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Sample records for structure binding preferences

  1. Mechanosensitive kinetic preference of actin-binding protein to actin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments is altered by external forces on the filament. Such an altered kinetic preference is largely responsible for remodeling the actin cytoskeletal structure in response to intracellular forces. During remodeling, actin-binding proteins and actin filaments interact under isothermal conditions, because the cells are homeostatic. In such a temperature homeostatic state, we can rigorously and thermodynamically link the chemical potential of actin-binding proteins to stresses on the actin filaments. From this relationship, we can construct a physical model that explains the force-dependent kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments. To confirm the model, we have analyzed the mechanosensitive alternation of the kinetic preference of Arp2/3 and cofilin to actin filaments. We show that this model captures the qualitative responses of these actin-binding proteins to the forces, as observed experimentally. Moreover, our theoretical results demonstrate that, depending on the structural parameters of the binding region, actin-binding proteins can show different kinetic responses even to the same mechanical signal tension, in which the double-helix nature of the actin filament also plays a critical role in a stretch-twist coupling of the filament.

  2. Dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding amino acid residues in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuraj, Karthe; Saravanan, Konda Mani

    2017-04-01

    A protein can interact with DNA or RNA molecules to perform various cellular processes. Identifying or analyzing DNA/RNA binding site amino acid residues is important to understand molecular recognition process. It is quite possible to accurately model DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues in experimental protein-DNA/RNA complex by using the electron density map whereas, locating/modeling the binding site amino acid residues in the predicted three dimensional structures of DNA/RNA binding proteins is still a difficult task. Considering the above facts, in the present work, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding site amino acid residues by using a classical Ramachandran map. We have computed backbone dihedral angles of non-DNA/RNA binding residues and used as control dataset to make a comparative study. The dihedral angle preference of DNA and RNA binding site residues of twenty amino acid type is presented. Our analysis clearly revealed that the dihedral angles (φ, ψ) of DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues prefer to occupy (-89° to -60°, -59° to -30°) bins. The results presented in this paper will help to model/locate DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues with better accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. PREFERRED ARGUMENT STRUCTURE IN MANDARIN CHILD LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-chih Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether Preferred Argument Structure (Du Bois, 1987 is characteristic of early child Mandarin (2;2-3;1, and whether the patterns observed in child Mandarin can be explained by the account of human-ness suggested by Everett (2009. The results showed that Mandarin child language conforms to the constraints of Preferred Argument Structure, but that it does not support the related hypothesis of an ergative structuring of discourse. Both the factor of human-ness (Everett, 2009 and that of role types contribute to the accusative patterning observed in the data. The results are discussed in relation to children’s sensitivity to the association between discourse and grammar, and to the referential strategies used by adults in conversations with young children.

  4. Structuring Consumer Preferences with the SEM Method

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Franco

    2002-01-01

    Structuring preferences has been developed with econometric models using functional flexible parametric form and the exploring the perceptions about expressed and latent needs using different multivariate approaches. Purpose of this research is to explore the demand for a new drink using the mean-end chain (MEC) theory and multivariate SEM procedure. The first part is dedicated to description of specialty foods for their capacity to create new niche markets. The MEC theory is introduced to ex...

  5. Genre and Gender in the Structure of Music Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Peter G.

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes the music preference structure of college students based on responses to a variety of music use and preference measures. Finds that the underlying structure of music preference is multivariate and that there are crucial differences between males and females in terms of their "mapping" of music types. (MS)

  6. Building the meaning of preference from logical paired structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Camilo; Rodríguez, J. Tinguaro; Montero, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Making decisions by learning preferences requires to consider semantical aspects dealing with the meaning and use of the preference concept. Examining recent developments on bipolarity, where concepts are measured/verified regarding a pair of opposite poles, we focus on the dialectic process...... by which the meaning of concepts emerges. Our proposal is based on the neutrality in between the opposite poles, such that a basic type of structure is used to characterize in logical terms the concepts and the knowledge that they generate. In this paper we model the meaning of concepts by paired...... structures, and apply these structures for learning and building the different meanings of preference for decision making....

  7. Demethylation of c-MYB binding site mediates upregulation of Bdnf IV in cocaine-conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weiping; Wang, Jiesi; Zhang, Ke; Teng, Huajing; Li, Chong; Szyf, Moshe; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Zhao, Mei

    2016-02-25

    Abnormal BDNF signaling contributes to the structural and behavioral plasticity induced by drugs of abuse. However, the mechanisms regulating expression of Bdnf in drug addiction remain elusive. In the present study, using the conditioned place preference (CPP) model, we showed that expression of Bdnf IV is upregulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of conditioned animals while Bdnf I is upregulated in cocaine-treated mice irrespective of conditioning. The methylation level of a putative c-MYB binding site in the promoter region of Bdnf IV was significantly decreased in the NAc under cocaine CPP conditioning but remained unchanged without conditioning, concurrently with increased binding of c-MYB to this site. Exon IV promoter/luciferase reporter assays revealed that transactivation of Bdnf by c-MYB was blocked by methylation of this c-MYB binding site. Administration of methionine, a precursor of SAM, inhibited cocaine CPP, reversed demethylation of c-MYB binding site and induction of Bdnf IV expression by cocaine CPP. Our results imply that Bdnf IV demethylation at c-MYB binding site is involved in cocaine-triggered seeking behavior, whereas Bdnf I responds to the immediate pharmacological effects of cocaine.

  8. Decomposition of the factors that govern binding site preference in a multiple rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Joseph P; Sohlberg, Karl

    2009-06-18

    A particularly interesting class of multiple rotaxanes consists of complexes where one long shaft threads two rings. If the shaft contains three or more potential binding sites for the rings, multiple co-conformations are possible. Such a complex is a molecular topological analogue to an abacus. Here we address the question, how does strength of ring binding to the shaft vary with respect to position on the shaft? Previous studies have found that a shaft with three binding sites exhibits strongest ring binding at the center site. Here a five-binding-site shaft is studied. We employ a novel method to partition the total energy of the system into contributions from intercomponent binding and intracomponent distortion. The method uses the output of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations to determine fitting parameters in a set of coupled equations. The solution of the equations yields the energy partitioning and reveals the influence of long-range intercomponent interactions.

  9. Structural basis for PECAM-1 homophilic binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddock, Cathy; Zhou, Dongwen; Lertkiatmongkol, Panida; Newman, Peter J.; Zhu, Jieqing (MCW)

    2015-12-23

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily (IgSF) that is present on the surface of circulating platelets and leukocytes, and highly expressed at the junctions of confluent endothelial cell monolayers. PECAM-1–mediated homophilic interactions, known to be mediated by its 2 amino-terminal immunoglobulin homology domains, are essential for concentrating PECAM-1 at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions to facilitate diapedesis, maintain vascular integrity, and transmit survival signals into the cell. Given the importance of PECAM-1–mediated homophilic interactions in mediating each of these cell physiological events, and to reveal the nature and orientation of the PECAM-1–PECAM-1 homophilic-binding interface, we undertook studies aimed at determining the crystal structure of the PECAM-1 homophilic-binding domain, which is composed of amino-terminal immunoglobulin homology domains 1 and 2 (IgD1 and IgD2). The crystal structure revealed that both IgD1 and IgD2 exhibit a classical IgSF fold, having a β-sandwich topology formed by 2 sheets of antiparallel β strands stabilized by the hallmark disulfide bond between the B and F strands. Interestingly, despite previous assignment to the C2 class of immunoglobulin-like domains, the structure of IgD1 reveals that it actually belongs to the I2 set of IgSF folds. Both IgD1 and IgD2 participate importantly in the formation of the trans homophilic-binding interface, with a total buried interface area of >2300 Å2. These and other unique structural features of PECAM-1 allow for the development of an atomic-level model of the interactions that PECAM-1 forms during assembly of endothelial cell intercellular junctions.

  10. Sex differences in dopamine binding and modafinil conditioned place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Rick E; Broccoli, Laura; Spanagel, Rainer; Hansson, Anita C

    2015-10-01

    Studies in humans and rodents have demonstrated under certain conditions some reinforcing properties of modafinil, a drug being examined clinically for its potential to treat psychostimulant abuse. However, the majority of rodent studies examining the abuse potential of modafinil have used high doses that may not be clinically relevant. In fact, recent work has indicated that doses similar to those administered to humans are not reinforcing in mice. The current study examined sex differences in the ability of low-dose modafinil (0.75mg/kg, IP) to induce a conditioned place preference in mice, and assessed sex-dependent alterations in dopamine D1, D2 and DAT binding sites in reward-related regions in naïve and modafinil-treated mice. Low-dose modafinil failed to induce a conditioned place preference in male mice, while female mice demonstrated a significant modafinil place preference. Several dopamine binding differences were also detected in naïve and modafinil-treated mice, including sex differences in D1 and D2 availability in reward-related regions, and are discussed in relation to sex-dependent differences in the reinforcing effects of modafinil and psychostimulants in general. These findings implicate sex differences in the reinforcing properties of modafinil in mice, and indicate that clinical evaluation of the sex dependence of the reinforcing properties of modafinil in humans is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  12. Oligosaccharide binding proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveal a preference for host glycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garrido

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO. Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs, part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process.

  13. A combined sequence and structure based method for discovering enriched motifs in RNA from in vivo binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Maya; Paz, Inbal; Kohen, Refael; Mesika, Rona; Yakhini, Zohar; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2017-04-15

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in regulating many processes in the cell. RBPs often recognize their RNA targets in a specific manner. In addition to the RNA primary sequence, the structure of the RNA has been shown to play a central role in RNA recognition by RBPs. In recent years, many experimental approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, were developed and employed to identify and characterize RBP targets and extract their binding specificities. In vivo binding techniques, such as CrossLinking and ImmunoPrecipitation (CLIP)-based methods, enable the characterization of protein binding sites on RNA targets. However, these methods do not provide information regarding the structural preferences of the protein. While methods to obtain the structure of RNA are available, inferring both the sequence and the structure preferences of RBPs remains a challenge. Here we present SMARTIV, a novel computational tool for discovering combined sequence and structure binding motifs from in vivo RNA binding data relying on the sequences of the target sites, the ranking of their binding scores and their predicted secondary structure. The combined motifs are provided in a unified representation that is informative and easy for visual perception. We tested the method on CLIP-seq data from different platforms for a variety of RBPs. Overall, we show that our results are highly consistent with known binding motifs of RBPs, offering additional information on their structural preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The structure of musical preferences: a five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J; Goldberg, Lewis R; Levitin, Daniel J

    2011-06-01

    Music is a cross-cultural universal, a ubiquitous activity found in every known human culture. Individuals demonstrate manifestly different preferences in music, and yet relatively little is known about the underlying structure of those preferences. Here, we introduce a model of musical preferences based on listeners' affective reactions to excerpts of music from a wide variety of musical genres. The findings from 3 independent studies converged to suggest that there exists a latent 5-factor structure underlying music preferences that is genre free and reflects primarily emotional/affective responses to music. We have interpreted and labeled these factors as (a) a Mellow factor comprising smooth and relaxing styles; (b) an Unpretentious factor comprising a variety of different styles of sincere and rootsy music such as is often found in country and singer-songwriter genres; (c) a Sophisticated factor that includes classical, operatic, world, and jazz; (d) an Intense factor defined by loud, forceful, and energetic music; and (e) a Contemporary factor defined largely by rhythmic and percussive music, such as is found in rap, funk, and acid jazz. The findings from a fourth study suggest that preferences for the MUSIC factors are affected by both the social and the auditory characteristics of the music. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  15. The Structure of Musical Preferences: A Five-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J.; Goldberg, Lewis R.; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Music is a cross-cultural universal, a ubiquitous activity found in every known human culture. Individuals demonstrate manifestly different preferences in music, and yet relatively little is known about the underlying structure of those preferences. Here, we introduce a model of musical preferences based on listeners’ affective reactions to excerpts of music from a wide variety of musical genres. The findings from three independent studies converged to suggest that there exists a latent five-factor structure underlying music preferences that is genre-free, and reflects primarily emotional/affective responses to music. We have interpreted and labeled these factors as: 1) a Mellow factor comprising smooth and relaxing styles; 2) an Urban factor defined largely by rhythmic and percussive music, such as is found in rap, funk, and acid jazz; 3) a Sophisticated factor that includes classical, operatic, world, and jazz; 4) an Intense factor defined by loud, forceful, and energetic music; and 5) a Campestral factor comprising a variety of different styles of direct, and rootsy music such as is often found in country and singer-songwriter genres. The findings from a fourth study suggest that preferences for the MUSIC factors are affected by both the social and auditory characteristics of the music. PMID:21299309

  16. Behavioral Variability of Choices versus Structural Inconsistency of Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenwetter, Michel; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2012-01-01

    Theories of rational choice often make the structural consistency assumption that every decision maker's binary strict preference among choice alternatives forms a "strict weak order". Likewise, the very concept of a "utility function" over lotteries in normative, prescriptive, and descriptive theory is mathematically equivalent to strict weak…

  17. Variations analysis of the Society's preference structure regarding environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel S, Enrique; Zambrano B, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    Society's preference structure regarding environmental issues is understood as the relative importance the society gives to various topics that collectively conform the environmental issues. Based on the hypothesis that this structure behavior and its definition vary with time, proposals are presented related to the concepts and a working plan allowing performing the structure's dynamic analysis. A method is described to gather information based on the systematic reading of a nation wide newspaper during a period time. A comparison is done between the resulting structure and several aspects as the environmental legislation, government plans and summits and environmental milestones

  18. Hardware device to physical structure binding and authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Stein, David J.; Bauer, Todd M.

    2013-08-20

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a binding of the hardware device and a physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generate an internal PUF value. Binding logic is coupled to receive the internal PUF value, as well as an external PUF value associated with the physical structure, and generates a binding PUF value, which represents the binding of the hardware device and the physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit also includes a cryptographic unit that uses the binding PUF value to allow a challenger to authenticate the binding.

  19. Structural Analysis of the Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65{angstrom} resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10{angstrom} relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  20. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  1. RCK: accurate and efficient inference of sequence- and structure-based protein-RNA binding models from RNAcompete data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Yaron; Wang, Yuhao; Berger, Bonnie

    2016-06-15

    Protein-RNA interactions, which play vital roles in many processes, are mediated through both RNA sequence and structure. CLIP-based methods, which measure protein-RNA binding in vivo, suffer from experimental noise and systematic biases, whereas in vitro experiments capture a clearer signal of protein RNA-binding. Among them, RNAcompete provides binding affinities of a specific protein to more than 240 000 unstructured RNA probes in one experiment. The computational challenge is to infer RNA structure- and sequence-based binding models from these data. The state-of-the-art in sequence models, Deepbind, does not model structural preferences. RNAcontext models both sequence and structure preferences, but is outperformed by GraphProt. Unfortunately, GraphProt cannot detect structural preferences from RNAcompete data due to the unstructured nature of the data, as noted by its developers, nor can it be tractably run on the full RNACompete dataset. We develop RCK, an efficient, scalable algorithm that infers both sequence and structure preferences based on a new k-mer based model. Remarkably, even though RNAcompete data is designed to be unstructured, RCK can still learn structural preferences from it. RCK significantly outperforms both RNAcontext and Deepbind in in vitro binding prediction for 244 RNAcompete experiments. Moreover, RCK is also faster and uses less memory, which enables scalability. While currently on par with existing methods in in vivo binding prediction on a small scale test, we demonstrate that RCK will increasingly benefit from experimentally measured RNA structure profiles as compared to computationally predicted ones. By running RCK on the entire RNAcompete dataset, we generate and provide as a resource a set of protein-RNA structure-based models on an unprecedented scale. Software and models are freely available at http://rck.csail.mit.edu/ bab@mit.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by

  2. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt); (MCW)

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  3. Regulation of Cellular Dynamics and Chromosomal Binding Site Preference of Linker Histones H1.0 and H1.X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Abe, Mayumi; Hisaoka, Miharu; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2016-11-01

    Linker histones play important roles in the genomic organization of mammalian cells. Of the linker histone variants, H1.X shows the most dynamic behavior in the nucleus. Recent research has suggested that the linker histone variants H1.X and H1.0 have different chromosomal binding site preferences. However, it remains unclear how the dynamics and binding site preferences of linker histones are determined. Here, we biochemically demonstrated that the DNA/nucleosome and histone chaperone binding activities of H1.X are significantly lower than those of other linker histones. This explains why H1.X moves more rapidly than other linker histones in vivo Domain swapping between H1.0 and H1.X suggests that the globular domain (GD) and C-terminal domain (CTD) of H1.X independently contribute to the dynamic behavior of H1.X. Our results also suggest that the N-terminal domain (NTD), GD, and CTD cooperatively determine the preferential binding sites, and the contribution of each domain for this determination is different depending on the target genes. We also found that linker histones accumulate in the nucleoli when the nucleosome binding activities of the GDs are weak. Our results contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms of dynamic behaviors, binding site selection, and localization of linker histones. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  5. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Integrating structural and mutagenesis data to elucidate GPCR ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Christian; Harpsøe, Kasper; Hauser, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of human membrane proteins, as well as drug targets. A recent boom in GPCR structural biology has provided detailed images of receptor ligand binding sites and interactions on the molecular level. An ever-increasing number of ligands...... elucidate new GPCR ligand binding sites, and ultimately design drugs with tailored pharmacological activity....

  7. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  8. Identifying functional transcription factor binding sites in yeast by considering their positional preference in the promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jou Lai

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site (TFBS identification plays an important role in deciphering gene regulatory codes. With comprehensive knowledge of TFBSs, one can understand molecular mechanisms of gene regulation. In the recent decades, various computational approaches have been proposed to predict TFBSs in the genome. The TFBS dataset of a TF generated by each algorithm is a ranked list of predicted TFBSs of that TF, where top ranked TFBSs are statistically significant ones. However, whether these statistically significant TFBSs are functional (i.e. biologically relevant is still unknown. Here we develop a post-processor, called the functional propensity calculator (FPC, to assign a functional propensity to each TFBS in the existing computationally predicted TFBS datasets. It is known that functional TFBSs reveal strong positional preference towards the transcriptional start site (TSS. This motivates us to take TFBS position relative to the TSS as the key idea in building our FPC. Based on our calculated functional propensities, the TFBSs of a TF in the original TFBS dataset could be reordered, where top ranked TFBSs are now the ones with high functional propensities. To validate the biological significance of our results, we perform three published statistical tests to assess the enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO terms, the enrichment of physical protein-protein interactions, and the tendency of being co-expressed. The top ranked TFBSs in our reordered TFBS dataset outperform the top ranked TFBSs in the original TFBS dataset, justifying the effectiveness of our post-processor in extracting functional TFBSs from the original TFBS dataset. More importantly, assigning functional propensities to putative TFBSs enables biologists to easily identify which TFBSs in the promoter of interest are likely to be biologically relevant and are good candidates to do further detailed experimental investigation. The FPC is implemented as a web tool at http://santiago.ee.ncku.edu.tw/FPC/.

  9. Predicting binding within disordered protein regions to structurally characterised peptide-binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqasuddin Khan

    Full Text Available Disordered regions of proteins often bind to structured domains, mediating interactions within and between proteins. However, it is difficult to identify a priori the short disordered regions involved in binding. We set out to determine if docking such peptide regions to peptide binding domains would assist in these predictions.We assembled a redundancy reduced dataset of SLiM (Short Linear Motif containing proteins from the ELM database. We selected 84 sequences which had an associated PDB structures showing the SLiM bound to a protein receptor, where the SLiM was found within a 50 residue region of the protein sequence which was predicted to be disordered. First, we investigated the Vina docking scores of overlapping tripeptides from the 50 residue SLiM containing disordered regions of the protein sequence to the corresponding PDB domain. We found only weak discrimination of docking scores between peptides involved in binding and adjacent non-binding peptides in this context (AUC 0.58.Next, we trained a bidirectional recurrent neural network (BRNN using as input the protein sequence, predicted secondary structure, Vina docking score and predicted disorder score. The results were very promising (AUC 0.72 showing that multiple sources of information can be combined to produce results which are clearly superior to any single source.We conclude that the Vina docking score alone has only modest power to define the location of a peptide within a larger protein region known to contain it. However, combining this information with other knowledge (using machine learning methods clearly improves the identification of peptide binding regions within a protein sequence. This approach combining docking with machine learning is primarily a predictor of binding to peptide-binding sites, and is not intended as a predictor of specificity of binding to particular receptors.

  10. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Penn)

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins: a structural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briony eForbes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6 bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that influence processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by influencing gene transcription.IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, Linker and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP to date, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarises structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. It also highlights future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease.

  12. Structural parameterization of the binding enthalpy of small ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Irene; Freire, Ernesto

    2002-11-01

    A major goal in ligand and drug design is the optimization of the binding affinity of selected lead molecules. However, the binding affinity is defined by the free energy of binding, which, in turn, is determined by the enthalpy and entropy changes. Because the binding enthalpy is the term that predominantly reflects the strength of the interactions of the ligand with its target relative to those with the solvent, it is desirable to develop ways of predicting enthalpy changes from structural considerations. The application of structure/enthalpy correlations derived from protein stability data has yielded inconsistent results when applied to small ligands of pharmaceutical interest (MW the enthalpy associated with any possible conformational change in the protein or ligand upon binding; and, (3) the enthalpy associated with protonation/deprotonation events, if present. As in the case of protein stability, the intrinsic binding enthalpy scales with changes in solvent accessible surface areas. However, an accurate estimation of the intrinsic binding enthalpy requires explicit consideration of long-lived water molecules at the binding interface. The best statistical structure/enthalpy correlation is obtained when buried water molecules within 5-7 A of the ligand are included in the calculations. For all seven protein systems considered (HIV-1 protease, dihydrodipicolinate reductase, Rnase T1, streptavidin, pp60c-Src SH2 domain, Hsp90 molecular chaperone, and bovine beta-trypsin) the binding enthalpy of 25 small molecular weight peptide and nonpeptide ligands can be accounted for with a standard error of +/-0.3 kcal x mol(-1). Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Structure-Based Redesign of Cofactor Binding in Putrescine Oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata M.; Rovida, Stefano; van Duijn, Esther; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase (PuO) from Rhodococcus erythropolis is a soluble homodimeric Flavoprotein, which oxidizes small aliphatic diamines. In this study, we report the crystal structures and cofactor binding properties of wild-type and mutant enzymes. From a structural viewpoint, PuO closely resembles

  14. Chirality-induced conformational preferences in peptide-metal ion binding revealed by IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R.C.; Steill, J.D.; Oomens, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chirality reversal of a residue in a peptide can change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by gas-phase IR spectroscopy of peptide−metal ion complexes. The binding conformations of Li+, Na+, and H+ with the ll and dl stereoisomers of PhePhe were compared through IR ion

  15. Chirality-Induced Conformational Preferences in Peptide-Metal Ion Binding Revealed by IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R. C.; Steill, J. D.; Oomens, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chirality reversal of a residue in a peptide can change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by gas-phase IR spectroscopy of peptide metal ion complexes. The binding conformations of Li+, Na+, and H+ with the LL and DL stereoisomers of PhePhe were compared through IR ion

  16. Species Differences in the Carbohydrate Binding Preferences of Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouch, Erika C.; Smith, Kelly; McDonald, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Interactions of surfactant protein D (SP-D) with micro-organisms and organic antigens involve binding to the trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domain (neck+CRD). In these studies, we compared the ligand binding of homologous human, rat, and mouse trimeric neck+CRD fusion proteins, each...

  17. Species Differences in the Carbohydrate Binding Preferences of Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouch, Erika C.; Smith, Kelly; McDonald, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Interactions of surfactant protein D (SP-D) with micro-organisms and organic antigens involve binding to the trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domain (neck+CRD). In these studies, we compared the ligand binding of homologous human, rat, and mouse trimeric neck+CRD fusion proteins, each ...

  18. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  19. Secbase: database module to retrieve secondary structure elements with ligand binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Oliver; Cole, Jason; Block, Peter; Klebe, Gerhard

    2009-10-01

    Secbase is presented as a novel extension module of Relibase. It integrates the information about secondary structure elements into the retrieval facilities of Relibase. The data are accessible via the extended Relibase user interface, and integrated retrieval queries can be addressed using an extended version of Reliscript. The primary information about alpha-helices and beta-sheets is used as provided by the PDB. Furthermore, a uniform classification of all turn families, based on recent clustering methods, and a new helix assignment that is based on this turn classification has been included. Algorithms to analyze the geometric features of helices and beta-strands were also implemented. To demonstrate the performance of the Secbase implementation, some application examples are given. They provide new insights into the involvement of secondary structure elements in ligand binding. A survey of water molecules detected next to the N-terminus of helices is analyzed to show their involvement in ligand binding. Additionally, the parallel oriented NH groups at the alpha-helix N-termini provide special binding motifs to bind particular ligand functional groups with two adjacent oxygen atoms, e.g., as found in negatively charged carboxylate or phosphate groups, respectively. The present study also shows that the specific structure of the first turn of alpha-helices provides a suitable explanation for stabilizing charged structures. The magnitude of the overall helix macrodipole seems to have no or only a minor influence on binding. Furthermore, an overview of the involvement of secondary structure elements with the recognition of some important endogenous ligands such as cofactors shows some distinct preference for particular binding motifs and amino acids.

  20. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphorus Binding Sites in Proteins: Structural Preorganization and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias Felix; Greisen, Per Junior; Junker, Märta Caroline

    2014-01-01

    to individual structures that bind to phosphate groups; here, we investigate a total of 8307 structures obtained from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB). An analysis of the binding site amino acid propensities reveals very characteristic first shell residue distributions, which are found to be influenced...... by the characteristics of the phosphorus compound and by the presence of cobound cations. The second shell, which supports the coordinating residues in the first shell, is found to consist mainly of protein backbone groups. Our results show how the second shell residue distribution is dictated mainly by the first shell...

  2. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  3. Antigenic and structural conservation of herpesvirus DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littler, E; Yeo, J; Killington, R A; Purifoy, D J; Powell, K L

    1981-10-01

    Previously, we have shown a common antigen of several herpesviruses (pseudorabies virus, equine abortion virus and bovine mammillitis virus) to be antigenically related to the major DNA-binding proteins of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. In this study we have purified the cross-reacting polypeptide from cells infected with pseudorabies virus, equine abortion virus and bovine mammillitis virus and shown the cross-reacting protein to be a major DNA-binding protein for each virus. Tryptic peptide analysis of the cross-reacting DNA-binding proteins of all five viruses has shown structural similarities. The proteins thus were shown to share common antigenic sites, to have similar biological properties and to have a highly conserved amino acid sequence. This unexpected similarity between proteins from diverse herpes viruses suggests an essential and fundamental role of the major DNA-binding protein in herpes virus replication.

  4. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PALLADIN’S ACTIN BINDING DOMAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Moriah R.; Dixon, Richard D.S.; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Murphy, Grant S.; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Beam, Matthew T.; Srinath, Pavan; Patel, Julie; Mohiuddin, Jahan; Otey, Carol A.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the NMR structure of the actin-binding domain contained in the cell adhesion protein palladin. Previously we demonstrated that one of the immunoglobulin domains of palladin (Ig3) is both necessary and sufficient for direct F-actin binding in vitro. In this study, we identify two basic patches on opposite faces of Ig3 that are critical for actin binding and crosslinking. Sedimentation equilibrium assays indicate that the Ig3 domain of palladin does not self-associate. These combined data are consistent with an actin crosslinking mechanism that involves concurrent attachment of two actin filaments by a single palladin molecule by an electrostatic mechanism. Palladin mutations that disrupt actin binding show altered cellular distributions and morphology of actin in cells, revealing a functional requirement for the interaction between palladin and actin in vivo. PMID:23806659

  5. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  6. Structural and histone binding ability characterizations of human PWWP domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently.The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3.PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical β-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third β-strands and a C-terminal α-helix bundle. Both the canonical β-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the

  7. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1375–1381. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0900-4. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni(II). Schiff base complex. SARAT CHANDRA KUMARa, ABHIJIT PALa, MERRY MITRAa,. V M MANIKANDAMATHAVANb, CHIA -HER LINc, BALACHANDRAN UNNI NAIRb,∗.

  8. Structural, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical, DNA binding and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical, DNA binding and protein docking studies of two flexible imine oximes. YUNUS KAYAa,b. aDepartment of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, 16059 Bursa, Turkey. bDepartment of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Architecture, and Engineering, ...

  9. Nuclear Cartography: Patterns in Binding Energies and Subatomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. C.; Shelley, M.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear masses and binding energies are some of the first nuclear properties met in high school physics, and can be used to introduce radioactive decays, fusion, and fission. With relatively little extension, they can also illustrate fundamental concepts in nuclear physics, such as shell structure and pairing, and to discuss how the elements…

  10. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 8. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni(II) Schiff base complex. Sarat Chandra Kumar Abhijit Pal Merry Mitra V M Manikandamathavan Chia -Her Lin Balachandran Unni Nair Rajarshi Ghosh. Regular Articles Volume 127 ...

  11. The identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis DHFR inhibitors and the investigation of their binding preferences by using molecular modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Yu; Chang, Zhe; Yang, Yanhui; Pu, Jing; Sun, Tao; Kaur, Sargit; Sacchettini, James C.; Jung, Hunmin; Lin Wong, Wee; Fah Yap, Lee; Fong Ngeow, Yun; Paterson, Ian C.; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    It is an urgent need to develop new drugs for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and the enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a recognised drug target. The crystal structures of methotrexate binding to mt- and h-DHFR separately indicate that the glycerol (GOL) binding site is likely to be critical for the function of mt-DHFR selective inhibitors. We have used in silico methods to screen NCI small molecule database and a group of related compounds were obtained that inhibit mt-DHFR activity and showed bactericidal effects against a test Mtb strain. The binding poses were then analysed and the influence of GOL binding site was studied by using molecular modelling. By comparing the chemical structures, 4 compounds that might be able to occupy the GOL binding site were identified. However, these compounds contain large hydrophobic side chains. As the GOL binding site is more hydrophilic, molecular modelling indicated that these compounds were failed to occupy the GOL site. The most potent inhibitor (compound 6) demonstrated limited selectivity for mt-DHFR, but did contain a novel central core (7H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinazoline-1,3-diamine), which may significantly expand the chemical space of novel mt-DHFR inhibitors. Collectively, these observations will inform future medicinal chemistry efforts to improve the selectivity of compounds against mt-DHFR. PMID:26471125

  12. Solvation structure of ice-binding antifreeze proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wettlaufer, John

    2009-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can be found in organisms which survive at subzero temperatures. They were first discovered in polar fishes since the 1950's [1] and have been isolated meanwhile also from insects, plants, and bacteria. While AFPs shift the freezing point of water below the bulk melting point and hence can prevent recrystallization; the effect is non-colligative and there is a pronounced hysteresis between freezing and melting. For many AFPs it is generally accepted that they function through an irreversible binding to the ice-water interface which leads to a piecewise convex growth front with a lower nonequilibrium freezing point due to the Kelvin effect. Recent molecular dynamics simulations of the AFP from Choristoneura fumiferana reveal that the solvation structures of water at ice-binding and non-ice-binding faces of the protein are crucial for understanding how the AFP binds to the ice surface and how it is protected from being overgrown [2]. We use density functional theory of classical fluids in order to assess the microscopic solvent structure in the vicinity of protein faces with different surface properties. With our method, binding energies of different protein faces to the water-ice-interface can be computed efficiently in a simplified model. [1] Y. Yeh and R.E. Feeney, Chem. Rev. 96, 601 (1996). [2] D.R. Nutt and J.C. Smith, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 13066 (2008).

  13. Structural study of LEDGF/p75 binding partners

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Těšina, Petr; Čermáková, Kateřina; Procházková, Kateřina; Hořejší, Magdalena; Christ, F.; De Rijck, J.; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2013), s. 12-12 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /11./. 14.03.2013-16.03.2013, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : LEDGF/p75 * HIV * integrase-binding domain Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  14. Mapping small molecule binding data to structural domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Felix A; Rostom, Raghd; Overington, John P

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale bioactivity/SAR Open Data has recently become available, and this has allowed new analyses and approaches to be developed to help address the productivity and translational gaps of current drug discovery. One of the current limitations of these data is the relative sparsity of reported interactions per protein target, and complexities in establishing clear relationships between bioactivity and targets using bioinformatics tools. We detail in this paper the indexing of targets by the structural domains that bind (or are likely to bind) the ligand within a full-length protein. Specifically, we present a simple heuristic to map small molecule binding to Pfam domains. This profiling can be applied to all proteins within a genome to give some indications of the potential pharmacological modulation and regulation of all proteins. In this implementation of our heuristic, ligand binding to protein targets from the ChEMBL database was mapped to structural domains as defined by profiles contained within the Pfam-A database. Our mapping suggests that the majority of assay targets within the current version of the ChEMBL database bind ligands through a small number of highly prevalent domains, and conversely the majority of Pfam domains sampled by our data play no currently established role in ligand binding. Validation studies, carried out firstly against Uniprot entries with expert binding-site annotation and secondly against entries in the wwPDB repository of crystallographic protein structures, demonstrate that our simple heuristic maps ligand binding to the correct domain in about 90 percent of all assessed cases. Using the mappings obtained with our heuristic, we have assembled ligand sets associated with each Pfam domain. Small molecule binding has been mapped to Pfam-A domains of protein targets in the ChEMBL bioactivity database. The result of this mapping is an enriched annotation of small molecule bioactivity data and a grouping of activity classes

  15. Listening, watching, and reading: the structure and correlates of entertainment preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J; Goldberg, Lewis R; Zilca, Ran

    2011-04-01

    People spend considerable amounts of time and money listening to music, watching TV and movies, and reading books and magazines, yet almost no attention in psychology has been devoted to understanding individual differences in preferences for such entertainment. The present research was designed to examine the structure and correlates of entertainment genre preferences. Analyses of the genre preferences of more than 3,000 individuals revealed a remarkably clear factor structure. Using multiple samples, methods, and geographic regions, data converged to reveal five entertainment-preference dimensions: Communal, Aesthetic, Dark, Thrilling, and Cerebral. Preferences for these entertainment dimensions were uniquely related to demographics and personality traits. Results also indicated that personality accounted for significant proportions of variance in entertainment preferences over and above demographics. The results provide a foundation for developing and testing hypotheses about the psychology of entertainment preferences. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Listening, Watching, and Reading: The Structure and Correlates of Entertainment Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J.; Goldberg, Lewis R.; Zilca, Ran

    2010-01-01

    People spend considerable amounts of time and money listening to music, watching TV and movies, and reading books and magazines, yet almost no attention in psychology has been devoted to understanding individual differences in preferences for such entertainment. The present research was designed to examine the structure and correlates of entertainment genre preferences. Analyses of the genre preferences of over 3,000 individuals revealed a remarkably clear factor structure. Using multiple samples, methods, and geographic regions, data converged to reveal five entertainment-preference dimensions: Communal, Aesthetic, Dark, Thrilling, and Cerebral. Preferences for these entertainment dimensions were uniquely related to demographics and personality traits. Results also indicated that personality accounted for significant proportions of variance in entertainment preferences over and above demographics. The results provide a foundation for developing and testing hypotheses about the psychology of entertainment preferences. PMID:20649744

  17. Structural Changes of Creatine Kinase upon Substrate Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Forstner, Michael; Kriechbaum, Manfred; Laggner, Peter; Wallimann, Theo

    1998-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering was used to investigate structural changes upon binding of individual substrates or a transition state analog complex (TSAC; Mg-ADP, creatine, and KNO3) to creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes (dimeric muscle-type (M)-CK and octameric mitochondrial (Mi)-CK) and monomeric arginine kinase (AK). Considerable changes in the shape and the size of the molecules occurred upon binding of Mg-nucleotide or TSAC. The radius of gyration of Mi-CK was reduced from 55.6 A (free enzym...

  18. Zinc-Binding Cysteines: Diverse Functions and Structural Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Nicholas J.; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine residues are known to perform essential functions within proteins, including binding to various metal ions. In particular, cysteine residues can display high affinity toward zinc ions (Zn2+), and these resulting Zn2+-cysteine complexes are critical mediators of protein structure, catalysis and regulation. Recent advances in both experimental and theoretical platforms have accelerated the identification and functional characterization of Zn2+-bound cysteines. Zn2+-cysteine complexes have been observed across diverse protein classes and are known to facilitate a variety of cellular processes. Here, we highlight the structural characteristics and diverse functional roles of Zn2+-cysteine complexes in proteins and describe structural, computational and chemical proteomic technologies that have enabled the global discovery of novel Zn2+-binding cysteines. PMID:24970223

  19. Structural requirements of cholesterol for binding to Vibrio cholerae hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, Hajime; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Koichiro; Shimamura, Tadakatsu

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol is necessary for the conversion of Vibrio cholerae hemolysin (VCH) monomers into oligomers in liposome membranes. Using different sterols, we determined the stereochemical structures of the VCH-binding active groups present in cholesterol. The VCH monomers are bound to cholesterol, diosgenin, campesterol, and ergosterol, which have a hydroxyl group at position C-3 (3betaOH) in the A ring and a C-C double bond between positions C-5 and C-6 (C-C Delta(5)) in the B ring. They are not bound to epicholesterol and dihydrocholesterol, which form a covalent link with a 3alphaOH group and a C-C single bond between positions C-5 and C-6, respectively. This result suggests that the 3betaOH group and the C-CDelta(5) bond in cholesterol are required for VCH monomer binding. We further examined VCH oligomer binding to cholesterol. However, this oligomer did not bind to cholesterol, suggesting that the disappearance of the cholesterol-binding potential of the VCH oligomer might be a result of the conformational change caused by the conversion of the monomer into the oligomer. VCH oligomer formation was observed in liposomes containing sterols with the 3betaOH group and the C-C Delta(5) bond, and it correlated with the binding affinity of the monomer to each sterol. Therefore, it seems likely that monomer binding to membrane sterol leads to the assembly of the monomer. However, since oligomer formation was induced by liposomes containing either epicholesterol or dihydrocholesterol, the 3betaOH group and the C-C Delta(5) bond were not essential for conversion into the oligomer.

  20. Structural insights into substrate and coenzyme preference by SDR family protein Gox2253 from Gluconobater oxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bo; Cui, Dongbing; Zhang, Lujia; Jiang, Shuiqin; Machida, Satoru; Yuan, Y Adam; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-11-01

    Gox2253 from Gluconobacter oxydans belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, and catalyzes the reduction of heptanal, octanal, nonanal, and decanal with NADPH. To develop a robust working platform to engineer novel G. oxydans oxidoreductases with designed coenzyme preference, we adopted a structure based rational design strategy using computational predictions that considers the number of hydrogen bonds formed between enzyme and docked coenzyme. We report the crystal structure of Gox2253 at 2.6 Å resolution, ternary models of Gox2253 mutants in complex with NADH/short-chain aldehydes, and propose a structural mechanism of substrate selection. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that hydrogen bonds could form between 2'-hydroxyl group in the adenosine moiety of NADH and the side chain of Gox2253 mutant after arginine at position 42 is replaced with tyrosine or lysine. Consistent with the molecular dynamics prediction, Gox2253-R42Y/K mutants can use both NADH and NADPH as a coenzyme. Hence, the strategies here could provide a practical platform to engineer coenzyme selectivity for any given oxidoreductase and could serve as an additional consideration to engineer substrate-binding pockets. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Identification and characterization of preferred DNA-binding sites for the Thermus thermophilus transcriptional regulator FadR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minwoo Lee

    Full Text Available One of the primary transcriptional regulators of fatty acid homeostasis in many prokaryotes is the protein FadR. To better understand its biological function in the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus HB8, we sought to first determine its preferred DNA-binding sequences in vitro using the combinatorial selection method Restriction Endonuclease Protection, Selection, and Amplification (REPSA and then use this information to bioinformatically identify potential regulated genes. REPSA determined a consensus FadR-binding sequence 5´-TTRNACYNRGTNYAA-3´, which was further characterized using quantitative electrophoretic mobility shift assays. With this information, a search of the T. thermophilus HB8 genome found multiple operons potentially regulated by FadR. Several of these were identified as encoding proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and degradation; however, others were novel and not previously identified as targets of FadR. The role of FadR in regulating these genes was validated by physical and functional methods, as well as comparative genomic approaches to further characterize regulons in related organisms. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a systematic approach involving REPSA, biophysical characterization of protein-DNA binding, and bioinformatics can be used to postulate biological roles for potential transcriptional regulators.

  2. Structural and binding studies of SAP-1 protein with heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikash K; Mandal, Rahul S; Puniya, Bhanwar L; Kumar, Rahul; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-03-01

    SAP-1 is a low molecular weight cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) which belongs to type-2 cystatins family. SAP-1 protein purified from human seminal plasma (HuSP) has been shown to inhibit cysteine and serine proteases and exhibit interesting biological properties, including high temperature and pH stability. Heparin is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan (with varied chain length) which interacts with a number of proteins and regulates multiple steps in different biological processes. As an anticoagulant, heparin enhances inhibition of thrombin by the serpin antithrombin III. Therefore, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to improve our understanding of the binding interaction between heparin and SAP-1 (protease inhibitor). SPR data suggest that SAP-1 binds to heparin with a significant affinity (KD = 158 nm). SPR solution competition studies using heparin oligosaccharides showed that the binding of SAP-1 to heparin is dependent on chain length. Large oligosaccharides show strong binding affinity for SAP-1. Further to get insight into the structural aspect of interactions between SAP-1 and heparin, we used modelled structure of the SAP-1 and docked with heparin and heparin-derived polysaccharides. The results suggest that a positively charged residue lysine plays important role in these interactions. Such information should improve our understanding of how heparin, present in the reproductive tract, regulates cystatins activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Predicting DNA-binding proteins and binding residues by complex structure prediction and application to human proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhao

    Full Text Available As more and more protein sequences are uncovered from increasingly inexpensive sequencing techniques, an urgent task is to find their functions. This work presents a highly reliable computational technique for predicting DNA-binding function at the level of protein-DNA complex structures, rather than low-resolution two-state prediction of DNA-binding as most existing techniques do. The method first predicts protein-DNA complex structure by utilizing the template-based structure prediction technique HHblits, followed by binding affinity prediction based on a knowledge-based energy function (Distance-scaled finite ideal-gas reference state for protein-DNA interactions. A leave-one-out cross validation of the method based on 179 DNA-binding and 3797 non-binding protein domains achieves a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.77 with high precision (94% and high sensitivity (65%. We further found 51% sensitivity for 82 newly determined structures of DNA-binding proteins and 56% sensitivity for the human proteome. In addition, the method provides a reasonably accurate prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins based on predicted DNA-binding complex structures. Its application to human proteome leads to more than 300 novel DNA-binding proteins; some of these predicted structures were validated by known structures of homologous proteins in APO forms. The method [SPOT-Seq (DNA] is available as an on-line server at http://sparks-lab.org.

  4. Structure of human stabilin-1 interacting chitinase-like protein (SI-CLP) reveals a saccharide-binding cleft with lower sugar-binding selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Geng; Zhao, Yanmei; Bai, Xiaoyun; Liu, Yong; Green, Todd J; Luo, Ming; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2010-12-17

    Human secreted protein stabilin-1 interacting chitinase-like protein (SI-CLP) has been identified as a novel member of Glyco_18 domain-containing proteins that is involved in host defense and inflammatory reactions. Efficient secretion of SI-CLP is mediated by its interaction with the endocytic/sorting receptor stabilin-1. SI-CLP is expressed abundantly in macrophages and neutrophils and is up-regulated by Th2 cytokine IL-4 and glucocorticoid, which suggest that SI-CLP could be a marker for adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy. To gain insight into the biological function of SI-CLP, we determined the crystal structure of SI-CLP at 2.7 Å resolution by x-ray crystallography and found that it featured a typical triose-phosphate isomerase barrel fold with a putative saccharide-binding cleft. Comparison with other chitinase-like proteins showed the cleft to be atypically wide and open. The saccharide-binding capacity of SI-CLP was investigated, and its ligand-binding specificity was found to relate to the length of the oligosaccharides, with preference for chitotetraose. Further investigations reveal that SI-CLP could bind LPS in vitro and neutralize its endotoxin effect on macrophages. Our results demonstrate the saccharide-binding property of SI-CLP by structure and in vitro biochemical analyses and suggest the possible roles of SI-CLP in pathogen sensing and endotoxin neutralization.

  5. Zinc induces structural reorganization of gelatin binding domain from human fibronectin and affects collagen binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graille, Marc; Pagano, Maurice; Rose, Thierry; Ravaux, Michèle Reboud; van Tilbeurgh, Herman

    2010-06-09

    Fibronectin is a modular extracellular matrix protein involved in cell adhesion, cell motility, wound healing, and maintenance of cell morphology. It is composed of multiple repeats of three distinct modules: F(I), F(II), and F(III). Various combinations of these modules create fragments able to interact with different constituents of the extracellular matrix. Here, we present the 2.5-A resolution crystal structure of its 45-kDa gelatin-binding domain (GBD; 6F(I)-1F(II)-2F(II)-7F(I)-8F(I)-9F(I)), which also corresponds to the C-terminal half of the migration stimulating factor, a Fn splice variant expressed in human breast cancers. GBD forms a very compact zinc-mediated homodimer, in stark contrast with previous structures of fibronectin fragments. Most remarkably, 8F(I) no longer adopts the canonical F(I) fold but is composed of two long strands that associate with 7F(I) and 9F(I) into a large beta-sheet superdomain. Binding studies in solution confirmed that Zn induces conformational rearrangements and causes loss of binding of Fn-GBD to high-affinity collagen peptides. These data suggest the Zn may play a regulatory role for the cellular functions of fibronectin.

  6. Medieval bindings: stiff board structures in Slovenian manuscript collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedert Vodopivec

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research of particular binding structures in extant Slovene medieval codices. The research is limited only to stiff-board bound medieval manuscript collections in Slovenian public archives and libraries. The research synthetically presents particular structures, binding techniques and materials on medieval manuscripts bound or rebound before 16th century. The basis of the research is a census of extant medieval bookbinding monuments, which includes all obtainable data, sketches, pencil rubbings, and photographs. The paper aims to present the methodology of work used in the research as well as the process of formulating description form related to conservation bookbinding. The paper closes with observations and conclusions drawn from the analysis of the Slovenian collection of medieval codices.

  7. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Brian C. J.; S?k, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated h...

  8. PREDICTED STRUCTURE AND BINDING MOTIFS OF COLLAGEN α1(XI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, Owen M; Warner, Lisa R; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2011-12-01

    The amino propeptide of collagen α1(XI) (NPP) has been shown to bind glycosaminoglycans and to form a dimer. While these are independent biochemical events, it is likely that dimerization facilitates the interaction with glycosaminoglycans or alternatively, that glycosaminoglycan interaction facilitates the formation of an NPP:NPP dimer. The computer program MODELLER was used to generate a homology model of the collagen α1(XI) NPP monomer using the crystal structure of the closely related noncollagenous-4 (NC4) domain of collagen α1(IX) (PDB:2UUR) as the template. Additionally, a dimer model of collagen α1(XI) NPP domain was created based upon the thrombospondin dimer template (PDB:1Z78). The structure of the dimer created in MODELLER was validated by comparison to a dimer model generated by docking two monomers of PDB:2UUR using ClusPro. Calculations of relative binding energy for the interaction between each collagen α1(XI) NPP model and glycosaminoglycans as ligands was performed using AutoDock4. Computational results support a higher affinity between heparan sulfate and a dimer compared to a monomer. These findings are supported by affinity chromatography experiments in which distinct monomer and dimer peaks were observed. Sequential point mutation studies of the putative binding site (147-KKKITK-152) indicated the importance of the basic lysine residue for binding to heparan sulfate. Two orders of magnitude change in binding affinity was predicted when comparing wild type to the mutation K152A. Experimental data supports the predicted change in affinity.

  9. Content-based music recommendation using underlying music preference structure

    OpenAIRE

    Soleymani M.; Aljanaki A.; Wiering F.; Veltkamp R.C.

    2015-01-01

    The cold start problem for new users or items is a great challenge for recommender systems. New items can be positioned within the existing items using a similarity metric to estimate their ratings. However, the calculation of similarity varies by domain and available resources. In this paper, we propose a content-based music recommender system which is based on a set of attributes derived from psychological studies of music preference. These five attributes, namely, Mellow, Unpretentious, So...

  10. eMatchSite: sequence order-independent structure alignments of ligand binding pockets in protein models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Brylinski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4-9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite.

  11. DNA binding of dinuclear iron(II) metallosupramolecular cylinders. DNA unwinding and sequence preference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malina, Jaroslav; Hannon, M.J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 11 (2008), s. 3630-3638 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB400040601; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200200651; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA MZd(CZ) NR8562 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040803; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08017 Program:IA; ME Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : supramolecular chemistry * enantiomeric DNA binding * metallosupramolecular cylinder Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine Impact factor: 6.878, year: 2008

  12. Dissociation and metal-binding characteristics of yellow lichen substances suggest a relationship with site preferences of lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René; Willenbruch, Karen; Huneck, Siegfried; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Many species of lichen-forming fungi contain yellow or orange extracellular pigments belonging to the dibenzofurans (usnic acid), anthraquinones (e.g. parietin) or pulvinic acid group. These pigments are all equally efficient light screens, leading us to question the potential ecological and evolutionary significance of diversity in yellow and orange lichen substances. Here the hypothesis is tested that the different pigments differ in metal-binding characteristics, which suggest that they may contribute to adaptation to sites differing in pH and metal availability. UV spectroscopy was used to study the dissociation and the pH dependence of the metal-binding behaviour of seven isolated lichen substances in methanol. Metals applied were selected macro- and micro-nutrients (Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+)). All the pigments studied are strong to moderate acids with pK(a1) values between 2.8 and 4.5. Metal complexation is common in the lichen substances studied. Complexation takes place under acidic conditions with usnic acid, but under alkaline conditions with parietin and most compounds of the pulvinic acid group. The pulvinic acid derivative rhizocarpic acid forms metal complexes both in the acidic and the alkaline range. Metal complexation by lichen substances could be a prerequisite for lichen substance-mediated control of metal uptake. Assuming such an effect at pH values where the affinity of the metal for the lichen substance is intermediate would explain the strong preference of lichens with usnic or rhizocarpic acids to acidic substrata. Moreover, it would explain the preference of lichens with parietin and some lichens with compounds of the pulvinic acid group either for nutrient-rich substrata at low pH or for calcareous substrata.

  13. Complementarity of structure ensembles in protein-protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberg, Raik; Leckner, Johan; Nilges, Michael

    2004-12-01

    Protein-protein association is often accompanied by changes in receptor and ligand structure. This interplay between protein flexibility and protein-protein recognition is currently the largest obstacle both to our understanding of and to the reliable prediction of protein complexes. We performed two sets of molecular dynamics simulations for the unbound receptor and ligand structures of 17 protein complexes and applied shape-driven rigid body docking to all combinations of representative snapshots. The crossdocking of structure ensembles increased the likelihood of finding near-native solutions. The free ensembles appeared to contain multiple complementary conformations. These were in general not related to the bound structure. We suggest that protein-protein binding follows a three-step mechanism of diffusion, free conformer selection, and refolding. This model combines previously conflicting ideas and is in better agreement with the current data on interaction forces, time scales, and kinetics.

  14. The do re mi's of everyday life: the structure and personality correlates of music preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J; Gosling, Samuel D

    2003-06-01

    The present research examined individual differences in music preferences. A series of 6 studies investigated lay beliefs about music, the structure underlying music preferences, and the links between music preferences and personality. The data indicated that people consider music an important aspect of their lives and listening to music an activity they engaged in frequently. Using multiple samples, methods, and geographic regions, analyses of the music preferences of over 3,500 individuals converged to reveal 4 music-preference dimensions: Reflective and Complex, Intense and Rebellious, Upbeat and Conventional, and Energetic and Rhythmic. Preferences for these music dimensions were related to a wide array of personality dimensions (e.g., Openness), self-views (e.g., political orientation), and cognitive abilities (e.g., verbal IQ).

  15. Client Proteins and Small Molecule Inhibitors Display Distinct Binding Preferences for Constitutive and Stress-Induced HSP90 Isoforms and Their Conformationally Restricted Mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Prince

    Full Text Available The two cytosolic/nuclear isoforms of the molecular chaperone HSP90, stress-inducible HSP90α and constitutively expressed HSP90β, fold, assemble and maintain the three-dimensional structure of numerous client proteins. Because many HSP90 clients are important in cancer, several HSP90 inhibitors have been evaluated in the clinic. However, little is known concerning possible unique isoform or conformational preferences of either individual HSP90 clients or inhibitors. In this report, we compare the relative interaction strength of both HSP90α and HSP90β with the transcription factors HSF1 and HIF1α, the kinases ERBB2 and MET, the E3-ubiquitin ligases KEAP1 and RHOBTB2, and the HSP90 inhibitors geldanamycin and ganetespib. We observed unexpected differences in relative client and drug preferences for the two HSP90 isoforms, with HSP90α binding each client protein with greater apparent affinity compared to HSP90β, while HSP90β bound each inhibitor with greater relative interaction strength compared to HSP90α. Stable HSP90 interaction was associated with reduced client activity. Using a defined set of HSP90 conformational mutants, we found that some clients interact strongly with a single, ATP-stabilized HSP90 conformation, only transiently populated during the dynamic HSP90 chaperone cycle, while other clients interact equally with multiple HSP90 conformations. These data suggest different functional requirements among HSP90 clientele that, for some clients, are likely to be ATP-independent. Lastly, the two inhibitors examined, although sharing the same binding site, were differentially able to access distinct HSP90 conformational states.

  16. Common structural features of cholesterol binding sites in crystallized soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alejandro M

    2017-06-01

    Cholesterol-protein interactions are essential for the architectural organization of cell membranes and for lipid metabolism. While cholesterol-sensing motifs in transmembrane proteins have been identified, little is known about cholesterol recognition by soluble proteins. We reviewed the structural characteristics of binding sites for cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate from crystallographic structures available in the Protein Data Bank. This analysis unveiled key features of cholesterol-binding sites that are present in either all or the majority of sites: i ) the cholesterol molecule is generally positioned between protein domains that have an organized secondary structure; ii ) the cholesterol hydroxyl/sulfo group is often partnered by Asn, Gln, and/or Tyr, while the hydrophobic part of cholesterol interacts with Leu, Ile, Val, and/or Phe; iii ) cholesterol hydrogen-bonding partners are often found on α-helices, while amino acids that interact with cholesterol's hydrophobic core have a slight preference for β-strands and secondary structure-lacking protein areas; iv ) the steroid's C21 and C26 constitute the "hot spots" most often seen for steroid-protein hydrophobic interactions; v ) common "cold spots" are C8-C10, C13, and C17, at which contacts with the proteins were not detected. Several common features we identified for soluble protein-steroid interaction appear evolutionarily conserved. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Small world network strategies for studying protein structures and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Small world network concepts provide many new opportunities to investigate the complex three dimensional structures of protein molecules. This mini-review explores the published literature on using small-world network approaches to study protein structure, with emphasis on the different combinations of descriptors that have been tested, on studies involving ligand binding in protein-ligand complexes, and on protein-protein complexes. The benefits and success of small world network approaches, which change the focus from specific interactions to the local environment, even to non-local phenomenon, are described. The purpose is to show the different ways that small world network concepts have been used for building new computational models for studying protein structure and function, and for extending and improving existing modelling approaches.

  18. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RNA BINDING DOMAIN OF HUMAN STEM LOOP BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruthi Kashyap

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A gene encoding the RNA binding domain (RBD of human stem loop binding protein (SLBP was cloned in pET 28a vector and over-expressed in E. coli codon plus cells. The over-expressed SLBP-RBD carried no tag and aggregated as inclusion bodies in the cell lysate. Inclusion bodies were semi-purified to >85% purity by establishing a method involving detergent washing and subsequently denatured in 8 M urea. Refolding of the denatured RBD was carried out by step dialysis in decreasing concentrations of urea and L-arginine. Refolded SLBP-RBD was analyzed using size exclusion chromatography that revealed its monomeric nature and folded state. Uniformly 15N and 15N,13C labeled SLBP-RBD was prepared at concentrations for solution NMR studies. Approximately, 60% of the sequence specific backbone resonance assignments have been achieved through standard triple resonance NMR experiments. Analyses of secondary chemical shifts reveal presence of a small helical secondary structural elements and large intrinsically disordered regions.

  19. Structural changes of creatine kinase upon substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, M; Kriechbaum, M; Laggner, P; Wallimann, T

    1998-08-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering was used to investigate structural changes upon binding of individual substrates or a transition state analog complex (TSAC; Mg-ADP, creatine, and KNO3) to creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes (dimeric muscle-type (M)-CK and octameric mitochondrial (Mi)-CK) and monomeric arginine kinase (AK). Considerable changes in the shape and the size of the molecules occurred upon binding of Mg-nucleotide or TSAC. The radius of gyration of Mi-CK was reduced from 55.6 A (free enzyme) to 48.9 A (enzyme plus Mg-ATP) and to 48.2 A (enzyme plus TSAC). M-CK showed similar changes from 28.0 A (free enzyme) to 25.6 A (enzyme plus Mg-ATP) and to 25.5 A (enzyme plus TSAC). Creatine alone did not lead to significant changes in the radii of gyration, nor did free ATP or ADP. AK also showed a change of the radius of gyration from 21.5 A (free enzyme) to 19.7 A (enzyme plus Mg-ATP), whereas with arginine alone only a minor change could be observed. The primary change in structure as seen with monomeric AK seems to be a Mg-nucleotide-induced domain movement relative to each other, whereas the effect of substrate may be of local order only. In CK, however, additional movements have to be involved.

  20. HemeBIND: a novel method for heme binding residue prediction by combining structural and sequence information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jianjun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prediction of binding residues involved in the interactions between proteins and small ligands is one of the major challenges in structural bioinformatics. Heme is an essential and commonly used ligand that plays critical roles in electron transfer, catalysis, signal transduction and gene expression. Although much effort has been devoted to the development of various generic algorithms for ligand binding site prediction over the last decade, no algorithm has been specifically designed to complement experimental techniques for identification of heme binding residues. Consequently, an urgent need is to develop a computational method for recognizing these important residues. Results Here we introduced an efficient algorithm HemeBIND for predicting heme binding residues by integrating structural and sequence information. We systematically investigated the characteristics of binding interfaces based on a non-redundant dataset of heme-protein complexes. It was found that several sequence and structural attributes such as evolutionary conservation, solvent accessibility, depth and protrusion clearly illustrate the differences between heme binding and non-binding residues. These features can then be separately used or combined to build the structure-based classifiers using support vector machine (SVM. The results showed that the information contained in these features is largely complementary and their combination achieved the best performance. To further improve the performance, an attempt has been made to develop a post-processing procedure to reduce the number of false positives. In addition, we built a sequence-based classifier based on SVM and sequence profile as an alternative when only sequence information can be used. Finally, we employed a voting method to combine the outputs of structure-based and sequence-based classifiers, which demonstrated remarkably better performance than the individual classifier alone

  1. Two unique ligand-binding clamps of Rhizopus oryzae starch binding domain for helical structure disruption of amylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21 members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs.

  2. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  3. HLA-G peptide preferences change in transformed cells: impact on the binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Alexander A; Simper, Gwendolin S; Hiemisch, Wiebke; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Döding, Christina

    2018-03-30

    HLA-G is known for its strictly restricted tissue distribution. HLA-G expression could be detected in immune privileged organs and many tumor entities such as leukemia, multiple myeloma, and non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin's lymphoma. This functional variability from mediation of immune tolerance to facilitation of tumor immune evasion strategies might translate to a differential NK cell inhibition between immune-privileged organs and tumor cells. The biophysical invariability of the HLA-G heavy chain and its contrary diversity in immunity implicates a strong influence of the bound peptides on the pHLA-G structure. The aim was to determine if HLA-G displays a tissue-specific peptide repertoire. Therefore, using soluble sHLA-G technology, we analyzed the K562 and HDLM-2 peptide repertoires. Although both cell lines possess a comparable proteome and recruit HLA-G-restricted peptides through the same peptide-loading pathway, the peptide features appear to be cell specific. HDLM-2 derived HLA-G peptides are anchored by an Arg at p1 and K562-derived peptides are anchored by a Lys. At p2, no anchor motif could be determined while peptides were anchored at pΩ with a Leu and showed an auxiliary anchor motif Pro at p3. To appreciate if the peptide anchor alterations are due to a cell-specific differential peptidome, we performed analysis of peptide availability within the different cell types. Yet, the comparison of the cell-specific proteome and HLA-G-restricted ligandome clearly demonstrates a tissue-specific peptide selection by HLA-G molecules. This exclusive and unexpected observation suggests an exquisite immune function of HLA-G.

  4. A Structural Labor Supply Model with Nonparametric Preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, A.H.O.; Das, J.W.M.; Gong, X.

    2000-01-01

    Nonparametric techniques are usually seen as a statistic device for data description and exploration, and not as a tool for estimating models with a richer economic structure, which are often required for policy analysis.This paper presents an example where nonparametric flexibility can be attained

  5. Debt-maturity structures should match risk preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapenski, L C

    1999-12-01

    Key to any debt-maturity matching strategy is financing assets with the appropriate debt structure. Financial managers need to establish an optimal capital structure and then choose the best maturity-matching structure for their debt. Two maturity-matching strategies that are available to healthcare financial managers are the accounting approach and the finance approach. The accounting approach, which defines asset maturities as current or fixed, is a riskier financing strategy than the finance approach, which defines asset maturities as permanent or temporary. The added risk occurs because of the accounting approach's heavy reliance on short-term debt. The accounting approach offers the potential for lower costs at the expense of higher risk. Healthcare financial managers who believe the financing function should support the organization's operations without adding undue risk should use the finance approach to maturity matching. Asset maturities in those organizations then should be considered permanent or temporary rather than current or fixed, and the debt-maturity structure should reflect this.

  6. Structure of a new DNA-binding domain which regulates pathogenesis in a wide variety of fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Matthew B; Rosenberg, Oren S; Cox, Jeffery S; Stroud, Robert M; Finer-Moore, Janet S; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-07-22

    WOPR-domain proteins are found throughout the fungal kingdom where they function as master regulators of cell morphology and pathogenesis. Genetic and biochemical experiments previously demonstrated that these proteins bind to specific DNA sequences and thereby regulate transcription. However, their primary sequence showed no relationship to any known DNA-binding domain, and the basis for their ability to recognize DNA sequences remained unknown. Here, we describe the 2.6-Å crystal structure of a WOPR domain in complex with its preferred DNA sequence. The structure reveals that two highly conserved regions, separated by an unconserved linker, form an interdigitated β-sheet that is tilted into the major groove of DNA. Although the main interaction surface is in the major groove, the highest-affinity interactions occur in the minor groove, primarily through a deeply penetrating arginine residue. The structure reveals a new, unanticipated mechanism by which proteins can recognize specific sequences of DNA.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG binds and unwinds model DNA substrates with a preference for Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Balasingham, Seetha V; Laerdahl, Jon K; Homberset, Håvard; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-08-01

    The RecG enzyme, a superfamily 2 helicase, is present in nearly all bacteria. Here we report for the first time that the recG gene is also present in the genomes of most vascular plants as well as in green algae, but is not found in other eukaryotes or archaea. The precise function of RecG is poorly understood, although ample evidence shows that it plays critical roles in DNA repair, recombination and replication. We further demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG (RecG(Mtb)) DNA binding activity had a broad substrate specificity, whereas it only unwound branched-DNA substrates such as Holliday junctions (HJs), replication forks, D-loops and R-loops, with a strong preference for the HJ as a helicase substrate. In addition, RecG(Mtb) preferentially bound relatively long (≥40 nt) ssDNA, exhibiting a higher affinity for the homopolymeric nucleotides poly(dT), poly(dG) and poly(dC) than for poly(dA). RecG(Mtb) helicase activity was supported by hydrolysis of ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Cu(2+) or Fe(2+). Like its Escherichia coli orthologue, RecG(Mtb) is also a strictly DNA-dependent ATPase.

  8. Consequences of cisplatin binding on nucleosome structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ryan C; Lippard, Stephen J

    2010-12-22

    The effects of cisplatin binding to DNA were explored at the nucleosome level to incorporate key features of the eukaryotic nuclear environment. An X-ray crystal structure of a site-specifically platinated nucleosome carrying a 1,3-cis-{Pt(NH₃)₂}²+-d(GpTpG) intrastrand cross-link reveals the details of how this adduct dictates the rotational positioning of DNA in the nucleosome. Results from in vitro nucleosome mobility assays indicate that a single platinum adduct interferes with ATP-independent sliding of DNA around the octamer core. Data from in vitro transcription experiments suggest that RNA polymerases can successfully navigate along cisplatin-damaged DNA templates that contain nucleosomes, but stall when the transcription elongation complex physically contacts a platinum cross-link located on the template strand. These results provide information about the effects of cisplatin binding to nuclear DNA and enhance our understanding of the mechanism of transcription inhibition by platinum anticancer compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Crystal structure of Methanococcus jannaschii TATA box-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Naruhiko; Senda, Miki; Natsume, Ryo; Senda, Toshiya; Horikoshi, Masami

    2008-11-01

    As the archaeal transcription system consists of a eukaryotic-type transcription apparatus and bacterial-type regulatory transcription factors, analyses of the molecular interface between the transcription apparatus and regulatory transcription factors are critical to reveal the evolutionary change of the transcription system. TATA box-binding protein (TBP), the central components of the transcription apparatus are classified into three groups: eukaryotic, archaeal-I and archaeal-II TBPs. Thus, comparative functional analysis of these three groups of TBP is important for the study of the evolution of the transcription system. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an archaeal-II TBP from Methanococcus jannaschii. The highly conserved and group-specific conserved surfaces of TBP bind to DNA and TFIIB/TFB, respectively. The phylogenetic trees of TBP and TFIIB/TFB revealed that they evolved in a coupled manner. The diversified surface of TBP is negatively charged in the archaeal-II TBP, which is completely different from the case of eukaryotic and archaeal-I TBPs, which are positively charged and biphasic, respectively. This difference is responsible for the diversification of the regulatory functions of TBP during evolution.

  10. TCR-contacting residues orientation and HLA-DRβ* binding preference determine long-lasting protective immunity against malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, Martha P.; Suarez, Carlos F.; Varela, Yahson; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Bermudez, Adriana; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Fully-protective, long-lasting, immunological (FPLLI) memory against Plasmodium falciparum malaria regarding immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) vaccinated into monkeys previously challenged and re-challenged 60 days later with a lethal Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum strain was found to be associated with preferential high binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1* allelic molecules of the major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II), rather than HLA-DRβ3*, β4*, β5* alleles. Complete PPII L 3D structure, a longer distance (26.5 Å ± 1.5 Å) between residues perfectly fitting into HLA-DRβ1*PBR pockets 1 and 9, a gauche − rotamer orientation in p8 TCR-contacting polar residue and a larger volume of polar p2 residues was also found. This data, in association with previously-described p3 and p7 apolar residues having gauche + orientation to form a perfect MHC-II-peptide-TCR complex, determines the stereo-electronic and topochemical characteristics associated with FPLLI immunological memory. - Highlights: • Stereo-electronic and topochemical rules associated with FPLLI immunological memory. • Presence of very high long-lasting antibody titres against Plasmodium falciparum Spz. • Protective memory induction associated with a binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1*. • gauche − rotamer orientation in p8 polar residue is related to is related to immunological memory.

  11. TCR-contacting residues orientation and HLA-DRβ* binding preference determine long-lasting protective immunity against malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba, Martha P.; Suarez, Carlos F. [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad de Ciencias Aplicadas y Ambientales (UDCA), Bogotá (Colombia); Varela, Yahson [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Bermudez, Adriana [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@gmail.com [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia)

    2016-09-02

    Fully-protective, long-lasting, immunological (FPLLI) memory against Plasmodium falciparum malaria regarding immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) vaccinated into monkeys previously challenged and re-challenged 60 days later with a lethal Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum strain was found to be associated with preferential high binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1* allelic molecules of the major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II), rather than HLA-DRβ3*, β4*, β5* alleles. Complete PPII{sub L} 3D structure, a longer distance (26.5 Å ± 1.5 Å) between residues perfectly fitting into HLA-DRβ1*PBR pockets 1 and 9, a gauche{sup −} rotamer orientation in p8 TCR-contacting polar residue and a larger volume of polar p2 residues was also found. This data, in association with previously-described p3 and p7 apolar residues having gauche{sup +} orientation to form a perfect MHC-II-peptide-TCR complex, determines the stereo-electronic and topochemical characteristics associated with FPLLI immunological memory. - Highlights: • Stereo-electronic and topochemical rules associated with FPLLI immunological memory. • Presence of very high long-lasting antibody titres against Plasmodium falciparum Spz. • Protective memory induction associated with a binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1*. • gauche{sup −} rotamer orientation in p8 polar residue is related to is related to immunological memory.

  12. Ice cream structure modification by ice-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleda, Aleksei; Tsanev, Robert; Klesment, Tiina; Vilu, Raivo; Laos, Katrin

    2018-04-25

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs), also known as antifreeze proteins, were added to ice cream to investigate their effect on structure and texture. Ice recrystallization inhibition was assessed in the ice cream mixes using a novel accelerated microscope assay and the ice cream microstructure was studied using an ice crystal dispersion method. It was found that adding recombinantly produced fish type III IBPs at a concentration 3 mg·L -1 made ice cream hard and crystalline with improved shape preservation during melting. Ice creams made with IBPs (both from winter rye, and type III IBP) had aggregates of ice crystals that entrapped pockets of the ice cream mixture in a rigid network. Larger individual ice crystals and no entrapment in control ice creams was observed. Based on these results a model of ice crystals aggregates formation in the presence of IBPs was proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Structure and Content of Long-Term and Short-Term Mate Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Jonason

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses two limitations in the mate preferences literature. First, research all-too-often relies on single-item assessments of mate preferences precluding more advanced statistical techniques like factor analysis. Second, when factor analysis could be done, it exclusively has done for long-term mate preferences, at the exclusion of short-term mate preferences. In this study (N = 401, we subjected 20 items designed to measure short- and long-term mate preferences to both principle components (n = 200 and confirmatory factor analysis (n = 201. In the long-term context, we replicated previous findings that there are three different categories of preferences: physical attractiveness, interpersonal warmth, and social status. In the short-term context, physical attractiveness occupied two parts of the structure, social status dropped out, and interpersonal warmth remained. Across short- and long-term contexts, there were slight changes in what defined the shared dimensions (i.e., physical attractiveness and interpersonal warmth, suggesting prior work that applies the same inventory to each context might be flawed. We also replicated sex differences and similarities in mate preferences and correlates with sociosexuality and mate value. We adopt an evolutionary paradigm to understand our results.

  14. The relationship between occupational culture dimensions and reward preferences: A structural equation modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bussin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Reward has links to employee attraction and retention and as such has a role to play in managing talent. However, despite a range of research, there is still lack of clarity on employee preferences relating to reward.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to recommend and appraise a theoretical model of the relationship between occupational culture dimensions and reward preferences of specific occupational groups in the South African context.Motivation for the study: The motivation for this study was to address the gap that exists with reward preferences and occupational culture with a view to identifying and gaining insight into individual preferences.Research design, approach and method: A structural equation modelling approach was adopted in exploring the proposed relationships. A South African Information, Communication, and Technology (ICT organisation served as the population, and a web-based survey assisted in gathering study data (n = 1362.Main findings: The findings provided support for the relationship between occupational culture dimensions and certain reward preferences. In particular, statistically significant results were obtained with the inclusion of the Environment, Team, and Time occupational culture dimensions as independent variables.Practical implications and value-add: The study provides workable input to organisations and reward professionals in the design of their reward strategies and programmes.Keywords: compensation; employee preferences; occupational culture; remuneration; reward preferences

  15. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  16. Crystal Structures and Binding Dynamics of Odorant-Binding Protein 3 from two aphid species Megoura viciae and Nasonovia ribisnigri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northey, Tom; Venthur, Herbert; De Biasio, Filomena; Chauviac, Francois-Xavier; Cole, Ambrose; Ribeiro, Karlos Antonio Lisboa; Grossi, Gerarda; Falabella, Patrizia; Field, Linda M; Keep, Nicholas H; Zhou, Jing-Jiang

    2016-04-22

    Aphids use chemical cues to locate hosts and find mates. The vetch aphid Megoura viciae feeds exclusively on the Fabaceae, whereas the currant-lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri alternates hosts between the Grossulariaceae and Asteraceae. Both species use alarm pheromones to warn of dangers. For N. ribisnigri this pheromone is a single component (E)-β-farnesene but M. viciae uses a mixture of (E)-β-farnesene, (-)-α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene. Odorant-binding proteins (OBP) are believed to capture and transport such semiochemicals to their receptors. Here, we report the first aphid OBP crystal structures and examine their molecular interactions with the alarm pheromone components. Our study reveals some unique structural features: 1) the lack of an internal ligand binding site; 2) a striking groove in the surface of the proteins as a putative binding site; 3) the N-terminus rather than the C-terminus occupies the site closing off the conventional OBP pocket. The results from fluorescent binding assays, molecular docking and dynamics demonstrate that OBP3 from M. viciae can bind to all four alarm pheromone components and the differential ligand binding between these very similar OBP3s from the two aphid species is determined mainly by the direct π-π interactions between ligands and the aromatic residues of OBP3s in the binding pocket.

  17. Structural basis of subunit selectivity for competitive NMDA receptor antagonists with preference for GluN2A over GluN2B subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Genevieve E.; Mou, Tung-Chung; Tamborini, Lucia; Pomper, Martin G.; De Micheli, Carlo; Conti, Paola; Pinto, Andrea; Hansen, Kasper B. (JHU); (Milan); (Montana)

    2017-07-31

    NMDA-type glutamate receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that contribute to excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS). Most NMDA receptors comprise two glycine-binding GluN1 and two glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits (GluN2A–D). We describe highly potent (S)-5-[(R)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid (ACEPC) competitive GluN2 antagonists, of which ST3 has a binding affinity of 52 nM at GluN1/2A and 782 nM at GluN1/2B receptors. This 15-fold preference of ST3 for GluN1/2A over GluN1/2B is improved compared with NVP-AAM077, a widely used GluN2A-selective antagonist, which we show has 11-fold preference for GluN1/2A over GluN1/2B. Crystal structures of the GluN1/2A agonist binding domain (ABD) heterodimer with bound ACEPC antagonists reveal a binding mode in which the ligands occupy a cavity that extends toward the subunit interface between GluN1 and GluN2A ABDs. Mutational analyses show that the GluN2A preference of ST3 is primarily mediated by four nonconserved residues that are not directly contacting the ligand, but positioned within 12 Å of the glutamate binding site. Two of these residues influence the cavity occupied by ST3 in a manner that results in favorable binding to GluN2A, but occludes binding to GluN2B. Thus, we reveal opportunities for the design of subunit-selective competitive NMDA receptor antagonists by identifying a cavity for ligand binding in which variations exist between GluN2A and GluN2B subunits. This structural insight suggests that subunit selectivity of glutamate-site antagonists can be mediated by mechanisms in addition to direct contributions of contact residues to binding affinity.

  18. Ubiquinone binding site of yeast NADH dehydrogenase revealed by structures binding novel competitive- and mixed-type inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tetsuo; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Shiba, Tomoo; Oohashi, Takumi; Iwata, So; Yagi, Takao; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Hideto; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; Hirano, Katsuya

    2018-02-05

    Yeast Ndi1 is a monotopic alternative NADH dehydrogenase. Its crystal structure in complex with the electron acceptor, ubiquinone, has been determined. However, there has been controversy regarding the ubiquinone binding site. To address these points, we identified the first competitive inhibitor of Ndi1, stigmatellin, along with new mixed-type inhibitors, AC0-12 and myxothiazol, and thereby determined the crystal structures of Ndi1 in complexes with the inhibitors. Two separate binding sites of stigmatellin, STG-1 and STG-2, were observed. The electron density at STG-1, located at the vicinity of the FAD cofactor, further demonstrated two binding modes: STG-1a and STG-1b. AC0-12 and myxothiazol are also located at the vicinity of FAD. The comparison of the binding modes among stigmatellin at STG-1, AC0-12, and myxothiazol revealed a unique position for the aliphatic tail of stigmatellin at STG-1a. Mutations of amino acid residues that interact with this aliphatic tail at STG-1a reduced the affinity of Ndi1 for ubiquinone. In conclusion, the position of the aliphatic tail of stigmatellin at STG-1a provides a structural basis for its competitive inhibition of Ndi1. The inherent binding site of ubiquinone is suggested to overlap with STG-1a that is distinct from the binding site for NADH.

  19. Discovery of novel membrane binding structures and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Lenoir, Marc; Dancea, Felician; Sridhar, Pooja; Raush, Eugene; Bissig, Christin; Gruenberg, Jean; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The function of a protein is determined by its intrinsic activity in the context of its subcellular distribution. Membranes localize proteins within cellular compartments and govern their specific activities. Discovering such membrane-protein interactions is important for understanding biological mechanisms, and could uncover novel sites for therapeutic intervention. Here we present a method for detecting membrane interactive proteins and their exposed residues that insert into lipid bilayers. Although the development process involved analysis of how C1b, C2, ENTH, FYVE, Gla, pleckstrin homology (PH) and PX domains bind membranes, the resulting Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) method yields predictions for a given protein of known three dimensional structures without referring to canonical membrane-targeting modules. This approach was tested on the Arf1 GTPase, ATF2 acetyltransferase, von Willebrand factor A3 domain and Neisseria gonorrhoeae MsrB protein, and further refined with membrane interactive and non-interactive FAPP1 and PKD1 pleckstrin homology domains, respectively. Furthermore we demonstrate how this tool can be used to discover unprecedented membrane binding functions as illustrated by the Bro1 domain of Alix, which was revealed to recognize lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). Validation of novel membrane-protein interactions relies on other techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) which was used here to map the sites of micelle interaction. Together this indicates that genome-wide identification of known and novel membrane interactive proteins and sites is now feasible, and provides a new tool for functional annotation of the proteome. PMID:25394204

  20. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  1. Saudi mothers' preferences about breaking bad news concerning newborns: a structured verbal questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Breaking bad news (BBN) to parents whose newborn has a major disease is an ethical dilemma. In Saudi Arabia, BBN about newborns is performed according to the parental preferences that have been reported from non-Arabic/non-Islamic countries. Saudi mothers' preferences about BBN have not yet been studied. Therefore, we aimed to elicit the preferences of Saudi mothers about BBN concerning newborns. Methods We selected a convenience sample of 402 Saudi mothers, aged 18-50 years, who had no previous experience with BBN. We selected them via a simple number-randomization scheme from the premises of a level III Saudi hospital between October of 2009 and January of 2011. We used a hypothetical situation (BBN about trisomy 21) to elicit their preferences about BBN concerning newborns via a structured verbal questionnaire composed of 12 multiple-choice questions. We expressed their preferences as percentages (95% confidence interval), and we used the Kendall's W test (W) to assess the degree of agreement in preferences. Results The Saudi mothers preferred that BBN be conducted with both parents together (64% [60-69]), albeit with weak levels of agreement (W = 0.29). They showed moderate agreement in their preferences that BBN should be conducted early (79% [75-83], W = 0.48), in detail (81% [77-85], W = 0.52), in person (88% [85-91], W = 0.58), and in a quiet setting (86% [83-90], W = 0.53). With extremely weak agreement, they preferred to have a known person present for support during BBN (56% [51-61], W = 0.01), to have close bodily contact with their babies (66% [61-70], W = 0.10), and to have no another patients present (64% [59-68], W = 0.08). They showed moderate levels of agreement in their desires to detail, in advance, their preferences about process of BBN by giving a reversible, written informed consent that could be utilized for guidance, if needed (80% [76-84], W = 0.36). Conclusions In our experience, Saudi mothers' preferences about BBN concerning

  2. Saudi mothers' preferences about breaking bad news concerning newborns: a structured verbal questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Saleh Yaseen M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breaking bad news (BBN to parents whose newborn has a major disease is an ethical dilemma. In Saudi Arabia, BBN about newborns is performed according to the parental preferences that have been reported from non-Arabic/non-Islamic countries. Saudi mothers' preferences about BBN have not yet been studied. Therefore, we aimed to elicit the preferences of Saudi mothers about BBN concerning newborns. Methods We selected a convenience sample of 402 Saudi mothers, aged 18-50 years, who had no previous experience with BBN. We selected them via a simple number-randomization scheme from the premises of a level III Saudi hospital between October of 2009 and January of 2011. We used a hypothetical situation (BBN about trisomy 21 to elicit their preferences about BBN concerning newborns via a structured verbal questionnaire composed of 12 multiple-choice questions. We expressed their preferences as percentages (95% confidence interval, and we used the Kendall's W test (W to assess the degree of agreement in preferences. Results The Saudi mothers preferred that BBN be conducted with both parents together (64% [60-69], albeit with weak levels of agreement (W = 0.29. They showed moderate agreement in their preferences that BBN should be conducted early (79% [75-83], W = 0.48, in detail (81% [77-85], W = 0.52, in person (88% [85-91], W = 0.58, and in a quiet setting (86% [83-90], W = 0.53. With extremely weak agreement, they preferred to have a known person present for support during BBN (56% [51-61], W = 0.01, to have close bodily contact with their babies (66% [61-70], W = 0.10, and to have no another patients present (64% [59-68], W = 0.08. They showed moderate levels of agreement in their desires to detail, in advance, their preferences about process of BBN by giving a reversible, written informed consent that could be utilized for guidance, if needed (80% [76-84], W = 0.36. Conclusions In our experience, Saudi mothers' preferences about

  3. Substrate Preferences and Catalytic Parameters Determined by Structural Characteristics of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase (CYP51) from Leishmania infantum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Jialin; Nes, W. David; Waterman, Michael R.; Lepesheva, Galina I. (Vanderbilt); (TTU); (NWU)

    2012-05-14

    Leishmaniasis is a major health problem that affects populations of {approx}90 countries worldwide, with no vaccine and only a few moderately effective drugs. Here we report the structure/function characterization of sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) from Leishmania infantum. The enzyme catalyzes removal of the 14{alpha}-methyl group from sterol precursors. The reaction is essential for membrane biogenesis and therefore has great potential to become a target for antileishmanial chemotherapy. Although L. infantum CYP51 prefers C4-monomethylated sterol substrates such as C4-norlanosterol and obtusifoliol (V{sub max} of {approx}10 and 8 min{sup -1}, respectively), it is also found to 14{alpha}-demethylate C4-dimethylated lanosterol (V{sub max} = 0.9 min{sup -1}) and C4-desmethylated 14{alpha}-methylzymosterol (V{sub max} = 1.9 min{sup -1}). Binding parameters with six sterols were tested, with K{sub d} values ranging from 0.25 to 1.4 {mu}m. Thus, L. infantum CYP51 is the first example of a plant-like sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase, where requirements toward the composition of the C4 atom substituents are not strict, indicative of possible branching in the postsqualene portion of sterol biosynthesis in the parasite. Comparative analysis of three CYP51 substrate binding cavities (Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and L. infantum) suggests that substrate preferences of plant- and fungal-like protozoan CYP51s largely depend on the differences in the enzyme active site topology. These minor structural differences are also likely to underlie CYP51 catalytic rates and drug susceptibility and can be used to design potent and specific inhibitors.

  4. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J; Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-09-07

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. J. Moore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008 suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS.

  6. Factor structure of the autonomy preference index in people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfils, Kelsey A; Adams, Erin L; Mueser, Kim T; Wright-Berryman, Jennifer L; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-08-30

    People vary in the amount of control they want to exercise over decisions about their healthcare. Given the importance of patient-centered care, accurate measurement of these autonomy preferences is critical. This study aimed to assess the factor structure of the Autonomy Preference Index (API), used widely in general healthcare, in individuals with severe mental illness. Data came from two studies of people with severe mental illness (N=293) who were receiving mental health and/or primary care/integrated care services. Autonomy preferences were assessed with the API regarding both psychiatric and primary care services. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate fit of the hypothesized two-factor structure of the API (decision-making autonomy and information-seeking autonomy). Results indicated the hypothesized structure for the API did not adequately fit the data for either psychiatric or primary care services. Three problematic items were dropped, resulting in adequate fit for both types of treatment. These results suggest that with relatively minor modifications the API has an acceptable factor structure when asking people with severe mental illness about their preferences to be involved in decision-making. The modified API has clinical and research utility for this population in the burgeoning field of autonomy in patient-centered healthcare. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Note on an Example of Use of Fuzzy Preference Structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hliněná, D.; Vojtáš, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2007), s. 29-39 ISSN N R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100300517; GA AV ČR 1ET100300419 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : multicriterial decision making * preference structures * fuzzy Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  8. Structural basis of substrate discrimination and integrin binding by autotaxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, Jens; Kamtekar, Satwik; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Day, Jacqueline E.; Wu, Tao; Fulkerson, Zachary; Albers, Harald M.H.G.; van Meeteren, Laurens A.; Houben, Anna J.S.; van Zeijl, Leonie; Jansen, Silvia; Andries, Maria; Hall, Troii; Pegg, Lyle E.; Benson, Timothy E.; Kasiem, Mobien; Harlos, Karl; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Smyth, Susan S.; Ovaa, Huib; Bollen, Mathieu; Morris, Andrew J.; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Perrakis, Anastassis (Pfizer); (Leuven); (Oxford); (NCI-Netherlands); (Kentucky)

    2013-09-25

    Autotaxin (ATX, also known as ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-2, ENPP2) is a secreted lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogen and chemoattractant for many cell types. ATX-LPA signaling is involved in various pathologies including tumor progression and inflammation. However, the molecular basis of substrate recognition and catalysis by ATX and the mechanism by which it interacts with target cells are unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of ATX, alone and in complex with a small-molecule inhibitor. We have identified a hydrophobic lipid-binding pocket and mapped key residues for catalysis and selection between nucleotide and phospholipid substrates. We have shown that ATX interacts with cell-surface integrins through its N-terminal somatomedin B-like domains, using an atypical mechanism. Our results define determinants of substrate discrimination by the ENPP family, suggest how ATX promotes localized LPA signaling and suggest new approaches for targeting ATX with small-molecule therapeutic agents.

  9. Population-level preferences for primary care physicians' characteristics in Japan: a structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Ohde, Sachiko; Jacobs, Joshua L; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Yanai, Haruo; Okubo, Tomoya; Shimbo, Takuro; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Hinohara, Shigeaki; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2010-01-01

    Primary care has potential to play a role for improving the patient care in Japanese health care system; however, little information is available about how patients perceive the roles of primary care physicians (PCPs) within the Japanese health care system. We aimed to assess population-level preferences for PCPs and investigated the extent to which preferences vary in relation to different population groups in Japan. Data were extracted from a cross-sectional questionnaire survey in October 2003. An 18-item questionnaire was used to measure the preferences for PCPs. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to identify latent factors, while confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the fit of the structure using structural equation modeling (SEM). Nationally representative sample of the adult Japanese general population was chosen by controlling for age, sex, and the size of cities. A total of 2,453 adults>or=18-years-old were analyzed. SEM provided a 4-factor structural model of the population-level preference for PCPs, such as clinical competence (path coefficient (pc)=0.72), gate-keeping (pc=0.64), communication with patients or specialists (pc=0.49) and high education (pc=0.25) and demonstrated the best goodness-of-fit. Those who were middle aged, have a high family income, and a high level of education, placed more importance on gate-keeping characteristics, and the rural residents emphasized communication rather than clinical competence. Our results indicate that the preferences for PCPs are divided into four main factors and underscore the variation among preferences according to different population groups, such as age, socioeconomic and educational status, and places of living. These variations should be considered to improve the primary care system in Japan.

  10. Crystallographic structure and substrate-binding interactions of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz-Pérez, Carolina; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Luís Carlos Souza; Neshich, Goran; Gonçalves Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro

    2008-02-01

    In Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac or X. citri), the modA gene codes for a periplasmic protein (ModA) that is capable of binding molybdate and tungstate as part of the ABC-type transporter required for the uptake of micronutrients. In this study, we report the crystallographic structure of the Xac ModA protein with bound molybdate. The Xac ModA structure is similar to orthologs with known three-dimensional structures and consists of two nearly symmetrical domains separated by a hinge region where the oxyanion-binding site lies. Phylogenetic analysis of different ModA orthologs based on sequence alignments revealed three groups of molybdate-binding proteins: bacterial phytopathogens, enterobacteria and soil bacteria. Even though the ModA orthologs are segregated into different groups, the ligand-binding hydrogen bonds are mostly conserved, except for Archaeglobus fulgidus ModA. A detailed discussion of hydrophobic interactions in the active site is presented and two new residues, Ala38 and Ser151, are shown to be part of the ligand-binding pocket.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and DNA-binding study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BOLIN

    The results suggest that neutral complexes 2a and 2b bind to DNA in an intercalative mode. On the other hand, cationic complexes 1a and 1b interact with DNA via weak intercalative or groove binding mode. (NOTE: See more examples of Graphical Abstracts in Journal website, http://www.ias.ac.in/chemsci/index.html under ...

  12. ssHMM: extracting intuitive sequence-structure motifs from high-throughput RNA-binding protein data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David; Krestel, Ralf; Ohler, Uwe; Vingron, Martin; Marsico, Annalisa

    2017-11-02

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in RNA post-transcriptional regulation and recognize target RNAs via sequence-structure motifs. The extent to which RNA structure influences protein binding in the presence or absence of a sequence motif is still poorly understood. Existing RNA motif finders either take the structure of the RNA only partially into account, or employ models which are not directly interpretable as sequence-structure motifs. We developed ssHMM, an RNA motif finder based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) and Gibbs sampling which fully captures the relationship between RNA sequence and secondary structure preference of a given RBP. Compared to previous methods which output separate logos for sequence and structure, it directly produces a combined sequence-structure motif when trained on a large set of sequences. ssHMM's model is visualized intuitively as a graph and facilitates biological interpretation. ssHMM can be used to find novel bona fide sequence-structure motifs of uncharacterized RBPs, such as the one presented here for the YY1 protein. ssHMM reaches a high motif recovery rate on synthetic data, it recovers known RBP motifs from CLIP-Seq data, and scales linearly on the input size, being considerably faster than MEMERIS and RNAcontext on large datasets while being on par with GraphProt. It is freely available on Github and as a Docker image. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. The necessity of connection structures in neural models of variable binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Frank; de Kamps, Marc

    2015-08-01

    In his review of neural binding problems, Feldman (Cogn Neurodyn 7:1-11, 2013) addressed two types of models as solutions of (novel) variable binding. The one type uses labels such as phase synchrony of activation. The other ('connectivity based') type uses dedicated connections structures to achieve novel variable binding. Feldman argued that label (synchrony) based models are the only possible candidates to handle novel variable binding, whereas connectivity based models lack the flexibility required for that. We argue and illustrate that Feldman's analysis is incorrect. Contrary to his conclusion, connectivity based models are the only viable candidates for models of novel variable binding because they are the only type of models that can produce behavior. We will show that the label (synchrony) based models analyzed by Feldman are in fact examples of connectivity based models. Feldman's analysis that novel variable binding can be achieved without existing connection structures seems to result from analyzing the binding problem in a wrong frame of reference, in particular in an outside instead of the required inside frame of reference. Connectivity based models can be models of novel variable binding when they possess a connection structure that resembles a small-world network, as found in the brain. We will illustrate binding with this type of model with episode binding and the binding of words, including novel words, in sentence structures.

  14. The influence of climatic niche preferences on the population genetic structure of a mistletoe species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; González, Clementina; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

    2017-06-01

    The prevalent view on genetic structuring in parasitic plants is that host-race formation is caused by varying degrees of host specificity. However, the relative importance of ecological niche divergence and host specificity to population differentiation remains poorly understood. We evaluated the factors associated with population differentiation in mistletoes of the Psittacanthus schiedeanus complex (Loranthaceae) in Mexico. We used genetic data from chloroplast sequences and nuclear microsatellites to study population genetic structure and tested its association with host preferences and climatic niche variables. Pairwise genetic differentiation was associated with environmental and host preferences, independent of geography. However, environmental predictors appeared to be more important than host preferences to explain genetic structure, supporting the hypothesis that the occurrence of the parasite is largely determined by its own climatic niche and, to a lesser degree, by host specificity. Genetic structure is significant within this mistletoe species complex, but the processes associated with this structure appear to be more complex than previously thought. Although host specificity was not supported as the major determinant of population differentiation, we consider this to be part of a more comprehensive ecological model of mistletoe host-race formation that incorporates the effects of climatic niche evolution. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang (Cornell); (UMM-MED); (Colorado)

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  16. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Using Acetylcholine-Binding Protein as a Structural Surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Balle, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in the control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for the development of drugs against a number of mental health disorders and for marketed smoking cessation aids. Unfortunately, drug discovery has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining sufficiently selective compounds. Together with functional complexity of the receptors, this has made it difficult to obtain drugs with sufficiently high-target to off-target affinity ratios. The recent and ongoing progress in structural studies holds promise to help understand structure-function relationships of nAChR drugs at the atomic level. This will undoubtedly lead to the design of more efficient drugs with fewer side effects. As a high-resolution structure of a nAChR is yet to be determined, structural studies are to a large extent based on acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) that despite low overall sequence identity display a high degree of conservation of overall structure and amino acids at the ligand-binding site. Further, AChBPs reproduce relative binding affinities of ligands at nAChRs. Over the past decade, AChBPs have been used extensively as models for nAChRs and have aided the understanding of drug receptor interactions at nAChRs significantly. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  17. Structures of Orf Virus Chemokine Binding Protein in Complex with Host Chemokines Reveal Clues to Broad Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couñago, Rafael M; Knapp, Karen M; Nakatani, Yoshio; Fleming, Stephen B; Corbett, Michael; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Krause, Kurt L

    2015-07-07

    The chemokine binding protein (CKBP) from orf virus (ORFV) binds with high affinity to chemokines from three classes, C, CC, and CXC, making it unique among poxvirus CKBPs described to date. We present its crystal structure alone and in complex with three CC chemokines, CCL2, CCL3, and CCL7. ORFV CKBP possesses a β-sandwich fold that is electrostatically and sterically complementary to its binding partners. Chemokines bind primarily through interactions involving the N-terminal loop and a hydrophobic recess on the ORFV CKBP β-sheet II surface, and largely polar interactions between the chemokine 20s loop and a negatively charged surface groove located at one end of the CKBP β-sheet II surface. ORFV CKBP interacts with leukocyte receptor and glycosaminoglycan binding sites found on the surface of bound chemokines. SEC-MALLS and chromatographic evidence is presented supporting that ORFV CKBP is a dimer in solution over a broad range of protein concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, Eric; Tardie, Mark; Carty, Maynard; Brown Phillips, Tracy; Wang, Ing-Kae; Soeller, Walt; Qiu, Xiayang; Karam, George

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) with a bound palmitate is reported at 1.5 Å resolution. Human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) belongs to a family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins involved in the transport and storage of lipids. Here, the crystal structure of human aP2 with a bound palmitate is described at 1.5 Å resolution. Unlike the known crystal structure of murine aP2 in complex with palmitate, this structure shows that the fatty acid is in a folded conformation and that the loop containing Phe57 acts as a lid to regulate ligand binding by excluding solvent exposure to the central binding cavity

  19. Nucleos: a web server for the identification of nucleotide-binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parca, Luca; Ferré, Fabrizio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2013-07-01

    Nucleos is a web server for the identification of nucleotide-binding sites in protein structures. Nucleos compares the structure of a query protein against a set of known template 3D binding sites representing nucleotide modules, namely the nucleobase, carbohydrate and phosphate. Structural features, clustering and conservation are used to filter and score the predictions. The predicted nucleotide modules are then joined to build whole nucleotide-binding sites, which are ranked by their score. The server takes as input either the PDB code of the query protein structure or a user-submitted structure in PDB format. The output of Nucleos is composed of ranked lists of predicted nucleotide-binding sites divided by nucleotide type (e.g. ATP-like). For each ranked prediction, Nucleos provides detailed information about the score, the template structure and the structural match for each nucleotide module composing the nucleotide-binding site. The predictions on the query structure and the template-binding sites can be viewed directly on the web through a graphical applet. In 98% of the cases, the modules composing correct predictions belong to proteins with no homology relationship between each other, meaning that the identification of brand-new nucleotide-binding sites is possible using information from non-homologous proteins. Nucleos is available at http://nucleos.bio.uniroma2.it/nucleos/.

  20. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and DNA-binding study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BOLIN

    SYNOPSIS. Synthesis and characterization of four mononuclear eight coordinated cadmium(II) complexes with newly explored carboxamide derivatives and study of interaction with calf-thymus DNA are reported. The results suggest that neutral complexes 2a and 2b bind to DNA in an intercalative mode. On the other hand, ...

  2. Electron microscopic and physico-chemical studies of DNA complexes with synthetic oligopeptides: binding specificity and DNA compact structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengerov, Y Y; Semenov, T E; Surovaya, A N; Sidorova NYu; Streltsov, S A; Khorlin, A A; Zhuze, A L; Gursky, G V

    1988-10-01

    Binding to DNA of two synthetic peptides, Val-Thr-Thr-Val-Val-NH-NH-Dns and Thr-Val-Thr-Lys-Val-Gly-Thr-Lsy-Val-Gly-Thr-Val-Val-NH-NH-Dns (where Dns is a residue of 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid), has been studied by circular dichroism, electron microscopy and fluorescence methods. It has been found that these two peptides can self-associate in aqueous solution as follows from the fact that concentration-dependent changes are observed in the UV absorbance and fluorescence spectra. The two peptides can bind to DNA both in self-associated and monomeric forms. The pentapeptide in the beta-associated form binds more strongly to poly(dG).poly(dC) than to poly[d(A-C)].poly[d(G-T)] and poly(dA).poly(dT) whereas the tridecapeptide exhibits an opposite order of preferences binding more strongly to poly[d(A-C)].poly[d(G-T)] and poly(dA).poly(dT) than to poly(dG).poly(dC). Binding is a cooperative process which is accompanied by the DNA compaction at peptide/DNA base pair ratios greater than 1. At the initial stage of the compaction process, the coalescence of DNA segments covered by bound peptide molecules leads to the formation of DNA loops stabilized by the interaction between peptide molecules bound to different DNA segments. Further increase in the peptide/DNA ratio leads to the formation of rod-like structures each consisting of two or more double-stranded DNA segments. The final stage of the compaction process involves folding of fibrillar macromolecular complexes into a globular structure containing only one DNA molecule.

  3. A tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins from PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jing

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the research on protein functional sites, researchers often need to identify binding-site residues on a protein. A commonly used strategy is to find a complex structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB that consists of the protein of interest and its interacting partner(s and calculate binding-site residues based on the complex structure. However, since a protein may participate in multiple interactions, the binding-site residues calculated based on one complex structure usually do not reveal all binding sites on a protein. Thus, this requires researchers to find all PDB complexes that contain the protein of interest and combine the binding-site information gleaned from them. This process is very time-consuming. Especially, combing binding-site information obtained from different PDB structures requires tedious work to align protein sequences. The process becomes overwhelmingly difficult when researchers have a large set of proteins to analyze, which is usually the case in practice. Results In this study, we have developed a tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins, TCBRP http://yanbioinformatics.cs.usu.edu:8080/ppbindingsubmit. For an input protein, TCBRP can quickly find all binding-site residues on the protein by automatically combining the information obtained from all PDB structures that consist of the protein of interest. Additionally, TCBRP presents the binding-site residues in different categories according to the interaction type. TCBRP also allows researchers to set the definition of binding-site residues. Conclusion The developed tool is very useful for the research on protein binding site analysis and prediction.

  4. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentian Chen

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  5. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wentian; Sun, Shisheng; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs) are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA) on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA) receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  6. Using remote substituents to control solution structure and anion binding in lanthanide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tropiano, Manuel; Blackburn, Octavia A.; Tilney, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A study of the anion-binding properties of three structurally related lanthanide complexes, which all contain chemically identical anion-binding motifs, has revealed dramatic differences in their anion affinity. These arise as a consequence of changes in the substitution pattern on the periphery ...

  7. Optimizing Stem Length To Improve Ligand Selectivity in a Structure-Switching Cocaine-Binding Aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Miguel A D; Shoara, Aron A; Reinstein, Oren; Abbasi Borhani, Okty; Martin, Taylor R; Johnson, Philip E

    2017-10-27

    Understanding how aptamer structure and function are related is crucial in the design and development of aptamer-based biosensors. We have analyzed a series of cocaine-binding aptamers with different lengths of their stem 1 in order to understand the role that this stem plays in the ligand-induced structure-switching binding mechanism utilized in many of the sensor applications of this aptamer. In the cocaine-binding aptamer, the length of stem 1 controls whether the structure-switching binding mechanism for this aptamer occurs or not. We varied the length of stem 1 from being one to seven base pairs long and found that the structural transition from unfolded to folded in the unbound aptamer is when the aptamer elongates from 3 to 4 base pairs in stem 1. We then used this knowledge to achieve new binding selectivity of this aptamer for quinine over cocaine by using an aptamer with a stem 1 two base pairs long. This selectivity is achieved by means of the greater affinity quinine has for the aptamer compared with cocaine. Quinine provides enough free energy to both fold and bind the 2-base pair-long aptamer while cocaine does not. This tuning of binding selectivity of an aptamer by reducing its stability is likely a general mechanism that could be used to tune aptamer specificity for tighter binding ligands.

  8. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Biogenic Amine-binding Proteins in Soft Ticks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M.C.; Andersen, John F. (NIH)

    2008-08-19

    Two highly abundant lipocalins, monomine and monotonin, have been isolated from the salivary gland of the soft tick Argas monolakensis and shown to bind histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), respectively. The crystal structures of monomine and a paralog of monotonin were determined in the presence of ligands to compare the determinants of ligand binding. Both the structures and binding measurements indicate that the proteins have a single binding site rather than the two sites previously described for the female-specific histamine-binding protein (FS-HBP), the histamine-binding lipocalin of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding sites of monomine and monotonin are similar to the lower, low affinity site of FS-HBP. The interaction of the protein with the aliphatic amine group of the ligand is very similar for the all of the proteins, whereas specificity is determined by interactions with the aromatic portion of the ligand. Interestingly, protein interaction with the imidazole ring of histamine differs significantly between the low affinity binding site of FS-HBP and monomine, suggesting that histamine binding has evolved independently in the two lineages. From the conserved features of these proteins, a tick lipocalin biogenic amine-binding motif could be derived that was used to predict biogenic amine-binding function in other tick lipocalins. Heterologous expression of genes from salivary gland libraries led to the discovery of biogenic amine-binding proteins in soft (Ornithodoros) and hard (Ixodes) tick genera. The data generated were used to reconstruct the most probable evolutionary pathway for the evolution of biogenic amine-binding in tick lipocalins.

  9. Impurity binding energy for δ-doped quantum well structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The binding energy of an impurity delta layer situated either in the centre or at the edge of a quantum well (QW) is theoretically considered for the example of n-type Si0∙8Ge0∙2/Si/Si0∙8Ge0∙2 QW doped with phosphorus. Calculations are made for the case of not so big impurity concentrations, when impurity.

  10. Observation of Protein Structural Vibrational Mode Sensitivity to Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first measurements of the dependence of large-scale protein intramolecular vibrational modes on ligand binding. These collective vibrational modes in the terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1) are of great interest due to their predicted relation to protein function. Our technique, Crystals Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), allows for room temperature, table-top measurements of the optically active intramolecular modes. CATM measurements have revealed surprisingly narrowband features. CATM measurements are performed on single crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) as well as CEWL bound to tri-N-acetylglucosamine (CEWL-3NAG) inhibitor. We find narrow band resonances that dramatically shift with binding. Quasiharmonic calculations are performed on CEWL and CEWL-3NAG proteins with CHARMM using normal mode analysis. The expected CATM response of the crystals is then calculated by summing over all protein orientations within the unit cell. We will compare the CATM measurements with the calculated results and discuss the changes which arise with protein-ligand binding. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI 2 grant DBI2959989.

  11. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding site (Site I and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III. In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV. All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate. In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2.

  12. Crystal structure of Yersinia pestis virulence factor YfeA reveals two polyspecific metal-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radka, Christopher D; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Wilson, Landon S; Lawrenz, Matthew B; Perry, Robert D; Aller, Stephen G

    2017-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria use siderophores, outer membrane receptors, inner membrane transporters and substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) to transport transition metals through the periplasm. The SBPs share a similar protein fold that has undergone significant structural evolution to communicate with a variety of differentially regulated transporters in the cell. In Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, YfeA (YPO2439, y1897), an SBP, is important for full virulence during mammalian infection. To better understand the role of YfeA in infection, crystal structures were determined under several environmental conditions with respect to transition-metal levels. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and anomalous X-ray scattering data show that YfeA is polyspecific and can alter its substrate specificity. In minimal-media experiments, YfeA crystals grown after iron supplementation showed a threefold increase in iron fluorescence emission over the iron fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions, and YfeA crystals grown after manganese supplementation during overexpression showed a fivefold increase in manganese fluorescence emission over the manganese fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions. In all experiments, the YfeA crystals produced the strongest fluorescence emission from zinc and could not be manipulated otherwise. Additionally, this report documents the discovery of a novel surface metal-binding site that prefers to chelate zinc but can also bind manganese. Flexibility across YfeA crystal forms in three loops and a helix near the buried metal-binding site suggest that a structural rearrangement is required for metal loading and unloading.

  13. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handing, Katarzyna B; Shabalin, Ivan G; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1Å. Cetirizine is bound in two sites--a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizine binding sites. We show that the residues forming the binding pockets in ESA are highly conserved in human serum albumin (HSA), and suggest that binding of cetirizine to HSA will be similar. In support of that hypothesis, we show that the dissociation constants for cetirizine binding to CBS2 in ESA and HSA are identical using tryptophan fluorescence quenching. Presence of lysine and arginine residues that have been previously reported to undergo nonenzymatic glycosylation in CBS1 and CBS2 suggests that cetirizine transport in patients with diabetes could be altered. A review of all available SA structures from the PDB shows that in addition to the novel drug binding site we present here (CBS1), there are two pockets on SA capable of binding drugs that do not overlap with fatty acid binding sites and have not been discussed in published reviews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An autoactive mutant of the M flax rust resistance protein has a preference for binding ATP, whereas wild-type M protein binds ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Simon J; Sornaraj, Pradeep; deCourcy-Ireland, Emma; Menz, R Ian; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N; Anderson, Peter A

    2011-08-01

    Resistance (R) proteins are key regulators of the plant innate immune system and are capable of pathogen detection and activation of the hypersensitive cell death immune response. To understand the molecular mechanism of R protein activation, we undertook a phenotypic and biochemical study of the flax nucleotide binding (NB)-ARC leucine-rich repeat protein, M. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression in flax cotyledons, site-directed mutations of key residues within the P-loop, kinase 2, and MHD motifs within the NB-ARC domain of M were shown to affect R protein function. When purified using a yeast expression system and assayed for ATP and ADP, these mutated proteins exhibited marked differences in the quantity and identity of the bound nucleotide. ADP was bound to recombinant wild-type M protein, while the nonfunctional P-loop mutant did not have any nucleotides bound. In contrast, ATP was bound to an autoactive M protein mutated in the highly conserved MHD motif. These data provide direct evidence supporting a model of R protein function in which the "off" R protein binds ADP and activation of R protein defense signaling involves the exchange of ADP for ATP.

  15. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-14

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  16. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-01

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  17. Manicured, romantic, or wild? The relation between need for structure and preferences for garden styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Agnes E.; van Winsum-Westra, Marijke

    2010-01-01

    The present research examined individual differences in preferences for three basic garden styles: manicured, romantic, and wild. Building on theoretical insights from landscape preference research, it was hypothesized that preferences for garden styles are guided by psychological needs. This

  18. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA binding and Nuclease activity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    s12039-016-1125-x. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA binding and Nuclease activity of lanthanide(III) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine acetylhydrazone. KARREDDULA RAJA, AKKILI SUSEELAMMA and KATREDDI HUSSAIN REDDY. ∗.

  19. Structure/Function Studies of the Androgen Receptor DNA-Binding Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2004-01-01

    .... The research goals associated with this study are to characterize the structural and functional aspects of the AR in order to uncover the potential of its domains, and in particular the DNA-binding...

  20. Structure/Function Studies of the Androgen Receptor DNA-Binding Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2003-01-01

    .... The research goals associated with this study are to characterize the structural and functional aspects of the AR in order to uncover the potential of its domains, and in particular the DNA-binding...

  1. Analysis of consumers' preferences and behavior with regard to horse meat using a structured survey questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Woon Yong; Lee, Ji Woong; Lee, Chong Eon; Ko, Moon Seok; Jeong, Jae Hong

    2009-12-01

    In this study, a structured survey questionnaire was used to determine consumers' preferences and behavior with regard to horse meat at a horse meat restaurant located in Jeju, Korea, from October 1 to December 24, 2005. The questionnaire employed in this study consisted of 20 questions designed to characterize six general attributes: horse meat sensory property, physical appearance, health condition, origin, price, and other attributes. Of the 1370 questionnaires distributed, 1126 completed questionnaires were retained based on the completeness of the answers, representing an 82.2% response rate. Two issues were investigated that might facilitate the search for ways to improve horse meat production and marketing programs in Korea. The first step was to determine certain important factors, called principal components, which enabled the researchers to understand the needs of horse meat consumers via principal component analysis. The second step was to define consumer segments with regard to their preferences for horse meat, which was accomplished via cluster analysis. The results of the current study showed that health condition, price, origin, and leanness were the most critical physical attributes affecting the preferences of horse meat consumers. Four segments of consumers, with different demands for horse meat attributes, were identified: origin-sensitive consumers, price-sensitive consumers, quality and safety-sensitive consumers, and non-specific consumers. Significant differences existed among segments of consumers in terms of age, nature of work, frequency of consumption, and general level of acceptability of horse meat.

  2. The host-binding domain of the P2 phage tail spike reveals a trimeric iron-binding structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Eiki; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Takahashi, Junichi; Tsunoda, Kin-ichi; Yamada, Seiko; Takeda, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of a bacteriophage P2 tail-spike protein, gpV, was crystallized and its structure was solved at 1.27 Å resolution. The refined model showed a triple β-helix structure and the presence of iron, calcium and chloride ions. The adsorption and infection of bacteriophage P2 is mediated by tail fibres and tail spikes. The tail spikes on the tail baseplate are used to irreversibly adsorb to the host cells. Recently, a P2 phage tail-spike protein, gpV, was purified and it was shown that a C-terminal domain, Ser87–Leu211, is sufficient for the binding of gpV to host Escherichia coli membranes [Kageyama et al. (2009 ▶), Biochemistry, 48, 10129–10135]. In this paper, the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P2 gpV is reported. The structure is a triangular pyramid and looks like a spearhead composed of an intertwined β-sheet, a triple β-helix and a metal-binding region containing iron, calcium and chloride ions

  3. Theoretical studies on the molecular structure, conformational preferences, topological and vibrational analysis of allicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlak, Piotr; Berski, Sławomir; Latajka, Zdzisław

    2016-01-01

    The molecular structure, conformational preferences, topological and vibrational analysis of allicin has been investigated at two different approaches. Calculations have been carried out on static (DFT and MP2) levels with an assortment of Dunning's basis sets and dynamic CPMD simulations. In this both case within the isolated molecule approximation. The results point out that at least twenty different conformers coexist on the PES as confirmed by the flexible character of this molecule. The topological analysis of ELF showed very similar nature of the Ssbnd S and Ssbnd O bonds. The infrared spectrum has been calculated, and a comparative vibrational analysis has been performed.

  4. Validating metal binding sites in macromolecule structures using the CheckMyMetal web server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D.; Cooper, David R.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Metals play vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules where metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal binding environments. The "CheckMyMetal" (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal binding sites in macromolecular structures in respect to 7350 metal binding sites observed in a benchmark dataset of 2304 high resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal binding sites and alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the anticipated results section. CMM was designed for a broad audience—biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids—but is equally well suited for structural biologists to validate new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure modeled with a few hundred amino acids. PMID:24356774

  5. Comparison of S. cerevisiae F-BAR domain structures reveals a conserved inositol phosphate binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Alvarado, Diego; Schmitz, Karl R.; Kenniston, Jon A.; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY F-BAR domains control membrane interactions in endocytosis, cytokinesis, and cell signaling. Although generally thought to bind curved membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, numerous functional studies argue that differences in lipid-binding selectivities of F-BAR domains are functionally important. Here, we compare membrane-binding properties of the S. cerevisiae F-BAR domains in vitro and in vivo. Whereas some F-BAR domains (such as Bzz1p and Hof1p F-BARs) bind equally well to all phospholipids, the F-BAR domain from the RhoGAP Rgd1p preferentially binds phosphoinositides. We determined X-ray crystal structures of F-BAR domains from Hof1p and Rgd1p, the latter bound to an inositol phosphate. The structures explain phospholipid-binding selectivity differences, and reveal an F-BAR phosphoinositide binding site that is fully conserved in a mammalian RhoGAP called Gmip, and is partly retained in certain other F-BAR domains. Our findings reveal previously unappreciated determinants of F-BAR domain lipid-binding specificity, and provide a basis for its prediction from sequence. PMID:25620000

  6. Structures of Human Pumilio with Noncognate RNAs Reveal Molecular Mechanisms for Binding Promiscuity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta,Y.; Nair, D.; Wharton, R.; Aggarwal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Pumilio is a founder member of the evolutionarily conserved Puf family of RNA-binding proteins that control a number of physiological processes in eukaryotes. A structure of human Pumilio (hPum) Puf domain bound to a Drosophila regulatory sequence showed that each Puf repeat recognizes a single nucleotide. Puf domains in general bind promiscuously to a large set of degenerate sequences, but the structural basis for this promiscuity has been unclear. Here, we describe the structures of hPum Puf domain complexed to two noncognate RNAs, CycBreverse and Puf5. In each complex, one of the nucleotides is ejected from the binding surface, in effect, acting as a 'spacer.' The complexes also reveal the plasticity of several Puf repeats, which recognize noncanonical nucleotides. Together, these complexes provide a molecular basis for recognition of degenerate binding sites, which significantly increases the number of mRNAs targeted for regulation by Puf proteins in vivo.

  7. A Potential Structural Switch for Regulating DNA-Binding by TEAD Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sun; Vonrhein, Clemens; Albarado, Diana; Raman, C S; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2016-06-19

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are essential for the normal development of eukaryotes and are the downstream effectors of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Whereas our earlier work established the three-dimensional structure of the highly conserved DNA-binding domain using solution NMR spectroscopy, the structural basis for regulating the DNA-binding activity remains unknown. Here, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure and activity of a TEAD mutant containing a truncated L1 loop, ΔL1 TEAD DBD. Unexpectedly, the three-dimensional structure of the ΔL1 TEAD DBD reveals a helix-swapped homodimer wherein helix 1 is swapped between monomers. Furthermore, each three-helix bundle in the domain-swapped dimer is a structural homolog of MYB-like domains. Our investigations of the DNA-binding activity reveal that although the formation of the three-helix bundle by the ΔL1 TEAD DBD is sufficient for binding to an isolated M-CAT-like DNA element, multimeric forms are deficient for cooperative binding to tandemly duplicated elements, indicating that the L1 loop contributes to the DNA-binding activity of TEAD. These results suggest that switching between monomeric and domain-swapped forms may regulate DNA selectivity of TEAD proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Kiso, Makoto [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ando, Hiromune, E-mail: hando@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kato, Ryuichi, E-mail: ryuichi.kato@kek.jp [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. - Highlights: • The six-bladed β-propeller structure of AOL was solved by seleno-sugar phasing. • The mode of fucose binding is essentially conserved at all six binding sites. • The seleno-fucosides exhibit slightly different interactions and electron densities. • These findings suggest that the affinity for fucose is not identical at each site.

  9. Crystal structure correlations with the intrinsic thermodynamics of human carbonic anhydrase inhibitor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Alexey; Zubrienė, Asta; Manakova, Elena; Gražulis, Saulius

    2018-01-01

    The structure-thermodynamics correlation analysis was performed for a series of fluorine- and chlorine-substituted benzenesulfonamide inhibitors binding to several human carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoforms. The total of 24 crystal structures of 16 inhibitors bound to isoforms CA I, CA II, CA XII, and CA XIII provided the structural information of selective recognition between a compound and CA isoform. The binding thermodynamics of all structures was determined by the analysis of binding-linked protonation events, yielding the intrinsic parameters, i.e., the enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy of binding. Inhibitor binding was compared within structurally similar pairs that differ by para- or meta-substituents enabling to obtain the contributing energies of ligand fragments. The pairs were divided into two groups. First, similar binders—the pairs that keep the same orientation of the benzene ring exhibited classical hydrophobic effect, a less exothermic enthalpy and a more favorable entropy upon addition of the hydrophobic fragments. Second, dissimilar binders—the pairs of binders that demonstrated altered positions of the benzene rings exhibited the non-classical hydrophobic effect, a more favorable enthalpy and variable entropy contribution. A deeper understanding of the energies contributing to the protein-ligand recognition should lead toward the eventual goal of rational drug design where chemical structures of ligands could be designed based on the target protein structure. PMID:29503769

  10. Structural Basis for Antagonism by Suramin of Heparin Binding to Vaccinia Complement Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Muthuvel, Suresh Kumar; Smith, Scott A.; Kotwal, Girish J.; Murthy, Krishna H.M. (U. of Cape Town); (UAB); (U. of Louisville)

    2010-07-19

    Suramin is a competitive inhibitor of heparin binding to many proteins, including viral envelope proteins, protein tyrosine phosphatases, and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). It has been clinically evaluated as a potential therapeutic in treatment of cancers caused by unregulated angiogenesis, triggered by FGFs. Although it has shown clinical promise in treatment of several cancers, suramin has many undesirable side effects. There is currently no experimental structure that reveals the molecular interactions responsible for suramin inhibition of heparin binding, which could be of potential use in structure-assisted design of improved analogues of suramin. We report the structure of suramin, in complex with the heparin-binding site of vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP), which interacts with heparin in a geometrically similar manner to many FGFs. The larger than anticipated flexibility of suramin manifested in this structure, and other details of VCP-suramin interactions, might provide useful structural information for interpreting interactions of suramin with many proteins.

  11. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  12. Phenylacetic acids and the structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac bind to specific gamma-hydroxybutyric acid sites in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe; Skonberg, Christian

    2009-01-01

    with a twofold higher affinity than GHB. Measuring the affinities of structurally related NSAIDs for the [(3)H]NCS-382 site identified diclofenac, a clinically relevant NSAID (Voltaren, Diclon) of the phenylacetic acid (PAA) type, as a GHB ligand (K(i) value of 5.1 microM). Other non-NSAID PAAs also exhibited...... affinities similar to GHB. Our data raise the interesting possibility that the widely used over-the-counter drug compound, diclofenac, might affect GHB binding at relevant clinical dosages. Furthermore, the identification of PAAs as GHB ligands supplies new information about the structural preferences...

  13. First principles study of structural stability and site preference in Co3 (W,X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Sri Raghunath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery [1] of γ′ precipitate (L12 – Co3(Al, W in the Co-Al-W ternary system, there has been an increased interest in Co-based superalloys. Since these alloys have two phase microstructures (γ + γ′ similar to Ni-based superalloys [2], they are viable candidates in high temperature applications, particularly in land-based turbines. The role of alloying on stability of the γ′ phase has been an active area of research. In this study, electronic structure calculations were done to probe the effect of alloying in Co3W with L12 structure. Compositions of type Co3(W,X, (where X/Y = Mn, Fe, Ni, Pt, Cr , Al, Si, V, W, Ta, Ti, Nb, Hf, Zr and Mo were studied. Effect of alloying on equilibrium lattice parameters and ground state energies was used to calculate Vegard's coefficients and site preference related data. The effect of alloying on the stability of the L12 structure vis a vis other geometrically close packed ordered structures was also studied for a range of Co3X compounds. Results suggest that the penchant of element for the W sublattice can be predicted by comparing heats of formation of Co3X in different structures.

  14. Tubulin inhibitors targeting the colchicine binding site: a perspective of privileged structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlong; Sun, Honghao; Xu, Shengtao; Zhu, Zheying; Xu, Jinyi

    2017-10-01

    The vital roles of microtubule in mitosis and cell division make it an attractive target for antitumor therapy. Colchicine binding site of tubulin is one of the most important pockets that have been focused on to design tubulin-destabilizing agents. Over the past few years, a large number of colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSIs) have been developed inspired by natural products or synthetic origins, and many moieties frequently used in these CBSIs are structurally in common. In this review, we will classify the CBSIs into classical CBSIs and nonclassical CBSIs according to their spatial conformations and binding modes with tubulin, and highlight the privileged structures from these CBSIs in the development of tubulin inhibitors targeting the colchicine binding site.

  15. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehan Lee

    Full Text Available The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP of estrogen receptor α (ERα allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors.

  16. Synthesis, Crystal Structure and in vitro DNA Binding Studies of Combretastatin A-4 Analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of a novel Combretastatin A-4 analogue using Schiff’s reaction of benzil and 4-aminoantipyrine has been achieved under solvent free conditions. The structure of compound was examined spectroscopically and confirmed from single crystal diffraction studies. The synthesized Combretastatin A-4 analogue was investigated for its DNA binding ability as the plausible mechanism for its antitumor activity. The binding propensity of the synthesized compound with calf-thymus (CT DNA was monitored with absorption and emission spectrophotometric titrations. The calculations predict a binding constant of 7.24×104 for the complex of the synthesized compound with CT DNA which is comparable in magnitude to that of DNA binding of bactericidal drug enoxacin and typical intercalation indicator ethidium bromide (EB. Competitive binding studies of the synthesized compound with EB using fluorescence titration reveal that it displaces the DNA-bound EB and binds in intercalative mode which was further supported by circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy. The probable site and binding energy of the compound with DNA was further theoretically investigated by molecular docking studies. The significant DNA binding ability of the synthesized Combretastatin A4 analogue as revealed from this study could be related to the anticancer activity of the Combretastatin A4.

  17. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  18. Stability of the octameric structure affects plasminogen-binding capacity of streptococcal enolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Cork

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen. Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen binding and activation.

  19. New insights into the GABAA receptor structure and orthosteric ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Tommy; Frølund, Bente Flensborg; Bruun, Anne Techau

    2011-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A) Rs) are ligand gated chloride ion channels that mediate overall inhibitory signaling in the CNS. A detailed understanding of their structure is important to gain insights in, e.g., ligand binding and functional properties of this pharmaceutically important target....... Homology modeling is a necessary tool in this regard because experimentally determined structures are lacking. Here we present an exhaustive approach for creating a high quality model of the a(1) ß(2) ¿(2) subtype of the GABA(A) R ligand binding domain, and we demonstrate its usefulness in understanding......, and its stability in molecular dynamics (MD) compared with that of the two homologous crystal structures. We then combined the model with extensive structure-activity relationships available from two homologous series of orthosteric GABA(A) R antagonists to create a detailed hypothesis for their binding...

  20. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  1. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbreth, Ryan N.; Koide, Shohei

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  2. Ligand binding and micro-switches in 7TM receptor structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    The past couple of years have seen several novel X-ray structures of 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptors in complex with antagonists and even with a peptide fragment of a G protein. These structures demonstrate that the main ligand-binding pocket in 7TM receptors is like a funnel with a partial 'lid...

  3. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  4. Crystal structure of a common GPCR-binding interface for G protein and arrestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepek, Michal; Beyrière, Florent; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Elgeti, Matthias; Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Bartl, Franz J; von Stetten, David; Heck, Martin; Sommer, Martha E; Hildebrand, Peter W; Scheerer, Patrick

    2014-09-10

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals to activate intracellular heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαβγ) and arrestins. For G protein signalling, the Gα C-terminus (GαCT) binds to a cytoplasmic crevice of the receptor that opens upon activation. A consensus motif is shared among GαCT from the Gi/Gt family and the 'finger loop' region (ArrFL1-4) of all four arrestins. Here we present a 2.75 Å crystal structure of ArrFL-1, a peptide analogue of the finger loop of rod photoreceptor arrestin, in complex with the prototypical GPCR rhodopsin. Functional binding of ArrFL to the receptor was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, competitive binding assays and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. For both GαCT and ArrFL, binding to the receptor crevice induces a similar reverse turn structure, although significant structural differences are seen at the rim of the binding crevice. Our results reflect both the common receptor-binding interface and the divergent biological functions of G proteins and arrestins.

  5. Crystal structure and DNA binding of the homeodomain of the stem cell transcription factor Nanog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2008-02-22

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  6. Crystal Structure and DNA Binding of the Homeodomain of the Stem Cell Transcription Factor Nanog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C.; Kolatkar, Prasanna R. (GI-Singapore); (Scripps)

    2010-02-08

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  7. Biochemical and Structural Insights into the Preference of Nairoviral DeISGylases for Interferon-Stimulated Gene Product 15 Originating from Certain Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deaton, M. K.; Dzimianski, J. V.; Daczkowski, C. M.; Whitney, G. K.; Mank, N. J.; Parham, M. M.; Bergeron, E.; Pegan, S. D.; Perlman, S.

    2016-07-13

    ABSTRACT

    The regulation of the interferon type I (IFN-I) response has been shown to rely on posttranslational modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15) to stabilize, or activate, a variety of IFN-I signaling and downstream effector proteins. Unlike Ub, which is almost perfectly conserved among eukaryotes, ISG15 is highly divergent, even among mammals. Since zoonotic viruses rely on viral proteins to recognize, or cleave, ISG15 conjugates in order to evade, or suppress, innate immunity, the impact of ISG15 biodiversity on deISGylating proteases of the ovarian tumor family (vOTU) from nairoviruses was evaluated. The enzymatic activities of vOTUs originating from the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Erve virus, and Nairobi sheep disease virus were tested against ISG15s from humans, mice, shrews, sheep, bats, and camels, which are mammalian species known to be infected by nairoviruses. This along with investigation of binding by isothermal titration calorimetry illustrated significant differences in the abilities of nairovirus deISGylases to accommodate certain species of ISG15. To investigate the molecular underpinnings of species preferences of these vOTUs, a structure was determined to 2.5 Å for a complex of Erve virus vOTU protease and a mouse ISG15 domain. This structure revealed the molecular basis of Erve virus vOTU's preference for ISG15 over Ub and the first structural insight into a nonhuman ISG15. This structure also revealed key interactions, or lack thereof, surrounding three amino acids that may drive a viral deISgylase to prefer an ISG15 from one species over that of another.

    IMPORTANCEViral ovarian tumor domain proteases (vOTUs) are one of the two principal classes of viral proteases observed to reverse posttranslational modification of host proteins by ubiquitin and interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15), subsequently facilitating downregulation of

  8. The Structure of the Iron Binding Protein, FutA1, from Synechocystis 6803*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koropatkin, Nicole; Randich, Amelia M.; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Cyanobacteria account for a significant percentage of aquatic primary productivity even in areas where the concentrations of essential micronutrients are extremely low. To better understand the mechanism of iron selectivity and transport, the structure of the solute-binding domain of an ABC iron transporter, FutA1, was determined in the presence and absence of iron. The iron ion is bound within the 'C-clamp' structure via four tyrosine and one histidine residues. There are extensive interactions between these ligating residues and the rest of the protein such that the conformations of the side chains remain relatively unchanged as the iron is released by the opening of the metal binding cleft. This is in stark contrast to the zinc binding protein, ZnuA, where the domains of the metal binding protein remain relatively fixed while the ligating residues rotate out of the binding pocket upon metal release. The rotation of the domains in FutA1 is facilitated by two flexible β-strands running along the back of the protein that act like a hinge during domain motion. This motion may require relatively little energy since total contact area between the domains is the same whether the protein is in the open or closed conformation. Consistent with the pH dependency of iron binding, the main trigger for iron release is likely the histidine in the iron-binding site. Finally, neither FutA1 nor FutA2 binds iron as a siderophore complex or in the presence of anions and both preferentially bind ferrous over ferric ions

  9. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  10. Crystal structures of lysine-preferred racemases, the non-antibiotic selectable markers for transgenic plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Mao Wu

    Full Text Available Lysine racemase, a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP-dependent amino acid racemase that catalyzes the interconversion of lysine enantiomers, is valuable to serve as a novel non-antibiotic selectable marker in the generation of transgenic plants. Here, we have determined the first crystal structure of a lysine racemase (Lyr from Proteus mirabilis BCRC10725, which shows the highest activity toward lysine and weaker activity towards arginine. In addition, we establish the first broad-specificity amino acid racemase (Bar structure from Pseudomonas putida DSM84, which presents not only the highest activity toward lysine but also remarkably broad substrate specificity. A complex structure of Bar-lysine is also established here. These structures demonstrate the similar fold of alanine racemase, which is a head-to-tail homodimer with each protomer containing an N-terminal (α/β(8 barrel and a C-terminal β-stranded domain. The active-site residues are located at the protomer interface that is a funnel-like cavity with two catalytic bases, one from each protomer, and the PLP binding site is at the bottom of this cavity. Structural comparisons, site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic, and modeling studies identify a conserved arginine and an adjacent conserved asparagine that fix the orientation of the PLP O3 atom in both structures and assist in the enzyme activity. Furthermore, side chains of two residues in α-helix 10 have been discovered to point toward the cavity and define the substrate specificity. Our results provide a structural foundation for the design of racemases with pre-determined substrate specificity and for the development of the non-antibiotic selection system in transgenic plants.

  11. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  12. Structural and functional analysis of the YAP-binding domain of human TEAD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jianzhong; Tomchick, Diana R; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian

    2010-04-20

    The Hippo pathway controls organ size and suppresses tumorigenesis in metazoans by blocking cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. The TEAD1-4 proteins (which contain a DNA-binding domain but lack an activation domain) interact with YAP (which lacks a DNA-binding domain but contains an activation domain) to form functional heterodimeric transcription factors that activate proliferative and prosurvival gene expression programs. The Hippo pathway inhibits the YAP-TEAD hybrid transcription factors by phosphorylating and promoting cytoplasmic retention of YAP. Here we report the crystal structure of the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of human TEAD2. TEAD2 YBD adopts an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich fold with two extra helix-turn-helix inserts. NMR studies reveal that the TEAD-binding domain of YAP is natively unfolded and that TEAD binding causes localized conformational changes in YAP. In vitro binding and in vivo functional assays define an extensive conserved surface of TEAD2 YBD as the YAP-binding site. Therefore, our studies suggest that a short segment of YAP adopts an extended conformation and forms extensive contacts with a rigid surface of TEAD. Targeting a surface-exposed pocket of TEAD might be an effective strategy to disrupt the YAP-TEAD interaction and to reduce the oncogenic potential of YAP.

  13. Structural insights for engineering binding proteins based on non-antibody scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Ryan N; Koide, Shohei

    2012-08-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these 'alternative' scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering strategies. Furthermore, the structural features of these synthetic proteins produced under tightly controlled, directed evolution deepen our understanding of the underlying principles governing molecular recognition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W.; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity

  15. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  16. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH Receptor Structure and GnRH Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen A. Flanagan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH regulates reproduction. The human GnRH receptor lacks a cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal tail but has amino acid sequence motifs characteristic of rhodopsin-like, class A, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. This review will consider how recent descriptions of X-ray crystallographic structures of GPCRs in inactive and active conformations may contribute to understanding GnRH receptor structure, mechanism of activation and ligand binding. The structures confirmed that ligands bind to variable extracellular surfaces, whereas the seven membrane-spanning α-helices convey the activation signal to the cytoplasmic receptor surface, which binds and activates heterotrimeric G proteins. Forty non-covalent interactions that bridge topologically equivalent residues in different transmembrane (TM helices are conserved in class A GPCR structures, regardless of activation state. Conformation-independent interhelical contacts account for a conserved receptor protein structure and their importance in the GnRH receptor structure is supported by decreased expression of receptors with mutations of residues in the network. Many of the GnRH receptor mutations associated with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, including the Glu2.53(90 Lys mutation, involve amino acids that constitute the conserved network. Half of the ~250 intramolecular interactions in GPCRs differ between inactive and active structures. Conformation-specific interhelical contacts depend on amino acids changing partners during activation. Conserved inactive conformation-specific contacts prevent receptor activation by stabilizing proximity of TM helices 3 and 6 and a closed G protein-binding site. Mutations of GnRH receptor residues involved in these interactions, such as Arg3.50(139 of the DRY/S motif or Tyr7.53(323 of the N/DPxxY motif, increase or decrease receptor expression and efficiency of receptor coupling to G protein signaling, consistent with the

  17. Metal binding spectrum and model structure of the Bacillus anthracis virulence determinant MntA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigonsky, Elena; Fish, Inbar; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Ovcharenko, Elena; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2015-10-01

    The potentially lethal human pathogen Bacillus anthracis expresses a putative metal import system, MntBCA, which belongs to the large family of ABC transporters. MntBCA is essential for virulence of Bacillus anthracis: deletion of MntA, the system's substrate binding protein, yields a completely non-virulent strain. Here we determined the metal binding spectrum of MntA. In contrast to what can be inferred from growth complementation studies we find no evidence that MntA binds Fe(2+) or Fe(3+). Rather, MntA binds a variety of other metal ions, including Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) with affinities ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-8) M. Binding of Zn(2+) and Co(2+) have a pronounced thermo-stabilizing effect on MntA, with Mn(2+) having a milder effect. The thermodynamic stability of MntA, competition experiments, and metal binding and release experiments all suggest that Mn(2+) is the metal that is likely transported by MntBCA and is therefore the limiting factor for virulence of Bacillus anthracis. A homology-model of MntA shows a single, highly conserved metal binding site, with four residues that participate in metal coordination: two histidines, a glutamate, and an aspartate. The metals bind to this site in a mutually exclusive manner, yet surprisingly, mutational analysis shows that for proper coordination each metal requires a different subset of these four residues. ConSurf evolutionary analysis and structural comparison of MntA and its homologues suggest that substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of metal ions use a pair of highly conserved prolines to interact with their cognate ABC transporters. This proline pair is found exclusively in ABC import systems of metal ions.

  18. Comparison Study on Polysaccharide Fractions from Laminaria japonica: Structural Characterization and Bile Acid Binding Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Lin, Lianzhu; Sun, Baoguo; Zhao, Mouming

    2017-11-08

    Our previous study has suggested that the crude polysaccharide obtained from Laminaria japonica by acid assisted extraction (LP-A) have significant bile acid-binding capacity, which probably ascribed to its specific structure characterization. The relationship between structure characterization and bile acid-binding capacity of the purified LP-A fractions are still unknown. This paper conducted a comparison study on the structure characterization and bile acid-binding capacity of three LP-A fractions (LP-A4, LP-A6, and LP-A8). The results indicated that LP-A4, LP-A6, and LP-A8, characterized as mannoglucan, fucomannoglucan, and fucogalactan, had significantly different structure characterization. Furthermore, the bile acid-binding capacity of LP-A8 was obviously higher than the other fractions, which may be attributed to its highly branched structure, abundant sulfate, fucose, and galactose in chemical composition and denser interconnected macromolecule network in molecular morphology. This study provides scientific evidence for the potential utilization of LP-A8 as an attractive functional food supplement candidate for the hyperlipidemia population.

  19. Structural study and thermodynamic characterization of inhibitor binding to lumazine synthase from Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgunova, Ekaterina [Karolinska Institutet NOVUM, Center of Structural Biochemistry, Hälsovägen 7-9, 141 57 Huddinge (Sweden); Illarionov, Boris; Saller, Sabine [Institut für Lebensmittelchemie, Universität Hamburg, Grindelallee 117, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Popov, Aleksander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX 09 (France); Sambaiah, Thota [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University (United States); Bacher, Adelbert [Chemistry Department, Technical University of Munich, 85747 Garching (Germany); Cushman, Mark [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University (United States); Fischer, Markus [Institut für Lebensmittelchemie, Universität Hamburg, Grindelallee 117, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Ladenstein, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.ladenstein@ki.se [Karolinska Institutet NOVUM, Center of Structural Biochemistry, Hälsovägen 7-9, 141 57 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Crystallographic studies of lumazine synthase, the penultimate enzyme of the riboflavin-biosynthetic pathway in B. anthracis, provide a structural framework for the design of antibiotic inhibitors, together with calorimetric and kinetic investigations of inhibitor binding. The crystal structure of lumazine synthase from Bacillus anthracis was solved by molecular replacement and refined to R{sub cryst} = 23.7% (R{sub free} = 28.4%) at a resolution of 3.5 Å. The structure reveals the icosahedral symmetry of the enzyme and specific features of the active site that are unique in comparison with previously determined orthologues. The application of isothermal titration calorimetry in combination with enzyme kinetics showed that three designed pyrimidine derivatives bind to lumazine synthase with micromolar dissociation constants and competitively inhibit the catalytic reaction. Structure-based modelling suggested the binding modes of the inhibitors in the active site and allowed an estimation of the possible contacts formed upon binding. The results provide a structural framework for the design of antibiotics active against B. anthracis.

  20. Structure solution of DNA-binding proteins and complexes with ARCIMBOLDO libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Meindl, Kathrin; Sammito, Massimo [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Pohl, Ehmke, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Durham University, (United Kingdom); Usón, Isabel, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); University of Göttingen, (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    The structure solution of DNA-binding protein structures and complexes based on the combination of location of DNA-binding protein motif fragments with density modification in a multi-solution frame is described. Protein–DNA interactions play a major role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, packaging, rearrangement, replication and repair. The molecular detail of protein–DNA interactions can be best visualized through crystallography, and structures emphasizing insight into the principles of binding and base-sequence recognition are essential to understanding the subtleties of the underlying mechanisms. An increasing number of high-quality DNA-binding protein structure determinations have been witnessed despite the fact that the crystallographic particularities of nucleic acids tend to pose specific challenges to methods primarily developed for proteins. Crystallographic structure solution of protein–DNA complexes therefore remains a challenging area that is in need of optimized experimental and computational methods. The potential of the structure-solution program ARCIMBOLDO for the solution of protein–DNA complexes has therefore been assessed. The method is based on the combination of locating small, very accurate fragments using the program Phaser and density modification with the program SHELXE. Whereas for typical proteins main-chain α-helices provide the ideal, almost ubiquitous, small fragments to start searches, in the case of DNA complexes the binding motifs and DNA double helix constitute suitable search fragments. The aim of this work is to provide an effective library of search fragments as well as to determine the optimal ARCIMBOLDO strategy for the solution of this class of structures.

  1. The Structure of Prejudice and Its Relation to Party Preferences in Belgium: Flanders and Wallonia Compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecil Meeusen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We test two assumptions of the generalized prejudice literature. First, that the structure of generalized prejudice (i.e. how prejudices are interrelated is dependent on the intergroup context. Second, that different types of prejudice have similar political consequences and run via the generalized prejudice component. We perform these tests in the two main regions of Belgium − Flanders and Wallonia − and investigate the influence of differences in the history of immigration, experience of the linguistic and autonomy conflict, and the separate party system and political discourse (i.e. the societal and intergroup context on these premises. We make use of the Belgian Election Panel (BEP data that included measures of prejudice toward multiple target groups (immigrants, Flemings, Walloons, homosexuals, and Jews and voting propensities for the main political parties. Our results show that, regardless of the differences in intergroup experiences, the structure of prejudice is identical in Flanders and Wallonia. Flemings are, however, more tolerant toward homosexuals and immigrants than Walloons. The political context and the set of potential political outlets does play an important moderating role in the translation of prejudices to party preferences: While negative attitudes toward the other regional group seem to divide the electorate in Flanders, it does not affect voting intentions in Wallonia. Anti-immigrant prejudice is crucial in both regions, but affects voters in different ways at the right-side of the political spectrum.

  2. Electrostatics, structure prediction, and the energy landscapes for protein folding and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Yeh; Zheng, Weihua; Balamurugan, D; Schafer, Nicholas P; Kim, Bobby L; Cheung, Margaret S; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    While being long in range and therefore weakly specific, electrostatic interactions are able to modulate the stability and folding landscapes of some proteins. The relevance of electrostatic forces for steering the docking of proteins to each other is widely acknowledged, however, the role of electrostatics in establishing specifically funneled landscapes and their relevance for protein structure prediction are still not clear. By introducing Debye-Hückel potentials that mimic long-range electrostatic forces into the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure, and Energy Model (AWSEM), a transferable protein model capable of predicting tertiary structures, we assess the effects of electrostatics on the landscapes of thirteen monomeric proteins and four dimers. For the monomers, we find that adding electrostatic interactions does not improve structure prediction. Simulations of ribosomal protein S6 show, however, that folding stability depends monotonically on electrostatic strength. The trend in predicted melting temperatures of the S6 variants agrees with experimental observations. Electrostatic effects can play a range of roles in binding. The binding of the protein complex KIX-pKID is largely assisted by electrostatic interactions, which provide direct charge-charge stabilization of the native state and contribute to the funneling of the binding landscape. In contrast, for several other proteins, including the DNA-binding protein FIS, electrostatics causes frustration in the DNA-binding region, which favors its binding with DNA but not with its protein partner. This study highlights the importance of long-range electrostatics in functional responses to problems where proteins interact with their charged partners, such as DNA, RNA, as well as membranes. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  3. Structural characterisation of Tpx from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis reveals insights into the binding of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Gabrielsen

    Full Text Available Thiol peroxidase, Tpx, has been shown to be a target protein of the salicylidene acylhydrazide class of antivirulence compounds. In this study we present the crystal structures of Tpx from Y. pseudotuberculosis (ypTpx in the oxidised and reduced states, together with the structure of the C61S mutant. The structures solved are consistent with previously solved atypical 2-Cys thiol peroxidases, including that for "forced" reduced states using the C61S mutant. In addition, by investigating the solution structure of ypTpx using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, we have confirmed that reduced state ypTpx in solution is a homodimer. The solution structure also reveals flexibility around the dimer interface. Notably, the conformational changes observed between the redox states at the catalytic triad and at the dimer interface have implications for substrate and inhibitor binding. The structural data were used to model the binding of two salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds to the oxidised structure of ypTpx. Overall, the study provides insights into the binding of the salicylidene acylhydrazides to ypTpx, aiding our long-term strategy to understand the mode of action of this class of compounds.

  4. Preferential binding of IFI16 protein to cruciform structure and superhelical DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan; Liao, J.C.C.; Arrowsmith, Ch.H.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 422, č. 4 (2012), s. 716-720 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1211 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cruciform structure * IFI16 * protein-DNA binding Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.406, year: 2012

  5. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1375–1381. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0900-4. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni(II). Schiff base complex. SARAT CHANDRA KUMARa, ABHIJIT PALa, MERRY MITRAa,. V M MANIKANDAMATHAVANb, CHIA -HER LINc, BALACHANDRAN UNNI NAIRb,∗.

  6. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J.; Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED); (Icahn)

    2017-09-07

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a ‘redox switch’ centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the ‘OFF’ state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins.

  7. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J; Rudenko, Gabby

    2017-11-02

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a 'redox switch' centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the 'OFF' state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Solution structure of fatty acid-binding protein from human brain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademacher, M.; Zimmerman, A.W.; Ruterjans, H.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Lucke, C.

    2002-01-01

    Human brain-type fatty acid-binding protein (B-FABP) has been recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli both unlabelled and 15N-enriched for structure investigation in solution using high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The sequential assignments of the 1H and 15N resonances were achieved by applying

  9. New insights into structure and function of the different types of fatty acid-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, Augusta Wilhelmina

    2002-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytosolic proteins with virtually identical backbone structures that facilitate the solubility and intracellular transport of fatty acids. They may also modulate the effect of fatty acids on various metabolic enzymes and receptors and on cellular

  10. Structure of P-Glycoprotein Reveals a Molecular Basis for Poly-Specific Drug Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Stephen G.; Yu, Jodie; Ward, Andrew; Weng, Yue; Chittaboina, Srinivas; Zhuo, Rupeng; Harrell, Patina M.; Trinh, Yenphuong T.; Zhang, Qinghai; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Chang, Geoffrey; (Scripps); (TTU)

    2009-04-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) detoxifies cells by exporting hundreds of chemically unrelated toxins but has been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR) in the treatment of cancers. Substrate promiscuity is a hallmark of P-gp activity, thus a structural description of poly-specific drug-binding is important for the rational design of anticancer drugs and MDR inhibitors. The x-ray structure of apo P-gp at 3.8 angstroms reveals an internal cavity of -6000 angstroms cubed with a 30 angstrom separation of the two nucleotide-binding domains. Two additional P-gp structures with cyclic peptide inhibitors demonstrate distinct drug-binding sites in the internal cavity capable of stereoselectivity that is based on hydrophobic and aromatic interactions. Apo and drug-bound P-gp structures have portals open to the cytoplasm and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer for drug entry. The inward-facing conformation represents an initial stage of the transport cycle that is competent for drug binding.

  11. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  12. Structure and binding properties of a cameloid nanobody raised against KDM5B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuf, Anders; Kristensen, Line Hyltoft; Kristensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The histone demethylase KDM5B is considered to be a promising target for anticancer therapy. Single-chain antibodies from llama (nanobodies) have been raised to aid in crystallization and structure determination of this enzyme. The antigen-binding properties of 15 of these nanobodies have been...

  13. Structural Basis for Sialoglycan Binding by the Streptococcus sanguinis SrpA Adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensing, Barbara A; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; McCulloch, Kathryn M; Yu, Hai; Vann, Kendra R; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Anderson, Spencer; Chen, Xi; Sullam, Paul M; Iverson, T M

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus sanguinisis a leading cause of infective endocarditis, a life-threatening infection of the cardiovascular system. An important interaction in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is attachment of the organisms to host platelets.S. sanguinisexpresses a serine-rich repeat adhesin, SrpA, similar in sequence to platelet-binding adhesins associated with increased virulence in this disease. In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of the putative binding region of SrpA (SrpABR) both unliganded and in complex with a synthetic disaccharide ligand at 1.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. We identified a conserved Thr-Arg motif that orients the sialic acid moiety and is required for binding to platelet monolayers. Furthermore, we propose that sequence insertions in closely related family members contribute to the modulation of structural and functional properties, including the quaternary structure, the tertiary structure, and the ligand-binding site. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Preference shifts, structural breaks and the domestic demand for Chilean wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Troncoso-Valverde

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates possible changes in Chilean domestic consumer preferences for wine through the estimation of a demand function that allows for structural breaks and regime shifts in the cointegrating relationship. Our findings support both higher own-price elasticity and higher substitutability between wine and beer after 1982, when a shift in regime in the demand function is found. We believe our findings might be due to the introduction of an increasing number of wine varieties in Chile during the last two decades. We argue that more wine varieties affect domestic consumer preferences by altering the product diversity available in the domestic market.El presente artículo investiga posibles cambios en las preferencias de los consumidores chilenos de vino por medio de la estimación de una función de demanda que permite quiebres estructurales y cambios de régimen en el vector de cointegración de la misma. Nuestros resultados muestran una alta elasticidad - precio y una mayor sustitución entre vino y cerveza a partir de 1982, fecha en la cual un cambio de régimen en la función de demanda es detectado. Dichos resultados pueden ser atribuidos a la introducción de un creciente número de variedades de vino en Chile en las últimas dos décadas. Así, la introducción de un mayor número de variedades de vino afecta las preferencias de los consumidores chilenos al alterar la variedad de productos disponibles en el mercado chileno de vino.Este artigo investiga possíveis mudanças nas preferências dos consumidores de vinho por meio da estimação de uma função da demanda que permite a ruptura estrutural e a mudança do regime no vetor da co-integração do mesmo. Nossos resultados mostram uma elevada elasticidade - preço e uma maior substituição entre o vinho e a cerveja a partir de 1982, data na qual uma mudança do regime na função da demanda é detectada. Estes resultados podem ser atribuídos à introdução de um n

  15. Effect of hairpin loop structure on reactivity, sequence preference and adduct orientation of a DNA-interactive pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) antitumour agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, David E; Vassoler, Higia; Jackson, Paul J M; James, Colin H; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2015-04-07

    The pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) are a family of covalent-binding DNA-interactive minor-groove binding agents with a thermodynamic preference for binding to 5'-Pu-G-Pu-3' sequences (Pu = Purine) but a kinetic preference for 5'-Py-G-Py-3' (Py = Pyrimidine). Using HPLC/MS methodology and a range of designed hairpin-forming oligonucleotides, the kinetics of reaction of a C8-bis-pyrrole pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) conjugate (GWL-78, 2) with sixteen isomeric oligonucleotides has been evaluated, each containing a single PBD binding site in one of two locations. The PBD-binding base-pair triplets were designed to include every possible combination of A and T bases adjacent to the covalently-reacting guanine, with the set of hairpins consisting of isomeric pairs containing the same sequence in the hairpin stem but with either hexaethylene glycol (HEG) or TTT loops. The PBD 2 reacted most rapidly with TGT and TGA sequences, with the possibility that adducts might form in both the 3'- and 5'-directions with some sequences according to modelling studies. A faster reaction rate was observed for all hairpins containing the HEG loop except one (Seq 10) when the PBD binding triplets were located either near the loop or adjacent to the 5'-end. Modelling studies have suggested that this difference in reactivity could be due to the structural flexibility of the HEG loop allowing both A-ring-3' and A-ring-5' adducts to form, while a TTT loop should favour only A-ring-5' adducts due to steric considerations. These findings contrast with the results reported by Nguyen and Wilson for the interaction of non-covalent DNA-binding molecules with DNA hairpins, where the loop structure was found to have little effect on interaction in the main stem of the hairpin.

  16. Structure of armadillo ACBP: a new member of the acyl-CoA-binding protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costabel, Marcelo D., E-mail: costabel@criba.edu.ar [Grupo de Biofísica, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ermácora, Mario R. [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Bernal (Argentina); Santomé, José A. [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas (IQUIFYB), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica (UBA-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alzari, Pedro M. [Unité de Biochimie Structurale, Institut Pasteur, Paris (France); Guérin, Diego M. A. [Unidad de Biofisica (CSIC-UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Grupo de Biofísica, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2006-10-01

    The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. ACBP is a carrier for activated long-chain fatty acids and has been associated with many aspects of lipid metabolism. Its secondary structure is highly similar to that of the corresponding form of bovine ACBP and exhibits the unique flattened α-helical bundle (up–down–down–up) motif reported for animal, yeast and insect ACBPs. Conformational differences are located in loops and turns, although these structural differences do not suffice to account for features that could be related to the unusual biochemistry and lipid metabolism of the Harderian gland.

  17. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Regular Octahedral Structure of Li6 Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Ping; Li, Ping; Gou, Qing-Quan; Liu, Wei-Na

    2008-12-01

    The formation mechanism for the regular octahedral structure of Li6cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between any two neighboring nuclei has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of -44.736 89 a.u. at R = 5.07a0. When R approaches infinity, the total energy of six lithium atoms has the value of -44.568 17 a.u. So the binding energy of Li6 with respect to six lithium atoms is 0.1687 a.u. Therefore, the binding energy per atom for Li6 is 0.028 12 a.u., or 0.7637 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2 and the binding energy per atom of 0.494 eV for Li3 calculated in our previous work. This means that the Li6 cluster may be formed in a regular octahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  18. Structural and biochemical studies on ATP binding and hydrolysis by the Escherichia coli RNA chaperone Hfq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Hämmerle

    Full Text Available In Escherichia coli the RNA chaperone Hfq is involved in riboregulation by assisting base-pairing between small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs and mRNA targets. Several structural and biochemical studies revealed RNA binding sites on either surface of the donut shaped Hfq-hexamer. Whereas sRNAs are believed to contact preferentially the YKH motifs present on the proximal site, poly(A(15 and ADP were shown to bind to tripartite binding motifs (ARE circularly positioned on the distal site. Hfq has been reported to bind and to hydrolyze ATP. Here, we present the crystal structure of a C-terminally truncated variant of E. coli Hfq (Hfq(65 in complex with ATP, showing that it binds to the distal R-sites. In addition, we revisited the reported ATPase activity of full length Hfq purified to homogeneity. At variance with previous reports, no ATPase activity was observed for Hfq. In addition, FRET assays neither indicated an impact of ATP on annealing of two model oligoribonucleotides nor did the presence of ATP induce strand displacement. Moreover, ATP did not lead to destabilization of binary and ternary Hfq-RNA complexes, unless a vast stoichiometric excess of ATP was used. Taken together, these studies strongly suggest that ATP is dispensable for and does not interfere with Hfq-mediated RNA transactions.

  19. Structural and functional analysis of the fibronectin-binding protein FNE from Streptococcus equi spp. equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiouajni, Mounira; Durand, Dominique; Blondeau, Karine; Graille, Marc; Urvoas, Agathe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marielle; Guellouz, Asma; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Minard, Philippe; van Tilbeurgh, Herman

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus equi is a horse pathogen belonging to Lancefield group C. Infection by S. equi ssp. equi causes strangles, a serious and highly contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract. S. equi ssp. equi secretes a fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein, FNE, that does not contain cell wall-anchoring motifs. FNE binds to the gelatin-binding domain (GBD) of Fn, composed of the motifs (6) FI (12) FII (789) FI . FNE lacks the canonical Fn-binding peptide repeats observed in many microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules. We found that the interaction between FNE and the human GBD is mediated by the binding of the disordered C-terminal region (residues 208-262) of FNE to the (789) FI GBD subfragment. The crystal structure of FNE showed that it is similar to the minor pilus protein Spy0125 of Streptococcus pyogenes, found at the end of pilus polymers and responsible for adhesion. FNE and Spy0125 both have a superimposable internal thioester bond between highly conserved Cys and Gln residues. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the FNE-(789) FI complex provided a model that aligns the C-terminal peptide of FNE with the E-strands of the FI domains, adopting the β-zipper extension model observed in previous structures of microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule adhesion peptides bound to FI domains. © 2014 FEBS.

  20. Structural properties governing drug-plasma protein binding determined by high-performance liquid chromatography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Sharad; Loadman, Paul; Abraham, Michael H; Liu, Xiangli

    2018-02-05

    The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method employing stationary phases immobilized with plasma proteins was used for this study to investigate the structural properties governing drug-plasma protein binding. A set of 65 compounds with a broad range of structural diversity (in terms of volume, hydrogen-bonding, polarity and electrostatic force) were selected for this purpose. The Abraham linear free energy relationship (LFER) analyses of the retention factors on the immobilized HSA (human serum albumin) and AGP (α 1 -acid glycoprotein) stationary phases showed that McGowan's characteristic molecular volume (V), dipolarity/polarizability (S) and hydrogen bond basicity (B) are the three significant molecular descriptors of solutes determining the interaction with immobilized plasma proteins, whereas excess molar refraction (E) is less important and hydrogen bond acidity (A) is not of statistical significance in both systems, for electrically neutral compounds. It was shown that ionised acids, as carboxylate anions, bind very strongly to the immobilized HSA stationary phase and that ionised bases, as cations bind strongly to the AGP stationary phase. This is the first time that the effect of ionised species on plasma protein binding has been determined quantitatively; the increased binding of acids to HSA is due almost entirely to acids in their ionised form. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure of the ankyrin-binding domain of alpha-Na,K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Devarajan, P; Dorfman, A L; Morrow, J S

    1998-07-24

    The ankyrin 33-residue repeating motif, an L-shaped structure with protruding beta-hairpin tips, mediates specific macromolecular interactions with cytoskeletal, membrane, and regulatory proteins. The association between ankyrin and alpha-Na,K-ATPase, a ubiquitous membrane protein critical to vectorial transport of ions and nutrients, is required to assemble and stabilize Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane. alpha-Na,K-ATPase binds both red cell ankyrin (AnkR, a product of the ANK1 gene) and Madin-Darby canine kidney cell ankyrin (AnkG, a product of the ANK3 gene) utilizing residues 142-166 (SYYQEAKSSKIMESFK NMVPQQALV) in its second cytoplasmic domain. Fusion peptides of glutathione S-transferase incorporating these 25 amino acids bind specifically to purified ankyrin (Kd = 118 +/- 50 nM). The three-dimensional structure (2.6 A) of this minimal ankyrin-binding motif, crystallized as the fusion protein, reveals a 7-residue loop with one charged hydrophilic face capping a double beta-strand. Comparison with ankyrin-binding sequences in p53, CD44, neurofascin/L1, and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor suggests that the valency and specificity of ankyrin binding is achieved by the interaction of 5-7-residue surface loops with the beta-hairpin tips of multiple ankyrin repeat units.

  2. Nucleotide-dependent structural fluctuations and regulation of microtubule-binding affinity of KIF1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Ryo; Takagi, Fumiko; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2015-05-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin regulate affinity to a rail protein during the ATP hydrolysis cycle. The regulation mechanism, however, is yet to be determined. To understand this mechanism, we investigated the structural fluctuations of the motor head of the single-headed kinesin called KIF1A in different nucleotide states using molecular dynamics simulations of a Gō-like model. We found that the helix α4 at the microtubule (MT) binding site intermittently exhibits a large structural fluctuation when MT is absent. Frequency of this fluctuation changes systematically according to the nucleotide states and correlates strongly with the experimentally observed binding affinity to MT. We also showed that thermal fluctuation enhances the correlation and the interaction with the nucleotide suppresses the fluctuation of the helix α4. These results suggest that KIF1A regulates affinity to MT by changing the flexibility of the helix α4 during the ATP hydrolysis process: the binding site becomes more flexible in the strong binding state than in the weak binding state. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Michael E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1 multiple sequence alignments, 2 mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3 phylogenetic trees, 4 inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5 amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural

  4. Structural feature extraction protocol for classifying reversible membrane binding protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källberg, Morten; Lu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Machine learning based classification protocols for automated function annotation of protein structures have in many instances proven superior to simpler sequence based procedures. Here we present an automated method for extracting features from protein structures by construction of surface patches to be used in such protocols. The utility of the developed patch-growing procedure is exemplified by its ability to identify reversible membrane binding domains from the C1, C2, and PH families.

  5. Crystal structure of glucose isomerase in complex with xylitol inhibitor in one metal binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji-Eun; Kim, In Jung; Nam, Ki Hyun

    2017-11-04

    Glucose isomerase (GI) is an intramolecular oxidoreductase that interconverts aldoses and ketoses. These characteristics are widely used in the food, detergent, and pharmaceutical industries. In order to obtain an efficient GI, identification of novel GI genes and substrate binding/inhibition have been studied. Xylitol is a well-known inhibitor of GI. In Streptomyces rubiginosus, two crystal structures have been reported for GI in complex with xylitol inhibitor. However, a structural comparison showed that xylitol can have variable conformation at the substrate binding site, e.g., a nonspecific binding mode. In this study, we report the crystal structure of S. rubiginosus GI in a complex with xylitol and glycerol. Our crystal structure showed one metal binding mode in GI, which we presumed to represent the inactive form of the GI. The metal ion was found only at the M1 site, which was involved in substrate binding, and was not present at the M2 site, which was involved in catalytic function. The O 2 and O 4 atoms of xylitol molecules contributed to the stable octahedral coordination of the metal in M1. Although there was no metal at the M2 site, no large conformational change was observed for the conserved residues coordinating M2. Our structural analysis showed that the metal at the M2 site was not important when a xylitol inhibitor was bound to the M1 site in GI. Thus, these findings provided important information for elucidation or engineering of GI functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Debasish

    2009-02-01

    the substrate-free conformation. Orientation of the substrate with respect to the active site histidine and serine (in the mutant enzyme also varies in different subunits. Conclusion The structures of the C. parvum GAPDH ternary complex and other GAPDH complexes demonstrate the plasticity of the substrate binding site. We propose that the active site of GAPDH can accommodate the substrate in multiple conformations at multiple locations during the initial encounter. However, the C-3 phosphate group clearly prefers the 'new Pi' site for initial binding in the active site.

  7. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Icosahedral Structure of Li13 Cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weina; Li Ping; Gou Qingquan; Zhao Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular icosahedral structure of Li 13 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li 13 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of -96.951 39 a.u. at R = 5.46a 0 . When R approaches to infinity, the total energy of thirteen lithium atoms has the value of -96.564 38 a.u. So the binding energy of Li 13 with respect to thirteen lithium atoms is 0.387 01 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li 13 is 0.029 77 a.u. or 0.810 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li 2 , 0.494 eV for Li 3 , 0.7878 eV for Li 4 , 0.632 eV for Li 5 , and 0.674 eV for Li 7 calculated by us previously. This means that the Li 13 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular icosahedral structure with a greater binding energy

  8. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Icosahedral Structure of Li13 Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Na; Li, Ping; Gou, Qing-Quan; Zhao, Yan-Ping

    2008-11-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular icosahedral structure of Li13 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li13 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of 96.951 39 a.u. at R = 5.46a0. When R approaches to infinity, the total energy of thirteen lithium atoms has the value of 96.564 38 a.u. So the binding energy of Li13 with respect to thirteen lithium atoms is 0.387 01 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li13 is 0.029 77 a.u. or 0.810 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2, 0.494 eV for Li3, 0.7878 eV for Li4, 0.632 eV for Li5, and 0.674 eV for Li7 calculated by us previously. This means that the Li13 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular icosahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  9. Revised domain structure of ulvan lyase and characterization of the first ulvan binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Rebecca L J; Neumann, Marten; Fuenzalida Werner, Juan Pablo; Gröhn, Franziska; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2017-03-22

    Biomass waste products from green algae have recently been given new life, as these polysaccharides have potential applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine. One such polysaccharide group called ulvans displays many different, potentially useful properties that arise from their structural versatility. Hence, performing structural analyses on ulvan is crucial for future applications. However, chemical reaction-based analysis methods cannot fully characterize ulvan and tend to alter its structure. Thus, better methods require well-characterized ulvan-degrading enzymes. Therefore, we analysed a previously sequenced ulvan lyase (Genebank TM reference number JN104480) and characterized its domains. We suggest that the enzyme consists of a shorter than previously described catalytic domain, a newly identified substrate binding domain, and a C-terminal type 9 secretion system signal peptide. By separately expressing the two domains in E. coli, we confirmed that the binding domain is ulvan specific, having higher affinity for ulvan than most lectins for their ligands (affinity constant: 10 5  M -1 ). To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ulvan-binding domain. Overall, identifying this new binding domain is one step towards engineering ulvan enzymes that can be used to characterize ulvan, e.g. through enzymatic/mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses, and help unlock its full potential.

  10. Structural and mutational analyses of the receptor binding domain of botulinum D/C mosaic neurotoxin: Insight into the ganglioside binding mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuemket, Nipawan [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshikazu [Creative Research Institution ' Sousei,' Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takao [Department of Microbiology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192 (Japan); Nakamura, Keiji; Kozaki, Shunji [Department of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka 598-8531 (Japan); Yao, Min [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao, E-mail: tanaka@castor.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT in complex with 3'-sialyllactose. {yields} An electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. {yields} Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed that GBS and GBL are important for ganglioside binding. {yields} A cell binding mechanism, which involves cooperative contribution of two sites, was proposed. -- Abstract: Clostridium botulinum type D strain OFD05, which produces the D/C mosaic neurotoxin, was isolated from cattle killed by the recent botulism outbreak in Japan. The D/C mosaic neurotoxin is the most toxic of the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) characterized to date. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT from strain OFD05 in complex with 3'-sialyllactose at a resolution of 3.0 A. In the structure, an electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed the significant contribution of the residues surrounding the cleft to ganglioside recognition. In addition, a loop adjoining the cleft also plays an important role in ganglioside recognition. In contrast, little effect was observed when the residues located around the surface previously identified as the protein receptor binding site in other BoNTs were substituted. The results of cell binding analysis of the mutants were significantly correlated with the ganglioside binding properties. Based on these observations, a cell binding mechanism of BoNT from strain OFD05 is proposed, which involves cooperative contribution of two ganglioside binding sites.

  11. Structural and mutational analyses of the receptor binding domain of botulinum D/C mosaic neurotoxin: Insight into the ganglioside binding mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuemket, Nipawan; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takao; Nakamura, Keiji; Kozaki, Shunji; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT in complex with 3'-sialyllactose. → An electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. → Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed that GBS and GBL are important for ganglioside binding. → A cell binding mechanism, which involves cooperative contribution of two sites, was proposed. -- Abstract: Clostridium botulinum type D strain OFD05, which produces the D/C mosaic neurotoxin, was isolated from cattle killed by the recent botulism outbreak in Japan. The D/C mosaic neurotoxin is the most toxic of the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) characterized to date. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT from strain OFD05 in complex with 3'-sialyllactose at a resolution of 3.0 A. In the structure, an electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed the significant contribution of the residues surrounding the cleft to ganglioside recognition. In addition, a loop adjoining the cleft also plays an important role in ganglioside recognition. In contrast, little effect was observed when the residues located around the surface previously identified as the protein receptor binding site in other BoNTs were substituted. The results of cell binding analysis of the mutants were significantly correlated with the ganglioside binding properties. Based on these observations, a cell binding mechanism of BoNT from strain OFD05 is proposed, which involves cooperative contribution of two ganglioside binding sites.

  12. Requirement for an A-tract structure at the binding site of phage phi 29 transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1994-03-25

    The Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 transcriptional activator, protein p4, binds to the 5'-AACT-TTTT-15 base-pair spacer-AAAATGTT-3' inverted repeat. In this communication, we study the influence in protein p4 binding of the DNA helical structure within the protein p4 recognition sequences, 5'-AAAATAG-3'. Protein p4 could efficiently bind to a modified target in which the A-tracts had been changed into T-tracts (a different sequence with a similar structure). Binding was lost when the structure of the binding site was modified by an interrupting C residue. The results suggest that the DNA helical structure of the A-tracts is critical for p4 binding. Two models are described that would explain how protein p4 recognized its target sequences on the DNA.

  13. Preferences and needs of patients with a rheumatic disease regarding the structure and content of online self-management support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerlaan, Judy W; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; de Boer-Nijhof, Nienke; Maat, Bertha; Scholtus, Lieske; Kruize, Aike A; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Geenen, Rinie

    2017-03-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate preferences and needs regarding the structure and content of a person-centered online self-management support intervention for patients with a rheumatic disease. A four step procedure, consisting of online focus group interviews, consensus meetings with patient representatives, card sorting task and hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify the preferences and needs. Preferences concerning the structure involved 1) suitability to individual needs and questions, 2) fit to the life stage 3) creating the opportunity to share experiences, be in contact with others, 4) have an expert patient as trainer, 5) allow for doing the training at one's own pace and 6) offer a brief intervention. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 55 content needs comprised eleven clusters: 1) treatment knowledge, 2) societal procedures, 3) physical activity, 4) psychological distress, 5) self-efficacy, 6) provider, 7) fluctuations, 8) dealing with rheumatic disease, 9) communication, 10) intimate relationship, and 11) having children. A comprehensive assessment of preferences and needs in patients with a rheumatic disease is expected to contribute to motivation, adherence to and outcome of self-management-support programs. The overview of preferences and needs can be used to build an online-line self-management intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Odorant-binding proteins OBP57d and OBP57e affect taste perception and host-plant preference in Drosophila sechellia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsuo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite its morphological similarity to the other species in the Drosophila melanogaster species complex, D. sechellia has evolved distinct physiological and behavioral adaptations to its host plant Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as Tahitian Noni. The odor of the ripe fruit of M. citrifolia originates from hexanoic and octanoic acid. D. sechellia is attracted to these two fatty acids, whereas the other species in the complex are repelled. Here, using interspecies hybrids between D. melanogaster deficiency mutants and D. sechellia, we showed that the Odorant-binding protein 57e (Obp57e gene is involved in the behavioral difference between the species. D. melanogaster knock-out flies for Obp57e and Obp57d showed altered behavioral responses to hexanoic acid and octanoic acid. Furthermore, the introduction of Obp57d and Obp57e from D. simulans and D. sechellia shifted the oviposition site preference of D. melanogaster Obp57d/e(KO flies to that of the original species, confirming the contribution of these genes to D. sechellia's specialization to M. citrifolia. Our finding of the genes involved in host-plant determination may lead to further understanding of mechanisms underlying taste perception, evolution of plant-herbivore interactions, and speciation.

  15. G-LoSA for Prediction of Protein-Ligand Binding Sites and Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput structure determination and computational protein structure prediction have significantly enriched the universe of protein structure. However, there is still a large gap between the number of available protein structures and that of proteins with annotated function in high accuracy. Computational structure-based protein function prediction has emerged to reduce this knowledge gap. The identification of a ligand binding site and its structure is critical to the determination of a protein's molecular function. We present a computational methodology for predicting small molecule ligand binding site and ligand structure using G-LoSA, our protein local structure alignment and similarity measurement tool. All the computational procedures described here can be easily implemented using G-LoSA Toolkit, a package of standalone software programs and preprocessed PDB structure libraries. G-LoSA and G-LoSA Toolkit are freely available to academic users at http://compbio.lehigh.edu/GLoSA . We also illustrate a case study to show the potential of our template-based approach harnessing G-LoSA for protein function prediction.

  16. PocketMatch: a new algorithm to compare binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeturu, Kalidas; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2008-12-17

    Recognizing similarities and deriving relationships among protein molecules is a fundamental requirement in present-day biology. Similarities can be present at various levels which can be detected through comparison of protein sequences or their structural folds. In some cases similarities obscure at these levels could be present merely in the substructures at their binding sites. Inferring functional similarities between protein molecules by comparing their binding sites is still largely exploratory and not as yet a routine protocol. One of the main reasons for this is the limitation in the choice of appropriate analytical tools that can compare binding sites with high sensitivity. To benefit from the enormous amount of structural data that is being rapidly accumulated, it is essential to have high throughput tools that enable large scale binding site comparison. Here we present a new algorithm PocketMatch for comparison of binding sites in a frame invariant manner. Each binding site is represented by 90 lists of sorted distances capturing shape and chemical nature of the site. The sorted arrays are then aligned using an incremental alignment method and scored to obtain PMScores for pairs of sites. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis and an extensive validation of the algorithm have been carried out. A comparison with other site matching algorithms is also presented. Perturbation studies where the geometry of a given site was retained but the residue types were changed randomly, indicated that chance similarities were virtually non-existent. Our analysis also demonstrates that shape information alone is insufficient to discriminate between diverse binding sites, unless combined with chemical nature of amino acids. A new algorithm has been developed to compare binding sites in accurate, efficient and high-throughput manner. Though the representation used is conceptually simplistic, we demonstrate that along with the new alignment strategy used, it is sufficient to

  17. NMR Structures and Dynamics in a Prohead RNA Loop that Binds Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaobo; Park, Sun-Young; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Xia, Tianbing; Zhong, Dongping; Schroeder, Susan J

    2016-10-06

    Metal ions are critical for RNA structure and enzymatic activity. We present the structure of an asymmetric RNA loop that binds metal ions and has an essential function in a bacteriophage packaging motor. Prohead RNA is a noncoding RNA that is required for genome packaging activity in phi29-like bacteriophage. The loops in GA1 and phi29 bacteriophage share a conserved adenine that forms a base triple, although the structural context for the base triple differs. NMR relaxation studies and femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal the dynamic behavior of the loop in the metal ion bound and unbound forms. The mechanism of metal ion binding appears to be an induced conformational change between two dynamic ensembles rather than a conformational capture mechanism. These results provide experimental benchmarks for computational models of RNA-metal ion interactions.

  18. LDA+U and tight-binding electronic structure of InN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Sánchez, A.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Terentjevs, A.; Cicero, G.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we employ a combined ab initio and tight-binding approach to obtain the electronic and optical properties of hydrogenated Indium nitride (InN) nanowires. We first discuss InN band structure for the wurtzite structure calculated at the LDA+U level and use this information to extract the parameters needed for an empirical tight-binging implementation. These parameters are then employed to calculate the electronic and optical properties of InN nanowires in a diameter range that would not be affordable by ab initio techniques. The reliability of the large nanowires results is assessed by explicitly comparing the electronic structure of a small diameter wire studied both at LDA+U and tight-binding level.

  19. Structures of Adnectin/Protein Complexes Reveal an Expanded Binding Footprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Bush, Alexander; Wei, Anzhi; Emanuel, Stuart L.; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Janjua, Ahsen; Cheng, Lin; Murdock, Melissa; Abramczyk, Bozena; Cohen, Daniel; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul; Davis, Jonathan H.; Dabritz, Michael; McLaughlin, Douglas C.; Russo, Katie A.; Chao, Ginger; Wright, Martin C.; Jenny, Victoria A.; Engle, Linda J.; Furfine, Eric; Sheriff, Steven (BMS)

    2014-10-02

    Adnectins are targeted biologics derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ({sup 10}Fn3), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Target-specific binders are selected from libraries generated by diversifying the three {sup 10}Fn3 loops that are analogous to the complementarity determining regions of antibodies. The crystal structures of two Adnectins were determined, each in complex with its therapeutic target, EGFR or IL-23. Both Adnectins bind different epitopes than those bound by known monoclonal antibodies. Molecular modeling suggests that some of these epitopes might not be accessible to antibodies because of the size and concave shape of the antibody combining site. In addition to interactions from the Adnectin diversified loops, residues from the N terminus and/or the {beta} strands interact with the target proteins in both complexes. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis confirmed the calculated binding energies of these {beta} strand interactions, indicating that these nonloop residues can expand the available binding footprint.

  20. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Daniel; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds...... a single SDS molecule under nondenaturing concentrations. Protein interaction with SDS was investigated by NMR, ITC and molecular dynamics simulations. The NMR resonances of the protein were assigned, with large stretches of the protein molecule not showing any detectable resonances. SDS is shown...... to specifically interact with the loops surrounding the catalytic triad with medium affinity (Ka ≈ 105 M−1). The mode of binding is closely similar to that seen previously for binding of amphiphilic molecules and substrate analogues to cutinases, and hence SDS acts as a substrate mimic. In addition, the structure...

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA binding and molecular docking studies of zinc(II) carboxylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Niaz; Ikram, Muhammad; Wadood, Abdul; Rehman, Sadia; Shujah, Shaukat; Erum; Ghufran, Mehreen; Rahim, Shahnaz; Shah, Muzamil; Schulzke, Carola

    2018-02-01

    New zinc(II) carboxylate complexes [Zn(3-F-C6H4CH2COO)2]n (1), [Zn3(3-F-C6H4CH2COO)6(Phen)2] (2) and [Zn3(3-F-C6H4CH2COO)6(bipy)2] (3) were synthesized and characterized by atomic absorption, single crystal structural analysis and IR studies. Complex 1 crystallizes as a coordination polymer constituting a web of μ - η1,η1 carboxylate bridged tetrahedral zinc centers. Complexes 2 and 3 comprise trinuclear zinc centers with two terminal fivefold coordinated slightly distorted square-pyramidal and central sixfold coordinated octahedral zinc centers. The complexes were also assessed for their DNA binding ability by UV/- Vis spectroscopy and their behavior rationalized theoretically by molecular docking studies. A DNA binding study has shown groove binding interactions with the complexes.

  2. Structure and characterization of a novel chicken biotin-binding protein A (BBP-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Mark S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chicken genome contains a BBP-A gene showing similar characteristics to avidin family genes. In a previous study we reported that the BBP-A gene may encode a biotin-binding protein due to the high sequence similarity with chicken avidin, especially at regions encoding residues known to be located at the ligand-binding site of avidin. Results Here, we expand the repertoire of known macromolecular biotin binders by reporting a novel biotin-binding protein A (BBP-A from chicken. The BBP-A recombinant protein was expressed using two different expression systems and purified with affinity chromatography, biochemically characterized and two X-ray structures were solved – in complex with D-biotin (BTN and in complex with D-biotin D-sulfoxide (BSO. The BBP-A protein binds free biotin with high, "streptavidin-like" affinity (Kd ~ 10-13 M, which is about 50 times lower than that of chicken avidin. Surprisingly, the affinity of BBP-A for BSO is even higher than the affinity for BTN. Furthermore, the solved structures of the BBP-A – BTN and BBP-A – BSO complexes, which share the fold with the members of the avidin and lipocalin protein families, are extremely similar to each other. Conclusion BBP-A is an avidin-like protein having a β-barrel fold and high affinity towards BTN. However, BBP-A differs from the other known members of the avidin protein family in thermal stability and immunological properties. BBP-A also has a unique ligand-binding property, the ability to bind BTN and BSO at comparable affinities. BBP-A may have use as a novel material in, e.g. modern bio(nanotechnological applications.

  3. Investigation of proton pump inhibitors binding with bovine serum albumin and their relationship to molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuping; Shi Shuyun; Peng Mijun

    2012-01-01

    The interactions of three proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), omeprazole, pantoprazole and ilaprazole with bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) and circular dichroism (CD). Various binding parameters have been calculated at various temperatures. The results indicated that omeprazole, pantoprazole and ilaprazole had a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA with static quenching mechanism, and the binding affinities were significantly affected by different substituents and polarities as the order ilaprazole>pantoprazole>omeprazole. The site marker competitive experiments indicated that the binding of omeprazole, pantoprazole and ilaprazole to BSA primarily took place in subdomain IIA. The results of thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS indicated that electrostatic interaction played a major role for PPIs–BSA association. The distance r between PPIs and BSA was evaluated according to the theory of Förster's energy transfer. The quantitative analysis of synchronous fluorescence and CD spectra showed the change in secondary structure of the BSA upon interaction with PPIs by a reduction of α-helix. All the above results many have relevant insight into the PPIs' availability and distribution. - Highlights: ► The interactions of three PPIs with BSA have been investigated. ► The fluorescence quenching mechanism is static quenching. ► Binding affinities were greatly affected by the substituents and polarities. ► The binding of three PPIs to BSA primarily took place in subdomain IIA.

  4. Structure of a group C streptococcal protein that binds to fibrinogen, albumin and immunoglobulin G via overlapping modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talay, S R; Grammel, M P; Chhatwal, G S

    1996-04-15

    Pathogenic streptococci express surface proteins that bind to host serum proteins. A novel multiple-ligand-binding protein has now been identified in a species belonging to serotype C streptococci. This protein binds to fibrinogen, albumin and IgG and was therefore designated FAI protein. The structure of the fai gene has been determined, and deletion analysis and expression of FAI fusion polypeptides revealed that the binding domain for fibrinogen and IgG is located within the nonrepetitive N-terminal half of the protein. A 93-amino acid peptide retained the ability to bind both proteins, whereas a 56-amino acid subpeptide only bound fibrinogen. IgG-binding activity required the complete fibrinogen-binding domain and an additional 37 amino acids C-terminal to it, and albumin-binding activity was only obtained with a polypeptide reflecting the complete surface-exposed region of FAI protein indicating that the binding sites for each ligand were located on overlapping modules. Signal sequence, C repeat region and C-terminus revealed high homology to group A streptococcal M proteins whereas the N-terminal region containing the fibrinogen/IgG-binding domains is completely different and exhibits no similarity to any other previously characterized protein. Thus FAI protein exhibits a framework structure that might have evolved in group C streptococci via fusion of unrelated sequences, thereby generating an albumin-binding domain in the functional context of multiple-ligand-binding activity.

  5. Crystal structure of a DNA binding protein from the hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Methanococcus jannaschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ganggang; Guo, Rong; Bartlam, Mark; Yang, Haitao; Xue, Hong; Liu, Yiwei; Huang, Li; Rao, Zihe

    2003-01-01

    The Sac10b family consists of a group of highly conserved DNA binding proteins from both the euryarchaeotal and the crenarchaeotal branches of Archaea. The proteins have been suggested to play an architectural role in the chromosomal organization in these organisms. Previous studies have mainly focused on the Sac10b proteins from the crenarchaeota. Here, we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of Mja10b from the euryarchaeon Methanococcus jannaschii. The model of Mja10b has been refined to an R-factor of 20.9%. The crystal structure of an Mja10b monomer reveals an α/β structure of four β-strands and two α-helices, and Mja10b assembles into a dimer via an extensive hydrophobic interface. Mja10b has a similar topology to that of its crenarchaeota counterpart Sso10b (also known as Alba). Structural comparison between the two proteins suggests that structural features such as hydrophobic inner core, acetylation sites, dimer interface, and DNA binding surface are conserved among Sac10b proteins. Structural differences between the two proteins were found in the loops. To understand the structural basis for the thermostability of Mja10b, the Mja10b structure was compared to other proteins with similar topology. Our data suggest that extensive ion-pair networks, optimized accessible surface area and the dimerization via hydrophobic interactions may contribute to the enhanced thermostability of Mja10b. PMID:14627741

  6. Constraining binding hot spots: NMR and molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural explanation for enthalpy-entropy compensation in SH2-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Joshua M; Gorenstein, Nina M; Tian, Jianhua; Martin, Stephen F; Post, Carol Beth

    2010-08-18

    NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to probe the structure and dynamics of complexes of three phosphotyrosine-derived peptides with the Src SH2 domain in an effort to uncover a structural explanation for enthalpy-entropy compensation observed in the binding thermodynamics. The series of phosphotyrosine peptide derivatives comprises the natural pYEEI Src SH2 ligand, a constrained mimic, in which the phosphotyrosine (pY) residue is preorganized in the bound conformation for the purpose of gaining an entropic advantage to binding, and a flexible analogue of the constrained mimic. The expected gain in binding entropy of the constrained mimic was realized; however, a balancing loss in binding enthalpy was also observed that could not be rationalized from the crystallographic structures. We examined protein dynamics to evaluate whether the observed enthalpic penalty might be the result of effects arising from altered motions in the complex. (15)N-relaxation studies and positional fluctuations from molecular dynamics indicate that the main-chain dynamics of the protein show little variation among the three complexes. Root mean squared (rms) coordinate deviations vary by less than 1.5 A for all non-hydrogen atoms for the crystal structures and in the ensemble average structures calculated from the simulations. In contrast to this striking similarity in the structures and dynamics, there are a number of large chemical shift differences from residues across the binding interface, but particularly from key Src SH2 residues that interact with pY, the "hot spot" residue, which contributes about one-half of the binding free energy. Rank-order correlations between chemical shifts and ligand binding enthalpy for several pY-binding residues, coupled with available mutagenesis and calorimetric data, suggest that subtle structural perturbations (enthalpy, leading to the observed enthalpy-entropy compensation. We find no evidence to support the premise

  7. A characteristic back support structure in the bisphenol A-binding pocket in the human nuclear receptor ERRγ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Liu

    Full Text Available The endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA affects various genes and hormones even at merely physiological levels. We recently demonstrated that BPA binds strongly to human nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor (ERR γ and that the phenol-A group of BPA is in a receptacle pocket with essential amino acid residues to provide structural support at the backside. This led BPA to bind to ERRγ in an induced-fit-type binding mode, for example, with a rotated motion of Val313 to support the Tyr326-binding site. A similar binding mechanism appears to occur at the binding site of the BPA phenol-B ring. X-ray crystal analysis of the ERRγ-ligand-binding domain/BPA complex suggested that the ERRγ receptor residues Leu342, Leu345, Asn346, and Ile349 function as intrinsic binding sites of the BPA phenol-B, whereas Leu265, Leu268, Ile310, Val313, Leu324, Tyr330, Lys430, Ala431, and His434 work as structural elements to assist these binding sites. In the present study, by evaluating the mutant receptors replaced by a series of amino acids, we demonstrated that a finely assembled structural network indeed exists around the two adjacent Leu342-Asn346 and Leu345-Ile349 ridges on the same α-helix 7 (H7, constructing a part of the binding pocket structure with back support residues for the BPA phenol-B ring. The results reveal that the double-layer binding sites, namely, the ordinary ligand binding sites and their back support residues, substantiate the strong binding of BPA to ERRγ. When ERRγ-Asn346 was replaced by the corresponding Gly and Tyr in ERRα and ERRβ, respectively, the binding affinity of BPA and even 4-hydroxytamxifen (4-OHT is much reduced. Asn346 was found to be one of the residues that make ERRγ to be exclusive to BPA.

  8. Structural basis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac binding to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Lee, Philbert; Liang, Shichu; Zhou, Zuping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in plasma, which plays a central role in drug pharmacokinetics because most compounds bound to HSA in blood circulation. To understand binding characterization of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to HSA, we resolved the structure of diclofenac and HSA complex by X-ray crystallography. HSA-palmitic acid-diclofenac structure reveals two distinct binding sites for three diclofenac in HSA. One diclofenac is located at the IB subdomain, and its carboxylate group projects toward polar environment, forming hydrogen bond with one water molecule. The other two diclofenac molecules cobind in big hydrophobic cavity of the IIA subdomain without interactive association. Among them, one binds in main chamber of big hydrophobic cavity, and its carboxylate group forms hydrogen bonds with Lys199 and Arg218, as well as one water molecule, whereas another diclofenac binds in side chamber, its carboxylate group projects out cavity, forming hydrogen bond with Ser480. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. The structure, stability and pheromone binding of the male mouse protein sex pheromone darcin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie M Phelan

    Full Text Available Mouse urine contains highly polymorphic major urinary proteins that have multiple functions in scent communication through their abilities to bind, transport and release hydrophobic volatile pheromones. The mouse genome encodes for about 20 of these proteins and are classified, based on amino acid sequence similarity and tissue expression patterns, as either central or peripheral major urinary proteins. Darcin is a male specific peripheral major urinary protein and is distinctive in its role in inherent female attraction. A comparison of the structure and biophysical properties of darcin with MUP11, which belongs to the central class, highlights similarity in the overall structure between the two proteins. The thermodynamic stability, however, differs between the two proteins, with darcin being much more stable. Furthermore, the affinity of a small pheromone mimetic is higher for darcin, although darcin is more discriminatory, being unable to bind bulkier ligands. These attributes are due to the hydrophobic ligand binding cavity of darcin being smaller, caused by the presence of larger amino acid side chains. Thus, the physical and chemical characteristics of the binding cavity, together with its extreme stability, are consistent with darcin being able to exert its function after release into the environment.

  10. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.; (UWASH); (UTSMC)

    2010-01-20

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  11. Solution NMR structure of selenium-binding protein from Methanococcus vannielii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Inyamah, Nwakaego; Stadtman, Thressa C; Tjandra, Nico

    2008-09-19

    Selenium is an important nutrient. The lack of selenium will suppress expression of various enzymes that will lead to cell abnormality and diseases. However, high concentrations of free selenium are toxic to the cell because it adversely affects numerous cell metabolic pathways. In Methanococcus vannielii, selenium transport in the cell is established by the selenium-binding protein, SeBP. SeBP sequesters selenium during transport, thus regulating the level of free selenium in the cell, and delivers it specifically to the selenophosphate synthase enzyme. In solution, SeBP is an oligomer of 8.8-kDa subunits. It is a symmetric pentamer. The solution structure of SeBP was determined by NMR spectroscopy. Each subunit of SeBP is composed of an alpha-helix on top of a 4-stranded twisted beta-sheet. The stability of the five subunits stems mainly from hydrophobic interactions and supplemented by hydrogen bond interactions. The loop containing Cys(59) has been shown to be important for selenium binding, is flexible, and adopts multiple conformations. However, the cysteine accessibility is restricted in the structure, reducing the possibility of the binding of free selenium readily. Therefore, a different selenium precursor or other factors might be needed to facilitate opening of this loop to expose Cys(59) for selenium binding.

  12. Structure of Dioclea virgata lectin: relations between carbohydrate binding site and nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delatorre, P.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Santi-Gadelha, T. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Nobrega, R.B.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nascimento, K.S.; Naganao, C.S.; Sampaio, A.H.; Cavada, B.S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Pires, A.F.; Assreuy, A.M.S. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara (UECE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. By binding to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface, lectins participate in a range of cellular processes without changing the properties of the carbohydrates involved. The lectin of Dioclea virgata (DvirL), both native and complexed with X-man, was submitted to X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystal structure was compared to that of other Diocleinae lectins in order to better understand differences in biological proper- ties, especially with regard to the ability of lectins to induce nitric oxide (NO) production. The DvirL diffraction analysis revealed that both the native crystal and the X-Man-complexed form are orthorhombic and belong to space group I222. The cell parameters were: a=65.4 , b=86.6 and c=90.2 (native structure), and a=61.89 , b=87.67 and c=88.78 (X-Man-complexed structure). An association was observed between the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the ability to induce NO production and the relative positions of Tyr12, Arg228 and Leu99. Thus, differences in biological activity induced by Diocleinae lectins are related to the configuration of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate binding site and to the structural conformation of subsequent regions capable of influencing site-ligand interactions. In conclusion, the ability of Diocleinae lectins to induce NO production depends on CRD configuration. (author)

  13. Structure of noncoding RNA is a determinant of function of RNA binding proteins in transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyoshi Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The majority of the noncoding regions of mammalian genomes have been found to be transcribed to generate noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, resulting in intense interest in their biological roles. During the past decade, numerous ncRNAs and aptamers have been identified as regulators of transcription. 6S RNA, first described as a ncRNA in E. coli, mimics an open promoter structure, which has a large bulge with two hairpin/stalk structures that regulate transcription through interactions with RNA polymerase. B2 RNA, which has stem-loops and unstructured single-stranded regions, represses transcription of mRNA in response to various stresses, including heat shock in mouse cells. The interaction of TLS (translocated in liposarcoma with CBP/p300 was induced by ncRNAs that bind to TLS, and this in turn results in inhibition of CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT activity in human cells. Transcription regulator EWS (Ewing's sarcoma, which is highly related to TLS, and TLS specifically bind to G-quadruplex structures in vitro. The carboxy terminus containing the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG repeat domains in these proteins are necessary for cis-repression of transcription activation and HAT activity by the N-terminal glutamine-rich domain. Especially, the RGG domain in the carboxy terminus of EWS is important for the G-quadruplex specific binding. Together, these data suggest that functions of EWS and TLS are modulated by specific structures of ncRNAs.

  14. Structure of Dioclea virgata lectin: relations between carbohydrate binding site and nitric oxide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delatorre, P.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Santi-Gadelha, T.; Nobrega, R.B.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nascimento, K.S.; Naganao, C.S.; Sampaio, A.H.; Cavada, B.S.; Pires, A.F.; Assreuy, A.M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. By binding to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface, lectins participate in a range of cellular processes without changing the properties of the carbohydrates involved. The lectin of Dioclea virgata (DvirL), both native and complexed with X-man, was submitted to X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystal structure was compared to that of other Diocleinae lectins in order to better understand differences in biological proper- ties, especially with regard to the ability of lectins to induce nitric oxide (NO) production. The DvirL diffraction analysis revealed that both the native crystal and the X-Man-complexed form are orthorhombic and belong to space group I222. The cell parameters were: a=65.4 , b=86.6 and c=90.2 (native structure), and a=61.89 , b=87.67 and c=88.78 (X-Man-complexed structure). An association was observed between the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the ability to induce NO production and the relative positions of Tyr12, Arg228 and Leu99. Thus, differences in biological activity induced by Diocleinae lectins are related to the configuration of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate binding site and to the structural conformation of subsequent regions capable of influencing site-ligand interactions. In conclusion, the ability of Diocleinae lectins to induce NO production depends on CRD configuration. (author)

  15. Structure and DNA binding of alkylation response protein AidB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, Timothy; Metz, Audrey H.; O' Quin, Jami; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Eichman, Brandt F. (Vanderbilt); (NWU)

    2009-01-12

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to alkylating agents activates expression of AidB in addition to DNA repair proteins Ada, AlkA, and AlkB. AidB was recently shown to possess a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and to bind to dsDNA, implicating it as a flavin-dependent DNA repair enzyme. However, the molecular mechanism by which AidB acts to reduce the mutagenic effects of specific DNA alkylators is unknown. We present a 1.7-{angstrom} crystal structure of AidB, which bears superficial resemblance to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily of flavoproteins. The structure reveals a unique quaternary organization and a distinctive FAD active site that provides a rationale for AidB's limited dehydrogenase activity. A highly electropositive C-terminal domain not present in structural homologs was identified by mutational analysis as the DNA binding site. Structural analysis of the DNA and FAD binding sites provides evidence against AidB-catalyzed DNA repair and supports a model in which AidB acts to prevent alkylation damage by protecting DNA and destroying alkylating agents that have yet to reach their DNA target.

  16. Composite Structural Motifs of Binding Sites for Delineating Biological Functions of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Most biological processes are described as a series of interactions between proteins and other molecules, and interactions are in turn described in terms of atomic structures. To annotate protein functions as sets of interaction states at atomic resolution, and thereby to better understand the relation between protein interactions and biological functions, we conducted exhaustive all-against-all atomic structure comparisons of all known binding sites for ligands including small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids, and identified recurring elementary motifs. By integrating the elementary motifs associated with each subunit, we defined composite motifs that represent context-dependent combinations of elementary motifs. It is demonstrated that function similarity can be better inferred from composite motif similarity compared to the similarity of protein sequences or of individual binding sites. By integrating the composite motifs associated with each protein function, we define meta-composite motifs each of which is regarded as a time-independent diagrammatic representation of a biological process. It is shown that meta-composite motifs provide richer annotations of biological processes than sequence clusters. The present results serve as a basis for bridging atomic structures to higher-order biological phenomena by classification and integration of binding site structures. PMID:22347478

  17. The structure of the catechin-binding site of human sulfotransferase 1A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian; Wang, Ting; Girvin, Mark; Leyh, Thomas S

    2016-12-13

    We are just beginning to understand the allosteric regulation of the human cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULTs) family-13 disease-relevant enzymes that regulate the activities of hundreds, if not thousands, of signaling small molecules. SULT1A1, the predominant isoform in adult liver, harbors two noninteracting allosteric sites, each of which binds a different molecular family: the catechins (naturally occurring flavonols) and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Here, we present the structure of an SULT allosteric binding site-the catechin-binding site of SULT1A1 bound to epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The allosteric pocket resides in a dynamic region of the protein that enables EGCG to control opening and closure of the enzyme's active-site cap. Furthermore, the structure offers a molecular explanation for the isozyme specificity of EGCG, which is corroborated experimentally. The binding-site structure was obtained without X-ray crystallography or multidimensional NMR. Instead, a SULT1A1 apoprotein structure was used to guide positioning of a small number of spin-labeled single-Cys mutants that coat the entire enzyme surface with a paramagnetic field of sufficient strength to determine its contribution to the bound ligand's transverse (T 2 ) relaxation from its 1D solution spectrum. EGCG protons were mapped to the protein surface by triangulation using the T 2 values to calculate their distances to a trio of spin-labeled Cys mutants. The final structure was obtained using distance-constrained molecular dynamics docking. This approach, which is readily extensible to other systems, is applicable over a wide range of ligand affinities, requires little protein, avoids the need for isotopically labeled protein, and has no protein molecular weight limitations.

  18. Crystal structure and RNA-binding properties of an Hfq homolog from the deep-branching Aquificae: conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanek, Kimberly A.; Patterson-West, Jennifer; Randolph, Peter S.; Mura, Cameron

    2017-03-31

    The host factor Hfq, as the bacterial branch of the Sm family, is an RNA-binding protein involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA expression and turnover. Hfq facilitates pairing between small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) and their corresponding mRNA targets by binding both RNAs and bringing them into close proximity. Hfq homologs self-assemble into homo-hexameric rings with at least two distinct surfaces that bind RNA. Recently, another binding site, dubbed the `lateral rim', has been implicated in sRNA·mRNA annealing; the RNA-binding properties of this site appear to be rather subtle, and its degree of evolutionary conservation is unknown. An Hfq homolog has been identified in the phylogenetically deep-branching thermophileAquifex aeolicus(Aae), but little is known about the structure and function of Hfq from basal bacterial lineages such as the Aquificae. Therefore,AaeHfq was cloned, overexpressed, purified, crystallized and biochemically characterized. Structures ofAaeHfq were determined in space groupsP1 andP6, both to 1.5 Å resolution, and nanomolar-scale binding affinities for uridine- and adenosine-rich RNAs were discovered. Co-crystallization with U6RNA reveals that the outer rim of theAaeHfq hexamer features a well defined binding pocket that is selective for uracil. ThisAaeHfq structure, combined with biochemical and biophysical characterization of the homolog, reveals deep evolutionary conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode, and lays a foundation for further studies of Hfq-associated RNA biology in ancient bacterial phyla.

  19. The structure of cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 highlights structural Ig-fold versatility for receptor binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemčovičová, Ivana; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of Human cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 was solved at 3.25 Å resolution. Here, a detailed analysis of its intimate dimerization interface and the biophysical properties of its receptor (TRAIL-R2 and CD155) binding interactions are presented. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of the innate immune system as they rapidly detect and destroy infected cells. To avoid immune recognition and to allow long-term persistence in the host, Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved a number of genes to evade or inhibit immune effector pathways. In particular, UL141 can inhibit cell-surface expression of both the NK cell-activating ligand CD155 as well as the TRAIL death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). The crystal structure of unliganded HCMV UL141 refined to 3.25 Å resolution allowed analysis of its head-to-tail dimerization interface. A ‘dimerization-deficient’ mutant of UL141 (ddUL141) was further designed, which retained the ability to bind to TRAIL-R2 or CD155 while losing the ability to cross-link two receptor monomers. Structural comparison of unliganded UL141 with UL141 bound to TRAIL-R2 further identified a mobile loop that makes intimate contacts with TRAIL-R2 upon receptor engagement. Superposition of the Ig-like domain of UL141 on the CD155 ligand T-cell immunoreceptor with Ig and ITIM domains (TIGIT) revealed that UL141 can potentially engage CD155 similar to TIGIT by using the C′C′′ and GF loops. Further mutations in the TIGIT binding site of CD155 (Q63R and F128R) abrogated UL141 binding, suggesting that the Ig-like domain of UL141 is a viral mimic of TIGIT, as it targets the same binding site on CD155 using similar ‘lock-and-key’ interactions. Sequence alignment of the UL141 gene and its orthologues also showed conservation in this highly hydrophobic (L/A)X 6 G ‘lock’ motif for CD155 binding as well as conservation of the TRAIL-R2 binding patches, suggesting that these host–receptor interactions

  20. The structure of cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 highlights structural Ig-fold versatility for receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemčovičová, Ivana [La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK 84505 Bratislava (Slovakia); Zajonc, Dirk M., E-mail: dzajonc@liai.org [La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The crystal structure of Human cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 was solved at 3.25 Å resolution. Here, a detailed analysis of its intimate dimerization interface and the biophysical properties of its receptor (TRAIL-R2 and CD155) binding interactions are presented. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of the innate immune system as they rapidly detect and destroy infected cells. To avoid immune recognition and to allow long-term persistence in the host, Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved a number of genes to evade or inhibit immune effector pathways. In particular, UL141 can inhibit cell-surface expression of both the NK cell-activating ligand CD155 as well as the TRAIL death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). The crystal structure of unliganded HCMV UL141 refined to 3.25 Å resolution allowed analysis of its head-to-tail dimerization interface. A ‘dimerization-deficient’ mutant of UL141 (ddUL141) was further designed, which retained the ability to bind to TRAIL-R2 or CD155 while losing the ability to cross-link two receptor monomers. Structural comparison of unliganded UL141 with UL141 bound to TRAIL-R2 further identified a mobile loop that makes intimate contacts with TRAIL-R2 upon receptor engagement. Superposition of the Ig-like domain of UL141 on the CD155 ligand T-cell immunoreceptor with Ig and ITIM domains (TIGIT) revealed that UL141 can potentially engage CD155 similar to TIGIT by using the C′C′′ and GF loops. Further mutations in the TIGIT binding site of CD155 (Q63R and F128R) abrogated UL141 binding, suggesting that the Ig-like domain of UL141 is a viral mimic of TIGIT, as it targets the same binding site on CD155 using similar ‘lock-and-key’ interactions. Sequence alignment of the UL141 gene and its orthologues also showed conservation in this highly hydrophobic (L/A)X{sub 6}G ‘lock’ motif for CD155 binding as well as conservation of the TRAIL-R2 binding patches, suggesting that these host

  1. Igs Expressed by Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells Show Limited Binding-Site Structure Variability

    KAUST Repository

    Marcatili, P.

    2013-05-01

    Ag selection has been suggested to play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis, but no large-scale analysis has been performed so far on the structure of the Ag-binding sites (ABSs) of leukemic cell Igs. We sequenced both H and L chain V(D)J rearrangements from 366 CLL patients and modeled their three-dimensional structures. The resulting ABS structures were clustered into a small number of discrete sets, each containing ABSs with similar shapes and physicochemical properties. This structural classification correlates well with other known prognostic factors such as Ig mutation status and recurrent (stereotyped) receptors, but it shows a better prognostic value, at least in the case of one structural cluster for which clinical data were available. These findings suggest, for the first time, to our knowledge, on the basis of a structural analysis of the Ab-binding sites, that selection by a finite quota of antigenic structures operates on most CLL cases, whether mutated or unmutated. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. MxaJ structure reveals a periplasmic binding protein-like architecture with unique secondary structural elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung Choi, Jin; Cao, Thinh-Phat; Wouk Kim, Si; Ho Lee, Kun; Haeng Lee, Sung

    2017-07-01

    MxaJ is a component of type II methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) that mediates electron transfer during methanol oxidation in methanotrophic bacteria. However, little is known about how MxaJ structurally cooperates with MDH and Cytochrome c L . Here, we report for the first time the crystal structure of MxaJ. MxaJ consists of eight α-helices and six β-strands, and resembles the "bi-lobate" folding architecture found in periplasmic binding proteins. Distinctive features of MxaJ include prominent loops and a β-strand around the hinge region supporting the ligand-binding cavity, which might provide a more favorable framework for interacting with proteins rather than small molecules. Proteins 2017; 85:1379-1386. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Wave fields in Weyl spaces and conditions for the existence of a preferred pseudo-Riemannian structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audretsch, J.; Gaehler, F.; Straumann, N.

    1984-01-01

    Previous axiomatic approaches to general relativity which led to a Weylian structure of space-time are supplemented by a physical condition which implies the existence of a preferred pseudo-Riemannian structure. It is stipulated that the trajectories of the short wave limit of classical massive fields agree with the geodesics of the Weyl connection and it is shown that this is equivalent to the vanishing of the covariant derivative of a ''mass function'' of nontrivial Weyl type.This in turn is proven to be equivalent to the existence of a preferred metric of the conformal structure such that the Weyl connection is reducible to a connection of the bundle of orthonormal frames belonging to this distinguished metric. (orig.)

  4. Structural characterization of binding mode of smoking cessation drugs to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors through study of ligand complexes with acetylcholine-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucktooa, Prakash; Haseler, Claire A; van Elk, René; Smit, August B; Gallagher, Timothy; Sixma, Titia K

    2012-07-06

    Smoking cessation is an important aim in public health worldwide as tobacco smoking causes many preventable deaths. Addiction to tobacco smoking results from the binding of nicotine to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain, in particular the α4β2 receptor. One way to aid smoking cessation is by the use of nicotine replacement therapies or partial nAChR agonists like cytisine or varenicline. Here we present the co-crystal structures of cytisine and varenicline in complex with Aplysia californica acetylcholine-binding protein and use these as models to investigate binding of these ligands binding to nAChRs. This analysis of the binding properties of these two partial agonists provides insight into differences with nicotine binding to nAChRs. A mutational analysis reveals that the residues conveying subtype selectivity in nAChRs reside on the binding site complementary face and include features extending beyond the first shell of contacting residues.

  5. Solution structure of the Arabidopsis thaliana telomeric repeat-binding protein DNA binding domain: a new fold with an additional C-terminal helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Shih-Che; Hsiao, Hsin-Hao; Chung, Ben C-P; Cheng, Ying-Hsien; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Chung Mong; Ho, Chia Hsing; Huang, Tai-Huang

    2006-02-10

    The double-stranded telomeric repeat-binding protein (TRP) AtTRP1 is isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. Using gel retardation assays, we defined the C-terminal 97 amino acid residues, Gln464 to Val560 (AtTRP1(464-560)), as the minimal structured telomeric repeat-binding domain. This region contains a typical Myb DNA-binding motif and a C-terminal extension of 40 amino acid residues. The monomeric AtTRP1(464-560) binds to a 13-mer DNA duplex containing a single repeat of an A.thaliana telomeric DNA sequence (GGTTTAG) in a 1:1 complex, with a K(D) approximately 10(-6)-10(-7) M. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination revealed that the solution structure of AtTRP1(464-560) is a novel four-helix tetrahedron rather than the three-helix bundle structure found in typical Myb motifs and other TRPs. Binding of the 13-mer DNA duplex to AtTRP1(464-560) induced significant chemical shift perturbations of protein amide resonances, which suggests that helix 3 (H3) and the flexible loop connecting H3 and H4 are essential for telomeric DNA sequence recognition. Furthermore, similar to that in hTRF1, the N-terminal arm likely contributes to or stabilizes DNA binding. Sequence comparisons suggested that the four-helix structure and the involvement of the loop residues in DNA binding may be features unique to plant TRPs.

  6. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  7. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zing Tsung-Yeh Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS and DNA structure (DS properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  8. Solution structure of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Implications for ligand entry and exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fengli [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States); Luecke, Christian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet (Germany); Baier, Leslie J. [NIDDK, NIH, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch (United States); Sacchettini, James C. [Texas A and M University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States); Hamilton, James A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    1997-04-15

    The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a small (131 amino acids) protein which binds dietary long-chain fatty acids in the cytosol of enterocytes. Recently, an alanine to threonine substitution at position 54 in I-FABP has been identified which affects fatty acid binding and transport, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in several populations including Mexican-Americans and Pima Indians. To investigate the molecular basis of the binding properties of I-FABP, the 3D solution structure of the more common form of human I-FABP (Ala54) was studied by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.Recombinant I-FABP was expressed from E. coli in the presence and absence of 15N-enriched media. The sequential assignments for non-delipidated I-FABP were completed by using 2D homonuclear spectra (COSY, TOCSY and NOESY) and 3D heteronuclear spectra(NOESY-HMQC and TOCSY-HMQC). The tertiary structure of human I-FABP was calculated by using the distance geometry program DIANA based on 2519 distance constraints obtained from the NMR data. Subsequent energy minimization was carried out by using the program SYBYL in the presence of distance constraints. The conformation of human I-FABP consists of 10 antiparallel {beta}-strands which form two nearly orthogonal {beta}-sheets of five strands each, and two short {alpha}-helices that connect the {beta}-strands A and B. The interior of the protein consists of a water-filled cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. The NMR solution structure of human I-FABP is similar to the crystal structure of rat I-FABP.The NMR results show significant conformational variability of certain backbone segments around the postulated portal region for the entry and exit of fatty acid ligand.

  9. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  10. Astaxanthin binding and structural stability of the apple snail carotenoprotein ovorubin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreon, Marcos S; Ceolín, Marcelo; Heras, Horacio

    2007-04-01

    Ovorubin (OR) is the major perivitellin of the eggs of Pomacea canaliculata. The astaxanthin (ASX) binding and structural stability of OR were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD). The apo-OR (without astaxanthin) shows a single, high affinity binding site for ASX (K(D)=0.5 microM). The quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by ASX indicates that about 22% are near the carotenoid-binding site in a non-polar environment, as indicated by tryptophan resonance energy transfer to the ligand. Secondary structure (alpha+beta) was virtually not affected by cofactor removal. Holo-OR shows unusually high thermal stability. The removal of ASX does not affect the thermal or chemical stability of the quaternary structure. In conclusion, although subtle changes were observed, ASX is not essential for OR stability, unlike most invertebrate carotenoproteins. This supports the idea that OR plays an important physiological role in the storage, transport and protection of carotenoids during snail embryogenesis.

  11. The RGD finger of Del-1 is a unique structural feature critical for integrin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schürpf, Thomas; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Jin-huan; Wang, Rui; Springer, Timothy A.; Wang, Jia-huai (Harvard-Med)

    2012-11-13

    Developmental endothelial cell locus-1 (Del-1) glycoprotein is secreted by endothelial cells and a subset of macrophages. Del-1 plays a regulatory role in vascular remodeling and functions in innate immunity through interaction with integrin {alpha}{sub V}{beta}{sub 3}. Del-1 contains 3 epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats and 2 discoidin-like domains. An Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif in the second EGF domain (EGF2) mediates adhesion by endothelial cells and phagocytes. We report the crystal structure of its 3 EGF domains. The RGD motif of EGF2 forms a type II' {beta} turn at the tip of a long protruding loop, dubbed the RGD finger. Whereas EGF2 and EGF3 constitute a rigid rod via an interdomain calcium ion binding site, the long linker between EGF1 and EGF2 lends considerable flexibility to EGF1. Two unique O-linked glycans and 1 N-linked glycan locate to the opposite side of EGF2 from the RGD motif. These structural features favor integrin binding of the RGD finger. Mutagenesis data confirm the importance of having the RGD motif at the tip of the RGD finger. A database search for EGF domain sequences shows that this RGD finger is likely an evolutionary insertion and unique to the EGF domain of Del-1 and its homologue milk fat globule-EGF 8. The RGD finger of Del-1 is a unique structural feature critical for integrin binding.

  12. The crystal structure and RNA-binding of an orthomyxovirus nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome packaging for viruses with segmented genomes is often a complex problem. This is particularly true for influenza viruses and other orthomyxoviruses, whose genome consists of multiple negative-sense RNAs encapsidated as ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. To better understand the structural features of orthomyxovirus RNPs that allow them to be packaged, we determined the crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (NP of a fish orthomyxovirus, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV (genus Isavirus. As the major protein component of the RNPs, ISAV-NP possesses a bi-lobular structure similar to the influenza virus NP. Because both RNA-free and RNA-bound ISAV NP forms stable dimers in solution, we were able to measure the NP RNA binding affinity as well as the stoichiometry using recombinant proteins and synthetic oligos. Our RNA binding analysis revealed that each ISAV-NP binds ~12 nts of RNA, shorter than the 24-28 nts originally estimated for the influenza A virus NP based on population average. The 12-nt stoichiometry was further confirmed by results from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Considering that RNPs of ISAV and the influenza viruses have similar morphologies and dimensions, our findings suggest that NP-free RNA may exist on orthomyxovirus RNPs, and selective RNP packaging may be accomplished through direct RNA-RNA interactions.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, DNA/BSA binding ability and antibacterial activity of asymmetric europium complex based on 1,10- phenanthroline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfi, Nafiseh; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Rezvani, Ali Reza; Noroozifar, Meissam; Molčanov, Krešimir

    2017-06-01

    A heteroleptic europium coordination compound formulated as [Eu(phen)2(OH2)2(Cl)2](Cl)(H2O) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffractometer. Crystal structure analysis reveals the complex is crystallized in orthorhombic system with Pca21 space group. Electronic absorption and various emission methods for investigation of the binding system of europium(III) complex to Fish Salmon deoxyribonucleic acid (FS-DNA) and Bovamin Serum Albumin (BSA) have been explored. Furthermore, the binding constants, binding sites and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters of the interaction system based on the van't Hoff equation for FS-DNA and BSA were calculated. The thermodynamic parameters reflect the exothermic nature of emission process (ΔH°<0 and ΔS°<0). The experimental results seem to indicate that the [Eu(phen)2(OH2)2(Cl)2](Cl)(H2O) bound to FS-DNA by non-intercalative mode which the groove binding is preferable mode. Also, the complex exhibits a brilliant antimicrobial activity in vitro against standard bacterial strains.

  14. Structural insights into substrate and inhibitor binding sites in human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Pham, Khoa N.; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Karkashon, Shay; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru (Einstein); (UCI)

    2017-11-22

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (hIDO1) is an attractive cancer immunotherapeutic target owing to its role in promoting tumoral immune escape. However, drug development has been hindered by limited structural information. Here, we report the crystal structures of hIDO1 in complex with its substrate, Trp, an inhibitor, epacadostat, and/or an effector, indole ethanol (IDE). The data reveal structural features of the active site (Sa) critical for substrate activation; in addition, they disclose a new inhibitor-binding mode and a distinct small molecule binding site (Si). Structure-guided mutation of a critical residue, F270, to glycine perturbs the Si site, allowing structural determination of an inhibitory complex, where both the Sa and Si sites are occupied by Trp. The Si site offers a novel target site for allosteric inhibitors and a molecular explanation for the previously baffling substrate-inhibition behavior of the enzyme. Taken together, the data open exciting new avenues for structure-based drug design.

  15. Crystal structures of Nova-1 and Nova-2 K-homology RNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H A; Chen, H; Edo, C; Buckanovich, R J; Yang, Y Y; Musunuru, K; Zhong, R; Darnell, R B; Burley, S K

    1999-02-15

    Nova-1 and Nova-2 are related neuronal proteins that were initially cloned using antisera obtained from patients with the autoimmune neurological disease paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (POMA). Both of these disease gene products contain three RNA-binding motifs known as K-homology or KH domains, and their RNA ligands have been identified via binding-site selection experiments. The KH motif structure has been determined previously using NMR spectroscopy, but not using X-ray crystallography. Many proteins contain more than one KH domain, yet there is no published structural information regarding the behavior of such multimers. We have obtained the first X-ray crystallographic structures of KH-domain-containing proteins. Structures of the third KH domains (KH3) of Nova-1 and Nova-2 were determined by multiple isomorphous replacement and molecular replacement at 2.6 A and 2.0 A, respectively. These highly similar RNA-binding motifs form a compact protease-resistant domain resembling an open-faced sandwich, consisting of a three-stranded antiparallel beta sheet topped by three alpha helices. In both Nova crystals, the lattice is composed of symmetric tetramers of KH3 domains that are created by two dimer interfaces. The crystal structures of both Nova KH3 domains are similar to the previously determined NMR structures. The most significant differences among the KH domains involve changes in the positioning of one or more of the alpha helices with respect to the betasheet, particularly in the NMR structure of the KH1 domain of the Fragile X disease protein FMR-1. Loop regions in the KH domains are clearly visible in the crystal structure, unlike the NMR structures, revealing the conformation of the invariant Gly-X-X-Gly segment that is thought to participate in RNA-binding and of the variable region. The tetrameric arrangements of the Nova KH3 domains provide insights into how KH domains may interact with each other in proteins containing multiple KH motifs.

  16. MetalionRNA: computational predictor of metal-binding sites in RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Boniecki, Michal; Rother, Kristian; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2012-01-15

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA molecules into stable tertiary structures and are often involved in the catalytic activity of ribozymes. However, the positions of metal ions in RNA 3D structures are difficult to determine experimentally. This motivated us to develop a computational predictor of metal ion sites for RNA structures. We developed a statistical potential for predicting positions of metal ions (magnesium, sodium and potassium), based on the analysis of binding sites in experimentally solved RNA structures. The MetalionRNA program is available as a web server that predicts metal ions for RNA structures submitted by the user. The MetalionRNA web server is accessible at http://metalionrna.genesilico.pl/.

  17. Different foraging preferences of hummingbirds on artificial and natural flowers reveal mechanisms structuring plant-pollinator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglianesi, María A; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Schleuning, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    In plant-pollinator networks, the floral morphology of food plants is an important determinant of the interaction niche of pollinators. Studies on foraging preferences of pollinators combining experimental and observational approaches may help to understand the mechanisms behind patterns of interactions and niche partitioning within pollinator communities. In this study, we tested whether morphological floral traits were associated with foraging preferences of hummingbirds for artificial and natural flower types in Costa Rica. We performed field experiments with artificial feeders, differing in length and curvature of flower types, to quantify the hummingbirds' interaction niche under unlimited nectar resources. To quantify the interaction niche under real-world conditions of limited nectar resources, we measured foraging preferences of hummingbirds for a total of 34 plant species. Artificial feeders were visited by Eupherusa nigriventris and Phaethornis guy in the pre-montane forest, and Lampornis calolaemus in the lower montane forest. Under experimental conditions, all three hummingbird species overlapped their interaction niches and showed a preference for the short artificial flower type over the long-straight and the long-curved flower types. Under natural conditions, the two co-occurring hummingbird species preferred to feed on plant species with floral traits corresponding to their bill morphology. The short-billed hummingbird E. nigriventris preferred to feed on short and straight flowers, whereas the long- and curved-billed P. guy preferred long and curved natural flowers. The medium-size billed species L. calolaemus preferred to feed on flowers of medium length and did not show preferences for plant species with specific corolla curvature. Our results show that floral morphological traits constrain access by short-billed hummingbird species to nectar resources. Morphological constraints, therefore, represent one important mechanism structuring trophic

  18. Thermodynamics of engineered gold binding peptides: establishing the structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Wilson, Brandon; Kulp, John L; Evans, John S; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2014-07-14

    Adsorption behavior of a gold binding peptide was experimentally studied to achieve kinetics and thermodynamics parameters toward understanding of the binding of an engineered peptide onto a solid metal surface. The gold-binding peptide, GBP1, was originally selected using a cell surface display library and contains 14 amino acid residues. In this work, single- and three-repeats of GBP1 were used to assess the effects of two parameters: molecular architecture versus secondary structure on adsorption on to gold substrate. The adsorption measurements were carried out using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy at temperatures ranging from 10 to 55 °C. At all temperatures, two different regimes of peptide adsorption were observed, which, based on the model, correspond to two sets of thermodynamics values. The values of enthalpy, ΔH(ads), and entropy, ΔS(ads), in these two regimes were determined using the van't Hoff approach and Gibbs-Helmholtz relationship. In general, the values of enthalpy for both peptides are negative indicating GBP1 binding to gold is an exothermic phenomenon and that the binding of three repeat gold binding peptide (3l-GBP1) is almost 5 times tighter than that for the single repeat (l-GBP1). More intriguing result is that the entropy of adsorption for the 3l-GBP1 is negative (-43.4 ± 8.5 cal/(mol K)), while that for the l-GBP1 is positive (10.90 ± 1.3 cal/(mol K)). Among a number of factors that synergistically contribute to the decrease of entropy, long-range ordered self-assembly of the 3l-GBP1 on gold surface is the most effective, probably through both peptide-solid and peptide-peptide intermolecular interactions. Additional adsorption experiments were conducted in the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) to determine how the conformational structures of the biomolecules responded to the environmental perturbation. We found that the peptides differ in their conformational responses to the change in solution conditions; while

  19. Effect of van der Waals interactions on the structural and binding properties of GaSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkisov, Sergey Y., E-mail: sarkisov@mail.tsu.ru [Tomsk State University, Lenin Avenue 36, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kosobutsky, Alexey V., E-mail: kosobutsky@kemsu.ru [Tomsk State University, Lenin Avenue 36, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kemerovo State University, Krasnaya 6, 650043 Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Shandakov, Sergey D. [Kemerovo State University, Krasnaya 6, 650043 Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The influence of van der Waals interactions on the lattice parameters, band structure, elastic moduli and binding energy of layered GaSe compound has been studied using projector-augmented wave method within density functional theory. We employed the conventional local/semilocal exchange-correlation functionals and recently developed van der Waals functionals which are able to describe dispersion forces. It is found that application of van der Waals density functionals allows to substantially increase the accuracy of calculations of the lattice constants a and c and interlayer distance in GaSe at ambient conditions and under hydrostatic pressure. The pressure dependences of the a-parameter, Ga–Ga, Ga–Se bond lengths and Ga–Ga–Se bond angle are characterized by a relatively low curvature, while c(p) has a distinct downward bowing due to nonlinear shrinking of the interlayer spacing. From the calculated binding energy curves we deduce the interlayer binding energy of GaSe, which is found to be in the range 0.172–0.197 eV/layer (14.2–16.2 meV/Å{sup 2}). - Highlights: • Effects of van der Waals interactions are analyzed using advanced density functionals. • Calculations with vdW-corrected functionals closely agree with experiment. • Interlayer binding energy of GaSe is estimated to be 14.2–16.2 meV/Å{sup 2}.

  20. The structure and binding mode of citrate in the stabilization of gold nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Johani, Hind

    2017-03-27

    Elucidating the binding mode of carboxylate-containing ligands to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is crucial to understand their stabilizing role. A detailed picture of the three-dimensional structure and coordination modes of citrate, acetate, succinate and glutarate to AuNPs is obtained by 13C and 23Na solid-state NMR in combination with computational modelling and electron microscopy. The binding between the carboxylates and the AuNP surface is found to occur in three different modes. These three modes are simultaneously present at low citrate to gold ratios, while a monocarboxylate monodentate (1κO1) mode is favoured at high citrate:gold ratios. The surface AuNP atoms are found to be predominantly in the zero oxidation state after citrate coordination, although trace amounts of Auδ+ are observed. 23Na NMR experiments show that Na+ ions are present near the gold surface, indicating that carboxylate binding occurs as a 2e− L-type interaction for each oxygen atom involved. This approach has broad potential to probe the binding of a variety of ligands to metal nanoparticles.

  1. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.; (UW)

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  2. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  3. Crystal structure of CbpF, a bifunctional choline-binding protein and autolysis regulator from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Rafael; González, Ana; Stelter, Meike; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Kahn, Richard; Morales, María; Moscoso, Miriam; Campuzano, Susana; Campillo, Nuria E; Mobashery, Shahriar; García, José L; García, Pedro; Hermoso, Juan A

    2009-03-01

    Phosphorylcholine, a crucial component of the pneumococcal cell wall, is essential in bacterial physiology and in human pathogenesis because it binds to serum components of the immune system and acts as a docking station for the family of surface choline-binding proteins. The three-dimensional structure of choline-binding protein F (CbpF), one of the most abundant proteins in the pneumococcal cell wall, has been solved in complex with choline. CbpF shows a new modular structure composed both of consensus and non-consensus choline-binding repeats, distributed along its length, which markedly alter its shape, charge distribution and binding ability, and organizing the protein into two well-defined modules. The carboxy-terminal module is involved in cell wall binding and the amino-terminal module is crucial for inhibition of the autolytic LytC muramidase, providing a regulatory function for pneumococcal autolysis.

  4. Structure and function of A41, a vaccinia virus chemokine binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad W Bahar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The vaccinia virus (VACV A41L gene encodes a secreted 30 kDa glycoprotein that is nonessential for virus replication but affects the host response to infection. The A41 protein shares sequence similarity with another VACV protein that binds CC chemokines (called vCKBP, or viral CC chemokine inhibitor, vCCI, and strains of VACV lacking the A41L gene induced stronger CD8+ T-cell responses than control viruses expressing A41. Using surface plasmon resonance, we screened 39 human and murine chemokines and identified CCL21, CCL25, CCL26 and CCL28 as A41 ligands, with Kds of between 8 nM and 118 nM. Nonetheless, A41 was ineffective at inhibiting chemotaxis induced by these chemokines, indicating it did not block the interaction of these chemokines with their receptors. However the interaction of A41 and chemokines was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by heparin, suggesting that A41 and heparin bind to overlapping sites on these chemokines. To better understand the mechanism of action of A41 its crystal structure was solved to 1.9 A resolution. The protein has a globular beta sandwich structure similar to that of the poxvirus vCCI family of proteins, but there are notable structural differences, particularly in surface loops and electrostatic charge distribution. Structural modelling suggests that the binding paradigm as defined for the vCCI-chemokine interaction is likely to be conserved between A41 and its chemokine partners. Additionally, sequence analysis of chemokines binding to A41 identified a signature for A41 binding. The biological and structural data suggest that A41 functions by forming moderately strong (nM interactions with certain chemokines, sufficient to interfere with chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions at the cell surface (microM-nM and thereby to destroy the chemokine concentration gradient, but not strong enough to disrupt the (pM chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions.

  5. Structure-dependent binding and activation of perfluorinated compounds on human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lianying [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); College of Life Science, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Ren, Xiao-Min; Wan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Guo, Liang-Hong, E-mail: LHGuo@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been shown to disrupt lipid metabolism and even induce cancer in rodents through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Lines of evidence showed that PPARα was activated by PFCs. However, the information on the binding interactions between PPARγ and PFCs and subsequent alteration of PPARγ activity is still limited and sometimes inconsistent. In the present study, in vitro binding of 16 PFCs to human PPARγ ligand binding domain (hPPARγ-LBD) and their activity on the receptor in cells were investigated. The results showed that the binding affinity was strongly dependent on their carbon number and functional group. For the eleven perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), the binding affinity increased with their carbon number from 4 to 11, and then decreased slightly. The binding affinity of the three perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs) was stronger than their PFCA counterparts. No binding was detected for the two fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs). Circular dichroim spectroscopy showed that PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. In dual luciferase reporter assays using transiently transfected Hep G2 cells, PFCs acted as hPPARγ agonists, and their potency correlated with their binding affinity with hPPARγ-LBD. Molecular docking showed that PFCs with different chain length bind with the receptor in different geometry, which may contribute to their differences in binding affinity and transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Binding affinity between PFCs and PPARγ was evaluated for the first time. • The binding strength was dependent on fluorinated carbon chain and functional group. • PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. • PFCs could act as hPPARγ agonists in Hep G2 cells.

  6. Predictive Structure and Topology of Peroxisomal ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoletti, Pierre; Raas, Quentin; Gondcaille, Catherine; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    The peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transporters, which are called ABCD1, ABCD2 and ABCD3, are transmembrane proteins involved in the transport of various lipids that allow their degradation inside the organelle. Defective ABCD1 leads to the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids and is associated with a complex and severe neurodegenerative disorder called X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Although the nucleotide-binding domain is highly conserved and characterized within the ABC transporters family, solid data are missing for the transmembrane domain (TMD) of ABCD proteins. The lack of a clear consensus on the secondary and tertiary structure of the TMDs weakens any structure-function hypothesis based on the very diverse ABCD1 mutations found in X-ALD patients. Therefore, we first reinvestigated thoroughly the structure-function data available and performed refined alignments of ABCD protein sequences. Based on the 2.85  Å resolution crystal structure of the mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB10, here we propose a structural model of peroxisomal ABCD proteins that specifies the position of the transmembrane and coupling helices, and highlight functional motifs and putative important amino acid residues. PMID:28737695

  7. Predictive Structure and Topology of Peroxisomal ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Andreoletti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette (ABC transporters, which are called ABCD1, ABCD2 and ABCD3, are transmembrane proteins involved in the transport of various lipids that allow their degradation inside the organelle. Defective ABCD1 leads to the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids and is associated with a complex and severe neurodegenerative disorder called X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD. Although the nucleotide-binding domain is highly conserved and characterized within the ABC transporters family, solid data are missing for the transmembrane domain (TMD of ABCD proteins. The lack of a clear consensus on the secondary and tertiary structure of the TMDs weakens any structure-function hypothesis based on the very diverse ABCD1 mutations found in X-ALD patients. Therefore, we first reinvestigated thoroughly the structure-function data available and performed refined alignments of ABCD protein sequences. Based on the 2.85  Å resolution crystal structure of the mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB10, here we propose a structural model of peroxisomal ABCD proteins that specifies the position of the transmembrane and coupling helices, and highlight functional motifs and putative important amino acid residues.

  8. Ceruloplasmin revisited: structural and functional roles of various metal cation-binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, Isabel; Peixoto, Cristina; Zaitsev, Vjacheslav N.; Lindley, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    The three-dimensional molecular structure of human serum ceruloplasmin has been reinvestigated using X-ray synchrotron data collected at 100 K from a crystal frozen to liquid-nitrogen temperature. The three-dimensional molecular structure of human serum ceruloplasmin has been reinvestigated using X-ray synchrotron data collected at 100 K from a crystal frozen to liquid-nitrogen temperature. The resulting model, with an increase in resolution from 3.1 to 2.8 Å, gives an overall improvement of the molecular structure, in particular the side chains. In addition, it enables the clear definition of previously unidentified Ca 2+ -binding and Na + -binding sites. The Ca 2+ cation is located in domain 1 in a configuration very similar to that found in the activated bovine factor Va. The Na + sites appear to play a structural role in providing rigidity to the three protuberances on the top surface of the molecule. These features probably help to steer substrates towards the mononuclear copper sites prior to their oxidation and to restrict the size of the approaching substrate. The trinuclear copper centre appears to differ from the room-temperature structure in that a dioxygen moiety is bound in a similar way to that found in the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus subtilis

  9. Structural Basis of Low-Affinity Nickel Binding to the Nickel-Responsive Transcription Factor NikR from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.; Schreiter, E.; Stultz, C.; Drennan, C.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli NikR regulates cellular nickel uptake by binding to the nik operon in the presence of nickel and blocking transcription of genes encoding the nickel uptake transporter. NikR has two binding affinities for the nik operon: a nanomolar dissociation constant with stoichiometric nickel and a picomolar dissociation constant with excess nickel (Bloom, S. L., and Zamble, D. B. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 10029-10038; Chivers, P. T., and Sauer, R. T. (2002) Chem. Biol. 9, 1141-1148). While it is known that the stoichiometric nickel ions bind at the NikR tetrameric interface (Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 794-799; Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 13676-13681), the binding sites for excess nickel ions have not been fully described. Here we have determined the crystal structure of NikR in the presence of excess nickel to 2.6 (angstrom) resolution and have obtained nickel anomalous data (1.4845 (angstrom)) in the presence of excess nickel for both NikR alone and NikR cocrystallized with a 30-nucleotide piece of double-stranded DNA containing the nik operon. These anomalous data show that excess nickel ions do not bind to a single location on NikR but instead reveal a total of 22 possible low-affinity nickel sites on the NikR tetramer. These sites, for which there are six different types, are all on the surface of NikR, and most are found in both the NikR alone and NikR-DNA structures. Using a combination of crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations, the nickel sites can be described as preferring octahedral geometry, utilizing one to three protein ligands (typically histidine) and at least two water molecules.

  10. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  11. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  12. High resolution crystal structures of the receptor-binding domain of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and FA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R. Davies

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The binding specificity of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs is primarily a consequence of their ability to bind to multiple receptors at the same time. BoNTs consist of three distinct domains, a metalloprotease light chain (LC, a translocation domain (HN and a receptor-binding domain (HC. Here we report the crystal structure of HC/FA, complementing an existing structure through the modelling of a previously unresolved loop which is important for receptor-binding. Our HC/FA structure also contains a previously unidentified disulphide bond, which we have also observed in one of two crystal forms of HC/A1. This may have implications for receptor-binding and future recombinant toxin production.

  13. The structural basis for CD36 binding by the malaria parasite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Turner, Louise; Bolla, Jani Reddy

    2016-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor involved in fatty acid metabolism, innate immunity and angiogenesis. It interacts with lipoprotein particles and facilitates uptake of long chain fatty acids. It is also the most common target of the PfEMP1 proteins of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum......, tethering parasite-infected erythrocytes to endothelial receptors. This prevents their destruction by splenic clearance and allows increased parasitaemia. Here we describe the structure of CD36 in complex with long chain fatty acids and a CD36-binding PfEMP1 protein domain. A conserved hydrophobic pocket...... allows the hugely diverse PfEMP1 protein family to bind to a conserved phenylalanine residue at the membrane distal tip of CD36. This phenylalanine is also required for CD36 to interact with lipoprotein particles. By targeting a site on CD36 that is required for its physiological function, PfEMP1...

  14. Structure-Based Inhibitor Design for an Enzyme That Binds Different Steriods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu,W.; Zhou, M.; Mazumdar, M.; Azzi, A.; Ghanmi, D.; Luu-The, V.; Labrie, F.; Lin, S.

    2007-01-01

    Human type 5 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase plays a crucial role in local androgen formation in prostate tissue. Several chemicals were synthesized and tested for their ability to inhibit this enzyme, and a series of estradiol derivatives bearing a lactone on the D-ring were found to inhibit its activity efficiently. The crystal structure of the type 5 enzyme in complex with NADP and such a novel inhibitor, EM1404, was determined to a resolution of 1.30 {angstrom}. Significantly more hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions were defined between EM1404 and the enzyme than in the substrate ternary complex. The lactone ring of EM1404 accounts for important interactions with the enzyme, whereas the amide group at the opposite end of the inhibitor contributes to the stability of three protein loops involved in the construction of the substrate binding site. EM1404 has a strong competitive inhibition, with a K{sub i} of 6.9 {+-} 1.4 nM, demonstrating 40 times higher affinity than that of the best inhibitor previously reported. This is observed despite the fact that the inhibitor occupies only part of the binding cavity. Attempts to soak the inhibitor into crystals of the binary complex with NADP were unsuccessful, yielding a structure with a polyethylene glycol fragment occupying the substrate binding site. The relative crystal packing is discussed. Combined studies of small molecule inhibitor synthesis, x-ray crystallography, enzyme inhibition, and molecular modeling make it possible to analyze the plasticity of the substrate binding site of the enzyme, which is essential for developing more potent and specific inhibitors for hormone-dependent cancer therapy.

  15. Structural variation and inhibitor binding in polypeptide deformylase from four different bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathrine J; Petit, Chantal M; Aubart, Kelly; Smyth, Martin; McManus, Edward; Jones, Jo; Fosberry, Andrew; Lewis, Ceri; Lonetto, Michael; Christensen, Siegfried B

    2003-02-01

    Polypeptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the deformylation of polypeptide chains in bacteria. It is essential for bacterial cell viability and is a potential antibacterial drug target. Here, we report the crystal structures of polypeptide deformylase from four different species of bacteria: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, and Escherichia coli. Comparison of these four structures reveals significant overall differences between the two Gram-negative species (E. coli and H. influenzae) and the two Gram-positive species (S. pneumoniae and S. aureus). Despite these differences and low overall sequence identity, the S1' pocket of PDF is well conserved among the four enzymes studied. We also describe the binding of nonpeptidic inhibitor molecules SB-485345, SB-543668, and SB-505684 to both S. pneumoniae and E. coli PDF. Comparison of these structures shows similar binding interactions with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive species. Understanding the similarities and subtle differences in active site structure between species will help to design broad-spectrum polypeptide deformylase inhibitor molecules.

  16. Theoretical investigations on the structure and potential binding sites of antineoplaston A10 and experimental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, D

    1990-01-01

    The essential biological importance of antineoplastons has motivated the present theoretical and experimental studies on the structure and potential binding sites of Antineoplaston A10, 3-phenylacetylamino-2,6-piperidinedione. Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations SCF-LCAO-MO were performed using the MNDO method. The calculated molecular geometry of A10 is in very good agreement with the recently obtained X-ray structure of synthetic A10. Experimental investigations of the Raman spectra of A10 and its N,N-dideuterated derivative confirm the theoretical predictions concerning the structure and hydrogen bonding of A10. Analysis of calculated charge distribution reveals that the negative charges are localized on the ring nitrogen and on the exocyclic oxygen atoms of A10 and are similar to the corresponding charges computed for some pyrimidine bases. This indicates that Antineoplaston A10 may have similar binding sites. It is concluded that the mechanism of action of Antineoplaston A10 may in part be related to its structural and chemical resemblance with deoxythymidine and uridine. A10 may act as a nucleoside antagonist and interact very closely with adenosine units in nucleic acids and enzymes, which may interfere with protein synthesis in neoplastic cells.

  17. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  18. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  19. Structural insights into the binding of lauric acid to CYP107L2 from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Jeong, Dabin; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2017-01-22

    Streptomyces avermitilis is an actinobacterium known to produce clinically useful macrolides including avermectins. CYP107L2 from S. avermitilis shares a high sequence similarity with the PikC (CYP107L1) from S. venezuelae. To elucidate the structural features of CYP107L2, we conducted biochemical and structural characterization of CYP107L2 from S. avermitilis. The CYP107L2 gene was cloned, and its recombinant protein was expressed and purified. The CYP107L2 showed a low-spin state of heme, and the reduced form yielded the CO difference spectra with a maximal absorption at 449 nm. Binding of pikromycin and lauric acid yielded the typical type I spectra with K d values of 4.8 ± 0.3 and 111 ± 9 μM, respectively. However, no metabolic product was observed in the enzyme reaction. X-ray crystal structures of the ligand-free CYP107L2 and its complex with lauric acid were determined at the resolution of 2.6 and 2.5 Å, respectively. CYP107L2 showed a well-conserved CYP structure with a wide-open substrate-binding cavity. The lauric acid is bound mainly via hydrophobic interactions with the carboxylate group of lauric acid coordinated to the heme of P450. Glu-40 and Leu-382 residues in the CYP107L2 complex with lauric acid showed significant conformational changes to provide plentiful room for the lauric acid in the substrate-binding site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ . • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ , which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics

  1. Empirical tight-binding modeling of ordered and disordered semiconductor structures; Empirische Tight-Binding-Modellierung geordneter und ungeordneter Halbleiterstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourad, Daniel

    2010-11-30

    In this thesis, we investigate the electronic and optical properties of pure as well as of substitutionally alloyed II-VI and III-V bulk semiconductors and corresponding semiconductor quantum dots by means of an empirical tight-binding (TB) model. In the case of the alloyed systems of the type A{sub x}B{sub 1-x}, where A and B are the pure compound semiconductor materials, we study the influence of the disorder by means of several extensions of the TB model with different levels of sophistication. Our methods range from rather simple mean-field approaches (virtual crystal approximation, VCA) over a dynamical mean-field approach (coherent potential approximation, CPA) up to calculations where substitutional disorder is incorporated on a finite ensemble of microscopically distinct configurations. In the first part of this thesis, we cover the necessary fundamentals in order to properly introduce the TB model of our choice, the effective bond-orbital model (EBOM). In this model, one s- and three p-orbitals per spin direction are localized on the sites of the underlying Bravais lattice. The matrix elements between these orbitals are treated as free parameters in order to reproduce the properties of one conduction and three valence bands per spin direction and can then be used in supercell calculations in order to model mixed bulk materials or pure as well as mixed quantum dots. Part II of this thesis deals with unalloyed systems. Here, we use the EBOM in combination with configuration interaction calculations for the investigation of the electronic and optical properties of truncated pyramidal GaN quantum dots embedded in AlN with an underlying zincblende structure. Furthermore, we develop a parametrization of the EBOM for materials with a wurtzite structure, which allows for a fit of one conduction and three valence bands per spin direction throughout the whole Brillouin zone of the hexagonal system. In Part III, we focus on the influence of alloying on the electronic

  2. Crystal structure of Yersinia pestis virulence factor YfeA reveals two polyspecific metal-binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radka, Christopher D.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, Landon S.; Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Perry, Robert D.; Aller, Stephen G.

    2017-06-30

    Gram-negative bacteria use siderophores, outer membrane receptors, inner membrane transporters and substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) to transport transition metals through the periplasm. The SBPs share a similar protein fold that has undergone significant structural evolution to communicate with a variety of differentially regulated transporters in the cell. InYersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, YfeA (YPO2439, y1897), an SBP, is important for full virulence during mammalian infection. To better understand the role of YfeA in infection, crystal structures were determined under several environmental conditions with respect to transition-metal levels. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and anomalous X-ray scattering data show that YfeA is polyspecific and can alter its substrate specificity. In minimal-media experiments, YfeA crystals grown after iron supplementation showed a threefold increase in iron fluorescence emission over the iron fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions, and YfeA crystals grown after manganese supplementation during overexpression showed a fivefold increase in manganese fluorescence emission over the manganese fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions. In all experiments, the YfeA crystals produced the strongest fluorescence emission from zinc and could not be manipulated otherwise. Additionally, this report documents the discovery of a novel surface metal-binding site that prefers to chelate zinc but can also bind manganese. Flexibility across YfeA crystal forms in three loops and a helix near the buried metal-binding site suggest that a structural rearrangement is required for metal loading and unloading.

  3. Structural and dynamic studies of the dimerization and DNA-binding domains of the transcription factors v-Myc and Max

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieber, W.

    2001-05-01

    In the present work, solution structural and dynamic properties of the dimerization and DNA binding domains of the transcription factors v-Myc and Max were characterized by NMR and CD spectroscopy. It could be demonstrated that v-Myc in the absence of its authentic binding partner Max does not homodimerize, but exists in a monomeric and prestructured form. Two separated α-helical regions in the leucine zipper region and in the basic-H1 region, respectively, could be identified, while the latter appeared to be less stable. Both helices lack stabilizing tertiary side chain interactions and represent exceptional examples for loosely coupled, structured segments in a native protein. The structure of v-Myc is dynamic and can be described as a distribution of conformational substates. Motion within the substates comprise fast (picosecond to nanosecond) local backbone fluctuations like helical fraying, whereas motion between the substates comprise the relative orientation of the two helices and occur at larger time scales (microsecond to millisecond). The preformation of the specific protein and DNA binding sites, leucine zipper and the basic region, presumably allows rapid and accurate recognition of the respective binding partners. v-Myc-Max and Max-Max protein preparations were shown to form stable dimers. Thermodynamic analysis of the dissociation reactions of v-Myc-Max revealed a significant higher stability of the heterodimer than of the Max-Max homodimer over the whole temperature range. It could be demonstrated that the restricted conformational space of the v-Myc bHLHZip domain reduces the entropy penalty associated with dimerization and contributes to the preference of Max to form heterodimers with v-Myc rather than homodimers. (author)

  4. Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2006-06-27

    Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae, are the most abundant autotrophs in aquatic environments and form the base of all aquatic food chains by fixing carbon and nitrogen into cellular biomass. The single most important nutrient for photosynthesis and growth is nitrate, which is severely limiting in many aquatic environments particularly the open ocean (1, 2). It is therefore not surprising that NrtA, the solute-binding component of the high-affinity nitrate ABC transporter, is the single-most abundant protein in the plasma membrane of these bacteria (3). Here we describe the first structure of a nitratespecific receptor, NrtA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, complexed with nitrate and determined to a resolution of 1.5Å. NrtA is significantly larger than other oxyanionbinding proteins, representing a new class of transport proteins. From sequence alignments, the only other solute-binding protein in this class is CmpA, a bicarbonatebinding protein. Therefore, these organisms created a novel solute-binding protein for two of the most important nutrients; inorganic nitrogen and carbon. The electrostatic charge distribution of NrtA appears to force the protein off of the membrane while the flexible tether facilitates the delivery of nitrate to the membrane pore. The structure not only details the determinants for nitrate selectivity in NrtA, but also the bicarbonate specificity in CmpA. Nitrate and bicarbonate transport are regulated by the cytoplasmic proteins NrtC and CmpC, respectively. Interestingly, the residues lining the ligand binding pockets suggest that they both bind nitrate. This implies that the nitrogen and carbon uptake pathways are synchronized by intracellular nitrate and nitrite.3 The nitrate ABC transporter of cyanobacteria is composed of four polypeptides (Figure 1): a high-affinity periplasmic solute-binding lipoprotein (NrtA), an integral membrane permease (NrtB), a cytoplasmic ATPase (NrtD), and a unique ATPase/solute-binding fusion protein (Nrt

  5. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase: NAD[superscript +]/NADH Binding and the Structural Basis of Disease-causing Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Machius, Mischa; Chuang, David T. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-07-13

    Human dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (hE3) is an enzymatic component common to the mitochondrial {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase and glycine decarboxylase complexes. Mutations to this homodimeric flavoprotein cause the often-fatal human disease known as E3 deficiency. To catalyze the oxidation of dihydrolipoamide, hE3 uses two molecules: noncovalently bound FAD and a transiently bound substrate, NAD{sup +}. To address the catalytic mechanism of hE3 and the structural basis for E3 deficiency, the crystal structures of hE3 in the presence of NAD{sup +} or NADH have been determined at resolutions of 2.5 {angstrom} and 2.1 {angstrom}, respectively. Although the overall fold of the enzyme is similar to that of yeast E3, these two structures differ at two loops that protrude from the proteins and at their FAD-binding sites. The structure of oxidized hE3 with NAD{sup +} bound demonstrates that the nicotinamide moiety is not proximal to the FAD. When NADH is present, however, the nicotinamide base stacks directly on the isoalloxazine ring system of the FAD. This is the first time that this mechanistically requisite conformation of NAD{sup +} or NADH has been observed in E3 from any species. Because E3 structures were previously available only from unicellular organisms, speculations regarding the molecular mechanisms of E3 deficiency were based on homology models. The current hE3 structures show directly that the disease-causing mutations occur at three locations in the human enzyme: the dimer interface, the active site, and the FAD and NAD{sup +}-binding sites. The mechanisms by which these mutations impede the function of hE3 are discussed.

  7. Model of Organizational Structure for University Institutes Binding with the Venezuelan Socioeconomic Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pertuz Belloso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at proposing a model of organizational structure for university institutes binding with the Venezuelan socioeconomic reality. This is a descriptive non-experimental cross-sectional research study. The study population included 746 professors and administration from the Cabimas and Maracaibo Technological Universities. Data was collected using a questionnaire consisting of 54 items and analyzed using the percentage frequency distribution. Results obtained indicate the sub-systems not integrated in the studied institutions, coexisting bureaucratic structural typologies, and a clear decontextualized implementation of the nation’s plans, which shows low relevance and relationship to the Venezuelan socioeconomic reality. To remedy this situation, a mixed departmental/matrix organizational structure model was designed that integrates the department into a matrix network linking teaching, research, and social action projects. The implementation of this model was proposed in three stages or phases in order to achieve the operational characteristics of the departmental model.

  8. Crystal structures of a GABAA-receptor chimera reveal new endogenous neurosteroid-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Duncan; Thomas, Philip; Field, Martin; Andersen, Ole J; Gold, Matthew G; Biggin, Philip C; Gielen, Marc; Smart, Trevor G

    2017-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA A Rs) are vital for controlling excitability in the brain. This is emphasized by the numerous neuropsychiatric disorders that result from receptor dysfunction. A critical component of most native GABA A Rs is the α subunit. Its transmembrane domain is the target for many modulators, including endogenous brain neurosteroids that impact anxiety, stress and depression, and for therapeutic drugs, such as general anesthetics. Understanding the basis for the modulation of GABA A R function requires high-resolution structures. Here we present the first atomic structures of a GABA A R chimera at 2.8-Å resolution, including those bound with potentiating and inhibitory neurosteroids. These structures define new allosteric binding sites for these modulators that are associated with the α-subunit transmembrane domain. Our findings will enable the exploitation of neurosteroids for therapeutic drug design to regulate GABA A Rs in neurological disorders.

  9. p15PAF is an intrinsically disordered protein with nonrandom structural preferences at sites of interaction with other proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biasio, Alfredo; Ibáñez de Opakua, Alain; Cordeiro, Tiago N; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Sibille, Nathalie; Lelli, Moreno; Diercks, Tammo; Bernadó, Pau; Blanco, Francisco J

    2014-02-18

    We present to our knowledge the first structural characterization of the proliferating-cell-nuclear-antigen-associated factor p15(PAF), showing that it is monomeric and intrinsically disordered in solution but has nonrandom conformational preferences at sites of protein-protein interactions. p15(PAF) is a 12 kDa nuclear protein that acts as a regulator of DNA repair during DNA replication. The p15(PAF) gene is overexpressed in several types of human cancer. The nearly complete NMR backbone assignment of p15(PAF) allowed us to measure 86 N-H(N) residual dipolar couplings. Our residual dipolar coupling analysis reveals nonrandom conformational preferences in distinct regions, including the proliferating-cell-nuclear-antigen-interacting protein motif (PIP-box) and the KEN-box (recognized by the ubiquitin ligase that targets p15(PAF) for degradation). In accordance with these findings, analysis of the (15)N R2 relaxation rates shows a relatively reduced mobility for the residues in these regions. The agreement between the experimental small angle x-ray scattering curve of p15(PAF) and that computed from a statistical coil ensemble corrected for the presence of local secondary structural elements further validates our structural model for p15(PAF). The coincidence of these transiently structured regions with protein-protein interaction and posttranslational modification sites suggests a possible role for these structures as molecular recognition elements for p15(PAF). Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preferences of people with advanced heart failure-a structured narrative literature review to inform decision making in the palliative care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Sandesh; Abernethy, Amy P; Rogers, Joseph G; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2012-09-01

    BACKGROUND AND APPROACH: There is a growing emphasis on the need for high-quality and patient-centered palliative care for patients with heart failure (HF) near end of life. Accordingly, clinicians require adequate knowledge of patient values and preferences, but this topic has been underreported in the HF literature. In response, we conducted a structured narrative review of available evidence regarding patient preferences for HF care near end of life, focusing on circumstances of death, advance care planning, and preferences for specific HF therapies. Patients had widely varying preferences for sudden ("unaware") death versus a death that was anticipated ("aware"), which would allow time to make arrangements and time with family; preferences influenced their choice of HF therapies. Patients and physicians rarely discussed advance care planning; physicians were rarely aware of resuscitation preferences. Advance care planning discussions rarely included preferences for limiting implantable cardioverter defibrillator use, and patients were often uninformed of the option of implantable cardioverter defibrillator deactivation. A substantial minority of patients strongly preferred improved quality of life versus extended survival, but preferences of individuals could not be easily predicted. Current evidence regarding preferences of patients with HF near end of life suggests substantial opportunities for improvement of end-of-life HF care. Most notably, the wide distribution of patient preferences highlights the need to tailor approach to patient wishes, avoiding assumptions of patient wishes. A research agenda and implications for health care provider training are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  12. Machine-learning scoring functions to improve structure-based binding affinity prediction and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain, Qurrat Ul; Aleksandrova, Antoniya; Roessler, Florian D; Ballester, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    Docking tools to predict whether and how a small molecule binds to a target can be applied if a structural model of such target is available. The reliability of docking depends, however, on the accuracy of the adopted scoring function (SF). Despite intense research over the years, improving the accuracy of SFs for structure-based binding affinity prediction or virtual screening has proven to be a challenging task for any class of method. New SFs based on modern machine-learning regression models, which do not impose a predetermined functional form and thus are able to exploit effectively much larger amounts of experimental data, have recently been introduced. These machine-learning SFs have been shown to outperform a wide range of classical SFs at both binding affinity prediction and virtual screening. The emerging picture from these studies is that the classical approach of using linear regression with a small number of expert-selected structural features can be strongly improved by a machine-learning approach based on nonlinear regression allied with comprehensive data-driven feature selection. Furthermore, the performance of classical SFs does not grow with larger training datasets and hence this performance gap is expected to widen as more training data becomes available in the future. Other topics covered in this review include predicting the reliability of a SF on a particular target class, generating synthetic data to improve predictive performance and modeling guidelines for SF development. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:405-424. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1225 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Structural Aspects for Evolution of [beta]-Lactamases from Penicillin-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meroueh, Samy O.; Minasov, George; Lee, Wenlin; Shoichet, Brian K.; Mobashery, Shahriar (NWU); (UCSF); (Notre)

    2010-03-08

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), biosynthetic enzymes of bacterial cell wall assembly, and {beta}-lactamases, resistance enzymes to {beta}-lactam antibiotics, are related to each other from an evolutionary point of view. Massova and Mobashery (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 1998, 42, 1-17) have proposed that for {beta}-lactamases to have become effective at their function as antibiotic resistance enzymes, they would have had to undergo structure alterations such that they would not interact with the peptidoglycan, which is the substrate for PBPs. A cephalosporin analogue, 7{beta}-[N-Acetyl-L-alanyl-{gamma}-D-glutamyl-L-lysine]-3-acetoxymethyl-3-cephem-carboxylic acid (compound 6), was conceived and synthesized to test this notion. The X-ray structure of the complex of this cephalosporin bound to the active site of the deacylation-deficient Q120L/Y150E variant of the class C AmpC {beta}-lactamase from Escherichia coli was solved at 1.71 {angstrom} resolution. This complex revealed that the surface for interaction with the strand of peptidoglycan that acylates the active site, which is present in PBPs, is absent in the {beta}-lactamase active site. Furthermore, insertion of a peptide in the {beta}-lactamase active site at a location where the second strand of peptidoglycan in some PBPs binds has effectively abolished the possibility for such interaction with the {beta}-lactamase. A 2.6 ns dynamics simulation was carried out for the complex, which revealed that the peptidoglycan surrogate (i.e., the active-site-bound ligand) undergoes substantial motion and is not stabilized for binding within the active site. These factors taken together disclose the set of structure modifications in the antibiotic resistance enzyme that prevent it from interacting with the peptidoglycan, en route to achieving catalytic proficiency for their intended function.

  14. Convergence of Domain Architecture, Structure, and Ligand Affinity in Animal and Plant RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel; Manny, Austin; Kolaczkowski, Oralia; Kolaczkowski, Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences using phylogenetic methods is a powerful technique for directly examining the evolution of molecular function. Although ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is itself very efficient, downstream functional, and structural studies necessary to characterize when and how changes in molecular function occurred are often costly and time-consuming, currently limiting ASR studies to examining a relatively small number of discrete functional shifts. As a result, we have very little direct information about how molecular function evolves across large protein families. Here we develop an approach combining ASR with structure and function prediction to efficiently examine the evolution of ligand affinity across a large family of double-stranded RNA binding proteins (DRBs) spanning animals and plants. We find that the characteristic domain architecture of DRBs-consisting of 2-3 tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsrms)-arose independently in early animal and plant lineages. The affinity with which individual dsrms bind double-stranded RNA appears to have increased and decreased often across both animal and plant phylogenies, primarily through convergent structural mechanisms involving RNA-contact residues within the β1-β2 loop and a small region of α2. These studies provide some of the first direct information about how protein function evolves across large gene families and suggest that changes in molecular function may occur often and unassociated with major phylogenetic events, such as gene or domain duplications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Crystal structures from the Plasmodium peroxiredoxins: new insights into oligomerization and product binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Dong, Aiping; Pizarro, Juan C; Botchkarsev, Alexei; Min, Jinrong; Wernimont, Amy K; Hills, Tanya; Hui, Raymond; Artz, Jennifer D

    2012-03-19

    Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite primarily responsible for more than one million malarial deaths, annually, and is developing resistance to current therapies. Throughout its lifespan, the parasite is subjected to oxidative attack, so Plasmodium antioxidant defences are essential for its survival and are targets for disease control. To further understand the molecular aspects of the Plasmodium redox system, we solved 4 structures of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins (Prx). Our study has confirmed PvTrx-Px1 to be a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-sensitive peroxiredoxin. We have identified and characterized the novel toroid octameric oligomer of PyTrx-Px1, which may be attributed to the interplay of several factors including: (1) the orientation of the conserved surface/buried arginine of the NNLA(I/L)GRS-loop; and (2) the C-terminal tail positioning (also associated with the aforementioned conserved loop) which facilitates the intermolecular hydrogen bond between dimers (in an A-C fashion). In addition, a notable feature of the disulfide bonds in some of the Prx crystal structures is discussed. Finally, insight into the latter stages of the peroxiredoxin reaction coordinate is gained. Our structure of PyPrx6 is not only in the sulfinic acid (RSO2H) form, but it is also with glycerol bound in a way (not previously observed) indicative of product binding. The structural characterization of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins provided herein provides insight into their oligomerization and product binding which may facilitate the targeting of these antioxidant defences. Although the structural basis for the octameric oligomerization is further understood, the results yield more questions about the biological implications of the peroxiredoxin oligomerization, as multiple toroid configurations are now known. The crystal structure depicting the product bound active site gives insight into the overoxidation of the active site and allows further characterization of the leaving group

  16. Structure-Based Drug Discovery for Prion Disease Using a Novel Binding Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ishibashi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc converted from the normal cellular isoform of PrP (PrPC is assumed to induce pathogenesis in prion diseases. Therefore, drug discovery studies for these diseases have focused on the protein conversion process. We used a structure-based drug discovery algorithm (termed Nagasaki University Docking Engine: NUDE that ran on an intensive supercomputer with a graphic-processing unit to identify several compounds with anti-prion effects. Among the candidates showing a high-binding score, the compounds exhibited direct interaction with recombinant PrP in vitro, and drastically reduced PrPSc and protein-aggresomes in the prion-infected cells. The fragment molecular orbital calculation showed that the van der Waals interaction played a key role in PrPC binding as the intermolecular interaction mode. Furthermore, PrPSc accumulation and microgliosis were significantly reduced in the brains of treated mice, suggesting that the drug candidates provided protection from prion disease, although further in vivo tests are needed to confirm these findings. This NUDE-based structure-based drug discovery for normal protein structures is likely useful for the development of drugs to treat other conformational disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Structure of theEscherichia coliProQ RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Grecia M; Hardwick, Steven W; Maslen, Sarah L; Skehel, J Mark; Holmqvist, Erik; Vogel, Jörg; Bateman, Alex; Luisi, Ben F; Broadhurst, R William

    2017-05-01

    The protein ProQ has recently been identified as a global small noncoding RNA-binding protein in Salmonella , and a similar role is anticipated for its numerous homologs in divergent bacterial species. We report the solution structure of Escherichia coli ProQ, revealing an N-terminal FinO-like domain, a C-terminal domain that unexpectedly has a Tudor domain fold commonly found in eukaryotes, and an elongated bridging intradomain linker that is flexible but nonetheless incompressible. Structure-based sequence analysis suggests that the Tudor domain was acquired through horizontal gene transfer and gene fusion to the ancestral FinO-like domain. Through a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we have mapped putative RNA-binding surfaces on all three domains of ProQ and modeled the protein's conformation in the apo and RNA-bound forms. Taken together, these data suggest how the FinO, Tudor, and linker domains of ProQ cooperate to recognize complex RNA structures and serve to promote RNA-mediated regulation. © 2017 Gonzalez et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. An FTIR investigation of flanking sequence effects on the structure and flexibility of DNA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Talia R; Fong, Kimberly K; Jordan, Brian; Lek, Janista C; Levitan, Rachel; Mitchell, Patrick S; Wood, Corrina; Hatcher, Mary E

    2009-02-17

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and a library of FTIR marker bands have been used to examine the structure and relative flexibilities conferred by different flanking sequences on the EcoRI binding site. This approach allowed us to examine unique peaks and subtle changes in the spectra of d(AAAGAATTCTTT)(2), d(TTCGAATTCGAA)(2), and d(CGCGAATTCGCG)(2) and thereby identify local changes in base pairing, base stacking, backbone conformation, glycosidic bond rotation, and sugar puckering in the studied sequences. The changes in flanking sequences induce differences in the sugar puckers, glycosidic bond rotation, and backbone conformations. Varying levels of local flexibility are observed within the sequences in agreement with previous biological activity assays. The results also provide supporting evidence for the presence of a splay in the G(4)-C(9) base pair of the EcoRI binding site and a potential pocket of flexibility at the G(4) cleavage site that have been proposed in the literature. In sum, we have demonstrated that FTIR is a powerful methodology for studying the effect of flanking sequences on DNA structure and flexibility, for it can provide information about the local structure of the nucleic acid and the overall relative flexibilities conferred by different flanking sequences.

  19. Insights into structural and functional diversity of Dof (DNA binding with one finger) transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Malviya, N; Kushwaha, H; Nasim, J; Bisht, N C; Singh, V K; Yadav, D

    2015-03-01

    The structural, functional and in-silico studies of Dof transcription factor attempted so far reveals immense opportunity to analyze the plant genomes in terms of number of Dof genes and discuss in light of the evolution. The multiple functions of Dof genes needs to explored for crop improvement. Transcription factors play a very vital role in gene regulation at transcriptional level and are being extensively studied across phylas. In recent years, sequencing of plant genomes has led to genome-wide identification and characterizations of diverse types of plant-specific transcription factor gene family providing key insights into their structural and functional diversity. The DNA binding with one finger (Dof), a class belonging to C2H2-type zinc finger family proteins, is a plant-specific transcription factor having multiple roles such as seed maturation and germination, phytohormone and light-mediated regulation and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Dof proteins are present across plant lineage, from green algae to higher angiosperm, and represent a unique class of transcription factor having bifunctional binding activities, with both DNA and proteins, to regulate the complex transcriptional machinery in plant cells. The structural and functional diversity of the Dof transcription factor family along with the bioinformatics analysis highlighting the phylogeny of Dof families is reviewed in light of its importance in plant biotechnology for crop improvement.

  20. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kold, David; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne K; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Turkenburg, Johan P; Nielsen, Anders D; Koldsø, Heidi; Petersen, Evamaria; Schiøtt, Birgit; De Maria, Leonardo; Wilson, Keith S; Svendsen, Allan; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds a single SDS molecule under nondenaturing concentrations. Protein interaction with SDS was investigated by NMR, ITC and molecular dynamics simulations. The NMR resonances of the protein were assigned, with large stretches of the protein molecule not showing any detectable resonances. SDS is shown to specifically interact with the loops surrounding the catalytic triad with medium affinity (Ka ≈ 105 M−1). The mode of binding is closely similar to that seen previously for binding of amphiphilic molecules and substrate analogues to cutinases, and hence SDS acts as a substrate mimic. In addition, the structure of the enzyme has been solved by X-ray crystallography in its apo form and after cocrystallization with diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DNPP) leading to a complex with monoethylphosphate (MEP) esterified to the catalytically active serine. The enzyme has the same fold as reported for other cutinases but, unexpectedly, esterification of the active site serine is accompanied by the ethylation of the active site histidine which flips out from its usual position in the triad. PMID:24832484

  1. Functional and structural changes of human erythrocyte catalase induced by cimetidine: proposed model of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Jahngirvand, Mahboubeh; Almasirad, Ali; Mousavi, Zahra; Masoud, Masoudeh; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza

    2015-06-01

    In erythrocyte, catalase plays an important role to protect cells from hydrogen peroxide toxicity. Hydrogen peroxide is a byproduct compound which is produced during metabolic pathway of cells. Cimetidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, is used for gastrointestinal tract diseases and prevents the extra release of gastric acid. In this study, the effect of cimetidine on the activity of human erythrocyte catalase was investigated. Erythrocytes were broken by hypotonic solution. The supernatant was used for catalase assay and kinetics study. Lineweaver-Burk plot was performed to determine the type of inhibition. The kinetics data revealed that cimetidine inhibited the catalase activity by mixed inhibition. The IC50 (1.54 μM) and Ki (0.45 μM) values of cimetidine determined that the drug was bound to the enzyme with high affinity. Circular dichroism and fluorescence measurement showed that the binding of cimetidine to the enzyme affected the content of secondary structure of the enzyme as well as its conformational changes. Docking studies were carried out to detect the site in which the drug was bound to the enzyme. Molecular modeling and energy calculation of the binding showed that the cyanoguanidine group of the drug connected to Asp59 via two hydrogen bonds, while the imidazole group of the drug interacted with Phe64 in the enzyme by a hydrophobic interaction. In conclusion, cimetidine could bind to human erythrocyte catalase, and its interaction caused functional and conformational changes in the enzyme.

  2. Membrane-associated insulin-like growth factor (IGF binding structures in placental cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMANA MASNIKOSA

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological activities of IGF-I and –II are mediated mainly by the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF 1R and controlled by their interaction with soluble proteins, the IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs. Although there is a growing body of evidence that some IGFBPs may be cell surface-bound, published data concerning cell association of IGFBP-1 are scarce and none of them concern placental cells. The cell membranes used in this study were isolated from term human placentae. Detergent-solubilized membranes were shown to contain two types of IGF binding structures that were separated by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column. Proteins in the first peak were eluted at V0 (Mr > 100 kD and they bound IGF-I with greater specificity and affinity than IGF-II and insulin. Most likely, they represented the IGF 1R. Small proteins (Mr ~ 45 kD were eluted with the membrane proteins in the second maximum. They were able to bind IGF-I and IGF-II, but not insulin. The identity of these proteins was shown to be IGFBP-1 on the basis of their reaction with specific anti-IGFBP-1 antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, the existence of IGFBP-1 associated with human placental cell membranes has not been reported in the literature before. Colocalisation of IGFBP-1 with IGF 1R in cell membranes could provide efficient modulation of IGF 1R receptor-ligand interactions.

  3. Structural Bases for the Regulation of CO Binding in the Archaeal Protoglobin from Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Tilleman

    Full Text Available Studies of CO ligand binding revealed that two protein states with different ligand affinities exist in the protoglobin from Methanosarcina acetivorans (in MaPgb*, residue Cys(E20101 was mutated to Ser. The switch between the two states occurs upon the ligation of MaPgb*. In this work, site-directed mutagenesis was used to explore the role of selected amino acids in ligand sensing and stabilization and in affecting the equilibrium between the "more reactive" and "less reactive" conformational states of MaPgb*. A combination of experimental data obtained from electronic and resonance Raman absorption spectra, CO ligand-binding kinetics, and X-ray crystallography was employed. Three amino acids were assigned a critical role: Trp(60B9, Tyr(61B10, and Phe(93E11. Trp(60B9 and Tyr(61B10 are involved in ligand stabilization in the distal heme pocket; the strength of their interaction was reflected by the spectra of the CO-ligated MaPgb* and by the CO dissociation rate constants. In contrast, Phe(93E11 is a key player in sensing the heme-bound ligand and promotes the rotation of the Trp(60B9 side chain, thus favoring ligand stabilization. Although the structural bases of the fast CO binding rate constant of MaPgb* are still unclear, Trp(60B9, Tyr(61B10, and Phe(93E11 play a role in regulating heme/ligand affinity.

  4. Structural basis for substrate specificity in phosphate binding (beta/alpha)8-barrels: D-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kui K; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2008-09-09

    Enzymes that share the (beta/alpha) 8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal (beta/alpha) 2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of d-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates d-ribulose 5-phosphate and d-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493-2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of d-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates d-allulose 6-phosphate and d-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for d-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other's substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with d-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with d-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth beta-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, DeltaT196, DeltaS197 and DeltaG198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that d-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in k cat/ K m are dominated by changes in k cat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE

  5. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (β/α)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kui K.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the (β/α)8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal (β/α)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates D-ribulose 5-phosphate and D-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493–2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of D-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates D-allulose 6-phosphate and D-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for D-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other’s substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with D-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with D-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth β-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, ΔT196, ΔS197 and ΔG198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that D-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in kcat/Km are dominated by changes in kcat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE, the phosphate group

  6. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan,K.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal ({beta}/a)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of d-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates d-ribulose 5-phosphate and d-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493-2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of d-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates d-allulose 6-phosphate and d-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for d-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other's substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with d-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with d-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth {beta}-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, ?T196, ?S197 and ?G198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that d-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in kcat/Km are dominated by changes in kcat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE, the

  7. Structural basis for the selective vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) binding to neuropilin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Matthew W.; Xu, Ping; Li, Xiaobo; Vander Kooi, Craig W. (Kentucky)

    2012-07-25

    Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) is an essential receptor for angiogenesis that binds to VEGF-A. Nrp1 binds directly to VEGF-A with high affinity, but the nature of their selective binding has remained unclear. Nrp1 was initially reported to bind to the exon 7-encoded region of VEGF-A and function as an isoform-specific receptor for VEGF-A164/165. Recent data have implicated exon 8-encoded residues, which are found in all proangiogenic VEGF-A isoforms, in Nrp binding. We have determined the crystal structure of the exon 7/8-encoded VEGF-A heparin binding domain in complex with the Nrp1-b1 domain. This structure clearly demonstrates that residues from both exons 7 and 8 physically contribute to Nrp1 binding. Using an in vitro binding assay, we have determined the relative contributions of exon 7- and 8-encoded residues. We demonstrate that the exon 8-encoded C-terminal arginine is essential for the interaction of VEGF-A with Nrp1 and mediates high affinity Nrp binding. Exon 7-encoded electronegative residues make additional interactions with the L1 loop of Nrp1. Although otherwise conserved, the primary sequences of Nrp1 and Nrp2 differ significantly in this region. We further show that VEGF-A{sub 164} binds 50-fold more strongly to Nrp1 than Nrp2. Direct repulsion between the electronegative exon 7-encoded residues of the heparin binding domain and the electronegative L1 loop found only in Nrp2 is found to significantly contribute to the observed selectivity. The results reveal the basis for the potent and selective binding of VEGF-A{sub 164} to Nrp1.

  8. Crystal structure of a common GPCR-binding interface for G protein and arrestin

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepek, Michal; Beyrière, Florent; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Elgeti, Matthias; Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Bartl, Franz J.; von Stetten, David; Heck, Martin; Sommer, Martha E.; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Scheerer, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    International audience; G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals to activate intracellular heterotrimeric G proteins (G alpha beta gamma) and arrestins. For G protein signalling, the G alpha C-terminus (G alpha CT) binds to a cytoplasmic crevice of the receptor that opens upon activation. A consensus motif is shared among GaCT from the G(i)/G(t) family and the 'finger loop' region (ArrFL1-4) of all four arrestins. Here we present a 2.75 angstrom crystal structure ofr...

  9. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  10. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA-binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  11. Investigating structural changes induced by nucleotide binding to RecA using difference FTIR.

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Blaine C; Hanchett, Ross H; Rafailov, Helena; MacDonald, Gina

    2002-01-01

    Nucleotide binding to RecA results in either the high-DNA affinity form (Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-bound) or the more inactive protein conformation associated with a lower affinity for DNA (Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-bound). Many of the key structural differences between the RecA-ATP and RecA-ADP bound forms have yet to be elucidated. We have used caged-nucleotides and difference FTIR in efforts to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the molecular changes induced by nucleotide b...

  12. Crystal structures of the ligand-binding region of uPARAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Cai; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Engelholm, Lars H

    2016-01-01

    The proteins of the mannose receptor (MR) family share a common domain organization and have a broad range of biological functions. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) (or Endo180) is a member of this family and plays an important role in extracellular matrix...... remodelling through interaction with its ligands, including collagens and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report the crystal structures of the first four domains of uPARAP (also named the ligand-binding region, LBR) at pH 7.4 in Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free forms. The first domain...

  13. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits [3H] dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of [ 3 H] dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity [ 3 H]DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances [ 3 H]DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+)- pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of [ 3 H]DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine

  14. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Cotmore, Susan F. [Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tattersall, Peter [Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Departments of Genetics, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Zhao, Haiyan, E-mail: zhaohy@ku.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Tang, Liang, E-mail: tangl@ku.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  15. Phocid seal leptin: tertiary structure and hydrophobic receptor binding site preservation during distinct leptin gene evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Hammond

    Full Text Available The cytokine hormone leptin is a key signalling molecule in many pathways that control physiological functions. Although leptin demonstrates structural conservation in mammals, there is evidence of positive selection in primates, lagomorphs and chiropterans. We previously reported that the leptin genes of the grey and harbour seals (phocids have significantly diverged from other mammals. Therefore we further investigated the diversification of leptin in phocids, other marine mammals and terrestrial taxa by sequencing the leptin genes of representative species. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that leptin diversification was pronounced within the phocid seals with a high dN/dS ratio of 2.8, indicating positive selection. We found significant evidence of positive selection along the branch leading to the phocids, within the phocid clade, but not over the dataset as a whole. Structural predictions indicate that the individual residues under selection are away from the leptin receptor (LEPR binding site. Predictions of the surface electrostatic potential indicate that phocid seal leptin is notably different to other mammalian leptins, including the otariids. Cloning the grey seal leptin binding domain of LEPR confirmed that this was structurally conserved. These data, viewed in toto, support a hypothesis that phocid leptin divergence is unlikely to have arisen by random mutation. Based upon these phylogenetic and structural assessments, and considering the comparative physiology and varying life histories among species, we postulate that the unique phocid diving behaviour has produced this selection pressure. The Phocidae includes some of the deepest diving species, yet have the least modified lung structure to cope with pressure and volume changes experienced at depth. Therefore, greater surfactant production is required to facilitate rapid lung re-inflation upon surfacing, while maintaining patent airways. We suggest that this additional

  16. Quadruplex-Flanking Stem Structures Modulate the Stability and Metal Ion Preferences of RNA Mimics of GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageely, Eman A; Kartje, Zachary J; Rohilla, Kushal J; Barkau, Christopher L; Gagnon, Keith T

    2016-09-16

    The spinach family of RNA aptamers are RNA mimics of green fluorescent protein (GFP) that have previously been designed to address the challenges of imaging RNA inside living cells. However, relatively low levels of free intracellular magnesium limited the practical use of these aptamers. Recent cell-based selections identified the broccoli RNA aptamer, which requires less magnesium for fluorescence, but the basis for magnesium preference remained unclear. Here, we find that the broccoli RNA structure is very similar to that of baby spinach, a truncated version of the spinach aptamer. Differences in stability and metal ion preferences between these two aptamers, and among broccoli mutants, are primarily associated with the sequence and structure of predicted quadruplex-flanking stem structures. Mutation of purine-purine pairs in broccoli at the terminal stem-quadruplex transition caused reversion of broccoli to a higher magnesium dependence. Unique duplex-to-quadruplex transitions in GFP-mimic RNAs likely explain their sensitivity to magnesium for stability and fluorescence. Thus, optimizations designed to improve aptamers should take into consideration the role of metal ions in stabilizing the transitions and interactions between independently folding RNA structural motifs.

  17. Identification of the bile salt binding site on IpaD from Shigella flexneri and the influence of ligand binding on IpaD structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Michael L; Guragain, Manita; Adam, Philip; Dickenson, Nicholas E; Patil, Mrinalini; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D

    2012-03-01

    Type III secretion (TTS) is an essential virulence factor for Shigella flexneri, the causative agent of shigellosis. The Shigella TTS apparatus (TTSA) is an elegant nanomachine that is composed of a basal body, an external needle to deliver effectors into human cells, and a needle tip complex that controls secretion activation. IpaD is at the tip of the nascent TTSA needle where it controls the first step of TTS activation. The bile salt deoxycholate (DOC) binds to IpaD to induce recruitment of the translocator protein IpaB into the maturing tip complex. We recently used spectroscopic analyses to show that IpaD undergoes a structural rearrangement that accompanies binding to DOC. Here, we report a crystal structure of IpaD with DOC bound and test the importance of the residues that make up the DOC binding pocket on IpaD function. IpaD binds DOC at the interface between helices α3 and α7, with concomitant movement in the orientation of helix α7 relative to its position in unbound IpaD. When the IpaD residues involved in DOC binding are mutated, some are found to lead to altered invasion and secretion phenotypes. These findings suggest that adoption of a DOC bound structural state for IpaD primes the Shigella TTSA for contact with host cells. The data presented here and in the studies leading up to this work provide the foundation for developing a model of the first step in Shigella TTS activation.

  18. Binding of DNA-bending non-histone proteins destabilizes regular 30-nm chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Gaurav; Jain, Ishutesh; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2017-01-01

    Why most of the in vivo experiments do not find the 30-nm chromatin fiber, well studied in vitro, is a puzzle. Two basic physical inputs that are crucial for understanding the structure of the 30-nm fiber are the stiffness of the linker DNA and the relative orientations of the DNA entering/exiting nucleosomes. Based on these inputs we simulate chromatin structure and show that the presence of non-histone proteins, which bind and locally bend linker DNA, destroys any regular higher order structures (e.g., zig-zag). Accounting for the bending geometry of proteins like nhp6 and HMG-B, our theory predicts phase-diagram for the chromatin structure as a function of DNA-bending non-histone protein density and mean linker DNA length. For a wide range of linker lengths, we show that as we vary one parameter, that is, the fraction of bent linker region due to non-histone proteins, the steady-state structure will show a transition from zig-zag to an irregular structure—a structure that is reminiscent of what is observed in experiments recently. Our theory can explain the recent in vivo observation of irregular chromatin having co-existence of finite fraction of the next-neighbor (i + 2) and neighbor (i + 1) nucleosome interactions. PMID:28135276

  19. Diverse modes of binding in structures of Leishmania majorN-myristoyltransferase with selective inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Brannigan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases are a spectrum of global diseases of poverty associated with immune dysfunction and are the cause of high morbidity. Despite the long history of these diseases, no effective vaccine is available and the currently used drugs are variously compromised by moderate efficacy, complex side effects and the emergence of resistance. It is therefore widely accepted that new therapies are needed. N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT has been validated pre-clinically as a target for the treatment of fungal and parasitic infections. In a previously reported high-throughput screening program, a number of hit compounds with activity against NMT from Leishmania donovani have been identified. Here, high-resolution crystal structures of representative compounds from four hit series in ternary complexes with myristoyl-CoA and NMT from the closely related L. major are reported. The structures reveal that the inhibitors associate with the peptide-binding groove at a site adjacent to the bound myristoyl-CoA and the catalytic α-carboxylate of Leu421. Each inhibitor makes extensive apolar contacts as well as a small number of polar contacts with the protein. Remarkably, the compounds exploit different features of the peptide-binding groove and collectively occupy a substantial volume of this pocket, suggesting that there is potential for the design of chimaeric inhibitors with significantly enhanced binding. Despite the high conservation of the active sites of the parasite and human NMTs, the inhibitors act selectively over the host enzyme. The role of conformational flexibility in the side chain of Tyr217 in conferring selectivity is discussed.

  20. Structural and functional analyses of the putrescine binding protein PotF from Xanthomonas citri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, L.D.F.; Balan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The focus of our group is to determinate the role of ABC transporters in the physiology and growth of Xanthomonas citri, a phytopathogenic bacteria that infects citrus plants causing significant losses for the economy. One of the ABC transporters identified in the X. citri genome and that was showed to be active during the infection in Citrus sinensis plants was the putrescine transporter. This transporter consists of two internal membrane proteins PotG and PotH that form a pore, a cytoplasmic protein that gives energy for the transport and the periplasmic-binding protein PotF, which is responsible for the affinity and specificity of the system. Its function is associated to the microbial carcinogenesis, biofilm formation, escape from phagolysosomes, bacteriocin production, toxin activity and protection from oxidative and acid stress. In this work, we show for the first time, the expression, purification, functional and structural analyses of the X. citri PotF protein. The PotF was expressed from Escherichia coli cells strain Arctic, as a 40 kDa soluble protein, after induction of IPTG for twenty four hours at thirteen deg C. Using immobilized metal affinity chromatography for purification, the protein was eluted in the fractions with 10-500 mM of imidazole. To test the folding and cability to bind putrescine, spectroscopic analyses were performed using circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence. The data showed that PotF suffers conformational changes in presence of ligands and in different pH, suggesting a possible interaction with the tested ligand. Moreover, based on bioinformatics studies and molecular modeling analyses, we showed that X. citri PotF is highly conserved when compared to orthologs present in other bacteria, including the residues that form the ligand-binding site. The production of PotF in a soluble and stable form will allow us to start the crystallization trials in attempt to solve its structure. (author)

  1. Structural and functional analyses of the putrescine binding protein PotF from Xanthomonas citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, L.D.F.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The focus of our group is to determinate the role of ABC transporters in the physiology and growth of Xanthomonas citri, a phytopathogenic bacteria that infects citrus plants causing significant losses for the economy. One of the ABC transporters identified in the X. citri genome and that was showed to be active during the infection in Citrus sinensis plants was the putrescine transporter. This transporter consists of two internal membrane proteins PotG and PotH that form a pore, a cytoplasmic protein that gives energy for the transport and the periplasmic-binding protein PotF, which is responsible for the affinity and specificity of the system. Its function is associated to the microbial carcinogenesis, biofilm formation, escape from phagolysosomes, bacteriocin production, toxin activity and protection from oxidative and acid stress. In this work, we show for the first time, the expression, purification, functional and structural analyses of the X. citri PotF protein. The PotF was expressed from Escherichia coli cells strain Arctic, as a 40 kDa soluble protein, after induction of IPTG for twenty four hours at thirteen deg C. Using immobilized metal affinity chromatography for purification, the protein was eluted in the fractions with 10-500 mM of imidazole. To test the folding and cability to bind putrescine, spectroscopic analyses were performed using circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence. The data showed that PotF suffers conformational changes in presence of ligands and in different pH, suggesting a possible interaction with the tested ligand. Moreover, based on bioinformatics studies and molecular modeling analyses, we showed that X. citri PotF is highly conserved when compared to orthologs present in other bacteria, including the residues that form the ligand-binding site. The production of PotF in a soluble and stable form will allow us to start the crystallization trials in attempt to solve its structure. (author)

  2. Interleukin-11 binds specific EF-hand proteins via their conserved structural motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Alexei S; Sokolov, Andrei S; Vologzhannikova, Alisa A; Permyakova, Maria E; Khorn, Polina A; Ismailov, Ramis G; Denessiouk, Konstantin A; Denesyuk, Alexander I; Rastrygina, Victoria A; Baksheeva, Viktoriia E; Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Zinchenko, Dmitry V; Glazatov, Vladimir V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Mirzabekov, Tajib A; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a hematopoietic cytokine engaged in numerous biological processes and validated as a target for treatment of various cancers. IL-11 contains intrinsically disordered regions that might recognize multiple targets. Recently we found that aside from IL-11RA and gp130 receptors, IL-11 interacts with calcium sensor protein S100P. Strict calcium dependence of this interaction suggests a possibility of IL-11 interaction with other calcium sensor proteins. Here we probed specificity of IL-11 to calcium-binding proteins of various types: calcium sensors of the EF-hand family (calmodulin, S100B and neuronal calcium sensors: recoverin, NCS-1, GCAP-1, GCAP-2), calcium buffers of the EF-hand family (S100G, oncomodulin), and a non-EF-hand calcium buffer (α-lactalbumin). A specific subset of the calcium sensor proteins (calmodulin, S100B, NCS-1, GCAP-1/2) exhibits metal-dependent binding of IL-11 with dissociation constants of 1-19 μM. These proteins share several amino acid residues belonging to conservative structural motifs of the EF-hand proteins, 'black' and 'gray' clusters. Replacements of the respective S100P residues by alanine drastically decrease its affinity to IL-11, suggesting their involvement into the association process. Secondary structure and accessibility of the hinge region of the EF-hand proteins studied are predicted to control specificity and selectivity of their binding to IL-11. The IL-11 interaction with the EF-hand proteins is expected to occur under numerous pathological conditions, accompanied by disintegration of plasma membrane and efflux of cellular components into the extracellular milieu.

  3. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  4. Structural Basis of Native CXCL7 Monomer Binding to CXCR2 Receptor N-Domain and Glycosaminoglycan Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Brown

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CXCL7, a chemokine highly expressed in platelets, orchestrates neutrophil recruitment during thrombosis and related pathophysiological processes by interacting with CXCR2 receptor and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG. CXCL7 exists as monomers and dimers, and dimerization (~50 μM and CXCR2 binding (~10 nM constants indicate that CXCL7 is a potent agonist as a monomer. Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis by which receptor and GAG interactions mediate CXCL7 function. Using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, we characterized the binding of CXCL7 monomer to the CXCR2 N-terminal domain (CXCR2Nd that constitutes a critical docking site and to GAG heparin. We found that CXCR2Nd binds a hydrophobic groove and that ionic interactions also play a role in mediating binding. Heparin binds a set of contiguous basic residues indicating a prominent role for ionic interactions. Modeling studies reveal that the binding interface is dynamic and that GAG adopts different binding geometries. Most importantly, several residues involved in GAG binding are also involved in receptor interactions, suggesting that GAG-bound monomer cannot activate the receptor. Further, this is the first study that describes the structural basis of receptor and GAG interactions of a native monomer of the neutrophil-activating chemokine family.

  5. Structural basis underlying CAC RNA recognition by the RRM domain of dimeric RNA-binding protein RBPMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova, Marianna; Farazi, Thalia A.; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-09-08

    Abstract

    RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (designated RBPMS) is a higher vertebrate mRNA-binding protein containing a single RNA recognition motif (RRM). RBPMS has been shown to be involved in mRNA transport, localization and stability, with key roles in axon guidance, smooth muscle plasticity, as well as regulation of cancer cell proliferation and migration. We report on structure-function studies of the RRM domain of RBPMS bound to a CAC-containing single-stranded RNA. These results provide insights into potential topologies of complexes formed by the RBPMS RRM domain and the tandem CAC repeat binding sites as detected by photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation. These studies establish that the RRM domain of RBPMS forms a symmetrical dimer in the free state, with each monomer binding sequence-specifically to all three nucleotides of a CAC segment in the RNA bound state. Structure-guided mutations within the dimerization and RNA-binding interfaces of RBPMS RRM on RNA complex formation resulted in both disruption of dimerization and a decrease in RNA-binding affinity as observed by size exclusion chromatography and isothermal titration calorimetry. As anticipated from biochemical binding studies, over-expression of dimerization or RNA-binding mutants of Flag-HA-tagged RBPMS were no longer able to track with stress granules in HEK293 cells, thereby documenting the deleterious effects of such mutationsin vivo.

  6. Crystal structure of the UBR-box from UBR6/FBXO11 reveals domain swapping mediated by zinc binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2017-10-01

    The UBR-box is a 70-residue zinc finger domain present in the UBR family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that directly binds N-terminal degradation signals in substrate proteins. UBR6, also called FBXO11, is an UBR-box containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that does not bind N-terminal signals. Here, we present the crystal structure of the UBR-box domain from human UBR6. The dimeric crystal structure reveals a unique form of domain swapping mediated by zinc coordination, where three independent protein chains come together to regenerate the topology of the monomeric UBR-box fold. Analysis of the structure suggests that the absence of N-terminal residue binding arises from the lack of an amino acid binding pocket. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  7. Solution structure and DNA binding of the zinc-finger domain from DNA ligase IIIalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W; Yang, Ji-Chun; Neuhaus, David

    2004-08-13

    DNA ligase IIIalpha carries out the final ligation step in the base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) mechanisms of DNA repair. The enzyme recognises single-strand nicks and other damage features in double-stranded DNA, both through the catalytic domain and an N-terminal domain containing a single zinc finger. The latter is homologous to other zinc fingers that recognise damaged DNA, two in the N terminus of poly(adenosine-ribose)polymerase and three in the N terminus of the Arabidopsis thaliana nick-sensing DNA 3'-phosphoesterase. Here, we present the solution structure of the zinc-finger domain of human DNA ligase IIIalpha, the first structure of a finger from this group. It is related to that of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1, but has an additional N-terminal beta-strand and C-terminal alpha-helix. Chemical shift mapping using a DNA ligand containing a single-stranded break showed that the DNA-binding surface of the DNA-ligase IIIalpha zinc finger is substantially different from that of GATA-1, consistent with the fact that the two proteins recognise very different features in the DNA. Likely implications for DNA binding are discussed.

  8. Discovery of potent thermolysin inhibitors using structure based virtual screening and binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan; Fuskevåg, Ole-Martin; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2009-01-08

    In the present work, 22 compounds of the U.S. NCI compound library (size 273K) were identified as putative thermolysin binders by structure based virtual screening with the ICM software (ICM-VLS). In vitro competitive binding assays confirmed that 12 were thermolysin binders. Thermolysin binding modes of the 12 compounds were studied by docking using ICM and Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). The most potent inhibitor had an IC(50) value of 6.4 x 10(-8) mM (NSC250686, 1 beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-N(4)-lauroylcytosine). The structure of this compound is quite different from the other 11 compounds. Nine out of the 12 compounds contained a similar chemical skeleton (3-nitrobenzamide derivatives) and have IC(50) values ranging from 697.48 to 0.047 mM. The ICM-VLS score and the activity profiles (pIC(50) values) were compared and found to be somewhat linearly correlated (R(2) = 0.78). Kinetic studies showed that, except for NSC285166 (oxyquinoline), the compounds are competitive thermolysin inhibitors.

  9. Structural evidence suggests that antiactivator ExsD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a DNA binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhards, R.C.; Robinson, H.; Jing, X.; Vogelaar, N. J.; Schubot, F. D.

    2009-03-01

    The opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa utilizes a type III secretion system (T3SS) to support acute infections in predisposed individuals. In this bacterium, expression of all T3SS-related genes is dependent on the AraC-type transcriptional activator ExsA. Before host contact, the T3SS is inactive and ExsA is repressed by the antiactivator protein ExsD. The repression, thought to occur through direct interactions between the two proteins, is relieved upon opening of the type III secretion (T3S) channel when secretion chaperone ExsC sequesters ExsD. We have solved the crystal structure of ?20ExsD, a protease-resistant fragment of ExsD that lacks only the 20 amino terminal residues of the wild-type protein at 2.6 {angstrom}. Surprisingly the structure revealed similarities between ExsD and the DNA binding domain of transcriptional repressor KorB. A model of an ExsD-DNA complex constructed on the basis of this homology produced a realistic complex that is supported by the prevalence of conserved residues in the putative DNA binding site and the results of differential scanning fluorimetry studies. Our findings challenge the currently held model that ExsD solely acts through interactions with ExsA and raise new questions with respect to the underlying mechanism of ExsA regulation.

  10. Structural insights into binding of STAC proteins to voltage-gated calcium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong King Yuen, Siobhan M.; Campiglio, Marta; Tung, Ching-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Excitation–contraction (EC) coupling in skeletal muscle requires functional and mechanical coupling between L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV1.1) and the ryanodine receptor (RyR1). Recently, STAC3 was identified as an essential protein for EC coupling and is part of a group of three proteins that can bind and modulate L-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Here, we report crystal structures of tandem-SH3 domains of different STAC isoforms up to 1.2-Å resolution. These form a rigid interaction through a conserved interdomain interface. We identify the linker connecting transmembrane repeats II and III in two different CaV isoforms as a binding site for the SH3 domains and report a crystal structure of the complex with the STAC2 isoform. The interaction site includes the location for a disease variant in STAC3 that has been linked to Native American myopathy (NAM). Introducing the mutation does not cause misfolding of the SH3 domains, but abolishes the interaction. Disruption of the interaction via mutations in the II–III loop perturbs skeletal muscle EC coupling, but preserves the ability of STAC3 to slow down inactivation of CaV1.2. PMID:29078335

  11. Structure of the human macrophage MARCO receptor and characterization of its bacteria-binding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elomaa, O; Sankala, M; Pikkarainen, T; Bergmann, U; Tuuttila, A; Raatikainen-Ahokas, A; Sariola, H; Tryggvason, K

    1998-02-20

    The primary structure of human macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) was determined from cDNA clones and shown to be highly similar to that of mouse (Elomaa, O., Kangas, M., Sahlberg, C. , Tuukkanen, J., Sormunen, R., Liakka, A., Thesleff, I., Kraal, G., and Tryggvason, K. (1995) Cell 80, 603-609). Features such as potential carbohydrate attachment sites in the extracellular spacer domain III and the interruption of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats in the collagenous domain IV were conserved between the two species. However, the human MARCO polypeptide chain lacked the intracellular cysteine present in mouse, as well as two extracellular cysteines that form interchain disulfide bonds in the murine protein. In situ hybridization showed MARCO to be strongly expressed in macrophages of several tissues of human individuals with sepsis. No expression was observed in other cell types. The bacteria-binding region of MARCO was determined in binding studies with full-length and truncated variants of MARCO, and localized to a region proximal to the cysteine-rich part of the COOH-terminal domain V. The intrachain disulfide bond pattern of domain V was established showing that these bonds are between cysteine pairs C1-C5, C2-C6, and C3-C4.

  12. Chemical synthesis, 3D structure, and ASIC binding site of the toxin mambalgin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Christina I; Rash, Lachlan D; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Rosengren, K Johan; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F; Alewood, Paul F; Craik, David J; Durek, Thomas

    2014-01-20

    Mambalgins are a novel class of snake venom components that exert potent analgesic effects mediated through the inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). The 57-residue polypeptide mambalgin-2 (Ma-2) was synthesized by using a combination of solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. The structure of the synthetic toxin, determined using homonuclear NMR, revealed an unusual three-finger toxin fold reminiscent of functionally unrelated snake toxins. Electrophysiological analysis of Ma-2 on wild-type and mutant ASIC1a receptors allowed us to identify α-helix 5, which borders on the functionally critical acidic pocket of the channel, as a major part of the Ma-2 binding site. This region is also crucial for the interaction of ASIC1a with the spider toxin PcTx1, thus suggesting that the binding sites for these toxins substantially overlap. This work lays the foundation for structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies and further development of this promising analgesic peptide. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structural combination of established 5-HT(2A) receptor ligands: new aspects of the binding mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Vasko; Herth, Matthias M; Santini, Martin A

    2010-01-01

    MH.MZ, MDL 100907, and altanserin are structurally similar 4-benzoyl-piperidine derivatives and are well accommodated to receptor interaction models. We combined structural elements of different high-affinity and selective 5-HT(2A) antagonists, as MH.MZ, altanserin, and SR 46349B, to improve......) with a moderate affinity toward the 5-HT(2A) receptor (K(i) = 57 nm). The remarkably reduced affinity of other compounds (4a), (4b), and (4c) (K(i) = 411, 360 and 356 nm respectively) indicates that MH.MZ can only bind to the 5-HT(2A) receptor with the p-fluorophenylethyl residue in a sterically restricted...

  14. Interactions of DNA binding proteins with G-Quadruplex structures at the single molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sujay

    Guanine-rich nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences can form non-canonical secondary structures, known as G-quadruplex (GQ). Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated formation of these structures in telomeric and non-telomeric regions of the genome. Telomeric GQs protect the chromosome ends whereas non-telomeric GQs either act as road blocks or recognition sites for DNA metabolic machinery. These observations suggest the significance of these structures in regulation of different metabolic processes, such as replication and repair. GQs are typically thermodynamically more stable than the corresponding Watson-Crick base pairing formed by G-rich and C-rich strands, making protein activity a crucial factor for their destabilization. Inside the cell, GQs interact with different proteins and their enzymatic activity is the determining factor for their stability. We studied interactions of several proteins with GQs to understand the underlying principles of protein-GQ interactions using single-molecule FRET and other biophysical techniques. Replication Protein-A (RPA), a single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is known to posses GQ unfolding activity. First, we compared the thermal stability of three potentially GQ-forming DNA sequences (PQS) to their stability against RPA-mediated unfolding. One of these sequences is the human telomeric repeat and the other two, located in the promoter region of tyrosine hydroxylase gene, are highly heterogeneous sequences that better represent PQS in the genome. The thermal stability of these structures do not necessarily correlate with their stability against protein-mediated unfolding. We conclude that thermal stability is not necessarily an adequate criterion for predicting the physiological viability of GQ structures. To determine the critical structural factors that influence protein-GQ interactions we studied two groups of GQ structures that have systematically varying loop lengths and number of G-tetrad layers. We

  15. Analysis of sequencing data for probing RNA secondary structures and protein-RNA binding in studying posttranscriptional regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xihao; Wu, Yang; Lu, Zhi John; Yip, Kevin Y

    2016-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been used to study posttranscriptional regulations, where the identification of protein-RNA binding is a major and fast-developing sub-area, which is in turn benefited by the sequencing methods for whole-transcriptome probing of RNA secondary structures. In the study of RNA secondary structures using high-throughput sequencing, bases are modified or cleaved according to their structural features, which alter the resulting composition of sequencing reads. In the study of protein-RNA binding, methods have been proposed to immuno-precipitate (IP) protein-bound RNA transcripts in vitro or in vivo By sequencing these transcripts, the protein-RNA interactions and the binding locations can be identified. For both types of data, read counts are affected by a combination of confounding factors, including expression levels of transcripts, sequence biases, mapping errors and the probing or IP efficiency of the experimental protocols. Careful processing of the sequencing data and proper extraction of important features are fundamentally important to a successful analysis. Here we review and compare different experimental methods for probing RNA secondary structures and binding sites of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the computational methods proposed for analyzing the corresponding sequencing data. We suggest how these two types of data should be integrated to study the structural properties of RBP binding sites as a systematic way to better understand posttranscriptional regulations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Unique structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand binding domain mediate its binding specificity as revealed by X-ray crystallography, NMR and MD simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelu Huan

    Full Text Available The 16 EphA and EphB receptors represent the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their interactions with 9 ephrin-A and ephrin-B ligands initiate bidirectional signals controlling many physiological and pathological processes. Most interactions occur between receptor and ephrins of the same class, and only EphA4 can bind all A and B ephrins. To understand the structural and dynamic principles that enable Eph receptors to utilize the same jellyroll β-sandwich fold to bind ephrins, the VAPB-MSP domain, peptides and small molecules, we have used crystallography, NMR and molecular dynamics (MD simulations to determine the first structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand-binding domain (LBD, which only binds ephrin-A ligands. Unexpectedly, despite being unbound, the high affinity ephrin-binding pocket of EphA5 resembles that of other Eph receptors bound to ephrins, with a helical conformation over the J-K loop and an open pocket. The openness of the pocket is further supported by NMR hydrogen/deuterium exchange data and MD simulations. Additionally, the EphA5 LBD undergoes significant picosecond-nanosecond conformational exchanges over the loops, as revealed by NMR and MD simulations, but lacks global conformational exchanges on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. This is markedly different from the EphA4 LBD, which shares 74% sequence identity and 87% homology. Consequently, the unbound EphA5 LBD appears to comprise an ensemble of open conformations that have only small variations over the loops and appear ready to bind ephrin-A ligands. These findings show how two proteins with high sequence homology and structural similarity are still able to achieve distinctive binding specificities through different dynamics, which may represent a general mechanism whereby the same protein fold can serve for different functions. Our findings also suggest that a promising strategy to design agonists/antagonists with high affinity and selectivity

  17. Structure of REV-ERBβ Ligand-binding Domain Bound to a Porphyrin Antagonist*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta-Camacho, Edna; Banerjee, Subhashis; Hughes, Travis S.; Solt, Laura A.; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P.; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors that play important roles in the regulation of circadian physiology, metabolism, and immune function. Although the REV-ERBs were originally characterized as orphan receptors, recent studies have demonstrated that they function as receptors for heme. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) are ligands that bind directly to the REV-ERBs. However, instead of mimicking the agonist action of heme, CoPP and ZnPP function as antagonists of REV-ERB function. This was unexpected because the only distinction between these ligands is the metal ion that is coordinated. To understand the structural basis by which REV-ERBβ can differentiate between a porphyrin agonist and antagonist, we characterized the interaction between REV-ERBβ with heme, CoPP, and ZnPP using biochemical and structural approaches, including x-ray crystallography and NMR. The crystal structure of CoPP-bound REV-ERBβ indicates only minor conformational changes induced by CoPP compared with heme, including the porphyrin ring of CoPP, which adopts a planar conformation as opposed to the puckered conformation observed in the heme-bound REV-ERBβ crystal structure. Thus, subtle changes in the porphyrin metal center and ring conformation may influence the agonist versus antagonist action of porphyrins and when considered with other studies suggest that gas binding to the iron metal center heme may drive alterations in REV-ERB activity. PMID:24872411

  18. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe 2+ transporter. → We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. → Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. → A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. → Algp7 may function as a Fe 2+ -chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  19. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Laboratory of Applied Structural Biology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hashimoto, Wataru [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Murata, Kousaku, E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe{sup 2+} transporter. {yields} We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. {yields} Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. {yields} A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. {yields} Algp7 may function as a Fe{sup 2+}-chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  20. Biochemical and structural features of extracellular vesicle-binding RNA aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kazuyoshi; Zhao, Jing; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Miyagishi, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are particles in mammalian body fluids that have attracted considerable attention as biomarkers for various diseases. In the present study, the authors isolated RNA aptamers with an affinity for extracellular vesicles from two library pools that encoded randomized sequences of different lengths. After the several rounds of selection, two conserved motifs are identified in the sequences that are obtained by next-generation sequencing. Most of the sequences were predicted to adopt a secondary structure that consisted of a non-conserved stem structure and a conserved loop sequence. Two minimal similar sequences are synthesized and confirmed the ability of these sequences to bind to extracellular vesicles. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and melting temperature analysis demonstrated that the aptamers were able to form a G-quadruplex structure in their loop regions and these structures were stabilized by potassium ions. Consistent with these structural data, the affinity of each aptamer for extracellular vesicles was dependent on potassium ions. The aptamers that were identified may be useful molecular tools for the development of diagnostic methods that utilize body fluids, such as blood, saliva and urine. PMID:28584632

  1. Crystal Structure of Menin Reveals Binding Site for Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Reddy, Gireesh; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz (Michigan); (UV)

    2014-10-02

    Menin is a tumor suppressor protein that is encoded by the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) gene and controls cell growth in endocrine tissues. Importantly, menin also serves as a critical oncogenic cofactor of MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) fusion proteins in acute leukemias. Direct association of menin with MLL fusion proteins is required for MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo, and this interaction has been validated as a new potential therapeutic target for development of novel anti-leukemia agents. Here, we report the first crystal structure of menin homolog from Nematostella vectensis. Due to a very high sequence similarity, the Nematostella menin is a close homolog of human menin, and these two proteins likely have very similar structures. Menin is predominantly an {alpha}-helical protein with the protein core comprising three tetratricopeptide motifs that are flanked by two {alpha}-helical bundles and covered by a {beta}-sheet motif. A very interesting feature of menin structure is the presence of a large central cavity that is highly conserved between Nematostella and human menin. By employing site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that this cavity constitutes the binding site for MLL. Our data provide a structural basis for understanding the role of menin as a tumor suppressor protein and as an oncogenic co-factor of MLL fusion proteins. It also provides essential structural information for development of inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL interaction as a novel therapeutic strategy in MLL-related leukemias.

  2. The mode of inhibitor binding to peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase: binding studies and structure determination of unbound and bound peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sanket; Singh, Nagendra; Yamini, Shavait; Singh, Avinash; Sinha, Mau; Arora, Ashish; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2013-01-01

    The incidences of infections caused by an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii are very common in hospital environments. It usually causes soft tissue infections including urinary tract infections and pneumonia. It is difficult to treat due to acquired resistance to available antibiotics is well known. In order to design specific inhibitors against one of the important enzymes, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii, we have determined its three-dimensional structure. Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (AbPth) is involved in recycling of peptidyl-tRNAs which are produced in the cell as a result of premature termination of translation process. We have also determined the structures of two complexes of AbPth with cytidine and uridine. AbPth was cloned, expressed and crystallized in unbound and in two bound states with cytidine and uridine. The binding studies carried out using fluorescence spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance techniques revealed that both cytidine and uridine bound to AbPth at nanomolar concentrations. The structure determinations of the complexes revealed that both ligands were located in the active site cleft of AbPth. The introduction of ligands to AbPth caused a significant widening of the entrance gate to the active site region and in the process of binding, it expelled several water molecules from the active site. As a result of interactions with protein atoms, the ligands caused conformational changes in several residues to attain the induced tight fittings. Such a binding capability of this protein makes it a versatile molecule for hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNAs having variable peptide sequences. These are the first studies that revealed the mode of inhibitor binding in Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases which will facilitate the structure based ligand design.

  3. The mode of inhibitor binding to peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase: binding studies and structure determination of unbound and bound peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanket Kaushik

    Full Text Available The incidences of infections caused by an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii are very common in hospital environments. It usually causes soft tissue infections including urinary tract infections and pneumonia. It is difficult to treat due to acquired resistance to available antibiotics is well known. In order to design specific inhibitors against one of the important enzymes, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii, we have determined its three-dimensional structure. Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (AbPth is involved in recycling of peptidyl-tRNAs which are produced in the cell as a result of premature termination of translation process. We have also determined the structures of two complexes of AbPth with cytidine and uridine. AbPth was cloned, expressed and crystallized in unbound and in two bound states with cytidine and uridine. The binding studies carried out using fluorescence spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance techniques revealed that both cytidine and uridine bound to AbPth at nanomolar concentrations. The structure determinations of the complexes revealed that both ligands were located in the active site cleft of AbPth. The introduction of ligands to AbPth caused a significant widening of the entrance gate to the active site region and in the process of binding, it expelled several water molecules from the active site. As a result of interactions with protein atoms, the ligands caused conformational changes in several residues to attain the induced tight fittings. Such a binding capability of this protein makes it a versatile molecule for hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNAs having variable peptide sequences. These are the first studies that revealed the mode of inhibitor binding in Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases which will facilitate the structure based ligand design.

  4. Deciphering common recognition principles of nucleoside mono/di and tri-phosphates binding in diverse proteins via structural matching of their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavat, Raghu; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2017-09-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) ligands are of high biological importance and are essential for all life forms. A pre-requisite for them to participate in diverse biochemical processes is their recognition by diverse proteins. It is thus of great interest to understand the basis for such recognition in different proteins. Towards this, we have used a structural bioinformatics approach and analyze structures of 4677 NTP complexes available in Protein Data Bank (PDB). Binding sites were extracted and compared exhaustively using PocketMatch, a sensitive in-house site comparison algorithm, which resulted in grouping the entire dataset into 27 site-types. Each of these site-types represent a structural motif comprised of two or more residue conservations, derived using another in-house tool for superposing binding sites, PocketAlign. The 27 site-types could be grouped further into 9 super-types by considering partial similarities in the sites, which indicated that the individual site-types comprise different combinations of one or more site features. A scan across PDB using the 27 structural motifs determined the motifs to be specific to NTP binding sites, and a computational alanine mutagenesis indicated that residues identified to be highly conserved in the motifs are also most contributing to binding. Alternate orientations of the ligand in several site-types were observed and rationalized, indicating the possibility of some residues serving as anchors for NTP recognition. The presence of multiple site-types and the grouping of multiple folds into each site-type is strongly suggestive of convergent evolution. Knowledge of determinants obtained from this study will be useful for detecting function in unknown proteins. Proteins 2017; 85:1699-1712. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The conserved potassium channel filter can have distinct ion binding profiles: structural analysis of rubidium, cesium, and barium binding in NaK2K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yee Ling; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David Bryant; Jiang, Youxing

    2014-08-01

    Potassium channels are highly selective for K(+) over the smaller Na(+). Intriguingly, they are permeable to larger monovalent cations such as Rb(+) and Cs(+) but are specifically blocked by the similarly sized Ba(2+). In this study, we used structural analysis to determine the binding profiles for these permeant and blocking ions in the selectivity filter of the potassium-selective NaK channel mutant NaK2K and also performed permeation experiments using single-channel recordings. Our data revealed that some ion binding properties of NaK2K are distinct from those of the canonical K(+) channels KcsA and MthK. Rb(+) bound at sites 1, 3, and 4 in NaK2K, as it does in KcsA. Cs(+), however, bound predominantly at sites 1 and 3 in NaK2K, whereas it binds at sites 1, 3, and 4 in KcsA. Moreover, Ba(2+) binding in NaK2K was distinct from that which has been observed in KcsA and MthK, even though all of these channels show similar Ba(2+) block. In the presence of K(+), Ba(2+) bound to the NaK2K channel at site 3 in conjunction with a K(+) at site 1; this led to a prolonged block of the channel (the external K(+)-dependent Ba(2+) lock-in state). In the absence of K(+), however, Ba(2+) acts as a permeating blocker. We found that, under these conditions, Ba(2+) bound at sites 1 or 0 as well as site 3, allowing it to enter the filter from the intracellular side and exit from the extracellular side. The difference in the Ba(2+) binding profile in the presence and absence of K(+) thus provides a structural explanation for the short and prolonged Ba(2+) block observed in NaK2K. © 2014 Lam et al.

  6. Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of the promiscuous EphA4 receptor reveals two distinct conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla, Nikhil; Goldgur, Yehuda; Xu, Kai; Paavilainen, Sari; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Himanen, Juha P. (MSKCC); (Turku)

    2010-09-08

    Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication. They are divided in two subclasses based on their affinities for each other and on sequence conservation. Receptor-ligand binding within each subclass is fairly promiscuous, while binding cross the subclasses happens rarely. EphA4 is an exception to this general rule, since it has long been known to bind both A- and B-class ephrin ligands but the reason for this exceptional behavior has not been worked out at molecular level. Recent structural and biochemical studies on EphA4 ligand-binding domain alone and in complex with its ligands have addressed this question. However, the published structures of EphA4/ephrin complexes differ considerably from each other and strikingly different explanations for the exceptional promiscuity of EphA4 were proposed. To address these contradictory findings, we have determined a crystal structure of the EphA4 ligand-binding domain at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and show that the receptor has an unprecedented ability to exist in two very different, well-ordered conformations even in the unbound state. Our results suggest that the ligand promiscuity of the Ephs is directly correlated with the structural flexibility of the ligand-binding surface of the receptor.

  7. Leg structure explains host site preference in bat flies (Diptera: Streblidae) parasitizing neotropical bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Thomas; Honner, Benjamin; Page, Rachel A; Tschapka, Marco

    2018-03-22

    Bat flies (Streblidae) are diverse, obligate blood-feeding insects and probably the most conspicuous ectoparasites of bats. They show preferences for specific body regions on their host bat, which are reflected in behavioural characteristics. In this study, we corroborate the categorization of bat flies into three ecomorphological groups, focusing only on differences in hind leg morphology. As no detailed phylogeny of bat flies is available, it remains uncertain whether these morphological differences reflect the evolutionary history of bat flies or show convergent adaptations for the host habitat type. We show that the division of the host bat into three distinct habitats contributes to the avoidance of interspecific competition of bat fly species. Finally, we found evidence for density-dependent competition between species belonging to the same ecomorphological group.

  8. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-01

    The uranyl cation (UO 2 2+ ) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  9. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  10. Structure and Ubiquitination-Dependent Activation of TANK-Binding Kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqi Tu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Upon stimulation by pathogen-associated inflammatory signals, TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1 induces type I interferon expression and modulates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB signaling. Here, we describe the 2.4 Å-resolution crystal structure of nearly full-length TBK1 in complex with specific inhibitors. The structure reveals a dimeric assembly created by an extensive network of interactions among the kinase, ubiquitin-like, and scaffold/dimerization domains. An intact TBK1 dimer undergoes K63-linked polyubiquitination on lysines 30 and 401, and these modifications are required for TBK1 activity. The ubiquitination sites and dimer contacts are conserved in the close homolog inhibitor of κB kinase ∊ (IKK∊ but not in IKKβ, a canonical IKK that assembles in an unrelated manner. The multidomain architecture of TBK1 provides a structural platform for integrating ubiquitination with kinase activation and IRF3 phosphorylation. The structure of TBK1 will facilitate studies of the atypical IKKs in normal and disease physiology and further the development of more specific inhibitors that may be useful as anticancer or anti-inflammatory agents.

  11. Structure and ubiquitination-dependent activation of TANK-binding kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Daqi; Zhu, Zehua; Zhou, Alicia Y; Yun, Cai-hong; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Toms, Angela V; Li, Yiqun; Dunn, Gavin P; Chan, Edmond; Thai, Tran; Yang, Shenghong; Ficarro, Scott B; Marto, Jarrod A; Jeon, Hyesung; Hahn, William C; Barbie, David A; Eck, Michael J

    2013-03-28

    Upon stimulation by pathogen-associated inflammatory signals, TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) induces type I interferon expression and modulates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling. Here, we describe the 2.4 Å-resolution crystal structure of nearly full-length TBK1 in complex with specific inhibitors. The structure reveals a dimeric assembly created by an extensive network of interactions among the kinase, ubiquitin-like, and scaffold/dimerization domains. An intact TBK1 dimer undergoes K63-linked polyubiquitination on lysines 30 and 401, and these modifications are required for TBK1 activity. The ubiquitination sites and dimer contacts are conserved in the close homolog inhibitor of κB kinase ε (IKKε) but not in IKKβ, a canonical IKK that assembles in an unrelated manner. The multidomain architecture of TBK1 provides a structural platform for integrating ubiquitination with kinase activation and IRF3 phosphorylation. The structure of TBK1 will facilitate studies of the atypical IKKs in normal and disease physiology and further the development of more specific inhibitors that may be useful as anticancer or anti-inflammatory agents. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Escherichia coli Penicillin-binding Protein 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dustin T; Wasney, Gregory A; Nosella, Michael; Fong, Anita; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2017-01-20

    In Escherichia coli, the peptidoglycan cell wall is synthesized by bifunctional penicillin-binding proteins such as PBP1b that have both transpeptidase and transglycosylase activities. The PBP1b transpeptidase domain is a major target of β-lactams, and therefore it is important to attain a detailed understanding of its inhibition. The peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase domain of PBP1b is also considered an excellent antibiotic target yet is not exploited by any clinically approved antibacterials. Herein, we adapt a pyrophosphate sensor assay to monitor PBP1b-catalyzed glycosyltransfer and present an improved crystallographic model for inhibition of the PBP1b glycosyltransferase domain by the potent substrate analog moenomycin. We elucidate the structure of a previously disordered region in the glycosyltransferase active site and discuss its implications with regards to peptidoglycan polymerization. Furthermore, we solve the crystal structures of E. coli PBP1b bound to multiple different β-lactams in the transpeptidase active site and complement these data with gel-based competition assays to provide a detailed structural understanding of its inhibition. Taken together, these biochemical and structural data allow us to propose new insights into inhibition of both enzymatic domains in PBP1b. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish; (UAB)

    2009-06-08

    occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in the substrate-free conformation. Orientation of the substrate with respect to the active site histidine and serine (in the mutant enzyme) also varies in different subunits. The structures of the C. parvum GAPDH ternary complex and other GAPDH complexes demonstrate the plasticity of the substrate binding site. We propose that the active site of GAPDH can accommodate the substrate in multiple conformations at multiple locations during the initial encounter. However, the C-3 phosphate group clearly prefers the 'new Pi' site for initial binding in the active site.

  14. Structural Studies on Dinuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes That Bind Diastereoselectively to an Antiparallel Folded Human Telomere Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We report DNA binding studies of the dinuclear ruthenium ligand [{Ru(phen)2}2tpphz]4+ in enantiomerically pure forms. As expected from previous studies of related complexes, both isomers bind with similar affinity to B-DNA and have enhanced luminescence. However, when tested against the G-quadruplex from human telomeres (which we show to form an antiparallel basket structure with a diagonal loop across one end), the ΛΛ isomer binds approximately 40 times more tightly than the ΔΔ, with a stronger luminescence. NMR studies show that the complex binds at both ends of the quadruplex. Modeling studies, based on experimentally derived restraints obtained for the closely related [{Ru(bipy)2}2tpphz]4+, show that the ΛΛ isomer fits neatly under the diagonal loop, whereas the ΔΔ isomer is unable to bind here and binds at the lateral loop end. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the ΔΔ isomer is prevented from binding under the diagonal loop by the rigidity of the loop. We thus present a novel enantioselective binding substrate for antiparallel basket G-quadruplexes, with features that make it a useful tool for quadruplex studies. PMID:24088028

  15. Molecular dynamics study of zinc binding to cysteines in a peptide mimic of the alcohol dehydrogenase structural zinc site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Erik G; Hellgren, Mikko; Brinck, Tore; Bergman, Tomas; Edholm, Olle

    2009-02-14

    The binding of zinc (Zn) ions to proteins is important for many cellular events. The theoretical and computational description of this binding (as well as that of other transition metals) is a challenging task. In this paper the binding of the Zn ion to four cysteine residues in the structural site of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) is studied using a synthetic peptide mimic of this site. The study includes experimental measurements of binding constants, classical free energy calculations from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanical (QM) electron structure calculations. The classical MD results account for interactions at the molecular level and reproduce the absolute binding energy and the hydration free energy of the Zn ion with an accuracy of about 10%. This is insufficient to obtain correct free energy differences. QM correction terms were calculated from density functional theory (DFT) on small clusters of atoms to include electronic polarisation of the closest waters and covalent contributions to the Zn-S coordination bond. This results in reasonably good agreement with the experimentally measured binding constants and Zn ion hydration free energies in agreement with published experimental values. The study also includes the replacement of one cysteine residue to an alanine. Simulations as well as experiments showed only a small effect of this upon the binding free energy. A detailed analysis indicate that the sulfur is replaced by three water molecules, thereby changing the coordination number of Zn from four (as in the original peptide) to six (as in water).

  16. Low-Quality Structural and Interaction Data Improves Binding Affinity Prediction via Random Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Wong, Man-Hon; Ballester, Pedro J

    2015-06-12

    Docking scoring functions can be used to predict the strength of protein-ligand binding. It is widely believed that training a scoring function with low-quality data is detrimental for its predictive performance. Nevertheless, there is a surprising lack of systematic validation experiments in support of this hypothesis. In this study, we investigated to which extent training a scoring function with data containing low-quality structural and binding data is detrimental for predictive performance. We actually found that low-quality data is not only non-detrimental, but beneficial for the predictive performance of machine-learning scoring functions, though the improvement is less important than that coming from high-quality data. Furthermore, we observed that classical scoring functions are not able to effectively exploit data beyond an early threshold, regardless of its quality. This demonstrates that exploiting a larger data volume is more important for the performance of machine-learning scoring functions than restricting to a smaller set of higher data quality.

  17. Unconventional miR-122 binding stabilizes the HCV genome by forming a trimolecular RNA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Stefanie A; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) typically downregulate protein expression from target mRNAs through limited base-pairing interactions between the 5' 'seed' region of the miRNA and the mRNA 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). In contrast to this established mode of action, the liver-specific human miR-122 binds at two sites within the hepatitis C viral (HCV) 5'UTR, leading to increased production of infectious virions. We show here that two copies of miR-122 interact with the HCV 5'UTR at partially overlapping positions near the 5' end of the viral transcript to form a stable ternary complex. Both miR-122 binding sites involve extensive base pairing outside of the seed sequence; yet, they have substantially different interaction affinities. Structural probing reveals changes in the architecture of the HCV 5'UTR that occur on interaction with miR-122. In contrast to previous reports, however, results using both the recombinant cytoplasmic exonuclease Xrn1 and liver cell extracts show that miR-122-mediated protection of the HCV RNA from degradation does not correlate with stimulation of viral propagation in vivo. Thus, the miR-122:HCV ternary complex likely functions at other steps critical to the viral life cycle.

  18. GPU-based Point Cloud Superpositioning for Structural Comparisons of Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Matthias; Fober, Thomas; Freisleben, Bernd

    2016-11-07

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to solve the labeled point cloud superpositioning problem for performing structural comparisons of protein binding sites. The solution is based on a parallel evolution strategy that operates on large populations and runs on GPU hardware. The proposed evolution strategy reduces the likelihood of getting stuck in a local optimum of the multimodal real-valued optimization problem represented by labeled point cloud superpositioning. The performance of the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy is compared to a previously proposed CPU-based sequential approach for labeled point cloud superpositioning, indicating that the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy leads to qualitatively better results and significantly shorter runtimes, with speed improvements of up to a factor of 1,500 for large populations. Binary classification tests based on the ATP, NADH and FAD protein subsets of CavBase, a database containing putative binding sites, show average classification rate improvements from about 92% (CPU) to 96% (GPU). Further experiments indicate that the proposed GPU-based labeled point cloud superpositioning approach can be superior to traditional protein comparison approaches based on sequence alignments.

  19. Structural mechanism and photoprotective function of water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigome, Daisuke; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Nobue; Mitsunaga, Katsuyoshi; Oonishi, Isao; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Uchida, Akira

    2007-03-02

    A water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) is the single known instance of a putative chlorophyll (Chl) carrier in green plants. Recently the photoprotective function of WSCP has been demonstrated by EPR measurements; the light-induced singlet-oxygen formation of Chl in the WSCP tetramer is about four times lower than that of unbound Chl. This paper describes the crystal structure of the WSCP-Chl complex purified from leaves of Lepidium virginicum (Virginia pepperweed) to clarify the mechanism of its photoprotective function. The WSCP-Chl complex is a homotetramer comprising four protein chains of 180 amino acids and four Chl molecules. At the center of the complex one hydrophobic cavity is formed in which all of the four Chl molecules are tightly packed and isolated from bulk solvent. With reference to the novel Chl-binding mode, we propose that the photoprotection mechanism may be based on the inhibition of physical contact between the Chl molecules and molecular oxygen.

  20. Insights into ligand binding to a Glutathione S-transferase from mango: structure, thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Chavira, Ignacio; Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A.; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A.; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.; García-Orozco, Karina D.; Hernandez-Paredes, Javier; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Stojanoff, Vivian; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Islas-Osuna, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied a mango glutathione S-transferase (GST) (Mangifera indica) bound to glutathione (GSH) and S-hexyl glutathione (GSX). This GST Tau class (MiGSTU) had a molecular mass of 25.5 kDa. MiGSTU Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants were determined for their substrates obtaining a Km, Vmax and kcat for CDNB of 0.792 mM, 80.58 mM·min−1 and 68.49 s−1 respectively and 0.693 mM, 105.32 mM·min−1 and 89.57 s−1, for reduced GSH respectively. MiGSTU had a micromolar affinity towards GSH (5.2 μM) or GSX (7.8 μM). The crystal structure of the MiGSTU in apo or bound to GSH or GSX generated a model that explains the thermodynamic signatures of binding and showed the importance of enthalpic-entropic compensation in ligand binding to Tau-class GST enzymes. PMID:28104507

  1. Structural Relationship and Binding Mechanisms of Five Flavonoids with Bovine Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are structurally diverse and the most ubiquitous groups of dietary polyphenols distributed in various fruits and vegetables. In this study, the interaction between five flavonoids, namely formononetin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, calycosin- 7-O-β-D-glucoside, calycosin, rutin, and quercetin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA was investigated by fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy. In the discussion, it was proved that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by flavonoids was a result of the formation of a flavonoid-BSA complex. Fluorescence quenching constants were determined using the Stern-Volmer and Lineweaver-Burk equations to provide a measure of the binding affinity between the flavonoids and BSA. The binding constants ranked in the order quercetin > rutin > calycosin > calycosin-7-O-β-D-glucoside ≈ formononetin-7-O-β-D-glucoside. The results of thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS at different temperatures indicated that the hydrophobic interaction played a major role in flavonoid-BSA association. The distance r between BSA and acceptor flavonoids was also obtained according to Förster’s theory of non-radiative energy transfer.

  2. Members' Preferences for Co-operative Structures: An Experimental Conjoint Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogeras, N.; Lans, van der I.A.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Dijk, van G.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract As market conditions change rapidly in the 21st century, questions arise concerning how the organizational structures of co-operatives (co-ops) can meet the challenges that these new conditions pose. This paper introduces a framework to structure marketing co-ops (MCs) based on members¿

  3. Structures of a diverse set of colchicine binding site inhibitors in complex with tubulin provide a rationale for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxi; Zhang, Hang; Gigant, Benoît; Yu, Yamei; Wu, Yangping; Chen, Xiangzheng; Lai, Qinhuai; Yang, Zhaoya; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Jinliang

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic assemblies of αβ-tubulin heterodimers and have been recognized as highly attractive targets for cancer chemotherapy. A broad range of agents bind to tubulin and interfere with microtubule assembly. Despite having a long history of characterization, colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSIs) have not yet reached the commercial phase as anti-cancer drugs to date. We determined the structures of tubulin complexed with a set of structurally diverse CBSIs (lexibulin, nocodazole, plinabulin and tivantinib), among which nocodazole and tivantinib are both binary-function inhibitors targeting cancer-related kinases and microtubules simultaneously. High resolution structures revealed the detailed interactions between these ligands and tubulin. Our results showed that the binding modes of the CBSIs were different from previous docking models, highlighting the importance of crystal structure information in structure-based drug design. A real structure-based pharmacophore was proposed to rationalize key common interactions of the CBSIs at the colchicine domain. Our studies provide a solid structural basis for developing new anti-cancer agents for the colchicine binding site. The atomic coordinates and structure factors for tubulin complexed with lexibulin, nocodazole, plinabulin and tivantinib have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank under accession codes 5CA0, 5CA1, 5C8Y and 5CB4, respectively. © 2015 FEBS.

  4. Crystal structure of recombinant tyrosinase-binding protein MtaL at 1.35 Å resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, X.; Soler-Lopez, M.; Ismaya, W.T.; Wichers, H.J.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    2016-01-01

    Mushroom tyrosinase-associated lectin-like protein (MtaL) binds to mature Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase in vivo, but the exact physiological function of MtaL is unknown. In this study, the crystal structure of recombinant MtaL is reported at 1.35 Å resolution. Comparison of its structure with that of

  5. Cation-pi interactions with a model for the side chain of tryptophan: structures and absolute binding energies of alkali metal cation-indole complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Chunhai; Yang, Zhibo; Hallowita, Nuwan; Rodgers, M T

    2005-12-22

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation techniques are employed to determine bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of mono- and bis-complexes of alkali metal cations, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+, with indole, C8H7N. The primary and lowest energy dissociation pathway in all cases is endothermic loss of an intact indole ligand. Sequential loss of a second indole ligand is observed at elevated energies for the bis-complexes. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G level of theory are used to determine the structures, vibrational frequencies, and rotational constants of these complexes. Theoretical BDEs are determined from single point energy calculations at the MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) level using the B3LYP/6-31G* geometries. The agreement between theory and experiment is very good for all complexes except Li+ (C8H7N), where theory underestimates the strength of the binding. The trends in the BDEs of these alkali metal cation-indole complexes are compared with the analogous benzene and naphthalene complexes to examine the influence of the extended pi network and heteroatom on the strength of the cation-pi interaction. The Na+ and K+ binding affinities of benzene, phenol, and indole are also compared to those of the aromatic amino acids, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan to elucidate the factors that contribute to the binding in complexes to the aromatic amino acids. The nature of the binding and trends in the BDEs of cation-pi complexes between alkali metal cations and benzene, phenol, and indole are examined to help understand nature's preference for engaging tryptophan over phenylalanine and tyrosine in cation-pi interactions in biological systems.

  6. Cisplatin binding to DNA: Structure, bonding and NMR properties from Car-Parrinello/Classical MD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, Katrin; Roethlisberger, Ursula; Carloni, Paolo

    2003-05-01

    Poster session: Abstract is full text. Cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug. At the molecular level, its beneficial effects arise from its binding to two adjacent purine nucleobases of DNA, which causes a kink in the double helix structure. The lesion is recognized by high mobility group (HMG) domain proteins, hampering cell repair processes and leading to cell death. Because of the serious side-effects of the drug, a large effort is devoted to design novel Pt-based drugs. Classical MD simulations modeling can be of great help in modeling Pt-DNA adducts, yet the intrinsic dependence of platinum coordination chemistry on the electronic structure has limited the domain of applicability, the accuracy and the transferability of the force field used. In this work, we adopt a Car-Parrinello / molecular dynamics approach to investigate structure and dynamics of Pt-DNA adducts, in which the platinum moiety is treated at the density functional level, whereas the macromolecule and the solvent are treated classically. Within this approach, it is shown that (i) the experimental structural determinants of the cisplatin modified DNA duplexes in the free state and in complex with an HMG protein respectively, are well reproduced; (ii) calculated 195Pt NMR chemical shifts are in semiquantitative agreement with experiment ; (III) docking of the Pt(NH3)2 {sup 2+} moiety on a canonical B-DNA dodecamer structure in water solution causes a lesion already in the 10 ps timescale, whose structural features are in fair agreement with experiment. Thus, this approach emerges as a novel computational tool for modeling platinum/DNA chemistry.

  7. Structures of Two Coronavirus Main Proteases: Implications for Substrate Binding and Antiviral Drug Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hongwei; Yang, Haitao; Xue, Fei; Wu, Zhixin; Shen, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhou, Zhe; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Xuejun C.; Liao, Ming; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe (SCAU); (Tsinghua); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2008-07-21

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) can infect humans and multiple species of animals, causing a wide spectrum of diseases. The coronavirus main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for anti-CoV drug design. In this study, the crystal structures of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) MP{sup pro} and a severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) M{sup pro} mutant (H41A), in complex with an N-terminal autocleavage substrate, were individually determined to elucidate the structural flexibility and substrate binding of M{sup pro}. A monomeric form of IBV M{sup pro} was identified for the first time in CoV M{sup pro} structures. A comparison of these two structures to other available M{sup pro} structures provides new insights for the design of substrate-based inhibitors targeting CoV M{sup pro}s. Furthermore, a Michael acceptor inhibitor (named N3) was cocrystallized with IBV M{sup pro} and was found to demonstrate in vitro inactivation of IBV M{sup pro} and potent antiviral activity against IBV in chicken embryos. This provides a feasible animal model for designing wide-spectrum inhibitors against CoV-associated diseases. The structure-based optimization of N3 has yielded two more efficacious lead compounds, N27 and H16, with potent inhibition against SARS-CoV M{sup pro}.

  8. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J. (Delaware)

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  9. Influence of the Changes of the Structure of Foundry Bentonites on Their Binding Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia ŻYMANKOWSKA-KUMON

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of the examination of the structure of calcium bentonites, activated by sodium carbonate, applied in the foundry industry as a binding agent for moulding sands, subjected to the effects of high temperature, were presented. The examination was conducted with the use of the infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray analysis (XRD. In addition, the montmorillonite contents in the bentonite sample was determined with the use of the modern, Cu(II-TET complex method and the technological properties of moulding sands containing the examined bentonites, such as: compactability, permeability, compression strength were examined.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.1.1342

  10. Crystal structures and inhibitor binding properties of plant class V chitinases: the cycad enzyme exhibits unique structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yuka; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Osawa, Takuo; Numata, Tomoyuki; Sakuda, Shohei; Taira, Toki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2015-04-01

    A class V (glycoside hydrolase family 18) chitinase from the cycad Cycas revoluta (CrChiA) is a plant chitinase that has been reported to possess efficient transglycosylation (TG) activity. We solved the crystal structure of CrChiA, and compared it with those of class V chitinases from Nicotiana tabacum (NtChiV) and Arabidopsis thaliana (AtChiC), which do not efficiently catalyze the TG reaction. All three chitinases had a similar (α/β)8 barrel fold with an (α + β) insertion domain. In the acceptor binding site (+1, +2 and +3) of CrChiA, the Trp168 side chain was found to stack face-to-face with the +3 sugar. However, this interaction was not found in the identical regions of NtChiV and AtChiC. In the DxDxE motif, which is essential for catalysis, the carboxyl group of the middle Asp (Asp117) was always oriented toward the catalytic acid Glu119 in CrChiA, whereas the corresponding Asp in NtChiV and AtChiC was oriented toward the first Asp. These structural features of CrChiA appear to be responsible for the efficient TG activity. When binding of the inhibitor allosamidin was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry, the changes in binding free energy of the three chitinases were found to be similar to each other, i.e. between -9.5 and -9.8 kcal mol(-1) . However, solvation and conformational entropy changes in CrChiA were markedly different from those in NtChiV and AtChiC, but similar to those of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens (SmChiA), which also exhibits significant TG activity. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the TG reaction and the molecular evolution from bacterial chitinases to plant class V chitinases. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Structural and histological characterization of oviductal magnum and lectin-binding patterns in Gallus domesticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Gwonhwa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although chicken oviduct is a useful model and target tissue for reproductive biology and transgenesis, little is known because of the highly specific hormonal regulation and the lack of fundamental researches, including lectin-binding activities and glycobiology. Because lectin is attached to secreted glycoproteins, we hypothesized that lectin could be bound to secretory egg-white proteins, and played a crucial role in the generation of egg-white protein in the oviduct. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the structural, histological and lectin-binding characteristics of the chicken oviductal magnum from juvenile and adult hens. Methods The oviductal magnums from juvenile and adult hens were prepared for ultrastructural analysis, qRT-PCR and immunostaining. Immunohistochemistry of anti-ovalbumin, anti-ESR1 and anti-PGR, and mRNA expression of egg-white genes and steroid hormone receptor genes were evaluated. Lectin histochemical staining was also conducted in juvenile and adult oviductal magnum tissues. Results The ultrastructural analysis showed that ciliated cells were rarely developed on luminal surface in juvenile magnum, but not tubular gland cells. In adult magnum, two types of epithelium and three types of tubular gland cells were observed. qRT-PCR analysis showed that egg-white genes were highly expressed in adult oviduct compared with the juvenile. However, mRNA expressions of ESR1 and PGR were considerably higher in juvenile oviduct than adult (P Conclusions The observation of ultrastructural analysis, mRNA expression, immunohistochemistry and lectin staining showed structural and physiological characterization of juvenile and adult oviductal magnum. Consequently, oviduct study could be helped to in vitro culture of chicken oviductal cells, to develop epithelial or tubular gland cell-specific markers, and to understand female reproductive biology and endocrinology.

  12. Changes of creatine kinase structure upon ligand binding as seen by small-angle scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, Michael; Kriechbaum, Manfred; Laggner, Peter; Wallimann, Theo

    1996-09-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to investigate structural changes upon binding of individual substrates or a transition state analogue complex (TSAC), consisting of Mg-ADP, creatine and KNO 3 to creatine kinase isoenzymes (dimeric M-CK and octameric Mi-CK) and monomeric arginine kinase (AK). Considerable changes in the shape and the size of the molecules occurred upon binding of Mg-ATP and TSAC, whereas creatine alone had only a small effect. In Mi-CK, the radius of gyration was reduced from 55.6 Å (free enzyme) to 48.9 Å (enzyme + Mg-ATP) and to 48.2 Å (enzyme + TSAC). The experiments performed with M-CK showed similar changes from 28.0 Å (free enzyme) to 25.6 Å (enzyme + Mg-ATP) and to 25.5 Å (enzyme + TSAC). Creatine alone did not lead to significant changes in the radii of gyration, nor did free ATP or ADP. AK showed the same behaviour: a change of the radius of gyration from 21.5 Å (free enzyme) to 19.7 Å (enzyme + MG-ATP), whereas with arginine alone only a minor change could be observed. The primary change in structure as seen with monomeric AK seems to be a magnesium-nucleotide induced domain movement relative to each other, whereas the effect of substrate may be of local order only. In creatine kinase, however, further movements must be involved in the large conformational change.

  13. A Structural Model for Binding of the Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesin GspB to Host Carbohydrate Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Bensing, Barbara A.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Melancon, Bruce J.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Ward, Nicholas J.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Oliver, Kevin M.; Cecchini, Gary; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M. (VA); (UCLA); (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2014-10-02

    GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR) adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIb{alpha}. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we determined the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of the GspB binding region (GspB{sub BR}), both alone and in complex with a disaccharide precursor to sialyl-T antigen. Analysis of the GspB{sub BR} structure revealed that it is comprised of three independently folded subdomains or modules: (1) an Ig-fold resembling a CnaA domain from prokaryotic pathogens; (2) a second Ig-fold resembling the binding region of mammalian Siglecs; (3) a subdomain of unique fold. The disaccharide was found to bind in a pocket within the Siglec subdomain, but at a site distinct from that observed in mammalian Siglecs. Confirming the biological relevance of this binding pocket, we produced three isogenic variants of S. gordonii, each containing a single point mutation of a residue lining this binding pocket. These variants have reduced binding to carbohydrates of GPIb{alpha}. Further examination of purified GspB{sub BR}-R484E showed reduced binding to sialyl-T antigen while S. gordonii harboring this mutation did not efficiently bind platelets and showed a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by an animal model of endocarditis. Analysis of other SRR proteins revealed that the predicted binding regions of these adhesins also had a modular organization, with those known to bind carbohydrate receptors having modules homologous to the Siglec and Unique subdomains of GspBBR. This suggests that the binding specificity of the SRR family of adhesins is determined by the type and organization of discrete modules within the binding domains, which may affect the tropism of organisms for different tissues.

  14. Tandem repeat structure of rhamnose-binding lectin from catfish (Silurus asotus) eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, M; Ishikawa, K; Mineki, R; Murayama, K; Numata, C; Ogawa, Y; Takayanagi, Y; Nitta, K

    1999-11-16

    The primary structure of catfish (Silurus asotus) egg lectin (SAL) was determined. SAL cDNA contained 1448-bp nucleotides and 308 amino acid residues, deduced from open reading frame. The SAL mature protein composed of 285-amino acid residues was followed by a predicted signal sequence having 23 residues. The mRNA of SAL was found to be expressed in eggs, but not in liver. SAL is composed of three tandem repeat domain structures divided into exactly 95 amino acid residues each, and all cysteine positions of each domain were completely conserved. Sequence homologies between the three domains, termed D1 (1-95), D2 (96-190) and D3 (191-285), were as follows; D1-D2, 28%; D2-D3, 33%; D1-D3, 43%. Two conserved peptide motifs, -(AN)YGR(TD)S(T)XCS(TGR)P- and -DPCX(G)T(Y)KY(L)-, appear to exist at the N- and C-terminal regions of each domain, respectively. The kinetic parameters of SAL obtained by measuring surface plasmon resonance were as follows: K(a) (M(-1)) for neohesperidosyl-BSA, 7. 1 x 10(6); for melibiosyl-BSA, 4.9 x 10(6); and for lactosyl-BSA, 5. 2 x 10(5). These results show that RBLs including SAL comprise a family of alpha-galactosyl binding lectins having characteristic tandem repeat domain structures.

  15. Structures of parasite calreticulins provide insights into their flexibility and dual carbohydrate/peptide-binding properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Moreau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Calreticulin (CRT is a multifaceted protein, initially discovered as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone protein, that is essential in calcium metabolism. Various implications in cancer, early development and immunology have been discovered more recently for CRT, as well as its role as a dominant `eat-me' prophagocytic signal. Intriguingly, cell-surface exposure/secretion of CRT is among the infective strategies used by parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Entamoeba histolytica, Taenia solium, Leishmania donovani and Schistosoma mansoni. Because of the inherent flexibility of CRTs, their analysis by X-ray crystallography requires the design of recombinant constructs suitable for crystallization, and thus only the structures of two very similar mammalian CRT lectin domains are known. With the X-ray structures of two distant parasite CRTs, insights into species structural determinants that might be harnessed to fight against the parasites without affecting the functions of the host CRT are now provided. Moreover, although the hypothesis that CRT can exhibit both open and closed conformations has been proposed in relation to its chaperone function, only the open conformation has so far been observed in crystal structures. The first evidence is now provided of a complex conformational transition with the junction reoriented towards P-domain closure. SAXS experiments also provided additional information about the flexibility of T. cruzi CRT in solution, thus complementing crystallographic data on the open conformation. Finally, regarding the conserved lectin-domain structure and chaperone function, evidence is provided of its dual carbohydrate/protein specificity and a new scheme is proposed to interpret such unusual substrate-binding properties. These fascinating features are fully consistent with previous experimental observations, as discussed considering the broad spectrum of CRT sequence conservations and differences.

  16. Crystal structure of the starch-binding domain of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yousuke; Muraki, Norifumi; Kusunoki, Masami; Miyake, Hideo

    2017-10-01

    Glucoamylases are widely used commercially to produce glucose syrup from starch. The starch-binding domain (SBD) of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger is a small globular protein containing a disulfide bond. The structure of A. niger SBD has been determined by NMR, but the conformation surrounding the disulfide bond was unclear. Therefore, X-ray crystal structural analysis was used to attempt to clarify the conformation of this region. The SBD was purified from an Escherichia coli-based expression system and crystallized at 293 K. The initial phase was determined by the molecular-replacement method, and the asymmetric unit of the crystal contained four protomers, two of which were related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis. Finally, the structure was solved at 2.0 Å resolution. The SBD consisted of seven β-strands and eight loops, and the conformation surrounding the disulfide bond was determined from a clear electron-density map. Comparison of X-ray- and NMR-determined structures of the free SBD showed no significant difference in the conformation of each β-strand, but the conformations of the loops containing the disulfide bond and the L5 loop were different. In particular, the difference in the position of the C α atom of Cys509 between the X-ray- and NMR-determined structures was 13.3 Å. In addition, the B factors of the amino-acid residues surrounding the disulfide bond are higher than those of other residues. Therefore, the conformation surrounding the disulfide bond is suggested to be highly flexible.

  17. Exploring alternate states and oligomerization preferences of coiled-coils by de novo structure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-02-01

    Homomeric coiled-coils can self-assemble into a wide range of structural states with different helix topologies and oligomeric states. In this study, we have combined de novo structure modeling with stability calculations to simultaneously predict structure and oligomeric states of homomeric coiled-coils. For dimers an asymmetric modeling protocol was developed. Modeling without symmetry constraints showed that backbone asymmetry is important for the formation of parallel dimeric coiled-coils. Collectively, our results demonstrate that high-resolution structure of coiled-coils, as well as parallel and antiparallel orientations of dimers and tetramers, can be accurately predicted from sequence. De novo modeling was also used to generate models of competing oligomeric states, which were used to compare stabilities and thus predict the native stoichiometry from sequence. In a benchmark set of 33 coiled-coil sequences, forming dimers to pentamers, up to 70% of the oligomeric states could be correctly predicted. The calculations demonstrated that the free energy of helix folding could be an important factor for determining stability and oligomeric state of homomeric coiled-coils. The computational methods developed here should be broadly applicable to studies of sequence-structure relationships in coiled-coils and the design of higher order assemblies with improved oligomerization specificity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mycorrhizal preferences and fine spatial structure of the epiphytic orchid Epidendrum rhopalostele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riofrío, María L; Cruz, Dario; Torres, Elena; de la Cruz, Marcelino; Iriondo, José M; Suárez, Juan Pablo

    2013-12-01

    The presence of compatible fungi is necessary for epiphytic orchid recruitment. Thus, identifying associated mycorrhizal fungi at the population level is essential for orchid conservation. Recruitment patterns may also be conditioned by factors such as seed dispersal range and specific environmental characteristics. In a forest plot, all trees with a diameter at breast height >1 cm and all individuals of the epiphytic orchid Epidendrum rhopalostele were identified and mapped. Additionally, one flowering individual of E. rhopalostele per each host tree was randomly selected for root sampling and DNA extraction. A total of 239 E. rhopalostele individuals were located in 25 of the 714 potential host trees. Light microscopy of sampled roots showed mycorrhizal fungi in 22 of the 25 sampled orchids. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequences yielded two Tulasnella clades. In four cases, plants were found to be associated with both clades. The difference between univariate and bivariate K functions was consistent with the random labeling null model at all spatial scales, indicating that trees hosting clades A and B of Tulasnella are not spatially segregated. The analysis of the inhomogenous K function showed that host trees are not clustered, suggesting no limitations to population-scale dispersal. χ(2) analysis of contingency tables showed that E. rhopalostele is more frequent on dead trees than expected. EPIDENDRUM RHOPALOSTELE establishes mycorrhizal associations with at least two different Tulasnella species. The analysis of the distribution patterns of this orchid suggests a microsite preference for dead trees and no seed dispersal limitation.

  19. A first principles study of the binding of formic acid in catalase complementing high resolution X-ray structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Carme; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Biarnes, Xevi; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Density functional molecular dynamics simulations using a QM/MM approach are used to get insight into the binding modes of formic acid in catalase. Two ligand binding sites are found, named A and B, in agreement with recent high resolution structures of catalase with bound formic acid. In addition, the calculations show that the His56 residue is protonated and the ligand is present as a formate anion. The lowest energy minimum structure (A) corresponds to the ligand interacting with both the heme iron and the catalytic residues (His56 and Asn129). The second minimum energy structure (B) corresponds to the situation in which the ligand interacts solely with the catalytic residues. A mechanism for the process of formic acid binding in catalase is suggested

  20. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauk, Pricila; Roman-Ramos, Henrique; Ho, Paulo Lee; Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Farah, Chuck S.

    2009-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca 2+ ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  1. Structure of the cobalamin-binding protein of a putative O-demethylase from Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjuts, Hanno; Dunstan, Mark S.; Fisher, Karl; Leys, David, E-mail: david.leys@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    The first crystal structure of the vitamin B12-binding protein from a three-component O-demethylase enzyme system is reported. During O-demethylation methyl groups are transferred from phenyl methyl ethers to tetrahydrofolate via methyl-B12 intermediates. This study describes the identification and the structural and spectroscopic analysis of a cobalamin-binding protein (termed CobDH) implicated in O-demethylation by the organohalide-respiring bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2. The 1.5 Å resolution crystal structure of CobDH is presented in the cobalamin-bound state and reveals that the protein is composed of an N-terminal helix-bundle domain and a C-terminal Rossmann-fold domain, with the cobalamin coordinated in the base-off/His-on conformation similar to other cobalamin-binding domains that catalyse methyl-transfer reactions. EPR spectroscopy of CobDH confirms cobalamin binding and reveals the presence of a cob(III)alamin superoxide, indicating binding of oxygen to the fully oxidized cofactor. These data provide the first structural insights into the methyltransferase reactions that occur during O-demethylation by D. hafniense.

  2. Exploring the water-binding pocket of the type II dehydroquinase enzyme in the structure-based design of inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Beatriz; Sedes, Antía; Peón, Antonio; Otero, José M; van Raaij, Mark J; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R; González-Bello, Concepción

    2014-04-24

    Structural and computational studies to explore the WAT1 binding pocket in the structure-based design of inhibitors against the type II dehydroquinase (DHQ2) enzyme are reported. The crystal structures of DHQ2 from M. tuberculosis in complex with four of the reported compounds are described. The electrostatic interaction observed between the guanidinium group of the essential arginine and the carboxylate group of one of the inhibitors in the reported crystal structures supports the recently suggested role of this arginine as the residue that triggers the release of the product from the active site. The results of the structural and molecular dynamics simulation studies revealed that the inhibitory potency is favored by promoting interactions with WAT1 and the residues located within this pocket and, more importantly, by avoiding situations where the ligands occupy the WAT1 binding pocket. The new insights can be used to advantage in the structure-based design of inhibitors.

  3. Structure of BT-3984, a member of the SusD/RagB family of nutrient-binding molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Xu, Qingping; Rife, Christopher L.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of BT-3984, a SusD-family protein, reveals a TPR N-terminal region providing support for a loop-rich C-terminal subdomain and suggests possible interfaces involved in sus complex formation. The crystal structure of the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron protein BT-3984 was determined to a resolution of 1.7 Å and was the first structure to be determined from the extensive SusD family of polysaccharide-binding proteins. SusD is an essential component of the sus operon that defines the paradigm for glycan utilization in dominant members of the human gut microbiota. Structural analysis of BT-3984 revealed an N-terminal region containing several tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs), while the signature C-terminal region is less structured and contains extensive loop regions. Sequence and structure analysis of BT-3984 suggests the presence of binding interfaces for other proteins from the polysaccharide-utilization complex

  4. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of primer binding site-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors from the murine packaging cell lines psi-2 and omega E was studied. The efficiency of transduction of the neo marker of all mutated constructs was found to decrease by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared......, suggesting the involvement of a specific endogenous virus-like sequence in patch repair rescue of the primer binding site mutants. The putative recombination partner RNA was found in virions from psi-2 cells as detected by analysis of glutamine tRNA-initiated cDNA and by sequence analysis of regions...

  5. Structure-based engineering to restore high affinity binding of an isoform-selective anti-TGFβ1 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Dana M; Bird, Julie J; Honey, Denise M; Best, Annie; Park, Anna; Wei, Ronnie R; Qiu, Huawei

    2018-01-15

    Metelimumab (CAT192) is a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody developed as a TGFβ1-specific antagonist. It was tested in clinical trials for the treatment of scleroderma but later terminated due to lack of efficacy. Subsequent characterization of CAT192 indicated that its TGFβ1 binding affinity was reduced by ∼50-fold upon conversion from the parental single-chain variable fragment (scFv) to IgG4. We hypothesized this result was due to decreased conformational flexibility of the IgG that could be altered via engineering. Therefore, we designed insertion mutants in the elbow region and screened for binding and potency. Our results indicated that increasing the elbow region linker length in each chain successfully restored the isoform-specific and high affinity binding of CAT192 to TGFβ1. The crystal structure of the high binding affinity mutant displays large conformational rearrangements of the variable domains compared to the wild-type antigen-binding fragment (Fab) and the low binding affinity mutants. Insertion of two glycines in both the heavy and light chain elbow regions provided sufficient flexibility for the variable domains to extend further apart than the wild-type Fab, and allow the CDR3s to make additional interactions not seen in the wild-type Fab structure. These interactions coupled with the dramatic conformational changes provide a possible explanation of how the scFv and elbow-engineered Fabs bind TGFβ1 with high affinity. This study demonstrates the benefits of re-examining both structure and function when converting scFv to IgG molecules, and highlights the potential of structure-based engineering to produce fully functional antibodies.

  6. Structural insight into exosite binding and discovery of novel exosite inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A through in silico screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Legler, Patricia M.; Southall, Noel; Maloney, David J.; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit

    2014-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is the most lethal toxin among the Tier 1 Select Agents. Development of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors against BoNT/A zinc metalloprotease remains a challenging problem due to its exceptionally large substrate binding surface and conformational plasticity. The exosites of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A are intriguing alternative sites for small molecule intervention, but their suitability for inhibitor design remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employed two recently identified exosite inhibitors, D-chicoric acid and lomofungin, to probe the structural features of the exosites and molecular mechanisms of synergistic inhibition. The results showed that D-chicoric acid favors binding at the α-exosite, whereas lomofungin preferentially binds at the β-exosite by mimicking the substrate β-sheet binding interaction. Molecular dynamics simulations and binding interaction analysis of the exosite inhibitors with BoNT/A revealed key elements and hotspots that likely contribute to the inhibitor binding and synergistic inhibition. Finally, we performed database virtual screening for novel inhibitors of BoNT/A targeting the exosites. Hits C1 and C2 showed non-competitive inhibition and likely target the α- and β-exosites, respectively. The identified exosite inhibitors may provide novel candidates for structure-based development of therapeutics against BoNT/A intoxication.

  7. Molecular simulations and Markov state modeling reveal the structural diversity and dynamics of a theophylline-binding RNA aptamer in its unbound state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becka M Warfield

    Full Text Available RNA aptamers are oligonucleotides that bind with high specificity and affinity to target ligands. In the absence of bound ligand, secondary structures of RNA aptamers are generally stable, but single-stranded and loop regions, including ligand binding sites, lack defined structures and exist as ensembles of conformations. For example, the well-characterized theophylline-binding aptamer forms a highly stable binding site when bound to theophylline, but the binding site is unstable and disordered when theophylline is absent. Experimental methods have not revealed at atomic resolution the conformations that the theophylline aptamer explores in its unbound state. Consequently, in the present study we applied 21 microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations to structurally characterize the ensemble of conformations that the aptamer adopts in the absence of theophylline. Moreover, we apply Markov state modeling to predict the kinetics of transitions between unbound conformational states. Our simulation results agree with experimental observations that the theophylline binding site is found in many distinct binding-incompetent states and show that these states lack a binding pocket that can accommodate theophylline. The binding-incompetent states interconvert with binding-competent states through structural rearrangement of the binding site on the nanosecond to microsecond timescale. Moreover, we have simulated the complete theophylline binding pathway. Our binding simulations supplement prior experimental observations of slow theophylline binding kinetics by showing that the binding site must undergo a large conformational rearrangement after the aptamer and theophylline form an initial complex, most notably, a major rearrangement of the C27 base from a buried to solvent-exposed orientation. Theophylline appears to bind by a combination of conformational selection and induced fit mechanisms. Finally, our modeling indicates that when Mg2+ ions are

  8. Structural studies on MtRecA-nucleotide complexes: insights into DNA and nucleotide binding and the structural signature of NTP recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S; Ganesh, N; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Muniyappa, K; Vijayan, M

    2003-02-15

    RecA protein plays a crucial role in homologous recombination and repair of DNA. Central to all activities of RecA is its binding to Mg(+2)-ATP. The active form of the protein is a helical nucleoprotein filament containing the nucleotide cofactor and single-stranded DNA. The stability and structure of the helical nucleoprotein filament formed by RecA are modulated by nucleotide cofactors. Here we report crystal structures of a MtRecA-ADP complex, complexes with ATPgammaS in the presence and absence of magnesium as well as a complex with dATP and Mg+2. Comparison with the recently solved crystal structures of the apo form as well as a complex with ADP-AlF4 confirms an expansion of the P-loop region in MtRecA, compared to its homologue in Escherichia coli, correlating with the reduced affinity of MtRecA for ATP. The ligand bound structures reveal subtle variations in nucleotide conformations among different nucleotides that serve in maintaining the network of interactions crucial for nucleotide binding. The nucleotide binding site itself, however, remains relatively unchanged. The analysis also reveals that ATPgammaS rather than ADP-AlF4 is structurally a better mimic of ATP. From among the complexed structures, a definition for the two DNA-binding loops L1 and L2 has clearly emerged for the first time and provides a basis to understand DNA binding by RecA. The structural information obtained from these complexes correlates well with the extensive biochemical data on mutants available in the literature, contributing to an understanding of the role of individual residues in the nucleotide binding pocket, at the molecular level. Modeling studies on the mutants again point to the relative rigidity of the nucleotide binding site. Comparison with other NTP binding proteins reveals many commonalties in modes of binding by diverse members in the structural family, contributing to our understanding of the structural signature of NTP recognition. Copyright 2003 Wiley

  9. From structure to spectra. Tight-binding theory of InGaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldmann, Elias

    2014-07-23

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots have raised considerable interest in the last decades due to a multitude of possible applications ranging from carrier storage to light emitters, lasers and future quantum communication devices. Quantum dots offer unique electronic and photonic properties due to the three-dimensional confinement of charge carriers and the coupling to a quasi-continuum of wetting layer and barrier states. In this work we investigate the electronic structure of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As quantum dots embedded in GaAs, considering realistic quantum dot geometries and Indium concentrations. We utilize a next-neighbour sp{sup 3}s{sup *} tight-binding model for the calculation of electronic single-particle energies and wave functions bound in the nanostructure and account for strain arising from lattice mismatch of the constituent materials atomistically. With the calculated single-particle wave functions we derive Coulomb matrix elements and include them into a configuration interaction treatment, yielding many-particle states and energies of the interacting many-carrier system. Also from the tight-binding single-particle wave functions we derive dipole transition strengths to obtain optical quantum dot emission and absorption spectra with Fermi's golden rule. Excitonic fine-structure splittings are obtained, which play an important role for future quantum cryptography and quantum communication devices for entanglement swapping or quantum repeating. For light emission suited for long-range quantum-crypted fiber communication InAs quantum dots are embedded in an In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As strain-reducing layer, shifting the emission wavelength into telecom low-absorption windows. We investigate the influence of the strain-reducing layer Indium concentration on the excitonic finestructure splitting. The fine-structure splitting is found to saturate and, in some cases, even reduce with strain-reducing layer Indium concentration, a result being

  10. From structure to spectra. Tight-binding theory of InGaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldmann, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots have raised considerable interest in the last decades due to a multitude of possible applications ranging from carrier storage to light emitters, lasers and future quantum communication devices. Quantum dots offer unique electronic and photonic properties due to the three-dimensional confinement of charge carriers and the coupling to a quasi-continuum of wetting layer and barrier states. In this work we investigate the electronic structure of In x Ga 1-x As quantum dots embedded in GaAs, considering realistic quantum dot geometries and Indium concentrations. We utilize a next-neighbour sp 3 s * tight-binding model for the calculation of electronic single-particle energies and wave functions bound in the nanostructure and account for strain arising from lattice mismatch of the constituent materials atomistically. With the calculated single-particle wave functions we derive Coulomb matrix elements and include them into a configuration interaction treatment, yielding many-particle states and energies of the interacting many-carrier system. Also from the tight-binding single-particle wave functions we derive dipole transition strengths to obtain optical quantum dot emission and absorption spectra with Fermi's golden rule. Excitonic fine-structure splittings are obtained, which play an important role for future quantum cryptography and quantum communication devices for entanglement swapping or quantum repeating. For light emission suited for long-range quantum-crypted fiber communication InAs quantum dots are embedded in an In x Ga 1-x As strain-reducing layer, shifting the emission wavelength into telecom low-absorption windows. We investigate the influence of the strain-reducing layer Indium concentration on the excitonic finestructure splitting. The fine-structure splitting is found to saturate and, in some cases, even reduce with strain-reducing layer Indium concentration, a result being counterintuitively. Our result

  11. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  12. Validation of metal-binding sites in macromolecular structures with the CheckMyMetal web server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D; Cooper, David R; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M; Minor, Wladek

    2014-01-01

    Metals have vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules in which metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal-binding environments. The CheckMyMetal (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal-binding sites in macromolecular structures using parameters derived from 7,350 metal-binding sites observed in a benchmark data set of 2,304 high-resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal-binding sites, as well as how it can alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal-binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the ANTICIPATED RESULTS section. CMM was designed for a broad audience--biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids--but it is equally well suited for structural biologists validating new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure with 2-5 metal sites and a few hundred amino acids.

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of Peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette Transporters Using Chimeric Dimers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W.; Lopez, Tatiana E.; Dias, Alexandre M. M.; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J.; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:25043761

  14. Structure-function analysis of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters using chimeric dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Charbonnier, Soëli; Van Roermund, Carlo W; Lopez, Tatiana E; Dias, Alexandre M M; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Arnould, Christine; Wanders, Ronald J; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2014-08-29

    ABCD1 and ABCD2 are two closely related ATP-binding cassette half-transporters predicted to homodimerize and form peroxisomal importers for fatty acyl-CoAs. Available evidence has shown that ABCD1 and ABCD2 display a distinct but overlapping substrate specificity, although much remains to be learned in this respect as well as in their capability to form functional heterodimers. Using a cell model expressing an ABCD2-EGFP fusion protein, we first demonstrated by proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay that ABCD1 interacts with ABCD2. Next, we tested in the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant the functionality of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers by expressing chimeric proteins mimicking homo- or heterodimers. For further structure-function analysis of ABCD1/ABCD2 dimers, we expressed chimeric dimers fused to enhanced GFP in human skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients. These cells are devoid of ABCD1 and accumulate very long-chain fatty acids (C26:0 and C26:1). We checked that the chimeric proteins were correctly expressed and targeted to the peroxisomes. Very long-chain fatty acid levels were partially restored in transfected X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts regardless of the chimeric construct used, thus demonstrating functionality of both homo- and heterodimers. Interestingly, the level of C24:6 n-3, the immediate precursor of docosahexaenoic acid, was decreased in cells expressing chimeric proteins containing at least one ABCD2 moiety. Our data demonstrate for the first time that both homo- and heterodimers of ABCD1 and ABCD2 are functionally active. Interestingly, the role of ABCD2 (in homo- and heterodimeric forms) in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids is clearly evidenced, and the chimeric dimers provide a novel tool to study substrate specificity of peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporters. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A₃ Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancetta, Antonella; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2017-03-11

    Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes, termed A₁, A 2A , A 2B and A₃, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The human A₃AR (hA₃AR) subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA₃AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of newly emerged A₃AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A₃AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates.

  16. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A3 Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancetta, Antonella; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes, termed A1, A2A, A2B and A3, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The human A3AR (hA3AR) subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA3AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of newly emerged A3AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A3AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates. PMID:28287473

  17. Consideration of relativistic effects in band structure calculations based on the empirical tight-binding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanke, M.; Hennig, D.; Kaschte, A.; Koeppen, M.

    1988-01-01

    The energy band structure of cadmium telluride and mercury telluride materials is investigated by means of the tight-binding (TB) method considering relativistic effects and the spin-orbit interaction. Taking into account relativistic effects in the method is rather simple though the size of the Hamilton matrix doubles. Such considerations are necessary for the interesting small-interstice semiconductors, and the experimental results are reflected correctly in the band structures. The transformation behaviour of the eigenvectors within the Brillouin zone gets more complicated, but is, nevertheless, theoretically controllable. If, however, the matrix elements of the Green operator are to be calculated, one has to use formula manipulation programmes in particular for non-diagonal elements. For defect calculations by the Koster-Slater theory of scattering it is necessary to know these matrix elements. Knowledge of the transformation behaviour of eigenfunctions saves frequent diagonalization of the Hamilton matrix and thus permits a numerical solution of the problem. Corresponding results for the sp 3 basis are available

  18. Crystal structure and ligand binding properties of the truncated hemoglobin from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Andrea; Kjelgaard, Peter; von Wachenfeldt, Claes; Catacchio, Bruno; Chiancone, Emilia; Boffi, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    A novel truncated hemoglobin has been identified in the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus (Gs-trHb). The protein has been expressed in Escherichia coli, the 3D crystal structure (at 1.5 Angstroms resolution) and the ligand binding properties have been determined. The distal heme pocket displays an array of hydrogen bonding donors to the iron-bound ligands, including Tyr-B10 on one side of the heme pocket and Trp-G8 indole nitrogen on the opposite side. At variance with the highly similar Bacillus subtilis hemoglobin, Gs-trHb is dimeric both in the crystal and in solution and displays several unique structural properties. In the crystal cell, the iron-bound ligand is not homogeneously distributed within each distal site such that oxygen and an acetate anion can be resolved with relative occupancies of 50% each. Accordingly, equilibrium titrations of the oxygenated derivative in solution with acetate anion yield a partially saturated ferric acetate adduct. Moreover, the asymmetric unit contains two subunits and sedimentation velocity ultracentrifugation data confirm that the protein is dimeric.

  19. STRUCTURAL INSIGHTS INTO SUBSTRATE BINDING AND STEREOSELECTIVITY OF GIARDIA FRUCTOSE-1,6-BISPHOSPHATE ALDOLASE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, Andrey; Li, Zhimin; Li, Ling; Kulakova, Liudmila; Pal, Lipika R.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2009-01-01

    Giardia lamblia fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBPA)1 is a member of the Class II zinc-dependent aldolase family that catalyzes the cleavage of D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) into dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P). In addition to the active site zinc, the catalytic apparatus of FBPA employs an aspartic acid, Asp83 in the G. lamblia enzyme, which when replaced by an alanine residue renders the enzyme inactive. A comparison of the crystal structures of the D83A FBPA in complex with FBP and of the wild-type FBPA in the unbound state revealed a substrate induced conformational transition of loops in the vicinity of the active site and a shift in the location of Zn2+. Upon FBP binding, the Zn2+ shifts up to 4.6 Å towards the catalytic Asp83, which brings the metal within coordination distance to the Asp83 carboxylate group. In addition, the structure of wild-type FBPA was determined in complex with the competitive inhibitor D-tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate (TBP), a FBP stereoisomer. In this structure, the zinc binds in a site close to that previously seen in the structure of FBPA in complex with phosphoglycolohydroxamate, an analog of the postulated DHAP ene-diolate intermediate. Together, the ensemble of structures suggests that the zinc mobility is necessary to orient the Asp83 side chain and to polarize the substrate for proton transfer from the FBP C(4) hydroxyl group to the Asp83 carboxyl group. In the absence of FBP, the alternative zinc position is too remote for coordinating the Asp83. We propose a modification of the catalytic mechanism that incorporates the novel features observed in the FBPA/FBP structure. The mechanism invokes coordination and co-planarity of the Zn2+ with the FBP’s O-C(3)-C(4)-O concomitant with coordination of Asp83 carboxylic group. Catalysis is accompanied by movement of Zn2+ to a site co-planar with the O-C(2)-C(3)-O of the DHAP. glFBPA exhibit strict substrate specificity towards FBP and

  20. Structural investigation of ribonuclease A conformational preferences using high pressure protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurpiewska, Katarzyna, E-mail: kurpiews@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Crystal Chemistry and Crystal Physics, Protein Crystallography Group, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland); Dziubek, Kamil; Katrusiak, Andrzej [Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Umultowska 89b, 61-61 Poznań (Poland); Font, Josep [School of Medical Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ribò, Marc; Vilanova, Maria [Universitat de Girona, Laboratorid’Enginyeria de Proteïnes, Departament de Biologia, Facultat de Ciències, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Lewiński, Krzysztof [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Crystal Chemistry and Crystal Physics, Protein Crystallography Group, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • A unique crystallographic studies of wild-type and mutated form of the same protein under high pressure. • Compressibility of RNase A molecule is significantly affected by a single amino acid substitution. • High pressure protein crystallography helps understanding protein flexibility and identify conformational substrates. - Abstract: Hydrostatic pressure in range 0.1–1.5 GPa is used to modify biological system behaviour mostly in biophysical studies of proteins in solution. Due to specific influence on the system equilibrium high pressure can act as a filter that enables to identify and investigate higher energy protein conformers. The idea of the presented experiments is to examine the behaviour of RNase A molecule under high pressure before and after introduction of destabilizing mutation. For the first time crystal structures of wild-type bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and its markedly less stable variant modified at position Ile106 were determined at different pressures. X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure showed that the secondary structure of RNase A is well preserved even beyond 0.67 GPa at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis of ribonuclease A conformation observed under high pressure revealed that pressure influences hydrogen bonds pattern, cavity size and packing of molecule.

  1. Insights into RNA binding by the anticancer drug cisplatin from the crystal structure of cisplatin-modified ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Sergey V.; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cisplatin is a widely prescribed anticancer drug, which triggers cell death by covalent binding to a broad range of biological molecules. Among cisplatin targets, cellular RNAs remain the most poorly characterized molecules. Although cisplatin was shown to inactivate essential RNAs, including ribosomal, spliceosomal and telomeric RNAs, cisplatin binding sites in most RNA molecules are unknown, and therefore it remains challenging to study how modifications of RNA by cisplatin contributes to its toxicity. Here we report a 2.6Å-resolution X-ray structure of cisplatin-modified 70S ribosome, which describes cisplatin binding to the ribosome and provides the first nearly atomic model of cisplatin–RNA complex. We observe nine cisplatin molecules bound to the ribosome and reveal consensus structural features of the cisplatin-binding sites. Two of the cisplatin molecules modify conserved functional centers of the ribosome—the mRNA-channel and the GTPase center. In the mRNA-channel, cisplatin intercalates between the ribosome and the messenger RNA, suggesting that the observed inhibition of protein synthesis by cisplatin is caused by impaired mRNA-translocation. Our structure provides an insight into RNA targeting and inhibition by cisplatin, which can help predict cisplatin-binding sites in other cellular RNAs and design studies to elucidate a link between RNA modifications by cisplatin and cisplatin toxicity. PMID:27079977

  2. Structural basis of activation-dependent binding of ligand-mimetic antibody AL-57 to integrin LFA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Yang, Wei; Springer, Timothy; Shimaoka, Motomu; Wang, Jia-huai; (CH-Boston); (DFCI)

    2010-09-21

    The activity of integrin LFA-1 ({alpha}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2}) to its ligand ICAM-1 is regulated through the conformational changes of its ligand-binding domain, the I domain of {alpha}{sub L} chain, from an inactive, low-affinity closed form (LA), to an intermediate-affinity form (IA), and then finally, to a high-affinity open form (HA). A ligand-mimetic human monoclonal antibody AL-57 (activated LFA-1 clone 57) was identified by phage display to specifically recognize the affinity-upregulated I domain. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the Fab fragment of AL-57 in complex with IA, as well as in its unligated form. We discuss the structural features conferring AL-57's strong selectivity for the high affinity, open conformation of the I domain. The AL-57-binding site overlaps the ICAM-1 binding site on the I domain. Furthermore, an antibody Asp mimics an ICAM Glu by forming a coordination to the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). The structure also reveals better shape complementarity and a more hydrophobic interacting interface in AL-57 binding than in ICAM-1 binding. The results explain AL-57's antagonistic mimicry of LFA-1's natural ligands, the ICAM molecules.

  3. Crystal structure of the gamma-2 herpesvirus LANA DNA binding domain identifies charged surface residues which impact viral latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Correia

    Full Text Available Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA mediates γ2-herpesvirus genome persistence and regulates transcription. We describe the crystal structure of the murine gammaherpesvirus-68 LANA C-terminal domain at 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals an alpha-beta fold that assembles as a dimer, reminiscent of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1. A predicted DNA binding surface is present and opposite this interface is a positive electrostatic patch. Targeted DNA recognition substitutions eliminated DNA binding, while certain charged patch mutations reduced bromodomain protein, BRD4, binding. Virus containing LANA abolished for DNA binding was incapable of viable latent infection in mice. Virus with mutations at the charged patch periphery exhibited substantial deficiency in expansion of latent infection, while central region substitutions had little effect. This deficiency was independent of BRD4. These results elucidate the LANA DNA binding domain structure and reveal a unique charged region that exerts a critical role in viral latent infection, likely acting through a host cell protein(s.

  4. Predicted 3D structures of olfactory receptors with details of odorant binding to OR1G1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Goddard, William A.

    2014-12-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are responsible for mediating the sense of smell; they allow humans to recognize an enormous number of odors but the connection between binding and perception is not known. We predict the ensemble of low energy structures for the human OR1G1 (hOR1G1) and also for six other diverse ORs, using the G protein-coupled receptor Ensemble of Structures in Membrane BiLayer Environment complete sampling method that samples 13 trillion different rotations and tilts using four different templates to predict the 24 structures likely to be important in binding and activation. Our predicted most stable structures of hOR1G1 have a salt-bridge between the conserved D3.49 and K6.30 in the D(E)RY region, that we expect to be associated with an inactive form. The hOR1G1 structure also has specific interaction in transmembrane domains (TMD) 3-6 (E3.39 and H6.40), which is likely an important conformational feature for all hORs because of the 94 to 98 % conservation among all hOR sequences. Of the five ligands studied (nonanal, 9-decen-1-ol, 1-nonanol, camphor, and n-butanal), we find that the 4 expected to bind lead to similar binding energies with nonanol the strongest.

  5. Solution structure and molecular determinants of hemoglobin binding of the first NEAT domain of IsdB in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonner, Brittany A; Tripet, Brian P; Eilers, Brian J; Stanisich, Jessica; Sullivan-Springhetti, Rose K; Moore, Rebecca; Liu, Mengyao; Lei, Benfang; Copié, Valérie

    2014-06-24

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus acquires heme iron from hemoglobin (Hb) via the action of a series of iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins. The cell wall anchored IsdB protein is recognized as the predominant Hb receptor, and is comprised of two NEAr transporter (NEAT) domains that act in concert to bind, extract, and transfer heme from Hb to downstream Isd proteins. Structural details of the NEAT 2 domain of IsdB have been investigated, but the molecular coordination between NEAT 2 and NEAT 1 to extract heme from hemoglobin has yet to be characterized. To obtain a more complete understanding of IsdB structure and function, we have solved the 3D solution structure of the NEAT 1 domain of IsdB (IsdB(N1)) spanning residues 125-272 of the full-length protein by NMR. The structure reveals a canonical NEAT domain fold and has particular structural similarity to the NEAT 1 and NEAT 2 domains of IsdH, which also interact with Hb. IsdB(N1) is also comprised of a short N-terminal helix, which has not been previously observed in other NEAT domain structures. Interestingly, the Hb binding region (loop 2 of IsdB(N1)) is disordered in solution. Analysis of Hb binding demonstrates that IsdB(N1) can bind metHb weakly and the affinity of this interaction is further increased by the presence of IsdB linker domain. IsdB(N1) loop 2 variants reveal that phenylalanine 164 (F164) of IsdB is necessary for Hb binding and rapid heme transfer from metHb to IsdB. Together, these findings provide a structural role for IsdB(N1) in enhancing the rate of extraction of metHb heme by the IsdB NEAT 2 domain.

  6. Structural analysis of dihydrofolate reductases enables rationalization of antifolate binding affinities and suggests repurposing possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosle, Amrisha; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2016-03-01

    Antifolates are competitive inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a conserved enzyme that is central to metabolism and widely targeted in pathogenic diseases, cancer and autoimmune disorders. Although most clinically used antifolates are known to be target specific, some display a fair degree of cross-reactivity with DHFRs from other species. A method that enables identification of determinants of affinity and specificity in target DHFRs from different species and provides guidelines for the design of antifolates is currently lacking. To address this, we first captured the potential druggable space of a DHFR in a substructure called the 'supersite' and classified supersites of DHFRs from 56 species into 16 'site-types' based on pairwise structural similarity. Analysis of supersites across these site-types revealed that DHFRs exhibit varying extents of dissimilarity at structurally equivalent positions in and around the binding site. We were able to explain the pattern of affinities towards chemically diverse antifolates exhibited by DHFRs of different site-types based on these structural differences. We then generated an antifolate-DHFR network by mapping known high-affinity antifolates to their respective supersites and used this to identify antifolates that can be repurposed based on similarity between supersites or antifolates. Thus, we identified 177 human-specific and 458 pathogen-specific antifolates, a large number of which are supported by available experimental data. Thus, in the light of the clinical importance of DHFR, we present a novel approach to identifying differences in the druggable space of DHFRs that can be utilized for rational design of antifolates. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Fungal endophytes of aquatic macrophytes: diverse host-generalists characterized by tissue preferences and geographic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Dustin C; Battista, Lorna J; Arnold, A Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    Most studies of endophytic symbionts have focused on terrestrial plants, neglecting the ecologically and economically important plants present in aquatic ecosystems. We evaluated the diversity, composition, host and tissue affiliations, and geographic structure of fungal endophytes associated with common aquatic plants in lentic waters in northern Arizona, USA. Endophytes were isolated in culture from roots and photosynthetic tissues during two growing seasons. A total of 226 isolates representing 60 putative species was recovered from 9,600 plant tissue segments. Although isolation frequency was low, endophytes were phylogenetically diverse and species-rich. Comparisons among the most thoroughly sampled species and reservoirs revealed that isolation frequency and diversity did not differ significantly between collection periods, among species, among reservoirs, or as a function of depth. However, community structure differed significantly among reservoirs and tissue types. Phylogenetic analyses of a focal genus (Penicillium) corroborated estimates of species boundaries and informed community analyses, highlighting clade- and genotype-level affiliations of aquatic endophytes with both sediment- and waterborne fungi, and endophytes of proximate terrestrial plants. Together these analyses provide a first quantitative examination of endophytic associations in roots and foliage of aquatic plants and can be used to optimize survey strategies for efficiently capturing fungal biodiversity at local and regional scales.

  8. EasyMIFS and SiteHound: a toolkit for the identification of ligand-binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghersi, Dario; Sanchez, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    SiteHound uses Molecular Interaction Fields (MIFs) produced by EasyMIFs to identify protein structure regions that show a high propensity for interaction with ligands. The type of binding site identified depends on the probe atom used in the MIF calculation. The input to EasyMIFs is a PDB file of a protein structure; the output MIF serves as input to SiteHound, which in turn produces a list of putative binding sites. Extensive testing of SiteHound for the detection of binding sites for drug-like molecules and phosphorylated ligands has been carried out. EasyMIFs and SiteHound executables for Linux, Mac OS X, and MS Windows operating systems are freely available for download from http://sitehound.sanchezlab.org/download.html. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Crystal structure of tetranectin, a trimeric plasminogen-binding protein with an alpha-helical coiled coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B B; Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H

    1997-01-01

    Tetranectin is a plasminogen kringle 4-binding protein. The crystal structure has been determined at 2.8 A resolution using molecular replacement. Human tetranectin is a homotrimer forming a triple alpha-helical coiled coil. Each monomer consists of a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) connected...... the third is present only in long-form CRDs. Tetranectin represents the first structure of a long-form CRD with intact calcium-binding sites. In tetranectin, the third disulfide bridge tethers the CRD to the long helix in the coiled coil. The trimerization of tetranectin as well as the fixation of the CRDs...... relative to the helices in the coiled coil indicate a demand for high specificity in the recognition and binding of ligands....

  10. Critical role of γ-phosphate in structural transition of Na,K-ATPase upon ATP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Klimanova, Elizaveta A.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2014-06-01

    Active transport of sodium and potassium ions by Na,K-ATPase is accompanied by the enzyme conformational transition between E1 and E2 states. ATP and ADP bind to Na,K-ATPase in the E1 conformation with similar affinity but the properties of enzyme in complexes with these nucleotides are different. We have studied thermodynamics of Na,K-ATPase binding with adenine nucleotides at different temperatures using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our data indicate that β-phosphate is involved in complex formation by increasing the affinity of adenine nucleotides to Na,K-ATPase by an order of magnitude, while γ-phosphate does not affect it. ATP binding to Na,K-ATPase in contrast to ADP binding generates a structural transition in the enzyme, which is consistent with the movement of a significant portion of the surface area to a solvent-protected state. We propose that ATP binding leads to convergence of the nucleotide-binding and phosphorylation domains transferring the enzyme from the ``E1-open'' to ``E1-closed'' conformation ready for phosphorylation.

  11. A switch of G protein-coupled receptor binding preference from phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-p85 to filamin A negatively controls the PI3K pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Souad; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Estève, Jean-Pierre; Schulz, Stefan; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Fourmy, Daniel; Lättig, Jens; Mollereau, Catherine; Pyronnet, Stéphane; Susini, Christiane; Bousquet, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    Frequent oncogenic alterations occur in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, urging identification of novel negative controls. We previously reported an original mechanism for restraining PI3K activity, controlled by the somatostatin G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) sst2 and involving a ligand-regulated interaction between sst2 with the PI3K regulatory p85 subunit. We here identify the scaffolding protein filamin A (FLNA) as a critical player regulating the dynamic of this complex. A preexisting sst2-p85 complex, which was shown to account for a significant basal PI3K activity in the absence of ligand, is disrupted upon sst2 activation. FLNA was here identified as a competitor of p85 for direct binding to two juxtaposed sites on sst2. Switching of GPCR binding preference from p85 toward FLNA is determined by changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation of p85- and FLNA-binding sites on sst2 upon activation. It results in the disruption of the sst2-p85 complex and the subsequent inhibition of PI3K. Knocking down FLNA expression, or abrogating FLNA recruitment to sst2, reversed the inhibition of PI3K and of tumor growth induced by sst2. Importantly, we report that this FLNA inhibitory control on PI3K can be generalized to another GPCR, the mu opioid receptor, thereby providing an unprecedented mechanism underlying GPCR-negative control on PI3K.

  12. PROCARB: A Database of Known and Modelled Carbohydrate-Binding Protein Structures with Sequence-Based Prediction Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Malik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the three-dimensional structures of proteins that interact with carbohydrates covalently (glycoproteins as well as noncovalently (protein-carbohydrate complexes is essential to many biological processes and plays a significant role in normal and disease-associated functions. It is important to have a central repository of knowledge available about these protein-carbohydrate complexes as well as preprocessed data of predicted structures. This can be significantly enhanced by tools de novo which can predict carbohydrate-binding sites for proteins in the absence of structure of experimentally known binding site. PROCARB is an open-access database comprising three independently working components, namely, (i Core PROCARB module, consisting of three-dimensional structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes taken from Protein Data Bank (PDB, (ii Homology Models module, consisting of manually developed three-dimensional models of N-linked and O-linked glycoproteins of unknown three-dimensional structure, and (iii CBS-Pred prediction module, consisting of web servers to predict carbohydrate-binding sites using single sequence or server-generated PSSM. Several precomputed structural and functional properties of complexes are also included in the database for quick analysis. In particular, information about function, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, hydrogen bonds and literature reference, and so forth, is included. In addition, each protein in the database is mapped to Uniprot, Pfam, PDB, and so forth.

  13. Binding Constant of Amines to Water/AOT/n-Hexene Reverse Micelles. Influence of the Chemical Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Silber

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of different amines between n-hexane bulk and the micellar pseudophase of AOT reverse micelles were measured by a fluorometric method. An independent method was used to corroborate the incorporation of the amines to the interface. The effect of the amine structure on the binding constant was analysed.

  14. Ionic core–shell dendrimers with a polycationic core: structural aspects and host–guest binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Coevering, R.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The structural aspects and host–guest binding properties of ionic core–shell dendrimers [1]Br8 and [2]Br4, which bear a polycationic core and a neutral shell of Fréchet-type poly(benzyl aryl ether) dendrons, have been investigated by means of dendritic wedges [3]Br2 and [4]Br, that resemble one of

  15. Structure, Receptor Binding, and Antigenicity of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins from the 1957 H2N2 Pandemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C.; Basler, Christopher F.; Wilson, Ian A. (Sinai); (Scripps)

    2010-03-04

    The hemagglutinin (HA) envelope protein of influenza viruses mediates essential viral functions, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, and is the major viral antigen for antibody neutralization. The 1957 H2N2 subtype (Asian flu) was one of the three great influenza pandemics of the last century and caused 1 million deaths globally from 1957 to 1968. Three crystal structures of 1957 H2 HAs have been determined at 1.60 to 1.75 {angstrom} resolutions to investigate the structural basis for their antigenicity and evolution from avian to human binding specificity that contributed to its introduction into the human population. These structures, which represent the highest resolutions yet recorded for a complete ectodomain of a glycosylated viral surface antigen, along with the results of glycan microarray binding analysis, suggest that a hydrophobicity switch at residue 226 and elongation of receptor-binding sites were both critical for avian H2 HA to acquire human receptor specificity. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in birds and pigs and, therefore, remain a substantial threat for transmission to humans. The H2 HA structure also reveals a highly conserved epitope that could be harnessed in the design of a broader and more universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  16. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  18. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D. O.; Newman, Joseph A.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K.; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40–200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors. PMID:25866208

  19. Structure of Calmodulin Bound to a Calcineurin Peptide: A New Way of Making an Old Binding Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Q.; Li, X.; Wong, A.; Wei, Q.; Jia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Calcineurin is a calmodulin-binding protein in brain and the only serine/threonine protein phosphatase under the control of Ca 2+ /calmodulin (CaM), which plays a critical role in coupling Ca 2+ signals to cellular responses. CaM up-regulates the phosphatase activity of calcineurin by binding to the CaM-binding domain (CBD) of calcineurin subunit A. Here, we report crystal structural studies of CaM bound to a CBD peptide. The chimeric protein containing CaM and the CBD peptide forms an intimate homodimer, in which CaM displays a native-like extended conformation and the CBD peptide shows -helical structure. Unexpectedly, the N-terminal lobe from one CaM and the C-terminal lobe from the second molecule form a combined binding site to trap the peptide. Thus, the dimer provides two binding sites, each of which is reminiscent of the fully collapsed conformation of CaM commonly observed in complex with, for example, the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) peptide. The interaction between the peptide and CaM is highly specific and similar to MLCK

  20. Consumers’ Preferences for Electronic Nicotine Delivery System Product Features: A Structured Content Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E. Kistler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To inform potential governmental regulations, we aimed to develop a list of electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS product features important to U.S. consumers by age and gender. We employed qualitative data methods. Participants were eligible if they had used an ENDS at least once. Groups were selected by age and gender (young adult group aged 18–25, n = 11; middle-age group aged 26–64, n = 9; and women’s group aged 26–64, n = 9. We conducted five individual older adult interviews (aged 68–80. Participants discussed important ENDS features. We conducted a structured content analysis of the group and interview responses. Of 34 participants, 68% were white and 56% were female. Participants mentioned 12 important ENDS features, including: (1 user experience; (2 social acceptability; (3 cost; (4 health risks/benefits; (5 ease of use; (6 flavors; (7 smoking cessation aid; (8 nicotine content; (9 modifiability; (10 ENDS regulation; (11 bridge between tobacco cigarettes; (12 collectability. The most frequently mentioned ENDS feature was modifiability for young adults, user experience for middle-age and older adults, and flavor for the women’s group. This study identified multiple features important to ENDS consumers. Groups differed in how they viewed various features by age and gender. These results can inform ongoing regulatory efforts.

  1. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A3 Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Ciancetta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR subtypes, termed A1, A2A, A2B and A3, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily. The human A3AR (hA3AR subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA3AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure–activity relationships (SARs of newly emerged A3AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A3AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates.

  2. Synthesis, structural characterization, cytotoxic properties and DNA binding of a dinuclear copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, B J M Leite; Brandão, P; Meireles, M; Martel, Fátima; Correia-Branco, Ana; Fernandes, Diana M; Santos, T M; Félix, V

    2016-08-01

    In this study a novel dinuclear copper(II) complex with adenine and phenanthroline has been synthesized and its structure determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the dinuclear complex [Cu₂(μ-adenine)₂(phen)₂(H2O)2](NO3)4·0.5H2O (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) (1) the two Cu(II) centres exhibit a distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry linked by two nitrogen donors from adenine bridges leading to a Cu-Cu distance of 3.242(3)Å. Intramolecular and intermolecular π⋯π interactions as well as an H-bonding network were observed. The antitumor capacity of the complex has been tested in vitro against human cancer cell lines, cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2), by metabolic tests, using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide as reagent. The complex 1 has remarkable low IC50 values of 0.87±0.06μM (HeLa) and 0.44±0.06μM (Caco-2), when compared with values for cisplatin against the same cell lines. The interaction of complex 1 with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was further investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. A binding constant of 5.09×10(5)M(-1) was obtained from UV-vis absorption studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Atomic and electronic structures of a-SiC:H from tight-binding molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivashchenko, V I; Shevchenko, V I; Ivashchenko, L A; Rusakov, G V

    2003-01-01

    The atomic and electronic properties of amorphous unhydrogenated (a-SiC) and hydrogenated (a-SiC:H) silicon carbides are studied using an sp sup 3 s sup * tight-binding force model with molecular dynamics simulations. The parameters of a repulsive pairwise potential are determined from ab initio pseudopotential calculations. Both carbides are generated from dilute vapours condensed from high temperature, with post-annealing at low temperature for a-SiC:H. A plausible model for the inter-atomic correlations and electronic states in a-SiC:H is suggested. According to this model, the formation of the amorphous network is weakly sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. Hydrogen passivates effectively only the weak bonds of threefold-coordinated atoms. Chemical ordering is very much affected by the cooling rate and the structure of the high-temperature vapour. The as-computed characteristics are in rather good agreement with the results for a-SiC and a-Si:H from ab initio calculations.

  4. Cardiac myosin binding protein-C plays no regulatory role in skeletal muscle structure and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Lin

    Full Text Available Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C exists in three major isoforms: slow skeletal, fast skeletal, and cardiac. While cardiac MyBP-C (cMyBP-C expression is restricted to the heart in the adult, it is transiently expressed in neonatal stages of some skeletal muscles. However, it is unclear whether this expression is necessary for the proper development and function of skeletal muscle. Our aim was to determine whether the absence of cMyBP-C alters the structure, function, or MyBP-C isoform expression in adult skeletal muscle using a cMyBP-C null mouse model (cMyBP-C((t/t. Slow MyBP-C was expressed in both slow and fast skeletal muscles, whereas fast MyBP-C was mostly restricted to fast skeletal muscles. Expression of these isoforms was unaffected in skeletal muscle from cMyBP-C((t/t mice. Slow and fast skeletal muscles in cMyBP-C((t/t mice showed no histological or ultrastructural changes in comparison to the wild-type control. In addition, slow muscle twitch, tetanus tension, and susceptibility to injury were all similar to the wild-type controls. Interestingly, fMyBP-C expression was significantly increased in the cMyBP-C((t/t hearts undergoing severe dilated cardiomyopathy, though this does not seem to prevent dysfunction. Additionally, expression of both slow and fast isoforms was increased in myopathic skeletal muscles. Our data demonstrate that i MyBP-C isoforms are differentially regulated in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, ii cMyBP-C is dispensable for the development of skeletal muscle with no functional or structural consequences in the adult myocyte, and iii skeletal isoforms can transcomplement in the heart in the absence of cMyBP-C.

  5. Vitamin D, vitamin D binding protein, lung function and structure in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Isaac; Hanson, Corrine; Sayles, Harlan

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) have been associated with COPD and FEV1. There are limited data regarding emphysema and vitamin D and DBP.......Vitamin D and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) have been associated with COPD and FEV1. There are limited data regarding emphysema and vitamin D and DBP....

  6. Complementary three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of binding affinity and functional potency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Ahring, Philip K; Dyhring, Tino

    2009-01-01

    Complementary 3D-QSAR modeling of binding affinity and functional potency is proposed as a tool to pinpoint the molecular features of the ligands, and the corresponding amino acids in the receptor, responsible for high affinity binding vs those driving agonist behavior and receptor activation...

  7. Structural insights into the binding mode and conformational changes of BSA induced by bixin and crocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Sankari; Hemachandran, Hridya; Sneha, P; George Priya Doss, C; Godwin Christopher, J; Jayaraman, Gurunathan; Ramamoorthy, Siva

    2017-06-30

    Bixin and crocin are natural apocarotenoids utilized as food colorants and additives in food industries worldwide. For safety assessment, it is necessary to understand the biological interaction of food colorants. In our present study, we report the interaction of two apocarotenoids with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at physiological pH using spectroscopic techniques and in silico tools. The binding constant and the mode of binding sites have been studied. The enthalpic and entropic contribution to the intermolecular binding event was analyzed and it was found that the contribution of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions was dominant. The adverse temperature dependence in the unusual static quenching is found to be a reasonable consequence of the large activation energy requirement in the binding process, which is required to overcome the fundamental block and is a direct result of the unique microstructure of the binding sites. To confirm the experimental analysis, we investigated the binding patterns using different in silico tools. A combination of molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and toxicity analysis was performed, and the obtained results revealed that both the apocarotenoids had high binding affinity with a binding energy of -5.44 and -5.93 kcal/mol for bixin and crocin, respectively, with no toxic effects and are in accordance with our experimental analysis. The results directly revealed the flexibility of the protein toward bixin and crocin which has a great impact on the interaction. Thus bixin and crocin can guardedly be used as food colorants in food industries.

  8. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  9. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  10. Structural basis for high substrate-binding affinity and enantioselectivity of 3-quinuclidinone reductase AtQR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Feng; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Michihiko; Takeshita, Daijiro; Kumashiro, Shoko; Uzura, Atsuko; Urano, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Koji; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of AtQR has been determined at 1.72 Å. • NADH binding induces the formation of substrate binding site. • AtQR possesses a conserved hydrophobic wall for stereospecific binding of substrate. • Additional Glu197 residue is critical to the high binding affinity. - Abstract: (R)-3-Quinuclidinol, a useful compound for the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, can be enantioselectively produced from 3-quinuclidinone by 3-quinuclidinone reductase. Recently, a novel NADH-dependent 3-quinuclidionone reductase (AtQR) was isolated from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and showed much higher substrate-binding affinity (>100 fold) than the reported 3-quinuclidionone reductase (RrQR) from Rhodotorula rubra. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtQR at 1.72 Å. Three NADH-bound protomers and one NADH-free protomer form a tetrameric structure in an asymmetric unit of crystals. NADH not only acts as a proton donor, but also contributes to the stability of the α7 helix. This helix is a unique and functionally significant part of AtQR and is related to form a deep catalytic cavity. AtQR has all three catalytic residues of the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family and the hydrophobic wall for the enantioselective reduction of 3-quinuclidinone as well as RrQR. An additional residue on the α7 helix, Glu197, exists near the active site of AtQR. This acidic residue is considered to form a direct interaction with the amine part of 3-quinuclidinone, which contributes to substrate orientation and enhancement of substrate-binding affinity. Mutational analyses also support that Glu197 is an indispensable residue for the activity

  11. Structural basis for high substrate-binding affinity and enantioselectivity of 3-quinuclidinone reductase AtQR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Feng; Miyakawa, Takuya [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kataoka, Michihiko [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 559-8531 (Japan); Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takeshita, Daijiro [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kumashiro, Shoko [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Uzura, Atsuko [Research and Development Center, Nagase and Co., Ltd., 2-2-3 Muratani, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2241 (Japan); Urano, Nobuyuki [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 559-8531 (Japan); Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagata, Koji [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Shimizu, Sakayu [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Faculty of Bioenvironmental Science, Kyoto Gakuen University, Sogabe-cho, Kameoka 621-8555 (Japan); Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of AtQR has been determined at 1.72 Å. • NADH binding induces the formation of substrate binding site. • AtQR possesses a conserved hydrophobic wall for stereospecific binding of substrate. • Additional Glu197 residue is critical to the high binding affinity. - Abstract: (R)-3-Quinuclidinol, a useful compound for the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, can be enantioselectively produced from 3-quinuclidinone by 3-quinuclidinone reductase. Recently, a novel NADH-dependent 3-quinuclidionone reductase (AtQR) was isolated from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and showed much higher substrate-binding affinity (>100 fold) than the reported 3-quinuclidionone reductase (RrQR) from Rhodotorula rubra. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtQR at 1.72 Å. Three NADH-bound protomers and one NADH-free protomer form a tetrameric structure in an asymmetric unit of crystals. NADH not only acts as a proton donor, but also contributes to the stability of the α7 helix. This helix is a unique and functionally significant part of AtQR and is related to form a deep catalytic cavity. AtQR has all three catalytic residues of the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family and the hydrophobic wall for the enantioselective reduction of 3-quinuclidinone as well as RrQR. An additional residue on the α7 helix, Glu197, exists near the active site of AtQR. This acidic residue is considered to form a direct interaction with the amine part of 3-quinuclidinone, which contributes to substrate orientation and enhancement of substrate-binding affinity. Mutational analyses also support that Glu197 is an indispensable residue for the activity.

  12. Ligand-induced structural changes in TEM-1 probed by molecular dynamics and relative binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, A C; Martins, J M; Fernandes, R; Moreira, I S

    2013-10-28

    The TEM family of enzymes has had a crucial impact on the pharmaceutical industry due to their important role in antibiotic resistance. Even with the latest technologies in structural biology and genomics, no 3D structure of a TEM-1/antibiotic complex is known previous to acylation. Therefore, the comprehension of their capability in acylate antibiotics is based on the protein macromolecular structure uncomplexed. In this work, molecular docking, molecular dynamic simulations, and relative free energy calculations were applied in order to get a comprehensive and thorough analysis of TEM-1/ampicillin and TEM-1/amoxicillin complexes. We described the complexes and analyzed the effect of ligand binding on the overall structure. We clearly demonstrate that the key residues involved in the stability of the ligand (hot-spots) vary with the nature of the ligand. Structural effects such as (i) the distances between interfacial residues (Ser70-Oγ and Lys73-Nζ, Lys73-Nζ and Ser130-Oγ, and Ser70-Oγ-Ser130-Oγ), (ii) side chain rotamer variation (Tyr105 and Glu240), and (iii) the presence of conserved waters can be also influenced by ligand binding. This study supports the hypothesis that TEM-1 suffers structural modifications upon ligand binding.

  13. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug-binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Handing, Katarzyna B.; Shabalin, Ivan G.; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A.; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1 ?. Cetirizine is bound in two sites ? a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizi...

  14. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  15. NMR insight into myosin-binding subunit coiled-coil structure reveals binding interface with protein kinase G-Iα leucine zipper in vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok K; Birrane, Gabriel; Anklin, Clemens; Rigby, Alan C; Alper, Seth L

    2017-04-28

    Nitrovasodilators relax vascular smooth-muscle cells in part by modulating the interaction of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (CC) and/or the leucine zipper (LZ) domain of the myosin light-chain phosphatase component, myosin-binding subunit (MBS), with the N-terminal LZ domain of protein kinase G (PKG)-Iα. Despite the importance of vasodilation in cardiovascular homeostasis and therapy, our structural understanding of the MBS CC interaction with LZ PKG-1α has remained limited. Here, we report the 3D NMR solution structure of homodimeric CC MBS in which amino acids 932-967 form a coiled-coil of two monomeric α-helices in parallel orientation. We found that the structure is stabilized by non-covalent interactions, with dominant contributions from hydrophobic residues at a and d heptad positions. Using NMR chemical-shift perturbation (CSP) analysis, we identified a subset of hydrophobic and charged residues of CC MBS (localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal region) contributing to the dimer-dimer interaction interface between homodimeric CC MBS and homodimeric LZ PKG-Iα. 15 N backbone relaxation NMR revealed the dynamic features of the CC MBS interface residues identified by NMR CSP. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement- and CSP-NMR-guided HADDOCK modeling of the dimer-dimer interface of the heterotetrameric complex exhibits the involvement of non-covalent intermolecular interactions that are localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal regions of each homodimer. These results deepen our understanding of the binding restraints of this CC MBS·LZ PKG-Iα low-affinity heterotetrameric complex and allow reevaluation of the role(s) of myosin light-chain phosphatase partner polypeptides in regulation of vascular smooth-muscle cell contractility. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Structural modeling and DNA binding autoinhibition analysis of Ergp55, a critical transcription factor in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti P Gangwar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ergp55 protein belongs to Ets family of transcription factor. The Ets proteins are highly conserved in their DNA binding domain and involved in various development processes and regulation of cancer metabolism. To study the structure and DNA binding autoinhibition mechanism of Ergp55 protein, we have produced full length and smaller polypeptides of Ergp55 protein in E. coli and characterized using various biophysical techniques. RESULTS: The Ergp55 polypeptides contain large amount of α-helix and random coil structures as measured by circular dichorism spectroscopy. The full length Ergp55 forms a flexible and elongated molecule as revealed by molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and structural prediction algorithms. The binding analyses of Ergp55 polypeptides with target DNA sequences of E74 and cfos promoters indicate that longer fragments of Ergp55 (beyond the Ets domain showed the evidence of auto-inhibition. This study also revealed the parts of Ergp55 protein that mediate auto-inhibition. SIGNIFICANCE: The current study will aid in designing the compounds that stabilize the inhibited form of Ergp55 and inhibit its binding to promoter DNA. It will contribute in the development of drugs targeting Ergp55 for the prostate cancer treatment.

  17. The crystal structure of the SV40 T-antigen origin binding domain in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Moine, Stephanie; Bochkareva, Elena; Bochkarev, Alexey; Bullock, Peter A; Bohm, Andrew

    2007-02-01

    DNA replication is initiated upon binding of "initiators" to origins of replication. In simian virus 40 (SV40), the core origin contains four pentanucleotide binding sites organized as pairs of inverted repeats. Here we describe the crystal structures of the origin binding domain (obd) of the SV40 large T-antigen (T-ag) both with and without a subfragment of origin-containing DNA. In the co-structure, two T-ag obds are oriented in a head-to-head fashion on the same face of the DNA, and each T-ag obd engages the major groove. Although the obds are very close to each other when bound to this DNA target, they do not contact one another. These data provide a high-resolution structural model that explains site-specific binding to the origin and suggests how these interactions help direct the oligomerization events that culminate in assembly of the helicase-active dodecameric complex of T-ag.

  18. Binding energy and preferred adsorption sites of CO on gold and silver-gold cluster cations: adsorption kinetics and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, Marco; Weigend, Florian; Hampe, Oliver; Kappes, Manfred M

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the reactivity of trapped pure gold (Au(n)+, n cluster cations (Ag(m)Au(n)+, m + n adsorption sites, associated vibrational frequencies) of CO to the noble metal as a function of cluster size and composition. Starting from results for pure gold cluster cations for which an overall decrease of CO binding energy with increasing cluster size was experimentally observed--from about 1.09 +/- 0.1 eV (for n = 6) to below 0.65 +/- 0.1 eV (for n > 26) we demonstrate that metal--CO bond energies correlate with the total electron density and with the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) on the bare metal cluster cation as obtained by density functional theory (DFT) computations. This is a consequence of the predominantly sigma-donating character of the CO-M bond. Further support for this concept is found by contrasting the predictions of binding energies to the experimental results for small alloy cluster cations (Ag(m)Au(n)+, 4 adsorption sites and pre-screen favorable isomers.

  19. Structural features of PhoX, one of the phosphate-binding proteins from Pho regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Santos, Rodrigo M. L.; Medrano, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter for phosphate is encoded by the pstSCAB operon. PstS is the periplasmic component responsible for affinity and specificity of the system and has also been related to a regulatory role and chemotaxis during depletion of phosphate. Xanthomonas citri has two phosphate-binding proteins: PstS and PhoX, which are differentially expressed under phosphate limitation. In this work, we focused on PhoX characterization and comparison with PstS. The PhoX three-dimensional structure was solved in a closed conformation with a phosphate engulfed in the binding site pocket between two domains. Comparison between PhoX and PstS revealed that they originated from gene duplication, but despite their similarities they show significant differences in the region that interacts with the permeases. PMID:28542513

  20. NMR structure of a biologically active peptide containing the RNA-binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujeeb, A; Bishop, K; Peterlin, B M; Turck, C; Parslow, T G; James, T L

    1994-01-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhances transcription by binding to a specific RNA element on nascent viral transcripts. Binding is mediated by a 10-amino acid basic domain that is rich in arginines and lysines. Here we report the three-dimensional peptide backbone structure of a biologically active 25-mer peptide that contains the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat basic domain linked to the core regulatory domain of another lentiviral Tat--i.e., that from equine infectious anemia virus. Circular dichroism and two-dimensional proton NMR studies of this hybrid peptide indicate that the Tat basic domain forms a stable alpha-helix, whereas the adjacent regulatory sequence is mostly in extended form. These findings suggest that the tendency to form stable alpha-helices may be a common property of arginine- and lysine-rich RNA-binding domains. Images PMID:8058789

  1. pH-tuneable binding of 2'-phospho-ADP-ribose to ketopantoate reductase: a structural and calorimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciulli, Alessio; Lobley, Carina M C; Tuck, Kellie L; Smith, Alison G; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The crystal structure of Escherichia coli ketopantoate reductase in complex with 2'-monophosphoadenosine 5'-diphosphoribose, a fragment of NADP+ that lacks the nicotinamide ring, is reported. The ligand is bound at the enzyme active site in the opposite orientation to that observed for NADP+, with the adenine ring occupying the lipophilic nicotinamide pocket. Isothermal titration calorimetry with R31A and N98A mutants of the enzyme is used to show that the unusual ;reversed binding mode' observed in the crystal is triggered by changes in the protonation of binding groups at low pH. This research has important implications for fragment-based approaches to drug design, namely that the crystallization conditions and the chemical modification of ligands can have unexpected effects on the binding modes.

  2. pH-tuneable binding of 2′-phospho-ADP-ribose to ketopantoate reductase: a structural and calorimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciulli, Alessio; Lobley, Carina M. C.; Tuck, Kellie L.; Smith, Alison G.; Blundell, Tom L.; Abell, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of Escherichia coli ketopantoate reductase in complex with 2′-monophosphoadenosine 5′-diphosphoribose, a fragment of NADP+ that lacks the nicotinamide ring, is reported. The ligand is bound at the enzyme active site in the opposite orientation to that observed for NADP+, with the adenine ring occupying the lipophilic nicotinamide pocket. Isothermal titration calorimetry with R31A and N98A mutants of the enzyme is used to show that the unusual ‘reversed binding mode’ observed in the crystal is triggered by changes in the protonation of binding groups at low pH. This research has important implications for fragment-based approaches to drug design, namely that the crystallization conditions and the chemical modification of ligands can have unexpected effects on the binding modes. PMID:17242510

  3. Design and creation of a Ca2+ binding site in human lysozyme to enhance structural stability.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroki, R; Taniyama, Y; Seko, C; Nakamura, H; Kikuchi, M; Ikehara, M

    1989-01-01

    A Ca2+ binding site like an EF-hand motif was designed and created in human lysozyme by replacing both Gln-86 and Ala-92 with aspartic acids by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant human lysozyme (D86/92-lysozyme) was expressed and secreted by yeast. One Ca2+ was found to bind one molecule of the purified protein with the binding constant 5.0 x 10(6) M-1. The enzymatic activity of holo-D86/92-lysozyme against glycol chitin at 40 degrees C was 2-fold higher than that of the native lysozyme. M...

  4. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2011-02-18

    A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10Å resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Disruption of the coenzyme binding site and dimer interface revealed in the crystal structure of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase "Asian" variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Heather N; Weiner, Henry; Hurley, Thomas D

    2005-08-26

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is the major enzyme that oxidizes ethanol-derived acetaldehyde. A nearly inactive form of the enzyme, ALDH2*2, is found in about 40% of the East Asian population. This variant enzyme is defined by a glutamate to lysine substitution at residue 487 located within the oligomerization domain. ALDH2*2 has an increased Km for its coenzyme, NAD+, and a decreased kcat, which lead to low activity in vivo. Here we report the 2.1 A crystal structure of ALDH2*2. The structure shows a large disordered region located at the dimer interface that includes much of the coenzyme binding cleft and a loop of residues that form the base of the active site. As a consequence of these structural changes, the variant enzyme exhibits rigid body rotations of its catalytic and coenzyme-binding domains relative to the oligomerization domain. These structural perturbations are the direct result of the inability of lysine 487 to form important stabilizing hydrogen bonds with arginines 264 and 475. Thus, the elevated Km for coenzyme exhibited by this variant probably reflects the energetic penalty for reestablishing this site for productive coenzyme binding, whereas the structural alterations near the active site are consistent with the lowered Vmax.

  6. The Staphylococcus aureus extracellular matrix protein (Emp) has a fibrous structure and binds to different extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Jennifer; Neubauer, Svetlana; Pöllath, Christine; Hansen, Uwe; Rizzo, Fabio; Krafft, Christoph; Westermann, Martin; Hussain, Muzaffar; Peters, Georg; Pletz, Mathias W; Löffler, Bettina; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Tuchscherr, Lorena

    2017-10-20

    The extracellular matrix protein Emp of Staphylococcus aureus is a secreted adhesin that mediates interactions between the bacterial surface and extracellular host structures. However, its structure and role in staphylococcal pathogenesis remain unknown. Using multidisciplinary approaches, including circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron (TEM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy, functional ELISA assays and in silico techniques, we characterized the Emp protein. We demonstrated that Emp and its truncated forms bind to suprastructures in human skin, cartilage or bone, among which binding activity seems to be higher for skin compounds. The binding domain is located in the C-terminal part of the protein. CD spectroscopy revealed high contents of β-sheets (39.58%) and natively disordered structures (41.2%), and TEM suggested a fibrous structure consisting of Emp polymers. The N-terminus seems to be essential for polymerization. Due to the uncommonly high histidine content, we suggest that Emp represents a novel type of histidine-rich protein sharing structural similarities to leucine-rich repeats proteins as predicted by the I-TASSER algorithm. These new findings suggest a role of Emp in infections of deeper tissue and open new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  7. Module structure of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP may provide bases for its complex role in the visual cycle – structure/function study of Xenopus IRBP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Debashis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein's (IRBP remarkable module structure may be critical to its role in mediating the transport of all-trans and 11-cis retinol, and 11-cis retinal between rods, cones, RPE and Müller cells during the visual cycle. We isolated cDNAs for Xenopus IRBP, and expressed and purified its individual modules, module combinations, and the full-length polypeptide. Binding of all-trans retinol, 11-cis retinal and 9-(9-anthroyloxy stearic acid were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring ligand-fluorescence enhancement, quenching of endogenous protein fluorescence, and energy transfer. Finally, the X-ray crystal structure of module-2 was used to predict the location of the ligand-binding sites, and compare their structures among modules using homology modeling. Results The full-length Xenopus IRBP cDNA codes for a polypeptide of 1,197 amino acid residues beginning with a signal peptide followed by four homologous modules each ~300 amino acid residues in length. Modules 1 and 3 are more closely related to each other than either is to modules 2 and 4. Modules 1 and 4 are most similar to the N- and C-terminal modules of the two module IRBP of teleosts. Our data are consistent with the model that vertebrate IRBPs arose through two genetic duplication events, but that the middle two modules were lost during the evolution of the ray finned fish. The sequence of the expressed full-length IRBP was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recombinant full-length Xenopus IRBP bound all-trans retinol and 11-cis retinaldehyde at 3 to 4 sites with Kd's of 0.2 to 0.3 μM, and was active in protecting all-trans retinol from degradation. Module 2 showed selectivity for all-trans retinol over 11-cis retinaldehyde. The binding data are correlated to the results of docking of all-trans-retinol to the crystal structure of Xenopus module 2 suggesting two ligand-binding sites

  8. Structural model for dihydropyridine binding to L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2009-07-10

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) constitute a major class of ligands for L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCC). The DHPs have a boat-like, six-membered ring with an NH group at the stern, an aromatic moiety at the bow, and substituents at the port and starboard sides. Various DHPs exhibit antagonistic or agonistic activities, which were previously explained as stabilization or destabilization, respectively, of the closed activation gate by the portside substituents. Here we report a novel structural model in which agonist and antagonist activities are determined by different parts of the DHP molecule and have different mechanisms. In our model, which is based on Monte Carlo minimizations of DHP-LTCC complexes, the DHP moieties at the stern, bow, and starboard form H-bonds with side chains of the key DHP-sensing residues Tyr_IIIS6, Tyr_IVS6, and Gln_IIIS5, respectively. We propose that these H-bonds, which are common for agonists and antagonists, stabilize the LTCC conformation with the open activation gate. This explains why both agonists and antagonists increase probability of the long lasting channel openings and why even partial disruption of the contacts eliminates the agonistic action. In our model, the portside approaches the selectivity filter. Hydrophobic portside of antagonists may induce long lasting channel closings by destabilizing Ca(2+) binding to the selectivity filter glutamates. Agonists have either hydrophilic substituents or a hydrogen atom at their portside, and thus lack this destabilizing effect. The predicted orientation of the DHP core allows accommodation of long substituents in the domain interface or in the inner pore. Our model may be useful for developing novel clinically relevant LTCC blockers.

  9. Structural Model for Dihydropyridine Binding to L-type Calcium Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B.; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2009-01-01

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) constitute a major class of ligands for L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCC). The DHPs have a boat-like, six-membered ring with an NH group at the stern, an aromatic moiety at the bow, and substituents at the port and starboard sides. Various DHPs exhibit antagonistic or agonistic activities, which were previously explained as stabilization or destabilization, respectively, of the closed activation gate by the portside substituents. Here we report a novel structural model in which agonist and antagonist activities are determined by different parts of the DHP molecule and have different mechanisms. In our model, which is based on Monte Carlo minimizations of DHP-LTCC complexes, the DHP moieties at the stern, bow, and starboard form H-bonds with side chains of the key DHP-sensing residues Tyr_IIIS6, Tyr_IVS6, and Gln_IIIS5, respectively. We propose that these H-bonds, which are common for agonists and antagonists, stabilize the LTCC conformation with the open activation gate. This explains why both agonists and antagonists increase probability of the long lasting channel openings and why even partial disruption of the contacts eliminates the agonistic action. In our model, the portside approaches the selectivity filter. Hydrophobic portside of antagonists may induce long lasting channel closings by destabilizing Ca2+ binding to the selectivity filter glutamates. Agonists have either hydrophilic substituents or a hydrogen atom at their portside, and thus lack this destabilizing effect. The predicted orientation of the DHP core allows accommodation of long substituents in the domain interface or in the inner pore. Our model may be useful for developing novel clinically relevant LTCC blockers. PMID:19416978

  10. Synthesis, structure, DNA binding and anticancer activity of mixed ligand ruthenium(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilewska, Agnieszka; Masternak, Joanna; Kazimierczuk, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Barszcz, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    In order to obtain a potential chemotherapeutic which is not affected on the normal BALB/3T3 cell line, a new arene ruthenium(II) complex {[RuCl(L1)(η6-p-cymene)]PF6}2 · H2O has been synthesized by a direct reaction of precursor, [{(η6-p-cymene)Ru(μ-Cl)}2Cl2], with N,N-chelating ligand (L1 - 2,2‧-bis(4,5-dimethylimidazole). The compound has been fully characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, IR, UV-Vis and 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopies. X-ray analysis have confirmed that the compound crystallized in the monoclinic group Cc as an inversion twin. The asymmetric unit contains two symmetrically independent cationic complexes [RuCl(L1)(η6-p-cymene)]+ whose charge is balanced by two PF6- counterions. The shape of each cationic coordination polyhedral can be described as a distorted dodecahedron and shows a typical piano-stool geometry. In addition, an analysis of the crystal structure and the Hirshfeld surface analysis were used to detect and visualize important hydrogen bonds and intermolecular interaction. Moreover, the antiproliferative behavior of the obtained complex was assayed against three human cells: MV-4-11, LoVo, MCF-7 and BALB/3T3 - normal mice fibroblast cells. To predict a binding mode, a potential interaction of ruthenium complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been explored using UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD).

  11. Selectivity in Ligand Binding to Uranyl Compounds: A Synthetic, Structural, Thermodynamic and Computational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-12-06

    The uranyl cation (UO22+) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. We believe that