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Sample records for structure corrosion caused

  1. Catastrophes caused by corrosion

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, huge attention has been paid to the problem of corrosion damage and destruction of metallic materials. Experience shows that failures due to corrosion problems are very important, and statistics at the world level shows that the damage resulting from the effects of various forms of corrosion is substantial and that, for example, in industrialized countries it reaches 4-5% of national incomes. Significant funds are determined annually for the prevention and control of corrosion...

  2. Evaluation of corrosion caused by the use of in natura biogas in steam generator boilers of carbon steel structural elements

    Fontenelle, Marcellus; Alves, Helton Jose, E-mail: helquimica@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil); Pellizzer, Eder Luis [Universidade do Oeste de Santa Catarina (UNOESC), Xanxere, SC (Brazil); Monteiro, Marcos Roberto; Rovere, Carlos Alberto Della [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil); Higa, Silvia Midori [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Londrina, PR (Brazil); Fontenelle, Isaddora [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    This work evaluates the corrosion process caused by the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas in natura, in steels commonly used in the construction of steam generator boilers, simulating conditions close to those found on the real application of these materials, exposing the test bodies directly to biogas in natura, flame of combustion and gases resulting from the combustion of this biofuel, in chimney. After 314 hours of exposure under the specified conditions, the corroded surfaces of ASTM A178 and ASTM A516 were analyzed, by optical microscopy, electronic scanning microscopy, X-ray diffraction and surface hardness. The determination of corrosion rates for each test condition and each material tested can be used as a parameter for the determination of the minimum tolerance for mechanical stability, in the calculation of the minimum required thickness of the structural elements of the steam generator boilers fed to biogas. (author)

  3. Evaluation of corrosion caused by the use of in natura biogas in steam generator boilers of carbon steel structural elements

    Fontenelle, Marcellus; Alves, Helton Jose; Pellizzer, Eder Luis; Monteiro, Marcos Roberto; Rovere, Carlos Alberto Della; Higa, Silvia Midori; Fontenelle, Isaddora

    2017-01-01

    This work evaluates the corrosion process caused by the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas in natura, in steels commonly used in the construction of steam generator boilers, simulating conditions close to those found on the real application of these materials, exposing the test bodies directly to biogas in natura, flame of combustion and gases resulting from the combustion of this biofuel, in chimney. After 314 hours of exposure under the specified conditions, the corroded surfaces of ASTM A178 and ASTM A516 were analyzed, by optical microscopy, electronic scanning microscopy, X-ray diffraction and surface hardness. The determination of corrosion rates for each test condition and each material tested can be used as a parameter for the determination of the minimum tolerance for mechanical stability, in the calculation of the minimum required thickness of the structural elements of the steam generator boilers fed to biogas. (author)

  4. Nuclear risk reduction study. The study of structure corrosion caused by sea salt aerosols

    Nakayasu, Fumio

    2008-01-01

    Present all nuclear power plants in Fukui prefecture are located at the bay side of Japan Sea coast. New facilities may be planed to be at ocean side. The sea salt corrosion at the ocean side should be larger than it at the bay side. We have the salt damage experimental yard at Awara sea coast and at Fukui city (about 15km from coast) for the corrosion comparison study between Japan Sea coast and inland. We confirm the amounts of sea salt aerosol vary among the season and year. The weight loss of specimen inside of shelter without filter is higher than both of sheltered with filter and inland specimen. The weight loss of specimen inside of shelter with filter is almost same as it of inland specimen. We confirmed the filter which we used is sufficient capability to prevent corrosion. We confirmed the corrosion rate of both opened specimen and sheltered specimen without filter increased after some periods. (author)

  5. Evaluation of Corrosion Caused by the use of In Natura Biogas in Steam Generator Boilers of Carbon Steel Structural Elements

    Fontenelle, Marcellus; Alves, Helton José; Monteiro, Marcos Roberto; Higa, Silvia Midori; Rovere, Carlos Alberto Della; Pellizzer, Eder Luis; Fontenelle, Isaddora

    2017-01-01

    This work evaluates the corrosion process caused by the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas in natura, in steels commonly used in the construction of steam generator boilers, simulating conditions close to those found on the real application of these materials, exposing the test bodies directly to biogas in natura, flame of combustion and gases resulting from the combustion of this biofuel, in chimney. After 314 hours of exposure under the specified conditions, the corroded surfaces of...

  6. Studying the causes for corrosive destruction of water conduits

    Azamatova, F I; Kulinichev, G P; Porubov, I S

    1979-01-01

    Pipes from different oil and gas production administrations were selected for X-ray and metallographic studies of the cause of corrosive destruction. The chemical composition and mechanical properties of the pipe material are presented in tables. The phase composition of the corrosion products was studied by X-rays. The complex structure of the layer made up of the corrosion products was taken into consideration. The studies were conducted in an X-ray diffraction chamber. The obtained results are presented in a table. The metallographic studies showed that a significant corrosive damage of the materials of water conduits occurs as a result of the development of local corrosion processes, caused by the substantive heterogeneity of the structure of the metal, related to the nonuniform distribution of the pearlite because of carbon liquidation.

  7. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-06-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed

  8. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in marine structures

    Mohammad Ismail; Nordin Yahaya

    1999-01-01

    The marine environment is known to be aggressive. Structures constructed on this belt need to undergo periodic assessment in order to ensure no defects or signs of deterioration had occurred. One of the most common deterioration that occurs on marine structures is corrosion of the reinforcement. Corrosion is an electrochemical process. The product of corrosion can increase the reinforcement volume, hence causing cracking on concrete cover. If no action is taken, delamination and spalling of concrete will follow and this will affect the structures integrity. It is therefore important to know the state of the structures condition by monitoring them periodically. NDT techniques that can detect the occurrence of corrosion of reinforcement in concrete uses half cell and resistivity meter. The method of application and interpretation of results are discussed. (author)

  9. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  10. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  11. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Sanjeev Kumar Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  12. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  13. Monitoring corrosion in reinforced concrete structures

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Many defects can cause deterioration and cracks in concrete; these are results of poor concrete mix, poor workmanship, inadequate design, shrinkage, chemical and environmental attack, physical or mechanical damage, and corrosion of reinforcing steel (RS). We want to develop a suite of sensors and systems that can detect that corrosion is taking place in RS and inform owners how serious the problem is. By understanding the stages of the corrosion process, we can develop special a sensor that detects each transition. First, moisture ingress can be monitored by a fiber optics humidity sensor, then ingress of Chloride, which acts as a catalyst and accelerates the corrosion process by converting iron into ferrous compounds. We need a fiber optics sensor which can quantify Chloride ingress over time. Converting ferric to ferrous causes large volume expansion and cracks. Such pressure build-up can be detected by a fiber optic pressure sensor. Finally, cracks emit acoustic waves, which can be detected by a high frequency sensor made with phase-shifted gratings. This paper will discuss the progress in our development of these special sensors and also our plan for a field test by the end of 2014. We recommend that we deploy these sensors by visually inspecting the affected area and by identifying locations of corrosion; then, work with the designers to identify spots that would compromise the integrity of the structure; finally, drill a small hole in the concrete and insert these sensors. Interrogation can be done at fixed intervals with a portable unit.

  14. Corrosion

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  15. Structural Effects of Reinforced Concrete Beam Due to Corrosion

    Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Idris, Nur'ain; Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Sarpin, Norliana; Zainal, Rozlin; Kasim, Narimah

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete is one of the main issues among construction stakeholders. The main consequences of steel corrosion include loss of cross section of steel area, generation of expansive pressure which caused cracking of concrete, spalling and delaminating of the concrete cover. Thus, it reduces the bond strength between the steel reinforcing bar and concrete, and deteriorating the strength of the structure. The objective of this study is to investigate the structural effects of corrosion damage on the performance of reinforced concrete beam. A series of corroded reinforced concrete beam with a corrosion rate of 0%, 20% and 40% of rebar corrosion is used in parametric study to assess the influence of different level of corrosion rate to the structural performance. As a result, the used of interface element in the finite element modelling predicted the worst case of corrosion analysis since cracks is induced and generate at this surface. On the other hand, a positive linear relationship was sketched between the increase of expansive pressure and the corrosion rate. Meanwhile, the gradient of the graph is decreased with the increase of steel bar diameter. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is a significant effect on the load bearing capacity of the structure where the higher corrosion rate generates a higher stress concentration at the mid span of the beam. This study could predict the residual strength of reinforced concrete beam under the corrosion using the finite element analysis. The experimental validation is needed on the next stage to investigate the quantitative relation between the corrosion rate and its influence on the mechanical properties.

  16. Interrelationship between structure and corrosion behaviour of zirconium

    Guenther, T [Bayer A.G., Leverkusen (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-05-01

    Due to plant failures caused by the break-down of zirconium grade 702 subjected to sulphuric acid the structure and corrosion behaviour of welded and as delivered specimens were tested for various heat treatments. It was shown by structure investigations and electron microprobe analysis that the corrosion behaviour of zirconium (in boiling 65 pct sulphuric acid) is strongly infuenced by the structure, which in its turn is dependent on the grade of purity and the prehistory of the material. Type, amount, and distribution of residual elements or precipitations caused by them are responsible for the corrosion resistance. This is valid particularly for the element iron. The plant failures mentioned here coincided with the examination results. Measures to improve the chemical resistance of pure zirconium subjected to extremely aggressive media were derived.

  17. Methods to Evaluate Corrosion in Buried Steel Structures: A Review

    Lorena-de Arriba-Rodriguez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, there are thousands of metal structures completely or partially buried in the soil. The main concern in their design is corrosion. Corrosion is a mechanism that degrades materials and causes structural failures in infrastructures, which can lead to severe effects on the environment and have direct impact on the population health. In addition, corrosion is extremely complex in the underground environment due to the variability of the local conditions. The problem is that there are many methods to its evaluation but none have been clearly established. In order to ensure the useful life of such structures, engineers usually consider an excess thickness that increases the economic cost of manufacturing and does not satisfy the principles of efficiency in the use of resources. In this paper, an extended revision of the existing methods to evaluate corrosion is carried out to optimize the design of buried steel structures according to their service life. Thus, they are classified into two categories depending on the information they provide: qualitative and quantitative methods. As a result, it is concluded that the most exhaustive methodologies for estimating soil corrosion are quantitative methods fed by non-electrochemical data based on experimental studies that measure the mass loss of structures.

  18. Corrosion in airframes

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  19. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    Cherry, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion damage that has been found in a number of nuclear power plant containment structures can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. This has prompted concerns regarding the capacity of corroded containments to withstand accident loadings. To address these concerns, finite element analyses have been performed for a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment structure. Using ABAQUS, the pressure capacity was calculated for a typical vessel with no corrosion damage. Multiple analyses were then performed with the location of the corrosion and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis. Using a strain-based failure criterion, a open-quotes lower boundclose quotes, open-quotes best estimateclose quotes, and open-quotes upper boundclose quotes failure level was predicted for each case. These limits were established by: determining the amount of variability that exists in material properties of typical containments, estimating the amount of uncertainty associated with the level of modeling detail and modeling assumptions, and estimating the effect of corrosion on the material properties

  20. Evaluation and rehabilitation of corrosion damaged reinforced concrete structures

    Paul, I.S.

    1999-01-01

    For the last two decades, rehabilitation of corrosion damaged concrete structures has been one of the most important challenges faced by the construction industry throughout the world. The extent of the damage is significant in cold climates and also in hot and humid climates. In both cases, the corrosion is invariably initiated by ingress of salts into the concrete either from de-icing salts used on roads, or from salt-laden air, soils or ground water. However, there is a contrast in sites of distress in the two climatic regions mentioned above. In cold climates, where de-icing salts are used, the damage is generally to superstructures and is therefore visible, but in hot, humid coastal regions damage is primarily in the substructures and may not be so clearly apparent. This paper presents the corrosion mechanism in concrete deterioration, the methods of evaluation of the damaged structures, and rehabilitation strategies. A case history of a concrete rehabilitation project is included together with some lessons learned in rehabilitation of corrosion damaged structures. Recommendations are made for maintenance of concrete structures and a warning is issued that salt run-off from roads in cold climates may cause distress in below ground concrete structures, similar to structures in hot and humid climates with saline groundwater and soils. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor structural material forming less radioactive corrosion product

    Nakazawa, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide nuclear reactor structural materials forming less radioactive corrosion products. Constitution: Ni-based alloys such as inconel alloy 718, 600 or inconel alloy 750 and 690 having excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical property even in coolants at high temperature and high pressure have generally been used as nuclear reactor structural materials. However, even such materials yield corrosion products being attacked by coolants circulating in the nuclear reactor, which produce by neutron irradiation radioactive corrosion products, that are deposited in primary circuit pipeways to constitute exposure sources. The present invention dissolves dissolves this problems by providing less activating nuclear reactor structural materials. That is, taking notice on the fact that Ni-58 contained generally by 68 % in Ni changes into Co-58 under irradiation of neutron thereby causing activation, the surface of nuclear reactor structural materials is applied with Ni plating by using Ni with a reduced content of Ni-58 isotopes. Accordingly, increase in the radiation level of the nuclear reactor structural materials can be inhibited. (K.M.)

  2. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  3. A corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures.

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated a multi-parameter corrosion monitoring system for existing reinforced concrete structures in chloride-laden service environments. The system was fabricated based on a prototype concrete corrosion measurement system that : had bee...

  4. Corrosion initiation and service life of concrete structures

    Byung Hwan Oh; Bong Seok Jang

    2005-01-01

    The Corrosion of steel reinforcements in concrete is of great concern in the view of safety and durability of reinforced concrete structures. The reinforced concrete structures exposed to sea environments suffer from corrosion of steel bars due to chloride ingress. The chloride penetration into concrete is influenced by many parameters such as type of cement, mixture proportions and existence of rebars. The conventional diffusion analyses have neglected the existence of steel bar in concrete. The purpose of the present paper is, therefore, to explore the effects of reinforcement on the chloride diffusion in concrete structures by incorporating realistic diffusion models. To this end, the nonlinear binding isotherm which includes the effects of cement types and mixture proportion has been introduced in the chloride diffusion analysis. The effects of reinforcements on the chloride penetration have been analyzed through finite element analysis. The present study indicates that the chlorides are accumulated in front of a reinforcing bar and the accumulation of chlorides is much more pronounced for the case of larger-size bars. The higher accumulation of chlorides at bar location causes faster corrosion of reinforcing bars. The corrosion initiation time reduces by about 30-40 percent when the existence of rebar is considered in the chloride diffusion analysis. (authors)

  5. Corrosion Protection Systems and Fatigue Corrosion in Offshore Wind Structures: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Seth J. Price

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Concerns over reducing CO2 emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels in combination with an increase in worldwide energy demands is leading to increased development of renewable energies such as wind. The installation of offshore wind power structures (OWS is one of the most promising approaches for the production of renewable energy. However, corrosion and fatigue damage in marine and offshore environments are major causes of primary steel strength degradation in OWS. Corrosion can reduce the thickness of structural components which may lead towards fatigue crack initiation and buckling. These failure mechanisms affect tower service life and may result in catastrophic structural failure. Additionally, environmental pollution stemming from corrosion’s by-products is possible. As a result, large financial investments are made yearly for both the prevention and recovery of these drawbacks. The corrosion rate of an OWS is dependent on different characteristics of attack which are influenced by access to oxygen and humidity. Structural degradation can occur due to chemical attack, abrasive action of waves, and microorganism attacks. Inspired by technological and scientific advances in recent years, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the current protective coating system technologies used to protect OWS as well as future perspectives.

  6. Cause Analysis of Flow Accelerated Corrosion and Erosion-Corrosion Cases in Korea Nuclear Power Plants

    Lee, Y. S.; Lee, S. H. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, K. M. [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Significant piping wall thinning caused by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and Erosion-Corrosion (EC) continues to occur, even after the Mihama Power Station unit 3 secondary pipe rupture in 2004, in which workers were seriously injured or died. Nuclear power plants in many countries have experienced FAC and EC-related cases in steam cycle piping systems. Korea has also experienced piping wall thinning cases including thinning in the downstream straight pipe of a check valve in a feedwater pump line, the downstream elbow of a control valve in a feedwater flow control line, and failure of the straight pipe downstream of an orifice in an auxiliary steam return line. Cause analyses were performed by reviewing thickness data using Ultrasonic Techniques (UT) and, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images for the failed pipe, and numerical simulation results for FAC and EC cases in Korea Nuclear Power Plants. It was concluded that the main cause of wall thinning for the downstream pipe of a check valve is FAC caused by water vortex flow due to the internal flow shape of a check valve, the main cause of wall thinning for the downstream elbow of a control valve is FAC caused by a thickness difference with the upstream pipe, and the main cause of wall thinning for the downstream pipe of an orifice is FAC and EC caused by liquid droplets and vortex flow. In order to investigate more cases, additional analyses were performed with the review of a lot of thickness data for inspected pipes. The results showed that pipe wall thinning was also affected by the operating condition of upstream equipment. Management of FAC and EC based on these cases will focus on the downstream piping of abnormal or unusual operated equipment.

  7. Image-based corrosion recognition for ship steel structures

    Ma, Yucong; Yang, Yang; Yao, Yuan; Li, Shengyuan; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2018-03-01

    Ship structures are subjected to corrosion inevitably in service. Existed image-based methods are influenced by the noises in images because they recognize corrosion by extracting features. In this paper, a novel method of image-based corrosion recognition for ship steel structures is proposed. The method utilizes convolutional neural networks (CNN) and will not be affected by noises in images. A CNN used to recognize corrosion was designed through fine-turning an existing CNN architecture and trained by datasets built using lots of images. Combining the trained CNN classifier with a sliding window technique, the corrosion zone in an image can be recognized.

  8. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2008-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., increased shutdown radiation, generation of defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, and increased volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behavior is greatly affected by water quality and differs according to the water quality values and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of the key issues that determine corrosion-related problems, but it is not the only issue. Most corrosion-related phenomena, e.g., flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, the ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. (orig.)

  9. Prevention of superheater corrosion caused by chlorine; Tulistimien kloorikorroosion estaeminen

    Roppo, J. [Kvaerner Power Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    2006-12-19

    Combustion of CO{sub 2}-neutral fuels is becoming more attractive and common method to decrease CO2 emissions of energy production. Also well managed and controlled combustion of waste fractions compared to their landfilling produces much less greenhouse gas emissions. In combustion of these fuels in high efficiency power plants notably increased superheater corrosion risk is prevailing, mainly caused by chlorine. Typical such fuels are forest, agricultural and household residues, biological sludge's of pulp and paper industry and RDF made from separated municipal and industrial solid waste. The goal of the project is to develop clearly cheaper and more effective method to protect superheaters, which enables combustion of biomass and waste fuels with higher energy shares. Tests in pilot and full scale power plants will reveal the potential and applicability of the developed method for commercial use. (orig.)

  10. Maintenance Planning for Chloride Initiated Corrosion in Concrete Structures

    Engelund, S.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion of the reinforcement in concrete structures can be initiated when the chloride concentration around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. In order to prevent the corrosion from reaching a stage where the load-bearing capacity of a given structure suffers a substantial decrease...

  11. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    Xingjun Lv

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  12. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  13. Nonuniform Grain Boundary Corrosion and the Local Electrode Potential in Crevicing. Types and Models of Precipitation Induced Nonuniform Grain Boundary Corrosion. Investigation of Sensitization and Grain Boundary Corrosion in Ferritic Stainless Steel. The Local Electrode Potential in Cavities, Crevices and Cracks and Its Role in Causing Degradation of Structural Materials.

    1987-02-01

    gratitude to the Instituto Universitario de Tecnologia - Regi6n Capital and to Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas, both in...electrochemical and exposure pitting test with passive metals". Paper No. 273. CORROSION 66. National Association of Corrosion Engineers. 1986. 3D

  14. Full surface inspection methods regarding reinforcement corrosion of concrete structures

    Reichling, K.; Raupach, M.; Broomfield, J.; Gulikers, J.; L'Hostis, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    For reinforced concrete structures a localisation of all significant critical areas can only be done by a full surface inspection. The economic advantages are obvious: uncritical areas have not to be repaired expensively.The first step of the assessment should always be a visual inspection. The range of deterioration causes can be limited and the degree of deterioration may be estimated roughly. The inspection program can be adjusted to the requirements. By means of a full surface potential mapping areas with a high risk for chloride induced reinforcement corrosion can be localised, although no deteriorations are visually detectable at the concrete surface. In combination with concrete cover depth and resistivity measurements areas with corrosion promoting exposure conditions can be localised even if the reinforcement is not yet de-passivated. The following publication gives an overview about the essential full surface investigation methods to localise critical areas regarding corrosion of steel in concrete. The selection of methods is based on the inspection procedure given in reference 2. (authors)

  15. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  16. Economic effects of full corrosion surveys for aging concrete structures

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Raupach, M.; Reichling, K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the economic effects of full corrosion surveys of concrete structures. The background is that the existing concrete infrastructure is aging, while being exposed to aggressive influences, which increases the occurrence of corrosion and related concrete damage over time. The

  17. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Seabed sediment (SBS) is a special soil that is covered by seawater. With the developments in marine oil exploitation and engineering, more and more steel structures have been buried in SBS. SBS corrosion has now become a serious problem in marine environment and an important issue in corrosion science. In this ...

  18. Erosion corrosion in water-steam systems: Causes and countermeasures

    Heitmann, H.G.; Kastner, W.

    1985-01-01

    For the purpose of a better understanding of erosion corrosion, the physical and chemical principles will be summarized briefly. Then results obtained at KWU in the BENSON test section in tests on test specimens in single-phase flow of fully demineralized water will be presented. The experimental studies provide information about the most important influencing parameters. These include flow rate, fluid temperature and water quality (pH value and oxygen content). In addition, the resistance of various materials is compared, and the resistance of magnetite coatings to erosion corrosion is investigated. Furthermore, tests are presented that will show the extent to which erosion corrosion in power plants can be influenced by chemical measures

  19. Analytical model for time to cover cracking in RC structures due to rebar corrosion

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Ghosh, A.K.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ramanujam, S.

    2006-01-01

    The structural degradation of concrete structures due to reinforcement corrosion is a major worldwide problem. Reinforcement corrosion causes a volume increase due to the oxidation of metallic iron, which is mainly responsible for exerting the expansive radial pressure at the steel-concrete interface and development of hoop tensile stresses in the surrounding concrete. Cracking occurs, once the maximum hoop tensile stress exceeds the tensile strength of the concrete. The cracking begins at the steel-concrete interface and propagates outwards and eventually results in the thorough cracking of the cover concrete and this would indicate the loss of service life for the corrosion affected structures. An analytical model is proposed to predict the time required for cover cracking and the weight loss of reinforcing bar in corrosion affected reinforced concrete structures. The modelling aspects of the residual strength of cracked concrete and the stiffness contribution from the combination of reinforcement and expansive corrosion products have also been incorporated in the model. The problem is modeled as a boundary value problem and the governing equations are expressed in terms of the radial displacement. The analytical solutions are presented considering a simple two-zone model for the cover concrete, viz. cracked or uncracked. Reasonable estimation of the various parameters in the model related to the composition and properties of expansive corrosion products based on the available published experimental data has also been discussed. The performance of the proposed corrosion cracking model is then investigated through its ability to reproduce available experimental trends. Reasonably good agreement between experimental results and the analytical predictions has been obtained. It has also been found that tensile strength and initial tangent modulus of cover concrete, annual mean corrosion rate and modulus of elasticity of reinforcement plus corrosion products combined

  20. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating

  1. Sensor Systems for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete Structures

    K.Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It is a need of permanently embedded corrosion monitoring devices to monitor the progress of corrosion problems on a new or existing reinforced concrete structures before embarking on repair or rehabilitation of the structures. Numerous devices are available for investigating corrosion problems, because no single technique exists which tells an engineer what he needs to know, namely how much damage there is on a structure now and how rapidly the damage will grow with time. In this investigation the studies on the sensors systems based on the measurements of half cell potential of rebars inside the concrete, resistivity of concrete, corrosion rate of rebars by eddy current measurements and sensing of chloride ions are reported. An integrated system consists of above sensors are fabricated and embedded into concrete. The response from each sensor was acquired and analyzed by NI hardware through LabVIEW software.

  2. Water chemistry: cause and control of corrosion degradation in nuclear power plants

    Kain, Vivekanand

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion degradation of a material is directly determined by the water chemistry, material (composition, fabrication procedure and microstructure) and by the stress/strain in the material under operating conditions. Water chemistry plays an important role in both uniform corrosion and localized forms of corrosion of materials. Once we understand how water chemistry is contributing to corrosion of a material, it is logical to modify/change that water chemistry to control the corrosion degradation. In nuclear power plants, different water chemistries have been used in different components/systems. This paper will cover the origin of corrosion degradation in the Primary Heat Transport system of different reactor types, Steam Generator tubing, secondary circuit pipelines, service water pipelines and auxiliary systems and establish the role of water chemistry in causing corrosion degradation. The history of changes in water chemistry adopted in these systems to control corrosion degradation is also described. It is shown by examples that there is an obvious limitation in changing water chemistry to control corrosion degradation and in those cases, a change of material or change of the state of stresses/fabrication procedure becomes necessary. The role of water chemistry as a causative factor and also as a controlling parameter on particular types of corrosion degradation e.g. stress corrosion cracking, flow accelerated corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion is illustrated. It will be shown that increase in dissolved oxygen content (due to radiolysis in nuclear reactors) is sufficient to make even the de-mineralized water to cause stress corrosion cracking in Boiling Water Reactors. Hydrogen Water Chemistry (by hydrogen injection) to control dissolved oxygen is shown to control the stress corrosion cracking. However, it is not possible to control dissolved oxygen at all parts of the Boiling Water Reactors. Therefore, a further refinement in terms of noble metal

  3. Fuel element failures caused by iodine stress corrosion

    Videm, K.; Lunde, L.

    1976-01-01

    Sections of unirradiated cladding tubes were plugged in both ends by mechanical seals and internally pressurized with argon containing iodine. The time to failure and the strain at failure as a function of stress was determined for tubing with different heat treatments. Fully annealed tubes suffer cracking at the lowest stress but exhibit the largest strains at failure. Elementary iodine is not necessary for stress corrosion: small amounts of iodides of zirconium, iron and aluminium can also give cracking. Moisture, however, was found to act as an inhibitor. A deformation threshold exists below which stress corrosion failure does not occur regardless of the exposure time. This deformation limit is lower the harder the tube. The deformation at failure is dependent on the deformation rate and has a minimum at 0.1%/hr. At higher deformation rates the failure deformation increases, but only slightly for hard tubes. Fuel was over-power tested at ramp rates varying between 0.26 to 30 W/cm min. For one series of fuel pins the failure deformations of 0.8% at high ramp rates were in good agreement with predictions based on stress corrosion experiments. For another series of experiments the failure deformation was surprisingly low, about 0.2%. (author)

  4. Investigation on the thermographic detection of corrosion in RC structures

    Tantele, Elia A.; Votsis, Renos A.; Kyriakides, Nicholas; Georgiou, Panagiota G.; Ioannou, Fotia G.

    2017-09-01

    Corrosion of the steel reinforcement is the main problem of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Over the past decades, several methods have been developed aiming to detect the corrosion process early in order to minimise the structural damage and consequently the repairing costs. Emphasis was given in developing methods and techniques of non-destructive nature providing fast on-the-spot detection and covering large areas rather that concentrating on single locations. This study, investigates a non-destructive corrosion detection technique for reinforced concrete, which is based on infrared thermography and the difference in thermal characteristics of corroded and non-corroded steel rebars. The technique is based on the principle that corrosion products have poor heat conductivity, and they inhibit the diffusion of heat that is generated in the reinforcing bar due to heating. For the investigation RC specimens, have been constructed in the laboratory using embedded steel bars of different corrosion states. Afterward, one surface of the specimens was heated using an electric device while thermal images were captured at predefined time instants on the opposite surface with an IR camera. The test results showed a clear difference between the thermal characteristics of the corroded and the non-corroded samples, which demonstrates the potential of using thermography in corrosion detection in RC structures.

  5. The anti corrosive design of structural metallic elements in buildings with large exploitation period

    Avila Ayon, V.; Rodriguez Quesada, A. L.

    2009-01-01

    The corrosion deterioration in metallic structural elements, with the consistent loss of his physical and mechanical properties, is cause by errors in the design or fabrication, that allows the accumulation of humidity and contaminants in the surfaces, or acceleration zones of the corrosion processes, as the bimetalics pairs. The aggressiveness of the environment and the productive processes that develop in industrial installations, causes the apparition of premature failures that engage the edification use. The identification of design errors is the first step in the conservation of these structures. the elimination and made a project adapted to the proper installations conditions, is essential procedures to prolong the edification useful life with an optimum and rational use of the resources that destined for this end. The investigation is about the results obtained in the diagnostic and the conservation of industrial installment, with large exploitation periods, in which existed evidences of failures by corrosion, specifically to the elimination of errors of design. (Author) 12 refs

  6. Corrosion caused by elevator and spider marks on CRA pipe: Comparison of conventional inserts and a new gripping system

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant alloys (CRA) are used to reduce corrosion damage to casing and tubing strings and prolong the life span of the well pipe. An analysis of various corrosion mechanisms shows that surface integrity is an important factor in corrosion prevention. Surface damage caused by inappropriate handling or conventional slip markings contribute directly to the development and propagation of corrosion. A newly developed gripping system distributes the load equally onto a large number of small peaks, minimizing the indentation of each single peak. The new gripping system does not damage the surface integrity of the pipe, virtually eliminating the corrosion potential.

  7. Corrosion-resistant multilayer structures with improved reflectivity

    Soufli, Regina; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Robinson, Jeff C.

    2013-04-09

    In one general embodiment, a thin film structure includes a substrate; a first corrosion barrier layer above the substrate; a reflective layer above the first corrosion barrier layer, wherein the reflective layer comprises at least one repeating set of sub-layers, wherein one of the sub-layers of each set of sub-layers being of a corrodible material; and a second corrosion barrier layer above the reflective layer. In another general embodiment, a system includes an optical element having a thin film structure as recited above; and an image capture or spectrometer device. In a further general embodiment, a laser according to one embodiment includes a light source and the thin film structure as recited above.

  8. Simple experiments studying the catastrophic corrosion of stainless steel caused by sodium leaks

    Mathison, J.; Trevalion, P.A.; Hamer, A.N.

    1971-01-01

    Under certain conditions, small quantities of soditum escaping through a small hole may cause extensive corrosion and cratering on the outside of the containment in the vicinity of the leak and there is a possibility that this might lead to a major rupture of the containment. It is difficult to estimate such a corrosion rate by conducting post mortems after an incident because of the lack of precise information about times and temperatures. Simple sodium burning experiments have therefore been carried out in an attempt to provide rough quantitative data on the size of these corrosion rates. These showed that the average rate of corrosion of specimens of 18.8.1 stainless steel beneath a burning pool of sodium was of the order of 0.05 cm/hr at 600 ° C and 0.005 cm/hr at 400 ° C. Enhanced corrosion occurs at the periphery of the burning sodium. The rate of penetration will depend on the shape of the corrosion profile which exists in the affected surface. The times needed to penetrate different wall thicknesses of stainless steel pipework have been calculated for various corrosion profiles similar to those which have been observed after incidents in REML. (author)

  9. Corrosion of structural materials for Generation IV systems

    Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Cabet, C.; Courouau, J.L.; Martinelli, L.; Arnoux, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum aims at developing future generation nuclear energy systems. Six systems have been selected for further consideration: sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). CEA, in the frame of a national program, of EC projects and of the GIF, contributes to the structural materials developments and research programs. Particularly, corrosion studies are being performed in the complex environments of the GEN IV systems. As a matter of fact, structural materials encounter very severe conditions regarding corrosion concerns: high temperatures and possibly aggressive chemical environments. Therefore, the multiple environments considered require also a large diversity of materials. On the other hand, the similar levels of working temperatures as well as neutron spectrum imply also similar families of materials for the various systems. In this paper, status of the research performed in CEA on the corrosion behavior of the structural material in the different environments is presented. The materials studied are either metallic materials as austenitic (or Y, La, Ce doped) and ferrito-martensitic steels, Ni base alloys, ODS steels, or ceramics and composites. In all the environments studied, the scientific approach is identical, the objective being in all cases the understanding of the corrosion processes to establish recommendations on the chemistry control of the coolant and to predict the long term behavior of the materials by the development of corrosion models. (author)

  10. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  11. Experimental investigation on the threshold chloride concentration for corrosion initiation in reinforced concrete structures

    Byung Hwan Oh; Seung Yup Jang

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion of steel reinforcements in concrete is of great importance in the view of safety and durability of reinforced concrete structures. This study is focused on the corrosion behavior of steel bars induced by internal chlorides in concrete. The main objective of this study is to determine the threshold chloride concentration causing depassivation and active corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete. To examine the threshold concentration of chloride ion, the half-cell potential, the chemical composition of extracted pore solutions of concrete and the extent of corroded area of the specimens were measured. Major test variables include the added amount of chlorides in concrete, type of binder, and water-to-binder ratios. From the present comprehensive test results, the factors influencing threshold chloride concentration are investigated, and the rational ranges of threshold chloride concentration causing active corrosion of steels are proposed. The present study provides the realistic chloride limit for corrosion initiation of reinforced concrete structures, which can be used efficiently in the future technical specification. (authors)

  12. Anaerobic Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel Caused by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    Ru Jia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous bacterium capable of forming problematic biofilms in many environments. They cause biocorrosion of medical implants and industrial equipment and infrastructure. Aerobic corrosion of P. aeruginosa against stainless steels has been reported by some researchers while there is a lack of reports on anaerobic P. aeruginosa corrosion in the literature. In this work, the corrosion by a wild-type P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1 biofilm against 304 stainless steel (304 SS was investigated under strictly anaerobic condition for up to 14 days. The anaerobic corrosion of 304 SS by P. aeruginosa was reported for the first time. Results showed that the average sessile cell counts on 304 SS coupons after 7- and 14-day incubations were 4.8 × 107 and 6.2 × 107 cells/cm2, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy corroborated the sessile cell counts. The X-ray diffraction analysis identified the corrosion product as iron nitride, confirming that the corrosion was caused by the nitrate reducing biofilm. The largest pit depths on 304 SS surfaces after the 7- and 14-day incubations with P. aeruginosa were 3.9 and 7.4 μm, respectively. Electrochemical tests corroborated the pitting data.

  13. Copper Tube Pitting in Santa Fe Municipal Water Caused by Microbial Induced Corrosion.

    Burleigh, Thomas D; Gierke, Casey G; Fredj, Narjes; Boston, Penelope J

    2014-06-05

    Many copper water lines for municipal drinking water in Santa Fe, New Mexico USA, have developed pinhole leaks. The pitting matches the description of Type I pitting of copper, which has historically been attributed to water chemistry and to contaminants on the copper tubing surface. However, more recent studies attribute copper pitting to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). In order to test for microbes, the copper tubing was fixed in hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), then the tops of the corrosion mounds were broken open, and the interior of the corrosion pits were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis found that microbes resembling actinobacteria were deep inside the pits and wedged between the crystallographic planes of the corroded copper grains. The presence of actinobacteria confirms the possibility that the cause of this pitting corrosion was MIC. This observation provides better understanding and new methods for preventing the pitting of copper tubing in municipal water.

  14. Copper Tube Pitting in Santa Fe Municipal Water Caused by Microbial Induced Corrosion

    Thomas D. Burleigh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many copper water lines for municipal drinking water in Santa Fe, New Mexico USA, have developed pinhole leaks. The pitting matches the description of Type I pitting of copper, which has historically been attributed to water chemistry and to contaminants on the copper tubing surface. However, more recent studies attribute copper pitting to microbial induced corrosion (MIC. In order to test for microbes, the copper tubing was fixed in hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS, then the tops of the corrosion mounds were broken open, and the interior of the corrosion pits were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The analysis found that microbes resembling actinobacteria were deep inside the pits and wedged between the crystallographic planes of the corroded copper grains. The presence of actinobacteria confirms the possibility that the cause of this pitting corrosion was MIC. This observation provides better understanding and new methods for preventing the pitting of copper tubing in municipal water.

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Brazed Zinc-Coated Structured Sheet Metal

    A. Nikitin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc brazing has, in comparison to arc welding, the advantage of less heat input while joining galvanized sheet metals. The evaporation of zinc is reduced in the areas adjacent to the joint and improved corrosion protection is achieved. In the automotive industry, lightweight design is a key technology against the background of the weight and environment protection. Structured sheet metals have higher stiffness compared to typical automobile sheet metals and therefore they can play an important role in lightweight structures. In the present paper, three arc brazing variants of galvanized structured sheet metals were validated in terms of the corrosion behavior. The standard gas metal arc brazing, the pulsed arc brazing, and the cold metal transfer (CMT® in combination with a pulsed cycle were investigated. In experimental climate change tests, the influence of the brazing processes on the corrosion behavior of galvanized structured sheet metals was investigated. After that, the corrosion behavior of brazed structured and flat sheet metals was compared. Because of the selected lap joint, the valuation of damage between sheet metals was conducted. The pulsed CMT brazing has been derived from the results as the best brazing method for the joining process of galvanized structured sheet metals.

  16. Effect of temperature on structure and corrosion resistance for ...

    The effect of plating temperatures between 60 and 90◦C on structure and corrosion resistance for elec- troless NiWP coatings ..... which helps to form fine grain. At 80 .... [23] Zhang W X, Jiang Z H, Li G Y and Jiang Q 2008 Surf. Coat. Technol.

  17. Monitoring dc stray current corrosion at sheet pile structures

    Peelen, W.H.A.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Leegwater, G.; Kanten-Roos, W. van; Courage, W.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Steel is discarded by railway owners as a material for underground structures near railway lines, due to uncertainty over increased corrosion by DC stray currents stemming from the traction power system. This paper presents a large scale field test in which stray currents interference of a sheet

  18. Investigation of Stress Concentration and Casing Strength Degradation Caused by Corrosion Pits

    Wei Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Downhole casing and tubing are subjected to corrosion in many cases because of the exposure to corrosive environment. A more serious problem is that pitting corrosion occurs in the casing inner surface. Meanwhile, downhole strings are subjected to various forms of mechanical loads, for example, internal pressure load, external collapse load, or both. These loads acting on the corrosion pits will cause stress concentration and degrade the casing strength. Thus, it is essential to evaluate the stress concentration degree reasonably. The SCF (stress concentration factor is usually used to characterize the degree of stress concentration induced by corrosion pits. This paper presented a comparison on the SCFs regarding the analytical method for a single pit and experimental method for double pits. The results show that the SCF of a single pit depends mainly on the depth of the corrosion pit; however, the SCF of the double pits strongly depends on the pits distance. A correction factor of 1.3 was recommended in the double pits SCF prediction model.

  19. On the application of thermodynamics of corrosion for service life design of concrete structures

    Küter, Andre; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    2010-01-01

    There are unexploited possibilities in the application of thermodynamics of corrosion for service life design (SLD) of concrete structures. Thermodynamics provides means for insightful descriptions of corrosion mechanisms and of corrosion protection mechanisms. Strategies for corrosion protection...... of the application of thermodynamics for SLD and gives examples of two applications: description of corrosion processes and design of countermeasures. Emphasis is set on chloride induced corrosion....... can be based on thermodynamically consistent corrosion mechanisms and evaluation of existing and design of new countermeasures can be performed using thermodynamics. Similarly, materials concepts for embedded electrodes can be designed using thermodynamics. The present paper provides a brief outline...

  20. FEM Modelling of the Evolution of Corrosion Cracks in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Corrosion cracks are caused by the increasing volume of corrosion products during the corrosion of the reinforcement. After corrosion initiation the rust products from the corroded reinforcement will initially fill the porous zone near the reinforcement and the result in an expansion of the concr......Corrosion cracks are caused by the increasing volume of corrosion products during the corrosion of the reinforcement. After corrosion initiation the rust products from the corroded reinforcement will initially fill the porous zone near the reinforcement and the result in an expansion...... of the concrete near the reinforcement. Tensile stresses are then initiated in the concrete. With increasing corrosion, the tensile stresses will at a certain time reach a critical value and cracks will be developed. The increase of the crack with after formation of the initial crack is the subject of this paper...

  1. The effect of corrosion on the structural reliability of steel offshore structures

    Melchers, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers essential theoretical concepts and data requirements for engineering structural reliability assessment suitable for the estimation of the safety and reliability of corroding ships, offshore structures and pipelines. Such infrastructure operates in a harsh environment. Allowance must be made for structural deterioration since protective measures such as paint coatings, galvanizing or cathodic protection may be ineffective. Reliability analysis requires accurate engineering models for the description and prediction of material corrosion loss and for the maximum depth of pitting. New probability-based models for both these forms of corrosion have been proposed recently and calibrated against a wide range of data. The effects of water velocity and of water pollution are reviewed and compared with recently reported field data for a corrosion at an offshore oil platform. The data interpreted according to the model show good correlation when allowance is made for the season of first immersion and the adverse effects of seawater velocity and of water pollution. An example is given to illustrate the application of reliability analysis to a pipeline subject to pitting corrosion. An important outcome is that good quality estimation of the longer-term probability of loss of structural integrity requires good modelling of the longer-term corrosion behaviour. This is usually associated with anaerobic corrosion. As a result, it cannot be extrapolated from data for short-term corrosion as this is associated with aerobic corrosion conditions

  2. The effect of corrosion on the structural reliability of steel offshore structures

    Melchers, Robert E. [Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability, Department of Civil, Surveying and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan NSW 2300 (Australia)]. E-mail: rob.melchers@newcastle.edu.au

    2005-10-01

    This paper considers essential theoretical concepts and data requirements for engineering structural reliability assessment suitable for the estimation of the safety and reliability of corroding ships, offshore structures and pipelines. Such infrastructure operates in a harsh environment. Allowance must be made for structural deterioration since protective measures such as paint coatings, galvanizing or cathodic protection may be ineffective. Reliability analysis requires accurate engineering models for the description and prediction of material corrosion loss and for the maximum depth of pitting. New probability-based models for both these forms of corrosion have been proposed recently and calibrated against a wide range of data. The effects of water velocity and of water pollution are reviewed and compared with recently reported field data for a corrosion at an offshore oil platform. The data interpreted according to the model show good correlation when allowance is made for the season of first immersion and the adverse effects of seawater velocity and of water pollution. An example is given to illustrate the application of reliability analysis to a pipeline subject to pitting corrosion. An important outcome is that good quality estimation of the longer-term probability of loss of structural integrity requires good modelling of the longer-term corrosion behaviour. This is usually associated with anaerobic corrosion. As a result, it cannot be extrapolated from data for short-term corrosion as this is associated with aerobic corrosion conditions.

  3. Influence of structural relaxation and partial devitrification on the corrosion resistance of Fe78B13Si9 amorphous alloy

    Souza, C.A.C.; Politi, F.S.; Kiminami, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous alloys obtained by rapid solidification from the melt exhibit a similar structure to those observed in the liquid state, i.e., without long range ordering, in such a way that the constituents of the alloy usually are randomly and homogeneously distributed. Amorphous alloys, depending on their composition, may exhibit interesting characteristics such as very soft magnetic properties and improved resistance to corrosion. The high corrosion resistance of these alloys is attributed mainly to a higher rate of dissolution of passivating elements in the amorphous state. In addition, amorphous alloys are chemically homogeneous and free of defects such as grain boundaries, precipitates and segregation, which are favorable sites for corrosion. The corrosion resistance of amorphous alloys also depends on their thermal history. Several authors have reported that structural changes, such as structural relaxation and devitrification caused by annealing, change significantly the corrosion properties of these alloys. The purpose of this paper is to study corrosion resistance of the amorphous FeBSi alloy and the effects of structural changes such as structural relaxation and partial crystallization caused by annealing

  4. Experimental Protocol to Determine the Chloride Threshold Value for Corrosion in Samples Taken from Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    Angst, Ueli M; Boschmann, Carolina; Wagner, Matthias; Elsener, Bernhard

    2017-08-31

    The aging of reinforced concrete infrastructure in developed countries imposes an urgent need for methods to reliably assess the condition of these structures. Corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel is the most frequent cause for degradation. While it is well known that the ability of a structure to withstand corrosion depends strongly on factors such as the materials used or the age, it is common practice to rely on threshold values stipulated in standards or textbooks. These threshold values for corrosion initiation (Ccrit) are independent of the actual properties of a certain structure, which clearly limits the accuracy of condition assessments and service life predictions. The practice of using tabulated values can be traced to the lack of reliable methods to determine Ccrit on-site and in the laboratory. Here, an experimental protocol to determine Ccrit for individual engineering structures or structural members is presented. A number of reinforced concrete samples are taken from structures and laboratory corrosion testing is performed. The main advantage of this method is that it ensures real conditions concerning parameters that are well known to greatly influence Ccrit, such as the steel-concrete interface, which cannot be representatively mimicked in laboratory-produced samples. At the same time, the accelerated corrosion test in the laboratory permits the reliable determination of Ccrit prior to corrosion initiation on the tested structure; this is a major advantage over all common condition assessment methods that only permit estimating the conditions for corrosion after initiation, i.e., when the structure is already damaged. The protocol yields the statistical distribution of Ccrit for the tested structure. This serves as a basis for probabilistic prediction models for the remaining time to corrosion, which is needed for maintenance planning. This method can potentially be used in material testing of civil infrastructures, similar to established

  5. Corrosion and corrosion protection of support structures for offshore wind energy devices (OWEA)

    Momber, A. [Muehlhan AG, Schlinckstrasse 3, D-21107 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The paper provides a review about the corrosion and corrosion protection of offshore wind energy devices (OWEA). Firstly, special features resulting from location and operation of OWEA are being discussed. Secondly, types of corrosion and corrosion phenomena are summarized in a systematic way. Finally, practical solutions to the corrosion protection of OWEA, including steel allowances, cathodic protection and coatings and linings, are discussed. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Lead-Bismuth technology ; corrosion resistance of structural materials

    Jeong, Ji Young; Park, Won Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Lead-Bismuth (Pb-Bi) eutectic alloy was determined as a coolant material for the HYPER system being studied by KAERI. The Pb-Bi alloy as a coolant, has a number of the favorable thermo-physical and technological properties, while it is comparatively corrosive to the structural materials. It is necessary to solve this problem for providing a long failure-proof operation of the facilities with Pb-Bi coolant. It seems to be possible to maintain corrosion resistance on structural material up to 600 deg C by using of various technologies, but it needs more studies for application to large-scale NPPs. 22 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  7. Ultrasonic assessment of service life of concrete structures subject to reinforcing steel corrosion

    Udegbunam, Ogechukwu Christian

    Over half of the bridges in the United States were built before 1970. Such bridges and the network of roads that they carry include the Inter State system, which was built as part of the great public works program, following the end of the Second World War. During that era, the emphasis was on strength design and economical construction of new structures, and not much premium was placed on durability and maintainability concerns. Since the end of this construction boom in the early 1970s, the concern for the durability of transportation infrastructure has steadily gained prominence among those agencies that must secure, program and administer funds for maintaining highway networks. The objective of this research was to develop a nondestructive method of assessing the durability of concrete bridge decks susceptible to damage from corrosion of embedded reinforcing steel. This was accomplished by formulating a holistic approach that accounts for the major factors that influence corrosion based deterioration of reinforced concrete. In this approach, the assessment of the durability of concrete bridge decks is based on a model that estimates the time it takes for the cover concrete to fail a result of stresses caused by expansion of reinforcing steel bars, due to corrosion activities. This time to failure is comprised of two distinct periods that must be evaluated before the problem can be solved. The research consisted of an experimental program and an analytical study. In the experimental program concrete specimens were cast and tested to determine their diffusivity and mechanical properties. The diffusivity was used to evaluate the period it takes for corrosion of the reinforcing bars to commence. In the analytical study, the resistance of the concrete structure against the internal forces caused by corrosion was evaluated with the finite element techniques. This resistance was used to evaluate the period defining the failure of the cover concrete. These two periods

  8. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Unknown

    corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion ... cables, steel rigs, pipelines and other marine facilities, is ..... make high strength steel material to crack with stress ... of SBS has yet been very limited, and selection of.

  9. Development of an Improved Crack Propagation Model for Corrosion-Induced Cover Cracking in RC Structures

    Hilyati, S.; Nizam, Z. M.; Zurisman, M. A. A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2017-06-01

    During the last two decades, reinforced concrete (RC) has been extensively used in most of the world as one of the common construction material due to its advantages and durability. However, RC structures exposed to marine environments are subjected to chloride attack. Chlorides from seawater penetrate into RC structures are not only causing severe corrosion problems but also affect the durability and serviceability of such structures. This paper investigates the influence of transverse reinforcement and spacing of reinforcing bars on concrete cover cracking of two-way RC slab specimens using accelerated corrosion tests. The experimental program involved the testing of four RC slab specimens and was generally designed to observe the crack width and the time of crack to propagate. An improved model for predicting the timing of crack propagation based on the experimental data was then developed.

  10. Detrimental effect of Air pollution, Corrosion on Building Materials and Historical Structures

    N. Venkat Rao; M. Rajasekhar; Dr. G. Chinna Rao

    2016-01-01

    The economy of any country would be drastically changed if there were no corrosion. The annual cost of corrosion world wise is over 3 % of the worlds GDP. As pet the sources available, India losses $ 45 billion every year on account of corrosion of infrastructure, Industrial machinery and other historical heritage. Keeping this critical and alarming situation in view, this paper focuses on how all these forms of corrosion affect building materials and historical structures. It als...

  11. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures. Betonirakenteiden raudoituksen korroosion tutkiminen

    Meuronen, A

    1992-03-01

    Ageing and aggressive enviromental conditions of concrete structures will result in deterioration of concrete and corrosion of steel in concrete. Corrosion of steel will in time result in the end of the service life or expensive renovations, unless corrosion of steel is noticed and renovated in time. Corrosion of steel in concrete can be found out by the present corrosion measurement methods, so that renovation can be started in right time. The report presents mainly on the basis of the literature references the following corrosion measurement methods: polarisation resistance, AC-impedance, electrical resistance probe, electrochemical noice and half-cell potential mapping. The half-cell potential mapping will be presented more precisely than the other corrosion measurement methods, for the potential mapping is the most used method. Concrete and Soils Laboratory of Imatran Voima Oy uses in the measurement of reinforcement corrosion the English, eight channel potential measuring equipment.

  12. Measurement of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures; Betonirakenteiden raudoituksen korroosion tutkiminen

    Meuronen, A

    1992-03-01

    Ageing and aggressive enviromental conditions of concrete structures will result in deterioration of concrete and corrosion of steel in concrete. Corrosion of steel will in time result in the end of the service life or expensive renovations, unless corrosion of steel is noticed and renovated in time. Corrosion of steel in concrete can be found out by the present corrosion measurement methods, so that renovation can be started in right time. The report presents mainly on the basis of the literature references the following corrosion measurement methods: polarisation resistance, AC-impedance, electrical resistance probe, electrochemical noice and half-cell potential mapping. The half-cell potential mapping will be presented more precisely than the other corrosion measurement methods, for the potential mapping is the most used method. Concrete and Soils Laboratory of Imatran Voima Oy uses in the measurement of reinforcement corrosion the English, eight channel potential measuring equipment.

  13. Integral diagnostic in the failure causes of external corrosion of a natural gas transport pipeline

    Mora-Mendoza, J.L.; Saucedo-Robles, L.C.; Rodriguez-Clemente, H. [PEMEX Gas y Petroquimica Basica, Subdireccion de Ductos; Marina Nacional 329, Edificio B-1, Piso 8, Col. Huasteca, D.F., CP 11311 (Mexico); Gonzalez-Nunez, M.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos, CP 62490 (Mexico); Zavala-Olivares, G.; Hernandez-Gayosso, M.J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Exploracion y Produccion, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, D.F., CP 07730 (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this study consisted in investigating the possible causes which give rise to the presence of low wall pipe thicknesses on a 16'' natural gas transport pipeline, even though during the last 12-year period cathodic protection (CP) potentials were kept in the protection range at which external corrosion should not occur. Results from in-line inspection from a 16'' natural gas transport pipeline showed 46 indications with more than 80% wall thickness lost due to external corrosion in the second segment of the pipeline. Direct inspection at the indication locations, review of the CP system performance, pipeline maintenance programs and studies, allowed to make an integral diagnostic where it was found out that the main cause of external corrosion was an inappropriate coating application since the pipeline construction, this situation has originated the increase of CP shielding effects through time. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. An AFM and XPS study of corrosion caused by micro-liquid of dilute sulfuric acid on stainless steel

    Wang Rongguang

    2004-01-01

    Micro-liquid of dilute sulfuric acid deposited on SUS304 steel surface were observed with the ac non-contact mode of an atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the detail of the corrosion process caused by them was investigated with the contact mode of the AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDXS). As a result, even not applying bias voltages between the tip of the cantilever and the specimen, micro-liquid of sulfuric acid can be successfully imaged using the ac non-contact mode of AFM. Two shapes of micro-acid, i.e., micro-droplets and micro-films, were found to co-exist on the specimen surface. On areas covered by micro-films of acid, only small corrosion product particles appeared and no corrosion pits were found. Beneath micro-droplets, corrosion reaction continue to produce pits until they were all consumed to form a corrosion product (mainly iron oxides) with almost the same shape with the droplet. The total corrosion reaction time was speculated to be between 690 and 1500 ks. The corrosion product formed from micro-droplets was believed to be a process of accumulating small corrosion product particles from the liquid/substrate interface to the surface of the formerly produced corrosion product. The XPS and WDXS analysis also supports the above results

  15. Research on corrosion detection for steel reinforced concrete structures using the fiber optical white light interferometer sensing technique

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Cui, Yanjun; Kong, Xianglong; Wei, Heming; Zhang, Pinglei; Sun, Changsen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of steel rebar corrosion monitoring technique for steel reinforced concrete structures is proposed, designed, and tested. The technique is based on the fiber optical white light interferometer (WLI) sensing technique. Firstly, a feasibility test was carried out using an equal-strength beam for comparison of strain sensing ability between the WLI and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The comparison results showed that the sensitivity of the WLI is sufficient for corrosion expansion strain monitoring. Then, two WLI corrosion sensors (WLI-CSs) were designed, fabricated, and embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion. Their performance was studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that expansion strain along the fiber optical coil winding area can be detected and measured accurately by the proposed sensor. The advantages of the proposed monitoring technique allow for quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring to be executed in real time for reinforced concrete structures and with low cost. (paper)

  16. Pitting corrosion and structural reliability of corroding RC structures: Experimental data and probabilistic analysis

    Stewart, Mark G.; Al-Harthy, Ali

    2008-01-01

    A stochastic analysis is developed to assess the temporal and spatial variability of pitting corrosion on the reliability of corroding reinforced concrete (RC) structures. The structure considered herein is a singly reinforced RC beam with Y16 or Y27 reinforcing bars. Experimental data obtained from corrosion tests are used to characterise the probability distribution of pit depth. The RC beam is discretised into a series of small elements and maximum pit depths are generated for each reinforcing steel bar in each element. The loss of cross-sectional area, reduction in yield strength and reduction in flexural resistance are then inferred. The analysis considers various member spans, loading ratios, bar diameters and numbers of bars in a given cross-section, and moment diagrams. It was found that the maximum corrosion loss in a reinforcing bar conditional on beam collapse was no more than 16%. The probabilities of failure considering spatial variability of pitting corrosion were up to 200% higher than probabilities of failure obtained from a non-spatial analysis after 50 years of corrosion. This shows the importance of considering spatial variability in a structural reliability analysis for deteriorating structures, particularly for corroding RC beams in flexure

  17. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  18. Corrosion resistance of structural material AlMg-2 in water following heat treatment and cooling

    Maman Kartaman A; Djoko Kisworo; Dedi Hariyadi; Sigit

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion tests of structural material AlMg-2 in water were carried out using autoclave in order to study the effects of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of the material. Prior to the tests, the samples were heat-treated at temperatures of 90, 200, 300 and 500 °C and cooled in air, sand and water. The corrosion tests were conducted in water at temperature of 150 °C for 250 hours. The results showed that AlMg-2 samples were corroded although the increase of mass gain was relatively small. Heat treatment from 90 to 500 °C in sand cooling media resulted in an increase of mass gain despite that at 300 °C the increase was less than those at 200 °C and 500 °C. For water cooling media in the temperature range of 90 to 200 °C, the mass gain increased from 0.1854 g/cm 2 to 2.1204 g/cm 2 although after 200 °C it decreased to 1.8207 g/cm 2 and 1.6779 g/cm 2 respectively. For air cooling media, the mass gain was relatively constant. Based on the experiment results, it can be concluded that heat treatment and cooling did not significantly influence the corrosion resistance of material AlMg-2. The passive film Al 2 O 3 on the surface was able to protect the inner surface from further corrosion. Water media with pH range from 4 – 9 did not cause damage to passive layer formed. (author)

  19. Effect of boron control of environment on corrosion and resistance to low-cycle corrosion fatigue in structural steels

    Babej, Yu.I.; Zhitkov, V.V.; Zvezdin, Yu.I.; Liskevich, I.Yu.; Nazarov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tests of the specimens on total, contact and crevice corrosion, corrosion cracking and low-cycle fatigue are conducted for determination of corrosion and corrosion-fatigue characteristics in the 15Kh3NMFA, 10N3MFA, 10Kh16N4B, 05Kh13N6M2 structural steels, used in energetics. The environment is subjected to boron control and contacting with atmosphere for simulation of stop and operation modes of the facility. The experiments are carried out in the distilled water with 12g/l H 3 BO 3 and 10 mg/l Cl' at 25, 60, 100 deg C under contacting with atmosphere. It is established, that the pearlitic steels 15Kh3NMFA, 10N3MFA, as well as transition and martensitic 05Kh13N6M2 and 10Kh16N4B steels are highly stable to total, crevice and contact corrosion at the high parameters of aqueous boron-containing medium. Steel resistance to low-cycle fracture decreases slightly under the conditions similar to the operation ones, in the water with 12 g/l H 3 BO 3 . Durability of the pearlitic steels at the simulation of stop conditions decreases more noticeably, crack formation as a rule, initiating from corrosion spots

  20. Oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents: effectiveness of balloon dilatation in children

    Doo, E.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.H. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, J.H.; Song, H.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate the safety and clinical effectiveness of balloon dilatation in children for oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents. Materials and methods: The study comprised 11 children (median age 6 years; range 1-14 years) with oesophageal strictures caused by corrosive agents, who underwent a total of 36 balloon dilatation sessions. The technical and clinical success, recurrence of dysphagia, complications, and primary and secondary patency rates were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Technical success was achieved in 91% of patients and in 97% of balloon dilatation sessions. Clinical success (defined as improved food intake and reduced dysphagia within 1 month of the first balloon dilatation session) was achieved in 64% of patients (7/11). During the mean 35-month follow-up period (range 1-89 months), 10 (91%) patients experienced recurrence. Oesophageal rupture (types 1 or 2) occurred in 45% of patients and in 31% of balloon dilatation sessions. Primary patency rates at 6 months and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 36, 27, 14, 14, 14, and 14%, respectively. Secondary patency rates at 6 months and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 82, 82, 82, 56, 42, and 42%, respectively. The secondary patency rate was higher than the primary patency rate (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The present study examined oesophageal balloon dilatation for paediatric oesophageal strictures caused by the ingestion of corrosive agents. Although the technical success rate was high and there were no deaths, the clinical success rate was low owing to a high recurrence rate. However, repeated balloon dilatations resulted in an acceptable secondary patency rate.

  1. Electrochemical techniques to detect corrosion in concrete structures in nuclear installations - Technical note

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of corrosion in aqueous media is of electrochemical nature. This means that the oxidation of the metal is counterbalanced by the reduction of another substance in another region of the metallic surface. Therefore, zones (anodes and cathodes) with different electrochemical potential, develop. In the case of concrete the electrolyte is constituted by the pore solution, which is very alkaline. This pore solution is formed by mainly a mixture of KOH and NaOH presenting pH values ranging between 12.6-14. The solution is saturated in Ca(OH) 2 . Steel embedded in concrete is naturally protected by this high alkalinity and by the barrier effect of the cover itself. The two main causes of electrochemical corrosion are carbonation and the presence of chlorides. Carbonation usually induces a generalized corrosion while chloride will lead into pitting or localized attack. The corrosion can be easily recognized by the rust presence on the rebar and by the appearance of cracks running parallel to the rebars. The objective of this report is to describe the electrochemical non-destructive techniques that can be used in real size reinforced concrete structures to assess the corrosion condition of their reinforcement. These techniques can be used indistinctly in conventional civil engineering structures or in those of nuclear installations. Electrochemical techniques are used to detect electrochemical corrosion activity of metallic reinforcements. They cannot quantify stress corrosion cracking or hydrogen embrittlement although may give some qualitative information about them. The aims of their applications may be one of the following circumstances: 1. Quality control of new constructions; 2. Condition evaluation of existing structures for: - Identification of steel de-passivation, - Detecting corroding areas for rehabilitation purposes, - Calculation of residual load-bearing capacity of the structure, - Prediction of the damage evolution, - Determination of the

  2. Simulation of Corrosion Process for Structure with the Cellular Automata Method

    Chen, M. C.; Wen, Q. Q.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, from the mesoscopic point of view, under the assumption of metal corrosion damage evolution being a diffusive process, the cellular automata (CA) method was proposed to simulate numerically the uniform corrosion damage evolution of outer steel tube of concrete filled steel tubular columns subjected to corrosive environment, and the effects of corrosive agent concentration, dissolution probability and elapsed etching time on the corrosion damage evolution were also investigated. It was shown that corrosion damage increases nonlinearly with increasing elapsed etching time, and the longer the etching time, the more serious the corrosion damage; different concentration of corrosive agents had different impacts on the corrosion damage degree of the outer steel tube, but the difference between the impacts was very small; the heavier the concentration, the more serious the influence. The greater the dissolution probability, the more serious the corrosion damage of the outer steel tube, but with the increase of dissolution probability, the difference between its impacts on the corrosion damage became smaller and smaller. To validate present method, corrosion damage measurements for concrete filled square steel tubular columns (CFSSTCs) sealed at both their ends and immersed fully in a simulating acid rain solution were conducted, and Faraday’s law was used to predict their theoretical values. Meanwhile, the proposed CA mode was applied for the simulation of corrosion damage evolution of the CFSSTCs. It was shown by the comparisons of results from the three methods aforementioned that they were in good agreement, implying that the proposed method used for the simulation of corrosion damage evolution of concrete filled steel tubular columns is feasible and effective. It will open a new approach to study and evaluate further the corrosion damage, loading capacity and lifetime prediction of concrete filled steel tubular structures.

  3. Experimental and Empirical Time to Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures under Different Curing Conditions

    Ahmed A. Abouhussien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures, especially those in marine environments, are commonly subjected to high concentrations of chlorides, which eventually leads to corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel. The total time to corrosion of such structures may be divided into three stages: corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods. This paper evaluates, both empirically and experimentally, the expected time to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures. The tested reinforced concrete samples were subjected to ten alternative curing techniques, including hot, cold, and normal temperatures, prior to testing. The corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods in this investigation were experimentally monitored by an accelerated corrosion test performed on reinforced concrete samples. Alternatively, the corrosion initiation time for counterpart samples was empirically predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion for comparison. The results showed that the corrosion initiation periods obtained experimentally were comparable to those obtained empirically. The corrosion initiation was found to occur at the first jump of the current measurement in the accelerated corrosion test which matched the half-cell potential reading of around −350 mV.

  4. Fractures in high-strength bolts due to hydrogen induced stress corrosion. Causes and corrective actions

    Hoche, Holger; Oechsner, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Delayed brittle fractures of high-strength bolts of the strength class 10.9 are presented, taking the example of three damage cases. The respective damage mechanisms could be attributed to hydrogen induced stress corrosion which was caused, in turn, by hydrogen absorption during operation. The examples were chosen with a particular focus on the material condition's susceptibility which explains the cause for the occurrence of the damage mechanism. However, in only one of the three cases the susceptibility was evident and could be explained by violations of normative specifications and an unfavorable material choice. Whereas in the two other examples, only slight or no deviations from the standards and/or regulations could be found. The influencing parameters that caused the damage, those that further promoted the damage, as well as possible corrective actions are discussed taking into account the three exemplary damage cases.

  5. Non-destructive electrochemical techniques applied to the corrosion evaluation of the liner structures in nuclear power plants

    Martinez, I.; Castillo, A.; Andrade, C.

    2008-01-01

    The liner structure in nuclear power plants provides containment for the operation and therefore the study of its durability and integrity during its service life is an important issue. There are several causes for the deterioration of the liner, which in general involve corrosion due to its metallic nature. The present paper is aimed at describing the assessment of corrosion problems of two liners from two different nuclear power plants, which were evaluated using non-destructive electrochemical techniques. In spite of the testing difficulties arisen, from the results extracted it can be concluded that the electrochemical techniques applied are adequate for the corrosion evaluation. They provide important information about the integrity of the structure and allow for its evolution with time to be assessed

  6. Eradication of the corrosion-causing bacterial strains Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans using photodisinfection

    Street, C.N.; Gibbs, A.J. [Biocorrosion Solutions Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) can cause oil and gas pipelines to fail prematurely. The free-floating bacteria collects on the inner pipeline surface to form complex adherent biofilms. This study evaluated the use of photodisinfection as a means of treating 2 sulfate-reducing bacterial strains known to contribute to MIC. The sulfate-reducing strains Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were studied experimentally to a concentration of 10{sup 7} colony-forming units per millimeter. Bacterial inocula was made to an optical density of 0.150 at 420 nm in order to assess biofilm growth. The study showed that photodisinfection was able to eradicate more than 99 per cent of the bacterial populations prepared in the study. The method was highly effective in removing the biofilms known to cause MIC in oil and gas pipelines. A close-loop dynamic flow system model will be prepared to evaluate the ability of photodisinfection to inhibit bacterially-influenced corrosion of steel coupons. 24 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.

  7. Corrosion and corrosion control

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  8. Evidence of the pitting corrosion induced embrittlement of the structural steel SAE 8620

    Atanazio Filho, Nelson do Nascimento; Mansur, Tanius Rodrigues; Rabello, Emerson Giovani

    2007-01-01

    The influence of an aggressive environment (NaCl 3.5% aerated solution) on fatigue crack initiation and crack growth behavior were studied. This study comprised corrosion fatigue tests using specimens of SAE 8620 steel. The decreasing cyclic frequency (60 Hz to 11.7 Hz) effect on corrosion fatigue crack initiation behavior was examined. The tests carried out under rotating-bending loading conditions at 11.7 Hz (700 rpm), showed that pitting corrosion caused by anodic attack was responsible for corrosion fatigue crack initiation (author)

  9. Corrosion cracking

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  10. Modeling of Metal Structure Corrosion Damage: A State of the Art Report

    Francesco Portioli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The durability of metal structures is strongly influenced by damage due to atmospheric corrosion, whose control is a key aspect for design and maintenance of both new constructions and historical buildings. Nevertheless, only general provisions are given in European codes to prevent the effects of corrosion during the lifetime of metal structures. In particular, design guidelines such as Eurocode 3 do not provide models for the evaluation of corrosion depth that are able to predict the rate of thickness loss as a function of different influencing parameters. In this paper, the modeling approaches of atmospheric corrosion damage of metal structures, which are available in both ISO standards and the literature, are presented. A comparison among selected degradation models is shown in order to evaluate the possibility of developing a general approach to the evaluation of thickness loss due to corrosion.

  11. Influence of Portland Cement Class on the Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement in Cement Mortar Caused by Penetrating Chloride and Sulfate from the Environment

    Bikić, F.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of portland cement class on the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar caused by penetrating chloride or sulfate from the environment in already hardened cement mortar is investigated in this paper. Three classes of portland cement have been used for the tests, PC 35, PC 45 and PC 55. Cylindrical samples of cement mortar with steel reinfor- cement in the middle were treated 6 months at room temperature in the following solutions: w(SO42- = 2.1 % and w(Cl- = 5 %. Two techniques have been used for testing corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar: Tafel extrapolation technique and potentiodynamic polarization technique. Investigations were conducted by potentiostat/galvanostat Princeton Applied Research 263A-2 with the software PowerCORR®. The results of both techniques indi-cate the most active corrosion of steel reinforcement in the samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both treated solutions, while the lowest corrosion of the steel reinforcement was observed in cement samples prepared from cement PC 55. This conclusion was drawn by analyzing the results shown in Figs. 1–4. Comparing corrosion current density of samples, working electrodes, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2, the results show the most stable corrosion of steel reinforcement in samples prepared from cement PC 55, and the most active corrosion in samples prepared from ce- ment PC 35. The most active corrosion in samples prepared from cement PC 35 is evident from the positions of the open circuit potentials whose values are less for samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both the treated solution, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2. Comparison of the anodic polarization curves of the working electrodes in both the treated solutions, Figs. 3 and 4, also shows that the intensity of corrosion is the largest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 35 and the smallest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 55. Investigation results should be

  12. A Probabilistic Model for Chloride-Ingress and Initation of Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Engelund, S.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion of the reinforcement is a major problem for a large number of reinforced concrete structures because it can lead to a substantial decrease of the load-bearing capacity. One mode of corrosion initiation is that the chloride content around the reinforcement exceeds a critical threshold va...

  13. Structure Analysis Of Corrosion Resistant Thermal Sprayed Coatings On Low Alloy Steels

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-01

    Metallic coatings have been proved to reduce the rate of corrosion of steel in various atmospheres. In this work the structure of Al, Cu-Al and Zn thermal sprayed coatings is examined. The as formed coatings are extremely rough, and they are composed of several phases which increase corrosion resistance as it was determined Salt Spray Chamber tests.

  14. Erosion-corrosion of structural materials of wet steam turbines

    Tomarov, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    A model of erosion-corrosion wear of elements of a wet steam zone and a condensate-feeding path of turbines is considered. It is shown that diffusion of impurities and corrosion products in pores of an oxide layer is the control mechanism under conditions of laminar flow of a media. Processes of mass transfer are controlling factors in turbulent flow

  15. Corrosion of reinforcement bars in steel ibre reinforced concrete structures

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe

    and the influence of steel fibres on initiation and propagation of cracks in concrete. Moreover, the impact of fibres on corrosion-induced cover cracking was covered. The impact of steel fibres on propagation of reinforcement corrosion was investigated through studies of their impact on the electrical resistivity...... of concrete, which is known to affect the corrosion process of embedded reinforcement. The work concerning the impact of steel fibres on initiation and propagation of cracks was linked to corrosion initiation and propagation of embedded reinforcement bars via additional studies. Cracks in the concrete cover...... are known to alter the ingress rate of depassivating substances and thereby influence the corrosion process. The Ph.D. study covered numerical as well as experimental studies. Electrochemically passive steel fibres are electrically isolating thus not changing the electrical resistivity of concrete, whereas...

  16. Investigation into the cause of leak in the pipe of the corrosion test apparatus of IS process

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Suwa, Hirokazu

    2008-12-01

    The thermochemical water-splitting hydrogen production IS process utilizes corrosive chemicals such as sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid. Corrosion tests in IS process environments have been carried out to get the corrosion data of materials. In the corrosion test in 90wt% sulfuric acid at 400degC, the leak of sulfuric acid was observed in a pipe connected with a reflux condenser. The cause of the leakage is a significant knowledge for the operation of the test apparatus. Therefore the cause was investigated. A 1mm wide through hole was detected in the pipe around the welding bead. By visual observation after cutting the pipe, the wall thickness of the pipe became thin at the inside welding bead around the through hole. In addition, EMPA showed that the inhomogeneous distribution of the constituent elements of the pipe was observed around the through hole. For these reasons, it is estimated that the lowering of the corrosion resistance by the sensitization at the welding caused the leakage. (author)

  17. Influence of grain structure on quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion of high strength aluminum alloy

    Liu, ShengDan, E-mail: csuliusd@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, ChengBo [Light Alloy Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Deng, YunLai; Zhang, XinMing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-11-01

    The influence of grain structure on quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion of high strength aluminum alloy 7055 was investigated by electrochemical test, accelerated exfoliation corrosion test, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The decrease of quench rate led to lower corrosion resistance of both the homogenized and solution heat treated (HS) alloy with equiaxed grains and the hot-rolled and solution heat treated (HRS) alloy with elongated grains, but there was a higher increment in corrosion depth and corrosion current density and a higher decrement in corrosion potential for the latter alloy, which therefore exhibited higher quench sensitivity. It is because in this alloy the larger amount of (sub) grain boundaries led to a higher increment in the amount of quench-induced η phase and precipitates free zone at (sub) grain boundaries with the decrease of quench rate, and there was a larger increment in the content of Zn, Mg and Cu in the η phase at grain boundaries due to slow quenching. The presence of subgrain boundaries in the HRS alloy tended to increase corrosion resistance at high quench rates higher than about 630 °C/min but decrease it at lower quench rates. - Highlights: • (Sub)Grain boundaries increase quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion. • Subgrain boundaries decrease corrosion resistance below quench rate of 630 °C/min. • More (sub) grain boundaries leads to more GBPs and PFZ with decreasing quench rate.

  18. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Gordon, G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  1. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  2. Effect of layerwise structural inhomogeneity on stress- corrosion cracking of steel tubes

    Perlovich, Yu A.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Morozov, N. S.; Fesenko, V. A.; Ryakhovskikh, I. V.; Esiev, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    Based on X-ray texture and structure analysis data of the material of main gas pipelines it was shown that the layerwise inhomogeneity of tubes is formed during their manufacturing. The degree of this inhomogeneity affects on the tendency of tubes to stress- corrosion cracking under exploitation. Samples of tubes were cut out from gas pipelines located under various operating conditions. Herewith the study was conducted both for sections with detected stress-corrosion defects and without them. Distributions along tube wall thickness for lattice parameters and half-width of X-ray lines were constructed. Crystallographic texture analysis of external and internal tube layers was also carried out. Obtained data testifies about considerable layerwise inhomogeneity of all samples. Despite the different nature of the texture inhomogeneity of gas pipeline tubes, the more inhomogeneous distribution of texture or structure features causes the increasing of resistance to stress- corrosion. The observed effect can be explained by saturation with interstitial impurities of the surface layer of the hot-rolled sheet and obtained therefrom tube. This results in rising of lattice parameters in the external layer of tube as compared to those in underlying metal. Thus, internal layers have a compressive effect on external layers in the rolling plane that prevents cracks opening at the tube surface. Moreover, the high mutual misorientation of grains within external and internal layers of tube results in the necessity to change the moving crack plane, so that the crack growth can be inhibited when reaching the layer with a modified texture.

  3. Reactor Structure Materials: Corrosion of Reactor Core Internals

    Van Dyck, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the corrosion of reactor core internals are: (1) to gain mechanistic insight into the Irradition Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) phenomenon by studying the influence of separate parameters in well controlled experiments; (2) to develop and validate a predictive capability on IASCC by model description and (3) to define and validate countermeasures and monitoring techniques for application in reactors. Progress and achievements in 1999 are described

  4. Microstructural characterisation and corrosion performance of old railway girder bridge steel and modern weathering structural steel

    Tewary, N.K.; Kundu, A.; Nandi, R.; Saha, J.K.; Ghosh, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructure and corrosion performance are compared for two structural steels. • Microstructure evolution shows primarily ferrite-pearlite in both the steels. • Steels show higher corrosion rate in 1% HCl solution than in 3.5% NaCl solution. • The corrosion products show the presence of oxide, hydroxide and oxy-hydroxides. • The corroded surface reveals morphologies like flowery, cotton balls and rosette. - Abstract: A comparison on microstructure and corrosion performance has been made between the two structural steels used in old railway girder bridge (Sample A) and modern grades of weathering structural steel (Sample B). The microstructures, viewed under optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), show mainly ferrite-pearlite phase constituents in both the steels, A and B. The phase fraction analysis shows higher amount of pearlite in steel A compared to that of steel B. The grain size of steel A is larger than that of steel B under identical processing condition. The immersion corrosion test in 3.5% NaCl shows that the corrosion rate of steel A increases with time, while the same for steel B decreases with time. On the other hand, corrosion test in 1% HCl shows that the corrosion rate of both steel A and B is higher as compared to that of NaCl which always decreases with time. The XRD analysis of corrosion products show the presence of many oxides, hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide like Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), Goethite (α-FeOOH), Akaganeite (β-FeOOH), Magnetite (Fe_3O_4) and Maghemite (γ-Fe_2O_3) in both the steels. The SEM images of corroded surfaces reveal different morphologies like flowery, cotton balls and rosette etc. which indicate that the corrosion products primarily contain Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), Goethite (α-FeOOH) and Akaganeite (β-FeOOH).

  5. Structures for common-cause failure analysis

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    Common-cause failure methodology and terminology have been reviewed and structured to provide a systematical basis for addressing and developing models and methods for quantification. The structure is based on (1) a specific set of definitions, (2) categories based on the way faults are attributable to a common cause, and (3) classes based on the time of entry and the time of elimination of the faults. The failure events are then characterized by their likelihood or frequency and the average residence time. The structure provides a basis for selecting computational models, collecting and evaluating data and assessing the importance of various failure types, and for developing effective defences against common-cause failure. The relationships of this and several other structures are described

  6. Structural design guidelines for concrete bridge decks reinforced with corrosion-resistant reinforcing bars.

    2014-10-01

    This research program develops and validates structural design guidelines and details for concrete bridge decks with : corrosion-resistant reinforcing (CRR) bars. A two-phase experimental program was conducted where a control test set consistent : wi...

  7. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  8. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-16

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux

  9. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and

  10. Lamb-Wave-Based Tomographic Imaging Techniques for Hole-Edge Corrosion Monitoring in Plate Structures

    Dengjiang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel monitoring method for hole-edge corrosion damage in plate structures based on Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques. An experimental procedure with a cross-hole layout using 16 piezoelectric transducers (PZTs was designed. The A0 mode of the Lamb wave was selected, which is sensitive to thickness-loss damage. The iterative algebraic reconstruction technique (ART method was used to locate and quantify the corrosion damage at the edge of the hole. Hydrofluoric acid with a concentration of 20% was used to corrode the specimen artificially. To estimate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the real corrosion damage was compared with the predicted corrosion damage based on the tomographic method. The results show that the Lamb-wave-based tomographic method can be used to monitor the hole-edge corrosion damage accurately.

  11. Highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy for reactor structural material

    Ito, Yoichi.

    1996-01-01

    The alloy of the present invention is a zirconium based alloy comprising tin (Sn), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) in zirconium (Zr). The amount of silicon (Si) as an impurity is not more than 60ppm. It is preferred that Sn is from 0.9 to 1.5wt%, that of Cr is from 0.05 to 0.15wt%, and (Fe + Ni) is from 0.17 to 0.5wt%. If not less than 0.12wt% of Fe is added, resistance against nodular corrosion is improved. The upper limit of Fe is preferably 0.40wt% from a view point of uniform suppression for the corrosion. The nodular corrosion can be suppressed by reducing the amount of Si-rich deposition product in the zirconium based alloy. Accordingly, a highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy improved for the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 and usable for a fuel cladding tube of a BWR type reactor can be obtained. (I.N.)

  12. Corrosion and indices of operating reliability of steam-water circuits of foreign NPP

    Martynova, O.I.

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion failures in circuits of foreign NPPs are considered. According to American statistics there are more corrosion failures in two-circuit NPPs than in NPPs with one circuit. Steam generators mostly suffer from ''corrosion denting''. Lately pitting corrosion becomes a potentially serious problem. Steam generator vertical tubes are maiply subjected to this corrosion type. Attention is drawn to intercrystalline corrosion. The causes of corrosion are described. The problem of optimization of structural materials is discussed to reduce corrosion failures as well as other methods of decreasing corrosion failures. Organization of nondestructive testing, increased requirements to water and steam purity are of great importance

  13. Causes and effects of the corrosion of a plumbing galvanised steel

    Alejandre Sánchez, F. J.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot dip galvanising life as a corrosion protective coatings on steel depends basically on three factors: coatings quality (thickness, correct installation of the galvanised article, and weathering effects. The aim of this research it is to study the decaying causes and effects of a plumbing installation made with hot dip galvanised steel tubes. The mentioned installation was of use during 30 years in the water supply system of the Parque Alcosa market (Sevilla, Spain. The research was divided in three parts: in the first one, shape analysis and XDR of internal decayed products was carried out: in the second one, physical properties were determined according to UNE 37- 505-89, corrosion morphology was conducted by metalographic microscopy, and it was evaluated also water quality: and finally, in the third one, diameter, section, and internal volume decrease was calculated in order to evaluate friction increase and pressure decrease in the installation. The results obtained show the correct plumbing installation according to quality requirements (UNE 37-509-89, so corrosion causes are mainly attributed to an aggressive environment for the hot dip galvanising.

    La durabilidad de los galvanizados en caliente como recubrimientos protectores de la corrosión del acero dependen básicamente de tres factores: la calidad del recubrimiento (espesor, la correcta instalación del elemento galvanizado, y la agresividad del medio al que se encuentren expuestos. En este trabajo se estudian las causas y consecuencias del deterioro sufrido por una tubería de acero galvanizado, destinada durante unos 30 años a la conducción de agua potable de la red en el mercado del Parque Al cosa (Sevilla. La investigación se ha dividido en tres etapas: en la primera, se ha realizado el análisis formal y la caracterización mediante DRX de los productos de alteración generados en el interior del tubo: en la segunda, se han determinado las características f

  14. Structure and corrosion properties of PVD Cr-N coatings

    Liu, C; Ziegele, H; Leyland, A; Matthews, A

    2002-01-01

    PVD Cr-N coatings produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are increasingly used for mechanical and tribological applications in various industrial sectors. These coatings are particularly attractive for their excellent corrosion resistance, which further enhances the lifetime and service quality of coated components. PVD Cr-N coated steels in an aqueous solution are usually corroded by galvanic attack via through-coating 'permeable' defects (e.g., pores). Therefore, the corrosion performance of Cr-N coated steel is determined by a number of variables of the coating properties and corrosive environment. These variables include: (i) surface continuity and uniformity; (ii) through-coating porosity; (iii) film density and chemical stability; (iv) growth stresses; (v) interfacial and intermediate layers; (vi) coating thickness; (vii) coating composition; and (viii) substrate properties. In this article, PVD Cr-N coatings were prepared, by electron-beam PVD and sputter deposition, with different compositions, t...

  15. Sustainability assessment of concrete structure durability under reinforcement corrosion

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    In the present paper a parametric study is conducted based on an existing finite element based model. The influence of cover layer, reinforcement diameter and water-to-cement ratio is compared to a possible scatter in the results due to insufficient knowledge about the distribution of the corrosion...... current density along the circumference of the reinforcement. Simulations show that the scatter has a greater influence on the results than changing the parameters wherefore it is concluded that further investigation of the non-uniform deposition of corrosion products is essential to better understand...

  16. Structure and corrosion properties of PVD Cr-N coatings

    Liu, C.; Bi, Q.; Ziegele, H.; Leyland, A.; Matthews, A.

    2002-01-01

    PVD Cr-N coatings produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are increasingly used for mechanical and tribological applications in various industrial sectors. These coatings are particularly attractive for their excellent corrosion resistance, which further enhances the lifetime and service quality of coated components. PVD Cr-N coated steels in an aqueous solution are usually corroded by galvanic attack via through-coating 'permeable' defects (e.g., pores). Therefore, the corrosion performance of Cr-N coated steel is determined by a number of variables of the coating properties and corrosive environment. These variables include: (i) surface continuity and uniformity; (ii) through-coating porosity; (iii) film density and chemical stability; (iv) growth stresses; (v) interfacial and intermediate layers; (vi) coating thickness; (vii) coating composition; and (viii) substrate properties. In this article, PVD Cr-N coatings were prepared, by electron-beam PVD and sputter deposition, with different compositions, thicknesses, and surface roughnesses, by changing the N 2 flow rate, applying multilayering techniques and changing the substrate finish prior to coating. The microstructure of such coatings is investigated by various analytical techniques such as glancing angle x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which are also correlated with the corrosion performance of the coated steel. Both dc polarization and ac impedance spectroscopy were employed to investigate the corrosion resistance of Cr-N coated steel in a 0.5N NaCl solution. It has been found that the N 2 flow rate during reactive deposition strongly determines the microstructure of Cr-N coatings (due to the changing nitrogen content in the film) and can thus affect the corrosion resistance of coated systems. The surface finish of the steel substrate also affects the uniformity and coverage of PVD coatings; grooves and inclusions on the original substrate can raise the susceptibility of coated

  17. Corrosion of candidate iron-base waste package structural barrier materials in moist salt environments

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.

    1984-11-01

    Mild steels are considered to be strong candidates for waste package structural barrier (e.g., overpack) applications in salt repositories. Corrosion rates of these materials determined in autoclave tests utilizing a simulated intrusion brine based on Permian Basin core samples are low, generally <25 μm (1 mil) per year. When the steels are exposed to moist salts containing simulated inclusion brines, the corrosion rates are found to increase significantly. The magnesium in the inclusion brine component of the environment is believed to be responsible for the increased corrosion rates. 1 reference, 4 figures, 2 tables

  18. Structural integrity assessment of steam generator tubes deteriorated through primary water stress corrosion cracking in transition region of tube expansion

    Silveira, Helvecio Carlos Klinke da

    2002-01-01

    In PWR plants, steam generator tube degradation has been one of the most important economical concerns, besides causing operational safety problems. In this work, a survey of steam generator tube degradation modes is done. Degradation mechanisms and influence factors are introduced and discussed. The importance of stress corrosion cracking, especially in transition region of tube expansion zone, is underlined. The actual steam generator tube plugging criteria are conservative. Proposed alternative criteria are introduced and discussed. Distinction is done to structural integrity assessment of defective tubes. Real data of tube defect indications of axial cracks in expansion transition zone due to primary water stress corrosion cracking are used in analysis. Results allow discussing application aspects of deterministic and probabilistic criteria on structural integrity assessment of tubes with defect indications. Applied models are specifics, but the application of concept may be extended to other steam generator tube degradation modes. (author)

  19. Development of stress corrosion techniques for structural integrity evaluation and life extension of PWR facilities

    Moreira, Pedro A.L.D.L. Pinheiro; Vilela, Jeferson J.; Lorenzo, Roberto F. Di; Lopes, Jadir A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The stress corrosion is a mechanism of degradation present in the nuclear plants. To extend the life of the plants components, this corrosion type it should be known. An evaluation for the implantation of methodologies of stress corrosion study in CDTN/CNEN, shows that the technique of slow deformation can be used in the evaluation of integrity structural nuclear power stations. This technique consists of straining a sample slowly, usually, in strain rate between 10 -4 and 10- 8 s -1 and in conditions that simulate the reactivity of the metal in environment (pressure, temperature, chemical composition of the water and etc) similar to the found at the nuclear power power stations. This simulation allows evaluating susceptibility the stress corrosion of components mechanical and structure that operate in central nuclear. (author)

  20. Structural Response to Blast Loading: The Effects of Corrosion on Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Hakan Yalciner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural blast design has become a necessary part of the design with increasing terrorist attacks. Terrorist attacks are not the one to make the structures important against blast loading where other explosions such as high gas explosions also take an important place in structural safety. The main objective of this study was to verify the structural performance levels under the impact of different blast loading scenarios. The blast loads were represented by using triangular pulse for single degree of freedom system. The effect of blast load on both corroded and uncorroded reinforced concrete buildings was examined for different explosion distances. Modified plastic hinge properties were used to ensure the effects of corrosion. The results indicated that explosion distance and concrete strength were key parameters to define the performance of the structures against blast loading.

  1. Structural Characterization of Highly Corrosion-resistant Steel

    Lančok, Adriana; Kmječ, T.; Štefánik, M.; Sklenka, L.; Miglierini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2015), s. 355-361 ISSN 0011-1643 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12449S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Mossbauer spectroscopy * corrosion-resistant steel * LC200 * CEMS Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.732, year: 2015

  2. Stress state reassessment of Romanian offshore structures taking into account corrosion influence

    Joavină, R.; Zăgan, S.; Zăgan, R.; Popa, M.

    2017-08-01

    Progressive degradation analysis for extraction or exploration offshore structure, with appraisal of failure potential and the causes that can be correlated with the service age, depends on the various sources of uncertainty that require particular attention in design, construction and exploitation phases. Romanian self erecting platforms are spatial lattice structures consist of tubular steel joints, forming a continuous system with an infinite number of dynamic degrees of freedom. Reassessment of a structure at fixed intervals of time, recorrelation of initial design elements with the actual situation encountered in location and with structural behaviour represents a major asset in lowering vulnerabilities of offshore structure. This paper proposes a comparative reassessment of the stress state for an offshore structure Gloria type, when leaving the shipyard and at the end of that interval corresponding to capital revision, taking into account sectional changes due to marine environment corrosion. The calculation was done using Newmark integration method on a 3D model, asses of the dynamic loads was made through probabilistic spectral method.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Galvanic Corrosion Caused by Shaft Grounding Systems in Steel Ship Hulls

    Wang, Y

    2005-01-01

    .... This led to the accelerated corrosion of the exposed steel ship hull on paint holidays because of the substantial difference of the electric potentials between the steel ship hull and the nickel...

  4. The anti corrosive design of structural metallic elements in buildings with large exploitation period; El diseno anticorrovio de elementos estructurales metalicos en edificaciones con periodos prolongados de explotacion

    Avila Ayon, V.; Rodriguez Quesada, A. L.

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion deterioration in metallic structural elements, with the consistent loss of his physical and mechanical properties, is cause by errors in the design or fabrication, that allows the accumulation of humidity and contaminants in the surfaces, or acceleration zones of the corrosion processes, as the bimetalics pairs. The aggressiveness of the environment and the productive processes that develop in industrial installations, causes the apparition of premature failures that engage the edification use. The identification of design errors is the first step in the conservation of these structures. the elimination and made a project adapted to the proper installations conditions, is essential procedures to prolong the edification useful life with an optimum and rational use of the resources that destined for this end. The investigation is about the results obtained in the diagnostic and the conservation of industrial installment, with large exploitation periods, in which existed evidences of failures by corrosion, specifically to the elimination of errors of design. (Author) 12 refs.

  5. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe0) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H2S, and scavenge of ‘cathodic’ H2 from chemical reaction of Fe0 with H2O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe0 year−1), while conventional H2-scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO3, Mg/CaCO3) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m−1). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe0 → 4Fe2+ + 8e−) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e− + SO42− + 9H+ → HS− + 4H2O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H2 rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments. PMID:22616633

  6. The corrosion behaviour and structure of amorphous and thermally treated Fe-B-Si alloys

    Raicheff, R.; Zaprianova, V.; Petrova, E.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of magnetic amorphous alloys Fe 78 B 13 Si 9 , Fe 81 B 13 Si 4 C 2 and Fe 67 Co 18 Bi 4 S 1 obtained by rapid quenching from the melts are investigated in a model corrosive environment of 1N H 2 SO 4 . The structure of the alloys, is, characterized by DTA, SEM, TEM, X-ray and electron diffraction techniques. The dissolution kinetics of the,alloys is studied using gravimetric and electrochemical polarization measurements. It is established that the corrosion rate of the amorphous Fe 67 Co 18 Bt 4 S 1 alloy is up to 50 times lower than that of Fe 78 Bi 3 Si 9 alloy and the addition of cobalt leads to a considerable reduction of the rates of both partial corrosion reactions, while the addition of carbon results only in a moderate decrease (2-3 times) of the corrosion rate. It is also shown that the crystallization of the amorphous Fe 78 B 13 Si 9 alloy (at 700 o C for 3 h) leads to formation of multiphase structure consisting of crystalline phases α-Fe and Fe 3 (B,Si). After crystallization an increase of the rate of both hydrogen evolution and anodic dissolution reactions is observed which results in a considerable (an order of magnitude) increase of the corrosion rate of the alloy. (Original)

  7. Analysis of Gamma Dose Rate Caused by Corrosion Products inside the Containment Building of Yonngwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 During Shutdown Period

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Occupational radiation exposure(ORE) of nuclear power plant(NPP) workers mainly occurs during the shutdown period. Major radioactive sources are the corrosion products released from the reactor coolant system(RCS). The corrosion products consist of circulating crud and deposited crud. Major radioactive corrosion products, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co, are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. In this study, the corrosion products regarding cobalt were evaluated during the shutdown period, and gamma dose rates caused by them were calculated at the main working area inside the containment building of the Yonggwang NPP Unit 3.

  8. A probabilistic physics-of-failure model for prognostic health management of structures subject to pitting and corrosion-fatigue

    Chookah, M.; Nuhi, M.; Modarres, M.

    2011-01-01

    A combined probabilistic physics-of-failure-based model for pitting and corrosion-fatigue degradation mechanisms is proposed to estimate the reliability of structures and to perform prognosis and health management. A mechanistic superposition model for corrosion-fatigue mechanism was used as a benchmark model to propose the simple model. The proposed model describes the degradation of the structures as a function of physical and critical environmental stresses, such as amplitude and frequency of mechanical loads (for example caused by the internal piping pressure) and the concentration of corrosive chemical agents. The parameters of the proposed model are represented by the probability density functions and estimated through a Bayesian approach based on the data taken from the experiments performed as part of this research. For demonstrating applications, the proposed model provides prognostic information about the reliability of aging of structures and is helpful in developing inspection and replacement strategies. - Highlights: ► We model an inventory system under static–dynamic uncertainty strategy. ► The demand is stochastic and non-stationary. ► The optimal ordering policy is proven to be a base stock policy. ► A solution algorithm for finding an optimal solution is provided. ► Two heuristics developed produce high quality solutions and scale-up efficiently.

  9. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  10. Causes and mechanisms of thermal embrittlement and corrosion cracking of complex α-titanium alloys

    Ushkov, S.S.; Rybin, V.V.; Razuvaeva, I.N.; Nesterova, E.V.; Gunbina, O.A.

    1995-01-01

    Effect of aging under 500 deg C on mechanical and corrosion-mechanical properties of Ti-6Al base titanium α-alloys with zirconium and carbon additions is studied. Using electron microscopy one determines the reasons of reduction of plasticity and of corrosion-mechanical strength of alloys after aging. It is determined that in the given alloys there are two different processes with occurrence different kinetics: the first one-formation of grain-boundary precipitations of Ti 2 (Fe, Ni) intermetallic compound responsible for plasticity reduction; and the second one-homogeneous decomposition of Ti-Al solid solution responsible for reduction of corrosion-mechanical properties. 14 refs., 6 figs

  11. Coal-fired power plants and the causes of high temperature corrosion

    Oakey, J E; Simms, N J [British Coal Corporation, Coal Technology Development Div., Cheltenham, Glos (United Kingdom); Tomkings, A B [ERA Technology Ltd., Leatherhead, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    The heat exchangers in all types of coal-fired power plant operate in aggressive, high temperature environments where high temperature corrosion can severely limit their service lives. The extent of this corrosion is governed by the combined effects of the operating conditions of the heat exchanger and the presence of corrosive species released from the coal during operation. This paper reviews the coal-related factors, such as ash deposition, which influence the operating environments of heat exchangers in three types of coal-fired power plant - conventional pulverized coal boilers, fluidized bed boilers and coal gasification systems. The effects on the performance of the materials used for these heat exchangers are then compared. (au) 35 refs.

  12. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  13. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  14. Enamel coated steel reinforcement for improved durability and life-cycle performance of concrete structures: microstructure, corrosion, and deterioration

    Tang, Fujian

    This study is aimed (a) to statistically characterize the corrosion-induced deterioration process of reinforced concrete structures (concrete cracking, steel mass loss, and rebar-concrete bond degradation), and (b) to develop and apply three types of enamel-coated steel bars for improved corrosion resistance of the structures. Commercially available pure enamel, mixed enamel with 50% calcium silicate, and double enamel with an inner layer of pure enamel and an outer layer of mixed enamel were considered as various steel coatings. Electrochemical tests were respectively conducted on steel plates, smooth bars embedded in concrete, and deformed bars with/without concrete cover in 3.5 wt.% NaCl or saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The effects of enamel microstructure, coating thickness variation, potential damage, mortar protection, and corrosion environment on corrosion resistance of the steel members were investigated. Extensive test results indicated that corrosion-induced concrete cracking can be divided into four stages that gradually become less correlated with corrosion process over time. The coefficient of variation of crack width increases with the increasing level of corrosion. Corrosion changed the cross section area instead of mechanical properties of steel bars. The bond-slip behavior between the corroded bars and concrete depends on the corrosion level and distribution of corrosion pits. Although it can improve the chemical bond with concrete and steel, the mixed enamel coating is the least corrosion resistant. The double enamel coating provides the most consistent corrosion performance and is thus recommended to coat reinforcing steel bars for concrete structures applied in corrosive environments. Corrosion pits in enamel-coated bars are limited around damage locations.

  15. In situ corrosion monitoring of PC structures with distributed hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer sensors

    Yang, C. Q.; Wu, Z. S.

    2007-08-01

    Firstly, the fabrication and sensing properties of hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer (HCFRP) composite sensors are addressed. In order to provide a distributed sensing manner, the HCFRP sensors were divided into multi-zones with electrodes, and each zone was regarded as a separate sensor. Secondly, their application is studied to monitor the steel corrosion of prestressed concrete (PC) beams. The HCFRP sensors with different gauge lengths were mounted on a PC tendon, steel bar and embedded in tensile and compressive sides of the PC beam. The experiment was carried out under an electric accelerated corrosion and a constant load of about 54 kN. The results reveal that the corrosion of the PC tendon can be monitored through measuring the electrical resistance (ER) change of the HCFRP sensors. For the sensors embedded in tensile side of the PC beam, their ER increases as the corrosion progresses, whereas for the sensors embedded in compressive side, their ER decreases with corrosion time. Moreover, the strains due to the corrosion can be obtained based on the ER change and calibration curves of HCFRP sensors. The strains measured with traditional strain gauges agree with the strains calculated from the ER changes of HCFRP sensors. The electrical behavior of the zones where the corrosion was performed is much different from those of the other zones. In these zones, either there exist jumps in ER, or the ER increases with a much larger rate than those of the other zones. Distributed corrosion monitoring for PC structures is thus demonstrated with the application of HCFRP sensors through a proper installation of multi-electrodes.

  16. Structural characteristics and corrosion behavior of biodegradable Mg-Zn, Mg-Zn-Gd alloys.

    Kubásek, J; Vojtěch, D

    2013-07-01

    In this research, binary Mg-Zn (up to 3 wt% Zn) and ternary Mg-Zn-Gd (up to 3 wt% Gd, 3 wt% Zn) alloys were prepared by induction melting in an argon atmosphere. The structures of these alloys were characterized using light and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence. In addition, Brinell hardness measurements were taken to supplement these studies. Corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion tests and potentiodynamic measurements in a physiological solution (9 g/l NaCl). Depending on the composition, structures of the as-cast alloys contained α-Mg dendrites, MgZn, Mg5Gd and Mg3Gd2Zn3 phases. Compared to pure Mg, zinc improved the corrosion resistance of binary Mg-Zn. Gadolinium also improved the corrosion resistance in the case of Mg-1Zn-3Gd alloy. The highest corrosion rate was observed for Mg-3Zn-3Gd alloy. Our results improve the understanding of the relationships between the structure and corrosion behavior of our studied alloy systems.

  17. Radiometric investigation of effect of decontamination agents on corrosion behavior of structural materials for nuclear power engineering

    Silber, R.; Ecksteinova, A.

    1987-01-01

    The tracer technique is used in monitoring corrosion behaviour of high-alloy steels used as structural materials in nuclear power engineering. Radioisotopes 59 Fe, 51 Cr, 58 Co and 60 Co produced by neutron irradiation of steel are mainly used for labelling steel components. The actual corrosion test proceeds in a facility whose description is given. The facility allows automatic sampling of corrosion medium fractions in preset intervals. The fractions are evaluated using a multi-channel analyzer with a Ge(Li) detector. The method can be applied in, e.g., monitoring extraction corrosion, the effect of decontamination agents on the corrosion of alloy steels and the effect of heat treatment of steels of their corrosion resistance in a model corrosion environment. (Z.M.). 2 fig., 1 tab., 5 refs

  18. Structure, mechanical and corrosion properties of powdered stainless steel Kh13

    Radomysel'skij, I.D.; Napara-Volgina, S.G.; Orlova, L.N.; Apininskaya, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Structure, mechanical and corrosion properties are studied for compact powdered stainless steel, Grade Kh13, produced from prealloyed powder and a mixture of chromium and iron powders by hot vacuum pressing (HVP) following four schemes: HVP of unsintered billets; HVP of presintered billets; HVP of unsintered billets followed by diffusion annealing; HVP of sintered billets followed by diffusion annealing. Analysis of the structure, mechanical and corrosion properties of Kh13 steel produced according to the four schemes confirmed that production of this steel by the HVP method without presintering of porous billets and diffusion annealing of compact stampings is possible only when prealloyed powder of particular composition is used as a starting material

  19. Corrosion in a STP Sump. (Subtitle: What Causes It and What Can Be Done About It?)

    State regulators have noticed extensive corrosion in the sumps for the submersible turbine pump (STP) of an underground storage tanks storing gasoline and E85. Acetic acid produced by biodegradation of ethanol that found its way into the sump is one plausible explanation. Resea...

  20. Boundary element inverse analysis for rebar corrosion detection: Study on the 2004 tsunami-affected structure in Aceh

    S. Fonna

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of rebar/reinforcing-steel corrosion for the 2004 tsunami-affected reinforced concrete (RC buildings in Aceh was conducted using half-cell potential mapping technique. However, the results only show qualitative meaning as corrosion risk rather than the corrosion itself, such as the size and location of corrosion. In this study, boundary element inverse analysis was proposed to be performed to detect rebar corrosion of the 2004 tsunami-affected structure in Aceh, using several electrical potential measurement data on the concrete surface. One RC structure in Peukan Bada, an area heavily damaged by the tsunami, was selected for the study. In 2004 the structure was submerged more than 5 m by the tsunami. Boundary element inverse analysis was developed by combining the boundary element method (BEM and particle swarm optimization (PSO. The corrosion was detected by evaluating measured and calculated electrical potential data. The measured and calculated electrical potential on the concrete surface was obtained by using a half-cell potential meter and by performing BEM, respectively. The solution candidates were evaluated by employing PSO. Simulation results show that boundary element inverse analysis successfully detected the size and location of corrosion for the case study. Compared with the actual corrosion, the error of simulation result was less than 5%. Hence, it shows that boundary element inverse analysis is very promising for further development to detect rebar corrosion. Keywords: Inverse analysis, Boundary element method, PSO, Corrosion, Reinforced concrete

  1. Prognostic investigation of galvanic corrosion precursors in aircraft structures and their detection strategy

    James, Robin; Kim, Tae Hee; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-04-01

    Aluminum alloys have been the dominant materials for aerospace construction in the past fifty years due to their light weight, forming and alloying, and relative low cost in comparison to titanium and composites. However, in recent years, carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and honeycomb materials have been used in aircrafts in the quest to attain lower weight, high temperature resistance, and better fuel efficiency. When these two materials are coupled together, the structural strength of the aircraft is unparalleled, but this comes at a price, namely galvanic corrosion. Previous experimental results have shown that when CFRP composite materials are joined with high strength aluminum alloys (AA7075-T6 or AA2024-T3), galvanic corrosion occurs at the material interfaces, and the aluminum is in greater danger of corroding, particularly since carbon and aluminum are on the opposite ends of the galvanic series. In this paper, we explore the occurrence of the recognizable precursors of galvanic corrosion when CFRP plate is coupled to an aluminum alloy using SS-304 bolts and exposed to environmental degradation, which creates significant concerns for aircraft structural reliability. The galvanic corrosion software package, BEASY, is used to simulate the growth of corrosion in the designed specimen after which a microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique is explored to detect corrosion defects that appear at the interface of this galvanic couple. This paper also explores a loaded waveguide technique to determine the dielectric constant of the final corrosion product at the Q-band millimeter-wave frequency range (33-50 GHz), as this can be an invaluable asset in developing early detection strategies.

  2. Hidden corrosion detection in aircraft aluminum structures using laser ultrasonics and wavelet transform signal analysis.

    Silva, M Z; Gouyon, R; Lepoutre, F

    2003-06-01

    Preliminary results of hidden corrosion detection in aircraft aluminum structures using a noncontact laser based ultrasonic technique are presented. A short laser pulse focused to a line spot is used as a broadband source of ultrasonic guided waves in an aluminum 2024 sample cut from an aircraft structure and prepared with artificially corroded circular areas on its back surface. The out of plane surface displacements produced by the propagating ultrasonic waves were detected with a heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Time-frequency analysis of the signals using a continuous wavelet transform allowed the identification of the generated Lamb modes by comparison with the calculated dispersion curves. The presence of back surface corrosion was detected by noting the loss of the S(1) mode near its cutoff frequency. This method is applicable to fast scanning inspection techniques and it is particularly suited for early corrosion detection.

  3. Fluid-structure-interaction analysis for welded pipes with flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    Sun, L.; Ding, Y., E-mail: lan.sun@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) entrance effect results in enhanced wall thinning immediately downstream of a weld if the weld connects an upstream FAC-resistant material with a downstream less resistant material. The weld regions, especially those with local repairs, are susceptible to cracking due to the high residual stresses induced by fabrication. The combined effects of the FAC entrance effect and high stresses at a weld might compromise the structural integrity of the piping and lead to a failure. Weld degradation by FAC entrance effect has been observed at nuclear and fossil power plants. This paper describes an application using fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) modelling to study the combined effects of FAC wall thinning, weld residual stresses, and in-service loads on welded structures. Simplified cases analyzed were based on CANDU outlet feeder conditions. The analysis includes the flow and mass transfer modelling of the FAC entrance effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and nonlinear structural analyses of the welded structures with wall thinning and an assumed weld residual stress and strain distribution. The FSI analyses were performed using ANSYS Workbench, an integrated platform that enables the coupling of CFD and structural analysis solutions. The obtained results show that the combination of FAC, weld residual stresses, in-service loads (including the internal pressure) and (or) extreme loads could cause high stresses and affect the integrity of the welded pipes. The present work demonstrated that the FSI modelling can be used as an effective approach to assess the integrity of welded structures. (author)

  4. Damage induced by continued corrosion in concrete repair systems

    Luckovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. After the repair, corrosion of the steel might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion cell depends on many parameters and is difficult to control, the occurrence of

  5. Failure Modes in Concrete Repair Systems due to Ongoing Corrosion

    Lukovic, M.; Šavija, B.; Ye, G.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; van Breugel, K.

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It can result in cracking and spalling of the concrete cover. After the damaged cover is repaired, reinforcement corrosion might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion

  6. Study of ion plating parameters, coating structure, and corrosion protection for aluminum coatings on uranium

    Egert, C.M.; Scott, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    A study of ion-plating parameters (primarily deposition rate and substrate bias voltage), coating structure, and the corrosion protection provided by aluminum coatings on uranium is presented. Ion plating at low temperatures yields a variety of aluminum coating structures on uranium. For example, aluminum coatings produced at high deposition rates and low substrate bias voltages are columnar with voids between columns, as expected for high-rate vapor deposition at low temperatures. On the other hand, low deposition rate and high bias voltage produce a modified coating with a dense, noncolumnar structure. These results are not in agreement with other studies that have found no relationship between deposition rate and coating structure in ion plating. This discrepancy is probably due to the high deposition rates used in these studies. An accelerated, water vapor corrosion test indicates that the columnar aluminum coatings provide some corrosion protection despite their porous nature; however, the dense noncolumnar coatings provide significantly greater protection. These results indicate that ion-plated aluminum coatings produced at low deposition rates and high substrate bias voltages creates dense coating structures that are most effective in protecting uranium from corrosion

  7. Corrosion Control in the Aerospace Industry

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it..

  8. Metagenomic analysis indicates Epsilonproteobacteria as a potential cause of microbial corrosion in pipelines injected with bisulfite

    Dongshan eAn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium bisulfite (SBS is used as an oxygen scavenger to decrease corrosion in pipelines transporting brackish subsurface water used in the production of bitumen by steam-assisted gravity drainage. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons has indicated that SBS addition increased the fraction of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB Desulfomicrobium, as well as of Desulfocapsa, which can also grow by disproportionating sulfite into sulfide, sulfur and sulfate. SRB use cathodic H2, formed by reduction of aqueous protons at the iron surface, or use low potential electrons from iron and aqueous protons directly for sulfate reduction. In order to reveal the effects of SBS treatment in more detail, metagenomic analysis was performed with pipe-associated solids (PAS scraped from a pipe section upstream (PAS-616P and downstream (PAS-821TP of the SBS injection point. A major SBS-induced change in microbial community composition and in affiliated hynL genes for the large subunit of [NiFe] hydrogenase was the appearance of sulfur-metabolizing Epsilonproteobacteria of the genera Sulfuricurvum and Sulfurovum. These are chemolithotrophs, which oxidize sulfide or sulfur with O2 or reduce sulfur with H2. Because O2 was absent, this class likely catalyzed reduction of sulfur (S0 originating from the metabolism of bisulfite with cathodic H2 (or low potential electrons and aqueous protons originating from the corrosion of steel (Fe0. Overall this accelerates reaction of of S0 and Fe0 to form FeS, making this class a potentially powerful contributor to microbial corrosion. The PAS-821TP metagenome also had increased fractions of Deltaproteobacteria including the SRB Desulfomicrobium and Desulfocapsa. Altogether, SBS increased the fraction of hydrogen-utilizing Delta- and Epsilonproteobacteria in brackish-water-transporting pipelines, potentially stimulating anaerobic pipeline corrosion if dosed in excess of the intended oxygen scavenger function.

  9. A degradation model for stray current induced corrosion in underground reinforced concrete structures

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of stray currents on durability and reinforcement corrosion of underground concrete structures. Cathodic protection of underground pipelines are stationary sources of stray current interference with concrete, and rail traction systems are non-stationary sources. The

  10. Corrosion monitoring for underground and submerged concrete structures - examples and interpretation issues

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Leegwater, G.

    2008-01-01

    Since about 1980 Corrosion Monitoring Systems have been used in many concrete structures in aggressive environmentworldwide. While these systemswork properly in aboveground environment, some questions have arisen for submerged conditions, e.g. the outer sides of tunnels, piers in seawater or

  11. An Influence of Ageing on the Structure, Corrosion Resistance and Hardness of High Aluminum ZnAl40Cu3 Alloy

    Michalik R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Zn-Al-Cu alloys are used primarily because of their tribological properties as an alternative material for bronze, cast iron and aluminum alloy bearings and as a construction material. Particularly interesting are high aluminum zinc alloys. Monoeutectic zinc and aluminum alloys are characterized by the highest hardness, tensile strength and wear resistance of all of the zinc alloys. A significant problem with the use of the Zn-Al-Cu alloys is their insufficient resistance to electrochemical corrosion. Properties of Zn-Al-Cu alloys can be improved by heat treatment. The purpose of examination was to determine the effect of heat treatment (aging at various temperatures on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of the ZnAl40Cu3 alloy. The scope of the examination included: structural examinations, determination of hardness using Brinell’s method and corrosion resistance examinations. Ageing at higher temperatures causes a creation of areas where is an eutectoid mixture. The study showed that ageing causes a decrease in hardness of ZnAl40Cu3 alloy. This decrease is even greater, when the temperature of ageing is lower. The studies have shown a significant influence of ageing on the corrosion resistance of the alloy ZnAl40Cu3. Maximum corrosion resistance were characterized by the sample after ageing at higher temperatures.

  12. The formation, composition and structure of corrosion products in CANDU nuclear power reactors

    Rummery, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the formation and transport of corrosion products in CANDU-PHW power reactors, and the role played by these products in the generation and subsequent fixation of radioactive species, we have examined in detail several surfaces removed from the Douglas Point Generating Station (Douglas Point, Ontario). Results are given for the surface of the primary-side of a Monel-400 boiler tube, and surfaces of carbon steel piping at the inlet and outlet of the boiler. The experimental techniques that were used included sequential acid stripping, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The corrosion products on the Monel-400 were mainly nickel, copper, nickel oxide and nickel-deficient nickel ferrite and varied in composition and quantity as a function of both distance from the boiler inlet, and depth in the corrosion layer. The radioactive cobalt ( 60 Co) content was localized in 'streaks' deposited in the straight sections of the boiler tube, but distributed uniformly over the whole surface in the downstream bend section. The material covering the carbon steel surface comprised three phases: magnetite, aluminosilicate particles at the outermost surface, and a mixed cation spinel phase uniformly distributed over the surface at the corrosion film-water interface. The formation, composition and structure of the corrosion products are discussed. (author)

  13. Corrosion Risk of Reinforced Concrete Structure Arising from Internal and External Chloride

    M. J. Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion risk of internal chloride and external chloride from three different exposure conditions was evaluated. The initiation of corrosion was detected by monitoring the galvanic current between cathode metal and embedded steel. The chloride threshold was determined by measuring the corrosion rate of steel by the polarization technique for internal chloride and the chloride profiling test for external chloride. As the result, the initiation of corrosion was accelerated with a cyclic wet/dry condition, compared to the totally wet condition. In addition, it was found that an increase of the drying ratio in the exposure condition resulted in an increase of corrosion rate after initiation. The threshold level of external chloride ranged from 0.2 to 0.3% weight by cement and internal chloride shows higher range, equated to 1.59–3.10%. Based on these data, the chloride penetration with exposure condition was predicted to determine the service life of reinforced concrete structure.

  14. Corrosion behavior of Ni-based structural materials for electrolytic reduction in lithium molten salt

    Cho, Soo Haeng, E-mail: nshcho1@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Bin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hyeon, E-mail: jonglee@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Green Energy Technology, Chungnam National University, 79 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Jin Mok; Lee, Han Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the corrosion behavior of new Ni-based structural materials was studied for electrolytic reduction after exposure to LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt at 650 deg. C for 24-216 h under an oxidizing atmosphere. The new alloys with Ni, Cr, Al, Si, and Nb as the major components were melted at 1700 deg. C under an inert atmosphere. The melt was poured into a preheated metallic mold to prepare an as-cast alloy. The corrosion products and fine structures of the corroded specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscope (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion products of as cast and heat treated low Si/high Ti alloys were Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Ni, NiO, and (Al,Nb,Ti)O{sub 2}; those of as cast and heat treated high Si/low Ti alloys were Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Ni, and NiO. The corrosion layers of as cast and heat treated low Si/high Ti alloys were continuous and dense. However, those of as cast and heat treated high Si/low Ti alloys were discontinuous and cracked. Heat treated low Si/high Ti alloy showed the highest corrosion resistance among the examined alloys. The superior corrosion resistance of the heat treated low Si/high Ti alloy was attributed to the addition of an appropriate amount of Si, and the metallurgical evaluations were performed systematically.

  15. Corrosion behavior of Ni-based structural materials for electrolytic reduction in lithium molten salt

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Park, Sung Bin; Lee, Jong Hyeon; Hur, Jin Mok; Lee, Han Soo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the corrosion behavior of new Ni-based structural materials was studied for electrolytic reduction after exposure to LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt at 650 deg. C for 24-216 h under an oxidizing atmosphere. The new alloys with Ni, Cr, Al, Si, and Nb as the major components were melted at 1700 deg. C under an inert atmosphere. The melt was poured into a preheated metallic mold to prepare an as-cast alloy. The corrosion products and fine structures of the corroded specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscope (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion products of as cast and heat treated low Si/high Ti alloys were Cr 2 O 3 , NiCr 2 O 4 , Ni, NiO, and (Al,Nb,Ti)O 2 ; those of as cast and heat treated high Si/low Ti alloys were Cr 2 O 3 , NiCr 2 O 4 , Ni, and NiO. The corrosion layers of as cast and heat treated low Si/high Ti alloys were continuous and dense. However, those of as cast and heat treated high Si/low Ti alloys were discontinuous and cracked. Heat treated low Si/high Ti alloy showed the highest corrosion resistance among the examined alloys. The superior corrosion resistance of the heat treated low Si/high Ti alloy was attributed to the addition of an appropriate amount of Si, and the metallurgical evaluations were performed systematically.

  16. Effect Of Age And Concrete Cover Thickness On Steel Reinforcement Corrosion At Splash Zone In Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures

    Nada M. Al- Galawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of reinforcing steel bars in reinforced concrete is considered as one of the biggest problems that face countries overlooking to the Arabian Gulf including Iraq. The research aims to study the effect of the corrosion of steel bars in concrete structures that are exposed to wetting and drying via waves. Reinforced concrete samples were exposed to marine simulated environment for 90 days using prepared system for this purpose. At the end of exposure period polarization test was implemented to measure the actual corrosion rate in each sample. After that the corrosion process was accelerated using impressed current technique by applying a constant electric current DC to the reinforcing bars. Depending on the corrosion current in natural conditions which was measured in polarization test periods of exposing samples to accelerated corrosion current so as to maintain virtual exposure ages of 5 and 25 years of exposure to natural corrosion were calculated. The results showed a remarkable increase in the corrosion current of steel bars in samples that had lower concrete cover thickness. The increase in the cover thickness from 20mm to 40 and 65 mm had a significant effect on reducing the corrosion current at the age of 90 days to about 70 of its original value in both cases. At the virtual exposure age of 5 years the reduction percentage in the corrosion current resulted from increasing cover thickness from 20mm to 40 and 65 mm were 43 and 79 respectively.

  17. Influence of Pitting Corrosion on Fatigue and Corrosion Fatigue of Ship and Offshore Structures, Part II: Load - Pit - Crack Interaction

    Jakubowski Marek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper has been discussed influence of stresses on general corrosion rate and corrosion pit nucleation rate and growth , whose presence has been questioned by some authors but accepted by most of them. Influence of roughness of pit walls on fatigue life of a plate suffering pit corrosion and presence of the so called „ non-damaging” pits which never lead to initiation of fatigue crack, has been presented. Possibility of prediction of pit-to-crack transition moment by two different ways, i.e. considering a pit a stress concentrator or an equivalent crack, has been analyzed. Also, influence of statistical distribution of depth of corrosion pits as well as anticorrosion protection on fatigue and corrosion fatigue has been described.

  18. Electrochemical methods for the inspection of reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures - field experience

    Elsener, B.; Boehni, H.

    1992-01-01

    Maintenance and planning of the restoration work on reinforced concrete structures need a rapid, non-destructive inspection technique that detects corrosion at an early stage. In this paper the field experience with electrochemical techniques are reported. The results of potential surveys on bridge decks of the Swiss highways, realized with a new computer controlled eight-wheel measurement system, clearly show that a fixed potential value (as proposed in ASTM C 876-87) for the identification and location of active corrosion of steel in concrete does not exist. A statistical elaboration of the potential data allows to identify the potential value for corroding and passive rebar for each structure individually. A rapid new technique using galvanostatic pulse measurements was tested successfully on site. It gives clear, unambiguous results on the corrosion state of the rebars when half-cell potentials are uncertain. In addition, the ohmic resistance and the apparent polarization resistance are determined from the evaluation of the transients. From these values the concrete resistivity and the actual corrosion rate of the rebars may be estimated

  19. Structural strength deterioration of coastal bridge piers considering non-uniform corrosion in marine environments

    Guo, Anxin; Yuan, Wenting; Li, Haitao; Li, Hui

    2018-04-01

    In the aggressive marine environment over a long-term service period, coastal bridges inevitably sustain corrosion-induced damage due to high sea salt and humidity. This paper investigates the strength reduction of coastal bridges, especially focusing on the effects of non-uniform corrosion along the height of bridge piers. First, the corrosion initiation time and the degradation of reinforcement and concrete are analyzed for bridge piers in marine environments. To investigate the various damage modes of the concrete cover, a discretization method with fiber cells is used for calculating time-dependent interaction diagrams of cross-sections of the bridge piers at the atmospheric zone and the splash and tidal zone under a combination of axial force and bending moment. Second, the shear strength of these aging structures is analyzed. Numerical simulation indicates that the strength of a concrete pier experiences dramatic reduction from corrosion initiation to the spalling of the concrete cover. Strength loss in the splash and tidal zone is more significant than in the atmospheric zone when structures' service time is assumed to be the same.

  20. Digital mapping of corrosion risk in coastal urban areas using remote sensing and structural condition assessment: case study in cyprus

    Neocleous Kyriacos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion is one of the main factors leading to performance deterioration of reinforced concrete buildings; and, hence, periodic structural condition monitoring is required to assess and repair the adverse effects of corrosion. However, this can become a cumbersome and expensive task to undertake for large populations of buildings, scattered in large urban areas. To optimize the use of available resources, appropriate tools are required for the assessment of corrosion risk of reinforced concrete construction. This paper proposes a framework for the production of digital corrosion risk maps for urban areas; Cyprus was used as a case study. This framework explored multi-temporal satellite remote sensing data from the Landsat sensors as well as corrosion risk factors derived from the results of a recently completed research project, entitled “STEELCOR”. This framework was used to develop two corrosion risk scenarios within Geographical Information Systems, and to produce corrosion risk maps for three coastal cities of Cyprus. The thematic maps indicated that, for slight corrosion damage, the distance of reinforced concrete buildings from the coast was more influential than the building age. While, for significant corrosion damage, the maps indicated that the age of RC buildings was more influential than the distance from the coast.

  1. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete, Part I – Mechanisms

    Küter, André; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2006-01-01

    prematurely. Reinforcement corrosion is identified to be the foremost cause of deterioration. Steel in concrete is normally protected by a passive layer due the high alkalinity of the concrete pore solution; corrosion is initiated by neutralization through atmospheric carbon dioxide and by ingress...... of depassivation ions, especially chloride ions. The background and consequences of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures caused by steel corrosion are summarized. Selected corrosion mechanisms postulated in the literature are briefly discussed and related to observations. The key factors controlling...... initiation and propagation of corrosion of steel in concrete are outlined....

  2. Control of molten salt corrosion of fusion structural materials by metallic beryllium

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, P.; Nishimura, H.; Terai, T.

    2009-01-01

    A series of tests have been performed between 2001 and 2006 at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research facility of the Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate chemical compatibility between the molten salt flibe (2LiF + BeF 2 in moles) and fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. The tests adopted metallic beryllium contact as main fluoride potential control, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) in controlled conditions at 530 deg. C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic impurities dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration dropped to levels close to the detectable limit when the beryllium rod was inserted and increased once the content of excess beryllium in the system had been consumed by HF reduction and specimen corrosion progressed. Metallographic analysis of the samples after 500 h exposure in reactive conditions showed evidence of the formation of unstable chromium oxide layers on the specimen's surface.

  3. In Vitro Corrosion Assessment of Additively Manufactured Porous NiTi Structures for Bone Fixation Applications

    Hamdy Ibrahim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available NiTi alloys possess distinct functional properties (i.e., shape memory effect and superelasticity and biocompatibility, making them appealing for bone fixation applications. Additive manufacturing offers an alternative method for fabricating NiTi parts, which are known to be very difficult to machine using conventional manufacturing methods. However, poor surface quality, and the presence of impurities and defects, are some of the major concerns associated with NiTi structures manufactured using additive manufacturing. The aim of this study is to assess the in vitro corrosion properties of additively manufactured NiTi structures. NiTi samples (bulk and porous were produced using selective laser melting (SLM, and their electrochemical corrosion characteristics and Ni ion release levels were measured and compared with conventionally fabricated NiTi parts. The additively manufactured NiTi structures were found to have electrochemical corrosion characteristics similar to those found for the conventionally fabricated NiTi alloy samples. The highest Ni ion release level was found in the case of 50% porous structures, which can be attributed to their significantly higher exposed surface area. However, the Ni ion release levels reported in this work for all the fabricated structures remain within the range of most of values for conventionally fabricated NiTi alloys reported in the literature. The results of this study suggest that the proposed SLM fabrication process does not result in a significant deterioration in the corrosion resistance of NiTi parts, making them suitable for bone fixation applications.

  4. Chromium-modified a-C films with advanced structural, mechanical and corrosive-resistant characteristics

    Ming, Miao Yi [International Chinese-Belarusian scientific laboratory on vacuum-plasma technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Francisk Skorina Gomel State University, Gomel 246019 (Belarus); Jiang, Xiaohong, E-mail: jxh0668@sina.com [International Chinese-Belarusian scientific laboratory on vacuum-plasma technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Francisk Skorina Gomel State University, Gomel 246019 (Belarus); Piliptsou, D.G., E-mail: pdg_@mail.ru [International Chinese-Belarusian scientific laboratory on vacuum-plasma technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Francisk Skorina Gomel State University, Gomel 246019 (Belarus); Zhuang, Yuzhao; Rogachev, A.V.; Rudenkov, A.S. [International Chinese-Belarusian scientific laboratory on vacuum-plasma technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Francisk Skorina Gomel State University, Gomel 246019 (Belarus); Balmakou, A. [Faculty of Material Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Trnava 91724 (Slovakia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Influence of the chromium interlayer on the structure and mechanical properties of a-C:Cr films. • Residual stress and wear of a-C:Cr and Cr/a-C varies due to their phase and surface morphology. • Chromium-modified a-C films with advanced structural, mechanical and corrosive-resistant characteristics. - Abstract: To improve structural, mechanical and chemical properties of diamond-like carbon films, we developed amorphous carbon chromium-modified composite films fabricated by means of cathode magnetic filtered arc deposition. The properties were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for the purpose of the structure characterization, elemental analysis and topology examination. Moreover, we also assessed residual stress, the coefficient of friction, hardness, the elastic modulus and corrosion parameters through X-ray double-crystal surface profilometry, tribo-testing, nanoindenter-testing, as well as contact angle measurements and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. As a result of a comparative analysis, we revealed a substantial improvement in the characteristics of developed composite films in comparison with amorphous carbon films. For example, Cr-modification is resulted, in greater integrated performance, toughness and corrosion resistance; the residual stress was reduced substantially.

  5. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2014-01-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along...

  6. Numerical simulation of the detection of crack in reinforced concrete structures of NPP due to expansion of reinforcing corrosive products using Impact-Echo method

    Morávka Š.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy boom is starting nowadays. But also current nuclear power plants (NPP are duty to certify their security for regular renewal of their operating licenses. NPP security can be significantly affected by defects of large amount of ageing reinforced concrete structures. Advanced Impact-Echo method seams to be very hopeful to cooperate at performing in-service inspections such structures. Just these in-service inspections are included in the first priority group of specific technical issues according to the recommendations of OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency, Commission on Safety of Nuclear Installation in the field of ageing management.This paper continues of extensive project dealing with Impact-Echo method application. It will present method description and main results of numerical modeling of detection and localization of crack caused by corrosive product expansion. Steel reinforcing rods are subjected to corrosion due to diffusion of corrosive agents from structure surface. Corrosive products have up to 7-times larger volume than pure steel. Raised strain can cad lead up to concrete failure and crack development. We investigate whether it is possible to detect these growing cracks by Impact-Echo method in time.Experimental verification of our numerical predictions is prepared on Civil Faculty in Brno.

  7. Fibre Bragg grating sensors for reinforcement corrosion monitoring in civil engineering structures

    Grattan, S K T; Basheer, P; Taylor, S E; Zhao, W; Sun, T; Grattan, K T V

    2007-01-01

    Fibre optic strain sensors offer a number of advantages over the current electrical resistance type gauges, yet are not widely used in civil engineering applications. The use of fibre optic strain sensors (with a cross comparison with the output of electrical resistance gauges) to monitor the production of corrosion by-products in civil engineering concrete structures containing reinforcement bars has been investigated and results reported

  8. Corrosion fatigue in LP steam turbine blading - experiences, causes and appropriate measures; Korrosionsutmattning i aangturbinskovlar - Erfarenheter, inverkande faktorer och moejliga aatgaerder

    Tavast, J [ABB STAL AB, Finspaang (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Corrosion fatigue in LP steam turbine blading was reviewed together with result of tests performed in order to find blade materials with improved resistance against this. According to international experience, corrosion fatigue of 12Cr steam turbine blades in the transition zone between dry and wet steam, is one of the major causes, if not the major cause, for unavailability of steam turbines. Corrosion fatigue in LP blading is a frequent problem also in Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants, especially in turbines of type D54 in BWR-plants. Corrosion fatigue has also been discovered in at least one type of nuclear turbine. Initiation times have been very long and the varying experiences in different types of turbines may simply reflect differing initiation times. Corrosion fatigue may therefore become more frequent in other types of turbines in the future. The type of water treatment (BWR/PWR) and possibly temperature after reheating seem to influence the risk for corrosion fatigue. Influence of inleakage of cooling water is less clear for these nuclear plants. The long initiation times together with the fact that very few of the cracked blades have actually failed, indicate that the cracks initiate and/or propagate during transients. Extensive laboratory tests show that there are alternative blade materials available with improved resistance against corrosion fatigue, with the most promising being 15/5 PH and A905, together with Ti6Al4V. The Ti alloy shows the best resistance against corrosion fatigue in most environments and is already used in some turbines. Disadvantage is a higher cost and possible need for redesign of the blades. The alternative materials are recommended for use for blades in the transition zone between dry and wet steam in LP turbines. The main disadvantage is a lack of references, even if 15%5 PH has been used to a very limited extent. 40 refs, 24 figs, 12 tabs, 9 appendices

  9. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 1. Evaluation of effects of flow-induced vibration on structural material integrity

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Anahara, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Katono, Kenichi; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. An innovative method for flow induced vibration of structures in two phase flow by combined analyses of three dimensional flow dynamics and structures is to be introduced. (author)

  10. Corrosion of target and structural materials in water irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam

    Butt, D.P.; Kanner, G.S.; Lillard, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation enhanced, aqueous corrosion of solid neutron-targets such as tungsten or tantalum, or target cladding or structural materials such as superalloys and stainless steels, is a significant concern in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies. In this paper we briefly describe our current methods for control and in situ monitoring of corrosion in accelerator cooling water loops. Using floating, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), we have measured the corrosion rates of aluminum 6061, copper, Inconel 718, and 304L stainless steel in the flow loop of a water target irradiated by a μamp, 800 MeV proton beam. Impedance spectroscopy allows us to model the corrosion process of a material as an equivalent electrical circuit. Thus the polarization resistance, which is inversely proportional to the corrosion rate, can be extracted from the frequency response of a metal specimen. During a three month period, without the use of corrosion mitigation techniques, we observed increases of several orders of magnitude in the water conductivity and the corrosion rates. The increase in corrosion is at least partially attributed to a build up of peroxide in our pseudo-closed loop system. In this paper we also briefly describe our second generation experiments, scheduled to begin in late 1996. In these experiments we plan to measure the corrosion rates of tungsten, tantalum, Inconel 718, 316L and 304L stainless steel, HT-9 austenitic stainless steel, and aluminum 5053. Two or three electrode probes of each material are being placed directly in the proton beam, in a high neutron flux region, or a significant distance from the high radiation area. We will be measuring corrosion rates, changes in pH and conductivity, and we will be establishing parameters for filtration and mitigation of corrosion. We will also discuss our ideas for making in situ measurements of water radiolysis using optical and laser diagnostic techniques

  11. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  12. Fracture evaluation of an in-service piping flaw caused by microbiologically induced corrosion

    Rudland, D.L.; Scott, P.M.; Wilkowski, G.M.; Rahman, S.

    1996-01-01

    A pipe fracture experiment was conducted on a section of 6-inch nominal diameter pipe which was degraded by microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) at a circumferential girth weld. The pipe was a section of one of the service water piping systems to one of the emergency diesel generators at the Haddam Neck (Connecticut Yankee) plant. The experimental results will help validate future ASME Section XI pipe flaw evaluation criteria for other than Class 1 piping. A critical aspect of this experiment was an assessment of the degree of conservatism embodied in the ASME definition of flaw size. The ASME flaw size definition assumes a rectangular shaped, constant depth flaw with a depth equal to its maximum depth for its entire length. Since most service flaws are irregular in shape, this definition may be overly conservative. Results from several fracture prediction models are compared with the experimental results. These results show that, for this case, the ASME Appendix H criteria significantly underpredicted the experimental maximum moment, while other fracture prediction models provided good predictions when accurate pipe, weld and flaw dimensions were used

  13. Direct visualization of β phase causing intergranular forms of corrosion in Al–Mg alloys

    Yang, Young-Ki, E-mail: deltag@naver.com; Allen, Todd

    2013-06-15

    For a more effective examination of microstructure in Al–Mg alloys, a new etching solution has been developed; dissolved ammonium persulfate in water. It is demonstrated how β phase (Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2}) in Al–Mg alloys respond to this solution using samples of a binary Al–Mg alloy and a commercial 5083 aluminum alloy. Nanometer sized β phase is clearly visualized for the first time using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) instead of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is anticipated that direct and unambiguous visualization of β phase will greatly augment intergranular corrosion research in 5xxx series aluminum alloys. - Highlights: • Nanometer sized β phase in Al-10% Mg is first clearly visualized with SEM. • Nanometer sized β phase in wrought alloy 5083 is first clearly visualized with SEM. • Grain boundary decorating β phase and isolated sponge-like β phase are shown. • This phase is confirmed to be β phase using composition analysis.

  14. Factors and mechanisms affecting corrosion of steel in concrete

    Dehqanian, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic power plants possess reinforced concrete structures which are exposed to sea water or sea atmosphere. Sea water or its surrounding environment contain very corrosive species which cause corrosion of metal in concrete. It should be mentioned that corrosion of steel in concrete is a complex problem that is not completely understood. Some of the factors which influence the corrosion mechanism and can be related to the pore solution composition is discussed. Chloride ion caused problems are the main source of the corrosion damage seen on the reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion rate in concrete varies and depends on the way chloride ion diffuses into concrete. In addition, the associated cations can influence diffusion of chloride into concrete. The type of portland cement and also the concrete mix design all affect the corrosion behaviour of steel in concrete

  15. Standard test method for determining whether gas-leak-detector fluid solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking of brass alloys

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers an accelerated test method for evaluating the tendency of gas leak detection fluids (LDFs) to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass components in compressed gas service. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. Corrosion of Structural Materials for Advanced Supercritical Carbon- Dioxide Brayton Cycle

    Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-05-13

    for simultaneous occurrence of carburization during oxidation of the material. Carburization can potentially lead to embrittlement of structural alloys in SC-CO2 Brayton cycle. An important consideration in regards to corrosion is that the temperatures can vary widely across the various sections of the SC-CO2 Brayton cycle, from room temperature to 750°C, with even higher temperatures being desirable for higher efficiencies. Thus the extent of corrosion and corrosion mechanisms in various components and SC-CO2 Brayton cycle will be different, requiring a judicious selection of materials for different sections of the cycle. The goal of this project was to address materials corrosion-related challenges, identify appropriate materials, and advance the body of scientific knowledge in the area of high temperature SC-CO2 corrosion. The focus was on corrosion of materials in SC-CO2 environment in the temperature range of 450°C to 750°C at a pressure of 2900 psi for exposure duration for up to 1000 hours. The Table below lists the materials tested in the project. The materials were selected based on their high temperature strength, their code certification status, commercial availabilities, and their prior or current usage in the nuclear reactor industry. Additionally, pure Fe, Fe-12%Cr, and Ni-22%Cr were investigated as simple model materials to more clearly understand corrosion mechanisms. This first phase of the project involved testing in research grade SC-CO2 (99.999% purity). Specially designed autoclaves with high fidelity temperature, pressure, and flow control capabilities were built or modified for this project.

  17. Effect of temperature, of oxygen content and the downstream effect on corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium

    Ilincev, G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects were experimentally tested of temperature and of oxygen content on the corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium and on reducing the corrosion rate down the sodium stream. The results of the experiments are shown in graphs and tables and are discussed in detail. The duration of all tests was standard 1,000 hours. The test parameters were set such as to determine the effect of temperature on corrosion of a quantity of various materials in sodium with a low oxygen content (1.2 to 2 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 800 degC and in sodium with a high oxygen content (345 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 700 degC. More experiments served the determination of the effect of a different oxygen content varying between 1.2 and 2 ppm at a constant temperature of 600 degC. The materials being tested included main structural materials used for fast reactor construction and materials allowing to establish the effect of main alloying elements on their corrosion in liquid sodium of different temperatures and purity grades. The relationships showing the effects of temperature and oxygen content in sodium on the rate of corrosion of various structural materials in hot parts of the installation and on the reduction in the rate of corrosion downstream due to sodium saturation with corrosion products were constructed using the experimental results. (Z.M.). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  18. Analytical model of cracking due to rebar corrosion expansion in concrete considering the structure internal force

    Lin, Xiangyue; Peng, Minli; Lei, Fengming; Tan, Jiangxian; Shi, Huacheng

    2017-12-01

    Based on the assumptions of uniform corrosion and linear elastic expansion, an analytical model of cracking due to rebar corrosion expansion in concrete was established, which is able to consider the structure internal force. And then, by means of the complex variable function theory and series expansion technology established by Muskhelishvili, the corresponding stress component functions of concrete around the reinforcement were obtained. Also, a comparative analysis was conducted between the numerical simulation model and present model in this paper. The results show that the calculation results of both methods were consistent with each other, and the numerical deviation was less than 10%, proving that the analytical model established in this paper is reliable.

  19. Formation of the self-assembled structures by the ultrasonic cavitation erosion-corrosion effect on carbon steel

    Dayun Yan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cavitation erosion-corrosion effect on the metal surface always forms irregular oxide structures. In this study, we reported the formation of regular self-assembled structures of amorphous nanoparticles around the cavitation erosion pits on carbon steel upon the ultrasonic cavitation in methylene blue solution. Each self-assembled structure was composed of linearly aligned nanoparticles of about 100 nm. The formation of self-assembled structures might be due to the combined effect of corrosion, specific sonochemical reaction in methylene blue solution, and the magnetic domain structures on the carbon steel.

  20. High temperature corrosion of metals

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  1. A study on structural analysis of highly corrosive melts at high temperature

    Ohtori, N

    2002-01-01

    When sodium is burned at high temperature in the atmosphere, it reacts simultaneously with H sub 2 O in the atmosphere so that it can produce high temperature melt of sodium hydroxide as a solvent. If this melt includes peroxide ion (O sub 2 sup 2 sup -), it will be a considerably active and corrosive for iron so that several sodium iron double oxides will be produced as corrosion products after the reaction with steel structures. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the ability of presence of peroxide ion in sodium hydroxide solvent at high temperature and that of identification of the several corrosion products using laser Raman spectroscopy. The measurement system with ultraviolet laser was developed simultaneously in the present work to improve the ability of the measurement at high temperature. As results from the measurements, the possibility of the presence of peroxide ion was shown up to 823K in sodium peroxide and 823K in the melt of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium peroxide. A...

  2. A Survey of Corrosion and Conditions of Corrosion Protection Systems in Civil Works Structures of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    2014-09-01

    corrosion: coatings and cathodic protection (CP). Coatings consist of paints, epoxies, enamels , metalizing, and other coatings. CP is a chem- ical means...environmental factors such as water quality and resistivity. One of the major problems associated with lock gates is structural cracking in the...One of the problems described by Mr. Davis is fatigue crack growth resulting from the poor welding usually associated with stress risers and

  3. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  4. Life time forecasting method upon occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of structure and test device therefor

    Anzai, Hideya; Kida, Toshitaka; Urayama, Yoshinao; Kikuchi, Eiji; Shimanuki, Sei; Kuniya, Jiro; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Izumitani, Masakiyo; Hattori, Shigeo.

    1993-01-01

    A load stress is applied to a metal piece made of a material identical with the constituent material of a structure and having the sensitivity enhanced to a predetermined level, and plurality of such pieces are immersed in a corrosive circumstance in this state. Then, the time from the immersion till the rupture thereof and the number of ruptured pieces of the metal pieces are detected while observing them. The relation with the probability of rupture is plotted on a paper to determine the life time for the occurrence of minimum stress corrosion creacks (SSC) of the metal pieces. Based on the relationship between the previously determined stress and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC, the ratio between the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to estimated stress applied to the structure and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to the stress applied to the metal pieces is determined as a first SSC acceleration rate. The ratio between the time of occurrence for minimum SSC and the sensitivity is determined as a second SSC acceleration rate. The first and the second SSC acceleration rates are multiplied to estimate the time for the occurrence of SSC of the structure. Then, the life time for the occurrence of SSC for the equipments and structures can be recognized quantitatively, to prevent ruptures of actual equipments and extend the life time. (N.H.)

  5. Study on the formation of heterogeneous structures in leached layers during the corrosion process of glass

    Willemien Anaf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Le verre, corrodé dans des conditions naturelles, montre souvent des hétérogénéités dans la couche lixiviée, comme une structure lamellaire ou des inclusions de MnO2 ou Ca3(PO42. La formation de ces hétérogénéités n’est pas encore bien comprise. Des structures de ce type ont été produites artificiellement en laboratoire en immergeant des échantillons de verre dans des solutions riches en métaux. Les résultats expérimentaux ont été comparés avec des théories décrivant la corrosion du verre.Glass that corrodes under natural conditions often shows heterogeneities in the leached layer, such as a lamellar structure or inclusions of MnO2 or Ca3(PO42. The formation of these heterogeneities is still not well understood. By means of experiments under laboratory conditions, our aim was to artificially generate specific structures. Therefore, glass samples were immersed in metal-rich solutions. The experimental results were compared with theories describing glass corrosion from a molecular point of view.

  6. A study on the corrosion characteristics of gear steel by shot peening

    Kang, Jin Shik; Kim, Tae Hyung; Cheong, Seong Kyun; Yoon, Jong Ku; Lee, Seung Ho

    2001-01-01

    The surface treatment technique to increase corrosion resistance is very important in mechanical components of structures. Therefore, this paper investigates the effects of shot peening on the corrosion resistance of SCM 420steel. The results show that the surface compressive residual stress largely increases, which cause the increase of corrosion resistance

  7. Environmental variables evaluation on concrete structures corrosion for medium level activities repositories

    Requena, Carlos; Alvarez, Marta G.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the long term durability of reinforced concrete structures as medium-level waste container material. Electrochemical techniques have been used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of steel rebars in several solutions simulating the liquid present in the pores of both alkaline and carbonated concrete in the presence of sulphate ions. Results shown that a decrease in p H has an adverse effect on the critical sulphate concentration. The inhibition effect of high carbonate/bicarbonate concentration is also shown. (author)

  8. Enhancing corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete structures with hybrid fiber reinforced concrete

    Blunt, J.; Jen, G.; Ostertag, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Reinforced concrete beams were subjected to cyclic flexural loading. • Hybrid fiber reinforced composites were effective in reducing corrosion rates. • Crack resistance due to fibers increased corrosion resistance of steel rebar. • Galvanic corrosion measurements underestimated corrosion rates. • Polarization resistance measurements predicted mass loss more accurately. - Abstract: Service loads well below the yield strength of steel reinforcing bars lead to cracking of reinforced concrete. This paper investigates whether the crack resistance of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HyFRC) reduces the corrosion rate of steel reinforcing bars in concrete after cyclic flexural loading. The reinforcing bars were extracted to examine their surface for corrosion and compare microcell and macrocell corrosion mass loss estimates against direct gravimetric measurements. A delay in corrosion initiation and lower active corrosion rates were observed in the HyFRC beam specimens when compared to reinforced specimens containing plain concrete matrices cycled at the same flexural load

  9. Structural, theoretical and corrosion inhibition studies on some transition metal complexes derived from heterocyclic system

    Gupta, Shraddha Rani; Mourya, Punita; Singh, M. M.; Singh, Vinod P.

    2017-06-01

    A Schiff base, (E)-N‧-((1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-aminobenzohydrazide (Iabh) and its Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized. These compounds have been characterized by different physico-chemical and spectroscopic tools (UV-Vis, IR, NMR and ESI-Mass). The molecular structure of Iabh is determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The ligand Iabh displays E-configuration about the >Cdbnd N- bond. The structure of ligand is stabilized by intra-molecular H-bonding. In all the metal complexes the ligand coordinates through azomethine-N and carbonyl-O resulting a distorted octahedral geometry for Mn(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes in which chloride ions occupy axial positions. Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes, however, form 4-coordinate distorted square planer and tetrahedral geometry around metal ion, respectively. The structures of the complexes have been satisfactorily modeled by calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent-DFT (TD-DFT). The corrosion inhibition study of the compounds have been performed against mild steel in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at 298 K by using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). They show appreciable corrosion inhibition property.

  10. Exploration and Modeling of Structural changes in Waste Glass Under Corrosion

    Pantano, Carlos; Ryan, Joseph; Strachan, Denis

    2013-11-10

    Vitrification is currently the world-wide treatment of choice for the disposition of high-level nuclear wastes. In glasses, radionuclides are atomistically bonded into the solid, resulting in a highly durable product, with borosilicate glasses exhibiting particularly excellent durability in water. Considering that waste glass is designed to retain the radionuclides within the waste form for long periods, it is important to understand the long-term stability of these materials when they react in the environment, especially in the presence of water. Based on a number of previous studies, there is general consensus regarding the mechanisms controlling the initial rate of nuclear waste glass dissolution. Agreement regarding the cause of the observed decrease in dissolution rate at extended times, however, has been elusive. Two general models have been proposed to explain this behavior, and it has been concluded that both concepts are valid and must be taken into account when considering the decrease in dissolution rate. Furthermore, other processes such as water diffusion, ion exchange, and precipitation of mineral phases onto the glass surface may occur in parallel with dissolution of the glass and can influence long-term performance. Our proposed research will address these issues through a combination of aqueous-phase dissolution/reaction experiments and probing of the resulting surface layers with state-of-the-art analytical methods. These methods include solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The resulting datasets will then be coupled with computational chemistry and reaction-rate modeling to address the most persistent uncertainties in the understanding of glass corrosion, which indeed have limited the performance of the best corrosion models to date. With an improved understanding of corrosion mechanisms, models can be developed and improved that, while still conservative, take advantage of

  11. Nano structure Formations and Improvement in Corrosion Resistance of Steels by Means of Pulsed Electron Beam Surface Treatment

    Zhang, K.M.; Zou, J.X.; Zou, J.X.; Grosdidier, T.; Zou, J.X.; Grosdidier, T.; Grosdidier, T.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of steels has long been the topic for materials scientists. It is established that surface treatment is an efficient way to improve the corrosion resistance of steels without changing the bulk properties and with low costs. In the present paper, different kinds of surface treatment techniques for steels are briefly reviewed. In particular, the surface modification involving nano structure formations of steels by using a low energy high pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB) treatment is lightened in the case of an AISI 316L stainless steel and D2 steel. The overall results demonstrate the high potential of the LEHCPEB technique for improving the corrosion performance of steels The corrosion of steels has long been the topic for materials scientists. It is established that surface treatment is an efficient way to improve the corrosion resistance of steels without changing the bulk properties and with low costs. In the present paper, different kinds of surface treatment techniques for steels are briefly reviewed. In particular, the surface modification involving nano structure formations of steels by using a low energy high pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB) treatment is lightened in the case of an AISI 316L stainless steel and D2 steel. The overall results demonstrate the high potential of the LEHCPEB technique for improving the corrosion performance of steels

  12. Boric Acid Corrosion of Concrete Rebar

    Yang L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure and compromise the integrity of the structure. Because corrosion rate of carbon steel in concrete in the presence of boric acid is lacking in published literature and available data are equivocal on the effect of boric acid on rebar corrosion, corrosion rate measurements were conducted in this study using several test methods. Rebar corrosion rates were measured in (i borated water flowing in a simulated concrete crack, (ii borated water flowing over a concrete surface, (iii borated water that has reacted with concrete, and (iv 2,400 ppm boric acid solutions with pH adjusted to a range of 6.0 to 7.7. The corrosion rates were measured using coupled multielectrode array sensor (CMAS and linear polarization resistance (LPR probes, both made using carbon steel. The results indicate that rebar corrosion rates are low (~1 μm/yr or lesswhen the solution pH is ~7.1 or higher. Below pH ~7.1, the corrosion rate increases with decreasing pH and can reach ~100 μm/yr in solutions with pH less than ~6.7. The threshold pH for carbon steel corrosion in borated solution is between 6.8 and 7.3.

  13. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Brondel, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); Edwards, R [Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States); Hayman, A [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France); Hill, D [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); Mehta, S [Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom); Semerad, T [Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia)

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  14. Chemical and structural effects of phosphorus on the corrosion behavior of ion beam mixed Fe-Cr-P alloys

    Demaree, J.D.; Was, G.S.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to determine the mechanisms by which phosphorus affects the corrosion and passivation behavior of Fe-Cr-P alloys. To identify separately the effects of structure and chemistry on the corrosion behavior, thin films of Fe-10Cr-xP (0≤x≤35 at.%) were prepared by ion beam mixing. Films with a phosphorus content greater than approximately 20at.% were found to be entirely amorphous. Devitrification of the amorphous phase was accomplished by heating the samples to 450degC in an inert environment. Standard polarization tests of the sulfuric acid (with and without Cl - ) indicated that the films containing phosphorus were more corrosion resistant than Fe-10Cr, at both active and passive potentials. There was a monotonic relationship between the amount of phosphorus in the alloy and the corrosion resistance, with the open-circuit corrosion rate of Fe-10Cr-35P nearly four orders of magnitude lower than that of Fe-10Cr. Devitrification of the alloys had no significant effect on the corrosion rate, indicating that the primary effect of phosphorus is chemical in nature, and not structural. The passive oxides were depth-profiled using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated that phosphorus was a primary constituent, as phosphate. The presence of phosphate in the passive oxides reduced the overall corrosion rate directly, by suppressing anodic dissolution. The presence of phosphorus did enhance chromium enrichment in the oxide, but that was not thought to be the primary mechanism by which phosphorus increased the corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  15. Data book of anti-corrosion method

    Lee, Ui Ho

    1997-07-01

    This book deals with cases, influence, cause, standard of corrosion of steel structure, which includes bridges, steel tower, corrosion data, the ocean, ports, and RC structure for civil engineering, exterior materials of construction, building equipment pipes, processing industries such as chemical equipment, oil device, pump and coolant, environment facility like trash incinerator, and sewage process, thermal power generation and nuclear energy generation, and energy industry.

  16. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  17. Fabrication of hydrophobic surface with hierarchical structure on Mg alloy and its corrosion resistance

    Wang Jun; Li Dandan; Liu Qi; Yin Xi; Zhang Ying; Jing Xiaoyan; Zhang Milin

    2010-01-01

    A hydrotalcite/hydromagnesite conversion coating with hierarchical structure has been fabricated on a Mg alloy substrate by in situ hydrothermal crystallization method. A MgO layer existing between the hydrotalcite/hydromagnesite film and the substrate was formed prior to the hydrotalcite/hydromagnesite film during the crystallization process. After surface treatment with silane coupling agent, the surface of conversion coating changes from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the silylated conversion coating with hierarchical structure maintains the original rough surface of which was composed of numerous micro-scale flakes and beautiful flower-like protrusions. Polarization measurements have shown that the hydrophobic conversion coating exhibited a low corrosion current density value of 0.432 μA/cm 2 , which means that the hydrophobic conversion coating can effectively protect Mg alloy from corrosion. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the impedance of the hydrophobic conversion coating was 9000 Ω. It means that the coating served as a passive layer with high charge transfer resistance.

  18. Advances in Chemical and Structural Characterization of Concretion with Implications for Modeling Marine Corrosion

    Johnson, Donald L.; DeAngelis, Robert J.; Medlin, Dana J.; Carr, James D.; Conlin, David L.

    2014-05-01

    The Weins number model and concretion equivalent corrosion rate methodology were developed as potential minimum-impact, cost-effective techniques to determine corrosion damage on submerged steel structures. To apply the full potential of these technologies, a detailed chemical and structural characterization of the concretion (hard biofouling) that transforms into iron bearing minerals is required. The fractions of existing compounds and the quantitative chemistries are difficult to determine from x-ray diffraction. Environmental scanning electron microscopy was used to present chemical compositions by means of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). EDS demonstrates the chemical data in mapping format or in point or selected area chemistries. Selected-area EDS data collection at precise locations is presented in terms of atomic percent. The mechanism of formation and distribution of the iron-bearing mineral species at specific locations will be presented. Based on water retention measurements, porosity in terms of void volume varies from 15 v/o to 30 v/o (vol.%). The void path displayed by scanning electron microscopy imaging illustrates the tortuous path by which oxygen migrates in the water phase within the concretion from seaside to metalside.

  19. Some observations on use of siliceous mineral waters in reduction of corrosion in RCC structures

    Venugopal, C.

    The corrosion-resisting characteristics of reinforcement in cement blended with siliceous mineral wastes viz. gold tailing and flyash have been evaluated by using an accelerated corrosion technique. The additions of these mineral admixtures...

  20. Integrated modelling of corrosion-induced deterioration in rein-forced concrete structures

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, M.R.; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    at the reinforcement surface, a FEM based me-chanical model was used to simulate corrosion-induced concrete damage. Both FEM models were fully coupled, i.e. information, such as corrosion current density, dam-age state of concrete cover, etc., were constantly exchanged between the models. To demonstrate the potential......An integrated finite element based modelling approach is presented, which allows for fully coupled simulation of reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced concrete damage. While a finite element method (FEM) based corrosion model was used to describe electrochemical processes...... use of the modelling approach, a numerical example is presented which illustrates full coupling of formation of corrosion cells, propagation of corrosion, and subsequent development of corrosion-induced concrete damage....

  1. The influence of cracks on chloride-induced corrosion of reinforced concrete structures - development of the experimental set-up

    Blagojevic, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Walraven, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is one of the major threats to durability of reinforced concrete structures in aggressive environmental conditions. When the steel reinforcement starts to corrode, structures gradually lose integrity and service life is shortened. Cracks are

  2. Corrosion kinetics of alloy Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W as structural material in high level nuclear waste containers

    Rodriguez, Martin A.

    2004-01-01

    was detected in the solutions containing fluoride ions. It was attributed to a change in the oxidation state of molybdenum and/or nickel in the passive film. Current densities in the trans passive range were higher in the solutions containing fluoride ions, especially at ph 6. Crevice corrosion was detected at potentials higher than the corrosion potential, only in presence of chloride ions at 90 C degrees. Pitting corrosion was not detected in any case. Chloride plus fluoride mixtures were more aggressive to localized corrosion resistance than pure chloride solutions. It was attributed to the weakening of the film caused by fluoride ions and the interference in the self-repairing process caused by chloride ions. There were no differences in behavior between of mill annealed and thermal aged alloys neither in the passive and trans passive states, nor in the localized corrosion susceptibility. (author) [es

  3. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  4. Fatigue strength degradation of metals in corrosive environments

    Adasooriya, Mudiyan Nirosha Damayanthi; Hemmingsen, Tor; Pavlou, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Structures exposed to aggressive environmental conditions are often subjected to time-dependent loss of coating and loss of material due to corrosion; this causes reduction in the cross-sectional properties of the members, increased surface roughness, surface irregularities and corrosion pits, and degradation of material strengths. These effects have been identified and simulated in different research studies. However, time and corrosive media dependent fatigue strength curves for materials h...

  5. Some problems on the aqueous corrosion of structural materials in nuclear engineering; Problemes de corrosion aqueuse de materiaux de structure dans les constructions nucleaires

    Coriou, H; Grall, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to give a comprehensive view of some aqueous corrosion studies which have been carried out with various materials for utilization either in nuclear reactors or in irradiated fuel treatment plants. The various subjects are listed below. Austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys: the behaviour of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in nitric medium and in the presence of hexavalent chromium; the stress corrosion of austenitic alloys in alkaline media at high temperatures; the stress corrosion of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in 650 C steam. Ferritic steels: corrosion of low alloy steels in water at 25 and 360 C; zirconium alloys; the behaviour of ultrapure zirconium in water and steam at high temperature. (authors) [French] On presente un ensemble d'etudes de corrosion en milieu aqueux effectuees sur des materiaux utilises, soit dans la construction des reacteurs soit pour la realisation des usines de traitement des combustibles irradies. Les differents sujets etudies sont les suivants. Les alliages austenitiques Fer-Nickel-Chrome: comportement d'alliages austenitiques fer-nickel-chrome en milieu nitrique en presence de chrome hexavalent; Corrosion sous contrainte d'alliages austenitiques dans les milieux alcalins a haute temperature; Corrosion sous contrainte dans la vapeur a 650 C d'alliages austenitiques fer-nickel-chrome. Les aciers ferritiques; Corrosion d'aciers faiblement allies dans l'eau a 25 et 360 C; le zirconium et ses alliages; Comportement du zirconium tres pur dans l'eau et la vapeur a haute temperature. (auteurs)

  6. Effect of Thermal Fields on the Structure of Corrosion-Resistant Steels Under Different Modes of Laser Treatment

    Tarasova, T. V.; Gusarov, A. V.; Protasov, K. E.; Filatova, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of temperature fields on the structure and properties of corrosion-resistant chromium steels under different modes of laser treatment is investigated. A model of heat transfer under laser impact on target is used to plot thermal fields and cycles and cooling rates. It is shown that the model used for computing thermal fields gives tentative geometric sizes of the fusion zones under laser treatment and selective laser fusion. The cooling rate is shown to have decisive influence on the structure of corrosion-resistant steels after laser treatment with surface fusion in devices for pulsed, continuous, and selective laser melting.

  7. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  8. Study on the formation of heterogeneous structures in leached layers during the corrosion process of glass

    Willemien Anaf

    2010-01-01

    Le verre, corrodé dans des conditions naturelles, montre souvent des hétérogénéités dans la couche lixiviée, comme une structure lamellaire ou des inclusions de MnO2 ou Ca3(PO4)2. La formation de ces hétérogénéités n’est pas encore bien comprise. Des structures de ce type ont été produites artificiellement en laboratoire en immergeant des échantillons de verre dans des solutions riches en métaux. Les résultats expérimentaux ont été comparés avec des théories décrivant la corrosion du verre.Gl...

  9. Galvanic corrosion of structural non-stoichiometric silicon nitride thin films and its implications on reliability of microelectromechanical devices

    Broas, M., E-mail: mikael.broas@aalto.fi; Mattila, T. T.; Paulasto-Kröckel, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, Espoo, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto (Finland); Liu, X.; Ge, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Aalto University, Espoo, P.O. Box 16200, FIN-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-06-28

    This paper describes a reliability assessment and failure analysis of a poly-Si/non-stoichiometric silicon nitride thin film composite structure. A set of poly-Si/SiN{sub x} thin film structures were exposed to a mixed flowing gas (MFG) environment, which simulates outdoor environments, for 90 days, and an elevated temperature and humidity (85 °C/95% R.H.) test for 140 days. The mechanical integrity of the thin films was observed to degrade during exposure to the chemically reactive atmospheres. The degree of degradation was analyzed with nanoindentation tests. Statistical analysis of the forces required to initiate a fracture in the thin films indicated degradation due to the exposure to the MFG environment in the SiN{sub x} part of the films. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a porous-like reaction layer on top of SiN{sub x}. The morphology of the reaction layer resembled that of galvanically corroded poly-Si. Transmission electron microscopy further clarified the microstructure of the reaction layer which had a complex multi-phase structure extending to depths of ∼100 nm. Furthermore, the layer was oxidized two times deeper in a 90 days MFG-tested sample compared to an untested reference. The formation of the layer is proposed to be caused by galvanic corrosion of elemental silicon in non-stoichiometric silicon nitride during hydrofluoric acid etching. The degradation is proposed to be due uncontrolled oxidation of the films during the stress tests.

  10. Organic compounds as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic media: correlation between inhibition efficiency and chemical structure

    Elias, Elizandra C.S.; Chrisman, Erika C.A.N. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2009-12-19

    The use of inhibitors for mild steels corrosion control which are in contact with aggressive environment is an accepted practice in acid treatment of oil-wells. Organic compounds have been studied to evaluate their corrosion inhibition potential. Film-forming corrosion inhibitors, commonly used to protect oil-field equipment, can be absorbed on the steel surface to give structurally ordered layers. Therefore, the electrons should act as an important role for this adsorption. Studies reveal that organic compounds show significant inhibition efficiency. For this purpose, their molecules should contain N, O and S heteroatoms in various functional groups, long hydrocarbon linear or branched radical and anion and cation active components. However, most of these compounds are not only expensive but also toxic to living beings. According to the 'Green Chemistry' rules, corrosion inhibitors based on organic compounds should be cheap, with low toxicity and have high inhibition efficiency. In this study, the effects of some organic compounds with different groups such as amide, ether, phenyldiamine, anime and aminophenol on the corrosion behavior of mild steel in acidic media have been investigated. The experimental data were obtained by gravimetric measurements. The results show that these compounds reveal a promising corrosion inhibition where phenyldiamine is the most efficient. The effect of molecular structure on the corrosion inhibition efficiency was investigated by semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The electronic properties such as highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels, and LUMO-HOMO energy gap orbital density were calculated. The relations between the inhibition efficiency and some quantum parameters are discussed and correlations are proposed. The highest values for the HOMO densities were found in the vicinity nitrogen atom, indicating that it is the most probable adsorption center

  11. Molten salt corrosion behavior of structural materials in LiCl-KCl-UCl3 by thermogravimetric study

    Rao, Ch Jagadeeswara; Ningshen, S.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2018-04-01

    The corrosion resistance of structural materials has been recognized as a key issue in the various unit operations such as salt purification, electrorefining, cathode processing and injection casting in the pyrochemical reprocessing of spent metallic nuclear fuels. In the present work, the corrosion behavior of the candidate materials of stainless steel (SS) 410, 2.25Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo steels was investigated in molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 salt by thermogravimetric analysis under inert and reactive atmospheres at 500 and 600 °C, for 6 h duration. Insignificant weight gain (less than 1 mg/cm2) in the inert atmosphere and marginal weight gain (maximum 5 mg/cm2) in the reactive atmosphere were observed at both the temperatures. Chromium depletion rates and formation of Cr-rich corrosion products increased with increasing temperature of exposure in both inert and reactive atmospheres as evidenced by SEM and EDS analysis. The corrosion attack by LiCl-KCl-UCl3 molten salt, under reactive atmosphere for 6 h duration was more in the case of SS410 than 9Cr-1Mo steel followed by 2.25Cr-1Mo steel at 500 °C and the corrosion attack at 600 °C followed the order: 9Cr-1Mo steel >2.25Cr-1Mo steel > SS410. Outward diffusion of the minor alloying element, Mo was observed in 9Cr-1Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo steels at both temperatures under reactive atmosphere. Laser Raman spectral analysis of the molten salt corrosion tested alloys under a reactive atmosphere at 500 and 600 °C for 6 h revealed the formation of unprotected Fe3O4 and α-as well as γ-Fe2O3. The results of the present study facilitate the selection of structural materials for applications in the corrosive molten salt environment at high temperatures.

  12. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in the marine environment is an important issue because the costs causes by marine corrosion increased year upon year. It is necessary a correctly approach to materials selection, protection and corrosion control to reduce this burden of wasted materials, wasted energy and wasted money. Many different types of corrosion attack can be observed to structures, ships and other equipment used in sea water service. Shipping containers are exposed to various corrosive mediums like as airborne salt, industrial pollutants, rain and saltwater. Transport damage during loading onto and unloading off trucks, train beds and ships breaches the paint coating which further contributes to corrosion. The result is shortened container life and high costs for container repair or replacement. The paper intends to evaluate, by gravimetric method, the corrosion rate and corrosion penetration rate of two types of carbon steel DX51D and S220GD. Carbon steel DX51D and hot-dip galvanized steel S220GD are used in marine and industrial applications for buildings cargo vessels, container ships and oil tankers. For testing it was used different corrosive environments: 5% NaOH solution; 5% HCL solution and 0.5M NaCl solution. The samples were immersed in 400mL of testing solution for exposure period of 28 days. Periodically at 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days was measured de mass loss and evaluate the corrosion rate and corrosion stability coefficient. The steel DX51D was stable in 5% NaOH solution for 28 days, the values of corrosion stability coefficient was 7 after 3 days and 6 after 28 days of immersion in corrosive medium. In 5% HCL solution steels DX51D and S220GD was completely corroded in 21 days with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 9 for 7 days and 8 for 21 days of immersion in corrosive solution. It was observed a good resistance for 3 days in 0.5M NaCl solution with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 5, but after that

  13. Structural cause of dysphagia detected during videofluoroscopic swallow study

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Kabuto, Syu

    2017-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Dysphagia can be caused by many different underlying conditions. The assessment and management of dysphagia depend on each individual patient, often requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Structural cause of dysphagia can be dealt with using endoscopic interventions before the patient's general status deteriorates.

  14. Using half-cell potential measurement to access the severity of corrosion in reinforced concrete structures in Gentilly-2 reactor building

    Picard, S.; Kadoum, N.; Poirier, F.

    2009-01-01

    The half-cell potential technique has been used to assess the corrosion in the reactor's building ring beam of the Gentilly-2 nuclear power plant. It is a non-destructive technique based on the ASTM C 876 Standard. Corrosion is the result of a difference of potential between anodic and cathodic zones within the re-bars network and these potential differences are measured in the half-cell potential technique. Time exposure is the leading factor and we recommend the installation of permanent electrodes of reference in strategic areas. The results show a low corrosion activity level on 98% of the investigated surface and no severe corrosion potential reading has been registered. Furthermore the exercise shows that the repair technique has no influence on the corrosion activity of the steel network. Since most of the readings are located in the low corrosion activity level (from 0 to -100 mV), it illustrates that there is heterogeneity of the corrosion activity within the ring beam. We recommend a system to monitor the evolution of the corrosion phenomena in real time. The installation of reference electrodes positioned in some ring beam strategic areas is a simple and accurate way of monitoring the corrosion activity of the steel in the structure. In the case where an evolution in higher level is noted in the corrosion activity, it would be possible to act and prevent any further degradation of the structure

  15. Response of reinforced concrete structures to macrocell corrosion of reinforcements. Part I: Before propagation of microcracks via an analytical approach

    Kiani, Keivan; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Response of RC structures to macrocell corrosion of a rebar is studied analytically. ► The problem is solved prior to the onset of microcrack propagation. ► Suitable Love's potential functions are used to study the steel-rust-concrete media. ► The role of crucial factors on the time of onset of concrete cracking is examined. ► The effect of vital factors on the maximum radial stress of concrete is explored. - Abstract: Assessment of the macrocell corrosion which deteriorates reinforced concrete (RC) structures have attracted the attention of many researchers during recent years. In this type of rebar corrosion, the reduction in cross-section of the rebar is significantly accelerated due to the large ratio of the cathode's area to the anode's area. In order to examine the problem, an analytical solution is proposed for prediction of the response of the RC structure from the time of steel depassivation to the stage just prior to the onset of microcrack propagation. To this end, a circular cylindrical RC member under axisymmetric macrocell corrosion of the reinforcement is considered. Both cases of the symmetric and asymmetric rebar corrosion along the length of the anode zone are studied. According to the experimentally observed data, corrosion products are modeled as a thin layer with a nonlinear stress–strain relation. The exact expressions of the elastic fields associated with the steel, and concrete media are obtained using Love's potential function. By imposing the boundary conditions, the resulting set of nonlinear equations are solved in each time step by Newton's method. The effects of the key parameters which have dominating role in the time of the onset of concrete cracking and maximum radial stress field of the concrete have been examined.

  16. Structure, corrosion behavior and mechanical property of a novel poly(vinyl alcohol) composite in simulated body fluid.

    Li, Juan; Suo, Jinping; Zou, Peng; Jia, Lintao; Wang, Shifang

    2010-01-01

    The data for long-term drug-delivery systems are scarce compared to the short-term systems because the required research efforts are more time-consuming. In this study, we report a novel cross-linked composite based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing cupric ions for long-term delivery, which is helpful for contraception and trace element balance in the human body. The composition, corrosion products, crystal structure, chemical structure and mechanical stability of the composite, after being immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for one year, were studied by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and mechanical testing. The results show that no other new elements, such as P, Cl and Ca, appear on the surface of the composite and no Cu(2)O was formed after immersion in SBF for one year. The effectiveness of copper can be greatly improved and the side-effects caused by these compounds might also be eliminated. Furthermore, this novel composite exhibits long-term mechanical stability in SBF. The present in vitro long-term data suggest that this novel copper-containing composite may serve as a substitute for conventional materials of copper-containing intrauterine devices (Cu-IUDs) and as a carrier for controlled-release material in a variety of other applications.

  17. Analysis of the structural steels corrosion resistance in sour water from petroleum refineries; Analise da resistencia a corrosao de acos estruturais em aguas acidas de refinarias de petroleo

    Proenca, Marcos B.; Freire, Celia M. de A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Santos, Margatita B. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada

    1994-07-01

    The presence of H{sub 2} S in refineries FCC sour water provokes the formation of a passive Fe S scale. The cyanides present on sour water remove this scale, raising the corrosion rate in pipping and vessels. In this work it was measured the corrosion rate of structural steels in this water by electrochemical methods. Anodic polarization curves were plotted and the corrosion rates of the steels were determined. (author)

  18. Methodology for Assessing the Probability of Corrosion in Concrete Structures on the Basis of Half-Cell Potential and Concrete Resistivity Measurements

    Sadowski, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the corrosion of steel reinforcement has become a major problem in the construction industry. Therefore, much attention has been given to developing methods of predicting the service life of reinforced concrete structures. The progress of corrosion cannot be visually assessed until a crack or a delamination appears. The corrosion process can be tracked using several electrochemical techniques. Most commonly the half-cell potential measurement technique is used for this purpos...

  19. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  20. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Laboratory study of reinforcement protection with corrosion inhibitors

    Stefanescu, D.; Mihalache, M.; Mogosan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete is a durable material and its performance as part of the containment function in NPPs has been good. However, experience shows that degradation of the reinforced concrete structures caused by the corrosion of the reinforcing steel represents more than 80% of all damages in the world. Much effort has been made to develop a corrosion inhibition process to prolong the life of existing structures and minimize corrosion damages in new structures. Migrating Corrosion Inhibitor technology was developed to protect the embedded steel rebar/concrete structure. These inhibitors can be incorporated as an admixture or can be surface impregnated on existing concrete structures. The effectiveness of two inhibitors (ethanolamine and diethanolamine) mixed in the reinforced concrete was evaluated by gravimetric measurements. The corrosion behavior of the steel rebar and the inhibiting effects of the amino alcohol chemistry in an aggressive environment were monitored using electrochemical measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations. (authors)

  2. Corrosion of Structural Materials in Liquid Metals Used as Fast Reactor Coolants

    Balbaud-Célérier, F.; Courouau, J.L.; Martinelli, L.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • Thermodynamic data give the stable state of the system, the compounds susceptible to form but no information on the kinetics of the process; • Need to perform corrosion tests in controlled conditions of temperature, chemistry, hydrodynamics; • Comparison of the materials behaviour: first selection of materials, optimisation of the composition; • Fundamental work on the understanding of the corrosion process to develop corrosion models and predictive laws to guarantee the long term behaviour

  3. Characterizing the relationship between hyperstoichiometry, defect structure and local corrosion kinetics of uranium dioxide

    He Heming; Qin, Z.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of the UO 2 fluorite structure to accommodate large amounts of interstitial oxygen in various lattice sites leads to the formation of hyper-stoichiometric phases. The defect structures occurring in hyper-stoichiometric UO 2+x over the range 0.02 ≤ x ≤ 0.1 have been characterized by SEM/EDX and Raman analyses. The results demonstrate that as the nominal stoichiometry increases from 2.002 to 2.1, the diversity of defective structures existing on the UO 2+ surface also increases. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurements combined with a theoretical model were used to determine the rate constant for the reduction of the redox mediator ferrocene methanol, acting as a cathodic oxidant to corrode the four UO 2+x specimens. The rate constant was found to vary with location on the surface. Stoichiometric locations, with a well defined fluorite structure, exhibited very low corrosion rates. Higher rates were observed at more non-stoichiometric locations with the highest rates being obtained on locations exhibiting tetragonal distortions as their composition approached UO 2.33 . The distribution of rates increases with the degree of nominal non-stoichiometry as the diversity of microstructures existing on the UO 2+x surface increases.

  4. Structural performance evaluation on aging underground reinforced concrete structures. Part 6. An estimation method of threshold value in performance verification taking reinforcing steel corrosion

    Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Miyagawa, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses applicability of material degradation model due to reinforcing steel corrosion for RC box-culverts with corroded reinforcement and an estimation method for threshold value in performance verification reflecting reinforcing steel corrosion. First, in FEM analyses, loss of reinforcement section area and initial tension strain arising from reinforcing steel corrosion, and deteriorated bond characteristics between reinforcement and concrete were considered. The full-scale loading tests using corroded RC box-culverts were numerically analyzed. As a result, the analyzed crack patterns and load-strain relationships were in close agreement with the experimental results within the maximum corrosion ratio 15% of primary reinforcement. Then, we showed that this modeling could estimate the load carrying capacity of corroded RC box-culverts. Second, a parametric study was carried out for corroded RC box culverts with various sizes, reinforcement ratios and levels of steel corrosion, etc. Furthermore, as an application of analytical results and various experimental investigations, we suggested allowable degradation ratios for a modification of the threshold value, which corresponds to the chloride induced deterioration progress that is widely accepted in maintenance practice for civil engineering reinforced concrete structures. Finally, based on these findings, we developed two estimation methods for threshold value in performance verification: 1) a structural analysis method using nonlinear FEM included modeling of material degradation, 2) a practical method using a threshold value, which is determined by structural analyses of RC box-culverts in sound condition, is multiplied by the allowable degradation ratio. (author)

  5. Corrosion inhibitors

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  6. Corrosion resistant structural materials for use in lithium fluoride molten salts and thermonuclear device using it

    Kawamura, Kazutaka; Takagi, Ryuzo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To provide blanket materials for thermo nuclear devices and structural materials for containers with less MHD effect and good heat exchanging efficiency. Constitution: LiF-PbF 2 is used as the liquid blanket material for moderating the MHD effect. That is, the lithium compound, in the form of a fluoride, can be made easily liquefiable being and PbF 2 is added for lowering the melting point. The reason of using the fluoride is that fluorine material is less activated by the adsorption of neutrons. Copper, phosphor bronze, nickel or nickel-based alloy, e.g., Monel metal is used as corrosion resistant structural material to LiF-PbF 2 molten salts. Use of copper as the low activating structural material can provide an excellent effect also in view of the maintenance and, further, a series of processes for purifying, separating injecting and recoverying tritium can be conducted safely and stationarily without contaminating the circumferences. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Effect of Chemical Environment and pH on AC Corrosion of Cathodically Protected Structures

    Junker-Holst, Andreas; Vendelbo Nielsen, Lars; Møller, Per

    2017-01-01

    and corrosion products is made using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The findings suggest an AC corrosion mechanism highly dependent on the build-up and break-down of calcareous deposits at high CP, which is clearly reflected...

  8. Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Alloy 1151 in Marine Atmosphere

    Bakulo, A. V.; Yakushin, B. F.; Puchkov, Yu. A.

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of joints formed by TIG and IMIG welding from clad sheets of heat-hardenable aluminum alloy 1151 of the Al - Cu - Mg system is studied. The corrosion tests are performed in an aqueous solution of NaCl in a salt-spray chamber. The welded joints are subjected to a metallographic analysis.

  9. Sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting natural corrosion depostis from marine steel structures

    Païssé, S.; Ghiglione, J.-F.; Marty, F.; Abbas, B.; Gueuné, H.; Sanchez Amaya, J.; Muyzer, G.; Quillet, L.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, investigations were conducted on natural corrosion deposits to better understand the role of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the accelerated corrosion process of carbon steel sheet piles in port environments. We describe the abundance and diversity of total and metabolically

  10. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  11. Launch Pad Coatings for Smart Corrosion Control

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Bucherl, Cori N.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Whitten, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material as a result of its interaction with the environment. The environment at the KSC launch pads has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the US. The 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that are generated by the solid rocket boosters during a launch exacerbate the corrosiveness of the environment at the pads. Numerous failures at the pads are caused by the pitting of stainless steels, rebar corrosion, and the degradation of concrete. Corrosion control of launch pad structures relies on the use of coatings selected from the qualified products list (QPL) of the NASA Standard 5008A for Protective Coating of Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel, and Aluminum on Launch Structures, Facilities, and Ground Support Equipment. This standard was developed to establish uniform engineering practices and methods and to ensure the inclusion of essential criteria in the coating of ground support equipment (GSE) and facilities used by or for NASA. This standard is applicable to GSE and facilities that support space vehicle or payload programs or projects and to critical facilities at all NASA locations worldwide. Environmental regulation changes have dramatically reduced the production, handling, use, and availability of conventional protective coatings for application to KSC launch structures and ground support equipment. Current attrition rate of qualified KSC coatings will drastically limit the number of commercial off the shelf (COTS) products available for the Constellation Program (CxP) ground operations (GO). CxP GO identified corrosion detection and control technologies as a critical, initial capability technology need for ground processing of Ares I and Ares V to meet Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD) CxP 70000 operability requirements for reduced ground processing complexity, streamlined integrated testing, and operations phase affordability

  12. Effect of temperature on the level of corrosion caused by heavy petroleum on AISI 304 and AISI 444 stainless steel

    João Paulo Sampaio Eufrásio Machado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a study on the influence of national heavy petroleum in the corrosion of the AISI 444 and AISI 304 stainless steels in simulated refining operation conditions. The petroleum was first characterized through physicochemical analysis (density, fluidity point, viscosity, sulfur concentration. In an attempt to understand the corrosion effect of temperature and of the type of heating the referred types of steel thermal treatments were carried out at three levels of temperature (200, 300 and 400 °C. The procedure was done in conditions close to those in the distillation column. Heat was gradually increased from room temperature, and directly heated to working temperature. Each treatment took 4 hours to be completed. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM and the analysis of X rays dispersive energy (EDX were used after the trials to characterize the samples. The results show that treatment temperature, as well as the type of heating, has distinct influences on each type of steel.

  13. Characterizing the structural degradation in a PEMFC cathode catalyst layer : carbon corrosion

    Young, A.; Stumper, J. [Ballard Power Systems, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Gyenge, E. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The structural degradation resulting from carbon corrosion of a cathode catalyst layer in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated in this study. In order to oxidize the catalyst carbon support, the PEMFC catalyst layer was subjected to a 30 hour accelerated stress test that cycled the cathode potential from 0.1 to 1.5 VRHE at 30 and 150 second intervals. The rate and amount of carbon loss was determined by measuring the carbon dioxide in the exhaust gas. The structural degradation of the catalyst layer was characterized and correlated to the PEMFC performance using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and polarization analyses. This analysis revealed a clear thinning of the cathode catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer carbon sub-layer, and a reduction in the effective platinum surface area due to the carbon support oxidation. The thinned cathode catalyst layer changed the water management, and increased the voltage loss associated with the oxygen mass transport and catalyst layer ohmic resistance. In order to further develop and verify this methodology for other degradation mechanisms, emphasis was placed on EIS measurements.

  14. [Assessment of biological corrosion of ferroconcrete of ground-based industrial structures].

    Rozhanskaia, A M; Piliashenko-Novokhatnyĭ, A I; Purish, L M; Durcheva, V N; Kozlova, I A

    2001-01-01

    One of the objects of a nuclear plant built in 1983 and put in 15-years long dead storage with the purpose to estimate the degree of contamination by rust-hazardous microorganisms of ferroconcrete structures and to predict their biocorrosion state after putting in operation was a subject of microbiological investigation. The everywhere distribution of sulphur cycle bacteria (thionic and sulphate-reducing bacteria) on the surface and in the bulk of concrete structures, their confineness to corrosion products of concrete and bars of the investigated building have been shown. It has been demonstrated that sulphate-reducing bacteria were the most distributed group in all the sampling points. An indirect estimation of participation degree of the microbial communities in the processes of ferroconcrete biological damages has been carried out as based on the accumulation intensity of aggressive gaseous metabolites--carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Probability of deterioration of biocorrosion situation under the full-scale operation of the object has been substantiated.

  15. Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Zhiquan; Wu, Yekang; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Guorui; Li, Dalong; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Yu, Shengxue; Shen, Dejiu; Nash, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coated AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), potentio-dynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Detached coating samples were fabricated by an electrochemical method and more details of the internal micro-structure of coatings were clearly observed on the fractured cross-section morphologies of the samples compared to general polished cross-section morphologies. Evolution mechanisms of the coating corrosion behavior in relation to the evolution of micro-structural characteristics were discussed in detail.

  16. Corrosion induced failure analysis of subsea pipelines

    Yang, Yongsheng; Khan, Faisal; Thodi, Premkumar; Abbassi, Rouzbeh

    2017-01-01

    Pipeline corrosion is one of the main causes of subsea pipeline failure. It is necessary to monitor and analyze pipeline condition to effectively predict likely failure. This paper presents an approach to analyze the observed abnormal events to assess the condition of subsea pipelines. First, it focuses on establishing a systematic corrosion failure model by Bow-Tie (BT) analysis, and subsequently the BT model is mapped into a Bayesian Network (BN) model. The BN model facilitates the modelling of interdependency of identified corrosion causes, as well as the updating of failure probabilities depending on the arrival of new information. Furthermore, an Object-Oriented Bayesian Network (OOBN) has been developed to better structure the network and to provide an efficient updating algorithm. Based on this OOBN model, probability updating and probability adaptation are performed at regular intervals to estimate the failure probabilities due to corrosion and potential consequences. This results in an interval-based condition assessment of subsea pipeline subjected to corrosion. The estimated failure probabilities would help prioritize action to prevent and control failures. Practical application of the developed model is demonstrated using a case study. - Highlights: • A Bow-Tie (BT) based corrosion failure model linking causation with the potential losses. • A novel Object-Oriented Bayesian Network (OOBN) based corrosion failure risk model. • Probability of failure updating and adaptation with respect to time using OOBN model. • Application of the proposed model to develop and test strategies to minimize failure risk.

  17. Rebar corrosion due to carbonation in structural reinforced concretes for near-surface LLW repositories: A critical failure mechanism

    Torok, J

    1995-03-01

    The concrete roof of a near-surface radioactive waste repository is the principle protection against water infiltration and intrusion. The following potential roof failure mechanism is examined: carbon dioxide generated by the biodegradation of organic materials in the repository initiates corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in the concrete roof. Because the bottom surface of the roof is mostly under tension, it is susceptible to cracking. The migration path for carbon dioxide is through cracks in the concrete between the bottom of the roof and the reinforcing bars. Carbonate corrosion of the reinforcing bars may result in concrete spalling, more extensive rebar corrosion and ultimately structural failure. Attention is brought to this failure mechanism because it has generally been overlooked in repository performance assessments. Literature relevant to the above failure is reviewed. Prerequisites for rebar corrosion are the presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the repository gas, high relative humidity and through-cracks in the concrete. High carbon dioxide concentrations and relative humidity are expected in the repository. The oxygen concentration in the repository is expected to be very low, and that is expected to minimize rebar corrosion rates. Cracks are likely to form in locations with high tensile stresses. Healing of the cracks could be a mitigating factor, but based on our analysis, it can not be relied on. To minimize the potential of this failure mechanism occurring with the Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure (IRUS), Canada`s proposed near-surface repository, carbon dioxide from the repository gas will be absorbed by the reactive, porous concrete placed between the waste and the roof. (author). 4 refs.

  18. Rebar corrosion due to carbonation in structural reinforced concretes for near-surface LLW repositories: A critical failure mechanism

    Torok, J.

    1995-03-01

    The concrete roof of a near-surface radioactive waste repository is the principle protection against water infiltration and intrusion. The following potential roof failure mechanism is examined: carbon dioxide generated by the biodegradation of organic materials in the repository initiates corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in the concrete roof. Because the bottom surface of the roof is mostly under tension, it is susceptible to cracking. The migration path for carbon dioxide is through cracks in the concrete between the bottom of the roof and the reinforcing bars. Carbonate corrosion of the reinforcing bars may result in concrete spalling, more extensive rebar corrosion and ultimately structural failure. Attention is brought to this failure mechanism because it has generally been overlooked in repository performance assessments. Literature relevant to the above failure is reviewed. Prerequisites for rebar corrosion are the presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the repository gas, high relative humidity and through-cracks in the concrete. High carbon dioxide concentrations and relative humidity are expected in the repository. The oxygen concentration in the repository is expected to be very low, and that is expected to minimize rebar corrosion rates. Cracks are likely to form in locations with high tensile stresses. Healing of the cracks could be a mitigating factor, but based on our analysis, it can not be relied on. To minimize the potential of this failure mechanism occurring with the Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure (IRUS), Canada's proposed near-surface repository, carbon dioxide from the repository gas will be absorbed by the reactive, porous concrete placed between the waste and the roof. (author). 4 refs

  19. An effective approach for restraining electrochemical corrosion of polycrystalline silicon caused by an HF-based solution and its application for mass production of MEMS devices

    Liu, Yunfei; Xie, Jing; Zhao, Hui; Luo, Wei; Yang, Jinling; An, Ji; Yang, Fuhua

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to effectively protect the structural material polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) from electrochemical corrosion, which often occurs when the MEMS device is released in HF-based solutions, especially when the device contains a noble metal. This corrosion seriously degrades the electrical and mechanical performance as well as the reliability of MEMS devices. In this method, a photoresist (PR) is employed to cover the noble metal, which is electrically coupled with the underlying polysilicon layer. This PR cover can effectually prevent an HF-based solution from diffusing through and arriving at the surface of the noble metal, thus cutting off the electrical current of the electrochemical corrosion reaction. The polysilicon is well protected for longer than 80 min in 49% concentrated HF solutions by a 3 µm-thick AZ 6130 PR film. This fabrication process is simple, reliable and suitable for mass production of high-end micromechanical disk resonators. Benefiting from the technology breakthrough mentioned above, a novel low-cost microfabrication method for disk resonators with high performance has been developed, and the VHF polysilicon disk resonators with resonance frequencies around 282 MHz and Q values larger than 2000 at atmosphere have been produced at wafer level. (paper)

  20. Comparative study on structure, corrosion properties and tribological behavior of pure Zn and different Zn-Ni alloy coatings

    Tafreshi, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allahkaram, S.R., E-mail: akaram@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O.Box: 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhangi, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O.Box: 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Zn and Zn-Ni alloy coatings were electrodeposited from sulfate based electrolytes. The effect of alloys Ni content on morphology, microstructure, corrosion properties, microhardness and tribological behavior of these coatings were investigated and the results were compared with Zn film. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, different intermediate phases (η-Ni{sub 3}Zn{sub 22}, γ-Ni{sub 5}Zn{sub 21}, β-Zn-Ni) were formed by increasing the coatings Ni content from 11 to 17 wt%. Polarization and EIS results revealed that all the alloy coatings had better corrosion resistance than the Zn film. Zn-14 wt%Ni coating had the least corrosion current density and maximum polarization resistance between all the samples. Microhardness of the coatings was improved by increasing their Ni percentage to 17%. However, Zn-14 wt%Ni coating had the lowest wear loss and friction coefficient, while Zn film had the worst wear resistance between all the coatings. - Highlights: • Effect of Ni alloying element on morphology and structure of Zn electrodeposits. • Comparing corrosion behavior of Zn and Zn-Ni coatings. • Influence of Ni content on hardness of Zn-Ni films. • A comparison of tribological behavior of Zn and different Zn-Ni electrodeposits.

  1. Structural and corrosive properties of ZrO2 thin films on zircaloy-4 by RF reactive magnetron sputtering

    Kim, Soo Ho; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Ko, Jae Hwan; Yoon, Young Soo; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Lee, Sang Jin

    2006-01-01

    Zirconium-oxide (ZrO 2 ) thin films as protective layers were grown on a Zircaloy-4 (Z-4) cladding material as a substrate by RF reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature. To investigate the effect of plasma immersion on the structural and the corrosive properties of the as-grown ZrO 2 thin film, we immersed Z-4 in plasma during the deposition process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed that the as-grown ZrO 2 thin films immersed in plasma had cubic, well as monoclinic and tetragonal, phases whereas those immersed in the plasma had monoclinic and tetragonal phases only. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of the surface morphology showed that the surface roughness of the as-grown ZrO 2 thin films immersed in plasma was larger than that of the films not immersed in plasma. In addition, the corrosive property of the as-grown ZrO 2 thin films immersed in the plasma was characterized using the weight gains of Z-4 after the corrosion test. Compared with the non-immersed films, the weight gains of the immersed films were larger. These results indicate that the ZrO 2 films immersed in plasma cannot protect Z-4 from corrosive phenomena.

  2. Fighting corrosion in India

    Rajagopalan, K S; Rangaswamy, N S

    1979-03-01

    A survey covers the cost of corrosion in India; methods of preventing corrosion in industrial plants; some case histories, including the prevention of corrosion in pipes through which fuels are pumped to storage and the stress-corrosion cracking of evaporators in fertilizer plants; estimates of the increase in demand in 1979-89 for anticorrosion products and processes developed by the Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) at Karaikudi, India; industries that may face corrosion problems requiring assistance from CECRI, including the light and heavy engineering structural, and transport industries and the chemical industry; and some areas identified for major efforts, including the establishment of a Corrosion Advisory Board with regional centers and the expansion of the Tropical Corrosion Testing Station at Mandapam Camp, Tamil Nadu.

  3. Underground Corrosion by Microorganisms Part II : Role of Anaerobic Sulphate Reducing Bacteria-Desulfotomaculum SP

    H. M. Dayal; K. C. Tiwari; Kamlesh Mehta; Mr. Chandrashekhar

    1988-01-01

    During the course of studies on the corrosion causing soil microflora from different geoclimatic regions of India, several strains of anaerobic sulphate reducing bacteria belonging to genus Desulfotomaculum were isolated and characterised. Their corrosive action on mild steel, galvanised iron and structural aluminium, the three main metals of construction of underground structures, have been studied under laboratory conditions.

  4. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing

    de Alcantara, Naasson P.; da Silva, Felipe M.; Guimarães, Mateus T.; Pereira, Matheus D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  5. Stress corrosion cracking countermeasure observed on Ni-based alloy welds of BWR core support structure

    Sagawa, Wataru; Aoki, Takayuki; Itou, Takashi; Enomoto, Kunio; Hayashi, Eisaku; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic test on the residual stress re-distribution was simulated by experiment to confirm the residual stress behavior of the cone-shaped shroud support to reactor pressure vessel (RPV) weld, where a number of cracks due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) were observed on the inner side only. Test specimen with tensile residual stress was loaded and unloaded with axial plus bending load, which simulates the hydrostatic test load, and the strain change was measured during the test to observe the residual stress behavior. The results verify that the residual stresses of the shroud support to the RPV weld were reduced and the stresses on inner and outer sides were reversed by the hydrostatic test. As the SCC countermeasure, the shot peening (SP) technology was applied. Residual stress reduction by SP on the complicated configuration, and improvement of SCC resistance and endurance of the compressive residual stress were experimentally confirmed. Then, SP treatment procedures on the actual structure were confirmed and a field application technique was established

  6. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing

    Naasson P. de Alcantara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works.

  7. Some problems on the aqueous corrosion of structural materials in nuclear engineering

    Coriou, H.; Grall, L.

    1964-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to give a comprehensive view of some aqueous corrosion studies which have been carried out with various materials for utilization either in nuclear reactors or in irradiated fuel treatment plants. The various subjects are listed below. Austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys: the behaviour of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in nitric medium and in the presence of hexavalent chromium; the stress corrosion of austenitic alloys in alkaline media at high temperatures; the stress corrosion of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in 650 C steam. Ferritic steels: corrosion of low alloy steels in water at 25 and 360 C; zirconium alloys; the behaviour of ultrapure zirconium in water and steam at high temperature. (authors) [fr

  8. Initial study and verification of a distributed fiber optic corrosion monitoring system for transportation structures.

    2012-07-01

    For this study, a novel optical fiber sensing system was developed and tested for the monitoring of corrosion in : transportation systems. The optical fiber sensing system consists of a reference long period fiber gratings (LPFG) sensor : for corrosi...

  9. Materials and methods for corrosion control of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures in new construction

    2000-08-01

    Salt-induced reinforcing steel corrosion in concrete bridges has undoubtedly become a considerable economic burden to many State and local transportation agencies. Since the iron in the steel has a natural tendency to revert eventually to its most st...

  10. Assessment of structural integrity of Monju steel liner against sodium leakage and combustion. Modeling of thinning process of liner due to corrosion in structural analysis

    Tsukimori, K.; Kato, T.; Furuhashi, I.; Iwata, K.; Akatsu, M.

    2001-01-01

    The lining structure of LMFBR (Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor) has an important role to prohibit leaking sodium from touching a concrete floor in a sodium leakage incident. JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) experienced a sodium leakage incident in 1995 in the secondary heat transport system room of the prototype LMFBR MONJU. In this incident, a part of the liner was covered with a certain amount of high temperature leaked sodium and its compounds. Visible but small distortion and thinning of the liner were detected, which were due to heating by sodium fire and chemical corrosion, respectively. To simulate the MONJU incident, JNC conducted a series of sodium leakage tests, in one of which severer corrosion (molten salt type corrosion) than that in the MONJU incident was observed. In order to secure the conservativeness in the integrity assessment of the liner, consideration of a severest corrosion process was demanded. This means that the loss of parts of the structure with time should be considered in the structural analyses. In this study a modeling of thinning process of the liner was developed in order to realize reasonable analysis from the point of view of actual phenomena. The concept of the method is to release the stress of the lost region by using artificial creep and reducing Young's modulus. The necessity of this kind of model and the validity was verified through an application analysis of the liner in the secondary heat transport system room of MONJU. (authors)

  11. Investigation of cause of cracking of high-strength 30HGSNA grade steel subjected to stresses and corrosive agents

    Sitko, E.

    1995-01-01

    It has been found out that 30HGSNA steel undergo cracking under action of stresses in aqueous solutions containing oxygen, while it show high resistance in deoxidated solutions. The purpose of such phenomena is the existence of sulfur inclusions in steel which are a centers of denting corrosion. That points acting as a stresses concentrators where pH factor decreases including hydrogen formation and its absorption in the metal. That mechanism is the main purpose of brittle steel cracking observed in oxygen rich solutions. (author)

  12. Implementation of Remote Corrosion-Monitoring Sensor for Mission-Essential Structures at Okinawa

    2009-08-01

    with voluminous corrosion products. Martensitic stainless steels are susceptible to pitting and chlo- ride stress corrosion cracking in marine... steel , zinc- rich epoxy-coated steel , phenolic coated steel and bare type 410 stainless steel . (The steel panels were A36 steel .) The racks were...and ER probes were installed on building number 125. The coupons were mounted to an aluminum frame using stainless steel bolts and nylon spacer

  13. Smart Multifunctional Coatings for Corrosion Detection and Control in the Aerospace Industry

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  14. Structure and corrosion properties of Cr coating deposited on aerospace bearing steel

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhang, Fengxiang; Zheng, Lijing; Zhang, Hu

    2017-11-01

    The corrosion protection of chromium coating deposited on aerospace bearing steels by using the Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc deposition- Metal Evaporation Vacuum Arc duplex technique (MEVVA-FCVA) had been investigated. The protection efficiency of chromium coating on different substrate materials had also been evaluated. The chromium coating was mainly composed of nanocrystallineα-Cr in a range of 50-200 nm. The orientation distributions of α-Cr film on substrates with different composition had a certain difference to each other. Electrochemical experimental results indicated that the chromium coating significantly improved the corrosion resistance of experimental bearing steels in 3.5% NaCl solution. The protective efficiency of chromium films were all over 98%. The corrosion resistance of chromium coating was influenced by the chemical composition of substrate material. The chromium coatings on higher Cr-containing substrate displayed lower corrosion current density and more positive corrosion potential. The increase of passive film thickness and the formation of a mass of chromium oxide and hydroxide on the surface are responsible for the improved corrosion properties.

  15. Structure and Corrosion Behavior of Arc-Sprayed Zn-Al Coatings on Ductile Iron Substrate

    Bonabi, Salar Fatoureh; Ashrafizadeh, Fakhreddin; Sanati, Alireza; Nahvi, Saied Mehran

    2018-02-01

    In this research, four coatings including pure zinc, pure aluminum, a double-layered coating of zinc and aluminum, and a coating produced by simultaneous deposition of zinc and aluminum were deposited on a cast iron substrate using electric arc-spraying technique. The coatings were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDS map and spot analyses. Adhesion strength of the coatings was evaluated by three-point bending tests, where double-layered coating indicated the lowest bending angle among the specimens, with detection of cracks at the coating-substrate interface. Coatings produced by simultaneous deposition of zinc and aluminum possessed a relatively uniform distribution of both metals. In order to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coatings, cyclic polarization and salt spray tests were conducted. Accordingly, pure aluminum coating showed susceptibility to pitting corrosion and other coatings underwent uniform corrosion. For double-layered coating, SEM micrographs revealed zinc corrosion products as flaky particles in the pores formed by pitting on the surface, an indication of penetration of corrosion products from the lower layer (zinc) to the top layer (aluminum). All coatings experienced higher negative corrosion potentials than the iron substrate, indicative of their sacrificial behavior.

  16. Ocean acidification causes structural deformities in juvenile coral skeletons.

    Foster, Taryn; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Clode, Peta L

    2016-02-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is causing the oceans to both warm and acidify, which could reduce the calcification rates of corals globally. Successful coral recruitment and high rates of juvenile calcification are critical to the replenishment and ultimate viability of coral reef ecosystems. Although elevated Pco2 (partial pressure of CO2) has been shown to reduce the skeletal weight of coral recruits, the structural changes caused by acidification during initial skeletal deposition are unknown. We show, using high-resolution three-dimensional x-ray microscopy, that ocean acidification (Pco2 ~900 μatm, pH ~7.7) not only causes reduced overall mineral deposition but also a deformed and porous skeletal structure in newly settled coral recruits. In contrast, elevated temperature (+3°C) had little effect on skeletal formation except to partially mitigate the effects of elevated Pco2. The striking structural deformities we observed show that new recruits are at significant risk, being unable to effectively build their skeletons in the Pco2 conditions predicted to occur for open ocean surface waters under a "business-as-usual" emissions scenario [RCP (representative concentration pathway) 8.5] by the year 2100.

  17. Influence of heat treatment conditions on structure and corrosion fracture of welded joints of zirconium alloy with 2.5 % niobium in agressive media

    Goncharov, A.B.; Nerodenko, M.M.; Tkachenko, L.M.; Adeeva, L.I.

    1990-01-01

    Influence of heat treatment on corrosion resistance of Zr-2.5 % Nb alloy welded joints is studied. It is stated that alloy after annealing in β-region has maximum corrosion resistance in sulfuric acid. Corrosion resistance in acetic acid doesn't depend on heat treatment. The best operating characteristics in steam-water medium of high parameters have welded joints, structure and phase composition of which approach α-phase with fine-dispersed β Nb particles, uniformly distributed in grain matrix. Such structure is attained by annealing in α-region or quenching with the following annealing at 850 K

  18. Structural and corrosion characterization of hydroxyapatite/zirconium nitride-coated AZ91 magnesium alloy by ion beam sputtering

    Kiahosseini, Seyed Rahim, E-mail: rkiahoseyni@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Damghan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afshar, Abdollah [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Majid [Radiation Applications Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yousefpour, Mardali [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan, 35131-19111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The thickness of HA coatings increase by ion beam sputtering time. • The residual strain in HA structure decrease by deposition time increment. • Crystallite size of HA coatings increase by deposition time increment. • The best corrosion resistance occurs at intermediate deposition time. - Abstract: The adhesion of hydroxyapatite (HA) as a coating for the AZ91 magnesium alloy substrate can be improved by using the sputtering method and an intermediate layer, such as ZrN. In this study, HA coatings were applied on ZrN intermediate layers at a temperature of 300 °C for 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 min by ion beam sputtering. A profilometer device was used to study the HA coating thickness, which changed from 2 μm for the 180-min deposition to 4.7 μm for 420-min deposition. The grazing incidence X-ray diffraction analysis method and the Williamson–Hall analysis were used for structural investigation. As the deposition time increased, the crystalline size increased from 50 nm to 690 nm. However, given sufficient time for stress relief on the coating structure, the lattice strain values were close to zero. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy results showed that the Ca/P ratio ranged from 1.73 to 1.81. The external indentation method was used to evaluate the coating adhesion to the substrate. The slope of curve for applied force changes versus the radius of cracks in the coating (dP/dr) varied in the range of 0.2–0.07 by the deposition time, indicating that the adhesion increased with the increase in coating thickness. The potentiodynamic polarization technique was used to study the corrosion behavior. With increasing deposition time, the corrosion potential of samples did not show a significant change, and the corrosion potential of all samples (coated and uncoated substrates) was more positive than approximately 55 mV. When the deposition time increased to 360 min, the corrosion current density decreased from 5.5 μA/cm{sup 2} to 0.33

  19. Aircraft Corrosion

    1981-08-01

    attribud au choix de traitements et de rev~tements spproprids. Au contrairo, dens d’sutros structures des corrosions iirportsntea se sont msnifestdes...au traitement . micaniqus qui provoque une compression de surface - h1l’spplication i1’une double protection comportant oxydation snodique et...chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont

  20. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique

    Zaki, Ahmad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Alver, Ninel

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods. PMID:26251904

  1. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique

    Ahmad Zaki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods.

  2. Influences of spray parameters on the structure and corrosion resistance of stainless steel layers coated on carbon steel by plasma spray treatment

    Yeom, Kyong An; Lee, Sang Dong; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Shur, Dong Soo; Kim, Joung Soo

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steel powders were sprayed on the grit-blasted SM45C carbon steel substrates using a plasma spray method. The influences of the spray parameters on the structure and corrosion resistance of the layers coated on the carbon steel were investigated. Corrosion behavior of the layers were analyzed by the anodic polarization tests in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl + 0.01 M NaOH solution at 80 deg C. The surface roughness and porosity were observed to decrease with decreasing the particle size. The surface hardness of the coating was always higher than that of the matrix, SM45C, implying that the higher resistance of the coating to erosion-corrosion than that of matrix, and increased as the spray power and the spray distance increase. Stainless steel coats showed more corrosion resistance than the carbon steel did, due to their passivity. The corrosion resistance of the coats, however, were inferior to that of the bulk stainless steels due to the inherent defects formed in the coats. The defects such as rough surface and pores provided the occluded sites favorable for the initiation of localized corrosion, resulting in the conclusion that finer the powder is, higher the corrosion resistance is. And the Cr oxides formation resulting in Cr depletion around the oxides reduced the corrosion resistance of the coats. (author)

  3. Structure, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity of biodegradable Mg-X (X=Sn, Ga, In) alloys.

    Kubásek, J; Vojtěch, D; Lipov, J; Ruml, T

    2013-05-01

    As-cast Mg-Sn, Mg-Ga and Mg-In alloys containing 1-7 wt.% of alloying elements were studied in this work. Structural and chemical analysis of the alloys was performed by using light and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and glow discharge spectrometry. Mechanical properties were determined by Vickers hardness measurements and tensile testing. Corrosion behavior in a simulated physiological solution (9 g/l NaCl) was studied by immersion tests and potentiodynamic measurements. The cytotoxicity effect of the alloys on human osteosarcoma cells (U-2 OS) was determined by an indirect contact assay. Structural investigation revealed the dendritic morphology of the as-cast alloys with the presence of secondary eutectic phases in the Mg-Sn and Mg-Ga alloys. All the alloying elements showed hardening and strengthening effects on magnesium. This effect was the most pronounced in the case of Ga. All the alloying elements at low concentrations of approximately 1 wt.% were also shown to positively affect the corrosion resistance of Mg. But at higher concentrations of Ga and Sn the corrosion resistance worsened due to galvanic effects of secondary phases. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that Ga had the lowest toxicity, followed by Sn. The most severe toxicity was observed in the case of In. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nondestructive evaluation algorithm of fatigue cracks and far-side corrosion around a rivet fastener in multi-layered structures

    Le, Min Hhuy; Kim, Jung Min [Research Center for IT-based Real Time NDT for Nano-Damage Tolerance, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sejin; Wang, Dabin [Dept. of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Graduate School, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Young Ha [Avionics System Technology Center, KITECH, Youngcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This research proposes a nondestructive inspection system for inspecting and localizing corrosion and fatigue cracks around rivets in air-intake structures. The system uses 64 InSb Hall sensor elements arrayed at a high spatial interval of 0.52 mm. Rivet detection and damage detection algorithms will be proposed. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curve and Probability of detection (POD) will be carried out to evaluate the performance of the system and detection algorithms. Artificial corrosion around a rivet with a minimum volume of 11.02 mm{sup 3} could be detected with 90/95% POD and artificial fatigue crack with minimum length of 2.95 mm from rivet body.

  5. Structural Characteristics and Corrosion Behavior of Bio-Degradable Zn-Li Alloys in Stent Application

    Zhao, Shan

    Zinc has begun to be studied as a bio-degradable material in recent years due to its excellent corrosion rate and optimal biocompatibility. Unfortunately, pure Zn's intrinsic ultimate tensile strength (UTS; below 120 MPa) is lower than the benchmark (about 300 MPa) for cardiovascular stent materials, raising concerns about sufficient strength to support the blood vessel. Thus, modifying pure Zn to improve its mechanical properties is an important research topic. In this dissertation project, a new Zn-Li alloy has been developed to retain the outstanding corrosion behavior from Zn while improving the mechanical characteristics and uniform biodegradation once it is implanted into the artery of Sprague-Dawley rats. The completed work includes: Manufactured Zn-Li alloy ingots and sheets via induction vacuum casting, melt spinning, hot rolling deformation, and wire electro discharge machining (wire EDM) technique; processed alloy samples using cross sectioning, mounting, etching and polishing technique; • Characterized alloy ingots, sheets and wires using hardness and tensile test, XRD, BEI imaging, SEM, ESEM, FTIR, ICP-OES and electrochemical test; then selected the optimum composition for in vitro and in vivo experiments; • Mimicked the degradation behavior of the Zn-Li alloy in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF) and explored the relations between corrosion rate, corrosion products and surface morphology with changing compositions; • Explanted the Zn-Li alloy wire in abdominal aorta of rat over 12 months and studied its degradation mechanism, rate of bioabsorption, cytotoxicity and corrosion product migration from histological analysis.

  6. Corrosion on reinforced concrete structures. An application for the intermediate level radioactive waste container

    Arva, Alejandro; Alvarez, Marta G.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of steel reinforcement bars (rebars) for a high performance reinforced concrete made of sulfate resistant portland cement was evaluated from the rebars corrosion point of view. The results from the present work will be used to evaluate the materials properties to be used in the construction of the intermediate level radioactive waste disposal containers. The study is carried out evaluating the incidence of chloride and sulfate ions, as well as, concrete carbonation in the rebar corrosion process. The electrochemical parameters that characterize the corrosion process (corrosion potential [E corr ], polarisation resistance [Rp] and concrete electrical resistivity [ρ]) were monitored on specially designed reinforced concrete specimens. The results up to date (about 1000 days of exposure) reveal that the concrete under study provides to the steel reinforcement bars of a passive state against corrosion under the test conditions. An increasing tendency as a function of time of ρ is observed that corroborates the continuous curing process of concrete. The chloride and carbonation diffusion coefficients were also determined, and their values are comparable with those of high quality concrete. (author)

  7. Structure, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity of biodegradable Mg–X (X = Sn, Ga, In) alloys

    Kubásek, J., E-mail: Jiri.Kubasek@vscht.cz [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vojtěch, D. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Lipov, J.; Ruml, T. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01

    As-cast Mg–Sn, Mg–Ga and Mg–In alloys containing 1–7 wt.% of alloying elements were studied in this work. Structural and chemical analysis of the alloys was performed by using light and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and glow discharge spectrometry. Mechanical properties were determined by Vickers hardness measurements and tensile testing. Corrosion behavior in a simulated physiological solution (9 g/l NaCl) was studied by immersion tests and potentiodynamic measurements. The cytotoxicity effect of the alloys on human osteosarcoma cells (U-2 OS) was determined by an indirect contact assay. Structural investigation revealed the dendritic morphology of the as-cast alloys with the presence of secondary eutectic phases in the Mg–Sn and Mg–Ga alloys. All the alloying elements showed hardening and strengthening effects on magnesium. This effect was the most pronounced in the case of Ga. All the alloying elements at low concentrations of approximately 1 wt.% were also shown to positively affect the corrosion resistance of Mg. But at higher concentrations of Ga and Sn the corrosion resistance worsened due to galvanic effects of secondary phases. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that Ga had the lowest toxicity, followed by Sn. The most severe toxicity was observed in the case of In. - Highlights: ► Gallium addition (up to 7 wt.%) improves the strength and toughness of as-cast Mg. ► The effect of indium addition (up to 7 wt.%) on mechanical properties is small. ► Gallium, Tin and Indium addition improves the corrosion resistance of as-cast Mg. ► Gallium shows no toxic effect on osteosarcoma cells. ► Tin and indium show serious toxic effect on osteosarcoma cells.

  8. Electrochemical construction of micro–nano spongelike structure on titanium substrate for enhancing corrosion resistance and bioactivity

    Jiang, Pinliang; Lin, Longxiang; Zhang, Fan; Dong, Xiang; Ren, Lei; Lin, Changjian

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A hierarchical micro–nano spongelike TiO 2 layer was constructed on Ti substrate. • The micro–nano TiO 2 surface presented good corrosion resistance. • Excellent biomineration ability was observed on such micro–nano TiO 2 layer. • Superior MG63 cell viability was discerned on the micro–nano structured surface. -- Abstract: Surface structures of medical implants generally play a crucial role in tissue growth and healing while implanted into a living body. The surface design and modification of implants can effectively promote its biocompatibility and integration ability. In this study, a hierarchically superhydrophilic structure on titanium surface with a nano-spongelike titania layer on the micro-roughened titanium surface was constructed through dual acid etching and electrochemical treatments. It is shown that the structure of micro/nano-spongelike TiO 2 provides not only better corrosion resistance and less oxygen vacancies, but also much higher ability of biomineralization after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days. It is evident, by the cell culture for the different samples, that the micro–nano spongelike structured surface on Ti significantly promotes human osteoblast-like MG63 cell attachment and proliferation. All evaluations of electrochemical behavior and biological responses in this study indicate that the micro/nano-spongelike structure on Ti surface is of excellent chemical stability, bioactivity as well as biocompatibility for biomedical implant applications

  9. General corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical evaluation of nuclear-waste-package structural-barrier materials. Progress report

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Nelson, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying the general corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmentally enhanced crack propagation of five candidate materials in high-temperature aqueous environments simulating those expected in basalt and tuff repositories. The materials include three cast ferrous materials (ductile cast iron and two low-alloy Cr-Mo cast steels) and two titanium alloys, titanium Grade 2 (commercial purity) and Grade 12 (a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy). The general corrosion results are being obtained by autoclave exposure of specimens to slowly replenished simulated ground water flowing upward through a bed of the appropriate crushed rock (basalt or tuff), which is maintained at the desired test temperature (usually 250 0 C). In addition, tests are being performed in deionized water. Metal penetration rates of iron-base alloys are being derived by stripping off the corrosion product film and weighing the specimen after the appropriate exposure time. The corrosion of titanium alloy specimens is being determined by weight gain methods. The irradiation-corrosion studies are similar to the general corrosion tests, except that the specimen-bearing autoclaves are held in a 60 Co gamma radiation field at dose rates up to 2 x 10 6 rad/h. For evaluating the resistance of the candidate materials to environmentally enhanced crack propagation, three methods are being used: U-bend and fracture toughness specimens exposed in autoclaves; slow strain rate studies in repository-relevant environments to 300 0 C; and fatigue crack growth rate studies at ambient pressure and 90 0 C. The preliminary data suggest a 1-in. corrosion allowance for iron-base barrier elements intended for 1000-yr service in basalt or tuff repositories. No evidence has yet been found that titanium Grade 2 or Grade 12 is susceptible to environmentally induced crack propagation or, by extension, to stress corrosion cracking

  10. New approach to the elucidation of corrosion mechanism of ceramics by the ion implantation

    Saito, J.; Hayashi, K.; Tachi, Y.; Kano, S.

    1998-08-01

    Ceramics possessing high temperature strength are promising materials for the structural application in severe environment. The development of ceramics has been carried out in order to use them in FBR environment such as liquid sodium. In particular, corrosion behavior of ceramics has been investigated to improve the corrosion resistance in liquid sodium. However, the corrosion mechanism of ceramics was not comprehended in detail even now. Because corrosion products which were deposited on the surface of test pieces during corrosion test and played an important role in corrosion behavior, were not detected distinctly after thr corrosion test. In this study, an ion implantation technique was applied to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics in stead of the conventional corrosion test. Sodium ions were implanted in ceramics (100 keV, 1.9 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 ) and then heat treatment was performed at either 923 K or 823 K for 36 ks in argon atmosphere. After that, products on the surface were analyzed using SEM and TEM observation and X-ray diffraction. Consequently, the corrosion products were not identified exactly, but their presence was confirmed on the surface. It was caused by the minute amount of corrosion products. In future, it is necessary to carry systematically out the implantation and heat treatment under various conditions. Therefore, it seems that the beneficial information will be obtained to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics. (author)

  11. Investigation of parameters governing the corrosion protection efficacy of fusion bonded epoxy coatings

    Ramniceanu, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    The primary cause of corrosion in transportation structures is due to chlorides which are applied to bridge decks as deicing salts. The direct cost of corrosion damage to the countryâ s infrastructure is approximately $8.3 billion per year. One of the most common corrosion abatement methods in the United States is the barrier protection implemented through the application of fusion bonded epoxy coatings. The purpose of this study was to investigate various coating and exposure param...

  12. Quantifying movements of corrosion products in reinforced concrete using x-ray attenuation measurements

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement, embedded in concrete, may substantially degrade concrete structures due to the expansive nature of corrosion products. Expansion of corrosion products cause tensile stresses to develop and cracks to form in concrete. Extensive research has focused on corrosion...... of corrosion products move into the concrete without generating tensile stresses and cracks in the concrete. Typically, corrosion products are thought to occupy pores, interfacial defects, and/or air voids located near the concrete-steel interface and stresses develop only after filling of these pores. Further....... X-ray attenuation measurements are also capable of detecting cracks. Therefore, this approach provides a direct measurement of the amount and location of reinforcement corrosion products required to induce cracking. Results of a parametric investigation on the impact of water-to-cement ratio (0...

  13. An electrochemical engineering technique to improve the corrosion resistance of some structural materials in lead-alloy coolants

    Tacica, M.; Andrei, V.; Rusu, O.; Coaca, E.; Minca, M.; Florea, S.; Oncioiu, G.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present some conclusions resulted from the literature studies referring to the materials potential to be used in Lead Fast Reactors (LFR), and the results obtained in the surface engineering field which can be used in our institute in order to obtain materials with appropriate properties for their use in LFR. In this context, the paper presents some preliminary results obtained in Surface Analysis Laboratory of INR Pitesti and research works in progress referring to: controlled modification of AISI 316 L surface by electrochemical plasma treatment (carburization, nitrocarburizings); electrodeposition of some protective thin-films based on Ni and Al obtained from ionic liquids; development of some procedures related to the activities involved in the behaviour evaluation, in LFR specific conditions, for material samples subjected to treatments by surface engineering techniques using the LEad COrrosion TEsting LOop (LECOTELO) test bench. The superficial structures obtained have been characterized by metallographic microscopy, X-Ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS); the electrochemical techniques were used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour. The preliminary results have shown that the used electrochemical surface engineering techniques are appropriate in order to improve the mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316 L steel. (authors)

  14. Comparative study on structure, corrosion and hardness of Zn-Ni alloy deposition on AISI 347 steel aircraft material

    Gnanamuthu, RM. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Gihung, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mohan, S., E-mail: sanjnamohan@yahoo.com [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, (CSIR), Karaikudi 630 006, Tamilnadu (India); Saravanan, G. [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, (CSIR), Karaikudi 630 006, Tamilnadu (India); Lee, Chang Woo, E-mail: cwlee@khu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Gihung, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrodeposition of Zn-Ni alloy on AISI 347 steel as an aircraft material has been carried out from various baths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of pulse duty cycle on thickness, current efficiency and hardness reached maximum values at 40% duty cycle and for 50 Hz frequencies average current density of 4 A dm{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The XRF characterizations of 88:12% Zn-Ni alloy provided excellent corrosion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that Zn-Ni alloy on AISI 347 aircraft material has better structure and corrosion resistance by pulse electrodeposits from electrolyte-4. - Abstract: Zn-Ni alloys were electrodeposited on AISI 347 steel aircraft materials from various electrolytes under direct current (DCD) and pulsed electrodepositing (PED) techniques. The effects of pulse duty cycle on thickness, current efficiency and hardness of electrodeposits were studied. Alloy phases of the Zn-Ni were indexed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Microstructural morphology, topography and elemental compositions were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The corrosion resistance properties of electrodeposited Zn-Ni alloy in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution obtained by DCD and PED were compared using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Elemental analysis showed that 88% of Zn and 12% of Ni obtained from electrolyte-4 by PED technique at 40% duty cycle for 50 Hz frequencies having better corrosion resistance than that of deposits obtained from other electrolytes.

  15. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 2. Evaluation of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Katono, Kenichi; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Hotta, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In order to establish safety and reliable plant operation, it is required to forecast future troubles on structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious problems on plant operation. The models are divided into two parts, which are as follows. 1. Prediction model of future trouble on structural materials based on evaluation of corrosive conditions. 2. Evaluation model of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion. (author)

  16. Corrosion protection of Arctic offshore structures: Final report. [Effects of temperature and salinity on required cathodic protection current

    Sackinger, W.M.; Rogers, J.C.; Feyk, C.; Theuveny, B.

    1985-10-01

    Results are presented for a research program on corrosion prevention for Arctic offshore structures which are in contact with sea ice for a significant portion of the year. The electrical method most adaptable for structure protection involves the injection of impressed current from several remote anodes buried just beneath the sea floor. The electrical resistivity of annual sea ice as a function of temperature and salinity is presented. Details of the interface layers formed between sea ice and steel in the presence of current injection are shown. A computer program was developed to enable the calculation of protective current density into the structure, in the presence of ice rubble and ridges around the structure. The program and the results of an example calculation are given for a caisson- retained island structure. 81 refs., 103 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Demonstration of Corrosion-Resistant Hybrid Composite Bridge Beams for Structural Applications

    2016-09-01

    published by ERDC, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. DoD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program ERDC/CERL...loading condition was con- trolled by positive flexure of the center girder at midspan. The HL-93 load rating was controlled by the two lanes loaded

  18. Some observations on use of siliceous mineral waters in reduction of corrosion in RCC structures

    Venugopal, C.

    to cement varied between 0 and 20% with difference of every 5% results of the test show that the blending of gold tailing and flyash to cement significantly improves the corrosion resistance performance of concrete exposed to sea water. Maximum reduction...

  19. Gel structure of the corrosion layer on cladding pipes of nuclear fuels

    Medek, Jiří; Weishauptová, Zuzana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 2 (2009), s. 306-310 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : cladding pipes of nuclear fuels * corrosion layer * zirconium alloys Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 1.933, year: 2009

  20. Solidified Structure and Corrosion Behavior of Laser-melt Magnesium Alloy

    FANG Zhi-hao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The AZ91D magnesium alloy samples were scanned by millisecond pulse Nd:YAG laser under high pure argon protection. The surface morphology, microstructure and composition of the treated magnesium alloy were studied by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy. In addition, the corrosion surface which was corroded using simulated body fluid and the mass fraction of 3.5%NaCl solution was observed and material corrosion rate was calculated. The results show that, at the same corrosion time, compared with the untreated samples, the surface corrosion resistance is improved by the enrichment of Al at the irradiated surface by the joint effect of the combination of refined homogeneous microstructure of α-Mg phase and β-Mg17Al12 phase and the selective vaporization and the chemical composition of base metal in the laser-treated AZ91D alloy; the solidification equation is obtained by calculating the relation between the size of the dendrite cell and the cooling rate in laser melting zone.

  1. The effect of functionalized polycarboxylate structures as corrosion inhibitors in a simulated concrete pore solution

    Fazayel, A. S.; Khorasani, M.; Sarabi, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the effects of polycarboxylate derivatives with different comonomers and functional groups on the control or reduction of corrosion in steel specimens were evaluated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic analysis. A highly alkaline contaminated concrete pore solution (CPS) containing chlorides was used to simulate the pitting corrosion, and according to the results, the mechanism of inhibitive action was determined. Both the inhibition efficiency and pitting corrosion inhibition of methacrylate-copolymers were in the order of poly methacrylate-co acrylamide > poly methacrylate-co-2-acrylamido-2 methylpropane sulfonic acid > poly methacrylate-co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. In addition, the corrosion potential of steel specimens in all studied concentrations of NaCl with different concentrations of polymethacrylate-co acrylamide (as the best inhibitor in this study) in saturated Ca(OH)2 solution showed almost an identical trend. Polymethacrylic acid-co-acrylamide showed a 92.35% inhibitor efficiency in the saturated Ca(OH)2 solution containing 1.8 wt.% chlorides and could effectively reduce the corrosion rate. Even at 3.5 wt.% of NaCl, this inhibitor could remarkably reduce the destructive effect of chloride ion attacks on the steel surface and passive film. The inhibition effect of these polymeric inhibitors seemed to be due to the formation of a barrier layer on the metal surface, approved by the well-known adsorption mechanism of organic molecules at the metal/solution interface. The results of SEM, EDS and AFM investigations were also in agreement with the outcomes of electrochemical studies.

  2. Methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete structures on the basis of half-cell potential and concrete resistivity measurements.

    Sadowski, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the corrosion of steel reinforcement has become a major problem in the construction industry. Therefore, much attention has been given to developing methods of predicting the service life of reinforced concrete structures. The progress of corrosion cannot be visually assessed until a crack or a delamination appears. The corrosion process can be tracked using several electrochemical techniques. Most commonly the half-cell potential measurement technique is used for this purpose. However, it is generally accepted that it should be supplemented with other techniques. Hence, a methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete slabs by means of a combination of two methods, that is, the half-cell potential method and the concrete resistivity method, is proposed. An assessment of the probability of corrosion in reinforced concrete structures carried out using the proposed methodology is presented. 200 mm thick 750 mm  ×  750 mm reinforced concrete slab specimens were investigated. Potential E corr and concrete resistivity ρ in each point of the applied grid were measured. The experimental results indicate that the proposed methodology can be successfully used to assess the probability of corrosion in concrete structures.

  3. Methodology for Assessing the Probability of Corrosion in Concrete Structures on the Basis of Half-Cell Potential and Concrete Resistivity Measurements

    Lukasz Sadowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the corrosion of steel reinforcement has become a major problem in the construction industry. Therefore, much attention has been given to developing methods of predicting the service life of reinforced concrete structures. The progress of corrosion cannot be visually assessed until a crack or a delamination appears. The corrosion process can be tracked using several electrochemical techniques. Most commonly the half-cell potential measurement technique is used for this purpose. However, it is generally accepted that it should be supplemented with other techniques. Hence, a methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete slabs by means of a combination of two methods, that is, the half-cell potential method and the concrete resistivity method, is proposed. An assessment of the probability of corrosion in reinforced concrete structures carried out using the proposed methodology is presented. 200 mm thick 750 mm  ×  750 mm reinforced concrete slab specimens were investigated. Potential Ecorr and concrete resistivity ρ in each point of the applied grid were measured. The experimental results indicate that the proposed methodology can be successfully used to assess the probability of corrosion in concrete structures.

  4. Improvement of PWR reliability by corrosion prevention

    Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Since first PWR in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, we have encountered the various modes of corrosion on primary and secondary side components. We have paid much efforts for resolving these corrosion problems, that is, investigating the causes of corrosion and establishing the countermeasures for these corrosion. We summarize these efforts in this article. (author)

  5. Finite element model for expansive stress due to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures; Analisis con elemento finito de los esfuerzos expansivos por corrosion en las estructuras de concreto reforzado

    Castorena Gonzalez, J.H.; Calderon Guillen, J.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Los Mochis, Sinaloa (Mexico)]. E-mail: kstor28@yahoo.com.mx; cajoel_99@yahoo.com; Almeraya Calderon, F.; Gaona Tiburcio, C. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: facundo.almeraya@cimav.edu.mx; citlalli.gaona@cimav.edu.mx; Almaral Sanchez, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Los Mochis, Sinaloa (Mexico)]. E-mail: jalmaral@gmail.com; Martinez Villafane, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: martinez.villafane@cimav.edu.mx

    2011-01-15

    The corrosion in the reinforcement steel is a problem that diminishes the useful life of reinforced concrete structures, reside committing its structural security. In the available models to estimate the mechanical effect of the corrosion, it is assumed that the corroded steel, through the oxides that grow to its surroundings, exercises a pressure on the surrounding concrete supposing a problem of plane stress or plane strain. In this work, the problem is modeled with three-dimensional finite element starting from an experiment on a subjected cylinder to accelerated corrosion, with strain gage to measure the pressure indirectly in the interface steel-concrete. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the effect of the length of corroded steel, anodic length, has a significant effect on the magnitude of the pressure in the interface steel-concrete, fact that can be used to improve the existing models. [Spanish] La corrosion en el acero de refuerzo es un problema que disminuye la vida util en las estructuras de concreto reforzado, ademas de comprometer su seguridad estructural. En los modelos disponibles para estimar el efecto mecanico de la corrosion, se supone que el acero corroido, a traves de los oxidos que crecen a su alrededor, ejercen una presion sobre el concreto circundante suponiendo un problema de esfuerzos o deformaciones planas, En el presente trabajo, se modela el problema con elemento finito tridimensional a partir de un experimento sobre un cilindro de concreto reforzado sometido a corrosion acelerada, instrumentado para medir indirectamente la presion en la interfase acero-concreto. De los resultados obtenidos se concluye que el efecto de la longitud de acero corroido, longitud anodica, tiene un efecto significativo sobre la magnitud de la presion en la interfase acero-concreto, hecho que puede ser utilizado para mejorar los modelos existentes.

  6. Nanofilm-coated long-period fiber grating humidity sensors for corrosion detection in structural health monitoring

    Zheng, Shijie; Zhu, Yinian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2011-04-01

    Long-period gratings (LPGs) have shown their significant promising applications in sensors owing to the attractive features that they posses such as small size, immunity for electromagnetic interference, geometric versatility, multiplexing capability, and resistance to corrosive and hazardous environments. Recent researches have revealed that LPGs written on the standard optical fibers could be used as a powerful sensing platform for structural health monitoring. In this work, we inscribe LPGs into SMF-28 optical fiber by focused-beam CO2 laser, demonstrating as a refractive index sensor for nondestructive chemical detections in the civil infrastructures. Although evanescent-field based LPG sensors have been applied in quantitatively monitoring chemical analytes including moisture, chloride, and corrosion by-product, etc., the sensitivity, selectivity, and response time as well as thermo-stability of such sensors are still the issues for some special purposes. In order to improve those characteristics of the sensors, we propose two types of nano-film to be coated in grating region by electrostatic self-assembly (ESA) deposition processing. The primary coating does not affect on LPG transmission parameters such as resonance wavelength and its intensity that can be used for sensing, but it increases the sensitivity to refractive index change of surrounding material. The secondary coating is for selectively absorption of analyte molecule of interest. Response time of the nanofilm-coated LPG sensor is dependent on the analyte absorption and de-absorption rates as well as the thicknesses of the coating materials, which is also investigated. Multi-channel sensor system is being designed to monitor different analytes simultaneously, which is continuing to further explore the monitoring of structural health conditions through in situ measurements of corrosion in the concrete structures.

  7. Corrosion of Aluminum Alloys in the Presence of Fire-Retardant Aircraft Interior Materials

    1995-10-01

    This research project was to evaluate the potential for fire-retardant materials used in aircraft interiors to cause corrosion of aluminum structural alloys. Service Difficulty Reports (SDR's) were reviewed for several aircraft types, and the most fr...

  8. Steel fibre corrosion in cracks:durability of sprayed concrete

    Nordström, Erik

    2000-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced sprayed concrete is common practice for permanent linings in underground construction. Today there is a demand on "expected technical service life" of 120 years. Thin steel fibres could be expected to discontinue carrying load fast with a decrease of fibre diameter caused by corrosion, especially in cracks. The thesis contains results from inspections on existing sprayed concrete structures and a literature review on corrosion of steel fibres in cracked concrete. To stu...

  9. Corrosion Behaviors of Structural Materials in High Temperature S-CO{sub 2} Environments

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Hyunmyung; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The isothermal corrosion tests of several types of stainless steels, Ni-based alloys, and ferritic-martensitic steels (FMS) were carried out at the temperature of 550 and 650 .deg. C in SFR S-CO{sub 2} environment (200 bar) for 1000 h. The weight gain was greater in the order of FMSs, stainless steels, and Ni-based alloys. For the FMSs (Fe-based with low Cr content), a thick outer Fe oxide, a middle (Fe,Cr)-rich oxide, and an inner (Cr,Fe)-rich oxide were formed. They showed significant weight gains at both 550 and 650 .deg. C. In the case of austenitic stainless steels (Fe-based) such as SS 316H and 316LN (18 wt.% Cr), the corrosion resistance was dependent on test temperatures except SS 310S (25 wt.% Cr). After corrosion test at 650 .deg. C, a large increase in weight gain was observed with the formation of outer thick Fe oxide and inner (Cr,Fe)-rich oxide. However, at 550 .deg. C, a thin Cr-rich oxide was mainly developed along with partially distributed small and nodular shaped Fe oxides. Meanwhile, for the Ni-based alloys (16-28 wt.% Cr), a very thin Cr-rich oxide was developed at both test temperatures. The superior corrosion resistance of high Cr or Ni-based alloys in the high temperature S-CO{sub 2} environment was attributed to the formation of thin Cr-rich oxide on the surface of the materials.

  10. A novel high-strength and highly corrosive biodegradable Fe-Pd alloy: Structural, mechanical and in vitro corrosion and cytotoxicity study.

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Msallamová, Šárka; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-10-01

    Recently, iron-based materials have been considered as candidates for the fabrication of biodegradable load-bearing implants. Alloying with palladium has been found to be a suitable approach to enhance the insufficient corrosion rate of iron-based alloys. In this work, we have extensively compared the microstructure, the mechanical and corrosion properties, and the cytotoxicity of an FePd2 (wt%) alloy prepared by three different routes - casting, mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering (SPS), and mechanical alloying and the space holder technique (SHT). The properties of the FePd2 (wt%) were compared with pure Fe prepared in the same processes. The preparation route significantly influenced the material properties. Materials prepared by SPS possessed the highest values of mechanical properties (CYS~750-850MPa) and higher corrosion rates than the casted materials. Materials prepared by SHT contained approximately 60% porosity; therefore, their mechanical properties reached the lowest values, and they had the highest corrosion rates, approximately 0.7-1.2mm/a. Highly porous FePd2 was tested in vitro according to the ISO 10993-5 standard using L929 cells, and two-fold diluted extracts showed acceptable cytocompatibility. In general, alloying with Pd enhanced both mechanical properties and corrosion rates and did not decrease the cytocompatibility of the studied materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Corrosion engineering

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  12. Effect of nitrogen ion dose on the corrosion resistance, the microstructure and the phase structure of the biomaterials austenitic stainless steel 316L

    Lely Susita RM; Bambang Siswanto; Ihwanul Aziz; Anjar Anggraini H

    2016-01-01

    The succeed of the use of biomaterials for orthopedic implant device is determined by its mechanical properties, chemical stability and biocompatibility in tissues and body fluids. The corrosion resistance is one of the main property of biomaterials to determine for successful orthopedic implant in body tissues. Surface modification is carried out to improve biomaterial surface properties of austenitic stainless steel 316L with nitrogen ion implantation technique and ion nitriding. Nitrogen ion implantation performed on 60 keV ion energy and ion dose variations 2 x 10"1"6 ions/cm"2- 2 x 10"1"7 ions/cm"2. The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel 316L in Hanks solution is measured by using a potentiostat, and corrosion resistance optimum of a sample is obtained at an ion dose of 5 x 10"1"6 ions/cm"2 and increase by a factor of 2.1 if compared to the sample without the nitrogen ion implantation. Further the sample of austenitic stainless steel 316L with the optimum corrosion resistance is processed by ion nitriding technique at a nitriding temperature of 350 °C and nitriding time of 4 hours. Based on corrosion test of the sample produced by ion nitriding is obtained an increasing the corrosion resistance by a factor of 2.96 when compared to the sample before nitrogen ion implantation. The improvement of corrosion resistance of the sample is caused by the formation of iron nitride ξ-Fe2N and γ- Fe4N which has excellent corrosion resistance properties. (author)

  13. Contribution to the study of corrosion in cementitious media for the phenomenological modelling of the long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures

    L'hostis, V.

    2010-12-01

    Many of the facilities and structures involved in the nuclear industry call for reinforced concrete (RC) in their construction. The corrosion of rebars is the main ageing pathology that those RC structures will meet during their service life (leading to concrete cracking and structural bearing capacity decrease). Concrete carbonation and chloride ingress in concrete are both at the origin of the active corrosion state. Passive corrosion has also to be considered in a context of very long lifetime (waste management). It is of primary importance to dispose of accurate and validated tools in order to predict where and how damages will appear. In 2002, the Commissariat a l Energie atomique decided to develop an intensive research programme dedicated to predicting the long-term behaviour of RC structures affected by steel corrosion (CIMETAL Project). This document aims at synthesize the main outputs coming from the project and exposes the scientific strategy was drawn and applied in order to predict the long-term behaviour of RCs that were mainly exposed to carbonation conditions. That strategy includes experiments for the characterisation of 'short-term' and 'long-term' corrosion layouts and processes, as well as modelling stages, with a view not only to predicting the behaviour of RC, but also to pointing out phenomena that are further verified experimentally. (author)

  14. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  15. A High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal - The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    Farmer, J.; Haslam, J.; Day, D.; Lian, T.; Saw, C.; Hailey, P.; Choi, J.S.; Rebak, R.; Yang, N.; Bayles, R.; Aprigliano, L.; Payer, J.; Perepezko, J.; Hildal, K.; Lavernia, E.; Ajdelsztajn, L.; Branagan, D.; Beardsley, B.

    2007-01-01

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of high-performance Ni-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal also makes it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications, as discussed in companion publications. Corrosion data for SAM2X5 (Fe 49.7 Cr 17.7 Mn 1.9 Mo 7.4 W 1.6 B 15.2 C 3.8 Si 2.4 ) is discussed here. (authors)

  16. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo.

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of ± 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs

  17. Evaluation methods for corrosion damage of components in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by coupling analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (1). Major targets and development strategies of the evaluation methods

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Hiranuma, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Nishida, Koji; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration and corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, future problems for structural materials should be predicted based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and they should be mitigated before becoming serious issues for plant operation. Three approaches have been prepared for predicting future problems in structural materials: 1. Computer program packages for predicting future corrosion fatigue on structural materials, 2. Computer program packages for predicting future corrosion damage on structural materials, and 3. Computer program packages for predicting wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion. General features of evaluation methods and their computer packages, technical innovations required for their development, and application plans for the developed approaches for plant operation are introduced in this paper. (author)

  18. Investigation of structure, adhesion strength, wear performance and corrosion behavior of platinum/ruthenium/nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon thin films with respect to film thickness

    Khun, N.W.; Liu, E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sputtered PtRuN-DLC thin films were fabricated with different film thicknesses. → The graphitization of the films increased with increased film thickness. → The wear resistance of the films increased though their adhesion strength decreased. → The corrosion potentials of the films shifted to more negative values. → However, the corrosion currents of the films decreased. - Abstract: In this study, the corrosion performance of platinum/ruthenium/nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (PtRuN-DLC) thin films deposited on p-Si substrates using a DC magnetron sputtering deposition system in a 0.1 M NaCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization test in terms of film thickness. The effect of the film thickness on the chemical composition, bonding structure, surface morphology, adhesion strength and wear resistance of the PtRuN-DLC films was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-scratch test and ball-on-disc tribotest, respectively. It was found that the wear resistance of the PtRuN-DLC films apparently increased with increased film thickness though the adhesion strength of the films decreased. The corrosion results revealed that the increased concentration of sp 2 bonds in the PtRuN-DLC films with increased film thickness shifted the corrosion potentials of the films to more negative values but the decreased porosity density in the films significantly decreased the corrosion currents of the films.

  19. Recent progress to understand stress corrosion cracking in sodium borosilicate glasses: linking the chemical composition to structural, physical and fracture properties

    Rountree, Cindy L.

    2017-08-01

    This topical review is dedicated to understanding stress corrosion cracking in oxide glasses and specifically the SiO_2{\\text-B_2O_3{\\text-}Na_2O} (SBN) ternary glass systems. Many review papers already exist on the topic of stress corrosion cracking in complex oxide glasses or overly simplified glasses (pure silica). These papers look at how systematically controlling environmental factors (pH, temperature...) alter stress corrosion cracking, while maintaining the same type of glass sample. Many questions still exist, including: What sets the environmental limit? What sets the velocity versus stress intensity factor in the slow stress corrosion regime (Region I)? Can researchers optimize these two effects to enhance a glass’ resistance to failure? To help answer these questions, this review takes a different approach. It looks at how systemically controlling the glass’ chemical composition alters the structure and physical properties. These changes are then compared and contrasted to the fracture toughness and the stress corrosion cracking properties. By taking this holistic approach, researchers can begin to understand the controlling factors in stress corrosion cracking and how to optimize glasses via the initial chemical composition.

  20. Achievments of corrosion science and corrosion protection technology

    Fontana, M.; Stehjl, R.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of corrosion-mechanical strength of metals, effect of corrosive media on creep characteristics are presented. New concepts of the mechanism of corrosion cracking and its relation to hydrogen embrittlement are described. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement effect on the process of corrosion cracking of different steels and alloys are considered. The dependence of such types of failure on various structural factors is shown. Data on corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminium and titanium alloys, mechanism of the processes and protective methods are given

  1. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  2. Structure adhesion and corrosion resistance study of tungsten bisulfide doped with titanium deposited by DC magnetron co-sputtering

    De La Roche, J. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 vía al aeropuerto, Campus La Nubia, Manizales (Colombia); González, J.M. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros y Aplicaciones Industriales – RDAI, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 N° 100-00 Ciudadela Meléndez, Cali (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepop@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 vía al aeropuerto, Campus La Nubia, Manizales (Colombia); Sequeda, F. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros y Aplicaciones Industriales – RDAI, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 N° 100-00 Ciudadela Meléndez, Cali (Colombia); Alleh, V.; Scharf, T.W. [The University of North Texas, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Ti-doped WS{sub 2} films were grown via the magnetron co-sputtering technique. • At a high Ti percentage, the crystalline structure of WS{sub 2} coatings tends to be amorphous. • As the Ti percentage increases in WS{sub 2} coatings, nanocomposites tend to form. • Ti-doped WS{sub 2} films have elastic behavior compared with the plastic response of pure WS{sub 2} films. • A high Ti percentage increases the corrosion resistance of WS{sub 2} films. - Abstract: Titanium-doped tungsten bisulfide thin films (WS{sub 2}-Ti) were grown using a DC magnetron co-sputtering technique on AISI 304 stainless steel and silicon substrates. The films were produced by varying the Ti cathode power from 0 to 25 W. Using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the concentration of Ti in the WS{sub 2} was determined, and a maximum of 10% was obtained for the sample grown at 25 W. Moreover, the S/W ratio was calculated and determined to increase as a function of the Ti cathode power. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results, at high titanium concentrations (greater than 6%), nanocomposite formation was observed, with nanocrystals of Ti embedded in an amorphous matrix of WS{sub 2}. Using the scratch test, the coatings’ adhesion was analyzed, and it was observed that as the Ti percentage was increased, the critical load (Lc) also increased. Furthermore, the failure type changed from plastic to elastic. Finally, the corrosion resistance was evaluated using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique, and it was observed that at high Ti concentrations, the corrosion resistance was improved, as Ti facilitates coating densification and generates a protective layer.

  3. Corrosion fatigue of steels

    Spaehn, H.; Wagner, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue phenomena can be classified into two main groups according to the electrochemical state of the metal surface in the presence of electrolytes: the active and the passive state with an important sub-group of corrosion fatigue in the unstable passive state. The allowable stress for structures exposed to the conjoint action of corrosion and fatigue is influenced by many factors: kind of media, number of cycles, frequency, mean stress, size, notches, loading mode, alloy composition and mechanical strength. A critical literature review shows contradictory results if a classification by the electrochemical surface state is not applied. Case histories and counter measures illustrate the practical importance of corrosion fatigue in many branches of industry as well as the urgent need for a better knowledge about the mutual influence of the phenomena to get rules by which the engineer can appraise the risk of corrosion fatigue. (orig.) [de

  4. Corrosion performance of some titanium-based hard coatings

    Matthes, B.; Broszeit, E.; Aromaa, J.; Ronkainen, H.; Hannula, S.P.; Leyland, A.; Matthews, A.

    1991-01-01

    Tools and machine parts which could benefit from wear-resistant titanium-based hard films are often subject to corrosive environments. Physically vapour-deposited coatings frequently exhibit porosity and even small defects, which can cause rapid local corrosion of the substrate material; there is therefore a requirement for dense and chemically inert coatings. This paper presents corrosion data for titanium-based hard coatings such as TiN, (Ti, Al)N, Ti(B, N) and TiB 2 and also for multilayered structures where additional aluminium-based insulating surface layers (AlN and Al 2 O 3 ) were deposited. The corrosion resistance and porosity of the films were analysed by electrochemical techniques. The degree of metallic bonding can play a significant role in influencing the corrosion resistance of refractory transition-metal-based ceramic coatings. Here we demonstrate that, under potentiodynamic corrosion test conditions, resistance to corrosive attack was relatively poor for TiB 2 , better for (Ti, Al)N and Ti(B, N) and best for TiN. It is also shown that applying the additional protective aluminium-based insulating surface layers on the coating can further improve corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  5. Radiation corrosion in aluminum alloy bellows

    Konno, Osamu

    1987-01-01

    Testing was carried out in which materials for vacuum devices (Al, Ti, Cu, SUS) are exposed to electron beams (50 MeV, average current 80 μA) to determine the changes in the quantity, partial pressure and composition of the gases released from the materials. The test appratus used are made of Al alloys alone. During the test, vacuum leak is found in the Al alloy bellows used in the drive device. The leak is found to result from corrosion caused by water. The surface structure is analyzed by SEM, EPMA, ESCA and IMA. It is confirmed that the Al alloy used as material for the bellows if highly resistant to corrosion. It is concluded that it is necessary to use high purity cooling water to prevent the cooling water from causing corrosion. It has been reported that high purity aluminum is very high in resistance to corrosion. Based on these measurements and considerations, it is suggested that when aluminum is to be used as material for vacuum devices in an accelerator, it is required to provide protection film on its surface to prevent corrosion or to use cooling water pipes cladded with pure aluminum and an aluminum alloy. In addition, the temperature of the cooling water should be set after adequately considering the environmental conditions in the room. (Nogami, K.)

  6. Standard guide for corrosion-related failure analysis

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers key issues to be considered when examining metallic failures when corrosion is suspected as either a major or minor causative factor. 1.2 Corrosion-related failures could include one or more of the following: change in surface appearance (for example, tarnish, rust, color change), pin hole leak, catastrophic structural failure (for example, collapse, explosive rupture, implosive rupture, cracking), weld failure, loss of electrical continuity, and loss of functionality (for example, seizure, galling, spalling, swelling). 1.3 Issues covered include overall failure site conditions, operating conditions at the time of failure, history of equipment and its operation, corrosion product sampling, environmental sampling, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, morphology (mode) or failure, and by considering the preceding, deducing the cause(s) of corrosion failure. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibili...

  7. Long-term prediction of reinforced concrete structures - Use of thermodynamic data to assess steel corrosion in carbonated concrete

    Huet, Bruno [Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et Argiles, DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECBA, Bat. 158, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France)]|[Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Industrielle, LPCI, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Leonard de Vinci, 20 av. Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); L' Hostis, Valerie; Le Bescop, Patrick [Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et Argiles, DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECBA, Bat. 158, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Idrissi, Hassane [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Industrielle, LPCI, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Leonard de Vinci, 20 av. Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In the context of the prediction of the long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures involved in the nuclear waste storage, the corrosion mechanisms of the steels have to be assessed and modelled. When nuclear wastes are embedded in reinforced concrete containers, the chemical environment of the reinforcement is progressively modified, due to the diffusion of the carbonation front inside the concrete matrix. This modification leads to the variation of the properties of the iron oxides formed at the steel/concrete interface, and the active corrosion can be initiated. In order to understand and modelled the mechanisms of steel corrosion in concrete, the equilibrium of two main systems must be separately described with the help of thermodynamic data issued from the literature: - The mineral phases, lime and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), in equilibrium with the pore solution during the propagation of the carbonation front; - The iron oxides in equilibrium with the aqueous solution. For this purpose, the nature of aqueous species present in the pore solution was calculated in the whole range of pH encountered during the cement paste degradation by carbonation. As a matter of fact, as the pH decreases, calcium concentration decreases and silicates concentration increases due to the calcium carbonate formation and C-S-H dissolution. The pH of a carbonated concrete ranges between 8.3 and 10, depending on the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the porosity and the conversion degree of carbonation. In this pH range, the iron oxides equilibria were analysed as a function of the redox potential and aqueous species (carbonates and sulphates present in the solution) present inside the solution. In a reductive solution and in presence of carbonates, the high solubility of iron oxides may prevent passivation or generate the dissolution of the passive film. Moreover, the relevance of thermodynamics calculations has been confirmed by corrosion tests of mild steel

  8. Long-term prediction of reinforced concrete structures - Use of thermodynamic data to assess steel corrosion in carbonated concrete

    Huet, Bruno; L'Hostis, Valerie; Le Bescop, Patrick; Idrissi, Hassane

    2004-01-01

    In the context of the prediction of the long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures involved in the nuclear waste storage, the corrosion mechanisms of the steels have to be assessed and modelled. When nuclear wastes are embedded in reinforced concrete containers, the chemical environment of the reinforcement is progressively modified, due to the diffusion of the carbonation front inside the concrete matrix. This modification leads to the variation of the properties of the iron oxides formed at the steel/concrete interface, and the active corrosion can be initiated. In order to understand and modelled the mechanisms of steel corrosion in concrete, the equilibrium of two main systems must be separately described with the help of thermodynamic data issued from the literature: - The mineral phases, lime and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), in equilibrium with the pore solution during the propagation of the carbonation front; - The iron oxides in equilibrium with the aqueous solution. For this purpose, the nature of aqueous species present in the pore solution was calculated in the whole range of pH encountered during the cement paste degradation by carbonation. As a matter of fact, as the pH decreases, calcium concentration decreases and silicates concentration increases due to the calcium carbonate formation and C-S-H dissolution. The pH of a carbonated concrete ranges between 8.3 and 10, depending on the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the porosity and the conversion degree of carbonation. In this pH range, the iron oxides equilibria were analysed as a function of the redox potential and aqueous species (carbonates and sulphates present in the solution) present inside the solution. In a reductive solution and in presence of carbonates, the high solubility of iron oxides may prevent passivation or generate the dissolution of the passive film. Moreover, the relevance of thermodynamics calculations has been confirmed by corrosion tests of mild steel

  9. Application of nano-structured coatings to mitigate flow-accelerated corrosion in secondary pipe systems of nuclear power plants

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Jin; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Carbon steel is widely used as a structural material in secondary pipe systems. However, the passivity of carbon steel is not sufficient for protection in secondary water chemistry with a very fast-flowing fluid because of the dissolution of ferrous and magnetite ions and surface friction at the interface of the coolant and pipe surface. There have been many efforts to mitigate flow-accelerated corrosion through adoption of advanced water chemistries such as optimized dissolve oxygen (DO) concentration and temperature, as well as usage of new additives such as monoethanol amine (ETA) to adjust pH. However, these mitigation techniques pose certain challenges relating to the compatibility of new water chemistries with the steam generator, the thermal efficiency of the secondary side, etc. In this study, to improve the passivity of carbon steel, nanostructured coatings especially nanoparticle-enhanced surface coatings were adopted to improve resistance to corrosion and wear. Nanoparticles in the coating matrix help decrease the electrochemical potential compared coatings without nanoparticles, and thus help improve the mechanical properties, especially hardness, through precipitation. In other words, nanoparticle-enhanced surface coatings have the potential to mitigate flow-accelerated corrosion in secondary pipe systems. As candidate coatings, TiO 2 - and SiC-enhanced electrolytic and electroless nickel plating and Fe-Cr-W amorphous metallic coatings (AMC) were selected by acquiring the Pourbaix diagram with thermodynamic calculations. Both TiO 2 and SiC show a stable state in secondary water chemistry, and it is estimated that Fe-Cr-W can be applied to secondary water chemistry because it has a similar chemical composition to carbon steel. Electron microscopic analysis results with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tunneling electron microscopy (TEM) show the distribution of TiO 2 nanoparticles in the nickel matrix coating layer, whereas the SiC nanoparticles

  10. Influence of corrosion on the morphology and structure of ZrO{sub x}N{sub y}−ZrN coatings deposited on stainless steel

    Cubillos, G.I., E-mail: gcubillos@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Química, Grupo de Materiales y Procesos Químicos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Romero, E., E-mail: erromerom@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Química, Grupo de Materiales y Procesos Químicos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Alfonso, J.E. [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 14490 Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-06-15

    Morphological and structural changes of zirconium nitride and oxynitride thin films (ZrO{sub x}N{sub y}/ZrN) deposited via DC magnetron sputtering on stainless steel substrates (AISI 316L, 304LS, and 2205) in a reactive N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere mixed with argon were studied. The crystallographic structures of the films were established through X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphology was evaluated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the corrosion resistance was evaluated using electrochemical techniques based on linear polarization (PL). The XRD analysis showed that the films were composed of cubic ZrO{sub x}N{sub y} and monoclinic ZrO{sub 2}. The electrochemical test showed that there was corrosion because of pitting phenomena and delamination in the coating deposited on AISI 2205 and AISI 304LS substrates. For AISI 316L, the damage generated by the corrosive solution was less. On the various substrates, an increase in the films' roughness was observed after the corrosion test. - Highlights: • We study the crystallographic change of ZrOxNy thin films after corrosion. • It was evaluated the morphological change of the coating after corrosion in NaCl solution. • The ZrOxNy films grew in the cubic phase and preferentially oriented along the (222) plane. • For AISI 316L, the damage generated by the corrosive solution was less, compared with AISI 304LS and AISI 2205.

  11. Structural, mechanical and corrosion studies of Cr-rich inclusions in 152 cladding of dissimilar metal weld joint

    Li, Yifeng; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Yang, Chengdong

    2018-01-01

    Cr-rich inclusions were discovered in 152 cladding at the inner wall of domestic dissimilar metal weld joint, and their morphologies, microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors were systematically characterized by SEM, TEM, nanoindentation and FIB. The results indicate that the Cr-rich inclusions originate from large-size Cr particles in 152 welding electrode flux, and they are 50-150 μm in size in most cases, and there is a continuous transition zone of 2-5 μm in width between the Cr inclusion core and 152 cladding matrix, and the transition zone consists of Ni & Fe-rich dendritic austenite and Cr23C6 and Cr matrix. The transition zone has the highest nanoindentation hardness (7.66 GPa), which is much harder than the inclusion core (5.14 GPa) and 152 cladding (3.71 GPa). In-situ microscopic tensile tests show that cracks initialize preferentially in transition zone, and then propagate into the inclusion core, and creep further into 152 cladding after penetrating the core area. The inclusion core and its transition zone both share similar oxide film structure with nickel-base 152 cladding matrix in simulated primary water, while those two parts present better general corrosion resistance than 152 cladding matrix due to higher Cr concentration.

  12. Tribological and corrosion behaviour of electroless Ni-B coating possessing a blackberry like structure

    Bülbül, Ferhat; Altun, Hikmet; Küçük, Özkan; Ezirmik, Vefa

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the tribological and corrosion properties of the electroless Ni-B coating deposited on AISI 304 stainless steels. The microstructure of the coating was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). XRD analysis revealed that the prepared coating possessed an amorphous character. SEM-EDS investigation also indicated that a non-stoichiometric Ni-B coating was deposited with a columnar growth mechanism on the stainless steel substrate and the morphology of the growth surface was blackberry-like. The hardness and tribological properties were characterized by microhardness and a pin-on-disc wear test. The electroless Ni-B coated sample had a higher degree of hardness, a lower friction coefficient and a lower wear rate than the uncoated substrate. The electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization method was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating. The electroless Ni-B coating offered cathodic protection on the substrate by acting as a sacrificial anode although it was electrochemically more reactive than the stainless steel substrate.

  13. Corrosion of Highly Specular Vapor Deposited Aluminum (VDA) on Earthshade Door Sandwich Structure

    Plaskon, Daniel; Hsieh, Cheng

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution infrared (IR) imaging requires spacecraft instrument design that is tightly coupled with overall thermal control design. The JPL Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument measures the 3-dimensional distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere on a global scale. The TES earthshade must protect the 180-K radiator and the 230-K radiator from the Earth IR and albedo. Requirements for specularity, emissivity, and solar absorptance of inner surfaces could only be met with vapor deposited aluminum (VDA). Circumstances leading to corrosion of the VDA are described. Innovative materials and processing to meet the optical and thermal cycle requirements were developed. Examples of scanning electronmicroscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and other surface analysis techniques used in failure analysis, problem solving, and process development are given. Materials and process selection criteria and development test results are presented in a decision matrix. Examples of conditions promoting and preventing galvanic corrosion between VDA and graphite fiber-reinforced laminates are provided.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MICROBIAL INHIBITOR TO CONTROL INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION

    Bill W. Bogan; Brigid M. Lamb; John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-30

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. Previous testing indicated that the growth, and the metal corrosion caused by pure cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were inhibited by hexane extracts of some pepper plants. This quarter tests were performed to determine if chemical compounds other than pepper extracts could inhibit the growth of corrosion-associated microbes and to determine if pepper extracts and other compounds can inhibit corrosion when mature biofilms are present. Several chemical compounds were shown to be capable of inhibiting the growth of corrosion-associated microorganisms, and all of these compounds limited the amount of corrosion caused by mature biofilms to a similar extent. It is difficult to control corrosion caused by mature biofilms, but any compound that disrupts the metabolism of any of the major microbial groups present in corrosion-associated biofilms shows promise in limiting the amount/rate of corrosion.

  15. Corrosion on Mars: An Investigation of Corrosion Mechanisms Under Relevant Simulated Martian Environments

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Johansen, Michael R.; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2017-01-01

    This one-year project was selected by NASA's Science Innovation Fund in FY17 to address Corrosion on Mars which is a problem that has not been addressed before. Corrosion resistance is one of the most important properties in selecting materials for landed spacecraft and structures that will support surface operations for the human exploration of Mars. Currently, the selection of materials is done by assuming that the corrosion behavior of a material on Mars will be the same as that on Earth. This is understandable given that there is no data regarding the corrosion resistance of materials in the Mars environment. However, given that corrosion is defined as the degradation of a metal that results from its chemical interaction with the environment, it cannot be assumed that corrosion is going to be the same in both environments since they are significantly different. The goal of this research is to develop a systematic approach to understand corrosion of spacecraft materials on Mars by conducting a literature search of available data, relevant to corrosion in the Mars environment, and by performing preliminary laboratory experiments under relevant simulated Martian conditions. This project was motivated by the newly found evidence for the presence of transient liquid brines on Mars that coincided with the suggestion, by a team of researchers, that some of the structural degradation observed on Curiosity's wheels may be caused by corrosive interactions with the brines, while the most significant damage was attributed to rock scratching. An extensive literature search on data relevant to Mars corrosion confirmed the need for further investigation of the interaction between materials used for spacecraft and structures designed to support long-term surface operations on Mars. Simple preliminary experiments, designed to look at the interaction between an aerospace aluminum alloy (AA7075-T73) and the gases present in the Mars atmosphere, at 20degC and a pressure of 700 Pa

  16. Application of Nano-Structured Coatings for Mitigation of Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Secondary Pipe Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Jin; Yoo, Seung Chang; Huh, Jae Hoon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) is a complex corrosion process combined with mechanical reaction with fluid. There were lots of research to mitigate FAC such as controlling temperature or water chemistry but in this research, we adopt active coating techniques especially nano-particle reinforced coatings. One of the general characteristics of FAC and its mitigation is that surface friction due to surface morphology makes a significant effect on FAC. Therefore to form a uniform coating layers, nano-particles including TiO2, SiC, Fe-Cr-W and Graphene were utilized. Those materials are known as greatly improve the corrosion resistance of substrates such as carbon steels but their effects on mitigation of FAC are not revealed clearly. Therefore in this research, the FAC resistive performance of nano-structured coatings were tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in room temperature 15 wt% sulfuric acid. As the flow-accelerated corrosion inhibitors in secondary piping system of nuclear power plants, various kinds of nano-structured coatings were prepared and tested in room-temperature electrochemical cells. SHS7740 with two types of Densifiers, electroless nickel plating with TiO2 are prepared. Electropolarization curves shows the outstanding corrosion mitigation performance of SHS7740 but EIS results shows the promising potential of Ni-P and Ni-P-TiO2 electroless nickel plating. For future work, high-temperature electrochemical analysis system will be constructed and in secondary water chemistry will be simulated.

  17. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Research Committee on Water Chemistry Standard; Naitoh, Masanori [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) (Japan). Computational Science and Engineering Div.; Uehara, Yasushi; Okada, Hidetoshi [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Tokyo (Japan); Hotta, Koji [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation (Japan); Ichikawa, Ryoko [Mizuho Information and Research Inst., Inc. (Japan); Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation method of corrosive conditions in cooling systems of nuclear power plants by combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Hotta, Koji; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. The analysis models are divided into two types. 1. Prediction models for future problems with structural materials: Distributions of oxidant concentrations along flow paths are obtained by solving water radiolysis reactions in the boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling water and hydrazine-oxygen reactions in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary cooling water. Then, the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at the point of interest is also obtained by the mixed potential model using oxidant concentration. Higher ECP enhances the possibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the BWR primary system, while lower ECP enhances flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) in the PWR secondary system. 2. Evaluation models of wall thinning caused by flow accelerated corrosion: The degree of wall thinning is evaluated at a location with a higher possibility of FAC occurrence, and lifetime is estimated for preventive maintenance. General features of models are reviewed in this paper and the prediction models for oxidant concentrations are briefly introduced. (orig.)

  19. Exfoliation Corrosion and Pitting Corrosion and Their Role in Fatigue Predictive Modeling: State-of-the-Art Review

    David W. Hoeppner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergranular attack (IG and exfoliation corrosion (EC have a detrimental impact on the structural integrity of aircraft structures of all types. Understanding the mechanisms and methods for dealing with these processes and with corrosion in general has been and is critical to the safety of critical components of aircraft. Discussion of cases where IG attack and exfoliation caused issues in structural integrity in aircraft in operational fleets is presented herein along with a much more detailed presentation of the issues involved in dealing with corrosion of aircraft. Issues of corrosion and fatigue related to the structural integrity of aging aircraft are introduced herein. Mechanisms of pitting nucleation are discussed which include adsorption-induced, ion migration-penetration, and chemicomechanical film breakdown theories. In addition, pitting corrosion (PC fatigue models are presented as well as a critical assessment of their application to aircraft structures and materials. Finally environmental effects on short crack behavior of materials are discussed, and a compilation of definitions related to corrosion and fatigue are presented.

  20. Development of Nb2O5|Cu composite as AISI 1020 steel thermal spray coating for protection against corrosion by soil in buried structures

    Regis Junior, Oscar; Silva, Jose Maurilio da; Portella, Kleber Franke; Paredes, Ramon Sigifredo Cortes

    2012-01-01

    An Nb 2 O|Cu corrosion-resistant coating was developed and applied onto AISI 1020 steel substrate by Powder Flame Spray. A galvanostatic electrochemical technique was employed, with and without ohmic drop, in four different soils (two corrosively aggressive and two less aggressive). Behavior of coatings in different soils was compared using a cathodic hydrogen reduction reaction (equilibrium potential, overvoltage and exchange current density) focusing on the effect of ohmic drop. Results allow recommendation of Nb 2 O 5 |Cu composite for use in buried structure protection. (author)

  1. An insight in spatial corrosion prediction

    Mustaffa, Zahiraniza; Gelder, Pieter van; Hashim, Ahmad Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries on fluid–structure interactions between the external flows and circular cylinders placed close to the wall have added new values to the hydrodynamics of unburied offshore pipelines laid on a sea bed. The hydrodynamics of waves and/or currents introduced vortex flows surrounding the pipeline. External corrosions formed in the pipelines were assumed to be partly contributed by such fluid–structure interactions. The spatial consequences of such interactions were of interest of this study. This paper summarizes selected previous experimental and numerical works reported by literature on these discoveries. Actual field data were utilized in this study for further validation. The characteristics of corrosion orientations in the pipelines were studied comprehensively using simple statistics and results were discussed. Results adopted from the field data acknowledged well to the hypothesis from the reported literature. The updated knowledge from this fluid–structure interaction is hoped to benefit the industry and constructively incorporated into the current subsea pipeline designs. Highlights: ► We attempt to predict spatial corrosions in offshore pipelines. ► We validate the analysis using theories on fluid–structure interactions. ► Vortex flows are assumed to cause external corrosions on pipeline walls. ► More defects are expected for pipelines placed in areas governed by waves.

  2. Corrosion in Electronics

    Ambat, Rajan; Gudla, Helene Virginie Conseil; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2017-01-01

    Electronic control units, power modules, and consumer electronics are used today in a wide variety of varying climatic conditions. Varying external climatic conditions of temperature and humidity can cause an uncontrolled local climate inside the device enclosure. Uncontrolled humidity together...... and high density packing combined with the use of several materials, which can undergo electrochemical corrosion in the presence of water film formed due to humidity exposure and bias conditions on the PCBA surface. This article provides a short review of the corrosion reliability issues of electronics due...... to the use of electronics under varying humidity conditions. Important PCBA aspects, which are fundamental to the corrosion cell formation under humid conditions, are discussed. Effect of hygroscopic residues from the process and service and their role in assisting water film build up and corrosion...

  3. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  4. CORROSION INHIBITION OF ALUMINUM ALLOY 3SR IN HCl BY POLYVINYLPYRROLIDONE AND POLYACRYLAMIDE: EFFECT OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE ON INHIBITION EFFICIENCY

    S. A. UMOREN

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitive performance of two water soluble polymers–polyacrylamide (PA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy 3SR in HCl solution was investigated using weight loss, hydrogen evolution, and thermometric methods at 30–60°C. Results obtained indicate that both polymers inhibited acid-induced corrosion of aluminum at the temperatures studied. PVP was found to be a better corrosion inhibitor than PA. All measurements from the three techniques show that in...

  5. Corrosion of beryllium

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Corrosion Rate Prediction Models Utilized for Reinforced Concrete Affected by Chloride

    Siamphukdee, Kanjana; Collins, Frank; Zou, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion is one of the major causes of premature deterioration in reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Given the high maintenance and replacement costs, accurate modeling of RC deterioration is indispensable for ensuring the optimal allocation of limited economic resources. Since corrosion rate is one of the major factors influencing the rate of deterioration, many predictive models exist. However, because the existing models use very different sets of input parameters, the choice of model for RC deterioration is made difficult. Although the factors affecting corrosion rate are frequently reported in the literature, there is no published quantitative study on the sensitivity of predicted corrosion rate to the various input parameters. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analysis of the input parameters for nine selected corrosion rate prediction models. Three different methods of analysis are used to determine and compare the sensitivity of corrosion rate to various input parameters: (i) univariate regression analysis, (ii) multivariate regression analysis, and (iii) sensitivity index. The results from the analysis have quantitatively verified that the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement bars in RC structures is highly sensitive to corrosion duration time, concrete resistivity, and concrete chloride content. These important findings establish that future empirical models for predicting corrosion rate of RC should carefully consider and incorporate these input parameters.

  7. Assessment of corrosion and fatigue damage to light water reactor metal containments

    Sinha, U.P.; Shah, V.N.; Smith, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a generic procedure for estimating aging damage, evaluating structural integrity, and identifying mitigation activities for safe operation of boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark I metal containments and ice-condenser type pressurized water reactor (PWR) cylindrical metal containments. The mechanisms of concern that can cause aging damage to these two types of containments are corrosion and fatigue. Assessment of fatigue damage to bellows is also described. Assessment of corrosion and fatigue damage described in this paper include: containment design features that are relevant to aging assessment, several corrosion and fatigue mechanisms, inspection of corrosion and fatigue damage, and mitigation of damage caused by these mechanisms. In addition, synergistic interaction between corrosion and fatigue is considered. Possible actions for mitigating aging include enhanced inspection methods, maintenance activities based on operating experience, and supplementary surveillance programs. Field experience related to aging of metal containments is reviewed. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented

  8. Evolution of dispersion fuel meat structure caused by interface reaction

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2000-01-01

    In reactor operation, the resultant layers are formed by interdiffusion at the fuel particle-matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. This results in the evolution of meat structure. On the basis of Monte-Carlo method, the author developed simulation method of fuel meat, and simulated the stochastic space locations of spherical fuel particles in the meat. The fuel volume fraction is 43%, and the particles are in definite size distribution. For the 13551 simulated particle samples, the evolution of meat structure is calculated with layer thickness ranging from 0 to 16 μm. The parameters of meat structure include the U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, resultant layer volume fraction, Al matrix volume fraction, particle contact probability and overlap degree as functions of layer thickness

  9. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  10. The Influence Of Modified Water Chemistries On Metal Oxide Films, Activity Build-Up And Stress Corrosion Cracking Of Structural Materials In Nuclear Power Plants

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1998-07-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of activated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60 Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  11. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  12. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as...

  13. Preparation of micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic film on aluminum plates using galvanic corrosion method.

    Wu, Ruomei; Chao, Guang Hua; Jiang, Haiyun; Pan, Anqiang; Chen, Hong; Yuan, Zhiqing; Liu, Qilong

    2013-10-01

    A simple and novel approach has been developed to obtain a microporous film with compound nanoparticles on the surface of aluminum alloy substrate using the galvanic corrosion method. The wettability of the surface changes from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity after chemical modification with stearic acid (SA). The water contact angle (WCA) and sliding angle (WSA) of superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface (SAAS) are 154 degrees and 9 degrees, respectively. The roughness of the aluminum substrate increases after the oxidation reaction. The porous aluminum matrix surface is covered with irregularly shaped holes with a mean radius of about 15 microm, similar to the surface papillae of natural Lotus leaf, with villus-like nanoparticles array on pore surfaces. The superhydrophobic property is attributed to this special surface morphology and low surface energy SA. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) pattern and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) spectrum indicate that Al2O3, Al(OH)3 and AIO(OH) has been formed on the surface of aluminum substrate after the oxidation reaction. The Raman spectra indicate that C-H bond from SA and the Al-O are formed on the SAAS. The as-formed SAAS has good stability.

  14. Corrosion Detection of Reinforcement of Building Materials with Piezoelectric Sensors

    Jia Peng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of reinforced materials in the construction industry has raised increased concerns about their safety and durability, while corrosion detection of steel materials is becoming increasingly important. For the scientific management, timely repair and health monitoring of construction materials, as well as to ensure construction safety and prevent accidents, this paper investigates corrosion detection on construction materials based on piezoelectric sensors. At present, the commonly used corrosion detection methods include physical and electrochemical methods, but there are shortcomings such as large equipment area, low detection frequency, and complex operation. In this study an improved piezoelectric ultrasonic sensor was designed, which could not only detect the internal defects of buildings while not causing structural damage, but also realize continuous detection and enable qualitative and quantitative assessment. Corrosion detection of reinforced building materials with piezoelectric sensors is quick and accurate, which can find hidden dangers and provide a reliable basis for the safety of the buildings.

  15. Analysis of the Causes and Recommendations on Elimination of Biological Damage of Structures During the Repair and Reconstruction of the State Biological Museum in Moscow

    Kamskov Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of mycological research on buildings of the State Biological Museum located in Moscow. Over time, the building maintenance conditions have worsened, in particular because of construction of high-rise buildings in the immediate vicinity of the museum, as well as construction of a greenhouse above the underground passage tunnel between buildings 1 and 2. Over the years, the temperature gradients, high humidity, wear and damage of wall waterproofing and foundations have caused leaks in the underpass tunnel and the biological corrosion of stone, wood and metal structures in indoor exhibition halls. In this connection, part of the survey was to determine the types and size of biological lesions in structures, determination of the causes of biological damage, and the development of measures to eliminate the mycological problems during repair and reconstruction works in the museum.

  16. The corrosion effect on the conduit systems

    Laaidi, Naouar; Belattar, Sougratti

    2009-01-01

    The conduits in the buildings require a regular and permanent control, in order to avoid the risks of deterioration caused by the corrosion or the escape of water. In this work, we present a thermal nondestructive testing method of concrete structures containing water conduits, based on numerical modeling in three dimensions. The goal is to study the detectability of these conduits in different situations and to give a thermal characterization of the rust behaviour in the steel conduits. (author)

  17. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  18. Corrosion Characteristics of Nano-structured Coatings for the Application in Secondary Piping System of Nuclear Power Plants

    Kim, Jeong Won; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Coating surface using less corrosive metal is one of methods that reduce electrochemical corrosion. And metal oxide like a TiO{sub 2} is studied because it is stable, insoluble when coating is exposed severe environment. Several coating technics are used for better corrosion resistance. Pysical vapor deposition(PVD), chemical vapor deposition(CVD), thermal spray, electroplating, electroless etc. But thermal spray coating makes thermal stress to substrates because its temperature are more than 3000K. And powder's deformation can occur. And CVD makes decarburization near interface between surface and coating layer. In addition, CVD and PVD needs vacuum chamber. Electroplating is chemical reaction at surface, but it needs electric power. On the other hands, electroless plating dosen't needs electric power and it's temperature is low than thermal spray. Also the pipe dipping into the chemically solution can proceed coating easily. To reduce FAC, we have experiment about corrosion resistance of electroless Ni-P coated carbon steel in room temperature. And it has possibility of reducing corrosion and addition of TiO{sub 2} nano particles in Ni-P coating layer makes having better corrosion resistance. And results give us a possibility that electroless Ni-P coating added TiO{sub 2} nano particle can have better corrosion resistance compared carbon steel. So it needs study about high temperature corrosion experiment of electroless Ni-P coating added TiO{sub 2} nano particle.

  19. Multifrequency Eddy Current Inspection of Corrosion in Clad Aluminum Riveted Lap Joints and Its Effect on Fatigue Life

    Okafor, A. C.; Natarajan, S.

    2007-03-01

    Aging aircraft are prone to corrosion damage and fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of fuselage skin panels. This can cause catastrophic failure if not detected and repaired. Hence detection of corrosion damage and monitoring its effect on structural integrity are essential. This paper presents multifrequency eddy current (EC) inspection of corrosion damage and machined material loss defect in clad A1 2024-T3 riveted lap joints and its effect on fatigue life. Results of eddy current inspection, corrosion product removal and fatigue testing are presented.

  20. Multifrequency Eddy Current Inspection of Corrosion in Clad Aluminum Riveted Lap Joints and Its Effect on Fatigue Life

    Okafor, A. C.; Natarajan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Aging aircraft are prone to corrosion damage and fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of fuselage skin panels. This can cause catastrophic failure if not detected and repaired. Hence detection of corrosion damage and monitoring its effect on structural integrity are essential. This paper presents multifrequency eddy current (EC) inspection of corrosion damage and machined material loss defect in clad A1 2024-T3 riveted lap joints and its effect on fatigue life. Results of eddy current inspection, corrosion product removal and fatigue testing are presented

  1. Investigation of structure, adhesion strength, wear performance and corrosion behavior of platinum/ruthenium/nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon thin films with respect to film thickness

    Khun, N.W. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, E., E-mail: MEJLiu@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Sputtered PtRuN-DLC thin films were fabricated with different film thicknesses. {yields} The graphitization of the films increased with increased film thickness. {yields} The wear resistance of the films increased though their adhesion strength decreased. {yields} The corrosion potentials of the films shifted to more negative values. {yields} However, the corrosion currents of the films decreased. - Abstract: In this study, the corrosion performance of platinum/ruthenium/nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (PtRuN-DLC) thin films deposited on p-Si substrates using a DC magnetron sputtering deposition system in a 0.1 M NaCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization test in terms of film thickness. The effect of the film thickness on the chemical composition, bonding structure, surface morphology, adhesion strength and wear resistance of the PtRuN-DLC films was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-scratch test and ball-on-disc tribotest, respectively. It was found that the wear resistance of the PtRuN-DLC films apparently increased with increased film thickness though the adhesion strength of the films decreased. The corrosion results revealed that the increased concentration of sp{sup 2} bonds in the PtRuN-DLC films with increased film thickness shifted the corrosion potentials of the films to more negative values but the decreased porosity density in the films significantly decreased the corrosion currents of the films.

  2. Corrosion of reinforcement induced by environment containing ...

    Unknown

    carbonation and chlorides causing corrosion of steel reinforcement. ... interesting and important when the evaluation of the service life of the ... preferably in the areas of industrial and transport activities. ... For controlling the embedded corrosion sensors, elec- .... danger of corrosion of reinforcement seems to be more.

  3. Corrosion Engineering.

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  4. Recognition structure of semipalatinsk residents caused by nuclear explosion tests

    Hirabayashi, Kyoko; Satoh, Kenichi; Ohtaki, Megu; Muldagaliyev, T.; Apsalikov, K.; Kawano, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Authors' team of Hiroshima University and Scientific Research Institute of Radiation Medicine and Ecology (Kazakhstan) has been investigating the health state, exposure route, contents and mental effect of nuclear explosion tests of Semipalatinsk residents through their witness and questionnaire since 2002, to elucidate the humanistic damage of nuclear tests. Reported here is the recognition structure in the title statistically analyzed with use of frequently spoken words in the witness. The audit was performed in 2002-2007 to 994 residents who had experienced ground explosion tests during the period from 1949 to 1962 and were living in 26 villages near the old test site. Asked questions concerning nuclear tests involved such items as still unforgettable matters, dreadful events, regretting things, thought about the test, requests; and matters about themselves, their family, close friends and anything. The frequency of the test site-related words heard in the interview were analyzed with hierarchical clustering and multi-dimensional scaling with a statistic software R for computation and MeCab for morphological analysis. Residents' recognition was found to be of two structures of memory at explosion tests and anger/dissatisfaction/anxiety to the present state. The former contained the frequent words of mushroom cloud, flash, blast, ground tremble and outdoor evacuation, and the latter, mostly anxiety about health of themselves and family. Thus residents have had to be confronted with uneasiness of their health even 20 years after the closure of the test site. (T.T.)

  5. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  6. Control of Fe(O,OH)6 nano-network structures of rust for high atmospheric-corrosion resistance

    Kimura, Masao; Kihira, Hiroshi; Ohta, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Misao; Senuma, Takehide

    2005-01-01

    A new-type of weathering steel containing 3.0 mass% Ni and 0.4 mass% Cu ('advanced weathering steel') exhibits good atmospheric-corrosion resistance in an atmosphere containing relatively high air-born salinity. Here, we show that the high performance was successfully achieved by controlling Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network structures of rust formed on their surfaces. A novel technique using synchrotron radiation has been developed for the in situ observation of rust-formation during wet-dry cycles. It has been revealed that the evolution of Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network structures of rust formed on the advanced weathering steel was more unique than those of conventional weathering steel and mild steel. At an early stage of reaction, Fe 2 NiO 4 and CuO phases precipitate, which provide sites for the nucleation of the Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network resulting in the formation of rust composed of fine and dense-packed grains. The existence of Fe 2 NiO 4 in the nano-network changes the ion-exchanging properties of rust from anion to cation selective. Then, the rust on the advanced weathering steel 'breathes out' chloride ions from the rust/steel interface, and protects steel for more than a century by reducing the life cycle maintenance cost in an environment-friendly manner

  7. Mechanical characteristics of heterogeneous structures obtained by high-temperature brazing of corrosion-resistant steels with rapidly quenched non-boron nickel-based alloys

    Kalin, B.; Penyaz, M.; Ivannikov, A.; Sevryukov, O.; Bachurina, D.; Fedotov, I.; Voennov, A.; Abramov, E.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing nickel filler metals for high temperature brazing corrosion resistance steels different classes is perspective. The use of these alloys leads to the formation of a complex heterogeneous structure in the diffusion zone that contains separations of intermediate phases such as silicides and borides. This structure negatively affects the strength characteristics of the joint, especially under dynamic loads and in corrosive environment. The use of non-boron filler metals based on the Ni-Si-Be system is proposed to eliminate this structure in the brazed seam. Widely used austenitic 12Cr18Ni10Ti and ferrite-martensitic 16Cr12MoSiWNiVNb reactor steels were selected for research and brazing was carried out. The mechanical characteristics of brazed joints were determined using uniaxial tensile and impact toughness tests, and fractography was investigated by electron microscopy.

  8. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  9. Metallurgy of stress corrosion cracking

    Donovan, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    The susceptibility of metals and alloys to stress corrosion is discussed in terms of the relationship between structural characteristics (crystal structure, grains, and second phases) and defects (vacancies, dislocations, and cracks) that exist in metals and alloys. (U.S.)

  10. Events as Power Source: Wireless Sustainable Corrosion Monitoring

    Sun, Guodong; Qiao, Guofu; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Zhibo

    2013-01-01

    This study presents and implements a corrosion-monitoring wireless sensor platform, EPS (Events as Power Source), which monitors the corrosion events in reinforced concrete (RC) structures, while being powered by the micro-energy released from the corrosion process. In EPS, the proposed corrosion-sensing device serves both as the signal source for identifying corrosion and as the power source for driving the sensor mote, because the corrosion process (event) releases electric energy; this is ...

  11. 21PF overpacks: Phenolic-foam induced corrosion

    Kovac, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    The 21PF overpack was developed in the 1960s and approved for use in the 1970s by the US Department of Transportation (DOT). This package, used for the transport of uranium hexafluoride enriched >1%, has had a history of severe metal corrosion, water ingress, and subsequent leakage. Problems associated with corrosion and water leaking from 21PF overpacks caused the DOT to seek public comments and to undertake rulemaking action. As a result, the DOT required modifications and refurbishment of existing overpacks, and specification changes for the fabrication of new 21PF overpacks. Recent studies conducted by the roofing industry indicate that phenolic foam has caused severe corrosion in metal roofing structures, and its use is being curtailed. These findings need to be explored in order to determine if phenolic foam in 21PF overpacks causes corrosion and compromises the package integrity. Metallic corrosion induced by phenolic foam may affect the continued use of the 21PF overpack because damage to the structural integrity of the metal parts of the packaging will affect its ability to meet design specifications

  12. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  13. Zircaloy-4 corrosion in PWR's

    Fyfitch, S.; Smalley, W.R.; Roberts, E.

    1985-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion has been studied extensively in the nuclear industry for a number of years. Following the early crud-related corrosion failures in the Saxton test reactor, Westinghouse undertook numerous programs to minimize crud deposition on fuel rods in power reactors through primary coolant chemistry control. Modern plants today are operating with improved coolant chemistry guidelines, and crud deposition levels are very low in proportion to earlier experience. Zircaloy-4 corrosion under a variety of coolant chemistry, heat flux and exposure conditions has been studied extensively. Experience to date, even in relatively high coolant temperature plants, has indicated that -for both fuel cladding and structural components- Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion performance has been excellent. Recognizing future industry trends, however, which will result in Zircaloy-4 being subjected to ever increasing corrosion duties, Westinghouse will continue accumulating Zircaloy-4 corrosion experience in large power plants. 13 refs.

  14. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  15. The significance of curing in the future corrosion resistance of concrete structures

    López, W.

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available Steel in contact with fresh concrete is covered by a layer of passivating oxydes due to the alkaline nature of the pore solution. The presence of oxygen plays an important role in this passivation process as well as in the corrosión one when is developped due to the ingress of aggressives, such as, chloride ions. In the present paper, results are commented on the behaviour found when oxygen is limited due to the concrete curing conditions, in a completely saturated chamber. Surprisely, the results indicate that the oxygen availability during the curing has a marked influence on the future corrosion beabieviour This allows to deduce that the mechanisms involved are not so simple as was currently accepted and that new specific tests are needed to clarify the controversial points.

    Cuando el acero se pone en contacto con el hormigón fresco, debido a la naturaleza alcalina de éste, el acero se recubre de una capa de óxidos pasivantes, que lo mantienen constantemente protegido. En este proceso juega un papel preponderante la presencia del oxígeno, que resulta también esencial para el desarrollo de los procesos de corrosión, cuando hay agresivos presentes (por ejemplo los cloruros. En el presente trabajo se comentan resultados de los cambios que se aprecian, tanto en el proceso de pasivación como de corrosión, cuando el acceso de oxígeno se limita, circunstancia que se produce cuando el hormigón se cura en condiciones de saturación de agua. Los resultados muestran que la disponibilidad de oxígeno durante el curado tiene una marcada influencia en la resistencia futura a la corrosión lo, que indica que los mecanismos no son tan evidentes como se pensaba y se necesitarán ensayos futuros específicos para aclarar todos los aspectos que ahora aparecen como contradictorios

  16. Predicting the Oxidation/Corrosion Performance of Structural Alloys in Supercritical CO2

    Wright, Ian [Wright HT Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Kung, Steven [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States); Shingledecker, John [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2017-12-22

    This project was the first research to address oxidation of alloys under supercritical CO2 conditions relevant to a semi-open Allam Cycle system. The levels of impurities expected in the CO2 for typical operation were determined by thermodynamic and mass balance calculations, and a test rig was assembled and used to run corrosion tests at temperatures from 650 to 750°C in CO2 at 200 bar for up to 5,000h, with and without impurities. Oxidation rates were measured for seven alloys representing high-strength ferritic steels, standard austenitic steels, and Ni-based alloys with higher-temperature capabilities. The very thin, protective scales formed on the high-temperature alloys provided significant challenges in characterization and thickness measurement. The rates of mass gain and scale thickening were possibly slower when oxidizing impurities were present in the sCO2, and the scale morphologies formed on the ferritic and austenitic steels were consistent with expectations, and similar to those formed in high-pressure steam, with some potential influences of C. Some surface hardening (possibly due to carbon uptake) was identified in ferritic steels Grade 91 and VM12, and appeared more severe in commercially-pure CO2. Hardening was also observed in austenitic steel TP304H, but that in HR3C appeared anomalous, probably the result of work-hardening from specimen preparation. No hardening was found in Ni-base alloys IN617 and IN740H. An existing EPRI Oxide Exfoliation Model was modified for this application and used to evaluate the potential impact of the scales grown in sCO2 on service lifetimes in compact heat exchanger designs. Results suggested that reduction in flow area by simple oxide growth as well as by accumulation of exfoliated scale may have a major effect on the design of small-channel heat exchangers. In addition, the specific oxidation behavior of each alloy strongly influences the

  17. Corrosion of lead shielding in a radiology department

    Schick, D.K.; CAsey, R.N.; Sim, L.H.; Siddle, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion of lead sheet used for structural radiation protection in the Princess Alexandra Hospital Radiology Department has been identified. The corrosion is thought to have been caused by organic acid vapours released from oregon timber wall panelling. Non-destructive testing (NDT) and X-ray transmission measurements were used to define the extent and severity of damage, and subsequently to provide the data necessary for estimation of staff and public radiation doses. Although radiation dose limits have not been exceeded, corrective actions including structural modifications and staff information sessions have been undertaken. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Fatigue strength degradation of metals in corrosive environments

    Adasooriya, N. D.; Hemmingsen, T.; Pavlou, D.

    2017-12-01

    Structures exposed to aggressive environmental conditions are often subjected to time-dependent loss of coating and loss of material due to corrosion; this causes reduction in the cross-sectional properties of the members, increased surface roughness, surface irregularities and corrosion pits, and degradation of material strengths. These effects have been identified and simulated in different research studies. However, time and corrosive media dependent fatigue strength curves for materials have not been discussed in the design or assessment guidelines for structures. This paper attempts to review the corrosion degradation process and available approaches/models used to determine the fatigue strength of corroded materials and to interpolate corrosion deterioration data. High cycle fatigue and full range fatigue life formulae for fatigue strength of corroded materials are proposed. The above formulae depend on the endurance limit of corroded material, in addition to the stress-life fatigue curve parameters of the uncorroded material. The endurance limit of corroded material can either be determined by a limited number of tests in the very high-cycle fatigue region or predicted by an analytical approach. Comparison with experimentally measured corrosion fatigue behavior of several materials is provided and discussed.

  19. Corrosion Analysis of TiCN Coated Al-7075 Alloy for Marine Applications: A Case Study

    Srinath, M. K.; Ganesha Prasad, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    Corrosion is one of the most important marine difficulties that cause long term problems, occurring in ships and submarines surrounded by a corrosive environment when coupled with chemical, temperature and stress related conditions. Corrosion of marine parts could lead to severe disasters. Coatings and heat treatment in a very effective way could be used to protect the aluminium parts against corrosion. The present case study focuses on the corrosion and microstructural properties of TiCN coatings fabricated on Al-7075 aluminium alloy substrate by using Physical Vapour Deposition technique. Corrosion properties of specimen's heat treated at 500 °C at durations of 1, 4, 8 and 12 h were tested through salt spray test. According to D-1193, ASTM standard, corrosion resistance of coated and heat treated Al-7075 samples were investigated in solution kept at 95 °F with a pH of 6.5-7.2, with 5 sections of NaCl to 95 sections of type IV water. The specimen's heat treated for 1 h showed positive corrosion resistance, while the specimens treated for longer durations had the opposite effect. The microstructures of the salt spray tested coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope. X-ray diffraction tests were conducted on specimens to determine the atomic and molecular structure of the surface crystals and the unit cell dimensions. The corrosion mechanisms of the coated specimens under the heat treated conditions have been explored.

  20. A wireless embedded passive sensor for monitoring the corrosion potential of reinforcing steel

    Bhadra, Sharmistha; Thomson, Douglas J; Bridges, Greg E

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel, which results in premature deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, is a worldwide problem. Most corrosion sensing techniques require some type of wired connection between the sensor and monitoring electronics. This causes significant problems in their installation and long-term use. In this paper we describe a new type of passive embeddable wireless sensor that is based on an LC coil resonator where the resonant frequency is changed by the corrosion potential of the reinforcing steel. The resonant frequency can be monitored remotely by an interrogator coil inductively coupled to the sensor coil. The sensor unit comprises an inductive coil connected in parallel with a voltage dependent capacitor (varactor) and a pair of corrosion electrodes consisting of a reinforcing steel sensing electrode and a stainless steel reference electrode. Change of potential difference between the electrodes due to variation of the corrosion potential of the reinforcing steel changes the capacitance of the varactor and shifts the resonant frequency of the sensor. A time-domain gating method was used for the interrogation of the inductively coupled corrosion sensor. Results of an accelerated corrosion test using the sensor indicate that the corrosion potential can be monitored with a resolution of less than 10 mV. The sensor is simple in design and requires no power source, making it an inexpensive option for long-term remote monitoring of the corrosion state of reinforcing steel. (paper)

  1. Electrochemical corrosion studies of the TStE 355 fine-grained structural steel in sulfide containing brine

    Farvaque-Bera, A.M.; Berg, H. von.

    1994-04-01

    Previous corrosion studies have shown that the unalloyed fine-grained steel TStE 355 (Material No. 1.0566) is a promising material for the manufacturing of long-lived high-level waste (HLW) containers that could act as a barrier in a rock-salt repository. Considering this fact, further electrochemical corrosion tests were performed in order to determine the influence of sulfide ions (1 -200 ppm), present as salt impurities in disposal relevant NaCl-brine (T = 55 -90 C), on the corrosion behaviour of this steel grade. For comparison, tests were carried out in the sulfide-free brine, too. (orig.) [de

  2. Effect of cerium on structure modifications of a hybrid sol–gel coating, its mechanical properties and anti-corrosion behavior

    Cambon, Jean-Baptiste; Esteban, Julien; Ansart, Florence; Bonino, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Viviane; Santagneli, S.H.; Santilli, C.V.; Pulcinelli, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New sol–gel routes to replace chromates for corrosion protection of aluminum. ► Effect of cerium concentration on the microstructure of xerogel. ► Electrochemical and mechanical performances of hybrid coating with different cerium contents. ► Good correlation between the different results with an optimal cerium content of 0.01 M. -- Abstract: An organic–inorganic hybrid coating was developed to improve the corrosion resistance of the aluminum alloy AA 2024-T3. Organic and inorganic coatings derived from glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and aluminum tri-sec-butoxide Al(O s Bu) 3 , with different cerium contents, were deposited onto aluminum by dip-coating process. Corrosion resistance and mechanical properties were investigated by electrochemical impedance measurements and nano-indentation respectively. An optimal cerium concentration of 0.01 M was evidenced. To correlate and explain the hybrid coating performances in relation to the cerium content, NMR experiments were performed. It has been shown that when the cerium concentration in the hybrid is higher than 0.01 M there are important modifications in the hybrid structure that account for the mechanical properties and anti-corrosion behavior of the sol–gel coating.

  3. Image analysis of corrosion pit initiation on ASTM type A240 stainless steel and ASTM type A 1008 carbon steel

    Nine, H. M. Zulker

    The adversity of metallic corrosion is of growing concern to industrial engineers and scientists. Corrosion attacks metal surface and causes structural as well as direct and indirect economic losses. Multiple corrosion monitoring tools are available although those are time-consuming and costly. Due to the availability of image capturing devices in today's world, image based corrosion control technique is a unique innovation. By setting up stainless steel SS 304 and low carbon steel QD 1008 panels in distilled water, half-saturated sodium chloride and saturated sodium chloride solutions and subsequent RGB image analysis in Matlab, in this research, a simple and cost-effective corrosion measurement tool has identified and investigated. Additionally, the open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results have been compared with RGB analysis to gratify the corrosion. Additionally, to understand the importance of ambiguity in crisis communication, the communication process between Union Carbide and Indian Government regarding the Bhopal incident in 1984 was analyzed.

  4. Toughened and corrosion- and wear-resistant composite structures and fabrication methods thereof

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Hallman, Russell L.

    2017-06-20

    Composite structures having a reinforced material interjoined with a substrate, wherein the reinforced material comprises a compound selected from the group consisting of titanium monoboride, titanium diboride, and combinations thereof.

  5. Feasibility Study on Nano-structured Coatings to Mitigate Flow-accelerated Corrosion in Secondary System of Nuclear Power Plants

    Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Jeong Won; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    There have been many efforts to mitigate FAC through the adoption of the advanced and modified water chemistries such as optimized dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and temperature. However, these mitigation techniques pose certain challenges relating to the compatibility of new water chemistries with the steam generator, the thermal efficiency of the secondary side, etc. In this context, nano-particle reinforced electroless nickel plating (NP ENP) could help solve the FAC issues in secondary pipe systems. This does not require modification of water chemistry or structural materials, and hence, its application is reasonable and time-saving compared to previous FAC mitigation techniques. The main parameters of FAC are known as electrochemical reaction at the interface, dissolution of magnetite and ferrous ions due to concentration gradient between carbon steels and water and wear due to a fast-flowing fluid. High-temperature corrosion characteristics of the both coatings have potential as FAC barrier for carbon steel. Feasibility study will be carried out with FAC simulation experiments.

  6. Optimal design of galvanic corrosion protection systems for offshore wind turbine support structures

    Sarhadi, Ali; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Stolpe, Mathias

    2018-01-01

    the optimized anodes on the support structure, and finally evaluating the protective potential on the structure during the lifetime by calling the finite element (FE) software COMSOL. An algorithm based on Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) is used for optimizing the number and dimensions of the anodes...... the electrical isolation degradation of the structure coating as well as the mass reduction of the anodes during the CP lifetime. The performance of the proposed optimization process is examined on a mono bucket inspired (with some simplifications) by the Dogger Bank metrological mast in England. The optimized......The current work addresses a mass/cost optimization procedure for galvanic anode cathodic protection (GACP) systems based on both cathodic protection (CP) standards and numerical simulation. An approach is developed for optimizing the number and dimensions of the galvanic anodes, distributing...

  7. Aluminium alloy containing iron and nickel. Influence of structure and composition on the corrosion behaviour in high temperature water; Alliages d'aluminium contenant du fer et du nickel. Influence de la structure et de la teneur sur la resistance a la corrosion par l'eau a haute temperature

    Coriou, H; Grall, L; Hure, J; Roux, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    The corrosion structures are determined on a series of aluminium (A{sub 9}) base alloys which contain a total Fe + Ni not superior to 3%. The tests are carried out to 5,000 hours in 350 deg. C deionized water in autoclave. The principal results were as follows: - For iron and nickel contents superior to 0,5%, the first factor is the distribution structure of insoluble intermetallic compounds: the particles must be as fine and randomly dispersed as possible. - The corrosion products developed on the surface may be subdivided in three distinct layers which total thickness tends rapidly towards a limit and stabilises itself. (author) [French] On a determine les structures de corrosion d'une gamme d'alliages a base d'aluminium A{sub 9} ayant une teneur Fe + Ni ne depassant pas 3%. Les essais ont ete effectues jusqu'a 5000 heures en autoclave a 350 deg. C dans l'eau demineralisee. Les resultats principaux sont les suivants: - Pour les teneurs superieures a 0,5 % en fer et en nickel, le facteur preponderant est la structure de repartition des composes intermetalliques en phase separee, qui doivent etre en particules aussi fines et uniformement reparties que possible. - Les produits de corrosion developpes en surface se subdivisent en trois couches distinctes dont l'epaisseur totale tend rapidement vers une limite et se stabilise. (auteur)

  8. Effects of nitrogen gas ratio on the structural and corrosion properties of ZrN thin films grown on biodegradable magnesium alloy by ion-beam sputtering

    Kiahosseini, Seyed Rahim [Islamic Azad University, Department of Engineering, Damghan Branch, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Majid [Nuclear Sciences and Technology Institute, Radiation Application Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-12-15

    Studies on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys, which are widely applied as biomaterials, have increased in recent years. In this work, zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy through ion-beam sputtering at 473 K with 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 nitrogen proportions [F(N{sub 2})] in ionized gas. X-ray diffraction, profilometry, hardness tests, scanning electron microscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques were used to analyze the structure, thickness, adhesion, microstructure, and corrosion resistance of coated samples, respectively. Results showed that the (111) crystalline orientation dominated in all coatings. Williamson-Hall technique revealed that the crystallite size of ZrN films decreased from 73 to 20 nm with increasing F(N{sub 2}), and compressive microstrain increased from 0.004 to 0.030. Film thicknesses were inversely correlated with N{sub 2} amount and significantly decreased from 1.7 to 0.8 μm. The maximum dP/dr ratio, a dependent factor of adhesion, was 0.04 kg/cm for the film deposited under the F(N{sub 2}) value of 0.5. The corrosion potential of coated samples was not significantly different from that of uncoated AZ91. Under the F(N{sub 2}) value of 0.6, corrosion current density slightly decreased from 14 to 9.7 μA/cm{sup 2} and significantly increased to 13.5 μA/cm{sup 2}. Results indicated that ZrN film deposited under the F(N{sub 2}) value of 0.5 showed high adhesion and corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  9. Effects of nitrogen gas ratio on the structural and corrosion properties of ZrN thin films grown on biodegradable magnesium alloy by ion-beam sputtering

    Kiahosseini, Seyed Rahim; Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Majid

    2017-12-01

    Studies on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys, which are widely applied as biomaterials, have increased in recent years. In this work, zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy through ion-beam sputtering at 473 K with 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 nitrogen proportions [F(N2)] in ionized gas. X-ray diffraction, profilometry, hardness tests, scanning electron microscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques were used to analyze the structure, thickness, adhesion, microstructure, and corrosion resistance of coated samples, respectively. Results showed that the (111) crystalline orientation dominated in all coatings. Williamson-Hall technique revealed that the crystallite size of ZrN films decreased from 73 to 20 nm with increasing F(N2), and compressive microstrain increased from 0.004 to 0.030. Film thicknesses were inversely correlated with N2 amount and significantly decreased from 1.7 to 0.8 µm. The maximum d P/d r ratio, a dependent factor of adhesion, was 0.04 kg/cm for the film deposited under the F(N2) value of 0.5. The corrosion potential of coated samples was not significantly different from that of uncoated AZ91. Under the F(N2) value of 0.6, corrosion current density slightly decreased from 14 to 9.7 µA/cm2 and significantly increased to 13.5 µA/cm2. Results indicated that ZrN film deposited under the F(N2) value of 0.5 showed high adhesion and corrosion resistance.

  10. Microscopic analysis of effect of shot peening on corrosion fatigue behavior of aluminum alloy

    Kim, Jong Cheon; Cheong, Seong Kyun

    2012-01-01

    The object of this study considers corrosion fatigue improvement of 7075-T6 aluminum by using shot peening treatment on 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature. Aluminum alloy is generally used in aerospace structural components because of the light weight and high strength characteristics. Many studies have shown that an aluminum alloy can be approximately 50% lighter than other materials. Mostly, corrosion leads to earlier fatigue crack propagation under tensile conditions and severely reduces the life of structures. Therefore, the technique to improve material resistance to corrosion fatigue is required. Shot peening technology is widely used to improve fatigue life and other mechanical properties by induced compressive residual stress. Even the roughness of treated surface causes pitting corrosion, the compressive residual stress, which is induced under the surface layer of material by shot peening, suppersses the corrosion and increases the corrosion resistance. The experimental results for shot peened specimens were compared with previous work for non treated aluminum alloy. The results show that the shot peening treatment affects the corrosion fatigue improvement of aluminum alloys and the induced compressive residual stress by shot peening treatment improves the resistance to corrosion fatigue

  11. Microscopic analysis of effect of shot peening on corrosion fatigue behavior of aluminum alloy

    Kim, Jong Cheon; Cheong, Seong Kyun [Seoul Nat' l Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The object of this study considers corrosion fatigue improvement of 7075-T6 aluminum by using shot peening treatment on 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature. Aluminum alloy is generally used in aerospace structural components because of the light weight and high strength characteristics. Many studies have shown that an aluminum alloy can be approximately 50% lighter than other materials. Mostly, corrosion leads to earlier fatigue crack propagation under tensile conditions and severely reduces the life of structures. Therefore, the technique to improve material resistance to corrosion fatigue is required. Shot peening technology is widely used to improve fatigue life and other mechanical properties by induced compressive residual stress. Even the roughness of treated surface causes pitting corrosion, the compressive residual stress, which is induced under the surface layer of material by shot peening, suppersses the corrosion and increases the corrosion resistance. The experimental results for shot peened specimens were compared with previous work for non treated aluminum alloy. The results show that the shot peening treatment affects the corrosion fatigue improvement of aluminum alloys and the induced compressive residual stress by shot peening treatment improves the resistance to corrosion fatigue.

  12. Effect of structure evolution induced by ultrasonic peening on the corrosion behavior of AISI-321 stainless steel

    Mordyuk, B.N.; Prokopenko, G.I.; Vasylyev, M.A.; Iefimov, M.O.

    2007-01-01

    A nanocrystalline surface layer was produced on an AISI-321 stainless steel by severe plastic deformation via ultrasonic peening (UP). The microstructural evolution of the surface layer was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The volume fraction of strain-induced α-martensite as a function of the effective strain (e-bar) was evaluated quantitatively using XRD and magnetic measurements. Considering the e-bar magnitudes and the TEM data obtained, it is concluded that a grain refinement of austenitic structure passes ahead of the α-martensite formation, particularly in the top surface layer. The nanocrystalline austenitic grain structure (mean grain size∼15nm) was observed at e-bar=0.45, while the startup of the strain-induced martensitic transformation was revealed at the strain extent of 0.62. The nanostructured surface layer formed after straining to e-bar=0.8 already contains mainly the martensite nanograins characterized by an average size of about 10nm. Grain size increased gradually up to 60nm within the layer containing both austenite and martensite phases at a depth of about 30μm from the treated surface. Both the microhardness behavior of the stainless steel surface and its corrosion performance in 3.5% NaCl solution can be enhanced by the UP. They are shown to be in correlation with: (i) the grain refinement process and (ii) the increase in the volume fraction of strain-induced α-martensite

  13. Evolutionary Computation Techniques for Predicting Atmospheric Corrosion

    Amine Marref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion occurs in many engineering structures such as bridges, pipelines, and refineries and leads to the destruction of materials in a gradual manner and thus shortening their lifespan. It is therefore crucial to assess the structural integrity of engineering structures which are approaching or exceeding their designed lifespan in order to ensure their correct functioning, for example, carrying ability and safety. An understanding of corrosion and an ability to predict corrosion rate of a material in a particular environment plays a vital role in evaluating the residual life of the material. In this paper we investigate the use of genetic programming and genetic algorithms in the derivation of corrosion-rate expressions for steel and zinc. Genetic programming is used to automatically evolve corrosion-rate expressions while a genetic algorithm is used to evolve the parameters of an already engineered corrosion-rate expression. We show that both evolutionary techniques yield corrosion-rate expressions that have good accuracy.

  14. Investigations on the determination of corrosion kinetics and the structure of corrosion products on high-temperature alloys under low oxygen partial pressures

    Poestges, A.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H.

    1979-04-01

    On three nickel-base-alloys (NIMONIC 80A, INCONNEL 617 and ALLOY 713LC), which are planned as materials for components of the primary cooling circuit of high-temperature reactors, studies for the determination of the oxidation behaviour under reactor relevant conditions were performed. The test conditions were fixed at an oxygen partial pressure of 10 -16 bars with a total pressure of 0,2 bars and a temperature of 1080 0 C. The use of the X-ray diffraction analysis on the oxidised samples of type NIMONIC 80A showed the corrosion products Cr 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Cr 2 Ti 2 O 7 in the outer oxide coating as well as Al 2 O 3 in the inner oxide zone. The samples of the alloy type INCOEL 617 showed the oxides Cr 2 O 3 and Cr 2 Ti 2 O 7 in the outer oxide coating. Samples of the alloy ALLOY 713LC showed Cr 2 O 3 and CrNbO 4 in the outer oxide coating and Al 2 O 3 in the zone of inner oxidation. Sufficient detection certainty was only ascertained by investigating samples with plane surface. For both alloys first mentioned, it was possible to prove the validity of the paralinear relationship W = k x t -1 / 2 - a x t for the increase in weight for the explanation of the time law of the oxidation. For the non-destructive determination of the oxide coating thickness on the alloys samples, the X-ray fluorescence analysis gave reproducible results of good precision. (orig.) [de

  15. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  16. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  17. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  18. Evaluation of the effect of corrosion defects on the structural integrity of X52 gas pipelines using the SINTAP procedure and notch theory

    Adib, H.; Jallouf, S.; Schmitt, C.; Carmasol, A.; Pluvinage, G.

    2007-01-01

    The notch stress intensity factor concept and the structural integrity assessment procedure for European industry (SINTAP) structural integrity procedure are used to assess gas pipeline integrity using deterministic and probabilistic methods. These pipes have external longitudinal semi-elliptical corrosion defects. Stress concentration at a defect tip is investigated via elastic-plastic finite element method analysis. The notch stress intensity concept is implemented into the SINTAP procedure and a notch-based failure assessment diagram is proposed. The safety factor and security factor are calculated through the SINTAP basic level

  19. Evaluation of the effect of corrosion defects on the structural integrity of X52 gas pipelines using the SINTAP procedure and notch theory

    Adib, H. [ENIM, Laboratoire de Fiabilite Mecanique (LFM) Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex (France); Jallouf, S. [ENIM, Laboratoire de Fiabilite Mecanique (LFM) Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex (France); Schmitt, C. [ENIM, Laboratoire de Fiabilite Mecanique (LFM) Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex (France)]. E-mail: schmitt@enim.fr; Carmasol, A. [ENIM, Laboratoire de Fiabilite Mecanique (LFM) Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex (France); Pluvinage, G. [ENIM, Laboratoire de Fiabilite Mecanique (LFM) Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex (France)

    2007-03-15

    The notch stress intensity factor concept and the structural integrity assessment procedure for European industry (SINTAP) structural integrity procedure are used to assess gas pipeline integrity using deterministic and probabilistic methods. These pipes have external longitudinal semi-elliptical corrosion defects. Stress concentration at a defect tip is investigated via elastic-plastic finite element method analysis. The notch stress intensity concept is implemented into the SINTAP procedure and a notch-based failure assessment diagram is proposed. The safety factor and security factor are calculated through the SINTAP basic level.

  20. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  1. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  2. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K.; Kim, J. J.; Hwang, W. S.; Park, Y. S.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time

  3. Local damage to reinforced concrete structures caused by impact of aircraft engine missiles. Pt. 1

    Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Ohnuma, H.; Von Riesemann, W.A.; Bickel, D.C.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Structural damage induced by an aircraft crashing into a reinforced concrete structure includes local damage caused by the deformable engines, and global damage caused by the entire aircraft. Local damage to the target may consist of spalling of concrete from its front face together with missile penetration into it, scabbing of concrete from its rear face, and perforation of missile through it. Until now, local damage to concrete structures has been mainly evaluated by rigid missile impact tests. Past research work regarding local damage caused by impact of deformable missiles has been limited. This paper presents the results of a series of impact tests of small-, intermediate-, and full-scale engine models into reinforced concrete panels. The purpose of the tests was to determine the local damage to a reinforced concrete structure caused by the impact of a deformable aircraft engine. (orig.)

  4. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  5. Evaluation of corrosion attack of chimney liners

    Blahetová M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The case study of chimney liner corrosion addresses three specific cases of damage of chimney systems from of stainless steels. These systems were used for flue of gas arising from the combustion of brown coal in small automatic boilers, which are used for heating. Detailed analyzes implied that the cause of devastating corrosion of the steel AISI 316 and 304 steel (CSN 17349, 17241 was particularly high content of halides (chlorides and fluorides, which caused a severe pitting corrosion, which led up to the perforation of the liner material. Simultaneous reduction of the thickness of the used sheets was due to by the general corrosion, which was caused by the sulfur in the solid fuel. The condensation then led to acid environment and therefore the corrosion below the dew point of the sulfuric acid has occurred. All is documented by metallographic analysis and microanalysis of the corrosion products.

  6. Effects of a range of machined and ground surface finishes on the simulated reactor helium corrosion of several candidate structural materials

    Thompson, L.D.

    1981-02-01

    This report discusses the corrosion behavior of several candidate reactor structural alloys in a simulated advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environment over a range of lathe-machined and centerless-ground surface finishes. The helium environment contained 50 Pa H 2 /5 Pa CO/5 Pa CH 4 / 2 O (500 μatm H 2 /50 μatm CO/50 μatm CH 4 / 2 O) at 900 0 C for a total exposure of 3000 h. The test alloys included two vacuum-cast superalloys (IN 100 and IN 713LC); a centrifugally cast austenitic alloy (HK 40); three wrought high-temperature alloys (Alloy 800H, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 617); and a nickel-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy (Inconel MA 754). Surface finish variations did not affect the simulated advanced-HTGR corrosion behavior of these materials. Under these conditions, the availability of reactant gaseous impurities controls the kinetics of the observed gas-metal interactions. Variations in the near-surface activities and mobilities of reactive solute elements, such as chromium, which might be expected to be affected by changes in surface finish, do not seem to greatly influence corrosion in this simulated advanced HTGR environment. 18 figures, 4 tables

  7. Corrosion inhibition

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  8. Workshop on Avionics Corrosion Control: Meeting of the Structures and Materials Panel of AGARD (62nd) Held in Hovik (Norway) on 16-17 April 1986.

    1987-09-01

    operator not smoke in the recording area and that the heads not be cleaned with a halogenated cleaning solvent. Use an alcohol . J. Connector 1. Radar...frplaed a drop of sealant is placed in the area where wott is accmplshe. RTN’- 118 has been replaed with dlear RTV-3 140 which is a dlear alcohol cure...to isolate 7-6 3.3.1.1 Alumimue Effects of corrosion on aluminum runs ae open circuits caused by oxydes . The mechanism Is simple : chloride Ions make

  9. An expert system for microbiologically influenced corrosion

    Carney, C.E.; Licina, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a damage mechanism that can cause serious degradation of service water system components. MIC can be particularly insidious since damage can occur very quickly, even in environments otherwise resistant to corrosion. Plant operations or maintenance personnel or system engineers typically do not have sufficient expertise to predict when and where MIC may occur or what methods of treatment are effective. An expert system (MICPro) has been devised which provides a tool for utilities to predict where MIC will occur, which systems or components are most susceptible, how operating parameters may affect vulnerability, and how to implement corrective and preventative measures. The system is designed to be simple to use: required inputs are common system parameters and results are presented as numbers from 1 to 10 indicating the likelihood of damage due to the given input. In this paper the structure and operation of the system is described, and future refinements are discussed

  10. Study on some experimental conditions that affect corrosion of some structural steel materials using in nuclear power plant

    Hoang Nhuan; Nguyen Thi Kim Dung; Hoang Xuan Thi; Nguyen Thi Thuc Phuong; Ngo Xuan Hung; Nguyen Thanh Chung; Tran Xuan Vinh; Hoang Van Duc; Hoang Thi Tuyen; Nguyen Duc Thang

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion cracking of stainless steels is an important degradation phenomenon not only in nuclear reactors but also in the other industrial factories. In this work, experimental research of mechanical properties and electro-chemical processes to degradation of carbon steel and SS304 was carried out. Hardness values, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation values and impact energy which are typical for material mechanical properties were measured. When changing heat treatment conditions, the differences of mechanical properties were not really significant. In electro-chemical experiments, the OCP results of C45 steel and 304 Stainless Steel in Cl - environment took initial assessment of corrosion process. The corrosion process of C45 was accelerated over Cl - concentration. In the case of 304 Stainless Steel, Cl - ions did not significantly affect corrosion process, only slowed down the formation of the chromium oxide layer on the SS304 surface. In the last section, experiments were conducted to get a procedure on the determination of 10 B/ 11 B isotope ratio in water samples by isotope dilution – inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. (author)

  11. Corrosion engineering in nuclear power industry

    Prazak, M.; Tlamsa, J.; Jirousova, D.; Silber, K.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion problems in nuclear power industry are discussed from the point of view of anticorrosion measures, whose aim is not only increasing the lifetime of the equipment but, first of all, securing ecological safety. A brief description is given of causes of corrosion damage that occurred at Czechoslovak nuclear power plants and which could have been prevented. These involve the corrosion of large-volume radioactive waste tanks made of the CSN 17247 steel and of waste piping of an ion exchange station made of the same material, a crack in a steam generator collector, contamination of primary circuit water with iron, and corrosion of CrNi corrosion-resistant steel in a spent fuel store. It is concluded that if a sufficient insight into the corrosion relationships exists and a reasonable volume of data is available concerning the corrosion state during the nuclear facility performance, the required safety can be achieved without adopting extremely costly anticorrosion measures. (Z.M.)

  12. Corrosion mechanism applicable to biodegradable magnesium implants

    Atrens, Andrej, E-mail: Andrejs.Atrens@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Liu Ming; Zainal Abidin, Nor Ishida [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Much of our understanding of the Mg corrosion mechanism is based on research using aggressive chloride based solutions like 3% NaCl, which are appropriate for understand the corrosion for applications such as auto construction. The chloride ions tend to cause break down of the partly protective surface film on the Mg alloy surface. The corrosion rate increases with exposure time until steady state is reached, which may take several weeks. An overview is provided of the aspects which determine the corrosion of Mg alloys: (i) measurement details; (ii) impurity elements Fe, Ni, Cu and Co; (iii) second phases; (iv) surface films and surface condition and (v) stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This understanding is used to help understand Mg corrosion for Mg as a biodegradable implant for medical applications. Solutions that elucidate these applications tend to form surface films and the corrosion rate tends to decrease with immersion time.

  13. Corrosion processes of physical vapor deposition-coated metallic implants.

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Protecting metallic implants from the harsh environment of physiological fluids is essential to guaranteeing successful long-term use in a patient's body. Chemical degradation may lead to the failure of an implant device in two different ways. First, metal ions may cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues surrounding the implant and, in extreme cases, these reactions may inflict acute pain on the patient and lead to loosening of the device. Therefore, increasing wear strength is beneficial to the performance of the metallic implant. Second, localized corrosion processes contribute to the nucleation of fatigue cracks, and corrosion fatigue is the main reason for the mechanical failure of metallic implants. Common biomedical alloys such as stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloys, and titanium alloys are prone to at least one of these problems. Vapor-deposited hard coatings act directly to improve corrosion, wear, and fatigue resistances of metallic materials. The effectiveness of the corrosion protection is strongly related to the structure of the physical vapor deposition layer. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the correlation between the structure of physical vapor deposition layers and the corrosion properties of metallic implants.

  14. Corrosion characteristics of an aqueous self-cooled fusion blanket

    Bogaerts, W.F.; Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Deutsch, L.; Jackson, D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel aqueous self-cooled blanket concept (ASCB) has recently been proposed. This blanket concept, as applied to a MARS-like tandem mirror reactor, consists of disks of spiraling tubes of Zircaloy-4 housed in a structural container of vanadium alloy (V-15 Ti-5 Cr). The Zircaloy tubes are cooled by a mixture of light and heavy water with 9 g of LiOH per 100 cm 3 of water dissolved in the coolant. A major issue for the feasibility of the integrated blanket coil concept is the chemical compatibility of the coolant and Zircaloy. Initial corrosion tests have been undertaken in order to resolve this question. Results clearly show that successful alloy heats can be prepared, for which corrosion problems will probably not be the limiting factor of the ASCB design concept. As is quite well known from fission engineering studies, small variations in the alloy compositions or in the metallurgical structure may, however, be able to cause significant alterations in the oxidation or corrosion rates. Further tests will be necessary to resolve the remaining uncertainties and to determine the behavior of successful alloy heats in the presence of trace impurities in order to address the sensitivity to localized corrosion phenomena such as pitting, stress corrosion cracking, and intergranular attack

  15. Degradation of aged plants by corrosion: 'Long cell action' in unresolved corrosion issues

    Saji, Genn

    2009-01-01

    In a series of previously published papers the author has identified that 'long cell action' corrosion plays a pivotal role in practically all unresolved corrosion issues for all types of nuclear power plants (e.g. PWR/VVER, BWR/RBMK and CANDU). Some of these unresolved issues are IGSCC, PWSCC, AOA and FAC (erosion-corrosion). In conventional corrosion science it is well established that 'long cell action' can seriously accelerate or suppress the local cell corrosion activities. Although long cell action is another fundamental mechanism of corrosion, especially in a 'soil corrosion' arena, potential involvement of this corrosion process has never been studied in nuclear and fossil power plants as far as the author has been able to establish. The author believes that the omission of this basic corrosion mechanism is the root cause of practically all un-resolved corrosion issues. In this paper, the author further elaborated on his assessment to other key corrosion issues, e.g. steam generator and turbine corrosion issues, while briefly summarizing previous discussions for completeness purposes, as well as introducing additional experimental and theoretical evidence of this basic corrosion mechanism. Due to the importance of this potential mechanism the author is calling for institutional review activities and further verification experiments in the form of a joint international project.

  16. Research Review: Structural Language in Autistic Spectrum Disorder--Characteristics and Causes

    Boucher, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Background: Structural language anomalies or impairments in autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) are theoretically and practically important, although underrecognised as such. This review aims to highlight the ubiquitousness of structural language anomalies and impairments in ASD, and to stimulate investigation of their immediate causes and…

  17. Using thin metal layers on composite structures for shielding the electromagnetic pulse caused by nearby lightning

    Blaj, M.A.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Damstra, G.C.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Electronic systems in composite structures could be vulnerable to the (dominant magnetic) field caused by a lightning strike, because only thin layers of metal can be used on composite structures. Thin layers result in a very low shielding effectiveness against magnetic fields. Many experiments

  18. Underground pipeline corrosion

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  19. Ultrasonic monitoring of pitting corrosion

    Jarvis, A. J. C.; Cegla, F. B.; Bazaz, H.; Lozev, M.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to corrosive substances in high temperature environments can cause damage accumulation in structural steels, particularly in the chemical and petrochemical industries. The interaction mechanisms are complex and varied; however initial damage propagation often manifests itself in the form of localized areas of increased material loss. Recent development of an ultrasonic wall thickness monitoring sensor capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 500°C has allowed permanent monitoring within such hostile environments, providing information on how the shape of a pulse which has reflected from a corroding surface can change over time. Reconstructing localized corrosion depth and position may be possible by tracking such changes in reflected pulse shape, providing extra information on the state of the backwall and whether process conditions should be altered to increase plant life. This paper aims to experimentally investigate the effect certain localized features have on reflected pulse shape by `growing' artificial defects into the backwall while wall thickness is monitored using the sensor. The size and complexity of the three dimensional scattering problem lead to the development of a semi-analytical simulation based on the distributed point source method (DPSM) which is capable of simulating pulse reflection from complex surfaces measuring approximately 17×10λ Comparison to experimental results show that amplitude changes are predicted to within approximately 1dB and that pulse shape changes are accurately modelled. All experiments were carried out at room temperature, measurements at high temperature will be studied in the future.

  20. Rehabilitation of the gas pipeline that had a rupture in service caused by SCC (Stress Corrosion C raking); Rehabilitacion al servicio de un gasoducto que ha sufrido una ruptura en servicio por SCC

    Silva, Fernando; Carzoglio, Eduardo; Hryciuk, Pedro [TGN - Transportadora de Gas del Norte S.A. (Argentina). Depto. de Integridad

    2003-07-01

    TGN had a rupture in service on Gasoducto Troncal Norte. After initial evaluation of the causes of the rupture it was concluded that it had been caused by Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). Subsequent investigation in the area of the rupture revealed that colonies of cracks, typical of SCC were found in pipes located near the rupture. In order to put back in service the pipeline in a safety condition, SCC mitigation activities were performed. A decision was made to conduct a hydro test along approximately 30 kilometers of pipe. The stages of the works, the problems faced and the solutions found are dealt with, as well as the conclusions reached upon completion of the works which allowed a better understanding of SCC phenomenon. The methodology for the identification of those areas susceptible to SCC is also described. (author)

  1. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  2. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    Mehta, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical basis for differentiation between hydrogen embrittlement and active path corrosion or anodic dissolution crack growth mechanisms is examined. The consequences of recently demonstrated acidification in crack tip region irrespective of electrochemical conditions at the bulk surface of the sample are that the hydrogen can evolve within the crack and may be involved in the cracking process. There are basically three aspects of hydrogen involvement in stress corrosion cracking. In dissolution models crack propagation is assumed to be caused by anodic dissolution on the crack tip sustained by cathodic reduction of hydrogen from electrolyte within the crack. In hydrogen induced structural transformation models it is postulated that hydrogen is absorbed locally at the crack tip producing structural changes which facilitate crack propagation. In hydrogen embrittlement models hydrogen is absorbed by stressed metal from proton reduction from the electrolyte within the crack and there is interaction between lattice and hydrogen resulting in embrittlement of material at crack tip facilitating crack propagation. In the present paper, the role of hydrogen in stress corrosion crack growth in high strength steels, austenitic stainless steels, titanium alloys and high strength aluminium alloys is discussed. (author)

  3. Hydrazine and hydrogen coinjection to mitigate stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in boiling water reactors (7). Effects of bulk water chemistry on ECP distribution inside a crack

    Wada, Yoichi; Ishida, Kazushige; Tachibana, Masahiko; Aizawa, Motohiro; Fuse, Motomasa

    2007-01-01

    Water chemistry in a simulated crack (crack) has been studied to understand the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor environment. Electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) in a crack made in an austenite type 304 stainless steel specimen was measured. The ECP distribution along the simulated crack was strongly affected by bulk water chemistry and bulk flow. When oxygen concentration was high in the bulk water, the potential difference between the crack tip and the outside of the crack (ΔE), which must be one motive force for crack growth, was about 0.3V under a stagnant condition. When oxygen was removed from the bulk water, ECP inside and outside the crack became low and uniform and ΔE became small. The outside ECP was also lowered by depositing platinum on the steel specimen surface and adding stoichiometrically excess hydrogen to oxygen to lower ΔE. This was effective only when bulk water did not flow. Under the bulk water flow condition, water-borne oxygen caused an increase in ECP on the untreated surface inside the crack. This also caused a large ΔE. The ΔE effect was confirmed by crack growth rate measurements with a catalyst-treated specimen. Therefore, lowering the bulk oxidant concentration by such measures as hydrazine hydrogen coinjection, which is currently under development, is important for suppressing the crack growth. (author)

  4. Virtual Instrumentation Corrosion Controller for Natural Gas Pipelines

    Gopalakrishnan, J.; Agnihotri, G.; Deshpande, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Corrosion is an electrochemical process. Corrosion in natural gas (methane) pipelines leads to leakages. Corrosion occurs when anode and cathode are connected through electrolyte. Rate of corrosion in metallic pipeline can be controlled by impressing current to it and thereby making it to act as cathode of corrosion cell. Technologically advanced and energy efficient corrosion controller is required to protect natural gas pipelines. Proposed virtual instrumentation (VI) based corrosion controller precisely controls the external corrosion in underground metallic pipelines, enhances its life and ensures safety. Designing and development of proportional-integral-differential (PID) corrosion controller using VI (LabVIEW) is carried out. When the designed controller is deployed at field, it maintains the pipe to soil potential (PSP) within safe operating limit and not entering into over/under protection zone. Horizontal deployment of this technique can be done to protect all metallic structure, oil pipelines, which need corrosion protection.

  5. Thermo-Structural Response Caused by Structure Gap and Gap Design for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzles

    Lin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-structural response of solid rocket motor nozzles is widely investigated in the design of modern rockets, and many factors related to the material properties have been considered. However, little work has been done to evaluate the effects of structure gaps on the generation of flame leaks. In this paper, a numerical simulation was performed by the finite element method to study the thermo-structural response of a typical nozzle with consideration of the structure gap. Initial boundary conditions for thermo-structural simulation were defined by a quasi-1D model, and then coupled simulations of different gap size matching modes were conducted. It was found that frictional interface treatment could efficiently reduce the stress level. Based on the defined flame leak criteria, gap size optimization was carried out, and the best gap matching mode was determined for designing the nozzle. Testing experiment indicated that the simulation results from the proposed method agreed well with the experimental results. It is believed that the simulation method is effective for investigating thermo-structural responses, as well as designing proper gaps for solid rocket motor nozzles.

  6. Effect of sputtering power on structure, adhesion strength and corrosion resistance of nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon thin films.

    Khun, N W; Liu, E

    2011-06-01

    Nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) thin films were deposited on highly conductive p-Si substrates using a DC magnetron sputtering deposition system. The DLC:N films were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurement and micro-scratch test. The XPS and Raman results indicated that the sputtering power significantly influenced the properties of the films in terms of bonding configuration in the films. The corrosion performance of the DLC:N films was investigated in a 0.6 M NaCl solution by means of potentiodynamic polarization testing. It was found that the corrosion performance of the films could be enhanced by higher sputtering powers.

  7. Corrosion detection of steel reinforced concrete using combined carbon fiber and fiber Bragg grating active thermal probe

    Li, Weijie; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Song, Gangbing

    2016-01-01

    Steel reinforcement corrosion is one of the dominant causes for structural deterioration for reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a novel corrosion detection technique using an active thermal probe. The technique takes advantage of the fact that corrosion products have poor thermal conductivity, which will impede heat propagation generated from the active thermal probe. At the same time, the active thermal probe records the temperature response. The presence of corrosion products can thus be detected by analyzing the temperature response after the injection of heat at the reinforcement-concrete interface. The feasibility of the proposed technique was firstly analyzed through analytical modeling and finite element simulation. The active thermal probe consisted of carbon fiber strands to generate heat and a fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor. Carbon fiber strands are used due to their corrosion resistance. Wet-dry cycle accelerated corrosion experiments were performed to study the effect of corrosion products on the temperature response of the reinforced concrete sample. Results suggest a high correlation between corrosion severity and magnitude of the temperature response. The technique has the merits of high accuracy, high efficiency in measurement and excellent embeddability. (paper)

  8. Corrosion in seawater systems

    Henrikson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels have been exposed to natural chlorinated and chlorine-free seawater at 35 deg. C. Simulated tube-tubesheet joints, weld joints and galvanic couples with titanium, 90/10 CuNi and NiAl bronze were tested and evaluated for corrosion. The corrosion rates of various anode materials - zinc, aluminium and soft iron - were also determined. Finally the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of tubes of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection was studied. An attempt was also made to explain the cracking mechanism of the ferritic steels by means of transmission electron microscopy. One important conclusion of the project is that chlorinated seawater is considerably more corrosive to stainless steels than chlorine-free water, whereas chlorination reduces the rate of galvanic corrosion of copper materials coupled to stainless steels. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection of carbon steel or cast iron in the same structure can be avoided by strict potentiostatic control of the applied potential. (author)

  9. Internal corrosion control of northern pipelines

    Papavinasam, S.

    2005-02-01

    The general causes of internal corrosion in pipelines were discussed along with the methods to control them. Efficient methods are needed to determine chemical efficiency for mitigating internal corrosion in transmission pipelines, particularly those used in environmentally sensitive regions in the Arctic where harsh environmental conditions prevail. According to the Office of Pipeline Safety, 15 per cent of pipeline failures in the United States from 1994 to 2000 were caused by internal corrosion. Since pipelines in the United States are slightly older than Canadian pipelines, internal corrosion is a significant issue from a Canadian perspective. There are 306,618 km of energy-related pipelines in western Canada. Between April 2001 and March 2002 there were 808 failures, of which 425 failures resulted from internal corrosion. The approach to control internal corrosion comprises of dehydrating the gases at production facilities; controlling the quality of corrosive gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide; and, using internal coatings. The approaches to control internal corrosion are appropriate, when supplemented by adequate integrity management program to ensure that corrosive liquids do not collect, over the operational lifetime of the pipelines, at localized areas. It was suggested that modeling of pipeline operations may need improvement. This paper described the causes, prediction and control of internal pitting corrosion. It was concluded that carbon steel equipment can continue to be used reliably and safely as pipeline materials for northern pipelines if the causes that lead to internal corrosion are scientifically and accurately predicted, and if corrosion inhibitors are properly evaluated and applied. 5 figs.

  10. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  11. The study of intergranular corrosion in aircraft aluminium alloys using X-ray tomography

    Knight, S.P.; Salagaras, M.; Trueman, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → IGC is stochastic, where initiation is statistical and growth kinetics was somewhat predictable. → Dissolved oxygen concentration was more important than the concentration of salt in the droplet. → A limiting depth occurred for AA2024, whereas no limiting depth occurs for AA7050 after 168 h exposure. → A limiting depth may be controlled by the transport of dissolved oxygen down the corrosion fissure. → A limiting IGC depth is dependent on the overpotential of the SDZ (adjacent to the grain boundary). - Abstract: Atmospheric corrosion is one of the leading causes of structural damage to aircraft. Of particular importance is pitting and intergranular corrosion, which can develop into fatigue cracks, stress corrosion cracks, or exfoliation. Therefore it is of interest to the Australian Defence Force (ADF) to understand how corrosion ensues in susceptible aircraft aluminium alloys, such as AA2024-T351 and 7050-T7451. However, there are many difficulties in measuring the extent of intergranular corrosion, since it is predominantly hidden below the surface. Traditionally, cross-sectioning has been used to view and measure the depth of attack. In the present work, 2 mm diameter pin specimens were contaminated with a droplet of 3.5% NaCl and exposed to constant humidity that resulted in intergranular corrosion. X-ray computed tomography was then used to non-destructively assess the depth and volume of corrosion both as a function of time in 97% relative humidity, and as a function of relative humidity after 168 h exposure. Both corrosion depth and volume increased with time, but there was evidence for a limiting depth in AA2024. Depth and volume also increased with relative humidity of the environment, for which the time-of-wetness and oxygen concentration of the droplets were considered the important factors in driving the corrosion process.

  12. Owner and Contractor Perceptions Toward Factors Causing Delays in Structural and Finishing Works

    Loanata V.R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A construction project comprises of a number of work packages, which are subjected to delays. These delays may be caused by many on-site factors. The aim of this research is to represent owner and contractors perceptions towards delay factors that frequently occur in structural and finishing works. Data for analysis were gathered by distributing questionnaire. A total of 198 sets of questionnaire were gathered and used for subsequent analyses. In general, design changes during construction are perceived by respondents as the most frequent factor to cause delay in all structural and finishing works. The results also show that there are a number of differences between owner’s and contractor’s perceptions towards the occurrences of the factors. Whilst most contractors concern that information factors related to project design and scope frequently causing delays in construction works, owners consider many contractor originated factors, as most frequent delay causes.

  13. Testing and diagnosis of the cause of increased vibration of the fan plant's support structure

    Varju Đerđ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a procedure of determining the causes of increased vibration of a fan plant and its support structure in the PUC 'Subotička toplana'. Excessive vibrations were observed following the installation of the frequency converter, thus a methodological approach of testing-analysis-diagnosis has been applied. Based on the definition of the causes of this problem, the paper also suggests possible repair procedures.

  14. Effects of gaseous nitriding AISI4140 alloy steel on corrosion and hardness properties

    Tamil Moli, L.; Wahab, N.; Gopinathan, M.; Karmegam, K.; Maniyarasi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Corrosion is one of the major problems in the industry especially on machinery since it weakens the structure of the machinery part and causes the mechanical failure. This will stop the production and increase the maintenance cost. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of gas nitriding on a screw press machine shaft made from AISI 4140 steel was investigated. Pitting corrosion was identified as a major cause of the shaft failure and this study was conducted to improve the corrosion resistance on the AISI 4140 alloy steel shaft by gas nitriding as a surface hardening treatment. Gas nitriding was performed with composition of 15% ammonia and 85% nitrogen at temperatures of 525 °C, 550 °C and 575 °C and with the soaking time of 30, 45 and 60 minutes, respectively. The samples were prepared as rectangular sized of 30mm x 12mm x 3mm for immersion testing. The results showed that corrosion rate of untreated samples was 77% higher compared to the nitrided samples. It was also found that hardness of the nitrided samples was higher than untreated sample. All in all, it can be concluded that gaseous nitriding can significantly improve the surface hardness and the corrosion resistance of the shaft made of AISI 4140 alloy steel, hence reduces the pitting that is the root cause of failure.

  15. Failure Modes in Concrete Repair Systems due to Ongoing Corrosion

    Mladena Luković

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It can result in cracking and spalling of the concrete cover. After the damaged cover is repaired, reinforcement corrosion might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion cell is difficult to control, the damage can be possibly delayed and controlled by use of a suitable repair material. The lattice fracture model is used in this paper to investigate the performance of strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC in concrete repair systems exposed to ongoing corrosion. Numerical results were verified by experimental tests when SHCC, nonreinforced material (repair mortar, and commercial repair mortar are used as repair materials. In experiments, reinforcement bars (surrounded by a repair material were exposed to accelerated corrosion tests. The influence of the substrate surface preparation, the type of repair material, the interface, and the substrate strength on the resulting damage and failure mode of repair systems are discussed. In general, SHCC repair enables distributed cracking with small crack widths, up to several times smaller compared to repair mortar. Furthermore, more warning signs prior to the final failure are present in the SHCC repair system.

  16. Corrosion in power engineering

    1988-03-01

    The proceedings contain the full texts of 25 papers of which 10 fall under the INIS Subject Scope. They concern the problems of corrosion in WWER type nuclear power plants. The topics include structural materials and equipment of the primary and the secondary circuits of nuclear power plants, components used in disposal of spent nuclear fuel, sodium valves for fast reactors and basic study of the properties of materials used in nuclear power. (Z.M.). 12 figs., 6 tabs., 46 refs

  17. Corrosion of steel in cracked concrete: a microscale study

    Pacheco, J.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Polder, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of concrete cracking upon reinforcement corrosion is complex. Cracks allow fast penetration of chlorides, potentially leading to a shorter initiation period of reinforcement corrosion. Structural regulations control acceptable crack width values based on the exposure class of the

  18. Corrosion and Corrosion-Fatigue Behavior of 7075 Aluminum Alloys Studied by In Situ X-Ray Tomography

    Stannard, Tyler

    7XXX Aluminum alloys have high strength to weight ratio and low cost. They are used in many critical structural applications including automotive and aerospace components. These applications frequently subject the alloys to static and cyclic loading in service. Additionally, the alloys are often subjected to aggressive corrosive environments such as saltwater spray. These chemical and mechanical exposures have been known to cause premature failure in critical applications. Hence, the microstructural behavior of the alloys under combined chemical attack and mechanical loading must be characterized further. Most studies to date have analyzed the microstructure of the 7XXX alloys using two dimensional (2D) techniques. While 2D studies yield valuable insights about the properties of the alloys, they do not provide sufficiently accurate results because the microstructure is three dimensional and hence its response to external stimuli is also three dimensional (3D). Relevant features of the alloys include the grains, subgrains, intermetallic inclusion particles, and intermetallic precipitate particles. The effects of microstructural features on corrosion pitting and corrosion fatigue of aluminum alloys has primarily been studied using 2D techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) surface analysis along with post-mortem SEM fracture surface analysis to estimate the corrosion pit size and fatigue crack initiation site. These studies often limited the corrosion-fatigue testing to samples in air or specialized solutions, because samples tested in NaCl solution typically have fracture surfaces covered in corrosion product. Recent technological advancements allow observation of the microstructure, corrosion and crack behavior of aluminum alloys in solution in three dimensions over time (4D). In situ synchrotron X-Ray microtomography was used to analyze the corrosion and cracking behavior of the alloy in four dimensions to elucidate crack initiation at corrosion pits

  19. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  20. Electrochemical studies of the corrosion behavior of the fine-grained structural steel DIN W.Nr. 1.0566 between 55 and 90deg C in simulated salt brine repository environments

    Farvaque-Bera, A.M.; Leistikow, S.

    1991-05-01

    The electrochemical corrosion of the fine-grained structural steel DIN W. Nr. 1.0566 was tested between 55 and 90deg C in three simulated salt brines of similar compositions as analyzed for the Gorleben repository environment. As test parameters the temperature, the salt brine composition, the stirring velocity and the oxygen content as well as the state of the steel surface were varied. As experimental results are presented: (1) the free corrosion potentials of the steel in three brines, (2) Tafel plots of current densities as measured potentiodynamically in the anodic and cathodic vicinity of the corrosion potentials and being representative for the rate of metal dissolution, (3) the surface morphology of the corroded specimens. As mechanisms - in the absence of oxygen - the cathodic reduction of water and the anodic dissolution of iron are considered to prevail the corrosion reaction. It is shown that the applied electrochemical techniques are able to determine within an accelerated procedure the most important corrosion parameters in respect to their influence on rate of metal dissolution and morphology of corrosion attack. (orig.) [de

  1. Studies of corrosion resistance of Japanese steels in liquid lead-bismuth

    Kamata, Kin-ya; Ono, Hiroshi; Kitano, Teruaki; Ono, Mikinori

    2003-01-01

    Liquid lead-bismuth has attractive characteristics as a coolant in future fast reactors and Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems (ADS) applications. The corrosion behavior of structural materials in lead-bismuth eutectic is one of key problems in developing nuclear power plants and installations using lead-bismuth coolant. Our experiences with heat exchangers using liquid lead-bismuth and the results of corrosion tests of Japanese steels are reported in this paper. A series of corrosion tests was carried out in collaboration with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE). Test specimens of various Japanese steels were exposed in a non-isothermal forced circulation loop. The influence of maximum temperature and oxygen content in lead bismuth were chosen for study as the primary causes of corrosion in Japanese steels. After the corrosion tests, corrosion behavior was analyzed by visual inspection, measurement of weight loss and metallurgical examination of the microstructure of the corroded zone. The corrosion mechanism in liquid lead bismuth is discussed on the basis of the metallurgical examination of the corroded zone. (author)

  2. Assessment of Corrosion Characteristics and Development of Remedial Technologies in Nuclear Materials

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, J. S.; Lim, Y. S. (and others)

    2007-04-15

    In general, materials having superior resistance to corrosion are used for main components and structures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) to improve their safety. During long-term operations in the high temperature and pressure environment, however, localized-corrosion related degradations occur frequently in those materials, leading to unexpected shutdown of the plants. The unexpected shutdowns may lower the operating efficiency of the power generation and expand the repair period, which results in a huge economical loss. Moreover, since the damages may cause a leakage of the primary coolant that brings about a contamination by radioactive substances, the corrosion related degradations of structural materials have become a menace to the safety of NPPs. The steam generator tubes forming a boundary between the primary and secondary sides of NPPs are one of the main components that are most damaged by corrosion. Therefore, it is strongly required to verify the degradation mechanisms of Alloy 182 and Alloy 600 materials used in the steam generator tubes and primary systems, to establish remedial techniques for the degradations, to manage the damages, and to develop techniques for the extension of the plant's life. In this study, (1) the assessment techniques of corrosion damages were improved and the database of the obtained results were established. (2) The basic technologies of the management of corrosion damages were developed for the practical use. (3) The fundamental technologies for inhibition and repair of corrosion damages were also developed. The results of this project are applicable to the assessment, failure analysis and life estimation of the materials against corrosion damages. The assessment data obtained in this work are available for the technical references of the corrosion failures of components in NPPs during operation. Furthermore, it is applicable to establish materials design requirements, to establish the optimum operation condition and to

  3. Effect of the chemistry and structure of the native oxide surface film on the corrosion properties of commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys

    Feliu, Sebastian, E-mail: sfeliu@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maffiotte, C. [CIEMAT-DT edificio 30, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Samaniego, A.; Galvan, Juan Carlos [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barranco, Violeta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study has been to advance in knowledge of the chemical composition, structure and thickness of the thin native oxide film formed spontaneously in contact with the laboratory atmosphere on the surface of freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to furthering the understanding of protection mechanisms. For comparative purposes, and to more fully describe the behaviour of the native oxide film, the external oxide films formed as a result of the manufacturing process (as-received condition) have been characterised. The technique applied in this research to study the thin oxide films (thickness of just a few nanometres) present on the surface of the alloys has basically been XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in combination with ion sputtering. Corrosion properties of the alloys were studied in 0.6 M NaCl by measuring charge transfer resistance values, which are deduced from EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) measurements after 1 h of exposure. Alloy AZ61 generally showed better corrosion resistance than AZ31, and the freshly polished alloys showed better corrosion resistance than the alloys in as-received condition. This is attributed to a combination of (1) higher thickness of the native oxide film on the AZ61 alloy and (2) greater uniformity of the oxide film in the polished condition. The formation of an additional oxide layer composed by a mixture of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and MgO seems to diminish the protective properties of the passive layer on the surface of the alloys in as-received condition.

  4. Effect of the chemistry and structure of the native oxide surface film on the corrosion properties of commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys

    Feliu, Sebastian; Maffiotte, C.; Samaniego, A.; Galvan, Juan Carlos; Barranco, Violeta

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study has been to advance in knowledge of the chemical composition, structure and thickness of the thin native oxide film formed spontaneously in contact with the laboratory atmosphere on the surface of freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to furthering the understanding of protection mechanisms. For comparative purposes, and to more fully describe the behaviour of the native oxide film, the external oxide films formed as a result of the manufacturing process (as-received condition) have been characterised. The technique applied in this research to study the thin oxide films (thickness of just a few nanometres) present on the surface of the alloys has basically been XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in combination with ion sputtering. Corrosion properties of the alloys were studied in 0.6 M NaCl by measuring charge transfer resistance values, which are deduced from EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) measurements after 1 h of exposure. Alloy AZ61 generally showed better corrosion resistance than AZ31, and the freshly polished alloys showed better corrosion resistance than the alloys in as-received condition. This is attributed to a combination of (1) higher thickness of the native oxide film on the AZ61 alloy and (2) greater uniformity of the oxide film in the polished condition. The formation of an additional oxide layer composed by a mixture of spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) and MgO seems to diminish the protective properties of the passive layer on the surface of the alloys in as-received condition.

  5. Structural evolution, thermomechanical recrystallization and electrochemical corrosion properties of Ni-Cu-Mg amorphous coating on mild steel fabricated by dual-anode electrolytic processing

    Abdulwahab, M., E-mail: mabdulwahab@abu.edu.ng [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria (Nigeria); Fayomi, O.S.I., E-mail: ojosundayfayomi3@gmail.com [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Covenant University, Ota (Nigeria); Popoola, A.P.I., E-mail: popoolaapi@tut.ac.za [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • The surface of the coat containing Ni-Cu-Mg alloy on mild steel have sufficiently enhanced the properties. • Isothermally treated composites demonstrated 45% increase in the micro-hardness and 79.6% corrosion resistance. • The thermal stability of the developed Ni-Cu-Mg thin films on mild steel was excellent. - Abstract: The electrolytic Ni-Cu based alloy coating with admixed interfacial blend of Mg have been successfully prepared on mild steel substrate by dual anode electroplating processes over a range of applied current density and dwell time. The electrocodeposition of Ni-Cu-Mg coating was investigated in the presence of other bath additives. The influence of deposition current on surface morphology, adhesion behavior, preferred crystal orientation, surface topography and electrochemical activity of Ni-Cu-Mg alloy coating on mild steel were systematically examined. The thermal stability of the developed composite materials was examined via isothermal treatment. Scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS, X-ray diffraction, Atomic force microscope, micro-hardness tester and 3 μmetrohm Potentiostat/galvanostat were used to compare untreated and isothermally treated electrocodeposited composite. The induced activity of the Ni-Cu-Mg alloy changed the surface modification and results to crystal precipitation within the structural interface by the formation of Cu{sub ,} Ni{sub 2}Mg{sub 3} phase. The obtained results showed that the introduction of Mg particles in the plating bath generally modified the surface and brings an increase in the hardness and corrosion resistance of Ni-Cu-Mg layers fabricated. Equally, isothermally treated composites demonstrated an improved properties indicating 45% increase in the micro-hardness and 79.6% corrosion resistance which further showed that the developed composite is thermally stable.

  6. Protecting solar collector systems from corrosion

    1978-01-01

    The main cause of the reduced life of a solar heating system is corrosion of the exterior parts and the internal components. This report outlines ways of reducing the cost of solar heating by reducing the corrosion in solar heating systems, and hence increasing the system's service life. Mechanisms for corrosion are discussed: these include galvanic corrosion and crevice corrosion. Means of minimizing corrosion at the design stage are then described. Such methods, when designing the solar collector, involve ensuring proper drainage of exterior water; eliminating situations where moisture, dirt and pollutants may collect; preventing condensation inside the collector; using proper gaskets and sealants at appropriate places; and selecting optimum materials and coatings. Interior corrosion can be minimized at the design stage by choosing a good heat transfer fluid and corrosion inhibitor, in the case of systems where liquids are used; ensuring a low enough flow rate to avoid erosion; designing the system to avoid crevices; and avoiding situations where galvanic corrosion could occur. Other procedures are given for minimizing corrosion in the construction and operation of solar heating systems. 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Impaired skin capillary recruitment in essential hypertension is caused by both functional and structural capillary rarefaction

    Serne, EH; Gans, ROB; ter Maaten, JC; Tangelder, GJ; Donker, AJM; Stehouwer, CDA

    Capillary rarefaction occurs in many tissues in patients with essential hypertension and may contribute to an increased vascular resistance and impaired muscle metabolism. Rarefaction may be caused by a structural (anatomic) absence of capillaries, functional nonperfusion, or both. The aim of this

  8. Structural changes of organic solids caused by irradiation: raman study at very low temperatures

    Hase, Hirotomo; Ishioka, Kunie; Miyatake, Yoko.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we first describe a simple liquid helium cryostat and a device of making and mounting organic solid samples. We then present the Raman spectra for irradiated ethanol crystal that were obtained by using the new cryostat and demonstrate how the Raman method is useful for getting insight into structural changes of organic solids caused by irradiation. (J.P.N.)

  9. Vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedures for automotive in Malaysia

    Anuar Liza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated corrosion test, known as proving ground accelerated test, is commonly performed by automotive manufacturers to evaluate the corrosion performance of a vehicle. The test combines corrosion and durability inputs to detect potential failures that may occur during in-service conditions. Currently, the test is conducted at an external test center overseas. Such test is aimed to simulate the effects of one year accelerated corrosion in severe corrosive environment of the north-east and south east of America. However, the test results obtained do not correlate with the actual corrosion conditions observed in the Malaysian market, which is likely attributed to the different test environment of the tropical climate of vehicles in service. Therefore, a vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedure that suits the Malaysian market is proposed and benchmarked with other global car manufacturers that have their own dedicated corrosion test procedure. In the present work, a test track is used as the corrosion test ground and consists of various types of roads for structural durability exposures. Corrosion related facilities like salt trough, mud trough and gravel road are constructed as addition to the existing facilities. The establishment of accelerated corrosion test facilities has contributed to the development of initial accelerated corrosion test procedure for the national car manufacturer. The corrosion exposure is monitored by fitting test coupons at the underbody of test vehicle using mass loss technique so that the desired corrosion rate capable of simulating the real time corrosion effects for its target market.

  10. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  11. Analysis of the causes and recommendations on elimination of biological damage of structures during the repair and reconstruction of the State Biological Museum in Moscow.

    Kamskov Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of mycological research on buildings of the State Biological Museum located in Moscow. The problems have been considered as for a complex of buildings of the State Biological Museum built in the late nineteenth century which, to the present time, has been operated almost in its original form. Over time, the building maintenance conditions have worsened, in particular because of construction of high-rise buildings in the immediate vicinity of the museum, as well as construction of a greenhouse above the underground passage tunnel between buildings 1 and 2. Over the years, the temperature gradients, high humidity, wear and damage of wall waterproofing and foundations have caused leaks in the underpass tunnel and the biological corrosion of stone, wood and metal structures in indoor exhibition halls. In this connection, part of the survey was to determine the types and size of biological lesions in structures, determination of the causes of biological damage, and the development of measures to eliminate the mycological problems during repair and reconstruction works in the museum.

  12. Durability evaluation method on rebar corrosion of reinforced concrete

    Kitsutaka, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, method on the durability evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures was investigated. In view of the importance of evaluating the degree of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, relationships should be formulated among the number of years elapsed, t, the amount of action of a deteriorative factor, F, the degree of material deterioration, D, and the performance of the structure, P. Evaluation by PDFt diagrams combining these relationships may be effective. A detailed procedure of durability evaluation for a reinforced concrete structure using PDFt concept is presented for the deterioration of rebar corrosion caused by neutralization and penetration of salinity by referring to the recent papers. (author)

  13. Emerging Corrosion Inhibitors for Interfacial Coating

    Mona Taghavikish

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is a deterioration of a metal due to reaction with environment. The use of corrosion inhibitors is one of the most effective ways of protecting metal surfaces against corrosion. Their effectiveness is related to the chemical composition, their molecular structures and affinities for adsorption on the metal surface. This review focuses on the potential of ionic liquid, polyionic liquid (PIL and graphene as promising corrosion inhibitors in emerging coatings due to their remarkable properties and various embedment or fabrication strategies. The review begins with a precise description of the synthesis, characterization and structure-property-performance relationship of such inhibitors for anti-corrosion coatings. It establishes a platform for the formation of new generation of PIL based coatings and shows that PIL corrosion inhibitors with various heteroatoms in different form can be employed for corrosion protection with higher barrier properties and protection of metal surface. However, such study is still in its infancy and there is significant scope to further develop new structures of PIL based corrosion inhibitors and coatings and study their behaviour in protection of metals. Besides, it is identified that the combination of ionic liquid, PIL and graphene could possibly contribute to the development of the ultimate corrosion inhibitor based coating.

  14. Electrochemical Characterisation of Filiform Corrosion on Aluminium Rolled Products

    Huisert, M.

    2001-01-01

    When aluminium is protected by an organic coating a special form of corrosion can occur underneath the organic coating; filiform corrosion. This form of corrosion manifests itself as threadlike filaments under the coating, it causes local delamination of the coating and the coating cannot protect

  15. The Leakage determination on corrosion fretting machine

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Hafid, Abdul; Febrianto; Prasetio, Joko; Abtokhi; Sumarno, Edy; Handoyo, Ismu; Hidayati, Nur Rahmah; Histori

    1998-01-01

    Fretting machine is an experimental loop to learn fretting corrosion phenomena wich is caused by loading and vibration. On the steam generator, one of the corrosion process that's occurred, it can be caused by vibration between tubes and bending material. Because of high flow rate inside the tube, the high frequency vibration will appeared so it can make the corrosion on bending material more faster. This process can be simulate by fretting machine. This machine has already damage because of leakage. So it will be repaired by dismantling, radiography testing and redrawing. from the result of radiography, the leakage is caused by cracking on bellows seals of the dynamic main support

  16. Structure, apatite inducing ability, and corrosion behavior of chitosan/halloysite nanotube coatings prepared by electrophoretic deposition on titanium substrate.

    Molaei, A; Amadeh, A; Yari, M; Reza Afshar, M

    2016-02-01

    In this study chitosan/halloysite nanotube composite (CS/HNT) coatings were deposited by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on titanium substrate. Using HNT particles were investigated as new substituents for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in chitosan matrix coatings. The ability of chitosan as a stabilizing, charging, and blending agent for HNT particles was exploited. Furthermore, the effects of pH, electrophoretic bath, and sonicating duration were studied on the deposition of suspensions containing HNT particles. Microstructure properties of coatings showed uniform distribution of HNT particles in chitosan matrix to form smooth nanocomposite coatings. The zeta potential results revealed that at pH around 3 there is an isoelectric point for HNT and it would have cathodic and anionic states at pH values less and more than 3, respectively. Therefore, CS/HNT composite deposits were produced in the pH range of 2.5 to 3. The apatite inducing ability of chitosan-HNT composite coating assigned that HNT particles were biocompatible because they formed carbonated hydroxyapatite particles on CS/HNT coating in corrected simulated body fluid (C-SBF). Finally, electrochemical corrosion characterizations determined that corrosion resistance in CS/HNT coating has been improved compared to bare titanium substrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Local damage to reinforced concrete structures caused by impact of aircraft engine missiles. Pt. 2

    Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Itoh, C.; Shirai, K.; Von Riesemann, W.A.; Bickel, D.C.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Three sets of impact tests, small-, intermediate-, and full-scale tests, have been executed to determine local damage to reinforced concrete structures caused by the impact of aircraft engine missiles. The results of the test program showed that (1) the use of the similarity law is appropriate, (2) suitable empirical formulas exist for predicting the local damage caused by rigid missiles, (3) reduction factors may be used for evaluating the reduction in local damage due to the deformability of the engines, (4) the reinforcement ratio has no effect on local damage, and (5) the test results could be adequately predicted using nonlinear response analysis. (orig.)

  18. Prediction of Corrosion Resistance of Concrete Containing Natural Pozzolan from Compressive Strength

    al-Swaidani, A. M.; Ismat, R.; Diyab, M. E.; Aliyan, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    A lot of Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures in Syria have suffered from reinforcement corrosion which shortened significantly their service lives. Probably, one of the most effective approaches to make concrete structures more durable and concrete industry on the whole - more sustainable is to substitute pozzolan for a portion of Portland cement (PC). Syria is relatively rich in natural pozzolan. In the study, in order to predict the corrosion resistance from compressive strength, concrete specimens were produced with seven cement types: one plain Portland cement (control) and six natural pozzolan-based cements with replacement levels ranging from 10 to 35%. The development of the compressive strengths of concrete cube specimens with curing time has been investigated. Chloride penetrability has also been evaluated for all concrete mixes after three curing times of 7, 28 and 90 days. The effect on resistance of concrete against damage caused by corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel has been investigated using an accelerated corrosion test by impressing a constant anodic potential for 7, 28 and 90 days curing. Test results have been statistically analysed and correlation equations relating compressive strength and corrosion performance have been developed. Significant correlations have been noted between the compressive strength and both rapid chloride penetrability and corrosion initiation times. So, this prediction could be reliable in concrete mix design when using natural pozzolan as cement replacement.

  19. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete u...

  20. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  1. Structural consequences of amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    Ohno, Kazuki; Saito, Seiji; Sugawara, Kanako; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    To determine the structural changes in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase due to amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease, we built structural models of mutant alpha-subunits resulting from 33 missense mutations (24 infantile and 9 late-onset), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid replacement on the structure by calculating the number of atoms affected and determining the solvent-accessible surface area of the corresponding amino acid residue in the wild-type alpha-subunit. In the infantile Tay-Sachs group, the number of atoms influenced by a mutation was generally larger than that in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group in both the main chain and the side chain, and residues associated with the mutations found in the infantile Tay-Sachs group tended to be less solvent-accessible than those in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group. Furthermore, color imaging determined the distribution and degree of the structural changes caused by representative amino acid substitutions, and that there were also differences between the infantile and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease groups. Structural study is useful for elucidating the basis of Tay-Sachs disease.

  2. Alloy Microstructure Dictates Corrosion Modes in THA Modular Junctions.

    Pourzal, Robin; Hall, Deborah J; Ehrich, Jonas; McCarthy, Stephanie M; Mathew, Mathew T; Jacobs, Joshua J; Urban, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) triggered by corrosion products from modular taper junctions are a known cause of premature THA failure. CoCrMo devices are of particular concern because cobalt ions and chromium-orthophosphates were shown to be linked to ALTRs, even in metal-on-polyethylene THAs. The most common categories of CoCrMo alloy are cast and wrought alloy, which exhibit fundamental microstructural differences in terms of grain size and hard phases. The impact of implant alloy microstructure on the occurring modes of corrosion and subsequent metal ion release is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether (1) the microstructure of cast CoCrMo alloy varies broadly between manufacturers and can dictate specific corrosion modes; and whether (2) the microstructure of wrought CoCrMo alloy is more consistent between manufacturers and has low implications on the alloy's corrosion behavior. The alloy microstructure of four femoral-stem and three femoral-head designs from four manufacturers was metallographically and electrochemically characterized. Three stem designs were made from cast alloy; all three head designs and one stem design were made from wrought alloy. Alloy samples were sectioned from retrieved components and then polished and etched to visualize grain structure and hard phases such as carbides (eg, M 23 C 6 ) or intermetallic phases (eg, σ phase). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) tests were conducted to determine the corrosion potential (E corr ), corrosion current density (I corr ), and pitting potential (E pit ) for each alloy. Four devices were tested within each group, and each measurement was repeated three times to ensure repeatable results. Differences in PDP metrics between manufacturers and between alloys with different hard phase contents were compared using one-way analysis of variance and independent-sample t-tests. Microstructural features such as twin boundaries and slip bands as well as corrosion

  3. Structural changes in connective tissues caused by a moderate laser heating

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N; Bagratashvili, N V; Sviridov, A P; Shakh, G Sh; Ignat'eva, Natalia Yu; Lunin, Valery V; Grokhovskaya, T E; Averkiev, S V

    2002-01-01

    The structural changes in adipose and fibrous tissues caused by 2- and 3-W IR laser irradiation are studied by the methods of IR and Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is shown that heating of fibrous tissue samples to 50 0 C and adipose tissue samples to 75 0 C by IR laser radiation changes the supramolecular structure of their proteins and triacylglycerides, respectively, without the intramolecular bond breaking. Heating of fibrous tissue to 70 0 C and adipose tissue to 90 - 110 0 C leads to a partial reversible denaturation of proteins and to oxidation of fats.

  4. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in ship ballast tanks

    Heyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is known to be a dangerous process in ship tanks due to its rapid and yet unpredictable occurrence, leading to extremely fast local corrosion, possibly jeopardizing the structural integrity, in a relatively short time. This project focuses on a

  5. Localized corrosion problems in water reactors

    Coriou, Henri.

    1977-01-01

    Main localized etching on the structure materials of water reactors are studied: stress corrosion on stainless steel 304 (B.W.R), stress corrosion, 'wall thinning' and denting of Inconel 600 vapor generator tubes (P.W.R.). Some mechanisms are examined and practical exemples in reactors are described. Various possible cures are presented [fr

  6. Investigations of the changes in the bentonite structure caused by the different treatments

    Stojiljković S.; Stamenković M.; Kostić D.; Miljković M.; Arsić B.; Savić I.; Savić I.

    2015-01-01

    The bentonite was treated in different ways and the changes in structure were monitored. Acid activation with sulphuric acid of investigated bentonite caused the increase in specific volume of micropore-mesopore. It was shown that activation by acid obtained at a constant temperature and constant period of time provides the possibility to obtain samples of bentonite of searched porosity only by changing the concentration of sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. ...

  7. New corrosion issues in gas sweetening plants

    Asperger, R.G. (CLI International and Asperger Technologies, Houston, TX (United States))

    Gas treating plants are experiencing corrosion problems which impact on efficiency and safety. While general corrosion is not particularly hazardous in the gas processing industry, local corrosion is very dangerous since it has several different mechanisms, all of which have dangerously high rates, and it occurs at locations which are hard to find and hard to predict. A newly discovered, velocity-dependent type of corrosion is reported. It is related to yet-undefined species which cause excessively high corrosion in areas of turbulence. This accelerated corrosion is not due to erosion or cavitation, but to a diffusion-limited reaction accelerated by turbulence. A full-flow test loop was built to evaluate the corrosiveness of gas plant solutions at their normal temperature and flow rates. Test runs were conducted with Co[sub 2]-loaded amine solutions for periods of 12 days. Carbon steel specimens mounted in the test loop were examined and corrosion rates calculated. Chromium alloys were shown to be attacked by corrodents in the low-velocity part of the loop and very aggressively attacked in the high-velocity part. The tests demonstrate the need for rigorous monitoring of corrosion in areas of higher velocity such as piping elbows and other points of turbulence. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Corrosion of austenitic stainless steel

    Silva, M C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1977-01-01

    Types of corrosion observed in a heat exchanger pipe and on a support of still of molasses fermented wort, both in austenitic stainless steel, are focused. Not only are the causes which might have had any kind of influence on them examined, but also the measures adopted in order to avoid and lessen its occurence.

  9. Stray current vs anodic polarization in reinforced mortar: a comparative study on steel corrosion behaviour in both regimes

    Chen, Zhipei; Koleva, D.A.; van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    Stray current arising from direct current electrified traction systems and then circulat-ing in reinforced concrete structures may initiate corrosion or even accelerate existing corrosion processes on embedded reinforcement. Therefore, stray-current induced corrosion of nearby reinforced concrete

  10. Cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures in the Netherlands - Experience and developments: Cathodic protection of concrete - 10 years experience

    Polder, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) of reinforcing steel in concrete structures has been used successfully for over 20 years. CP is able to stop corrosion in a reliable and economical way where chloride contamination has caused reinforcement corrosion and subsequent concrete damage. To new structures where

  11. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  12. Relationship between Corrosion Level of Rebar Embedded in Concrete, Corrosion Potential and Current Density Measured by Non-destructive Test Method

    Chung, Lan; Cho, Seung Ho; Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Joong Koo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify corrosion mechanism and develop qualitative measurement method of corrosion level. Fist of all, structural behavior of each different level of corrosion states have been evaluated. And mathematical models that can predict corrosion level in terms of electric potential and corrosion intensity are proposed. Corrosion rate in reinforcing bar was investigated in this study using accelerated corrosion method due to electric potential differences based on Faradays law. Total 288 measurement spots were designed in terms of corrosion rates, diameter of reinforcing bars, and concrete cover thickness. Corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials of concrete were measured on these specimens using Gecor device. This study suggested the relationship between corrosion levels, and measured electric current density as follows

  13. Early detection of micro-structural changes due to fatigue of non-corrosive austenitic stainless steels

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M.

    2003-03-01

    In view of life extension efforts of nuclear power plants, many investigations are in progress in order to assess the structural integrity of different components. In many cases, this involves unexpected loads, which were not taken into account during design of components, e.g. temperature cycling arising from unforeseen stratification flow conditions. Under certain power plant transients (start-up/shut-down, hot stand-by, thermal stratification) at critical locations of piping and nozzles, material degradation caused by accumulated cyclic plastic strain takes place. However, materials subjected to cyclic loading exhibit changes in microstructure already before macroscopic crack initiation begins, this period covers a considerable part of fatigue life. Existing methods for in-service inspection are mainly specialised for crack detection. Advanced non-destructive testing methods for monitoring of material degradation are sensitive to any micro-structural changes in the material leading to a degradation of the mechanical properties. Therefore, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing. During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, microstructural changes occur, which affect both the mechanical and the physical properties. Typical features are the rearrangement of dislocations and, in some cases, a deformation-induced martensitic phase transformation. In our investigation martensite formation was used as an indication for material degradation due to fatigue. Knowledge about mechanisms and influencing parameters of the martensitic transformation process is essential for the application in a lifetime monitoring system. The investigations showed that for a given austenitic stainless steel the deformation-induced martensite depends on the applied strain amplitude, the cycle number (usage factor, lifetime) and the temperature. It was demonstrated that the volume fraction of

  14. Erosion and corrosion of nuclear power plant materials

    1994-01-01

    This conference is composed of 23 papers, grouped in 3 sessions which main themes are: analysis of corrosion and erosion damages of nuclear power plant equipment and influence of water chemistry, temperature, irradiations, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, flow assisted cracking, stress cracking; monitoring and control of erosion and corrosion in nuclear power plants; susceptibility of structural materials to erosion and corrosion and ways to improve the resistance of materials, steels, coatings, etc. to erosion, corrosion and cracking

  15. Ultrasonic guided wave for monitoring corrosion of steel bar

    Liu, Xi; Qin, Lei; Huang, Bosheng

    2018-01-01

    Steel corrosion of reinforced concrete structures has become a serious problem all over the word. In this paper, the work aims at monitoring steel corrosion using ultrasonic guided wave (UGW). Ultrasonic guided wave monitoring is a dynamic and non-destructive testing technology. The advantages of ultrasonic guided wave monitoring for reinforcement corrosion are real-time, online and continuous. In addition, it can judge the different stages of steel bar corrosion, which achieved non-destructive detection.

  16. Statistical characterization of pitting corrosion process and life prediction

    Sheikh, A.K.; Younas, M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to prevent corrosion failures of machines and structures, it is desirable to know in advance when the corrosion damage will take place, and appropriate measures are needed to mitigate the damage. The corrosion predictions are needed both at development as well as operational stage of machines and structures. There are several forms of corrosion process through which varying degrees of damage can occur. Under certain conditions these corrosion processes at alone and in other set of conditions, several of these processes may occur simultaneously. For a certain type of machine elements and structures, such as gears, bearing, tubes, pipelines, containers, storage tanks etc., are particularly prone to pitting corrosion which is an insidious form of corrosion. The corrosion predictions are usually based on experimental results obtained from test coupons and/or field experiences of similar machines or parts of a structure. Considerable scatter is observed in corrosion processes. The probabilities nature and kinetics of pitting process makes in necessary to use statistical method to forecast the residual life of machine of structures. The focus of this paper is to characterization pitting as a time-dependent random process, and using this characterization the prediction of life to reach a critical level of pitting damage can be made. Using several data sets from literature on pitting corrosion, the extreme value modeling of pitting corrosion process, the evolution of the extreme value distribution in time, and their relationship to the reliability of machines and structure are explained. (author)

  17. Geological structure of Osaka basin and characteristic distributions of structural damage caused by earthquake; Osaka bonchi kozo to shingai tokusei

    Nakagawa, K; Shiono, K; Inoue, N; Senda, S [Osaka City University, Osaka (JP. Faculty of Science); Ryoki, K [Osaka Polytechnic Collage, Osaka (Japan); Shichi, R [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1996-05-01

    The paper investigates relations between the damage caused by the Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake and the deep underground structures. A characteristic of the earthquake damage distribution is that the damage concentrated near faults. Most of the damages were seen on the side of faults` relatively falling rather than right above the faults and of their slightly slanting to the seaside. Distribution like this seems to be closely related to underground structures. Therefore, a distribution map of the depth of basement granite in Osaka sedimentary basin was drawn, referring to the data on basement rock depth obtained from the distribution map of gravity anomaly and the result of the survey using the air gun reflection method. Moreover, cubic underground structures were determined by 3-D gravity analysis. The result was concluded as follows: when observing the M7 zone of the low land, in particular, where the damage was great from an aspect of gravity anomaly, the basement rock below the zone declined near the cliff toward the sea, which indicates a great possibility of its being a fault. There is a high possibility that the zone suffered mostly from the damage caused by focusing by refraction and total reflection of seismic wave rays. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Influence of the selected structural parameter on a depth of intergranular corrosion of Al-Si7-Mg0,3 aluminum alloy

    L. Bernat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an influence of the Dendrite Arm Spacing (DAS microstructure parameter on the intergranular corrosion of AlSi7Mg aluminum alloy. The samples were subjected to the corrosion process for: 2,5; 12; 24; 48 and 96 hours in NaCl + HCl + H2O solution. It was noted that the DAS parameter significantly influenced on a distribution and depth of the intergranular corrosion of the hypoeutectic Al - Si - Mg silumin.

  19. ALS-causing profilin-1-mutant forms a non-native helical structure in membrane environments.

    Lim, Liangzhong; Kang, Jian; Song, Jianxing

    2017-11-01

    Despite having physiological functions completely different from superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), profilin 1 (PFN1) also carries mutations causing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with a striking similarity to that triggered by SOD1 mutants. Very recently, the C71G-PFN1 has been demonstrated to cause ALS by a gain of toxicity and the acceleration of motor neuron degeneration preceded the accumulation of its aggregates. Here by atomic-resolution NMR determination of conformations and dynamics of WT-PFN1 and C71G-PFN1 in aqueous buffers and in membrane mimetics DMPC/DHPC bicelle and DPC micelle, we deciphered that: 1) the thermodynamic destabilization by C71G transforms PFN1 into coexistence with the unfolded state, which is lacking of any stable tertiary/secondary structures as well as restricted ps-ns backbone motions, thus fundamentally indistinguishable from ALS-causing SOD1 mutants. 2) Most strikingly, while WT-PFN1 only weakly interacts with DMPC/DHPC bicelle without altering the native structure, C71G-PFN1 acquires abnormal capacity in strongly interacting with DMPC/DHPC bicelle and DPC micelle, energetically driven by transforming the highly disordered unfolded state into a non-native helical structure, similar to what has been previously observed on ALS-causing SOD1 mutants. Our results imply that one potential mechanism for C71G-PFN1 to initiate ALS might be the abnormal interaction with membranes as recently established for SOD1 mutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CORROSION ANALYSIS OF METALLIZED FILMS AFTER PRINTING

    Mr. Dhirender*1, Mr. Rajeev2 & Mr.Manoj3

    2017-01-01

    Print quality has always been a point of strong concern among printers and consumers. Metalized films have gain a wide spread popularity among printers because of its low cost and high usages in food packaging applications. But sometimes corrosion spoils the printed products causing huge financial loss to the printers or customers.This paper throws light on major causes of corrosion on metallized films and possible remedies for the same. The metallized films with polyester base were base coat...

  1. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars; Evaluacion del comportamiento estructural y de resistencia a la corrosion de armaduras de acero inoxidable austenitico AISI 304 y duplex AISI 2304 embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  2. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses

  3. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  4. Synthesis and Structures of Pb3O2(CH3COO)2 · 0.5H2O and Pb2O(HCOO)2: Two Corrosion Products Revisited

    Mauck, Catherine M.; van den Heuvel, Titus W.P.; Hull, Michaela M.; Zeller, Matthias; Oertel, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    Reactions of carboxylic acids with lead play an important role in the atmospheric corrosion of lead and lead-tin alloys. This is of particular concern for the preservation of lead-based cultural objects, including historic lead-tin alloy organ pipes. Two initial corrosion products, Pb 3 O 2 (CH 3 COO) 2 · 0.5H 2 O (1) and Pb 2 O(HCOO) 2 (2), had been identified through powder diffraction fingerprints in the Powder Diffraction File, but their structures had never been determined. We have crystallized both compounds using hydrothermal solution conditions, and structures were determined using laboratory and synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Compound 1 crystallizes in P t , and 2 in Cccm. These compounds may be viewed as inorganic-organic networks containing single and double chains of edge-sharing Pb 4 O tetrahedra and have structural similarities to inorganic basic lead compounds. Bond valence sum analysis has been applied to the hemidirected lead coordination environments in each compound. Atmospheric exposure experiments contribute to understanding of the potential for conversion of these short-term corrosion products to hydrocerussite, Pb 3 (CO 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 , previously identified as a long-term corrosion product on lead-rich objects. Each compound was also characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC), and Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Research on corrosion mechanism of suspension insulator steel foot of direct current system and measures for corrosion inhibition

    Chen, He; Yang, Yueguang; Su, Guolei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hourong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fan, Youping

    2017-09-01

    There are increasingly serious electrocorrosion phenomena on insulator hardware caused by direct current transmission due to the wide-range popularization of extra high voltage direct current transmission engineering in our country. Steel foot corrosion is the main corrosion for insulators on positive polarity side of transmission lines. On one hand, the corrosion leads to the tapering off of steel foot diameter, having a direct influence on mechanical property of insulators; on the other hand, in condition of corrosion on steel foot wrapped in porcelain ware, the volume of the corrosion product is at least 50% more than that of the original steel foot, leading to bursting of porcelain ware, threatening safe operation of transmission lines. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct research on the phenomenon and propose feasible measures for corrosion inhibition. Starting with the corrosion mechanism, this article proposes two measures for corrosion inhibition, and verifies the inhibition effect in laboratory conditions, providing reference for application in engineering.

  6. HIV reservoirs and immune surveillance evasion cause the failure of structured treatment interruptions: a computational study.

    Emiliano Mancini

    Full Text Available Continuous antiretroviral therapy is currently the most effective way to treat HIV infection. Unstructured interruptions are quite common due to side effects and toxicity, among others, and cannot be prevented. Several attempts to structure these interruptions failed due to an increased morbidity compared to continuous treatment. The cause of this failure is poorly understood and often attributed to drug resistance. Here we show that structured treatment interruptions would fail regardless of the emergence of drug resistance. Our computational model of the HIV infection dynamics in lymphoid tissue inside lymph nodes, demonstrates that HIV reservoirs and evasion from immune surveillance themselves are sufficient to cause the failure of structured interruptions. We validate our model with data from a clinical trial and show that it is possible to optimize the schedule of interruptions to perform as well as the continuous treatment in the absence of drug resistance. Our methodology enables studying the problem of treatment optimization without having impact on human beings. We anticipate that it is feasible to steer new clinical trials using computational models.

  7. Alternative approaches used to assess structural changes of natural zircon caused by heat treatment

    Huong, L. T. T.; Thuyet, N. T. M.; Phan, T. L.; Tran, N.; Toan, D. N.; Thang, P. D.; Huy, B. T.

    2018-03-01

    It is known that large changes in the crystal structure of zircon (ZrSiO4) can be assessed through the linewidth of the characteristic Raman mode (Δν3) at 1008 cm-1. However, the use of Δν3 to assess small changes caused by heat treatment at temperatures below its decomposition temperature of 1670 °C is difficult. The present work points out that the combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and photoluminescence (PL) and Raman (RS) measurements with different excitation wavelengths is an effective approach to solve the above problem. In this context, we have selected natural zircon containing some rare-earth (RE) impurities, and then studied the changes in its crystal structure caused by heat treatment at temperatures Tan=400-1600 °C. XRD analyses reveal that small modifications of the unit-cell parameters occur as Tan>600 °C. Taking the intensity ratios of the ν3 mode to RE-related emissions (Iν3/IRE) or the PL intensity ratios between RE-related emissions into consideration, the similar results in good agreement with the XRD analyses are also found. We believe that the small structural changes are related to the migration and redistribution of defects and impurities, and re-crystallization of zircon. This could be further confirmed though the relation between paramagnetic and ferromagnetic signals when Tan changes.

  8. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  9. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  10. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    F. Hua

    2004-01-01

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847])

  11. Dynamic response of the high flux isotope reactor structure caused by nearby heavy load drop

    Chang, Shih-Jung.

    1995-01-01

    A heavy load of 50,000 lb is assumed to drop from 10 ft above the bottom of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pool at the loading station. The consequences of the dynamic impact to the bottom slab of the pool and to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel are analyzed by applying the ABAQUS computer code The results show that both the BM vessel structure and its supporting legs are subjected to elastic disturbances only and, therefore, will not be damaged. The bottom slab of the pool, however, will be damaged to about half of the slab thickness. The velocity response spectrum at the concrete floor next to the HFIR vessel as a result of the vibration caused by the impact is obtained. It is concluded, that the damage caused by heavy load drop at the loading station is controlled by the slab damage and the nearby HFIR vessel and the supporting legs will not be damaged

  12. Corrosion of materials for heat exchangers and the countermeasures

    Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    When the materials for heat exchangers are selected, the heat transfer performance, mechanical strength, workability, cost, corrosion resistance and so on are taken in consideration. Most of the failure of heat exchangers is due to corrosion, and the corrosion failure on cooling water side occurs frequently, to which attention is not paid much usually. The rate of occurrence of corrosion failure is overwhelmingly high in heating tubes, and the failure owing to cooling water exceeds that owing to process fluid. The material of heating tubes is mostly aluminum brass, and local failure such as pitting corrosion or stress corrosion cracking holds a majority. The cause of corrosion failure due to cooling water is mostly the poor water quality. The mechanism of corrosion of metals can be explained by the electrochemical reaction between the metals and solutions. As for the factors affecting corrosion, dissolved oxygen, pH, Cl - ions, temperature, flow velocity, and foreign matters are enumerated. Copper alloys are sensitive to the effect of polluted sea water. Erosion corrosion is caused by eddies and bubbles owing to high flow velocity, and impingement attack is caused by scratching foreign matters. The quality of fresh water affects corrosion more than sea water in case of copper alloys. The preliminary examination of water quality is essential. (Kako, I.)

  13. Corrosion Measurements in Reinforced Fly Ash Concrete Containing Steel Fibres Using Strain Gauge Technique

    V. M. Sounthararajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel bars in concrete is a serious problem leading to phenomenal volume expansion and thereby leading to cover concrete spalling. It is well known that the reinforced concrete structures subjected to chloride attack during its service life cause these detrimental effects. The early detection of this damage potential can extend the service life of concrete. This study reports the comprehensive experimental studies conducted on the identification of corrosion mechanism in different types of reinforced concrete containing class-F fly ash and hooked steel fibres. Fly ash replaced concrete mixes were prepared with 25% and 50% fly ash containing steel fibres at 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% by volume fraction. Corrosion process was investigated in an embedded steel bar (8 mm diameter reinforced in concrete by passing an impressed current in sodium chloride solution. Strain gauge attached to the rebars was monitored for electrical measurements using strain conditioner. Strain gauge readings observed during the corrosion process exhibited the volume changes of the reinforcement embedded inside the concrete. The corrosion potential of different steel fibre reinforced concrete mixes with fly ash addition showed higher resistance towards the corrosion initiation.

  14. Stress corrosion of low alloy steel forgings

    Thornton, D.V.; Mould, P.B.; Patrick, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The catastrophic failure of a steam turbine rotor disc at Hinkley Point 'A' Power station was shown to have been caused by the growth of a stress corrosion crack to critical dimensions. This failure has promoted great interest in the stress corrosion susceptibility of medium strength low alloy steel forgings in steam environments. Consequently, initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks of typical disc steels have been investigated in steam and also in water at 95 0 C. Cracking has been shown to occur, predominantly in an intergranular manner, with growth rates of between 10 -9 and 10 -7 mm sec. -1 . It is observed that corrosion pitting and oxide penetration prior to the establishment of a stress corrosion crack in the plain samples. (author)

  15. Water side corrosion prevention in boilers

    Zeid, A.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion may be defined as a naturally occurring physical and chemical deterioration of a material due to reaction with the environment or surrounding atmosphere. In boilers the material is subjected on both sides to two different media which may cause severe corrosion. At the water side the content of O 2 considered one of the principal factors which determine the extent of corrosion in the boiler tubes. This paper deals with certain conditions that result in the increase of O 2 in the boiler water and hence increase the corrosion rate, to minimize the effect of these conditions a chemical treatment was carried out the results obtained indicated the success of the treatment procedure in corrosion prevention and boiler material protection. The treatment is traditional. But the study indicates how a simple mean could be applied to solve a serious problem. 4 tab

  16. Corrosion products in the primary circuits of PWRs

    Darras, R.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of PWR primary circuits are recalled, particularly the chemical specifications of the medium and the various materials used (austenitic steel, nickel alloys, cobalt-based alloys and zirconium alloys). The behaviour of these materials as regards general corrosion in nominal and transient conditions is then outlined briefly, special emphasis being laid on the effect of the determining parameters on the quantity of corrosion products formed. The release of the latter into the primary coolant is caused by two main processes: solubilization and erosion. Particular attention was given therefore to the laws governing the solubility of the oxides involved, especially as a function of temperature and pH. Erosion, or release in the form of solid particles, is relatively severe during transient events. As these corrosion products are then carried through all circuits, they cause deposits to form in favourable places on the walls as a result either of precipitation of soluble species or of sedimentation followed by consolidation of suspended particles. The presence of corrosion products in the primary circuits creates a particular impact since they become radioactive as they pass through the core and especially when they remain in it in the form of deposits; as a result, the products are capable of contaminating the entire system. Finally, although long-term reliability is obviously an essential condition for materials developed, attention must also be given to problems associated with a build-up of corrosion products in the cooling circuits and efforts made to minimize them. To that end, a number of precautions are recommended, and various remedies can be applied: selecting materials which are not readily activated, keeping structures clean, purifying fluids properly, restricting solubilization and precipitation, and perhaps, periodic decontamination. (author)

  17. Dynamic corrosion investigations in the eutectic lead-lithium melt Pb-17Li

    Frees, G.; Drechsler, G.; Peric, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The Pb-17Li circuit 'PICOLO' was constructed and commissioned in the Institute for Material and Solid State Research II of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe. This circuit serves for corrosion tests with the martensitic steel 1.4914, which is under discussion for the application as structural material for a fusion reactor blanket. The design and the functions of the circuit are described. The experience which has been gained so far is principally favorable. A temperature of 500deg C seems, however, to be the upper limit for the operation with the structural materials of the circuit. The corrosion of specimens and materials of the components becomes considerably high at higher temperatures; this has been seen to cause the plugging due to the precipitation of corrosion products. The results of the first test series are presented and discussed. (orig.) [de

  18. Investigations of the changes in the bentonite structure caused by the different treatments

    Stojiljković S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bentonite was treated in different ways and the changes in structure were monitored. Acid activation with sulphuric acid of investigated bentonite caused the increase in specific volume of micropore-mesopore. It was shown that activation by acid obtained at a constant temperature and constant period of time provides the possibility to obtain samples of bentonite of searched porosity only by changing the concentration of sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. By thermal activation of bentonite clay in the temperature range 100-1100 0C, samples of desired porosity were acquired. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 174007i br. TR 34020

  19. Manual on the Fatigue of Structures. II. Causes and Prevention of Damage. 7. Mechanical Surface Damage,

    1981-06-01

    AO-A103 «29 ADVISORY 6R0UP FOR AEROSPACE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT—ETC F/O 20/11 MANUAL ON THE FATIfUE OF STRUCTURES. IX. CAUSES AND PREVENTION —ETC... stresses . In the case of 99.999% pure aluminium Vyas and Preece240 investigated the changes in the surface finish of the metal under the electron...during the erosion process. In the case of annealed nickel and of electrolytically polished test specimens cavitation- stressed in distilled water at 25°C

  20. Ventricular dyssynchrony as a cause of structural disease in the heart of Dorper sheep

    J. Ker

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular dyssynchrony is a disturbance of the normal, organized electromechanical coupling of the two ventricles. This condition has many causes, such as left bundle branch block, ventricular preexcitation, right ventricular pacing and right ventricular premature ventricular complexes (PVCs. Ventricular dyssynchrony has many adverse haemodynamic effects on the left ventricle and we wanted to know whether these adverse haemodynamic effects might have any structural consequences on the left ventricles of such hearts. Six healthy Dorper wethers were subjected to numerous right ventricular PVCs to induce ventricular dyssynchrony in order to determine whether any structural consequences will occur in the left ventricles of these hearts. Myocarditis in the musculature of the left ventricles of all six these hearts was seen.

  1. Effects of Variations in Salt-Spray Conditions on the Corrosion Mechanisms of an AE44 Magnesium Alloy

    Holly J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of how corrosion affects magnesium alloys is of utmost importance as the automotive and aerospace industries have become interested in the use of these lightweight alloys. However, the standardized salt-spray test does not produce adequate corrosion results when compared with field data, due to the lack of multiple exposure environments. This research explored four test combinations through three sets of cycles to determine how the corrosion mechanisms of pitting, intergranular corrosion, and general corrosion were affected by the environment. Of the four test combinations, Humidity-Drying was the least corrosive, while the most corrosive test condition was Salt Spray-Humidity-Drying. The differences in corrosivity of the test conditions are due to the various reactions needed to cause corrosion, including the presence of chloride ions to cause pit nucleation, the presence of humidity to cause galvanic corrosion, and the drying phase which trapped chloride ions beneath the corrosion by-products.

  2. Neural network for prediction of superheater fireside corrosion

    Makkonen, P. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula R and D Center, Karhula (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Superheater corrosion causes vast annual losses to the power companies. If the corrosion could be reliably predicted, new power plants could be designed accordingly, and knowledge of fuel selection and determination of process conditions could be utilized to minimize superheater corrosion. If relations between inputs and the output are poorly known, conventional models depending on corrosion theories will fail. A prediction model based on a neural network is capable of learning from errors and improving its performance as the amount of data increases. The neural network developed during this study predicts superheater corrosion with 80 % accuracy at early stage of the project. (orig.) 10 refs.

  3. Neural network for prediction of superheater fireside corrosion

    Makkonen, P [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula R and D Center, Karhula (Finland)

    1999-12-31

    Superheater corrosion causes vast annual losses to the power companies. If the corrosion could be reliably predicted, new power plants could be designed accordingly, and knowledge of fuel selection and determination of process conditions could be utilized to minimize superheater corrosion. If relations between inputs and the output are poorly known, conventional models depending on corrosion theories will fail. A prediction model based on a neural network is capable of learning from errors and improving its performance as the amount of data increases. The neural network developed during this study predicts superheater corrosion with 80 % accuracy at early stage of the project. (orig.) 10 refs.

  4. Pitting Corrosion Topography Characteristics and Evolution Laws of LC4 Aluminum Alloy in Service Environment

    LIU Zhiguo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft aluminum alloy is easy to initiate pitting corrosion in the service environment, the pitting corrosion topography characteristics could directly affect the fatigue mechanical property of structure material. In order to obtain the pitting corrosion topography characteristics of LC4 aluminum alloy in the service environment, the accelerated corrosion test was carried out along the accelerated corrosion test environment spectrum which imitated the service environment spectrum, and the corrosion topography characteristic parameters of corrosion pit depth H,corrosion pit surface length L and corrosion pit surface width W were defined respectively. During the corrosion test process,the three parameters of typical corrosion pit were successively measured in different equivalent corrosion years for obtaining the corrosion pit damage size data, then the data were analysed through the statistics method and fractal theory. Further more in order to gain the pit topography characteristics in the same equivalent corrosion year and the topography evolution laws during different equivalent corrosion years were gained. The analysis results indicate that LC4 aluminum alloy corrosion pit topography characteristics in the service environment include the following:firstly, the pit topography characteristic parameters conform to the lognormal distributions in the same equivalent corrosion years; secondly,the pit topography characteristic parameters gradually reflect the fractal feature in accordance with the equivalent corrosion year increment, and the pits tend to be shallow, long and moderate wide topography character.

  5. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Wong, F; Ji, X; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Marshall, M C; Meacham, B E; Buffa, E J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Beardsley, M B; Weaver, D T; Aprigliano, L F; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E J; Wolejsza, T M; Martin, F J; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A H; Ernst, F; Michal, G M; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E J

    2004-01-01

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an ''integral drip shield'' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent

  6. Effect of LiOH, NaOH and KOH on corrosion and oxide microstructure of Zr-based alloys

    Jeong, Y.H.; Kim, H.G.; Jung, Y.H.; Ruhmann, H.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term corrosion test, SIMS analysis, and TEM microstructural study were carried out to investigate the corrosion characteristics and mechanism of Zr alloys in alkali hydroxides. The corrosion tests were performed in solutions of LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH, and CsOH at 350 deg. C for 500 days. SIMS analysis was performed for the specimens prepared to have an equal oxide thickness. TEM studies on the specimens with an equal oxide thickness in various solutions in both pre- and post-transition regimes were also conducted. The corrosion rate in alkali hydroxide solutions was observed to decrease as the ionic radius of alkali cation was increased. The penetration depth of cation into the oxide decreases with increasing the ionic radius of cation. Even though the oxide thickness was equal, the different oxide morphologies were observed in specimens. Namely, in LiOH solution the oxide morphology was transformed early from columnar to equiaxed structure. However, in KOH solution the columnar structure was maintained up to post-transition regime. Based on the corrosion test, SIMS analysis, and microstructural study, the cation is considered to control the corrosion in a alkali hydroxide solution and its effect is dependent on the concentration of alkali and the oxide thickness. The slight acceleration of the corrosion rate at a low concentration is thought to be caused by cation incorporation into oxide while the significant acceleration at a high concentration is due to the transformation of oxide microstructure that would be induced by cation incorporation. KOH was shown not to affect significantly the corrosion and the hydrogen pickup of Zircaloy. Therefore, it has a potential for PWR application only from the point of view of Zircaloy corrosion. (author)

  7. Corrosion monitoring using FSM technology

    Strommen, R.; Horn, H.; Gartland, P.O.; Wold, K.; Haroun, M.

    1995-01-01

    FSM is a non-intrusive monitoring technique based on a patented principle, developed for the purpose of detection and monitoring of both general and localized corrosion, erosion, and cracking in steel and metal structures, piping systems, and vessels. Since 1991, FSM has been used for a wide range of applications, including for buried and open pipelines, process piping offshore, subsea pipelines and flowlines, applications in the nuclear power industry, and in materials, research in general. This paper describes typical applications of the FSM technology, and presents operational experience from some of the land-based and subsea installations. The paper also describes recent enhancements in the FSM technology and in the analysis of FSM readings, allowing for monitoring and detailed quantification of pitting and mesa corrosion, and of corrosion in welds

  8. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  9. Corrosion mechanism of copper in palm biodiesel

    Fazal, M.A.; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of copper in biodiesel increases with the increase of immersion time. ► The corrosion patina is found to be composed of CuO, Cu 2 O, CuCO 3 and Cu(OH) 2 . ► Green CuCO 3 was found as the major corrosion product. ► The mechanisms governing corrosion of copper in palm biodiesel are discussed. - Abstract: Biodiesel is a promising alternative fuel. However, it causes enhanced corrosion of automotive materials, especially of copper based components. In the present study, corrosion mechanism of copper was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Compositional change of biodiesel due to the exposure of copper was also investigated. Corrosion patina on copper is found to be composed of Cu 2 O, CuO, Cu(OH) 2 and CuCO 3. Dissolved O 2 , H 2 O, CO 2 and RCOO − radical in biodiesel seem to be the leading factors in enhancing the corrosiveness of biodiesel.

  10. Downhole corrosion mechanisms and mitigation strategies

    McDougall, D. [Baker Hughes Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Pipeline corrosion refers to its deterioration because of a reaction with its environment. Although the physical condition of the metal at the anode initiates the corrosion process, it is the chemistry and composition of the electrolyte that controls the rate of the corrosion reaction and the severity of the corrosion. This presentation described the role of corrosion rate accelerators, with particular reference to dissolved gases such as oxygen, hydrogen sulfides and carbon dioxide, as well as pH levels, salinity, flow rate, temperature and presence of solids such as iron sulfides and sulfur. The effects of these accelerators were shown to be additive. Mitigation strategies include using materials such as resistant metal alloys or fiberglass, and applying coatings and chemical inhibitors. The importance of corrosion monitoring was also emphasized, with particular reference to the value of examining the number of corrosion related failures that have occurred over a fixed period of time. It was concluded that the ability to analyze samples of failed materials results in a better understanding of the cause of the failure, and is an integral part of designing any successful corrosion control program. tabs., figs.

  11. Management and control of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in the oil and gas industry-Overview and a North Sea case study.

    Skovhus, Torben Lund; Eckert, Richard B; Rodrigues, Edgar

    2017-08-20

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is the terminology applied where the actions of microorganisms influence the corrosion process. In literature, terms such as microbial corrosion, biocorrosion, microbially influenced/induced corrosion, and biodegradation are often applied. MIC research in the oil and gas industry has seen a revolution over the past decade, with the introduction of molecular microbiological methods: (MMM) as well as new industry standards and procedures of sampling biofilm and corrosion products from the process system. This review aims to capture the most important trends the oil and gas industry has seen regarding MIC research over the past decade. The paper starts out with an overview of where in the process stream MIC occurs - from the oil reservoir to the consumer. Both biotic and abiotic corrosion mechanisms are explained in the context of managing MIC using a structured corrosion management (CM) approach. The corrosion management approach employs the elements of a management system to ensure that essential corrosion control activities are carried out in an effective, sustainable, well-planned and properly executed manner. The 3-phase corrosion management approach covering of both biotic and abiotic internal corrosion mechanisms consists of 1) corrosion assessment, 2) corrosion mitigation and 3) corrosion monitoring. Each of the three phases are described in detail with links to recent field cases, methods, industry standards and sampling protocols. In order to manage the corrosion threat, operators commonly use models to support decision making. The models use qualitative, semi-quantitative or quantitative measures to help assess the rate of degradation caused by MIC. The paper reviews four existing models for MIC Threat Assessment and describe a new model that links the threat of MIC in the oil processing system located on an offshore platform with a Risk Based Inspection (RBI) approach. A recent field case highlights and explains

  12. Presentation of common cause failures in fault tree structure of Krsko PSA : an historical overview

    Vrbanic, I.; Kosutic, I.; Vukovic, I.; Simic, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Failure of multiple components due to a common cause represents one of the most important issues in evaluation of system reliability or unavailability. The frequency of such events has relatively low expectancy, when compared to random failures, which affect individual components. However, in many cases the consequence is a direct loss of safety system or mitigative safety function. For this reason, the modeling of a common cause failure (CCF) and its presentation in fault tree structure is of the uttermost importance in probabilistic safety analyses (PSA). During the past decade, PSA model of Krsko NPP has undergone many small changes and a couple of major ones in fulfilling its basic purpose, which was serving as a tool for providing an appropriate information on the risk associated with actual plant design and operation. All changes to Krsko PSA model were undertaken in order to make it a better tool and / or to make it represent the plant in more accurate manner. The paper provides an overview of changes in CCF modeling in the fault tree structure from the initial PSA model development till present. (author)

  13. EYS Mutations Causing Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa: Changes of Retinal Structure and Function with Disease Progression

    David B. McGuigan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the EYS (eyes shut homolog gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive (ar retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Without a mammalian model of human EYS disease, there is limited understanding of details of disease expression and rates of progression of the retinal degeneration. We studied clinically and with chromatic static perimetry, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, and en face autofluoresence imaging, a cohort of 15 patients (ages 12–51 at first visit, some of whom had longitudinal data of function and structure. Rod sensitivity was able to be measured by chromatic perimetry in most patients at their earliest visits and some patients retained patchy rod function into the fifth decade of life. As expected from RP, cone sensitivity persisted after rod function was no longer measurable. The photoreceptor nuclear layer of the central retina was abnormal except at the fovea in most patients at first visit. Perifoveal disease measured over a period of years indicated that photoreceptor structural loss was followed by dysmorphology of the inner retina and loss of retinal pigment epithelial integrity. Although there could be variability in severity, preliminary analyses of the rates of vision loss suggested that EYS is a more rapidly progressive disease than other ciliopathies causing arRP, such as USH2A and MAK.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of RNA Repeat Expansions That Cause Huntington's Disease and Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Chen, Jonathan L; VanEtten, Damian M; Fountain, Matthew A; Yildirim, Ilyas; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-07-11

    RNA repeat expansions cause a host of incurable, genetically defined diseases. The most common class of RNA repeats consists of trinucleotide repeats. These long, repeating transcripts fold into hairpins containing 1 × 1 internal loops that can mediate disease via a variety of mechanism(s) in which RNA is the central player. Two of these disorders are Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1, which are caused by r(CAG) and r(CUG) repeats, respectively. We report the structures of two RNA constructs containing three copies of a r(CAG) [r(3×CAG)] or r(CUG) [r(3×CUG)] motif that were modeled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics. The 1 × 1 internal loops of r(3×CAG) are stabilized by one-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) AA pairs, while those of r(3×CUG) prefer one- or two-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) UU pairs. Assigned chemical shifts for the residues depended on the identity of neighbors or next nearest neighbors. Additional insights into the dynamics of these RNA constructs were gained by molecular dynamics simulations and a discrete path sampling method. Results indicate that the global structures of the RNA are A-form and that the loop regions are dynamic. The results will be useful for understanding the dynamic trajectory of these RNA repeats but also may aid in the development of therapeutics.

  15. New approaches to the estimation of erosion-corrosion

    Bakirov, Murat; Ereemin, Alexandr; Levchuck, Vasiliy; Chubarov, Sergey

    2006-09-01

    Reliability safety and effectiveness of Russian and foreign power plants to a significant degree depend on erosion-corrosion durability of the equipment and pipelines, which work in single-phase and double-phase flows. Variety of failure mechanisms of metal equipment is determined phase conditions, thermodynamic, hydrodynamic, water-chemistry and other parameters of regimes. Analysis of statistic data about the damage in the main feed water pipe and of steam-water pipe and investigations in this field show, that the most of such work are fulfilled without taking into account the different mechanisms damaging the metal. Classification of failure mechanisms of metallic equipment, gave the possibility to select two groups of the destruction (failure) mechanisms of the metals: the first - which damages surface (reduction of thickness), the second - which breaks down inner structure of metals. Mechanism of erosion-corrosion of the metal is realized in single-phase and in double-phase steams (flows), and is widespread in operational circuits of NPPs. The results of erosion-corrosion influence are: reduction of thickness and as a final degree - failure of the power equipment elements, and after it failure of operational circuit of NPP. General corrosion becomes the main cause of a pollution of the working medium by the iron-containing compounds and of the deposits forming in steam generators and turbines. Local erosion-corrosion in single-phase flow can be accompanied by cavitational erosion, and in double-phase flow by drop-impact erosion. Erosion-corrosion should be understood as a physical-mechanical mechanism of destruction of the metal surface layer, accompanied, from one side, by formation of the protective oxide layer, and from the other side, by its dilution and removal into the main flow. Erosion-corrosion in the double-phase streams (flows) is a combination of the processes of corrosion and erosion components which progress at the same time. Principal feature of

  16. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  17. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment,

  18. Corrosion performance of epoxy-coated reinforcement in aggressive environments

    Vaca Cortes, Enrique

    The objective of this research was to investigate the integrity and corrosion performance of epoxy-coated reinforcement in aggressive environments. A series of experimental studies were conducted: (a) hot water immersion and knife adhesion testing for assessment of coating adhesion; (b) materials and procedures for repairing coating damage; (c) degree of mechanical damage caused during concrete placement when using metal head and rubber head vibrators; (d) accelerated corrosion of coated bars embedded in macrocell and beam specimens placed in a corrosive environment for more than four years. The effects of coating condition and amount of damage, repaired vs. unrepaired damage, bar fabrication, and concrete cracking were studied. Regardless of coating condition, the performance of epoxy-coated bars was better than that of uncoated bars. Unlike black bars, coated bars did not exhibit deep pitting or substantial loss of cross section at crack locations. Damage to epoxy coating was the most significant factor affecting corrosion performance. Bars with coating in good condition, without any visible damage, performed best. The greater the size and frequency of damage, the more severe and extensive the amount of corrosion. The performance of bars that were fabricated or bent after coating was worse than that of coated straight bars. Mixing coated and uncoated bars in the same concrete member led to undesirable performance. Patching damaged coating reduced but did not prevent corrosion, particularly at bar ends. The most important factor in coating repair was the type and properties of the patching material. Surface preparation prior to coating had little effect. The absence of cracks in the concrete delayed, but did not prevent the onset of corrosion of coated bars. During consolidation of concrete, rubber head vibrators caused less damage to epoxy-coated reinforcement than did comparable metal heads. Hot water and adhesion tests were useful and practical for evaluating

  19. Corrosion protection and steel-concrete bond improvement of prestressing strand.

    2012-12-01

    Corrosion can lead to the premature deterioration and failure of transportation structures. In pre-stressed bridge structures corrosion is more severe, : leading to sudden failures when cracking is induced at pitting sites by tensile or compressive s...

  20. Benefits from corrosion management of ORBEL-I pipeline; Resultados obtidos com o gerenciamento da corrosao do oleoduto ORBEL-I

    Lima, Aline de Souza [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fernandes Junior, Anibal Augusto; Viana, Flavio Godinho [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    This work has for objective to present the results gotten with the management of the implanted internal corrosion in the pipeline Rio de Janeiro - Belo Horizonte I (ORBEL I), with 363 kilometers of extension and 18 inch of diameter. This management has for purpose to prevent and to control the corrosive process in the internal structure of the pipe through the identification of the basic causes of the corrosive process and the implantation of actions adjusted for the control of the process. The applied techniques and actions had been based on the described recommendations in the Communication Technique 116/99 No. - Management of the Corrosion of ORBEL I emitted for the Center of Research of PETROBRAS (CENPES). The applied actions had been: determination of the corrosion rate with the coupon use of loss of mass and probe, races of pig of cleanness, chemical analyses of the pumped product and the residue of corrosion, inhibitor injection and water reduction in the product. The results obtained show the decrease of corrosion rates and of corrosiveness of the products transported. (author)