给出了一些具体应用实例.%A method for feature recognition of 3D geometrical part from its slicing discrete curve series is studied. Some features of planar curve, which can represent its basic characteristics, are discussed. Furthermore, a number of eigenfunction used to recognize the 3D structure of geometrical part are constructed. Based on the eigenfunction, the geometrical part is decomposed into a combination of cylinder, taper as well as surface part. Some examples are given also.

  15. Uniformization of elliptic curves

    OpenAIRE

    Ülkem, Özge; Ulkem, Ozge

    2015-01-01

    Every elliptic curve E defined over C is analytically isomorphic to C*=qZ for some q ∊ C*. Similarly, Tate has shown that if E is defined over a p-adic field K, then E is analytically isomorphic to K*=qZ for some q ∊ K . Further the isomorphism E(K) ≅ K*/qZ respects the action of the Galois group GK/K, where K is the algebraic closure of K. I will explain the construction of this isomorphism.

  16. Trend curve data development and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; Gold, R.; Simons, R.L.; Roberts, J.H.

    1986-08-01

    Existing trend curves do not account for previous and more recently observed test and power reactor flux-level, thermal neutron and gamma-ray field-induced effects. Any agreement between measured data and trend curve predictions that does not adequately represent the important neutron environmental and temperature effects as well as the microstructural damage processes, therefore, could be fortuitous. Two principal questions asked concerning the metallurgical condition of the pressure vessel and its support structures are: What are the controlling variables; and What effects do they have on changing the metallurgical properties of the vessel and its support structures throughout their lifetimes

  17. Single-particle dispersion in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Xiao, Zuoli

    2018-04-01

    Single-particle dispersion statistics in compressible box turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation. Focus is placed on the detailed discussion of effects of the particle Stokes number and turbulent Mach number, as well as the forcing type. When solenoidal forcing is adopted, it is found that the single-particle dispersion undergoes a transition from the ballistic regime at short times to the diffusive regime at long times, in agreement with Taylor's particle dispersion argument. The strongest dispersion of heavy particles is announced when the Stokes number is of order 1, which is similar to the scenario in incompressible turbulence. The dispersion tends to be suppressed as the Mach number increases. When hybrid solenoidal and compressive forcing at a ratio of 1/2 is employed, the flow field shows apparent anisotropic property, characterized by the appearance of large shock wave structures. Accordingly, the single-particle dispersion shows extremely different behavior from the solenoidal forcing case.

  18. Roc curves for continuous data

    CERN Document Server

    Krzanowski, Wojtek J

    2009-01-01

    Since ROC curves have become ubiquitous in many application areas, the various advances have been scattered across disparate articles and texts. ROC Curves for Continuous Data is the first book solely devoted to the subject, bringing together all the relevant material to provide a clear understanding of how to analyze ROC curves.The fundamental theory of ROC curvesThe book first discusses the relationship between the ROC curve and numerous performance measures and then extends the theory into practice by describing how ROC curves are estimated. Further building on the theory, the authors prese

  19. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  20. Dispersion relation for pure dust Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2011-01-01

    Pure dust Bernstein waves are investigated using non-Maxwellian kappa and (r,q) distribution functions in a collisionless, uniform magnetized dusty plasma. Dispersion relations for both the distributions are derived by considering waves whose frequency is of the order of dust cyclotron frequency, and dispersion curves are plotted. It is observed that the propagation band for dust Bernstein waves is rather narrow as compared with that of the electron Bernstein waves. However, the band width increases for higher harmonics, for both kappa and (r,q) distributions. Effect of dust charge on dispersion curves is also studied, and one observes that with increasing dust charge, the dispersion curves shift toward the lower frequencies. Increasing the dust to ion density ratio ((n d0 /n i0 )) causes the dispersion curve to shift toward the higher frequencies. It is also found that for large values of spectral index kappa (κ), the dispersion curves approach to the Maxwellian curves. The (r,q) distribution approaches the kappa distribution for r = 0, whereas for r > 0, the dispersion curves show deviation from the Maxwellian curves as expected. Relevance of this work can be found in astrophysical plasmas, where non-Maxwellian velocity distributions as well as dust particles are commonly observed.

  1. Dispersion relation for pure dust Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeba, F. [National Tokamak Fusion Program, PAEC, P.O. Box 3329, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Zahoor [National Tokamak Fusion Program, PAEC, P.O. Box 3329, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-07-15

    Pure dust Bernstein waves are investigated using non-Maxwellian kappa and (r,q) distribution functions in a collisionless, uniform magnetized dusty plasma. Dispersion relations for both the distributions are derived by considering waves whose frequency is of the order of dust cyclotron frequency, and dispersion curves are plotted. It is observed that the propagation band for dust Bernstein waves is rather narrow as compared with that of the electron Bernstein waves. However, the band width increases for higher harmonics, for both kappa and (r,q) distributions. Effect of dust charge on dispersion curves is also studied, and one observes that with increasing dust charge, the dispersion curves shift toward the lower frequencies. Increasing the dust to ion density ratio ((n{sub d0}/n{sub i0})) causes the dispersion curve to shift toward the higher frequencies. It is also found that for large values of spectral index kappa ({kappa}), the dispersion curves approach to the Maxwellian curves. The (r,q) distribution approaches the kappa distribution for r = 0, whereas for r > 0, the dispersion curves show deviation from the Maxwellian curves as expected. Relevance of this work can be found in astrophysical plasmas, where non-Maxwellian velocity distributions as well as dust particles are commonly observed.

  2. Structure and stability of acrolein and allyl alcohol networks on Ag(111) from density functional theory based calculations with dispersion corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Branda, Maria Marta; Illas, Francesc

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of acrolein and allyl alcohol with the Ag(111) surface has been studied by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations including explicitly dispersion terms. Different coverage values have been explored going from isolated adsorbed molecules to isolated dimers, interacting dimers or ordered overlayers. The inclusion of the dispersion terms largely affects the calculated values of the adsorption energy and also the distance between adsorbed molecule and the metallic surface but much less the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. Owing to the large dipole moment of acrolein, the present calculations predict that at high coverage this molecule forms a stable extensive two-dimensional network on the surface, caused by the alignment of the adsorbate dipoles. For the case of allyl alcohol, dimers and complex networks exhibit similar stability.

  3. Surface growth kinematics via local curve evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, Derek E.

    2012-11-18

    A mathematical framework is developed to model the kinematics of surface growth for objects that can be generated by evolving a curve in space, such as seashells and horns. Growth is dictated by a growth velocity vector field defined at every point on a generating curve. A local orthonormal basis is attached to each point of the generating curve and the velocity field is given in terms of the local coordinate directions, leading to a fully local and elegant mathematical structure. Several examples of increasing complexity are provided, and we demonstrate how biologically relevant structures such as logarithmic shells and horns emerge as analytical solutions of the kinematics equations with a small number of parameters that can be linked to the underlying growth process. Direct access to cell tracks and local orientation enables for connections to be made to the underlying growth process. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  4. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21-0.47+0.43 on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36-0.17+0.46.

  5. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  6. Curved Josephson junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrowolski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    The constant curvature one and quasi-one dimensional Josephson junction is considered. On the base of Maxwell equations, the sine–Gordon equation that describes an influence of curvature on the kink motion was obtained. It is showed that the method of geometrical reduction of the sine–Gordon model from three to lower dimensional manifold leads to an identical form of the sine–Gordon equation. - Highlights: ► The research on dynamics of the phase in a curved Josephson junction is performed. ► The geometrical reduction is applied to the sine–Gordon model. ► The results of geometrical reduction and the fundamental research are compared.

  7. Curved-Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je Hyun Baekt

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study is conducted on the fully-developed laminar flow of an incompressible viscous fluid in a square duct rotating about a perpendicular axis to the axial direction of the duct. At the straight duct, the rotation produces vortices due to the Coriolis force. Generally two vortex cells are formed and the axial velocity distribution is distorted by the effect of this Coriolis force. When a convective force is weak, two counter-rotating vortices are shown with a quasi-parabolic axial velocity profile for weak rotation rates. As the rotation rate increases, the axial velocity on the vertical centreline of the duct begins to flatten and the location of vorticity center is moved near to wall by the effect of the Coriolis force. When the convective inertia force is strong, a double-vortex secondary flow appears in the transverse planes of the duct for weak rotation rates but as the speed of rotation increases the secondary flow is shown to split into an asymmetric configuration of four counter-rotating vortices. If the rotation rates are increased further, the secondary flow restabilizes to a slightly asymmetric double-vortex configuration. Also, a numerical study is conducted on the laminar flow of an incompressible viscous fluid in a 90°-bend square duct that rotates about axis parallel to the axial direction of the inlet. At a 90°-bend square duct, the feature of flow by the effect of a Coriolis force and a centrifugal force, namely a secondary flow by the centrifugal force in the curved region and the Coriolis force in the downstream region, is shown since the centrifugal force in curved region and the Coriolis force in downstream region are dominant respectively.

  8. Elliptic curves for applications (Tutorial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, T.; Bernstein, D.J.; Chatterjee, S.

    2011-01-01

    More than 25 years ago, elliptic curves over finite fields were suggested as a group in which the Discrete Logarithm Problem (DLP) can be hard. Since then many researchers have scrutinized the security of the DLP on elliptic curves with the result that for suitably chosen curves only exponential

  9. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  10. Phonon dispersion in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni2MnGa studied by neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorderwisch, P.; Shapiro, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Neutron spectroscopy is an ideal technique to study the structure and dynamics of crystals. For the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni 2 MnGa, all previously obtained information from inelastic neutron scattering experiments is restricted to the phonon dispersion in the austenitic (fcc) phase of alloys with different compositions. For the (tetragonally distorted) martensitic phase recent inelastic neutron scattering data are presented. These new data were taken on a single crystal with stoichiometric composition. A single-variant martensitic phase of the sample has been obtained by the application of magnetic fields in horizontal or vertical direction with respect to the scattering plane used in the experiments. The measured phonon-dispersion curves are compared with recently published ab initio (zero-temperature) phonon-dispersion calculations. The anomalous phonon behavior observed in both, the austenitic and martensitic phase is discussed

  11. Focus on Physics: The Delightful Catenary Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2017-01-01

    When teaching how "tension" and "compression" relate to geometrical structures such as bridges, arches, and domes, The author shows a picture of the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, completed in the 14th century, and presents a lesson on using the curve called a catenary to explain how he teaches about tension and compression…

  12. A Journey Between Two Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Cherkis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A typical solution of an integrable system is described in terms of a holomorphic curve and a line bundle over it. The curve provides the action variables while the time evolution is a linear flow on the curve's Jacobian. Even though the system of Nahm equations is closely related to the Hitchin system, the curves appearing in these two cases have very different nature. The former can be described in terms of some classical scattering problem while the latter provides a solution to some Seiberg-Witten gauge theory. This note identifies the setup in which one can formulate the question of relating the two curves.

  13. Auroral electron time dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kletzing, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    A sounding rocket flight was launched from Greenland in 1985 to study high latitude, early morning auroral physics. The payload was instrumented with electron and ion detectors, AC and DC electric field experiments, a plasma density experiment, and a magnetometer to measure the ambient field. The rocket was launched during disturbed conditions, when the polar cap was in a contracted state with visible aurora overhead. The electron data contained numerous signatures indicative of time-of-flight energy dispersion characterized by a coherent structure in which lower energy electrons arrived at the rocket after higher energy electrons. A model was constructed to explain this phenomena by the sudden application of a region of parallel electric field along a length of magnetic field line above the rocket. The model incorporates detector response and uses an altitudinal density profile based on auroral zone measurements. Three types of potential structures were tried: linear, quadratic and cubic. Of the three it was found that the cubic (electric field growing in a quadratic manner moving up the field line) produced the best fit to the data. The potential region was found to be approximately 1-2 R e in extent with the lower edge 3000-4000 km away from the rocket. The background electron temperature in the model which produced the best fit to the data was of the order of 15 eV

  14. Soil Water Retention Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. E.; Kim, J.; Cifelli, R.; Chandra, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Potential water retention, S, is one of parameters commonly used in hydrologic modeling for soil moisture accounting. Physically, S indicates total amount of water which can be stored in soil and is expressed in units of depth. S can be represented as a change of soil moisture content and in this context is commonly used to estimate direct runoff, especially in the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number (CN) method. Generally, the lumped and the distributed hydrologic models can easily use the SCS-CN method to estimate direct runoff. Changes in potential water retention have been used in previous SCS-CN studies; however, these studies have focused on long-term hydrologic simulations where S is allowed to vary at the daily time scale. While useful for hydrologic events that span multiple days, the resolution is too coarse for short-term applications such as flash flood events where S may not recover its full potential. In this study, a new method for estimating a time-variable potential water retention at hourly time-scales is presented. The methodology is applied for the Napa River basin, California. The streamflow gage at St Helena, located in the upper reaches of the basin, is used as the control gage site to evaluate the model performance as it is has minimal influences by reservoirs and diversions. Rainfall events from 2011 to 2012 are used for estimating the event-based SCS CN to transfer to S. As a result, we have derived the potential water retention curve and it is classified into three sections depending on the relative change in S. The first is a negative slope section arising from the difference in the rate of moving water through the soil column, the second is a zero change section representing the initial recovery the potential water retention, and the third is a positive change section representing the full recovery of the potential water retention. Also, we found that the soil water moving has traffic jam within 24 hours after finished first

  15. Physical Properties and Effect in a Battery of Safety Pharmacology Models for Three Structurally Distinct Enteric Polymers Employed as Spray-dried Dispersion Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Fryer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Establishing a wide therapeutic index (TI for pre-clinical safety is important during lead optimization (LO in research, prior to clinical development, although is often limited by a molecules physiochemical characteristics. Recent advances in the application of the innovative vibrating mesh spray-drying technology to prepare amorphous solid dispersions may offer an opportunity to achieve high plasma concentrations of poorly soluble NCEs to enable testing and establishment of a wide TI in safety pharmacology studies. While some of the amorphous solid dispersion carriers are generally recognized as safe for clinical use, whether they are sufficiently benign to enable in vivo pharmacology studies has not been sufficiently demonstrated. Thus, the physical properties, and effect in a battery of in vivo safety pharmacology models, were assessed in three classes of polymers employed as spray-dried dispersion carriers. The polymers (HPMC-AS, Eudragit, PVAP displayed low affinity with acetone/methanol, suitable for solvent-based spray drying. The water sorption of the polymers was moderate, and the degree of hysteresis of HPMC-AS was smaller than Eudragit and PVAP indicating the intermolecular interaction of water-cellulose molecules is weaker than water-acrylate or water-polyvinyl molecules. The polymer particles were well-suspended without aggregation with a mean particle size less than 3 µm in an aqueous vehicle. When tested in conscious Wistar Han rats in safety pharmacology models (n=6-8/dose/polymer investigating effects on CNS, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular function, no liabilities were identified at any dose tested (30-300 mg/kg PO, suspension. In brief, the polymers had no effect in a modified Irwin test that included observational and evoked endpoints related to stereotypies, excitation, sedation, pain/anesthesia, autonomic balance, reflexes, and others. No effect of the polymers on gastric emptying or intestinal transit was observed

  16. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN U-MO DISPERSED FUEL OF FULL-SIZE FUEL ELEMENTS AND MINI-RODS IRRADIATED IN THE MIR REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    ALEKSEY. L. IZHUTOV; VALERIY. V. IAKOVLEV; ANDREY. E. NOVOSELOV; VLADIMIR. A. STARKOV; ALEKSEY. A. SHELDYAKOV; VALERIY. YU. SHISHIN; VLADIMIR. M. KOSENKOV; ALEKSANDR. V. VATULIN; IRINA. V. DOBRIKOVA; VLADIMIR. B. SUPRUN; GENNADIY. V. KULAKOV

    2013-01-01

    The paper summarizes the irradiation test and post-irradiation examination (PIE) data for the U-Mo low-enriched fuel that was irradiated in the MIR reactor under the RERTR Program. The PIE data were analyzed for both full-size fuel rods and mini-rods with atomized powder dispersed in Al matrix as well as with additions of 2%, 5% and 13% of silicon in the matrix and ZrN protective coating on the fuel particles. The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%235U; th...

  17. Fermions in curved spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippoldt, Stefan

    2016-01-21

    In this thesis we study a formulation of Dirac fermions in curved spacetime that respects general coordinate invariance as well as invariance under local spin base transformations. We emphasize the advantages of the spin base invariant formalism both from a conceptual as well as from a practical viewpoint. This suggests that local spin base invariance should be added to the list of (effective) properties of (quantum) gravity theories. We find support for this viewpoint by the explicit construction of a global realization of the Clifford algebra on a 2-sphere which is impossible in the spin-base non-invariant vielbein formalism. The natural variables for this formulation are spacetime-dependent Dirac matrices subject to the Clifford-algebra constraint. In particular, a coframe, i.e. vielbein field is not required. We disclose the hidden spin base invariance of the vielbein formalism. Explicit formulas for the spin connection as a function of the Dirac matrices are found. This connection consists of a canonical part that is completely fixed in terms of the Dirac matrices and a free part that can be interpreted as spin torsion. The common Lorentz symmetric gauge for the vielbein is constructed for the Dirac matrices, even for metrics which are not linearly connected. Under certain criteria, it constitutes the simplest possible gauge, demonstrating why this gauge is so useful. Using the spin base formulation for building a field theory of quantized gravity and matter fields, we show that it suffices to quantize the metric and the matter fields. This observation is of particular relevance for field theory approaches to quantum gravity, as it can serve for a purely metric-based quantization scheme for gravity even in the presence of fermions. Hence, in the second part of this thesis we critically examine the gauge, and the field-parametrization dependence of renormalization group flows in the vicinity of non-Gaussian fixed points in quantum gravity. While physical

  18. A study on CCDTL structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mutian; Xu Taoguang; Xu Wenwu; Zhou Linong

    2002-01-01

    The CCDTL (Coupled Cavity Drift Tube Linac) structure presented by Los Alamos Lab is a new structure for proton's velocity from 0.1 c to 0.5 c. The CCDTL aluminium and copper model are manufactured. The final OFHC (Oxygen Free High Conductivity) model consists of four accelerating cavities and three coupling cavities. There is only one drift tube in the accelerating cavity, so one accelerating cavity has two accelerating gaps. The model was made and tuned. The basic characteristics of the structure such as cavity frequency, dispersion curve, coupling, field profile are measured

  19. Analysis of site-specific dispersion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paesler-Sauer, J.

    1989-03-01

    This report presents an analysis of atmospheric dispersion conditions in the environs of nuclear power stations in the Federal Republic of Germany. The analysis is based on meteorological data measured on the power station sites (KFUe = nuclear reactor remote control records) and by neighbouring stations operated by the German Weather Service. The data are series of hourly mean values of wind and temperature gradient or stability class over the period of one or more years. The aim of the data analysis is to find types of dispersion conditions characterized by the flow field and stratification, and to assess the feasibility of calculating these quantities in the case of an emergency. Influences of terrain structures in the environs of the site are considered. The annual frequencies of types of dispersion situations are assessed, the capability to recognize the dispersion situation from meteorological data measured on the site and the applicability of dispersion models are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Dispersal of forest insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  1. Improved new generation dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The use of dispersants to combat oil spills has attracted controversy over the years, and there has been a number of accusations of the chemicals involved doing more harm than good. A new study by the International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association discusses the positive and the negatives of dispersant use to be considered when drawing up spill contingency plans. (author)

  2. Seed dispersal in fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  3. Experimental simulation of closed timelike curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbauer, Martin; Broome, Matthew A; Myers, Casey R; White, Andrew G; Ralph, Timothy C

    2014-06-19

    Closed timelike curves are among the most controversial features of modern physics. As legitimate solutions to Einstein's field equations, they allow for time travel, which instinctively seems paradoxical. However, in the quantum regime these paradoxes can be resolved, leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. The study of these systems therefore provides valuable insight into nonlinearities and the emergence of causal structures in quantum mechanics--essential for any formulation of a quantum theory of gravity. Here we experimentally simulate the nonlinear behaviour of a qubit interacting unitarily with an older version of itself, addressing some of the fascinating effects that arise in systems traversing a closed timelike curve. These include perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states and, most intriguingly, the ability to distinguish nominally equivalent ways of preparing pure quantum states. Finally, we examine the dependence of these effects on the initial qubit state, the form of the unitary interaction and the influence of decoherence.

  4. Trend curve data development and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; Gold, R.; Simons, R.L.; Roberts, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Existing trend curves do not account for previous and more recently observed test and power reactor flux-level, thermal neutron and γ-ray field-induced effects. Any agreement between measured data and trend curve predictions that does not adequately represent the important neutron environmental and temperature effects as well as the microstructural damage processes, therefore, could be fortuitous. Empirically derived end-of-life (EOL) and life-extension-range (LER) trend curves are presented and discussed in this paper for high temperature [∼288 0 C (550 0 F)] irradiation of two weld, two plate, and two forging pressure vessel (PV) steels and low-temperature [∼60 0 C (140 0 F)] irradiation of one support structure-type steel

  5. Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Curved Surfaces: Buckyballs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sygula, Andrzej [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of a new allotropic form of elemental carbon – the fullerenes – and subsequently other novel forms of elemental carbon with pyramidalized surfaces, most notably single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, introduced a novel structural motif to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with nonplanar surfaces. Our research program supported by BES DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER15514 has dealt with the synthesis, structural studies, and chemistry of the novel curved-surface PAHs with carbon frameworks structurally related to fullerenes. They are referred to as “buckybowls”. We prepared several new buckybowls and, even more importantly, developed the efficient, gram-scale synthetic methodologies for the preparation of small buckybowls, most notably corannulene (C20H10) and its derivatives. In addition, the employment of the corannulene-based synthons previously developed in our laboratory led to a number of highly nonplanar molecular architectures with two or more corannulene subunits with a potential for the applications as novel materials in separation sciences, nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and catalysis. In collaboration with Professor Angelici (Iowa State) we prepared and characterized several transition metal complexes of corannulene, providing the first structural characterization of η6 metal complexes of buckybowls by a single crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition to the definitive structural characterization of the complexes we demonstrated that the (η6-C6Me6)Ru2+ unit in some relatively stable complexes activate the corannulene ligand to react with proper nucleophiles suggesting that such complexex may be used in catalysis. (Section C). We have explored the efficiency of the dispersion-based interactions of curved-surface conjugated carbon networks by high-level computational models. We showed that the curvature of such networks does not reduce the van der Waals attractions as compared to the planar systems of similar size. We than

  6. Multiwavelength light curve parameters of Cepheid variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Anupam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparative analysis of theoretical and observed light curves of Cepheid variables using Fourier decomposition. The theoretical light curves at multiple wavelengths are generated using stellar pulsation models for chemical compositions representative of Cepheids in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds. The observed light curves at optical (VI, near-infrared (JHKs and mid-infrared (3.6 & 4.5-μm bands are compiled from the literature. We discuss the variation of light curve parameters as a function of period, wavelength and metallicity. Theoretical and observed Fourier amplitude parameters decrease with increase in wavelength while the phase parameters increase with wavelength. We find that theoretical amplitude parameters obtained using canonical mass-luminosity levels exhibit a greater offset with respect to observations when compared to non-canonical relations. We also discuss the impact of variation in convective efficiency on the light curve structure of Cepheid variables. The increase in mixing length parameter results in a zero-point offset in bolometric mean magnitudes and reduces the systematic large difference in theoretical amplitudes with respect to observations.

  7. Supertori are algebraic curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, J.M.; Freund, P.G.O.; Chicago Univ., IL; Chicago Univ., IL

    1988-01-01

    Super Riemann surfaces of genus 1, with arbitrary spin structures, are shown to be the sets of zeroes of certain polynomial equations in projective superspace. We conjecture that the same is true for arbitrary genus. Properties of superelliptic functions and super theta functions are discussed. The boundary of the genus 1 super moduli space is determined. (orig.)

  8. Algorithm for Automatic Generation of Curved and Compound Twills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mei-zhen; WANG Fu-mei; WANG Shan-yuan

    2005-01-01

    A new arithmetic using matrix left-shift functions for the quicker generation of curved and compound twills is introduced in this paper. A matrix model for the generation of regular, curved and compound twill structures is established and its computing simulation realization are elaborated. Examples of the algorithm applying in the simulation and the automatic generation of curved and compound twills in fabric CAD are obtained.

  9. Integrable Flows for Starlike Curves in Centroaffine Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Calini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We construct integrable hierarchies of flows for curves in centroaffine R^3 through a natural pre-symplectic structure on the space of closed unparametrized starlike curves. We show that the induced evolution equations for the differential invariants are closely connected with the Boussinesq hierarchy, and prove that the restricted hierarchy of flows on curves that project to conics in RP^2 induces the Kaup-Kuperschmidt hierarchy at the curvature level.

  10. An interactive editor for curve-skeletons: SkeletonLab

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Simone; Meloni, P.; Usai, F.; Spano, L.D.; Scateni, R.

    2016-01-01

    Curve-skeletons are powerful shape descriptors able to provide higher level information on topology, structure and semantics of a given digital object. Their range of application is wide and encompasses computer animation, shape matching, modelling and remeshing. While a universally accepted definition of curve-skeleton is still lacking, there are currently many algorithms for the curve-skeleton computation (or skeletonization) as well as different techniques for building a mesh around a give...

  11. Real parabolic vector bundles over a real curve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We define real parabolic structures on real vector bundles over a real curve. Let (X,σX ) be a real curve, and let S ⊂ X be a non-empty finite subset of X such that σX (S) = S. Let N ≥ 2 be an integer. We construct an N-fold cyclic cover p : Y → X in the category of real curves, ramified precisely over each point of S, ...

  12. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kaplan

    Full Text Available Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2 of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective juveniles (IJs of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN, e.g., Steinernema feltiae. Regulation of dispersal behavior has not been thoroughly investigated for C. elegans or any other nematode species. Based on the fact that ascarosides regulate entry in dauer stage as well as multiple behaviors in C. elegans adults including mating, avoidance and aggregation, we hypothesized that ascarosides might also be involved in regulation of dispersal behavior in C. elegans and for other nematodes such as IJ of phylogenetically related EPNs.Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of C. elegans dauer conditioned media, which shows strong dispersing activity, revealed four known ascarosides (ascr#2, ascr#3, ascr#8, icas#9. A synthetic blend of these ascarosides at physiologically relevant concentrations dispersed C. elegans dauer in the presence of food and also caused dispersion of IJs of S. feltiae and J2s of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. Assay guided fractionation revealed structural analogs as major active components of the S. feltiae (ascr#9 and C. elegans (ascr#2 dispersal blends. Further analysis revealed ascr#9 in all Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp. infected insect host cadavers.Ascaroside blends represent evolutionarily conserved, fundamentally important communication systems for nematodes from diverse habitats, and thus may provide sustainable means for control of parasitic nematodes.

  13. Models of genus one curves

    OpenAIRE

    Sadek, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we give insight into the minimisation problem of genus one curves defined by equations other than Weierstrass equations. We are interested in genus one curves given as double covers of P1, plane cubics, or complete intersections of two quadrics in P3. By minimising such a curve we mean making the invariants associated to its defining equations as small as possible using a suitable change of coordinates. We study the non-uniqueness of minimisations of the genus one curves des...

  14. High-frequency parameters of magnetic films showing magnetization dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenkov, V.V.; Zimin, A.B.; Kornev, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetization dispersion leads to skewed resonance curves shifted towards higher magnetizing fields, together with considerable reduction in the resonant absorption, while the FMR line width is considerably increased. These effects increase considerably with frequency, in contrast to films showing magnetic-anisotropy dispersion, where they decrease. It is concluded that there may be anomalies in the frequency dependence of the resonance parameters for polycrystalline magnetic films

  15. Impact factors on the structuration and the rheological behavior of the clay-water system for smectite dispersions; Facteurs determinant l'organisation et la rheologie du systeme argile-eau pour des suspensions de smectites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, S

    2007-11-15

    Smectite are swelling clays widely used in industry. Their mechanical properties are unequal according to their mineralogical and physico-chemical characteristics. The aim of this study is to improve the knowledge of the interlayer cation impact on the structure built by the smectite-water system according to the concentration. Homo-ionic (Na{sup +} et Ca{sup 2+}) and bi-ionic systems are observed. This study cross checks mineralogical methods, physicochemical analysis and broad range of rheometric tests. At low concentration (less than 60 g/l) the calcium dispersions are shear thinning and few viscous due to the layer association in huge deformable flocks. The sodium smectite layers are dispersed; the dispersions are highly viscous. The lowest viscosity is detected for mix of 20 % of sodium smectite and 80 % of calcium smectite. At higher concentration (60 to 100 g/l), the yield stress and viscoelastic properties are studied by creep-recovery tests, oscillatory tests and imposed shear step. At the liquid state, the flow is first heterogeneous with a shear banding effect then homogeneous. The results make it possible to define the concentration area characteristic of each mechanical behavior (viscosity, shear thinning and yield stress) according to the saturation cation. The thixotropic properties are characterized with de-structuring-restructuring tests. Two kinetics are determined. Finally we realize a data base with 12 natural and industrial bentonite. The rheograms would be efficient to differentiate the natural calcium bentonite (Newtonian law), natural sodium bentonite (Herschel-Bulkley law) and activated calcium bentonite (Bingham law). (author)

  16. Transverse dispersion in heterogeneous fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dershowitz, Bill; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate; Outters, Nils; Hermanson, Jan

    2004-12-01

    breakthrough curves are much more strongly affected by transverse dispersivity, with t 95 delayed by up to almost 50%. This is because when aperture is held constant, velocity varies directly with transmissivity, such that flow outside the high transmissivity channel is slower. However, even for these cases, the effect of transverse dispersivity in these single fracture studies was to increase transport times. Studies of sorbing tracer transport (Case 3) produced results similar to those found with conservative tracers, in which the magnitude of changes in breakthrough statistics due to transverse dispersion was on the same order as the changes between stochastic realizations of the spatial fields. Similarly, simulations with larger tracer release area (Case 2) also produced variations due to transverse dispersion within the range defined by stochastic realizations

  17. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H; Zhang, Jin Z; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Yano, Junko

    2015-04-14

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. The detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions.

  18. Curved VPH gratings for novel spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, J. Christopher; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Dunlap, Bart H.

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings into astronomy over a decade ago opened new possibilities for instrument designers. In this paper we describe an extension of VPH grating technology that will have applications in astronomy and beyond: curved VPH gratings. These devices can disperse light while simultaneously correcting aberrations. We have designed and manufactured two different kinds of convex VPH grating prototypes for use in off-axis reflecting spectrographs. One type functions in transmission and the other in reflection, enabling Offnerstyle spectrographs with the high-efficiency and low-cost advantages of VPH gratings. We will discuss the design process and the tools required for modelling these gratings along with the recording layout and process steps required to fabricate them. We will present performance data for the first convex VPH grating produced for an astronomical spectrograph.

  19. Anomalous dispersion enhanced Cerenkov phase-matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Singer, K.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Cahill, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The authors report on a scheme for phase-matching second harmonic generation in polymer waveguides based on the use of anomalous dispersion to optimize Cerenkov phase matching. They have used the theoretical results of Hashizume et al. and Onda and Ito to design an optimum structure for phase-matched conversion. They have found that the use of anomalous dispersion in the design results in a 100-fold enhancement in the calculated conversion efficiency. This technique also overcomes the limitation of anomalous dispersion phase-matching which results from absorption at the second harmonic. Experiments are in progress to demonstrate these results.

  20. Dispersal and metapopulation stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability.