WorldWideScience

Sample records for structurally diverse t-type

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... genetic structure of M. quintuplinervia has probably been shaped by its breeding modes, biogeographic history and human impact ... Key words: Meconopsis quintuplinervia Regel, genetic diversity, random amplified polymorphic DNA markers, ..... inbreeding depression and facilitate quality control of drug.

  2. Structural and functional diversities in lepidopteran serine proteases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srinivasan, Ajay; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2006-01-01

    .... Though the evolutionary significance of mutations that lead to structural diversity in serine proteases has been well characterized, detailing the resultant functional diversity has continually posed...

  3. A bouquet of DNA structures: Emerging diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahima Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural polymorphism of DNA has constantly been evolving from the time of illustration of the double helical model of DNA by Watson and Crick. A variety of non-canonical DNA structures have constantly been documented across the globe. DNA attracted worldwide attention as a carrier of genetic information. In addition to the classical Watson–Crick duplex, DNA can actually adopt diverse structures during its active participation in cellular processes like replication, transcription, recombination and repair. Structures like hairpin, cruciform, triplex, G-triplex, quadruplex, i-motif and other alternative non-canonical DNA structures have been studied at length and have also shown their in vivo occurrence. This review mainly focuses on non-canonical structures adopted by DNA oligonucleotides which have certain prerequisites for their formation in terms of sequence, its length, number and orientation of strands along with varied solution conditions. This conformational polymorphism of DNA might be the basis of different functional properties of a specific set of DNA sequences, further giving some insights for various extremely complicated biological phenomena. Many of these structures have already shown their linkages with diseases like cancer and genetic disorders, hence making them an extremely striking target for structure-specific drug designing and therapeutic applications.

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of maize landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ivoire. However, no study on the genetic diversity of the species has been performed to date. This study aims at analyzing the diversity and genetic structure of 35 maize accessions using 10 microsatellite markers. These accessions are from ...

  5. Assessment of Vegetation Structural Diversity and Similarity Index of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The forest reserve of IITA shows a high diversity (alpha, gamma and beta diversity) of plants and have multiplicity of species, therefore, adequate protection of the reserve should be a priority to maintain and prevent loss of plant biodiversity. Keywords: Vegetation, structural diversity, IITA forest reserve, plant biodiversity, ...

  6. Structure, Function and Diversity of the Healthy Human Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    REPORT Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Studies of the human microbiome ...Std. Z39.18 - Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome Report Title ABSTRACT Studies of the human microbiome have revealed...that even healthy individuals differ remarkably in the microbes that occupy habitats such as the gut , skin and vagina. Much of this diversity remains

  7. Community structure and diversity of macrobenthic invertebrates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macrobenthic invertebrates' community structure and diversity in relation to some water quality parameters of Owan River; Edo State, was investigated from March 2011 to August, 2011. The study was aimed to determine the water-quality and their relationship with the community structure and diversity of ...

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees (Apis cerana) under microsatellite markers. T Ji, L Yin, G Chen. Abstract. Using 21 microsatellite markers and PCR method, the polymorphisms of 20 Apis cerana honeybee populations across China was investigated and the genetic structure and diversity of ...

  9. AFLP analysis on genetic diversity and population structure of small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... Bohai Bay, Yellow Sea and East China Sea were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism. (AFLP). Ninety-one ... Key words: Small yellow croaker, Larimichthys polyactis, genetic population structure, genetic diversity, AFLP. ... gene mapping, linkage and genetic diversity of species.

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis, is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A.

  11. Structural Diversity and Close Interracial Relationships in College

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicholas A. Bowman

    2012-01-01

    .... Within a large longitudinal data set, structural diversity is positively related to having close interracial friendships and a different-race romantic partner forWhite students, and no main effects...

  12. Forest structure drives global diversity of primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Sidney F; Villalobos, Fabricio; Dobrovolski, Ricardo; Beltrão-Mendes, Raone; Ferrari, Stephen F

    2014-11-01

    Geographic gradients in the species richness of non-human primates have traditionally been attributed to the variation in forest productivity (related to precipitation levels), although an all-inclusive, global-scale analysis has never been conducted. We perform a more comprehensive test on the role of precipitation and biomass production and propose an alternative hypothesis - the variation in vertical structure of forest habitats as measured by forest canopy height - in determining primate species richness on a global scale. Considering the potential causal relationships among precipitation, productivity and forest structure, we arranged these variables within a path framework to assess their direct and indirect associations with the pattern of primate species richness using structural equation modelling. The analysis also accounted for the influence of spatial autocorrelation in the relationships and assessed possible historical differences among biogeographical regions. The path coefficients indicate that forest canopy height (used as a proxy for vertical forest structure) is a better predictor of primate species richness than either precipitation or productivity on both global and continental scales. The only exception was Asia, where precipitation prevailed, albeit independently from productivity or forest structure. The influence of spatially structured processes varied markedly among biogeographical regions. Our results challenge the traditional rainfall-based viewpoint in favour of forest distribution and structure as primary drivers of primate species richness, which aggregate potential effects from both climatic factors and habitat complexity. These findings may support predictions of the impact of forest removal on primate species richness. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  13. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Dunn, Matthew R; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D; Egli, Martin

    2016-02-18

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson-Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results exhibit a strong genetic differentiation which is obviously due to genetic drift in the isolated populations. The genetic structure of M. quintuplinervia has probably been shaped by its breeding modes, biogeographic history and human impact (both grazing and collection for medicinal purposes). This research might ...

  15. tree structural and species diversities in okwangwo forest, cross river

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tersor

    ABSTRACT. For sound forest management decisions, appraisal of flora species and forest structure is crucial for any meaningful .... the study area. TREE STRUCTURAL AND SPECIES DIVERSITIES IN OKWANGWO FOREST, CROSS RIVER STATE, NIGERIA ..... architecture to absorb nutrients for growth. This is in line with ...

  16. Structure, diversity and evolution of myriapod hemocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Christian; Scherbaum, Samantha; Hegedüs, Elöd; Meyer, Andreas; Saur, Michael; Neumann, Ruben; Markl, Jürgen; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Oxygen transport in the hemolymph of many arthropods is mediated by hemocyanins, large copper-containing proteins that are well-studied in Chelicerata and Crustacea, but had long been considered unnecessary in the subphylum of Myriapoda. Only recently has it become evident that hemocyanins are present in Scutigeromorpha (Chilopoda) and Spirostreptida (Diplopoda). Here we present evidence for a more widespread occurrence of hemocyanin in the myriapods. By means of RT-PCR, western blotting and database searches, hemocyanins were identified in the symphylans Hanseniella audax and Symphylella vulgaris, the chilopod Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani and the diplopod Polydesmus angustus. No hemocyanins were found in the diplopods Polyxenus lagurus, Cylindroiulus punctatus, Glomeris marginata, Glomeris pustulata and Arthrosphaera brandtii, or the chilopods Lithobius forficatus, Geophilus flavus and Strigamia maritima. This suggests multiple independent losses in myriapod taxa. Two independent hemocyanin subunits were found that were already present in the myriapod stem line. We specifically investigated the structure of the hemocyanin of P. angustus, which consists of three distinct subunits that occur in an approximately equimolar ratio. As deduced by 3D electron microscopy, the quaternary structure is a 3 × 6-mer that resembles the half structure of the 6 × 6-mer hemocyanin from Scutigera coleoptrata. It was analyzed more closely by homology modeling of 1 × 6-mers and their rigid-body fitting to the electron density map of the 3 × 6-mer. In addition, we obtained the cDNA sequence of a putative myriapod phenoloxidase. Phenoloxidases are related to the arthropod hemocyanins, but diverged before radiation of the arthropod subphyla. © 2014 FEBS.

  17. On the Topological and Uniform Structure of Diversities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Poelstra

    2013-01-01

    sequences, and completeness to diversities. We develop conformities, a diversity analogue of uniform spaces, which abstract these concepts in the metric case. We show that much of the theory of uniform spaces admits a natural analogue in this new structure; for example, conformities can be defined either axiomatically or in terms of uniformly continuous pseudodiversities. Just as diversities can be restricted to metrics, conformities can be restricted to uniformities. We find that these two notions of restriction, which are functors in the appropriate categories, are related by a natural transformation.

  18. Role of T-type channels in vasomotor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuo, Ivana Y-T; Howitt, Lauren; Sandow, Shaun L

    2014-01-01

    Low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels play an important role in regulating cellular excitability and are implicated in conditions, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. T-type channels, especially Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, are also expressed in the vasculature, although patch clamp studies of i...

  19. Structural diversity effect on hashtag adoption in Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Zheng, Mingxing; Pang, Bowen

    2018-03-01

    With online social network developing rapidly these years, user' behavior in online social network has attracted a lot of attentions to it. In this paper, we study Twitter user's behavior of hashtag adoption from the perspective of social contagion and focus on "structure diversity" effect on individual's behavior in Twitter. We achieve data through Twitter's API by crawling and build a users' network to carry on empirical research. The Girvan-Newman (G-N) algorithm is used to analyze the structural diversity of user's ego network, and Logistic regression model is adopted to examine the hypothesis. The findings of our empirical study indicate that user' behavior in online social network is indeed influenced by his friends and his decision is significantly affected by the number of groups that these friends belong to, which we call structural diversity.

  20. Structural diversity in lithium aryloxides, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOYLE,TIMOTHY J.; PEDROTTY,DAWN M.; ALAM,TODD M.; VICK,SARA C.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.

    2000-06-06

    A series of arylalcohols [H-OAr where OAr = OC{sub 6}H{sub 5} (OPh), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Me) (oMP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Me){sub 2} (DMP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Pr{prime}) (oPP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Pr{prime}){sub 2} (DIP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(2-Bu{prime}) (oBP), OC{sub 6}H{sub 3}(2,6-Bu{prime}){sub 2} (DBP) where Me = CH{sub 3}, Pr{prime} = CHMe{sub 2}, and Bu{prime} = CMe{sub 3}] were reacted with LiN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} in pyridine (py) to generate the appropriate ``Li(OAr)(py){sub x}'' complex. The resultant products were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction as: [Li(OPh)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (1), [Li(oMP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (2), [Li(DMP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (3), [Li(oPP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (4), [Li(DIP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (5), [Li(oBP)(py){sub 2}]{sub 2} (6), and [Li(DBP)(py)]{sub 2} (7). Compounds 1--6 adopt a dinuclear, edge-shared tetrahedral complex. For 7, due to the steric crowding of the DBP ligand, only one py is coordinated yielding a dinuclear fused trigonal planar arrangement. Two additional structure types were also characterized for the DIP ligand as [Li(DIP)(H-DIP)(py)]{sub 2} (5b) and [Li{sub 2}(DIP){sub 2}(py){sub 3}] (5c). {sup 6,7}Li and {sup 13}C NMR solid state MAS spectroscopy indicated that the bulk powder was consistent with the crystalline material. Solution state NMR spectroscopy revealed a symmetric molecule existed in solution for 1--7.

  1. Culture, population structure, and low genetic diversity in Pleistocene hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premo, L S; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-06

    Paleogenomic research has shown that modern humans, Neanderthals, and their most recent common ancestor have displayed less genetic diversity than living great apes. The traditional interpretation that low levels of genetic diversity in modern humans resulted from a relatively recent demographic bottleneck cannot account for similarly low levels of genetic diversity in Middle Pleistocene hominins. A more parsimonious hypothesis proposes that the effective population size of the human lineage has been low for more than 500,000 years, but the mechanism responsible for suppressing genetic diversity in Pleistocene hominin populations without similarly affecting that of their hominoid contemporaries remains unknown. Here we use agent-based simulation to study the effect of culturally mediated migration on neutral genetic diversity in structured populations. We show that, in populations structured by culturally mediated migration, selection can suppress neutral genetic diversity over thousands of generations, even in the absence of bottlenecks or expansions in census population size. In other words, selection could have suppressed the effective population size of Pleistocene hominins for as long as the degree of cultural similarity between regionally differentiated groups played an important role in mediating intraspecific gene flow.

  2. Opposing Responses of Bird Functional Diversity to Vegetation Structural Diversity in Wet and Dry Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Sitters

    Full Text Available Disturbance regimes are changing worldwide, and the consequences for ecosystem function and resilience are largely unknown. Functional diversity (FD provides a surrogate measure of ecosystem function by capturing the range, abundance and distribution of trait values in a community. Enhanced understanding of the responses of FD to measures of vegetation structure at landscape scales is needed to guide conservation management. To address this knowledge gap, we used a whole-of-landscape sampling approach to examine relationships between bird FD, vegetation diversity and time since fire. We surveyed birds and measured vegetation at 36 landscape sampling units in dry and wet forest in southeast Australia during 2010 and 2011. Four uncorrelated indices of bird FD (richness, evenness, divergence and dispersion were derived from six bird traits, and we investigated responses of these indices and species richness to both vertical and horizontal vegetation diversity using linear mixed models. We also considered the extent to which the mean and diversity of time since fire were related to vegetation diversity. Results showed opposing responses of FD to vegetation diversity in dry and wet forest. In dry forest, where fire is frequent, species richness and two FD indices (richness and dispersion were positively related to vertical vegetation diversity, consistent with theory relating to environmental variation and coexistence. However, in wet forest subject to infrequent fire, the same three response variables were negatively associated with vertical diversity. We suggest that competitive dominance by species results in lower FD as vegetation diversity increases in wet forest. The responses of functional evenness were opposite to those of species richness, functional richness and dispersion in both forest types, highlighting the value of examining multiple FD metrics at management-relevant scales. The mean and diversity of time since fire were uncorrelated

  3. Opposing Responses of Bird Functional Diversity to Vegetation Structural Diversity in Wet and Dry Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitters, Holly; York, Alan; Swan, Matthew; Christie, Fiona; Di Stefano, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance regimes are changing worldwide, and the consequences for ecosystem function and resilience are largely unknown. Functional diversity (FD) provides a surrogate measure of ecosystem function by capturing the range, abundance and distribution of trait values in a community. Enhanced understanding of the responses of FD to measures of vegetation structure at landscape scales is needed to guide conservation management. To address this knowledge gap, we used a whole-of-landscape sampling approach to examine relationships between bird FD, vegetation diversity and time since fire. We surveyed birds and measured vegetation at 36 landscape sampling units in dry and wet forest in southeast Australia during 2010 and 2011. Four uncorrelated indices of bird FD (richness, evenness, divergence and dispersion) were derived from six bird traits, and we investigated responses of these indices and species richness to both vertical and horizontal vegetation diversity using linear mixed models. We also considered the extent to which the mean and diversity of time since fire were related to vegetation diversity. Results showed opposing responses of FD to vegetation diversity in dry and wet forest. In dry forest, where fire is frequent, species richness and two FD indices (richness and dispersion) were positively related to vertical vegetation diversity, consistent with theory relating to environmental variation and coexistence. However, in wet forest subject to infrequent fire, the same three response variables were negatively associated with vertical diversity. We suggest that competitive dominance by species results in lower FD as vegetation diversity increases in wet forest. The responses of functional evenness were opposite to those of species richness, functional richness and dispersion in both forest types, highlighting the value of examining multiple FD metrics at management-relevant scales. The mean and diversity of time since fire were uncorrelated with vegetation

  4. Diversity and structure of woody vegetation across areas with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we investigate the differences and/or similarities of woody vegetation diversity and structure across areas with different edaphic factors (i.e. soil group) in Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe. We stratified our study area into two strata based on soil group, namely siallitic soil in northern Gonarezhou and regosol soil ...

  5. Structural and functional diversity in rangelands: integrating different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many rangelands exist as dynamic systems where structural and functional diversity of the community is a function of several interacting factors. Understanding the effects of these factors in rangelands requires an understanding of component functioning at different scales. Integrating the range of levels from ecophysiology ...

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genetic structure and diversity of 10 Chinese indigenous egg-type duck breeds were investigated using 29 microsatellite markers. ... genetic variability originated from differences among breeds, with all loci contributing significantly. An unrooted ..... be made for this breed to avoid inbreeding depression and genetic drift.

  7. Floristic composition, species diversity and vegetation structure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Floristic composition, species diversity and vegetation structure of Gera Moist Montane Forest was conducted in Jimma Zone of Oromia National Regional State, southwest Ethiopia. A total of 132 plant species in 112 genera and 59 families were identified from this forest. Fabaceae was the most dominant family with ten ...

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genetic structure and diversity of 10 Chinese indigenous egg-type duck breeds were investigated using 29 microsatellite markers. The total number of animals examined were 569, on average 57 animals per breed were selected. The microsatellite marker set analysed provided 177 alleles (mean 6.1 alleles per locus, ...

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of sweet cassava using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population structure was analyzed by means of genetic distances and probabilistic models; allelic frequencies were used in order to assess the genetic diversity indexes (Ht, Ho, PIC, % polymorphism and number of alleles) for each locus studied. All evaluated loci were polymorphic and the average was highly heterozygote ...

  10. Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations for seed quality traits in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Ashok Badigannavar and Gerald O. Myers. J. Genet. 94, 87–94. Table 1. List of cotton germplasm lines used in this study. Germplasm no. Cultivar. Region. Germplasm no. Cultivar.

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of Caragana microphylla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caragana microphylla Lam. is a long-lived shrub species in the semi-arid, arid and desert regions. To determine the genetic diversity and population structure of C. microphylla Lam., 17 wild populations from the central and eastern part of Inner Mongolia were analyzed by inter-simple sequence repeat. 18 primers produced ...

  12. AFLP analysis on genetic diversity and population structure of small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The population genetic structure and diversity of small yellow croaker Larimichthys polyactis in the Bohai Bay, Yellow Sea and East China Sea were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Ninety-one individuals were collected from six locations representing three stocks of small yellow croaker.

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 2. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard, Calotes ... These two lineages are separated by mountain ranges, which play an important role as natural barriers blocking gene flow. Our finding reveal at least two cryptic lineages represented in C.

  14. The influence of compositional and structural diversity on forest productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    James N. Long; John D. Shaw

    2010-01-01

    Data from ~1500 ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa C. Lawson) stands in the western United States were used to examine the potential influence of compositional and structural diversity on forest productivity. Relative density, height and site quality were combined in a conceptually sound expression of the relationship between growth and growing stock for ponderosa pine-...

  15. Vascular plant diversity and community Structure of nandi forests ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this study was assessing the species diversity and plant community structure of Nandi forests of Kenya. Seventy six (20 × 20 m) sample plots, of which 27 located in North Nandi and 49 from South Nandi Forest were used to collect vegetation data. Sample plots were established along transects ...

  16. Population structure and genetic diversity of Sudanese native chickens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of Sudanese native chicken breeds involved in a conservation program. Five Sudanese native chicken breeds were compared with populations studied previously, which included six purebred lines, six African populations and one ...

  17. Structural Diversity and Close Interracial Relationships in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent legal and political actions have challenged the use of race-conscious college admissions policies. Earlier research offers mixed evidence about the link between an institution's racial/ethnic composition (i.e., structural diversity) and the formation of close interracial relationships, so the present study examines this topic directly for…

  18. An analysis of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientific approaches to conservation of threatened species depend on a good understanding of the genetic information of wild and artificial population. The genetic diversity and structure analysis of 10 Eucommia ulmoides population was analyzed using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers in this paper.

  19. Review: Genetic diversity and population structure of cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Genetic diversity and population structure of cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L. race latifolium H. ) using microsatellite markers. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Four groups were identified applying different methods (the probabilistic method, Principal Coordinates Analysis and Neighbor Joining tree). American ...

  20. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  1. Information Diversity in Structure and Dynamics of Simulated Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo eMäki-Marttunen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance (NCD. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviours are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses.We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  2. T-type calcium channels in synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C

    2017-03-04

    The role of T-type calcium currents is rarely considered in the extensive literature covering the mechanisms of long-term synaptic plasticity. This situation reflects the lack of suitable T-type channel antagonists that till recently has hampered investigations of the functional roles of these channels. However, with the development of new pharmacological and genetic tools, a clear involvement of T-type channels in synaptic plasticity is starting to emerge. Here, we review a number of studies showing that T-type channels participate to numerous homo- and hetero-synaptic plasticity mechanisms that involve different molecular partners and both pre- and post-synaptic modifications. The existence of T-channel dependent and independent plasticity at the same synapse strongly suggests a subcellular localization of these channels and their partners that allows specific interactions. Moreover, we illustrate the functional importance of T-channel dependent synaptic plasticity in neocortex and thalamus.

  3. Structural Diversity and Biological Activity of the Genus Pieris Terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Huan; Yan, Xi-Tao; Zhang, An-Ling; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2017-11-22

    Secondary metabolites, particularly the grayanane diterpenoids produced by the members of genus Pieris, have been investigated in past decades for their remarkable antifeedant and insecticidal activities and toxicity. Grayanoids exhibit diverse biological properties such as antifeedant, insecticidal, cAMP regulatory, and sodium-channel-modulating activities. Structural complexity and diverse bioactivity of grayanoids have made them attractive targets for chemical, biological, and synthetic purposes. The current review synthesized findings published from 1966 to 2017, which include 135 reports that describe 130 terpenoids, including 103 grayanoids. The distribution, structure, skeleton, as well as the antifeedant and insecticidal activity of terpenoids, particularly the grayanane diterpenoids, are discussed in detail in this review. In cases where sufficient information is available, the structure-activity relationships of their antifeedant activity are also presented. We hope that this contribution will prompt more scientists to pay attention to these diterpenoids, which may be potentially applied in the agricultural field.

  4. The meaning of alignment: lessons from structural diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heringa Jaap

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structural alignment provides a fundamental basis for deriving principles of functional and evolutionary relationships. It is routinely used for structural classification and functional characterization of proteins and for the construction of sequence alignment benchmarks. However, the available techniques do not fully consider the implications of protein structural diversity and typically generate a single alignment between sequences. Results We have taken alternative protein crystal structures and generated simulation snapshots to explicitly investigate the impact of structural changes on the alignments. We show that structural diversity has a significant effect on structural alignment. Moreover, we observe alignment inconsistencies even for modest spatial divergence, implying that the biological interpretation of alignments is less straightforward than commonly assumed. A salient example is the GroES 'mobile loop' where sub-Ångstrom variations give rise to contradictory sequence alignments. Conclusion A comprehensive treatment of ambiguous alignment regions is crucial for further development of structural alignment applications and for the representation of alignments in general. For this purpose we have developed an on-line database containing our data and new ways of visualizing alignment inconsistencies, which can be found at http://www.ibi.vu.nl/databases/stralivari.

  5. Opposing Responses of Bird Functional Diversity to Vegetation Structural Diversity in Wet and Dry Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Sitters, Holly; York, Alan; Swan, Matthew; Christie, Fiona; Di Stefano, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance regimes are changing worldwide, and the consequences for ecosystem function and resilience are largely unknown. Functional diversity (FD) provides a surrogate measure of ecosystem function by capturing the range, abundance and distribution of trait values in a community. Enhanced understanding of the responses of FD to measures of vegetation structure at landscape scales is needed to guide conservation management. To address this knowledge gap, we used a whole-of-landscape samplin...

  6. Microbial mat ecosystems: Structure types, functional diversity, and biotechnological application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Prieto-Barajas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mats are horizontally stratified microbial communities, exhibiting a structure defined by physiochemical gradients, which models microbial diversity, physiological activities, and their dynamics as a whole system. These ecosystems are commonly associated with aquatic habitats, including hot springs, hypersaline ponds, and intertidal coastal zones and oligotrophic environments, all of them harbour phototrophic mats and other environments such as acidic hot springs or acid mine drainage harbour non-photosynthetic mats. This review analyses the complex structure, diversity, and interactions between the microorganisms that form the framework of different types of microbial mats located around the globe. Furthermore, the many tools that allow studying microbial mats in depth and their potential biotechnological applications are discussed.

  7. Floral glands in asclepiads: structure, diversity and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Demarco

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Species of Apocynaceae stand out among angiosperms in having very complex flowers, especially those of asclepiads, which belong to the most derived subfamily (Asclepiadoideae. These flowers are known to represent the highest degree of floral synorganization of the eudicots, and are comparable only to orchids. This morphological complexity may also be understood by observing their glands. Asclepiads have several protective and nuptial secretory structures. Their highly specific and specialized pollination systems are associated with the great diversity of glands found in their flowers. This review gathers data regarding all types of floral glands described for asclepiads and adds three new types (glandular trichome, secretory idioblast and obturator, for a total of 13 types of glands. Some of the species reported here may have dozens of glands of up to 11 types on a single flower, corresponding to the largest diversity of glands recorded to date for a single structure.

  8. Landscape, population structure and genetic diversity of Stomoxys calcitrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsouli Aymes, N; Mavoungou, J F; De Stordeur, E; Duvallet, G

    2009-03-01

    To investigate whether different landscapes could affect genetic diversity and structure of the cosmopolitan diptera Stomoxys calcitrans, populations from Gabon and southern France were studied using dominant amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Gabon is characterized by a forested closed landscape, and southern France by an open Mediterranean landscape. The genetic diversity between Gabon and France populations did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Contrary to our expectation, this study shows a moderate level of genetic differentiation between these two distant countries (Fst = 0.0979) and a low genetic structure among Gabonese and French populations (Fst = 0.0291 and 0.0275 respectively). This result could indicate the capacities of S. calcitrans populations to sustain a high level of gene flow, despite geographic distance and isolation.

  9. Multivalent Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics: Design Principles and Structural Diversities

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S.P.; Zhou, L.; Lakshminarayanan, R; Beuerman, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights the design principles, progress and advantages attributed to the structural diversity associated with both natural and synthetic multivalent antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Natural homo- or hetero-dimers of AMPs linked by intermolecular disulfide bonds existed in the animal kingdom, but the multivalency strategy has been adopted to create synthetic branched or polymeric AMPs that do not exist in nature. The multivalent strategy for the design of multivalent AMPs provides...

  10. Determination of the Structural Basis of Antibody Diversity Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-15

    diversity found in these anti- Lewitter, F. I., Rindone. W. P., Swindell , C. D. & Tung, C. S. DNP-SL antibodies provides a rich source for structural...matching heavy and light chains combi- Genetics il5. 169-176. natorially increases the number of related antibodies within 16. Jardetzky, 0. & Roberts . G. C...relative peak amplitudes & Roberts , 1981), giving an r- dependence for the effect that are consistent with those observed in the spectra. Using (Solomon

  11. Structural and functional diversity in Listeria cell wall teichoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Boulos, Samy; Sumrall, Eric; Gerber, Benjamin; Julian-Rodero, Alicia; Eugster, Marcel R; Fieseler, Lars; Nyström, Laura; Ebert, Marc-Olivier; Loessner, Martin J

    2017-10-27

    Wall teichoic acids (WTAs) are the most abundant glycopolymers found on the cell wall of many Gram-positive bacteria, whose diverse surface structures play key roles in multiple biological processes. Despite recent technological advances in glycan analysis, structural elucidation of WTAs remains challenging due to their complex nature. Here, we employed a combination of ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem-MS/MS and NMR to determine the structural complexity of WTAs from Listeria species. We unveiled more than 10 different types of WTA polymers that vary in their linkage and repeating units. Disparity in GlcNAc to ribitol connectivity, as well as variable O-acetylation and glycosylation of GlcNAc contribute to the structural diversity of WTAs. Notably, SPR analysis indicated that constitution of WTA determines the recognition by bacteriophage endolysins. Collectively, these findings provide detailed insight into Listeria cell wall-associated carbohydrates, and will guide further studies on the structure-function relationship of WTAs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. A novel complexity-to-diversity strategy for the diversity-oriented synthesis of structurally diverse and complex macrocycles from quinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardiello, J J; Stewart, H L; Sore, H F; Galloway, W R J D; Spring, D R

    2017-06-01

    Recent years have witnessed a global decline in the productivity and advancement of the pharmaceutical industry. A major contributing factor to this is the downturn in drug discovery successes. This can be attributed to the lack of structural (particularly scaffold) diversity and structural complexity exhibited by current small molecule screening collections. Macrocycles have been shown to exhibit a diverse range of biological properties, with over 100 natural product-derived examples currently marketed as FDA-approved drugs. Despite this, synthetic macrocycles are widely considered to be a poorly explored structural class within drug discovery, which can be attributed to their synthetic intractability. Herein we describe a novel complexity-to-diversity strategy for the diversity-oriented synthesis of novel, structurally complex and diverse macrocyclic scaffolds from natural product starting materials. This approach exploits the inherent structural (including functional) and stereochemical complexity of natural products in order to rapidly generate diversity and complexity. Readily-accessible natural product-derived intermediates serve as structural templates which can be divergently functionalized with different building blocks to generate a diverse range of acyclic precursors. Subsequent macrocyclisation then furnishes compounds that are each based around a distinct molecular scaffold. Thus, high levels of library scaffold diversity can be rapidly achieved. In this proof-of-concept study, the natural product quinine was used as the foundation for library synthesis, and six novel structurally diverse, highly complex and functionalized macrocycles were generated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural and functional diversity of the microbial kinome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Kannan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK domain mediates the majority of signaling and coordination of complex events in eukaryotes. By contrast, most bacterial signaling is thought to occur through structurally unrelated histidine kinases, though some ePK-like kinases (ELKs and small molecule kinases are known in bacteria. Our analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS dataset reveals that ELKs are as prevalent as histidine kinases and may play an equally important role in prokaryotic behavior. By combining GOS and public databases, we show that the ePK is just one subset of a diverse superfamily of enzymes built on a common protein kinase-like (PKL fold. We explored this huge phylogenetic and functional space to cast light on the ancient evolution of this superfamily, its mechanistic core, and the structural basis for its observed diversity. We cataloged 27,677 ePKs and 18,699 ELKs, and classified them into 20 highly distinct families whose known members suggest regulatory functions. GOS data more than tripled the count of ELK sequences and enabled the discovery of novel families and classification and analysis of all ELKs. Comparison between and within families revealed ten key residues that are highly conserved across families. However, all but one of the ten residues has been eliminated in one family or another, indicating great functional plasticity. We show that loss of a catalytic lysine in two families is compensated by distinct mechanisms both involving other key motifs. This diverse superfamily serves as a model for further structural and functional analysis of enzyme evolution.

  14. Peach genetic resources: diversity, population structure and linkage disequilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) is one of the most important model fruits in the Rosaceae family. Native to the west of China, where peach has been domesticated for more than 4,000 years, its cultivation spread from China to Persia, Mediterranean countries and to America. Chinese peach has had a major impact on international peach breeding programs due to its high genetic diversity. In this research, we used 48 highly polymorphic SSRs, distributed over the peach genome, to investigate the difference in genetic diversity, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) among Chinese cultivars, and North American and European cultivars, and the evolution of current peach cultivars. Results In total, 588 alleles were obtained with 48 SSRs on 653 peach accessions, giving an average of 12.25 alleles per locus. In general, the average value of observed heterozygosity (0.47) was lower than the expected heterozygosity (0.60). The separate analysis of groups of accessions according to their origin or reproductive strategies showed greater variability in Oriental cultivars, mainly due to the high level of heterozygosity in Chinese landraces. Genetic distance analysis clustered the cultivars into two main groups: one included four wild related Prunus, and the other included most of the Oriental and Occidental landraces and breeding cultivars. STRUCTURE analysis assigned 469 accessions to three subpopulations: Oriental (234), Occidental (174), and Landraces (61). Nested STRUCTURE analysis divided the Oriental subpopulation into two different subpopulations: ‘Yu Lu’ and ‘Hakuho’. The Occidental breeding subpopulation was also subdivided into nectarine and peach subpopulations. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis in each of these subpopulations showed that the percentage of linked (r2 > 0.1) intra-chromosome comparisons ranged between 14% and 47%. LD decayed faster in Oriental (1,196 Kbp) than in Occidental (2,687 Kbp) samples. In the ‘Yu Lu’ subpopulation there

  15. Noradrenaline upregulates T-type calcium channels in rat pinealocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijie; Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2015-02-15

    The mammalian pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ that responds to circadian and seasonal rhythms. Its major function is to secrete melatonin as a hormonal night signal in response to nocturnal delivery of noradrenaline from sympathetic neurons. Culturing rat pinealocytes in noradrenaline for 24 h induced a low-voltage activated transient Ca(2+) current whose pharmacology and kinetics corresponded to a CaV3.1 T-type channel. The upregulation of the T-type Ca(2+) current is initiated by β-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Messenger RNA for CaV3.1 T-type channels is significantly elevated by noradrenaline at 8 h and 24 h. The noradrenaline-induced T-type channel mediated an increased Ca(2+) entry and supported modest transient electrical responses to depolarizing stimuli, revealing the potential for circadian regulation of pinealocyte electrical excitability and Ca(2+) signalling. Our basic hypothesis is that mammalian pinealocytes have cycling electrical excitability and Ca(2+) signalling that may contribute to the circadian rhythm of pineal melatonin secretion. This study asked whether the functional expression of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV channels) in rat pinealocytes is changed by culturing them in noradrenaline (NA) as a surrogate for the night signal. Channel activity was assayed as ionic currents under patch clamp and as optical signals from a Ca(2+)-sensitive dye. Channel mRNAs were assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cultured without NA, pinealocytes showed only non-inactivating L-type dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca(2+) current. After 24 h in NA, additional low-voltage activated transient Ca(2+) current developed whose pharmacology and kinetics corresponded to a T-type CaV3.1 channel. This change was initiated by β-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A as revealed by pharmacological experiments. mRNA for CaV3.1 T-type channels became significantly elevated, but mRNA for

  16. The systematic structure and predictability of urban business diversity

    CERN Document Server

    Youn, Hyejin; Lobo, José; Strumsky, Deborah; Samaniego, Horacio; West, Geoffrey B

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cities is central to addressing major global challenges from climate and health to economic resilience. Although increasingly perceived as fundamental socio-economic units, the detailed fabric of urban economic activities is only now accessible to comprehensive analyses with the availability of large datasets. Here, we study abundances of business categories across U.S. metropolitan statistical areas to investigate how diversity of economic activities depends on city size. A universal structure common to all cities is revealed, manifesting self-similarity in internal economic structure as well as aggregated metrics (GDP, patents, crime). A derivation is presented that explains universality and the observed empirical distribution. The model incorporates a generalized preferential attachment process with ceaseless introduction of new business types. Combined with scaling analyses for individual categories, the theory quantitatively predicts how individual business types systematically change rank ...

  17. Structuring of bacterioplankton diversity in a large tropical bay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo B Gregoracci

    Full Text Available Structuring of bacterioplanktonic populations and factors that determine the structuring of specific niche partitions have been demonstrated only for a limited number of colder water environments. In order to better understand the physical chemical and biological parameters that may influence bacterioplankton diversity and abundance, we examined their productivity, abundance and diversity in the second largest Brazilian tropical bay (Guanabara Bay, GB, as well as seawater physical chemical and biological parameters of GB. The inner bay location with higher nutrient input favored higher microbial (including vibrio growth. Metagenomic analysis revealed a predominance of Gammaproteobacteria in this location, while GB locations with lower nutrient concentration favored Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. According to the subsystems (SEED functional analysis, GB has a distinctive metabolic signature, comprising a higher number of sequences in the metabolism of phosphorus and aromatic compounds and a lower number of sequences in the photosynthesis subsystem. The apparent phosphorus limitation appears to influence the GB metagenomic signature of the three locations. Phosphorus is also one of the main factors determining changes in the abundance of planktonic vibrios, suggesting that nutrient limitation can be observed at community (metagenomic and population levels (total prokaryote and vibrio counts.

  18. Enzymatic synthesis of capsaicin analogs and their effect on the T-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Edmundo; López-González, Ignacio; De Regil-Hernández, Rubén; Reyes-Duarte, Dolores; Sánchez-Herrera, Daniel; López-Munguía, Agustín; Darszon, Alberto

    2007-05-04

    Capsaicin (Cap) and its analogs (CAPanalogs) have diverse effects in sensory neurons including analgesia, implying they modulate other cellular targets besides the TRPV1 Cap receptor. Since Cap and CAPanalogs are not largely available and their chemical synthesis is cumbersome, they have been obtained through a direct lipase-catalyzed reaction. Capsiate, the ester CAPanalog, was synthesized using a novel enzymatic transacylation one-pot strategy. Five different CAPanalogs were synthesized by amidation in 2-methyl-2-butanol with higher yields than previously reported. Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (Ca(v)s) are among the main Ca(2+) entry paths into cells. They are classified as high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels (HVA) and low-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels (LVA) constituted only by T-type channels. Though HVA Ca(v)s are Cap sensitive, it is not known if capsaicinoids inhibit LVA Ca(v)s which participate in the primary sensory neuron pain pathway. Here we first report that Cap, dihydrocapsaicin, N-VAMC(8), N-VAMC(9), and N-VAMC(10) can directly and partially reversibly inhibit T-type Ca(v)s, whereas olvanil, capsiate, and vanillylamine cannot. The Cap inhibition of T-type Ca(v)s was independent of TRPV1 activation.

  19. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure and Ancestral Origin of Australian Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Joukhadar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of wheat into Australia by the First Fleet settlers, germplasm from different geographical origins has been used to adapt wheat to the Australian climate through selection and breeding. In this paper, we used 482 cultivars, representing the breeding history of bread wheat in Australia since 1840, to characterize their diversity and population structure and to define the geographical ancestral background of Australian wheat germplasm. This was achieved by comparing them to a global wheat collection using in-silico chromosome painting based on SNP genotyping. The global collection involved 2,335 wheat accessions which was divided into 23 different geographical subpopulations. However, the whole set was reduced to 1,544 accessions to increase the differentiation and decrease the admixture among different global subpopulations to increase the power of the painting analysis. Our analysis revealed that the structure of Australian wheat germplasm and its geographic ancestors have changed significantly through time, especially after the Green Revolution. Before 1920, breeders used cultivars from around the world, but mainly Europe and Africa, to select potential cultivars that could tolerate Australian growing conditions. Between 1921 and 1970, a dependence on African wheat germplasm became more prevalent. Since 1970, a heavy reliance on International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT germplasm has persisted. Combining the results from linkage disequilibrium, population structure and in-silico painting revealed that the dependence on CIMMYT materials has varied among different Australian States, has shrunken the germplasm effective population size and produced larger linkage disequilibrium blocks. This study documents the evolutionary history of wheat breeding in Australia and provides an understanding for how the wheat genome has been adapted to local growing conditions. This information provides a guide for industry to

  20. Expanded alternative splice isoform profiling of the mouse Cav3.1/α1G T-type calcium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst Wayne L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing of low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels contributes to the molecular and functional diversity mediating complex network oscillations in the normal brain. Transcript scanning of the human CACNA1G gene has revealed the presence of 11 regions within the coding sequence subjected to alternative splicing, some of which enhance T-type current. In mouse models of absence epilepsy, elevated T-type calcium currents without clear increases in channel expression are found in thalamic neurons that promote abnormal neuronal synchronization. To test whether enhanced T-type currents in these models reflect pathogenic alterations in channel splice isoforms, we determined the extent of alternative splicing of mouse Cacna1g transcripts and whether evidence of altered transcript splicing could be detected in mouse absence epilepsy models. Results Transcript scanning of the murine Cacna1g gene detected 12 regions encoding alternative splice isoforms of Cav3.1/α1G T-type calcium channels. Of the 12 splice sites, six displayed homology to the human CACNA1G splice sites, while six novel mouse-specific splicing events were identified, including one intron retention, three alternative acceptor sites, one alternative donor site, and one exon exclusion. In addition, two brain region-specific alternative splice patterns were observed in the cerebellum. Comparative analyses of brain regions from four monogenic absence epilepsy mouse models with altered thalamic T-type currents and wildtype controls failed to reveal differences in Cacna1g splicing patterns. Conclusion The determination of six novel alternative splice sites within the coding region of the mouse Cacna1g gene greatly expands the potential biophysical diversity of voltage-gated T-type channels in the mouse central nervous system. Although alternative splicing of Cav3.1/α1G channels does not explain the enhancement of T-type current identified in four mouse

  1. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Phylogeography, genetic structure, and diversity in the dhole (Cuon alpinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, A; Babu, V N; Hedges, S; Venkataraman, A B; Maclean, N; Morin, P A

    2005-07-01

    The Asiatic wild dog or dhole was once very widely distributed across Asia but now has a very fragmented range. In this first genetic study of this little-known species, we obtained information on genetic diversity, phylogeography, and social structure using both mitochondrial control region sequencing and microsatellite genotyping of noninvasive faecal samples from wild populations, as well as from museum and captive samples. A pattern largely consistent with isolation by distance across the Asian mainland was observed, with no clear subspecies distinctions. However, two major phylogeographical groupings were found across the mainland, one extending from South, Central, and North India (south of the Ganges) into Myanmar, and the other extending from India north of the Ganges into northeastern India, Myanmar, Thailand and the Malaysian Peninsula. We propose a scenario involving glaciation events that could explain this pattern. The origin of the dhole populations in Sumatra and Java is enigmatic and requires further study. Very low levels of genetic diversity were observed among wild dholes from Baluran National Park in Java, Indonesia, but in contrast, high levels were observed in Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary in South India.

  3. Diverse Structure Synchronization of Fractional Order Hyper-Chaotic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Zhao, Guo-Bin; Yang, Yu-Hong

    2013-04-01

    This paper studied the dynamic behavior of the fractional order hyper-chaotic Lorenz system and the fractional order hyper-chaotic Rössler system, then numerical analysis of the different fractional orders hyper-chaotic systems are carried out under the predictor-corrector method. We proved the two systems are in hyper-chaos when the maximum and the second largest Lyapunov exponential are calculated. Also the smallest orders of the systems are proved when they are in hyper-chaos. The diverse structure synchronization of the fractional order hyper-chaotic Lorenz system and the fractional order hyper-chaotic Rössler system is realized using active control method. Numerical simulations indicated that the scheme was always effective and efficient.

  4. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; H Tageldin, Mohammed; Weir, William; Al-Fahdi, Amira; Johnson, Eugene H; Bobade, Patrick; Alqamashoui, Badar; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Thompson, Joanne; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Babiker, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle. Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman. We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia). A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST' = 0.075, θ = 0.07) were

  5. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salama Al-Hamidhi

    Full Text Available Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle.Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman.We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia. A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST' = 0.075,

  6. Patterns of genetic structure and phenotypic diversity in sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of phenotypic intra-varietal diversity in early, intermediate and late maturing varieties varied in relation to the observed trait. The genetic analysis specified that the highest diversity rates were in the late maturing varieties (3.3 for allelic richness and 0.47 for gene diversity). Factorial Discriminant Analysis on ...

  7. Metabolic Effects of Berries with Structurally Diverse Anthocyanins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Overall

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Overconsumption of energy dense foods and sedentary lifestyle are considered as major causes of obesity-associated insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. Results from both cohort studies and randomized trials suggested that anthocyanins from berries may lower metabolic risks, however these reports are equivocal. The present study was designed to examine effects of six berries with structurally diverse anthocyanin profiles (normalized to 400 µg/g total anthocyanin content on development of metabolic risk factors in the C57BL/6 mouse model of polygenic obesity. Diets supplemented with blackberry (mono-glycosylated cyanidins, black raspberry (acylated mono-glycosylated cyanidins, blackcurrant (mono- and di-glycosylated cyanidins and delphinidins, maqui berry (di-glycosylated delphinidins, Concord grape (acylated mono-glycosylated delphinidins and petunidins, and blueberry (mono-glycosylated delphinidins, malvidins, and petunidins showed a prominent discrepancy between biological activities of delphinidin/malvidin-versus cyanidin-type anthocyanins that could be explained by differences in their structure and metabolism in the gut. Consumption of berries also resulted in a strong shift in the gastrointestinal bacterial communities towards obligate anaerobes that correlated with decrease in the gastrointestinal luminal oxygen and oxidative stress. Further work is needed to understand mechanisms that lead to nearly anoxic conditions in the gut lumens, including the relative contributions of host, diet and/or microbial oxidative activity, and their implication to human health.

  8. Biosynthetic multitasking facilitates thalassospiramide structural diversity in marine bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Ross, Avena C.

    2013-01-23

    Thalassospiramides A and B are immunosuppressant cyclic lipopeptides first reported from the marine α-proteobacterium Thalassospira sp. CNJ-328. We describe here the discovery and characterization of an extended family of 14 new analogues from four Tistrella and Thalassospira isolates. These potent calpain 1 protease inhibitors belong to six structure classes in which the length and composition of the acylpeptide side chain varies extensively. Genomic sequence analysis of the thalassospiramide-producing microbes revealed related, genus-specific biosynthetic loci encoding hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthases consistent with thalassospiramide assembly. The bioinformatics analysis of the gene clusters suggests that structural diversity, which ranges from the 803.4 Da thalassospiramide C to the 1291.7 Da thalassospiramide F, results from a complex sequence of reactions involving amino acid substrate channeling and enzymatic multimodule skipping and iteration. Preliminary biochemical analysis of the N-terminal nonribosomal peptide synthetase module from the Thalassospira TtcA megasynthase supports a biosynthetic model in which in cis amino acid activation competes with in trans activation to increase the range of amino acid substrates incorporated at the N terminus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Andrea Valdés-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots. The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14±5% (mean ± standard deviation. Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil.

  10. Isotopic Diversity Indices: How Sensitive to Food Web Structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brind'Amour, Anik; Dubois, Stanislas F.

    2013-01-01

    Recently revisited, the concept of niche ecology has lead to the formalisation of functional and trophic niches using stable isotope ratios. Isotopic diversity indices (IDI) derived from a set of measures assessing the dispersion/distribution of points in the δ-space were recently suggested and increasingly used in the literature. However, three main critics emerge from the use of these IDI: 1) they fail to account for the isotopic sources overlap, 2) some indices are highly sensitive to the number of species and/or the presence of rare species, and 3) the lack of standardization prevents any spatial and temporal comparisons. Using simulations we investigated the ability of six commonly used IDI to discriminate among different trophic food web structures, with a focus on the first two critics. We tested the sensitivity of the IDI to five food web structures along a gradient of sources overlap, varying from two distinct food chains with differentiated sources to two superimposed food chains sharing two sources. For each of the food web structure we varied the number of species (from 10 to 100 species) and the type of species feeding behaviour (i.e. random or selective feeding). Values of IDI were generally larger in food webs with distinct basal sources and tended to decrease as the superimposition of the food chains increased. This was more pronounced when species displayed food preferences in comparison to food webs where species fed randomly on any prey. The number of species composing the food web also had strong effects on the metrics, including those that were supposedly less sensitive to small sample size. In all cases, computing IDI on food webs with low numbers of species always increases the uncertainty of the metrics. A threshold of ∼20 species was detected above which several metrics can be safely used. PMID:24391910

  11. Isotopic diversity indices: how sensitive to food web structure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik Brind'Amour

    Full Text Available Recently revisited, the concept of niche ecology has lead to the formalisation of functional and trophic niches using stable isotope ratios. Isotopic diversity indices (IDI derived from a set of measures assessing the dispersion/distribution of points in the δ-space were recently suggested and increasingly used in the literature. However, three main critics emerge from the use of these IDI: 1 they fail to account for the isotopic sources overlap, 2 some indices are highly sensitive to the number of species and/or the presence of rare species, and 3 the lack of standardization prevents any spatial and temporal comparisons. Using simulations we investigated the ability of six commonly used IDI to discriminate among different trophic food web structures, with a focus on the first two critics. We tested the sensitivity of the IDI to five food web structures along a gradient of sources overlap, varying from two distinct food chains with differentiated sources to two superimposed food chains sharing two sources. For each of the food web structure we varied the number of species (from 10 to 100 species and the type of species feeding behaviour (i.e. random or selective feeding. Values of IDI were generally larger in food webs with distinct basal sources and tended to decrease as the superimposition of the food chains increased. This was more pronounced when species displayed food preferences in comparison to food webs where species fed randomly on any prey. The number of species composing the food web also had strong effects on the metrics, including those that were supposedly less sensitive to small sample size. In all cases, computing IDI on food webs with low numbers of species always increases the uncertainty of the metrics. A threshold of ~20 species was detected above which several metrics can be safely used.

  12. Isotopic diversity indices: how sensitive to food web structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brind'Amour, Anik; Dubois, Stanislas F

    2013-01-01

    Recently revisited, the concept of niche ecology has lead to the formalisation of functional and trophic niches using stable isotope ratios. Isotopic diversity indices (IDI) derived from a set of measures assessing the dispersion/distribution of points in the δ-space were recently suggested and increasingly used in the literature. However, three main critics emerge from the use of these IDI: 1) they fail to account for the isotopic sources overlap, 2) some indices are highly sensitive to the number of species and/or the presence of rare species, and 3) the lack of standardization prevents any spatial and temporal comparisons. Using simulations we investigated the ability of six commonly used IDI to discriminate among different trophic food web structures, with a focus on the first two critics. We tested the sensitivity of the IDI to five food web structures along a gradient of sources overlap, varying from two distinct food chains with differentiated sources to two superimposed food chains sharing two sources. For each of the food web structure we varied the number of species (from 10 to 100 species) and the type of species feeding behaviour (i.e. random or selective feeding). Values of IDI were generally larger in food webs with distinct basal sources and tended to decrease as the superimposition of the food chains increased. This was more pronounced when species displayed food preferences in comparison to food webs where species fed randomly on any prey. The number of species composing the food web also had strong effects on the metrics, including those that were supposedly less sensitive to small sample size. In all cases, computing IDI on food webs with low numbers of species always increases the uncertainty of the metrics. A threshold of ~20 species was detected above which several metrics can be safely used.

  13. Genetic diversity and structure found in samples of Eritrean bread wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desta, Zeratsion Abera; Orabi, Jihad; Jahoor, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity and structure plays a key role in the selection of parents for crosses in plant breeding programmes. The aim of the present study was to analyse the genetic diversity and structure of Eritrean bread wheat accessions. We analysed 284 wheat accessions from Eritrea using 30 simple...... major groups. This is the first report of the genetic diversity and structure of Eritrean bread wheat....

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ethiopian genetic center is considered to be one of the secondary centers of diversity for the common bean. This study was conducted to characterize the distribution of genetic diversity between and within ecological/geographical regions of Ethiopia. A germplasm sample of 116 landrace accessions was developed, ...

  15. Genetic diversity and population structure assessed by SSR and SNP markers in a large germplasm collection of grape

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emanuelli, Francesco; Lorenzi, Silvia; Grzeskowiak, Lukasz; Catalano, Valentina; Stefanini, Marco; Troggio, Michela; Myles, Sean; Martinez-Zapater, José M; Zyprian, Eva; Moreira, Flavia M; Grando, M Stella

    2013-01-01

    ... on genetic diversity, population structure and proper phenotypic assessment. The identification of representative and manageable subset of accessions would facilitate access to the diversity available in large collections...

  16. Structural diversity in bacterial ribosomes: mycobacterial 70S ribosome structure reveals novel features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasmal, Manidip; Sengupta, Jayati

    2012-01-01

    Here we present analysis of a 3D cryo-EM map of the 70S ribosome from Mycobacterium smegmatis, a saprophytic cousin of the etiological agent of tuberculosis in humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In comparison with the 3D structures of other prokaryotic ribosomes, the density map of the M. smegmatis 70S ribosome reveals unique structural features and their relative orientations in the ribosome. Dramatic changes in the periphery due to additional rRNA segments and extra domains of some of the peripheral ribosomal proteins like S3, S5, S16, L17, L25, are evident. One of the most notable features appears in the large subunit near L1 stalk as a long helical structure next to helix 54 of the 23S rRNA. The sharp upper end of this structure is located in the vicinity of the mRNA exit channel. Although the M. smegmatis 70S ribosome possesses conserved core structure of bacterial ribosome, the new structural features, unveiled in this study, demonstrates diversity in the 3D architecture of bacterial ribosomes. We postulate that the prominent helical structure related to the 23S rRNA actively participates in the mechanisms of translation in mycobacteria.

  17. Gender Diversity in Top Management and Financial Performance. The Role of Organizational Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opstrup, Niels; Villadsen, Anders Ryom

    and financial performance of public organizations. Theory suggests that management diversity can be a positive asset for organizations. It may allow for the use of more diverse knowledge and human skill sets. In this paper it is suggested that organizations, however, may only be able to leverage...... these advantages if they have a supporting management structure. In a longitudinal study of top management teams in Danish municipalities, the study finds top management team gender diversity to be associated with higher financial performance but only in municipalities with a management structure that supports......Recent research has illustrated how demographic diversity influences the outcome of public sector organizations. Most studies focus on workforce diversity and little is known about how managerial diversity affects organizational outcome. This study focuses on top management team gender diversity...

  18. The structure and diversity of human, animal and environmental resistomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Chandan; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Kristiansson, Erik; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2016-10-07

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are widespread but cause problems only when present in pathogens. Environments where selection and transmission of antibiotic resistance frequently take place are likely to be characterized by high abundance and diversity of horizontally transferable ARGs. Large-scale quantitative data on ARGs is, however, lacking for most types of environments, including humans and animals, as is data on resistance genes to potential co-selective agents, such as biocides and metals. This paucity prevents efficient identification of risk environments. We provide a comprehensive characterization of resistance genes, mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and bacterial taxonomic compositions for 864 metagenomes from humans (n = 350), animals (n = 145) and external environments (n = 369), all deeply sequenced using Illumina technology. Environment types showed clear differences in both resistance profiles and bacterial community compositions. Human and animal microbial communities were characterized by limited taxonomic diversity and low abundance and diversity of biocide/metal resistance genes and MGEs but a relatively high abundance of ARGs. In contrast, external environments showed consistently high taxonomic diversity which in turn was linked to high diversity of both biocide/metal resistance genes and MGEs. Water, sediment and soil generally carried low relative abundance and few varieties of known ARGs, whereas wastewater/sludge was on par with the human gut. The environments with the largest relative abundance and/or diversity of ARGs, including genes encoding resistance to last resort antibiotics, were those subjected to industrial antibiotic pollution and a limited set of deeply sequenced air samples from a Beijing smog event. Our study identifies air and antibiotic-polluted environments as under-investigated transmission routes and reservoirs for antibiotic resistance. The high taxonomic and genetic diversity of external environments

  19. Genetic diversity and structure in two protected Posidonia oceanica meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Carla; D'Esposito, Daniela; Belmonte, Alessandro; Peirano, Andrea; Valiante, Luigi Maria; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Posidonia oceanica meadows growing along the west Mediterranean coastline are under continuous anthropogenic pressure. The way meadow health correlates with genetic and genotypic diversity in P. oceanica, is still under debate. Here we report a microsatellite analysis of two P. oceanica meadows living in protected areas of the Ligurian (Monterosso al Mare, MPA of "Cinque Terre") and central Tyrrhenian Sea (Santa Marinella, regional Site of Community Importance). Both meadows were recently classified as "disturbed", according to shoot density and other phenological parameters. Between the two meadows, Santa Marinella showed higher genetic diversity, while clear genetic substructure was present in both sites, reflecting high spatial heterogeneity. The present study suggests that genetic diversity does not match unequivocally with shoot density and leaf morphology and that small scale intra-meadow heterogeneity is an important factor to consider for establishing the relation between genetic/genotypic variability and health of natural seagrass meadows. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathophysiological significance of T-type Ca2+ channels: expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in fetal and diseased heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yasui, Kenji; Niwa, Noriko; Takemura, Haruki; Opthof, Tobias; Muto, Takao; Horiba, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Atsuya; Lee, Jong-Kook; Honjo, Haruo; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kodama, Itsuo

    2005-01-01

    Re-expression of fetal genes has been considered to underlie ionic remodeling in diseased heart. T-type Ca(2+) channels have been reported to be functionally expressed in embryonic hearts. In this review, we summarize developmental changes of T-type Ca(2+) channels in mouse ventricles from 9.5 days

  1. Diversity issue acquires official status in AGU's Committee structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Frank; Johnson, Roberta; Karsten, Jill

    Diversity is at the forefront of critical issues related to the present and future populations of Earth and space scientists in the United States. The changing demographic patterns of the United States in the 21st century are such that the profession must be proactive in recruiting and retaining persons from ethnic, racial, and other groups under-represented in these fields if we are to meet the demands for Earth and space scientists in academia, research, government, and industry. To meet this challenge, AGU has created a Subcommittee on Diversity as a part of its Committee on Education and Human Resources.

  2. Genetic diversity, phylogeographic structure and effect of selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdulhakeem B. Ajibike

    2017-12-11

    Dec 11, 2017 ... culture to address poverty in Africa: opportunities and challenges. (eds. J. E. O. Rege, A. M. Nyamu and D. Sendalo), pp. 293–298. ILRI Publications, Nairobi. Mtileni B. J., Muchadeyi F. C., Maiwashe A., Groeneveld. E., Groeneveld L. F., Dzama K. and Weigend S. 2011. Genetic diversity and conservation of ...

  3. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... tant repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of ..... Peakall R. and Smouse P. E. 2012 GenAlEx 6.5: genetic analysis in. Excel. Population genetic software for teaching and research—an update. Bioinformatics 28, 2537–2539.

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of begomoviruses infecting sweet potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begomoviruses infecting sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) exhibit high genetic diversity, and approximately eight species including Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) have been described from different regions around the world. In this study, the complete genomic sequences of 17 geographically dist...

  5. Changes in the trophic structure, abundance and species diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the biomass of high trophic level species and indices of species diversity between 1990 and 2009 were observed in commercial catches. These decreases were then related to changes in fishing pressure, fishing strategy and the combined effects of fishing and environmental factors (as derived from satellite observations) ...

  6. Similar levels of diversity and population Structure in superflock and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We use DNA microsatellite loci to estimate neutral genetic diversity and the level of gene flow among populations of two cichlid species from southern Lake Victoria, Africa: the endemic and stenotopic superflock species Pundamilia nyererei and the non-endemic, widespread species Astatoreochromis alluaudi. The two ...

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fire7-

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... The Ethiopian genetic center is considered to be one of the secondary centers of diversity for the ... accessions was developed, which represented different common bean production ecologies and seed .... The size of the bubbles does not correspond to number of genotypes sampled in each location.

  8. Genetic structure and diversity of East African taro [ Colocasia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taro [Colocasia esculenta (L) Schott] is mainly produced in Africa by small holder farmers and plays an important role in the livelihood of millions of poor people in less developed countries. The genetic diversity of East African taro has not been determined. This study utilizes six microsatellite primers to analyze five ...

  9. Genetic diversity, phylogeographic structure and effect of selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the maternal genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationship and effect of natural selection on indigenous chickens from Nigeria were assessed. A total of 397-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region of 171 indigenous chickens from four populations of Nigeria and four commercial egg line ...

  10. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  11. Assessing genetic diversity and phylogeographic structure of duck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the maternal genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of Nigerian duck populations were assessed. A total of 591 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region of 87 indigenous ducks from two populations in Nigeria were analyzed. Seven haplotypes and 70 polymorphic sites were ...

  12. Effect of three aromatic polycarboxylates on the structural diversities ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HONGYAN LIN

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... Compound 1 displays a 3D metal-organic framework with (4,4,4)- connected ... linear optics, gas separation and luminescence.1–6 The self-assembly of ... of metal ions. (ii) It has a flexible -(CH2)6- skeleton which can form diverse coordination configurations. (iii) It can interact by hydrogen bonding interac-.

  13. Genomic patterns in Acropora cervicornis show extensive population structure and variable genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Crawford; Schopmeyer, Stephanie; Goergen, Elizabeth; Bartels, Erich; Nedimyer, Ken; Johnson, Meaghan; Maxwell, Kerry; Galvan, Victor; Manfrino, Carrie; Lirman, Diego

    2017-08-01

    Threatened Caribbean coral communities can benefit from high-resolution genetic data used to inform management and conservation action. We use Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS) to investigate genetic patterns in the threatened coral, Acropora cervicornis, across the Florida Reef Tract (FRT) and the western Caribbean. Results show extensive population structure at regional scales and resolve previously unknown structure within the FRT. Different regions also exhibit up to threefold differences in genetic diversity (He), suggesting targeted management based on the goals and resources of each population is needed. Patterns of genetic diversity have a strong spatial component, and our results show Broward and the Lower Keys are among the most diverse populations in Florida. The genetic diversity of Caribbean staghorn coral is concentrated within populations and within individual reefs (AMOVA), highlighting the complex mosaic of population structure. This variance structure is similar over regional and local scales, which suggests that in situ nurseries are adequately capturing natural patterns of diversity, representing a resource that can replicate the average diversity of wild assemblages, serving to increase intraspecific diversity and potentially leading to improved biodiversity and ecosystem function. Results presented here can be translated into specific goals for the recovery of A. cervicornis, including active focus on low diversity areas, protection of high diversity and connectivity, and practical thresholds for responsible restoration.

  14. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guillen, Karine; Ortiz-Vallejo, Diana; Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-10-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 β-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5-10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families.

  15. Forest structure in low diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Ostertag; F. Inman-Narahari; S. Cordell; C.P. Giardina; L. Sack

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai‘i Island. We compared the species...

  16. Development of a leafy Brassica rapa fixed line collection for genetic diversity and population structure analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pang, W.; Li, X.; Choi, S.R.; Dhandapani, V.; Im, S.; Park, M.Y.; Jang, C.S.; Yang, M.S.; Ham, I.K.; Lee, E.M.; Kim, W.; Lee, S.S.; Bonnema, A.B.; Park, S.; Piao, Z.; Lim, Y.P.

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa is an economically important crop with a wide range of morphologies. Developing a set of fixed lines and understanding their diversity has been challenging, but facilitates resource conservation. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of 238 fixed lines of leafy

  17. Analysis of the structural diversity of the microbial community in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2002-10-04

    Oct 4, 2002 ... the analysis of signature lipid biomarkers to study the structural diversity of microbial populations. ... presence of a large diversity of micro-organisms. ... Microbial control is very important in the paper industry, since biofilm formation can lead to breakages, spotting, holes and discolouration of the paper,.

  18. Environmental and Climatic Determinants of Molecular Diversity and Genetic Population Structure in a Coenagrionid Damselfly

    OpenAIRE

    Maren Wellenreuther; Sánchez-Guillén, Rosa A.; Adolfo Cordero-Rivera; Svensson, Erik I.; Bengt Hansson

    2011-01-01

    Identifying environmental factors that structure intraspecific genetic diversity is of interest for both habitat preservation and biodiversity conservation. Recent advances in statistical and geographical genetics make it possible to investigate how environmental factors affect geographic organisation and population structure of molecular genetic diversity within species. Here we present a study on a common and wide ranging insect, the blue tailed damselfly Ischnuraelegans, which has been the...

  19. Genetic Structure and Diversity in Oryza sativa L

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garris, Amanda J; Tai, Thomas H; Coburn, Jason; Kresovich, Steve; McCouch, Susan

    ... practices exercised by humans. Within Oryza sativa, there is an ancient and well-established divergence between the two major subspecies, indica and japonica, but finer levels of genetic structure are suggested by the breeding history...

  20. Upregulation of T-type Ca2+ channels in primary sensory neurons in spinal nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jing; Liu, Lieju; Liu, Zhiguo; Shu, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2013-03-15

    Painful behavior testing, whole-cell patch clamp recordings, and PCR analysis were served to test the influence of T-type Ca channels in spinal nerve-injured rats. To determine the changes of T-type Ca channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of different sizes and the contribution to neuronal firing and painful behavior in neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury. T-type and high-voltage-activated Ca channels play an important role in the transmission of nociceptive signals, especially in neuronal hyperexcitability in neuropathic pain. However, little is known about how nerve injury affects T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons of different sizes. The effect of intrathecal administration of mibefradil in nerve-ligated rats was examined by painful behavior testing and current clamp. The changes of T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons caused by spinal nerve ligation were determined by RT-PCR analysis and voltage clamp. Spinal nerve injury significantly increased current density of T-type Ca channels in small DRG neurons. In addition, nerve injury significantly increased the percentage of T-type Ca channels in medium and large DRG neurons. Nerve injury significantly increased the mRNA levels of Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 in DRGs. Block of T-type Ca channels on mibefradil administration significantly normalized painful behavior and hyperexcitability in neuronal firing in spinal nerve-injured rats. Our study first indicated the upregulation of functional T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons of different sizes and the changes in different subtypes of T-type Ca channels by spinal nerve injury. Considering the effect of blocking T-type Ca channels in painful behavior and abnormal neuronal firing in rats with nerve injury, our results suggest that T-type Ca channels are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain.

  1. γ-Protocadherin structural diversity and functional implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Kerry Marie; Rubinstein, Rotem; Thu, Chan Aye; Mannepalli, Seetha; Bahna, Fabiana; Ahlsén, Göran; Rittenhouse, Chelsea; Maniatis, Tom; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-10-26

    Stochastic cell-surface expression of α-, β-, and γ-clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) provides vertebrate neurons with single-cell identities that underlie neuronal self-recognition. Here we report crystal structures of ectodomain fragments comprising cell-cell recognition regions of mouse γ-Pcdhs γA1, γA8, γB2, and γB7 revealingtrans-homodimers, and of C-terminal ectodomain fragments from γ-Pcdhs γA4 and γB2, which depictcis-interacting regions in monomeric form. Together these structures span the entire γ-Pcdh ectodomain. Thetrans-dimer structures reveal determinants of γ-Pcdh isoform-specific homophilic recognition. We identified and structurally mappedcis-dimerization mutations to the C-terminal ectodomain structures. Biophysical studies showed that Pcdh ectodomains from γB-subfamily isoforms formedcisdimers, whereas γA isoforms did not, but both γA and γB isoforms could interact inciswith α-Pcdhs. Together, these data show how interaction specificity is distributed over all domains of the γ-Pcdhtransinterface, and suggest that subfamily- or isoform-specificcis-interactions may play a role in the Pcdh-mediated neuronal self-recognition code.

  2. Structural Differences Explain Diverse Functions of Plasmodium Actins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahokoski, Juha; Martinez, Silvia Muñico; Ignatev, Alexander; Lepper, Simone; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Sidén-Kiamos, Inga; Sachse, Carsten; Kursula, Inari

    2014-01-01

    Actins are highly conserved proteins and key players in central processes in all eukaryotic cells. The two actins of the malaria parasite are among the most divergent eukaryotic actins and also differ from each other more than isoforms in any other species. Microfilaments have not been directly observed in Plasmodium and are presumed to be short and highly dynamic. We show that actin I cannot complement actin II in male gametogenesis, suggesting critical structural differences. Cryo-EM reveals that Plasmodium actin I has a unique filament structure, whereas actin II filaments resemble canonical F-actin. Both Plasmodium actins hydrolyze ATP more efficiently than α-actin, and unlike any other actin, both parasite actins rapidly form short oligomers induced by ADP. Crystal structures of both isoforms pinpoint several structural changes in the monomers causing the unique polymerization properties. Inserting the canonical D-loop to Plasmodium actin I leads to the formation of long filaments in vitro. In vivo, this chimera restores gametogenesis in parasites lacking actin II, suggesting that stable filaments are required for exflagellation. Together, these data underline the divergence of eukaryotic actins and demonstrate how structural differences in the monomers translate into filaments with different properties, implying that even eukaryotic actins have faced different evolutionary pressures and followed different paths for developing their polymerization properties. PMID:24743229

  3. Diverse Family Structures and the Care of Older Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Karen A; Blieszner, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    Demographic and social trends lead to a variety of micro-level and internal structural contexts that influence caregiving in families with older members. The results of macro-level changes have received little focused attention in the aging literature, where much of the caregiving research has addressed issues within the context of traditional family structure. Yet the conventional nuclear family model is increasingly uncommon as new, pluralistic models of family life are emerging in contemporary society. The majority of elder care is provided by relatives, albeit with varying patterns of involvement and responsibility across family structures. Both conventional and pluralistic families face challenges in meeting the care needs of their oldest members, leaving some older adults at risk of having unmet needs. Additional research on family risk and resilience related to the care of older relatives is warranted, particularly with respect to pluralistic models of family life.

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of leaf-nosed bat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation and population structure of the leaf-nosed bat Hipposideros speoris were estimated using 16S rRNA sequence and microsatellite analysis. Twenty seven distinct mitochondrial haplotypes were identified from 186 individuals, sampled from eleven populations. FST test revealed significant variations ...

  5. Interfaces of regeneration, structure, diversity and uses of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 243 plant species belonging to 85 families were recorded from the Bonga Forest. Of these, 66 families were angiosperms, 2 gymnosperms and 17 monilophytes (ferns). Studies on the structure and regeneration of some woody species indicated that there are species that require urgent conservation measures.

  6. Structural diversity in serine derived homochiral metal organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-09-01

    Sep 1, 2014 ... Abstract. Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) based homochiral metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) [SerCdOAc and. Zn(Ser)2] have been synthesized using pyridyl functionalized amino acid, viz., serine, as an organic linker. The. SerCdOAc structure is three dimensional, while that of the Zn(Ser)2 is two dimensional.

  7. Evolving Structural Diversity and Metallicity in Compressed Lithium Azide

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Dasari L. V. K.

    2013-10-10

    In pursuit of new stable nitrogen-rich phases and of a possible insulator-metal transition, the ground-state electronic structure of lithium azide, LiN3, is investigated from 1 atm to 300 GPa (∼2-fold compression) using evolutionary crystal structure exploration methods coupled with density functional theoretical calculations. Two new LiN3 phases, containing slightly reduced and well-separated N2 units, are found to be enthalpically competitive with the known lithium azide crystal structure at 1 atm. At pressures above 36 GPa nitrogen-rich assemblies begin to evolve. These incorporate NN bond formation beyond that in N2 or N3 -. N6 rings and infinite one-dimensional linear nitrogen chains (structural analogues to polyacetylene) appear. Above 200 GPa quasi-one- and two-dimensional extended puckered hexagonal and decagonal nitrogen layers emerge. The high-pressure phase featuring linear chains may be quenchable to P = 1 atm. With increasing pressure the progression in electrical conductivity is from insulator to metal. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Pollen diversity, viability and floral structure of some Musa genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was designed to study the floral structure, pollen morphology and the potential pollen viability of five Musa genotypes obtained from the Musa field ... Three different types of pollen were encountered viz, big, moderate and small pollens with corresponding big, moderate and small apertures and pores.

  9. Diversity, Structure and Regeneration Status of the Woodland and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted on the woodland and riverine vegetation of Sire Beggo in Gololcha District, eastern Ethiopia with the aim of documenting the floristic composition, population structure and identifying major plant community types. ... Vegetation classification was performed using TWINSPAN software package.

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of maize landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2016-11-02

    Nov 2, 2016 ... (Chen et al., 2012) and quinoa (Bazile et al., 2014). This study aims at assessing the variability and genetic structure of local varieties of Ivorian maize using microsatellite markers. The results of the assessment can contribute to the ex situ conservation and the development of selection strategies in order to ...

  11. Structural Diversity and Biochemical and Microbiological Characteristics of Aflatoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketney Otto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Among all mycotoxins, Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is considered to be the most carcinogenic, and it has been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Group 1 of human carcinogen. It signifies a high hazard because it contaminates a diversity of agricultural products such as nuts and derivatives, peanuts/hazelnuts, grains, seeds, cottonseed, milk, dairy food. In milk AFB1 is metabolized to aflatoxin M (AFM1 which is 4-hydroxy derivative of AFB1, it is formed in the liver and excreted in the milk into the mammary glands of both human and lactating animals which have been fed with AFB1 contaminated diet. After the food contamination, one part of the aflatoxin B1 which was present in the food is eliminated through the milk. At the molecular level aflatoxin biosynthesis involves several levels of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control, so the main stages subsequent biochemical and genetic constituents of aflatoxin biosynthesis have been demonstrated recently. Recent studies over the last few decades have shown that the metabolism of AFB is an essential component of hepatocarcinogenic, however it was shown that AFB1 is metabolized by cytochrome P450 oxidised to intermediates and other metabolites Therefore, the biotransformation process may also lead to the formation of carcinogenic metabolites.

  12. The impact of spatial structure on viral genomic diversity generated during adaptation to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilara Ally

    Full Text Available Most clinical and natural microbial communities live and evolve in spatially structured environments. When changes in environmental conditions trigger evolutionary responses, spatial structure can impact the types of adaptive response and the extent to which they spread. In particular, localized competition in a spatial landscape can lead to the emergence of a larger number of different adaptive trajectories than would be found in well-mixed populations. Our goal was to determine how two levels of spatial structure affect genomic diversity in a population and how this diversity is manifested spatially.We serially transferred bacteriophage populations growing at high temperatures (40°C on agar plates for 550 generations at two levels of spatial structure. The level of spatial structure was determined by whether the physical locations of the phage subsamples were preserved or disrupted at each passage to fresh bacterial host populations. When spatial structure of the phage populations was preserved, there was significantly greater diversity on a global scale with restricted and patchy distribution. When spatial structure was disrupted with passaging to fresh hosts, beneficial mutants were spread across the entire plate. This resulted in reduced diversity, possibly due to clonal interference as the most fit mutants entered into competition on a global scale. Almost all substitutions present at the end of the adaptation in the populations with disrupted spatial structure were also present in the populations with structure preserved.Our results are consistent with the patchy nature of the spread of adaptive mutants in a spatial landscape. Spatial structure enhances diversity and slows fixation of beneficial mutants. This added diversity could be beneficial in fluctuating environments. We also connect observed substitutions and their effects on fitness to aspects of phage biology, and we provide evidence that some substitutions exclude each other.

  13. Structural evolution and diversity of the caterpillar trunk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Steen Thorleif

    : the myrmecophilous ‘blue butterflies’ (Lycaenidae). The thesis includes four manuscript/chapters (MS 1-4). The four main objectives of the thesis are 1), to describe the larval morphology, including secondary locomotory structures, trunk chaetotaxy, and trunk musculature in the nonneolepidopterans, and in doing so...... feeding and climbing behavior (MS1), 3) describe the micropterigid and agathiphagid trunk morphology, including secondary locomotory structures, chaetotaxy, trunk musculature, and in the case of the former also the unique cuticle. The purpose of these descriptions is to focus on the seemingly aberrant...... morphology in an attempt to link form and function (MS2-3). 4) to re-evaluate the previously indicated correlation between the cuticle thickness of lycaenid larvae and the degree of myrmecophily in a selection of species in this family, and through a comparative study to better understand the link between...

  14. Sclerotic rings in mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae: structures and taxonomic diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momo Yamashita

    Full Text Available Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae were a highly diverse, globally distributed group of aquatic lizards in the Late Cretaceous (98-66 million years ago that exhibited a high degree of adaptation to life in water. To date, despite their rich fossil record, the anatomy of complete mosasaur sclerotic rings, embedded in the sclera of the eyeball, has not been thoroughly investigated. We here describe and compare sclerotic rings of four mosasaur genera, Tylosaurus, Platecarpus, Clidastes, and Mosasaurus, for the first time. Two specimens of Tylosaurus and Platecarpus share an exact scleral ossicle arrangement, excepting the missing portion in the specimen of Platecarpus. Furthermore, the exact arrangement and the total count of 14 ossicles per ring are shared between Tylosaurus and numerous living terrestrial lizard taxa, pertaining to both Iguania and Scleroglossa. In contrast, two species of Mosasaurus share the identical count of 12 ossicles and the arrangement with each other, while no living lizard taxa share exactly the same arrangement. Such a mosaic distribution of these traits both among squamates globally and among obligatorily aquatic mosasaurs specifically suggests that neither the ossicle count nor their arrangement played major roles in the aquatic adaptation in mosasaur eyes. All the mosasaur sclerotic rings examined consistently exhibit aperture eccentricity and the scleral ossicles with gently convex outer side. Hitherto unknown to any squamate taxa, one specimen of Platecarpus unexpectedly shows a raised, concentric band of roughened surface on the inner surface of the sclerotic ring. It is possible that one or both of these latter features may have related to adaptation towards aquatic vision in mosasaurs, but further quantitative study of extant reptilian clades containing both terrestrial and aquatic taxa is critical and necessary in order to understand possible adaptive significances of such osteological features.

  15. Sclerotic rings in mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae): structures and taxonomic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Momo; Konishi, Takuya; Sato, Tamaki

    2015-01-01

    Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae) were a highly diverse, globally distributed group of aquatic lizards in the Late Cretaceous (98-66 million years ago) that exhibited a high degree of adaptation to life in water. To date, despite their rich fossil record, the anatomy of complete mosasaur sclerotic rings, embedded in the sclera of the eyeball, has not been thoroughly investigated. We here describe and compare sclerotic rings of four mosasaur genera, Tylosaurus, Platecarpus, Clidastes, and Mosasaurus, for the first time. Two specimens of Tylosaurus and Platecarpus share an exact scleral ossicle arrangement, excepting the missing portion in the specimen of Platecarpus. Furthermore, the exact arrangement and the total count of 14 ossicles per ring are shared between Tylosaurus and numerous living terrestrial lizard taxa, pertaining to both Iguania and Scleroglossa. In contrast, two species of Mosasaurus share the identical count of 12 ossicles and the arrangement with each other, while no living lizard taxa share exactly the same arrangement. Such a mosaic distribution of these traits both among squamates globally and among obligatorily aquatic mosasaurs specifically suggests that neither the ossicle count nor their arrangement played major roles in the aquatic adaptation in mosasaur eyes. All the mosasaur sclerotic rings examined consistently exhibit aperture eccentricity and the scleral ossicles with gently convex outer side. Hitherto unknown to any squamate taxa, one specimen of Platecarpus unexpectedly shows a raised, concentric band of roughened surface on the inner surface of the sclerotic ring. It is possible that one or both of these latter features may have related to adaptation towards aquatic vision in mosasaurs, but further quantitative study of extant reptilian clades containing both terrestrial and aquatic taxa is critical and necessary in order to understand possible adaptive significances of such osteological features.

  16. Genetic diversity, structure and differentiation in cultivate walnut (Juglans regia L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Aradhya; K. Woeste; D. Velasco

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of genetic structure and differentiation in cultivated walnut (Juglans regia) using 15 microsatellite loci revealed a considerable amount of genetic variation with a mild genetic structure indicating five genetic groups corresponding to the centers of diversity within the home range of walnut in Eurasia. Despite the narrow genetic...

  17. Genetic structure, diversity, and inbreeding of eastern white pine under different management conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula E. Marquardt; Craig S. Echt; Bryan K. Epperson; Dan M. Pubanz

    2007-01-01

    Resource sustainability requires a thorough understanding of the influence of forest management programs on the conservation of genetic diversity in tree populations. To observe how differences in forest structure affect the genetic structure of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.), we evaluated six eastern white pine sites across the 234000 acre (1...

  18. Structural diversity of biologically interesting datasets: a scaffold analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Varun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent public availability of the human metabolome and natural product datasets has revitalized "metabolite-likeness" and "natural product-likeness" as a drug design concept to design lead libraries targeting specific pathways. Many reports have analyzed the physicochemical property space of biologically important datasets, with only a few comprehensively characterizing the scaffold diversity in public datasets of biological interest. With large collections of high quality public data currently available, we carried out a comparative analysis of current day leads with other biologically relevant datasets. Results In this study, we note a two-fold enrichment of metabolite scaffolds in drug dataset (42% as compared to currently used lead libraries (23%. We also note that only a small percentage (5% of natural product scaffolds space is shared by the lead dataset. We have identified specific scaffolds that are present in metabolites and natural products, with close counterparts in the drugs, but are missing in the lead dataset. To determine the distribution of compounds in physicochemical property space we analyzed the molecular polar surface area, the molecular solubility, the number of rings and the number of rotatable bonds in addition to four well-known Lipinski properties. Here, we note that, with only few exceptions, most of the drugs follow Lipinski's rule. The average values of the molecular polar surface area and the molecular solubility in metabolites is the highest while the number of rings is the lowest. In addition, we note that natural products contain the maximum number of rings and the rotatable bonds than any other dataset under consideration. Conclusions Currently used lead libraries make little use of the metabolites and natural products scaffold space. We believe that metabolites and natural products are recognized by at least one protein in the biosphere therefore, sampling the fragment and scaffold

  19. "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures": Correction to Kaiser et al. (2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "Presumed fair: Ironic effects of organizational diversity structures" by Cheryl R. Kaiser, Brenda Major, Ines Jurcevic, Tessa L. Dover, Laura M. Brady and Jenessa R. Shapiro (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2013[Mar], Vol 104[3], 504-519). In the article, a raw data merging error in one racial discrimination claim condition from Experiment 6 inadvertently resulted in data analyses on an inaccurate data set. When the error was discovered by the authors and corrected, all analyses reported in Experiment 6 for claim validity, seriousness of the claim, and support for the claimant were inaccurate and none were statistically significant. The conclusions should be altered to indicate that participants with management experience who reflected on their own workplace diversity policies did not show the predicted effects. The literature review, remaining five studies, and remaining conclusions in the article are unaffected by this error. Experiment 6 should also report that 26.4% (not 26.4.7%) of participants had a graduate degree and eight participants (not 8%) did not provide educational data. Experiment 5 should have referred to the claim validity measure as a six-item measure ( .92) rather than a five-item measure; analyses on claim validity are accurate in text. Table 2's note should have said standard errors, not standard deviations. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2012-31077-001.) This research tests the hypothesis that the presence (vs. absence) of organizational diversity structures causes high-status group members (Whites, men) to perceive organizations with diversity structures as procedurally fairer environments for underrepresented groups (racial minorities, women), even when it is clear that underrepresented groups have been unfairly disadvantaged within these organizations. Furthermore, this illusory sense of fairness derived from the mere presence of diversity structures causes high

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of Vietnamese indigenous cattle populations by microsatellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Lan Doan; Do, Duy Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Trong

    2013-01-01

    Cattle play a very important role in agriculture and food security in Vietnam. A high level of cattle diversity exists and serves different needs of Vietnamese cattle keepers but has not yet been molecularly characterized. This study evaluates the genetic diversity and structure of Vietnamese......) to 17 (ETH185). The level of gene diversity was high indicated by a mean expected heterozygosity (He) across populations and loci of 0.73. Level of inbreeding (mean FIS=0.05) and genetic differentiation (mean FST=0.04) was moderate. The phylogenetic tree based on Reynolds genetic distance reflected...... of genetic diversity and distinct genetic structures. Based on these results, we recommend that for conservation homogenous populations (Nghe An, Thanh Hoa and Phu Yen) can be grouped to reduce costs and U Dau Riu, Lang Son and Ha Giang populations should be conserved separately to avoid loss of genetic...

  1. Petroleum-influenced beach sediments of the campeche bank, Mexico: Diversity and bacterial community structure assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosano-Hernandez, M. C.; Ramirez-Saad, H.; Fernandez-Linares, L.; Xoconostle, B.

    2009-07-01

    In Mexican, either spilled or seeped out petroleum impacts nearly 300 km of the beach between Dos Bocas (Tabasco State) to Champoton town (Campeche State), where between 9 to exceptionally 9 to exceptionally 300 tonnes of oil as tar balls have been measured. This study was focused to explore, for the first time, the bacterial diversity and community structure ({alpha}-diversity)- in a kilometric scale on petroleum influenced sediments of 100 km of sandy beach. (Author)

  2. Structural Diversity and Biological Activities of the Cyclodipeptides from Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodipeptides, called 2,5-diketopiperazines (2,5-DKPs, are obtained by the condensation of two amino acids. Fungi have been considered to be a rich source of novel and bioactive cyclodipeptides. This review highlights the occurrence, structures and biological activities of the fungal cyclodipeptides with the literature covered up to July 2017. A total of 635 fungal cyclodipeptides belonging to the groups of tryptophan-proline, tryptophan-tryptophan, tryptophan–Xaa, proline–Xaa, non-tryptophan–non-proline, and thio-analogs have been discussed and reviewed. They were mainly isolated from the genera of Aspergillus and Penicillium. More and more cyclodipeptides have been isolated from marine-derived and plant endophytic fungi. Some of them were screened to have cytotoxic, phytotoxic, antimicrobial, insecticidal, vasodilator, radical scavenging, antioxidant, brine shrimp lethal, antiviral, nematicidal, antituberculosis, and enzyme-inhibitory activities to show their potential applications in agriculture, medicinal, and food industry.

  3. Structural Diversity and Function of Xyloglucan Sidechain Substituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Schultink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Xyloglucan (XyG is a hemicellulose found in the cell walls of all land plants including early-divergent groups such as liverworts, hornworts and mosses. The basic structure of XyG, a xylosylated glucan, is similar in all of these plants but additional substituents can vary depending on plant family, tissue, and developmental stage. A comprehensive list of known XyG sidechain substituents is assembled including their occurrence within plant families, thereby providing insight into the evolutionary origin of the various sidechains. Recent advances in DNA sequencing have enabled comparative genomics approaches for the identification of XyG biosynthetic enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as in non-model plant species. Characterization of these biosynthetic genes not only allows the determination of their substrate specificity but also provides insights into the function of the various substituents in plant growth and development.

  4. Secondary Metabolites from Acremonium Fungi: Diverse Structures and Bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jin; Lai, Daowan; Zhou, Ligang

    2017-01-01

    Acremonium fungi have been isolated from various sources, such as soil, plants, and marine organisms. The species in Acremonium have been proved to be rich sources of novel and bioactive secondary metabolites. Up to now, 356 metabolites belonging to steroids (6 compounds), terpenoids (86), meroterpenoids (66), polyketides (89), alkaloids (28), peptides (75), and miscellaneous types (6) have been isolated from Acremonium fungi. These metabolites displayed a wide range of biological activities including antimicrobial, cytotoxic, antitumor, immunosuppressive, antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antimalarial, phytotoxic, tremorgenic, antiviral, neuritogenic, insecticidal and enzymesinhibiting activities. This review highlights the structures and bioactivities of the secondary metabolites from Acremonium fungi reported until July 2016. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. The gut microbiota of insects - diversity in structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Philipp; Moran, Nancy A

    2013-09-01

    Insect guts present distinctive environments for microbial colonization, and bacteria in the gut potentially provide many beneficial services to their hosts. Insects display a wide range in degree of dependence on gut bacteria for basic functions. Most insect guts contain relatively few microbial species as compared to mammalian guts, but some insects harbor large gut communities of specialized bacteria. Others are colonized only opportunistically and sparsely by bacteria common in other environments. Insect digestive tracts vary extensively in morphology and physicochemical properties, factors that greatly influence microbial community structure. One obstacle to the evolution of intimate associations with gut microorganisms is the lack of dependable transmission routes between host individuals. Here, social insects, such as termites, ants, and bees, are exceptions: social interactions provide opportunities for transfer of gut bacteria, and some of the most distinctive and consistent gut communities, with specialized beneficial functions in nutrition and protection, have been found in social insect species. Still, gut bacteria of other insects have also been shown to contribute to nutrition, protection from parasites and pathogens, modulation of immune responses, and communication. The extent of these roles is still unclear and awaits further studies. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Myogenic Differential Methylation: Diverse Associations with Chromatin Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruti Chandra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Employing a new algorithm for identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs from reduced representation bisulfite sequencing profiles, we identified 1972 hypermethylated and 3250 hypomethylated myogenic DMRs in a comparison of myoblasts (Mb and myotubes (Mt with 16 types of nonmuscle cell cultures. DMRs co-localized with a variety of chromatin structures, as deduced from ENCODE whole-genome profiles. Myogenic hypomethylation was highly associated with both weak and strong enhancer-type chromatin, while hypermethylation was infrequently associated with enhancer-type chromatin. Both myogenic hypermethylation and hypomethylation often overlapped weak transcription-type chromatin and Polycomb-repressed-type chromatin. For representative genes, we illustrate relationships between DNA methylation, the local chromatin state, DNaseI hypersensitivity, and gene expression. For example, MARVELD2 exhibited myogenic hypermethylation in transcription-type chromatin that overlapped a silenced promoter in Mb and Mt while TEAD4 had myogenic hypomethylation in intronic subregions displaying enhancer-type or transcription-type chromatin in these cells. For LSP1, alternative promoter usage and active promoter-type chromatin were linked to highly specific myogenic or lymphogenic hypomethylated DMRs. Lastly, despite its myogenesis-associated expression, TBX15 had multiple hypermethylated myogenic DMRs framing its promoter region. This could help explain why TBX15 was previously reported to be underexpressed and, unexpectedly, its promoter undermethylated in placentas exhibiting vascular intrauterine growth restriction.

  7. Comparative analyses of structural features and scaffold diversity for purchasable compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jun; Sun, Huiyong; Liu, Hui; Chen, Fu; Tian, Sheng; Pan, Peichen; Li, Dan; Kong, Dexin; Hou, Tingjun

    2017-04-21

    Large purchasable screening libraries of small molecules afforded by commercial vendors are indispensable sources for virtual screening (VS). Selecting an optimal screening library for a specific VS campaign is quite important to improve the success rates and avoid wasting resources in later experimental phases. Analysis of the structural features and molecular diversity for different screening libraries can provide valuable information to the decision making process when selecting screening libraries for VS. In this study, the structural features and scaffold diversity of eleven purchasable screening libraries and Traditional Chinese Medicine Compound Database (TCMCD) were analyzed and compared. Their scaffold diversity represented by the Murcko frameworks and Level 1 scaffolds was characterized by the scaffold counts and cumulative scaffold frequency plots, and visualized by Tree Maps and SAR Maps. The analysis demonstrates that, based on the standardized subsets with similar molecular weight distributions, Chembridge, ChemicalBlock, Mucle, TCMCD and VitasM are more structurally diverse than the others. Compared with all purchasable screening libraries, TCMCD has the highest structural complexity indeed but more conservative molecular scaffolds. Moreover, we found that some representative scaffolds were important components of drug candidates against different drug targets, such as kinases and guanosine-binding protein coupled receptors, and therefore the molecules containing pharmacologically important scaffolds found in screening libraries might be potential inhibitors against the relevant targets. This study may provide valuable perspective on which purchasable compound libraries are better for you to screen. Graphical abstract Selecting diverse compound libraries with scaffold analyses.

  8. Clonal diversity and structure within a population of the pondweed Potamogeton pectinatus foraged by Bewick's swans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangelbroek, H H; Ouborg, N J; Santamaría, L; Schwenk, K

    2002-10-01

    Clonal diversity within plant populations is affected by factors that influence genet (clone) survival and seed recruitment, such as resource availability, disturbance, seed dispersal mechanism, propagule predation and the age of the population. Here we studied a population of Potamogeton pectinatus, a pseudo-annual aquatic macrophyte. Within populations reproduction appears to be mainly asexually through subterranean propagules (tubers), while recruitment via seeds is believed to be relatively unimportant. RAPD markers were used to analyse clonal diversity and genetic variation within the population. Ninety-seven genets were identified among 128 samples taken from eight plots. The proportion of distinguishable genets (0.76) and Simpson's diversity index (0.99) exhibited high levels of clonal diversity compared to other clonal plants. According to an analysis of molecular variance (amova) most genetic variation occurred between individuals within plots (93-97%) rather than between plots (8-3%). These results imply that sexual reproduction plays an unexpectedly important role within the population. Nevertheless, autocorrelation statistics revealed a spatial genetic structure resulting from clonal growth. In contrast to genetic variation, clonal diversity was affected by several ecological factors. Water depth and silt content had direct negative effects on clonal diversity. Tuber predation by Bewick's swans had an unexpected indirect negative effect on clonal diversity through reducing the tuber-bank biomass in spring, which on its turn was positively correlated to clonal diversity. The disturbance by swans, therefore, did not enhance seed recruitment and thus clonal diversity; on the contrary, heavily foraged areas are probably more prone to stochastic loss of genets leading to reduced clonal diversity.

  9. Scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities using functional diversity and community deconstruction approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pedro Giovâni da; Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina

    2015-01-01

    Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass) for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in the distribution

  10. Scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities using functional diversity and community deconstruction approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giovâni da Silva

    Full Text Available Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in

  11. Radical aryl migration enables diversity-oriented synthesis of structurally diverse medium/macro- or bridged-rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Zhong-Liang; Wang, Fu-Li; Guo, Zhen; Cheng, Yong-Feng; Wang, Na; Dong, Xiao-Wu; Fang, Chao; Liu, Jingjiang; Hou, Chunhui; Tan, Bin; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Medium-sized and medium-bridged rings are attractive structural motifs in natural products and therapeutic agents. Due to the unfavourable entropic and/or enthalpic factors with these ring systems, their efficient construction remains a formidable challenge. To address this problem, we herein disclose a radical-based approach for diversity-oriented synthesis of various benzannulated carbon- and heteroatom-containing 8-11(14)-membered ketone libraries. This strategy involves 1,4- or 1,5-aryl migration triggered by radical azidation, trifluoromethylation, phosphonylation, sulfonylation, or perfluoroalkylation of unactivated alkenes followed by intramolecular ring expansion. Demonstration of this method as a highly flexible tool for the construction of 37 synthetically challenging medium-sized and macrocyclic ring scaffolds including bridged rings with diverse functionalities and skeletons is highlighted. Some of these products showed potent inhibitory activity against the cancer cell or derivative of human embryonic kidney line in preliminary biological studies. The mechanism of this novel strategy is investigated by control experiments and DFT calculations.

  12. Tonotopic Variation of the T-Type Ca2+ Current in Avian Auditory Coincidence Detector Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Ryota; Yamada, Rei; Kuba, Hiroshi

    2018-01-10

    Neurons in avian nucleus laminaris (NL) are binaural coincidence detectors for sound localization and are characterized by striking structural variations in dendrites and axon initial segment (AIS) according to their acoustic tuning [characteristic frequency (CF)]. T-type Ca2+ (CaT) channels regulate synaptic integration and firing behavior at these neuronal structures. However, whether or how CaT channels contribute to the signal processing in NL neurons is not known. In this study, we addressed this issue with whole-cell recording and two-photon Ca2+ imaging in brain slices of posthatch chicks of both sexes. We found that the CaT current was prominent in low-CF neurons, whereas it was almost absent in higher-CF neurons. In addition, a large Ca2+ transient occurred at the dendrites and the AIS of low-CF neurons, indicating a localization of CaT channels at these structures in the neurons. Because low-CF neurons have long dendrites, dendritic CaT channels may compensate for the attenuation of EPSPs at dendrites. Furthermore, the short distance of AIS from the soma may accelerate activation of axonal CaT current in the neurons and help EPSPs reach spike threshold. Indeed, the CaT current was activated by EPSPs and augmented the synaptic response and spike generation of the neurons. Notably, the CaT current was inactivated during repetitive inputs, and these augmenting effects predominated at the initial phase of synaptic activity. These results suggested that dendritic and axonal CaT channels increase the sensitivity to sound at its onset, which may expand the dynamic range for binaural computation in low-CF NL neurons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in nucleus laminaris are binaural coincidence detectors for sound localization. We report that T-type Ca2+ (CaT) current was prominent at dendrites and the axonal trigger zone in neurons tuned to low-frequency sound. Because these neurons have long dendrites and a closer trigger zone compared with those tuned to higher

  13. Response of rocky invertebrate diversity, structure and function to the vertical layering of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, María; Tajadura, Javier; Gorostiaga, José María; Saiz-Salinas, José Ignacio

    2014-06-01

    Macroalgae comprise a prominent part of the rocky benthos where many invertebrates develop, and are believed to be undergoing severe declines worldwide. In order to investigate how the vegetation structure (crustose, basal and canopy layers) contributes to the diversity, structure and function of benthic invertebrates, a total of 31 subtidal transects were sampled along the northeast Atlantic coast of Spain. Significant positive relationships were found between the canopy layer and faunal abundance, taxonomic diversity and functional group diversity. Canopy forming algae were also related to epiphytic invertebrates, medium size forms, colonial strategy and suspensivores. By contrast, basal algae showed negative relationships with all variables tested except for detritivores. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (DISTLM) point to crustose as well as canopy layers as the best link between seaweeds and invertebrate assemblage structure. A close relationship was found between taxonomic and functional diversities. In general, low levels of taxonomic redundancy were detected for functional groups correlated with vegetation structure. A conceptual model based on the results is proposed, describing distinct stages of invertebrate assemblages in relation to the vertical structure of vegetation.

  14. T-Type Calcium Channels Are Required to Maintain Viability of Neural Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Woon; Oh, Hyun Ah; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ki Chan; Eun, Pyung Hwa; Ko, Mee Jung; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Seung, Hana; Kim, Seonmin; Bahn, Geon Ho; Shin, Chan Young

    2018-02-21

    T-type calcium channels are low voltage-activated calcium channels that evoke small and transient calcium currents. Recently, T-type calcium channels have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and neural tube defects. However, their function during embryonic development is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the function and expression of T-type calcium channels in embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). First, we compared the expression of T-type calcium channel subtypes (CaV3.1, 3.2, and 3.3) in NPCs and differentiated neural cells (neurons and astrocytes). We detected all subtypes in neurons but not in astrocytes. In NPCs, CaV3.1 was the dominant subtype, whereas CaV3.2 was weakly expressed, and CaV3.3 was not detected. Next, we determined CaV3.1 expression levels in the cortex during early brain development. Expression levels of CaV3.1 in the embryonic period were transiently decreased during the perinatal period and increased at postnatal day 11. We then pharmacologically blocked T-type calcium channels to determine the effects in neuronal cells. The blockade of T-type calcium channels reduced cell viability, and induced apoptotic cell death in NPCs but not in differentiated astrocytes. Furthermore, blocking T-type calcium channels rapidly reduced AKT-phosphorylation (Ser473) and GSK3β-phosphorylation (Ser9). Our results suggest that T-type calcium channels play essential roles in maintaining NPC viability, and T-type calcium channel blockers are toxic to embryonic neural cells, and may potentially be responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders.

  15. The potential roles of T-type Ca2+ channels in motor coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Gyun ePark

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Specific behavioral patterns are expressed by complex combinations of muscle coordination. Tremors are simple behavioral patterns and are the focus of studies investigating motor coordination mechanisms in the brain. T-type Ca2+ channels mediate intrinsic neuronal oscillations and rhythmic burst spiking, and facilitate the generation of tremor rhythms in motor circuits. Despite substantial evidence that T-type Ca2+ channels mediate pathological tremors, their roles in physiological motor coordination and behavior remain unknown. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the roles that T-type Ca2+ channels play under pathological conditions, and discuss the potential relevance of these channels in mediating physiological motor coordination.

  16. The role of T-type calcium channel genes in absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucai eChen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The thalamic relay neurons, reticular thalamic nucleus, and neocortical pyramidal cells form a circuit that sustains oscillatory burst firing, and is regarded as the underlying mechanism of absence seizures. T-type calcium channels play a key role in this circuit. Here we review the role of T-type calcium channel genes in the development of absence seizures, and emphasize gain or loss of function mutations, and other variations that alter both quantity and quality of transcripts, and methylation status of isoforms of T-type calcium channel proteins might be of equal importance in understanding the pathological mechanism of absence seizures.

  17. Microsatellite primers in Parietaria judaica (Urticaceae) to assess genetic diversity and structure in urban landscapes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Angèle; Bertaudière-Montès, Valérie; Dubut, Vincent; Manel, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Urbanization is one of the main factors contributing to loss of genetic diversity, as the resulting landscape fragmentation and habitat loss induce species isolation. However, studies of genetic structure and diversity in urbanized landscapes are still rare. We characterized microsatellite primers for Parietaria judaica to study this environment. • Methods and Results: Eleven microsatellite loci from P. judaica, an urban plant, were isolated using shotgun pyrosequencing, and the simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were screened in 20 individuals of P. judaica. The loci were tested on 166 individuals from three populations in different cities. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19, and expected and observed heterozygosity values ranged from 0.019 to 0.912 and 0.019 to 0.448, respectively. • Conclusions: The markers amplified well in the species and will be useful for examining genetic diversity and population genetic structure in this urban plant. PMID:25225626

  18. Microsatellite primers in Parietaria judaica (Urticaceae) to assess genetic diversity and structure in urban landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Angèle; Bertaudière-Montès, Valérie; Dubut, Vincent; Manel, Stéphanie

    2014-09-01

    Urbanization is one of the main factors contributing to loss of genetic diversity, as the resulting landscape fragmentation and habitat loss induce species isolation. However, studies of genetic structure and diversity in urbanized landscapes are still rare. We characterized microsatellite primers for Parietaria judaica to study this environment. • Eleven microsatellite loci from P. judaica, an urban plant, were isolated using shotgun pyrosequencing, and the simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were screened in 20 individuals of P. judaica. The loci were tested on 166 individuals from three populations in different cities. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19, and expected and observed heterozygosity values ranged from 0.019 to 0.912 and 0.019 to 0.448, respectively. • The markers amplified well in the species and will be useful for examining genetic diversity and population genetic structure in this urban plant.

  19. Microsatellite Primers in Parietaria judaica (Urticaceae to Assess Genetic Diversity and Structure in Urban Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Bossu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Urbanization is one of the main factors contributing to loss of genetic diversity, as the resulting landscape fragmentation and habitat loss induce species isolation. However, studies of genetic structure and diversity in urbanized landscapes are still rare. We characterized microsatellite primers for Parietaria judaica to study this environment. Methods and Results: Eleven microsatellite loci from P. judaica, an urban plant, were isolated using shotgun pyrosequencing, and the simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were screened in 20 individuals of P. judaica. The loci were tested on 166 individuals from three populations in different cities. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19, and expected and observed heterozygosity values ranged from 0.019 to 0.912 and 0.019 to 0.448, respectively. Conclusions: The markers amplified well in the species and will be useful for examining genetic diversity and population genetic structure in this urban plant.

  20. Does the habitat structure control the distribution and diversity of the Odonatofauna?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Souza

    Full Text Available AbstractThe statement that the habitat complexity and structure govern the abundance and diversity of biological communities has been widely investigated. In this context, we assumed the hypothesis of habitat heterogeneity, that is, the higher habitat complexity leads to greater diversity of Odonata. In addition, we analyzed the influence of habitat structure on the distribution of this community, and evaluated the effects of abiotic variables. Odonata larvae were collected with sieves and by electrofishing in ten neotropical streams belonging to the Pirapó River basin. Forty species of Odonata were registered, which were distributed in eight families, Libellulidae stood out with the highest richness. The high gamma diversity and distribution of Odonata were associated with habitat heterogeneity in these streams. However, the abiotic variables also seem to affect the distribution of Odonata species, in view of the impact of the land use in the vicinity of streams.

  1. Forest structure and plant diversity in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) stands in central Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, L. F.; Bravo, F.; Zaldivar, P.; Pando, V.

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between forest structure and plant diversity in Mediterranean Maritime pine stands (Pinus pinaster Ait.) in the Iberian Range (Spain) was studied. Forty eight stands were sampled. In each, a circular plot (15 m radius) and a transect (25*1 m{sup 2}) were established to estimate stand variables and record presence and abundance of vascular species respectively. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA), simple correlations and multiple stepwise linear regressions were used to explore the relationship between plant diversity and forest structure. Correlation between diversity measurements and stand variables is very weak, but significant correlations were found when evaluating each set of variables separately. Presence and cover of some species (for instance, Veronica arvensis L. or Micropyrum tenellum (L.) Link) is correlated with stand variables; however, determination coefficients found in step-by-step regression are not significant. (Author) 34 refs.

  2. Molecular genetic diversity and genetic structure of Vietnamese indigenous pig populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, L. D.; Do, Duy Ngoc; Nam, L. Q.

    2014-01-01

    of alleles (MNA = 10.1), gene diversity (He = 0.82), allele richness (5.33) and number of private alleles (10). Thirteen percentage of the total genetic variation observed was due to differences among populations. The neighbour-joining dendrogram obtained from Nei's standard genetic distance differentiated......% (Ha Lang) to 98% (Mong Cai). individuals in indigenous pigs were assigned to their own populations. The results confirmed high level of genetic diversity and shed a new light on genetic structure of Vietnam indigenous pig populations.......The study characterized genetic diversity and genetic structure of five indigenous pig populations (Ha Lang, Muong Te, Mong Cai, Lung and Lung Pu), two wild pig populations (Vietnamese and Thai wild pigs) and an exotic pig breed (Yorkshire) using FAO/ISAG recommended 16 microsatellite markers...

  3. [60]Fullerene-peptides: bio-nano conjugates with structural and chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    [60]Fullerene-peptides represent a simple yet chemically diverse example of a bio-nano conjugate. The C60 moiety provides the following attributes to the conjugate: (a) precise three-dimensional architecture, (b) a large hydrophobic mass and (c) unique electronic properties. Conversely, the peptide component provides: (a) structural diversity depending on the overall length and amino acids composition, (b) charge flexibility and (c) secondary structure and recognition. Recent advances in the synthetic strategy for [60]fullerene-peptide synthesis from both pre-formed peptides and using solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) are described. The effects of the hydrophobic C60 on the secondary structure of the peptide depend on the sequence of the latter, but in general the relative stability of particular structures is greatly enhanced. The ability of the [60]fullerene substituent to dramatically modify both cellular uptake and transdermal transport is discussed as is the effects on cell viability and antimicrobial activity.

  4. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha van der Meer

    Full Text Available Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68, which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G"ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G"ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands.

  6. Different histories but similar genetic diversity and structure for black walnut in Indiana and Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin R. Victory; Jeffrey C. Glaubitz; Jennifer A. Fike; Olin E. Rhodes; Keith E. Woeste

    2008-01-01

    Missouri and Indiana have markedly different histories of glaciation and recolonization by forest trees. These states also differ in land use patterns and degree of anthropogenic landscape change such as forest fragmentation. To determine the overall effects of these and other demographic differences on the levels of genetic diversity and structure in black walnut (...

  7. Diversity of condensed tannin structures affects rumen in vitro methane production in sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) accessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatew, B.; Hayot Carbonero, C.; Stringano, E.; Sales, L.F.; Smith, L.M.J.; Mueller-Harvey, I.; Hendriks, W.H.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2015-01-01

    Sainfoin is a non-bloating temperate forage legume with a moderate-to-high condensed tannin (CT) content. This study investigated whether the diversity of sainfoin accessions in terms of CT structures and contents could be related to rumen in vitro gas and methane (CH4) production and fermentation

  8. Comparison of genetic diversity and population structure of Pacific Coast whitebark pine across multiple markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Bower; Bryce A. Richardson; Valerie Hipkins; Regina Rochefort; Carol Aubry

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of "neutral" molecular markers and "adaptive" quantitative traits are common methods of assessing genetic diversity and population structure. Molecular markers typically reflect the effects of demographic and stochastic processes but are generally assumed to not reflect natural selection. Conversely, quantitative (or "adaptive")...

  9. Genetic diversity, population structure, and resistance to Phytophthora capsici of a worldwide collection of eggplant germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegele, Rachel P; Boyle, Samantha; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M; Hausbeck, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important solanaceous crop with high phenotypic diversity and moderate genotypic diversity. Ninety-nine genotypes of eggplant germplasm (species (S. melongena, S. incanum, S. linnaeanum and S. gilo), landraces and heirloom cultivars) from 32 countries and five continents were evaluated for genetic diversity, population structure, fruit shape, and disease resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot. Fruits from each line were measured for fruit shape and evaluated for resistance to two Phytophthora capsici isolates seven days post inoculation. Only one accession (PI 413784) was completely resistant to both isolates evaluated. Partial resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot was found in accessions from all four eggplant species evaluated in this study. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed using 22 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The polymorphism information content (PIC) for the population was moderate (0.49) in the population. Genetic analyses using the program STRUCTURE indicated the existence of four genetic clusters within the eggplant collection. Population structure was detected when eggplant lines were grouped by species, continent of origin, country of origin, fruit shape and disease resistance.

  10. Structure, diversity and evolution of protein toxins from spore-forming entomopathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maagd, de R.A.; Bravo, A.; Berry, C.; Crickmore, N.; Schnepf, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    Gram-positive spore-forming entomopathogenic bacteria can utilize a large variety of protein toxins to help them invade, infect, and finally kill their hosts, through their action on the insect midgut. These toxins belong to a number of homology groups containing a diversity of protein structures

  11. Zooplankton standing stock, community structure and diversity in the northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.; Srivastava, Y.

    The effects of large scale oil spill, which occurred during the Gulf War in 1991 on zooplankton standing stock, community structure and diversity in the northern Arabian Sea were studied. Surface (1-0 m) and vertical zooplankton hauls (200-0 m, 250...

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of sickleweed (Falcaria vulgaris; Apiaceae) in the upper Midwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbottam Piya; Madhav P. Nepal; Jack L. Butler; Gary E. Larson; Achal Neupane

    2014-01-01

    Sickleweed (Falcaria vulgaris), an introduced species native to Europe and Asia, grows as an aggressive weed in some areas of the upper Midwest in the United States. We are reporting genetic diversity and population structure of sickleweed populations using microsatellite markers and nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences. Populations showed high genetic differentiation...

  13. Floristic diversity, stand structure, and composition 11 years after herbicide site preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller; Robert S. Boyd; M. Boyd. Edwards

    1999-01-01

    This study tested for effects of site preparation herbicides applied at high labeled rates 11 years earlier on plant species richness, diversity, and stand structure and composition. Four study sites in three physiographic provinces were established in central Georgia in 1984. Six herbicide treatments were included on each site: hexazinone liquid, hexazinone pellets,...

  14. Interracial Friendship and Structural Diversity: Trends for Greek, Religious, and Ethnic Student Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie J.; Kim, Young K.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how peer interactions in college organizations (Greek, ethnic, and religious) affect interracial friendships, including whether peer interaction in student organizations mediates the relationship between structural diversity and interracial friendship. Involvement in ethnic student organizations was non-significant;…

  15. Understanding the genetic diversity and population structure of yam (Dioscorea alata L.) using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Gemma; Bhattacharjee, Ranjana; Mn, Sheela; Chair, Hana; Malapa, Roger; Lebot, Vincent; K, Abraham; Perrier, Xavier; Petro, Dalila; Penet, Laurent; Pavis, Claudie

    2017-01-01

    Yams (Dioscorea sp.) are staple food crops for millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Dioscorea alata, also known as greater yam, is one of the major cultivated species and most widely distributed throughout the tropics. Despite its economic and cultural importance, very little is known about its origin, diversity and genetics. As a consequence, breeding efforts for resistance to its main disease, anthracnose, have been fairly limited. The objective of this study was to contribute to the understanding of D. alata genetic diversity by genotyping 384 accessions from different geographical regions (South Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean), using 24 microsatellite markers. Diversity structuration was assessed via Principal Coordinate Analysis, UPGMA analysis and the Bayesian approach implemented in STRUCTURE. Our results revealed the existence of a wide genetic diversity and a significant structuring associated with geographic origin, ploidy levels and morpho-agronomic characteristics. Seventeen major groups of genetically close cultivars have been identified, including eleven groups of diploid cultivars, four groups of triploids and two groups of tetraploids. STRUCTURE revealed the existence of six populations in the diploid genetic pool and a few admixed cultivars. These results will be very useful for rationalizing D. alata genetic resources in breeding programs across different regions and for improving germplasm conservation methods.

  16. Analysis of the structural diversity of the microbial community in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of the structural diversity of the microbial community in a paper-mill water system. Thea Van der Merwe, Karl-Heinz Riedel, Francois Wolfaardt. Abstract. Microbial populations in paper-mill water systems are usually enumerated using microbiological techniques such as plate counts and the most probable number ...

  17. Diverse Asian American Families and Communities: Culture, Structure, and Education (Part 1: Why They Differ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Susan J.; Rahman, Zaynah; Kula, Stacy M.; Saito, L. Erika; Witenstein, Matthew A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on 11 diverse Asian American (AA) communities, this article discusses the similarities and differences across East, South, and Southeast Asians. Of two parts in this journal issue, Part 1 presents a review of literature and census data to understand the cultural and structural factors of different types of coethnic communities (strong, weak,…

  18. Genetic diversity, population structure, and resistance to Phytophthora capsici of a worldwide collection of eggplant germplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P Naegele

    Full Text Available Eggplant (Solanum melongena L. is an important solanaceous crop with high phenotypic diversity and moderate genotypic diversity. Ninety-nine genotypes of eggplant germplasm (species (S. melongena, S. incanum, S. linnaeanum and S. gilo, landraces and heirloom cultivars from 32 countries and five continents were evaluated for genetic diversity, population structure, fruit shape, and disease resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot. Fruits from each line were measured for fruit shape and evaluated for resistance to two Phytophthora capsici isolates seven days post inoculation. Only one accession (PI 413784 was completely resistant to both isolates evaluated. Partial resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot was found in accessions from all four eggplant species evaluated in this study. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed using 22 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs. The polymorphism information content (PIC for the population was moderate (0.49 in the population. Genetic analyses using the program STRUCTURE indicated the existence of four genetic clusters within the eggplant collection. Population structure was detected when eggplant lines were grouped by species, continent of origin, country of origin, fruit shape and disease resistance.

  19. Sampling and estimation procedures for the vegetation diversity and structure indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethany K. Schulz; William A. Bechtold; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2009-01-01

    The Vegetation Diversity and Structure Indicator (VEG) is an extensive inventory of vascular plants in the forests of the United States. The VEG indicator provides baseline data to assess trends in forest vascular plant species richness and composition, and the relative abundance and spatial distribution of those species, including invasive and introduced species. The...

  20. Spatial Diversity in Composition and Structure of Nekton in Ngenep Spring and Its Channels, Karangploso - Malang

    OpenAIRE

    Lia Hapsari; Maic Audo Lin Sihombing; Ade Meylisa Crystel Rohie; Catur Retnaningdyah

    2014-01-01

    Water springs and its channel degradation due to anthropogenic pollution may alter the community structure of aquatic organisms. Water spring degradation tehrefore affect the quality of water as tourism resources. This study aims to investigate the changes in community structure of nekton  and determine the relationships between water quality characteristics to the diversity of nekton.  The field survey was set up in Ngenep spring and its channels. Results showed that nekton species found in ...

  1. T-type Ca2+ channels. New players in the aging brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proft, Juliane; Weiss, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2014), e28424/1-e28424/4 ISSN 1942-0889 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * Amyloid beta * calcium channel * calcium signaling * T-type channel Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. Improved Control Strategy for T-type Isolated DC/DC Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dong; Deng, Fujin; Wang, Yanbo

    2017-01-01

    . Under the proposed strategy, the primary circulating current flows through the auxiliary switches (metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors) instead of their body diodes in free-wheeling periods. Such feature can reduce conduction losses, thereby improving the efficiency of T-type isolated DC......T-type isolated DC/DC converters have recently attracted attention due to their numerous advantages, including few components, low cost, and symmetrical operation of transformers. This study proposes an improved control strategy for increasing the efficiency of T-type isolated DC/DC converters....../DC converters. The operation principles and performances of T-type isolated DC/DC converters under the proposed control strategy are analyzed in detail and verified through the simulation and experimental results....

  3. Population structure and genetic diversity of native and invasive populations of Solanum rostratum (Solanaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Zhao

    Full Text Available AIMS: We investigate native and introduced populations of Solanum rostratum, an annual, self-compatible plant that has been introduced around the globe. This study is the first to compare the genetic diversity of Solanum rostratum between native and introduced populations. We aim to (1 determine the level of genetic diversity across the studied regions; (2 explore the likely origins of invasive populations in China; and (3 investigate whether there is the evidence of multiple introductions into China. METHODS: We genotyped 329 individuals at 10 microsatellite loci to determine the levels of genetic diversity and to investigate population structure of native and introduced populations of S. rostratum. We studied five populations in each of three regions across two continents: Mexico, the U.S.A. and China. IMPORTANT FINDINGS: We found the highest genetic diversity among Mexican populations of S. rostratum. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in Chinese and U.S.A. populations, but we found no regional difference in inbreeding coefficients (F IS or population differentiation (F ST. Population structure analyses indicate that Chinese and U.S.A. populations are more closely related to each other than to sampled Mexican populations, revealing that introduced populations in China share an origin with the sampled U.S.A. populations. The distinctiveness between some introduced populations indicates multiple introductions of S. rostratum into China.

  4. Genetic diversity and structure of an endangered desert shrub and the implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhihao; Richardson, Bryce A; Zhuo, Li; Jiang, Xiaolong; Li, Wenjun; Kang, Xiaoshan

    2017-05-01

    Population genetic information can provide valuable insight for the conservation and management of threatened and endangered plant species. Tamarix taklamakanensis is an endangered shrub endemic to arid basins of northwestern China. This species serves to stabilize soils in this region, but has seen substantial loss in its abundance due to depletion of ground water. The populations of this species have become small and fragmented, warranting conservation. Seven microsatellite loci were used to assess the genetic diversity and structure of 15 populations in the Tarim Basin, China. Among populations, the expected heterozygosity and total gene diversity were both moderate ( H E = 0.392, h T = 0.432), however the allelic diversity was low ( A = 2.4). Eleven populations were detected to have experienced recent bottlenecks using Wilcoxon's test and a model-shift test. Most populations of T. taklamakanensis in the centre of Tarim Basin showed low levels of genetic differentiation, but higher levels in geographically outlying populations. Genetic structure based on Bayesian assignment, the neighbour-joining network and principal coordinates analyses produced similar results, supporting five groups in the Tarim Basin. Gene flow was high among Bayesian groups based on historical gene flow estimated by private alleles. The genetic structure of T. taklamakanensis supports a pattern where gene flow principally occurs along river corridors through hydrochory of seeds and insect-mediated pollination. Populations upstream have contributed to a more diverse mixture of populations near the confluence of several rivers near the centre of Tarim Basin. This pattern of genetic structure could be influenced by the flow of water from different river systems. Conservation efforts should focus on fostering the regeneration of this species, maintaining genetic diversity and preserving the extant genetic structure. Conservation efforts are contingent upon maintaining ground water and

  5. Genetic diversity, population structure, and traditional culture ofCamellia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tong; Huang, Weijuan; De Riek, Jan; Zhang, Shuang; Ahmed, Selena; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Long, Chunlin

    2017-11-01

    Camellia reticulata is an arbor tree that has been cultivated in southwestern China by various sociolinguistic groups for esthetic purposes as well as to derive an edible seed oil. This study examined the influence of management, socio-economic factors, and religion on the genetic diversity patterns of Camellia reticulata utilizing a combination of ethnobotanical and molecular genetic approaches. Semi-structured interviews and key informant interviews were carried out with local communities in China's Yunnan Province. We collected plant material ( n  = 190 individuals) from five populations at study sites using single-dose AFLP markers in order to access the genetic diversity within and between populations. A total of 387 DNA fragments were produced by four AFLP primer sets. All DNA fragments were found to be polymorphic (100%). A relatively high level of genetic diversity was revealed in C. reticulata samples at both the species ( H sp  = 0.3397, I sp  = 0.5236) and population (percentage of polymorphic loci = 85.63%, H pop  = 0.2937, I pop  = 0.4421) levels. Findings further revealed a relatively high degree of genetic diversity within C. reticulata populations (Analysis of Molecular Variance = 96.31%). The higher genetic diversity within populations than among populations of C. reticulata from different geographies is likely due to the cultural and social influences associated with its long cultivation history for esthetic and culinary purposes by diverse sociolinguistic groups. This study highlights the influence of human management, socio-economic factors, and other cultural variables on the genetic and morphological diversity of C. reticulata at a regional level. Findings emphasize the important role of traditional culture on the conservation and utilization of plant genetic diversity.

  6. Ca-α1T, a fly T-type Ca2+ channel, negatively modulates sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyunghwa; Lee, Soyoung; Seo, Haengsoo; Oh, Yangkyun; Jang, Donghoon; Choe, Joonho; Kim, Daesoo; Lee, Jung-Ha; Jones, Walton D

    2015-12-09

    Mammalian T-type Ca(2+) channels are encoded by three separate genes (Cav3.1, 3.2, 3.3). These channels are reported to be sleep stabilizers important in the generation of the delta rhythms of deep sleep, but controversy remains. The identification of precise physiological functions for the T-type channels has been hindered, at least in part, by the potential for compensation between the products of these three genes and a lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors. Invertebrates have only one T-type channel gene, but its functions are even less well-studied. We cloned Ca-α1T, the only Cav3 channel gene in Drosophila melanogaster, expressed it in Xenopus oocytes and HEK-293 cells, and confirmed it passes typical T-type currents. Voltage-clamp analysis revealed the biophysical properties of Ca-α1T show mixed similarity, sometimes falling closer to Cav3.1, sometimes to Cav3.2, and sometimes to Cav3.3. We found Ca-α1T is broadly expressed across the adult fly brain in a pattern vaguely reminiscent of mammalian T-type channels. In addition, flies lacking Ca-α1T show an abnormal increase in sleep duration most pronounced during subjective day under continuous dark conditions despite normal oscillations of the circadian clock. Thus, our study suggests invertebrate T-type Ca(2+) channels promote wakefulness rather than stabilizing sleep.

  7. Low threshold T-type calcium channels as targets for novel epilepsy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kim L; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-05-01

    Low voltage-activated T-type calcium channels were originally cloned in the 1990s and much research has since focused on identifying the physiological roles of these channels in health and disease states. T-type calcium channels are expressed widely throughout the brain and peripheral tissues, and thus have been proposed as therapeutic targets for a variety of diseases such as epilepsy, insomnia, pain, cancer and hypertension. This review discusses the literature concerning the role of T-type calcium channels in physiological and pathological processes related to epilepsy. T-type calcium channels have been implicated in pathology of both the genetic and acquired epilepsies and several anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in clinical use are known to suppress seizures via inhibition of T-type calcium channels. Despite the fact that more than 15 new AEDs have become clinically available over the past 20 years at least 30% of epilepsy patients still fail to achieve seizure control, and many patients experience unwanted side effects. Furthermore there are no treatments that prevent the development of epilepsy or mitigate the epileptic state once established. Therefore there is an urgent need for the development of new AEDs that are effective in patients with drug resistant epilepsy, are anti-epileptogenic and are better tolerated. We also review the mechanisms of action of the current AEDs with known effects on T-type calcium channels and discuss novel compounds that are being investigated as new treatments for epilepsy. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. T-type calcium channel: a privileged gate for calcium entry and control of adrenal steroidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Florian Rossier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular calcium plays a crucial role in modulating a variety of functions such as muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression or cell growth. Calcium signaling has been however shown to be more complex than initially thought. Indeed, it is confined within cell microdomains and different calcium channels are associated with different functions, as shown by various channelopathies.Sporadic mutations on voltage-operated L-type calcium channels in adrenal glomerulosa cells have been shown recently to be the second most prevalent genetic abnormalities present in human aldosterone-producing adenoma. The observed modification of the threshold of activation of the mutated channels not only provides an explanation for this gain of function but reminds us on the importance of maintaining adequate electrophysiological characteristics to make channels able to exert specific cellular functions. Indeed, the contribution to steroid production of the various calcium channels expressed in adrenocortical cells is not equal and the reason has been investigated for a long time. Given the very negative resting potential of these cells, and the small membrane depolarization induced by their physiological agonists, low threshold T-type calcium channels are particularly well suited for responding under these conditions and conveying calcium into the cell, at the right place for controlling steroidogenesis. In contrast, high threshold L-type channels are normally activated by much stronger cell depolarizations. The fact that dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, specific for L-type channels, are poorly efficient for reducing aldosterone secretion either in vivo or in vitro, strongly supports the view that these two types of channels differently affect steroid biosynthesis.Whether a similar analysis is transposable to fasciculata cells and cortisol secretion is one of the questions addressed in the present review. No similar mutations on L-type or T-type

  9. Genetic diversity, population structure and association analysis in cut chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pirui; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Wang, Haibin; Su, Jiangshuo; Fang, Weimin; Guan, Zhiyong; Chen, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the genetic diversity present in a working set of plant germplasm can contribute to its effective management and genetic improvement. The cut flower chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) is an economically important ornamental species. With the repeated germplasm exchange and intensive breeding activities, it remains a major task in genetic research. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the genetic diversity and the population structure of a worldwide collection of 159 varieties, and to apply an association mapping approach to identify DNA-based markers linked to five plant architecture traits and six inflorescence traits. The genotyping demonstrated that there was no lack of genetic diversity in the collection and that pair-wise kinship values were relatively low. The clustering based on a Bayesian model of population structure did not reflect known variation in either provenance or inflorescence type. A principal coordinate analysis was, however, able to discriminate most of the varieties according to both of these criteria. About 1 in 100 marker pairs exhibited a degree of linkage disequilibrium. The association analysis identified a number of markers putatively linked to one or more of the traits. Some of these associations were robust over two seasons. The findings provide an in-depth understanding of genetic diversity and population structure present in cut flower chrysanthemum varieties, and an insight into the genetic control of plant architecture and inflorescence-related traits.

  10. Effects of timber harvest on structural diversity and species composition in hardwood forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARZAM TAVANKAR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tavankar F, Bonyad AE. 2015. Effects of timber harvest on structural diversity and species composition in hardwood forests. Biodiversitas 16: 1-9. Forest management leads to changes in structure and species composition of stands. In this research vertical and horizontal structure and species composition were compared in two harvested and protected stands in the Caspian forest of Iran. The results indicated the tree and seedling density, total basal area and stand volume was significantly (P < 0.01 higher in the protected stand. The Fagus orientalis L. had the most density and basal area in the both stands. Species importance value (SIV of Fagus orientalis in the protected stand (92.5 was higher than in the harvested stand (88.5. While, the SIV of shade-intolerant tree species such as Acer insigne, Acer cappadocicum and Alnus subcordata was higher in the harvested stand. The density of trees and seedling of rare tree species, such as Ulmus glabra, Tilia begonifolia, Zelkova caprinifolia and Fraxinus coriarifolia, was also higher in the protected stand. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index in the protected stand (0.84 was significantly higher (P < 0.01 than in the harvested stand (0.72. The highest diversity value in the harvested stand was observed in DBH of 10-40 cm class, while DBH of 40-70 cm had the highest diversity value in the protected stand.

  11. Structure and genetic diversity of natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvares-Carvalho, S V; Duarte, J F; Santos, T C; Santos, R M; Silva-Mann, R; Carvalho, D

    2016-06-17

    In the face of a possible loss of genetic diversity in plants due the environmental changes, actions to ensure the genetic variability are an urgent necessity. The extraction of Brazilian pepper fruits is a cause of concern because it results in the lack of seeds in soil, hindering its distribution in space and time. It is important to address this concern and explore the species, used by riparian communities and agro-factories without considering the need for keeping the seeds for natural seed banks and for species sustainability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the structure and the genetic diversity in natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi). Twenty-two alleles in 223 individuals were identified from eight forest remnants located in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo, and Sergipe. All populations presented loci in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviation. Four populations presented six combinations of loci in linkage disequilibrium. Six exclusive alleles were detected in four populations. Analysis of molecular variance showed the absence of diversity between regions and that between the populations (GST) was 41%. Genetic diversity was structured in seven clusters (ΔK7). Brazilian pepper populations were not structured in a pattern of isolation by distance and present genetic bottleneck. The populations São Mateus, Canastra, Barbacena, and Ilha das Flores were identified as management units and may support conservation projects, ecological restoration and in implementation of management plans for Brazilian pepper in the State of Sergipe.

  12. SSR-based genetic diversity and structure of garlic accessions from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Camila Pinto; Resende, Francisco Vilela; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Pinheiro, José Baldin

    2014-10-01

    Garlic is a spice and a medicinal plant; hence, there is an increasing interest in 'developing' new varieties with different culinary properties or with high content of nutraceutical compounds. Phenotypic traits and dominant molecular markers are predominantly used to evaluate the genetic diversity of garlic clones. However, 24 SSR markers (codominant) specific for garlic are available in the literature, fostering germplasm researches. In this study, we genotyped 130 garlic accessions from Brazil and abroad using 17 polymorphic SSR markers to assess the genetic diversity and structure. This is the first attempt to evaluate a large set of accessions maintained by Brazilian institutions. A high level of redundancy was detected in the collection (50 % of the accessions represented eight haplotypes). However, non-redundant accessions presented high genetic diversity. We detected on average five alleles per locus, Shannon index of 1.2, HO of 0.5, and HE of 0.6. A core collection was set with 17 accessions, covering 100 % of the alleles with minimum redundancy. Overall FST and D values indicate a strong genetic structure within accessions. Two major groups identified by both model-based (Bayesian approach) and hierarchical clustering (UPGMA dendrogram) techniques were coherent with the classification of accessions according to maturity time (growth cycle): early-late and midseason accessions. Assessing genetic diversity and structure of garlic collections is the first step towards an efficient management and conservation of accessions in genebanks, as well as to advance future genetic studies and improvement of garlic worldwide.

  13. Genetic diversity and structure in Bos taurus and Bos indicus populations analyzed by SNP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bang Zhong; Sasazaki, Shinji; Mannen, Hideyuki

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationship and population structure among nine Eurasian cattle populations using 58 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The calculated distribution of minor allele frequencies and heterozygosities suggested that the genetic diversity of Bos indicus populations was lower than that of Bos taurus populations. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the main divergence between the Bos taurus and Bos indicus populations, and subsequently between Asian and European populations. By principal components analysis, the Bos taurus and Bos indicus populations were clearly distinguished with PC1 (61.1%); however, six Bos taurus populations clustered loosely and the partial separation between European and Asian groups was observed by PC2 (12.5%). The structure analysis was performed using the STRUCTURE program. Distinct separation between Bos taurus and Bos indicus was shown at K = 2, and that between European and Asian populations at K = 3. At K = 4, 5 and 6, Mongolian population showed an admixture pattern with different ancestry of Asian and European cattle. At K = 7, all Bos taurus populations showed each cluster with little proportion of admixture. In conclusion, 58 SNP markers in this study could sufficiently estimate the genetic diversity, relationship and structure for nine Eurasian cattle populations, especially by analyses of principal components and STRUCTURE.

  14. Population structure and genetic diversity of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) in a highly fragmented watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, S.M.; Wilson, C.C.; Mandrak, N.E.; Carl, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dams have the potential to affect population size and connectivity, reduce genetic diversity, and increase genetic differences among isolated riverine fish populations. Previous research has reported adverse effects on the distribution and demographics of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), a threatened fish species in Canada. However, effects on genetic diversity and population structure are unknown. We used microsatellite DNA markers to assess the number of genetic populations in the Grand River (Ontario) and to test whether dams have resulted in a loss of genetic diversity and increased genetic differentiation among populations. Three hundred and seventy-seven individuals from eight Grand River sites were genotyped at eight microsatellite loci. Measures of genetic diversity were moderately high and not significantly different among populations; strong evidence of recent population bottlenecks was not detected. Pairwise FST and exact tests identified weak (global FST = 0.011) but statistically significant population structure, although little population structuring was detected using either genetic distances or an individual-based clustering method. Neither geographic distance nor the number of intervening dams were correlated with pairwise differences among populations. Tests for regional equilibrium indicate that Grand River populations were either in equilibrium between gene flow and genetic drift or that gene flow is more influential than drift. While studies on other species have identified strong dam-related effects on genetic diversity and population structure, this study suggests that barrier permeability, river fragment length and the ecological characteristics of affected species can counterbalance dam-related effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Overstory structure and soil nutrients effect on plant diversity in unmanaged moist tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Manhas, Rajesh Kumar; Tripathi, Ashutosh Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Forests with intensive management past are kept unmanaged to restore diversity and ecosystem functioning. Before perpetuating abandonment after protracted restitution, understanding its effect on forest vegetation is desirable. We studied plant diversity and its relation with environmental variables and stand structure in northern Indian unmanaged tropical moist deciduous forest. We hypothesized that post-abandonment species richness would have increased, and the structure of contemporary forest would be heterogeneous. Vegetation structure, composition, and diversity were recorded, in forty 0.1 ha plots selected randomly in four forest ranges. Three soil samples per 0.1 ha were assessed for physicochemistry, fine sand, and clay mineralogy. Contemporary forest had less species richness than pre-abandonment reference period. Fourteen species were recorded as either seedling or sapling, suggesting reappearance or immigration. For most species, regeneration was either absent or impaired. Ordination and multiple regression results showed that exchangeable base cations and phosphorous affected maximum tree diversity and structure variables. Significant correlations between soil moisture and temperature, and shrub layer was observed, besides tree layer correspondence with shrub richness, suggesting that dense overstory resulting from abandonment through its effect on soil conditions, is responsible for dense shrub layer. Herb layer diversity was negatively associated with tree layer and shrub overgrowth (i.e. Mallotus spp.). Protracted abandonment may not reinforce species richness and heterogeneity; perhaps result in high tree and shrub density in moist deciduous forests, which can impede immigrating or reappearing plant species establishment. This can be overcome by density/basal area reduction strategies, albeit for both tree and shrub layer.

  16. A fast virtual screening approach to identify structurally diverse inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giorgio; Jaeger, Timo; Moraca, Francesca; Biava, Mariangela; Flohé, Leopold; Botta, Maurizio

    2011-09-15

    Trypanothione reductase (TryR) is one of the favorite targets for those designing drugs for the treatment of Chagas disease. We present the application of a fast virtual screening approach for designing hit compounds active against TryR. Our protocol combines information derived from structurally known inhibitors and from the TryR receptor structure. Five structurally diverse hit compounds active against TryR and holding promise for the treatment of Chagas disease are reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Forest structure in low-diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; Inman-Narahari, Faith; Cordell, Susan; Giardina, Christian P; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai'i Island. We compared the species diversity, tree density, basal area, biomass, and size class distributions between the two forest types. We then examined these variables across tropical forests within the CTFS network. Consistent with other island forests, the Hawai'i forests were characterized by low species richness and very high relative dominance. The two Hawai'i forests were floristically distinct, yet similar in species richness (15 vs. 21 species) and stem density (3078 vs. 3486/ha). While these forests were selected for their low invasive species cover relative to surrounding forests, both forests averaged 5->50% invasive species cover; ongoing removal will be necessary to reduce or prevent competitive impacts, especially from woody species. The montane wet forest had much larger trees, resulting in eightfold higher basal area and above-ground biomass. Across the CTFS network, the Hawaiian montane wet forest was similar to other tropical forests with respect to diameter distributions, density, and aboveground biomass, while the Hawai'i lowland dry forest was similar in density to tropical forests with much higher diversity. These findings suggest that forest structural variables can be similar across tropical forests independently of species richness. The inclusion of low-diversity Pacific Island forests in the CTFS network provides an ∼80-fold range in species richness (15-1182 species), six-fold variation in mean annual rainfall (835-5272 mm yr(-1)) and 1.8-fold variation in mean annual temperature (16.0-28.4°C). Thus, the Hawaiian forest plots expand the global forest plot network to enable testing of ecological theory for

  18. FLORA: a novel method to predict protein function from structure in diverse superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver C Redfern

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Predicting protein function from structure remains an active area of interest, particularly for the structural genomics initiatives where a substantial number of structures are initially solved with little or no functional characterisation. Although global structure comparison methods can be used to transfer functional annotations, the relationship between fold and function is complex, particularly in functionally diverse superfamilies that have evolved through different secondary structure embellishments to a common structural core. The majority of prediction algorithms employ local templates built on known or predicted functional residues. Here, we present a novel method (FLORA that automatically generates structural motifs associated with different functional sub-families (FSGs within functionally diverse domain superfamilies. Templates are created purely on the basis of their specificity for a given FSG, and the method makes no prior prediction of functional sites, nor assumes specific physico-chemical properties of residues. FLORA is able to accurately discriminate between homologous domains with different functions and substantially outperforms (a 2-3 fold increase in coverage at low error rates popular structure comparison methods and a leading function prediction method. We benchmark FLORA on a large data set of enzyme superfamilies from all three major protein classes (alpha, beta, alphabeta and demonstrate the functional relevance of the motifs it identifies. We also provide novel predictions of enzymatic activity for a large number of structures solved by the Protein Structure Initiative. Overall, we show that FLORA is able to effectively detect functionally similar protein domain structures by purely using patterns of structural conservation of all residues.

  19. Community structure and diversity of tropical forest mammals: data from a global camera trap network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Jorge A; Silva, Carlos E F; Gajapersad, Krisna; Hallam, Chris; Hurtado, Johanna; Martin, Emanuel; McWilliam, Alex; Mugerwa, Badru; O'Brien, Tim; Rovero, Francesco; Sheil, Douglas; Spironello, Wilson R; Winarni, Nurul; Andelman, Sandy J

    2011-09-27

    Terrestrial mammals are a key component of tropical forest communities as indicators of ecosystem health and providers of important ecosystem services. However, there is little quantitative information about how they change with local, regional and global threats. In this paper, the first standardized pantropical forest terrestrial mammal community study, we examine several aspects of terrestrial mammal species and community diversity (species richness, species diversity, evenness, dominance, functional diversity and community structure) at seven sites around the globe using a single standardized camera trapping methodology approach. The sites-located in Uganda, Tanzania, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Suriname, Brazil and Costa Rica-are surrounded by different landscape configurations, from continuous forests to highly fragmented forests. We obtained more than 51 000 images and detected 105 species of mammals with a total sampling effort of 12 687 camera trap days. We find that mammal communities from highly fragmented sites have lower species richness, species diversity, functional diversity and higher dominance when compared with sites in partially fragmented and continuous forest. We emphasize the importance of standardized camera trapping approaches for obtaining baselines for monitoring forest mammal communities so as to adequately understand the effect of global, regional and local threats and appropriately inform conservation actions.

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure of leafy kale and Brassica rupestris Raf. in south Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Lorenzo; von Bothmer, Roland; Poulsen, Gert; Branca, Ferdinando; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2014-12-01

    Local varieties of leafy kales (Brassica oleracea L.) are grown in home gardens in Calabria and Sicily for self-consumption, in the same area where the wild relative Brassica rupestris Raf. also grows. With the use of AFLP markers, comparisons were made of the genetic diversity and population structure of ten wild and 22 cultivated populations, as well as of a hybrid population and of four commercial cultivars of different B. oleracea crops. The level of genetic diversity was higher in leafy kales than in wild populations and this diversity was mainly distributed within populations. Wild populations remained distinct from cultivated material. Additionally, most wild populations were distinctively isolated from each other. On the other hand, it was not possible to molecularly distinguish even geographically distant leafy kale populations from each other or from different B. oleracea crops. It was possible to detect inter-crossing between leafy kales and B. rupestris. Findings from this study illustrate the existing level of genetic diversity in the B. oleracea gene pool. Individual populations (either wild or leafy kales) with higher levels of genetic diversity have been identified and suggestions are given for an informed conservation strategy. Domestication hypotheses are also discussed. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. Analysis of Structure and Diversity of the Kilengwe Forest in the Morogoro Region, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sylvester Kacholi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the structure, species composition, and diversity of a section of the Kilengwe Forest in Tanzania. In order to accomplish the proposed objectives, 18 plots of 20 m × 20 m were randomly established in the forest and the number of tree species in each plot was identified and counted. The most important families and species were determined using importance value indices at the respective taxonomic levels. Diversity was measured using the Shannon-Wiener and Fisher alpha diversity indices. A total of 276 stems/ha representing 93 species/ha within 26 families were documented from 0.72 ha. Fabaceae and Julbernadia globiflora were the dominant family and species, respectively. Seventy-eight percent of the total species were rare. The average basal area of the forest was 7.1 m2/ha. The Shannon-Wiener index (4.02 and Fisher’s alpha diversity (35.5 indicated high species diversity within the forest. The species-area and species-abundance curves revealed an escalating trend implying that more sampling efforts could result in a higher number of species existing in the forest. The size class distribution displayed a reverse J-shaped pattern; however, the larger size classes DBH >50 cm were not represented. The study suggests the necessity for anthropogenic disturbance control as this is the major source of forest degradation in the studied area.

  2. Community structure and diversity of demersal fish assemblages: the role of fishery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Labropoulou

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal experimental trawl surveys were carried out in the Northern Aegean and Thracian seas (NE Mediterranean, Greece, from summer 1990 to autumn 1993, during which a total of 172 fish species were caught. In these areas, fishing pressure is very high, since approximately 50% of the Greek otter trawl fleet operates there, producing more than 57% of the total demersal landings. Different statistics were used to assess spatial structure, seasonal changes and diversity of the demersal fish assemblages on the continental shelf and upper slope. The following measures were applied to the species abundance matrix: species diversity, species richness, evenness and dominance. The analysis of 501 bottom trawls revealed that, in general, species diversity, richness and evenness decreased with water depth, with the highest values at depths 200 m. The effect of depth on the diversity patterns observed was always significant, while seasonal trends were similar with those described for the overall diversity characteristics in each area. Classification and ordination methods showed the existence of 4 groups associated with the continental shelf and upper slope in each area. Classification of the top ranking species at each group and area revealed that commercially important species were dominant in the shallowest zone (

  3. Spatiotemporal diversity, structure and trophic guilds of insect assemblages in a semi-arid Sabkha ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenchouni, Haroun; Menasria, Taha; Neffar, Souad; Chafaa, Smail; Bradai, Lyès; Chaibi, Rachid; Mekahlia, Mohamed Nacer; Bendjoudi, Djamel; Si Bachir, Abdelkrim

    2015-01-01

    The current study highlights some knowledge on the diversity and structure of insect communities and trophic groups living in Sabkha Djendli (semi-arid area of Northeastern Algeria). The entomofauna was monthly sampled from March to November 2006 using pitfall traps at eight sites located at the vicinity of the Sabkha. Structural and diversity parameters (species richness, Shannon index, evenness) were measured for both insect orders and trophic guilds. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was applied to determine how vegetation parameters (species richness and cover) influence spatial and seasonal fluctuations of insect assemblages. The catches totalled 434 insect individuals classified into 75 species, 62 genera, 31 families and 7 orders, of which Coleoptera and Hymenoptera were the most abundant and constant over seasons and study stations. Spring and autumn presented the highest values of diversity parameters. Individual-based Chao-1 species richness estimator indicated 126 species for the total individuals captured in the Sabkha. Based on catch abundances, the structure of functional trophic groups was predators (37.3%), saprophages (26.7%), phytophages (20.5%), polyphages (10.8%), coprophages (4.6%); whereas in terms of numbers of species, they can be classified as phytophages (40%), predators (25.3%), polyphages (13.3%), saprophages (12%), coprophages (9.3%). The CCA demonstrated that phytophages and saprophages as well as Coleoptera and Orthoptera were positively correlated with the two parameters of vegetation, especially in spring and summer. While the abundance of coprophages was positively correlated with species richness of plants, polyphage density was positively associated with vegetation cover. The insect community showed high taxonomic and functional diversity that is closely related to diversity and vegetation cover in different stations of the wetland and seasons.

  4. Spatiotemporal diversity, structure and trophic guilds of insect assemblages in a semi-arid Sabkha ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroun Chenchouni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The current study highlights some knowledge on the diversity and structure of insect communities and trophic groups living in Sabkha Djendli (semi-arid area of Northeastern Algeria. The entomofauna was monthly sampled from March to November 2006 using pitfall traps at eight sites located at the vicinity of the Sabkha. Structural and diversity parameters (species richness, Shannon index, evenness were measured for both insect orders and trophic guilds. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA was applied to determine how vegetation parameters (species richness and cover influence spatial and seasonal fluctuations of insect assemblages. The catches totalled 434 insect individuals classified into 75 species, 62 genera, 31 families and 7 orders, of which Coleoptera and Hymenoptera were the most abundant and constant over seasons and study stations. Spring and autumn presented the highest values of diversity parameters. Individual-based Chao-1 species richness estimator indicated 126 species for the total individuals captured in the Sabkha. Based on catch abundances, the structure of functional trophic groups was predators (37.3%, saprophages (26.7%, phytophages (20.5%, polyphages (10.8%, coprophages (4.6%; whereas in terms of numbers of species, they can be classified as phytophages (40%, predators (25.3%, polyphages (13.3%, saprophages (12%, coprophages (9.3%. The CCA demonstrated that phytophages and saprophages as well as Coleoptera and Orthoptera were positively correlated with the two parameters of vegetation, especially in spring and summer. While the abundance of coprophages was positively correlated with species richness of plants, polyphage density was positively associated with vegetation cover. The insect community showed high taxonomic and functional diversity that is closely related to diversity and vegetation cover in different stations of the wetland and seasons.

  5. Structure of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) diversity in West Africa covaries with a climatic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glato, Kodjo; Aidam, Atsou; Kane, Ndjido Ardo; Bassirou, Diallo; Couderc, Marie; Zekraoui, Leila; Scarcelli, Nora; Barnaud, Adeline; Vigouroux, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Sub-Saharan agriculture has been identified as vulnerable to ongoing climate change. Adaptation of agriculture has been suggested as a way to maintain productivity. Better knowledge of intra-specific diversity of varieties is prerequisites for the successful management of such adaptation. Among crops, root and tubers play important roles in food security and economic growth for the most vulnerable populations in Africa. Here, we focus on the sweet potato. The Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) was domesticated in Central and South America and was later introduced into Africa and is now cultivated throughout tropical Africa. We evaluated its diversity in West Africa by sampling a region extending from the coastal area of Togo to the northern Sahelian region of Senegal that represents a range of climatic conditions. Using 12 microsatellite markers, we evaluated 132 varieties along this gradient. Phenotypic data from field trials conducted in three seasons was also obtained. Genetic diversity in West Africa was found to be 18% lower than in America. Genetic diversity in West Africa is structured into five groups, with some groups found in very specific climatic areas, e.g. under a tropical humid climate, or under a Sahelian climate. We also observed genetic groups that occur in a wider range of climates. The genetic groups were also associated with morphological differentiation, mainly the shape of the leaves and the color of the stem or root. This particular structure of diversity along a climatic gradient with association to phenotypic variability can be used for conservation strategies. If such structure is proved to be associated with specific climatic adaptation, it will also allow developing strategies to adapt agriculture to ongoing climate variation in West Africa.

  6. Influence of biotic variables on invertebrate size structure and diversity in coastal wetlands of Southeastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón-Pardo, María; Armengol, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Biomass and size-based estimations provide relevant information regarding ecosystem functioning and biotic interactions. Our aims were to study the effect of fish and macrophytes on the size structure of invertebrate assemblages (from rotifers to insects) in a set of coastal water bodies, estimating the biomass (total and main invertebrate groups), the biomass-size spectra (model of Pareto) and size diversity. In fishless ponds, cladoceran and ostracod biomass were higher, and they presented greater size diversity. In fish ponds, rotifer biomass presented greater proportion; while in fishless ponds, cladocerans were usually the most abundant taxa and the largest organisms. The biomass size spectra showed more irregularities in fishless ponds, due to the low densities of small taxa (rotifers and copepod juveniles) and big taxa (malacostraceans or insects). Differences is size structure and diversity were also observed between spring and summer, suggesting a higher recruitment of juveniles in spring, and thus, a higher predation pressure upon zooplankton at that moment. Macrophyte cover did not apparently influence those parameters, except for the biomass of ostracods, copepods, and insects. Therefore, predation by fish strongly affected invertebrate biomass, reflecting their selective feeding, and allowing high densities of small taxa. Predation pressure decreased size diversity, by limiting the abundance of vulnerable taxa of specific size. Seasonal changes were likely related to the spring recruitment of fish juveniles. The presence of small fish and invertebrate predator taxa among the macrophytes, restrict their role as refuges for prey invertebrates.

  7. [Diversity and community structure of endophytic fungi from Taxus chinensis var. mairei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A total of 628 endophytic fungi were isolated from 480 tissue segments of needles and branches of Taxus chinensis var. mairei. According to morphological characteristics and ITS sequences, they represented 43 taxa in 28 genera, of which 10 Hyphomycetes, 20 Coelomycetes, 12 Ascomycetes and 1 unknown fungus. Phomopsis mali was confirmed as the dominant species. In accordance with relative frequency, Alternaria alternata, Aureobasidium pullulans, Colletotrichum boninense, C. gloeosporioides, Epicoccum nigrum , Fungal sp., Fusarium lateritium, Glomerella cingulata, Magnaporthales sp. , Nigrospora oryzae, Pestalotiopsis maculiformans, P. microspora, Peyronellaea glomerata and Xylaria sp. 1 were more common in T. chinensis var. mairei. T. chinensis var. mairei were severely infected by endophytic fungi. Endophytic fungi were found in 81 percent of plant tissues with a high diversity. Distribution ranges of endophytic fungi were influenced by tissue properties. The colonization rate, richness, diversity of endophytic fungi in needles were obviously lower than in branches, and kinds of endophytic fungi between branches were more similar than those in needles, thus endophytic fungi had tissue preference. In addition, tissue age influenced the community structure of endophytic fungi. The elder branch tissues were, the higher colonization rate, richness, diversity of endophytic fungi were. Systematic studying the diversity and community structure of endophytic fungi in T. chinensis var. mairei and clarifying their distribution regularity in plant tissues would offer basic data and scientific basis for their development and utilization. Discussing the presence of fungal pathogens in healthy plant tissues would be of positive significance for source protection of T. chinensis var. mairei.

  8. Environmental and climatic determinants of molecular diversity and genetic population structure in a coenagrionid damselfly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Wellenreuther

    Full Text Available Identifying environmental factors that structure intraspecific genetic diversity is of interest for both habitat preservation and biodiversity conservation. Recent advances in statistical and geographical genetics make it possible to investigate how environmental factors affect geographic organisation and population structure of molecular genetic diversity within species. Here we present a study on a common and wide ranging insect, the blue tailed damselfly Ischnuraelegans, which has been the target of many ecological and evolutionary studies. We addressed the following questions: (i Is the population structure affected by longitudinal or latitudinal gradients?; (ii Do geographic boundaries limit gene flow?; (iii Does geographic distance affect connectivity and is there a signature of past bottlenecks?; (iv Is there evidence of a recent range expansion and (vi what is the effect of geography and climatic factors on population structure? We found low to moderate genetic sub-structuring between populations (mean F(ST = 0.06, D(est = 0.12, and an effect of longitude, but not latitude, on genetic diversity. No significant effects of geographic boundaries (e.g. water bodies were found. F(ST-and D(est-values increased with geographic distance; however, there was no evidence for recent bottlenecks. Finally, we did not detect any molecular signatures of range expansions or an effect of geographic suitability, although local precipitation had a strong effect on genetic differentiation. The population structure of this small insect has probably been shaped by ecological factors that are correlated with longitudinal gradients, geographic distances, and local precipitation. The relatively weak global population structure and high degree of genetic variation within populations suggest that I. elegans has high dispersal ability, which is consistent with this species being an effective and early coloniser of new habitats.

  9. Community diversity, structure and carbon footprint of nematode food web following reforestation on degraded Karst soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ning; Li, Hui; Tang, Zheng; Li, Zhongfang; Tian, Jing; Lou, Yilai; Li, Jianwei; Li, Guichun; Hu, Xiaomin

    2016-06-17

    We examined community diversity, structure and carbon footprint of nematode food web along a chronosequence of T. Sinensis reforestation on degraded Karst. In general, after the reforestation: a serious of diversity parameters and community indices (Shannon-Weinier index (H'), structure index (SI), etc.) were elevated; biomass ratio of fungivores to bacterivores (FFC/BFC), and fungi to bacteria (F/B) were increased, and nematode channel ratio (NCR) were decreased; carbon footprints of all nematode trophic groups, and biomass of bacteria and fungi were increased. Our results indicate that the Karst aboveground vegetation restoration was accompanied with belowground nematode food web development: increasing community complexity, function and fungal dominance in decomposition pathway, and the driving forces included the bottom-up effect (resource control), connectedness of functional groups, as well as soil environments.

  10. Network diversity structure, closeness and innovation of South African micro-entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliada Wosu Griffin-EL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study qualitatively explores the embeddedness of the innovation process of South African microbusinesses by investigating how small local entrepreneurs in the Greater Johannesburg area utilise their social networks to source entrepreneurial value. A comparative grounded theory analysis enabled the original conceptualisation of Network Diversity Structure and formulates the central proposition that the network dimensions of diversity and closeness enable the innovation process among manufacturing microbusinesses more so than in service microbusinesses.  Furthermore, the study proposes that both a structural and relational/experiential dimension of closeness, enables micro-entrepreneurs to create meaning and knowledge collaboratively with other entrepreneurs and actors. This socially facilitated process of exchanging ideas, information, and resources is central to the innovation process of firms traditionally limited by both their size and historical social institutions.

  11. Structural and regulatory diversity shape HLA-C protein expression levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurman; Gras, Stephanie; Mobbs, Jesse I.; Vivian, Julian P.; Cortes, Adrian; Barber, Thomas; Kuttikkatte, Subita Balaram; Jensen, Lise Torp; Attfield, Kathrine E.; Dendrou, Calliope A.; Carrington, Mary; McVean, Gil; Purcell, Anthony W.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Fugger, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Expression of HLA-C varies widely across individuals in an allele-specific manner. This variation in expression can influence efficacy of the immune response, as shown for infectious and autoimmune diseases. MicroRNA binding partially influences differential HLA-C expression, but the additional contributing factors have remained undetermined. Here we use functional and structural analyses to demonstrate that HLA-C expression is modulated not just at the RNA level, but also at the protein level. Specifically, we show that variation in exons 2 and 3, which encode the α1/α2 domains, drives differential expression of HLA-C allomorphs at the cell surface by influencing the structure of the peptide-binding cleft and the diversity of peptides bound by the HLA-C molecules. Together with a phylogenetic analysis, these results highlight the diversity and long-term balancing selection of regulatory factors that modulate HLA-C expression. PMID:28649982

  12. First regional evaluation of nuclear genetic diversity and population structure in northeastern coyotes ( Canis latrans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzón, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of eastern coyotes ( Canis latrans) are based on one of two strategies: sampling many individuals using one or very few molecular markers, or sampling very few individuals using many genomic markers. Thus, a regional analysis of genetic diversity and population structure in eastern coyotes using many samples and several molecular markers is lacking. I evaluated genetic diversity and population structure in 385 northeastern coyotes using 16 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A region-wide analysis of population structure revealed three primary genetic populations, but these do not correspond to the same three subdivisions inferred in a previous analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. More focused geographic analyses of population structure indicated that ample genetic structure occurs in coyotes from an intermediate contact zone where two range expansion fronts meet. These results demonstrate that genotyping several highly heterozygous SNPs in a large, geographically dense sample is an effective way to detect cryptic population genetic structure. The importance of SNPs in studies of population and wildlife genomics is rapidly increasing; this study adds to the growing body of recent literature that demonstrates the utility of SNPs ascertained from a model organism for evolutionary inference in closely related species. PMID:25075291

  13. First regional evaluation of nuclear genetic diversity and population structure in northeastern coyotes ( Canis latrans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzón, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of eastern coyotes ( Canis latrans) are based on one of two strategies: sampling many individuals using one or very few molecular markers, or sampling very few individuals using many genomic markers. Thus, a regional analysis of genetic diversity and population structure in eastern coyotes using many samples and several molecular markers is lacking. I evaluated genetic diversity and population structure in 385 northeastern coyotes using 16 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A region-wide analysis of population structure revealed three primary genetic populations, but these do not correspond to the same three subdivisions inferred in a previous analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. More focused geographic analyses of population structure indicated that ample genetic structure occurs in coyotes from an intermediate contact zone where two range expansion fronts meet. These results demonstrate that genotyping several highly heterozygous SNPs in a large, geographically dense sample is an effective way to detect cryptic population genetic structure. The importance of SNPs in studies of population and wildlife genomics is rapidly increasing; this study adds to the growing body of recent literature that demonstrates the utility of SNPs ascertained from a model organism for evolutionary inference in closely related species.

  14. No apparent role for T-type Ca2+ channels in renal autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Hassing; Salomonsson, Max; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard

    2016-01-01

    Renal autoregulation protects glomerular capillaries against increases in renal perfusion pressure (RPP). In the mesentery, both L- and T-type calcium channels are involved in autoregulation. L-type calcium channels participate in renal autoregulation, but the role of T-type channels is not fully......-type and CaV3.1 knockout mice were assessed. Autoregulation of renal blood flow was examined during acute increases in RPP in normo- and hypertensive rats under pharmacological blockade of T- and L-type calcium channels using mibefradil (0.1 μM) and nifedipine (1 μM). In contrast to the results from previous...... pharmacological studies, genetic deletion of T-type channels CaV3.1 did not affect renal autoregulation. Pharmacological blockade of T-type channels using concentrations of mibefradil which specifically blocks T-type channels also had no effect in wild-type or knockout mice. Blockade of L-type channels...

  15. Impact of Stand Structure to the Diversity of Tree Sapling in Rubber Agroforest System

    OpenAIRE

    Rasnovi, Saida

    2012-01-01

    The study of stand structure of rubber agroforest system and its effect on tree sapling diversity was carried out in Bungo District, Jambi Province from August 2004 to August 2005. Basal area (BA) and tree density were surveyed using variable-area transect method. Tree sapling species was surveyed using standard plots combined with circular elementary subplots laid along 60 m transect line. The result shown that BA and tree density of rubber agroforest system were lower significantly with for...

  16. Land-use systems affect Archaeal community structure and functional diversity in western Amazon soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio Aparecido Navarrete

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of the ecology of soil microbial communities at relevant spatial scales is primordial in the wide Amazon region due to the current land use changes. In this study, the diversity of the Archaea domain (community structure and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (richness and community composition were investigated using molecular biology-based techniques in different land-use systems in western Amazonia, Brazil. Soil samples were collected in two periods with high precipitation (March 2008 and January 2009 from Inceptisols under primary tropical rainforest, secondary forest (5-20 year old, agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA (PCR-DGGE using the 16S rRNA gene as a biomarker showed that archaeal community structures in crops and pasture soils are different from those in primary forest soil, which is more similar to the community structure in secondary forest soil. Sequence analysis of excised DGGE bands indicated the presence of crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal organisms. Based on clone library analysis of the gene coding the subunit of the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (amoA of Archaea (306 sequences, the Shannon-Wiener function and Simpson's index showed a greater ammonia-oxidizing archaeal diversity in primary forest soils (H' = 2.1486; D = 0.1366, followed by a lower diversity in soils under pasture (H' = 1.9629; D = 0.1715, crops (H' = 1.4613; D = 0.3309 and secondary forest (H' = 0.8633; D = 0.5405. All cloned inserts were similar to the Crenarchaeota amoA gene clones (identity > 95 % previously found in soils and sediments and distributed primarily in three major phylogenetic clusters. The findings indicate that agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture affect the archaeal community structure and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in western Amazon soils.

  17. High Genetic Diversity and Structured Populations of the Oriental Fruit Moth in Its Range of Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yan; Peng, Xiong; Liu, Gaoming; Pan, Hongyan; Dorn, Silvia; Chen, Maohua

    2013-01-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita ( = Cydia) molesta is a key fruit pest globally. Despite its economic importance, little is known about its population genetics in its putative native range that includes China. We used five polymorphic microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial gene sequences to characterize the population genetic diversity and genetic structure of G. molesta from nine sublocations in three regions of a major fruit growing area of China. Larval samples were collected through...

  18. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND STRUCTURE OF Oenocarpus mapora GERMPLASM CONSERVED AT EASTERN AMAZON

    OpenAIRE

    ELISA FERREIRA MOURA; MARIA DO SOCORRO PADILHA DE OLIVEIRA; DIEHGO TULOZA DA SILVA; LÍGIA CRISTINE GONÇALVES PONTES

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and structure in the germoplasm of Oenocarpus mapora conserved at Eastern Amazon. Thus, 88 individuals were genotyped with five microsatellite loci. These individuals belong to 24 accessions that were sampled in eight sample places of three Brazilian Amazon states conserved at the Active Germplasm Bank (AGB) of Embrapa Eastern Amazon. All loci were polymorphic and they generated 85 alleles with an average of 17 alleles per ...

  19. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Ethiopian Sheep Populations Revealed by High-Density SNP Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edea, Zewdu; Dessie, Tadelle; Dadi, Hailu; Do, Kyoung-Tag; Kim, Kwan-Suk

    2017-01-01

    Sheep in Ethiopia are adapted to a wide range of environments, including extreme habitats. Elucidating their genetic diversity is critical for improving breeding strategies and mapping quantitative trait loci associated with productivity. To this end, the present study investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of five Ethiopian sheep populations exhibiting distinct phenotypes and sampled from distinct production environments, including arid lowlands and highlands. To investigate the genetic relationships in greater detail and infer population structure of Ethiopian sheep breeds at the continental and global levels, we analyzed genotypic data of selected sheep breeds from the Ovine SNP50K HapMap dataset. All Ethiopian sheep samples were genotyped with Ovine Infinium HD SNP BeadChip (600K). Mean genetic diversity ranged from 0.29 in Arsi-Bale to 0.32 in Menz sheep, while estimates of genetic differentiation among populations ranged from 0.02 to 0.07, indicating low to moderate differentiation. An analysis of molecular variance revealed that 94.62 and 5.38% of the genetic variation was attributable to differences within and among populations, respectively. Our population structure analysis revealed clustering of five Ethiopian sheep populations according to tail phenotype and geographic origin-i.e., short fat-tailed (very cool high-altitude), long fat-tailed (mid to high-altitude), and fat-rumped (arid low-altitude), with clear evidence of admixture between long fat-tailed populations. North African sheep breeds showed higher levels of within-breed diversity, but were less differentiated than breeds from Eastern and Southern Africa. When African breeds were grouped according to geographic origin (North, South, and East), statistically significant differences were detected among groups (regions). A comparison of population structure between Ethiopian and global sheep breeds showed that fat-tailed breeds from Eastern and Southern Africa clustered

  20. Spatial Diversity in Composition and Structure of Nekton in Ngenep Spring and its Channels, Karangploso - Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Hapsari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Water springs and its channel degradation due to anthropogenic pollution may alter the community structure of aquatic organisms. Water spring degradation tehrefore affect the quality of water as tourism resources. This study aims to investigate the changes in community structure of nekton  and determine the relationships between water quality characteristics to the diversity of nekton.  The field survey was set up in Ngenep spring and its channels. Results showed that nekton species found in Ngenep spring and its channels consists of 4 classes, 4 orders, 6 families, and 7 species with total 627 nekton samples. It is comprises of fishes, shrimp, frogs and waterstriders. Nekton diversity index (H’ in the spring and irrigation channel were in moderate level (1diversity and community structure. Clustering analyses and PCA result shows correlation pattern between nekton distribution with physico-chemical water quality parameters. However, physico-chemical water quality parameters in Ngenep springs and its channel were still optimum as nekton habitat (PP No. 82/ 2001. Keywords: Community structure, Nekton, Spatial diversity, Spring, Water channel

  1. Fish diversity and assemblage structure in Ken River of Panna landscape, central India

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J.A.; Parmar, R.; Ramesh, K; S Sen; R.S. Murthy

    2012-01-01

    Fish diversity and assemblage structure in relation to habitat variables were studied in 15 sites in Panna landscape, central India. The sampling was performed between February-April 2009. Fifty species of fishes belonging to 32 genera, 15 families and four orders were recorded from the study area. Cyprinids were the dominant assemblage members in all study streams (abundance ranges from 56.6-94.5 %). The cyprinid Devario aequipinnatus and the snakehead Channa gachua had highest local dom...

  2. Impacts of aquaculture wastewater irrigation on soil microbial functional diversity and community structure in arid regions

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lijuan; Feng, Qi; Li, Changsheng; Wei, Yongping; Zhao, Yan; Feng, Yongjiu; Zheng, Hang; Li, Fengrui; Li, Huiya

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture wastewater is one of the most important alternative water resources in arid regions where scarcity of fresh water is common. Irrigation with this kind of water may affect soil microbial functional diversity and community structure as changes of soil environment would be significant. Here, we conducted a field sampling to investigate these effects using Biolog and metagenomic methods. The results demonstrated that irrigation with aquaculture wastewater could dramatically reduce soi...

  3. The levels of fruit organization in Celastraceae and structural diversity of pirenariums in Cassinoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Savinov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The levels of fruit organization are determined for the Celastraceae family on the basis of fruit morphology and anatomical study of pericarp (114 species from 45 genera. Analysis of their correlation with basal and derivative lineages according to the last molecular data is conducted and reconstruction of initial stages of the family phylogeny is presented. Special focus to structural diversity of pirenarium in Cassinoideae subfamily is spared.

  4. Allelic diversity and population structure of Bacillus sphaericus as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yong; Hu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Dasheng; Wu, Yiming; Yuan, Zhiming

    2011-08-01

    The genetic diversity of 35 Bacillus sphaericus strains was analyzed by a newly developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, toxin gene pool survey, and mosquito bioassay. The results demonstrated that strains assigned to the same sequence type (ST) had the same occurrence of toxin genes. Further sequence analysis revealed that toxic strains presented a nearly clonal population structure, whereas nontoxic strains had a high level of heterogeneity and were significantly distinct from toxic strains.

  5. Allelic Diversity and Population Structure of Bacillus sphaericus as Revealed by Multilocus Sequence Typing ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yong; Hu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Dasheng; Wu, Yiming; Yuan, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 35 Bacillus sphaericus strains was analyzed by a newly developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, toxin gene pool survey, and mosquito bioassay. The results demonstrated that strains assigned to the same sequence type (ST) had the same occurrence of toxin genes. Further sequence analysis revealed that toxic strains presented a nearly clonal population structure, whereas nontoxic strains had a high level of heterogeneity and were significantly distinct from toxic strains. PMID:21685170

  6. Fungal endophytes of aquatic macrophytes: diverse host-generalists characterized by tissue preferences and geographic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Dustin C.; Battista, Lorna J.; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Most studies of endophytic symbionts have focused on terrestrial plants, neglecting the ecologically and economically important plants present in aquatic ecosystems. We evaluated the diversity, composition, host- and tissue affiliations, and geographic structure of fungal endophytes associated with common aquatic plants in northern Arizona, USA. Endophytes were isolated in culture from roots and photosynthetic tissues during two growing seasons. A total of 226 isolates representing 60 putativ...

  7. Structure and diversity of restingas along a flood gradient in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Silva Magnago

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to relate changes in structure and species diversity with edaphic variables (soil type and flooding regime in a gradient of forest formations within the Brazilian restingas (coastal woodlands. The study was carried out in the Jacarenema Municipal Natural Park, in the city of Vila Velha, in the Espírito Santo State, Brazil. We evaluated the structure of shrub and tree components by sampling 80 plots of 5 × 25 m each, equally distributed among four forest types (well-drained, transitional, floodplain and flooded. We included all individuals with a ≥ 3.2 cm diameter at breast height. From each plot, soil samples (for chemical and physical analysis were collected at a depth of 0-10 cm. We identified a significant fertility gradient (of soil nutrient availability and a strong influence of groundwater on each forest type. We also found significant differences among the forest types in terms of individual basal area and height, as well as density. Diversity increased along the environmental gradient, from flooded to well-drained forest. We conclude that variations in structure and diversity among the four forest types were correlated with the flooding regime, as well as with chemical and physical characteristics of the soil.

  8. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Two Tomato Species from the Galapagos Islands

    KAUST Repository

    Pailles, Yveline

    2017-02-15

    Endemic flora of the Galapagos Islands has adapted to thrive in harsh environmental conditions. The wild tomato species from the Galapagos Islands, Solanum cheesmaniae and S. galapagense, are tolerant to various stresses, and can be crossed with cultivated tomato. However, information about genetic diversity and relationships within and between populations is necessary to use these resources efficiently in plant breeding. In this study, we analyzed 3,974 polymorphic SNP markers, obtained through the genotyping-by-sequencing technique, DArTseq, to elucidate the genetic diversity and population structure of 67 accessions of Galapagos tomatoes (compared to two S. lycopersicum varieties and one S. pimpinellifolium accession). Two clustering methods, Principal Component Analysis and STRUCTURE, showed clear distinction between the two species and a subdivision in the S. cheesmaniae group corresponding to geographical origin and age of the islands. High genetic variation among the accessions within each species was suggested by the AMOVA. High diversity in the S. cheesmaniae group and its correlation with the islands of origin were also suggested. This indicates a possible influence of the movement of the islands, from west to east, on the gene flow. Additionally, the absence of S. galapagense populations in the eastern islands points to the species divergence occurring after the eastern islands became isolated. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the population structure of the Galapagos tomatoes collection partially explains the evolutionary history of both species, knowledge that facilitates exploitation of their genetic potential for the identification of novel alleles contributing to stress tolerance.

  9. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Two Tomato Species from the Galapagos Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailles, Yveline; Ho, Shwen; Pires, Inês S; Tester, Mark; Negrão, Sónia; Schmöckel, Sandra M

    2017-01-01

    Endemic flora of the Galapagos Islands has adapted to thrive in harsh environmental conditions. The wild tomato species from the Galapagos Islands, Solanum cheesmaniae and S. galapagense , are tolerant to various stresses, and can be crossed with cultivated tomato. However, information about genetic diversity and relationships within and between populations is necessary to use these resources efficiently in plant breeding. In this study, we analyzed 3,974 polymorphic SNP markers, obtained through the genotyping-by-sequencing technique, DArTseq, to elucidate the genetic diversity and population structure of 67 accessions of Galapagos tomatoes (compared to two S. lycopersicum varieties and one S. pimpinellifolium accession). Two clustering methods, Principal Component Analysis and STRUCTURE, showed clear distinction between the two species and a subdivision in the S. cheesmaniae group corresponding to geographical origin and age of the islands. High genetic variation among the accessions within each species was suggested by the AMOVA. High diversity in the S. cheesmaniae group and its correlation with the islands of origin were also suggested. This indicates a possible influence of the movement of the islands, from west to east, on the gene flow. Additionally, the absence of S. galapagense populations in the eastern islands points to the species divergence occurring after the eastern islands became isolated. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the population structure of the Galapagos tomatoes collection partially explains the evolutionary history of both species, knowledge that facilitates exploitation of their genetic potential for the identification of novel alleles contributing to stress tolerance.

  10. Diversity and biogeochemical structuring of bacterial communities across the Porangahau ridge accretionary prism, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, L.J.; Gillevet, P.M.; Pohlman, J.W.; Sikaroodi, M.; Greinert, J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Sediments from the Porangahau ridge, located off the northeastern coast of New Zealand, were studied to describe bacterial community structure in conjunction with differing biogeochemical regimes across the ridge. Low diversity was observed in sediments from an eroded basin seaward of the ridge and the community was dominated by uncultured members of the Burkholderiales. Chloroflexi/GNS and Deltaproteobacteria were abundant in sediments from a methane seep located landward of the ridge. Gas-charged and organic-rich sediments further landward had the highest overall diversity. Surface sediments, with the exception of those from the basin, were dominated by Rhodobacterales sequences associated with organic matter deposition. Taxa related to the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus and the JS1 candidates were highly abundant at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) at three sites. To determine how community structure was influenced by terrestrial, pelagic and in situ substrates, sequence data were statistically analyzed against geochemical data (e.g. sulfate, chloride, nitrogen, phosphorous, methane, bulk inorganic and organic carbon pools) using the Biota-Environmental matching procedure. Landward of the ridge, sulfate was among the most significant structuring factors. Seaward of the ridge, silica and ammonium were important structuring factors. Regardless of the transect location, methane was the principal structuring factor on SMTZ communities. FEMS Microbiology Ecology ?? 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  11. Population structure and genetic diversity in tristylous Narcissus triandrus: insights from microsatellite and chloroplast DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2007-06-01

    We investigated cpDNA sequence and nuclear microsatellite variation among populations of the wild daffodil Narcissus triandrus to examine the role of historical vs. contemporary forces in shaping population structure, morphological differentiation and sexual-system evolution. This wide-ranging heterostylous species of the Iberian Peninsula is largely composed of two allopatric varieties (vars. cernuus and triandrus), and populations with either stylar trimorphism or dimorphism. Dimorphic populations only occur in var. triandrus, are mainly restricted to the northwestern portion of the species range, and uniformly lack the mid-styled morph (M-morph). Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence variation revealed strong geographical structuring and evidence for a fragmentation event associated with differentiation of the two varieties. In var. triandrus, population fragmentation, restricted gene flow and isolation-by-distance were also inferred. Significant differences in genetic diversity and population structure between the two varieties likely reflect historical and contemporary differences in demography and gene flow among populations. Discordance between cpDNA markers and both microsatellite and morphological variation indicate that hybridization has occurred between the two varieties at contact zones. There were no differences in genetic diversity or population structure between dimorphic and trimorphic populations, and chloroplast haplotypes were not associated with either sexual system, indicating transitions in morph structure within each maternal lineage. M-morph frequencies were positively correlated with differentiation at microsatellite loci, indicating that the evolutionary processes influencing these neutral markers also influence alleles controlling the style morphs.

  12. Arthropod diversity and assemblage structure response to deforestation and desertification in the Sahel of western Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Lingbeek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Drylands are highly vulnerable to desertification and among the most endangered ecosystems. To understand how biodiversity responds to environmental degradation in these fragile ecosystems, we examined whether arthropod, beetle, spider and ant diversity and assemblage structure differed (1 between seasons, (2 among locations (3 between protected areas of tropical dry forest and adjacent communal lands suffering from desertification, as well as (4 how vegetation impacts assemblage structures. We established 12 plots spaced homogenously throughout each protected area and the adjacent communal land at three locations: Beersheba, Bandia and Ngazobil. Within each plot, we measured canopy closure, vegetation height, percent cover of bare ground, leaf litter, grasses and forbs and collected arthropods using pitfall traps during the 2014 dry (May and rainy (September seasons. We collected 123,705 arthropods representing 733 morphospecies, 10,849 beetles representing 216 morphospecies, 4969 spiders representing 91 morphospecies and 59,183 ants representing 45 morphospecies. Results showed greater arthropod and beetle diversities (P = 0.002–0.040 in the rainy season, no difference in diversity among locations for any taxonomic group and a difference (P ≤ 0.001 in diversity for all taxa between protected areas and communal lands. Assemblage structures of all taxa responded (P = 0.001 to vegetation characteristics, differed (P = 0.015–0.045 between seasons and, with a few exceptions, locations and fragments. Our results illustrate the importance of a multi-taxa approach in understanding biodiversity response to anthropogenic disturbances as well as the value of protected areas in preserving biodiversity of the Sahel.

  13. Impacts of aquaculture wastewater irrigation on soil microbial functional diversity and community structure in arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lijuan; Feng, Qi; Li, Changsheng; Wei, Yongping; Zhao, Yan; Feng, Yongjiu; Zheng, Hang; Li, Fengrui; Li, Huiya

    2017-09-11

    Aquaculture wastewater is one of the most important alternative water resources in arid regions where scarcity of fresh water is common. Irrigation with this kind of water may affect soil microbial functional diversity and community structure as changes of soil environment would be significant. Here, we conducted a field sampling to investigate these effects using Biolog and metagenomic methods. The results demonstrated that irrigation with aquaculture wastewater could dramatically reduce soil microbial functional diversity. The values of diversity indices and sole carbon source utilization were all significantly decreased. Increased soil salinity, especially Cl concentration, appeared primarily associated with the decreases. Differently, higher bacterial community diversity was obtained in aquaculture wastewater irrigated soils. More abundant phyla Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and fewer members of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Planctomycetes were found in this kind of soils. Changes in the concentration of soil Cl mainly accounted for the shifts of bacterial community composition. This research can improve our understanding of how aquaculture wastewater irrigation changes soil microbial process and as a result, be useful to manage soil and wastewater resources in arid regions.

  14. Genetic Diversity and Structure among Isolated Populations of the Endangered Gees Golden Langur in Assam, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuvarmadam S Ram

    Full Text Available Gee's golden langur (Trachypithecus geei is an endangered colobine primate, endemic to the semi-evergreen and mixed-deciduous forests of Indo-Bhutan border. During the last few decades, extensive fragmentation has caused severe population decline and local extinction of golden langur from several fragments. However, no studies are available on the impact of habitat fragmentation and the genetic diversity of golden langur in the fragmented habitats. The present study aimed to estimate the genetic diversity in the Indian population of golden langur. We sequenced and analyzed around 500 bases of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA hypervariable region-I from 59 fecal samples of wild langur collected from nine forest fragments. Overall, genetic diversity was high (h = 0.934, π = 0.0244 and comparable with other colobines. Populations in smaller fragments showed lower nucleotide diversity compared to the larger forest fragments. The median-joining network of haplotypes revealed a genetic structure that corresponded with the geographical distribution. The Aie and Champabati Rivers were found to be a barrier to gene flow between golden langur populations. In addition, it also established that T. geei is monophyletic but revealed possible hybridization with capped langur, T. pileatus, in the wild. It is hoped that these findings would result in a more scientific approach towards managing the fragmented populations of this enigmatic species.

  15. Floristic Composition and Structural Diversity of Shasha Forest Reserve in Ile-Ife, Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damilare Stephen AKINYEMI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The floristic composition and structural diversity were studied in two plots, 25 m x 25 m each, in three different sites of varying vegetation physiognomy: Taungya system, Regrowth forest and Gmelina arborea plantation (TS, RF and GA respectively of Shasha forest reserve in Ile- Ife southwestern Nigeria. A total of 119 plant species belonging to 51 families and 100 genera were identified in the forest reserve. Woody species represented the most diverse life form. Plant species diversity was higher in the GA (Hʹ=3.5 compared to the RF (Hʹ=3.4 and TS (Hʹ=2.9. Woody plant species density also differed significantly (p < 0.05 among the different physiognomy. Mean basal area and mean girth size were higher in RF compared to TS and GA. Species evenness was also quantitatively higher in the TS (E=0.12 compared to RF (E=0.09 and GA (E=0.08. Sorensen index of similarity were 12.12% (TS and RF, 19.71% (TS and GA and 20.20% (RF and GA, which is an indication of the heterogeneity of the three different sites, as a result of different management systems of the sites. The knowledge about species composition in the forest reserve will go a long way in identifying important elements of plant diversity, protecting and preserving threatened plant species, monitoring and providing effective management of the forest reserve.

  16. Genetic diversity and population structure of an important wild berry crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoratti, Laura; Palmieri, Luisa; Jaakola, Laura; Häggman, Hely

    2015-01-01

    The success of plant breeding in the coming years will be associated with access to new sources of variation, which will include landraces and wild relatives of crop species. In order to access the reservoir of favourable alleles within wild germplasm, knowledge about the genetic diversity and the population structure of wild species is needed. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) is one of the most important wild crops growing in the forests of Northern European countries, noted for its nutritional properties and its beneficial effects on human health. Assessment of the genetic diversity of wild bilberry germplasm is needed for efforts such as in situ conservation, on-farm management and development of plant breeding programmes. However, to date, only a few local (small-scale) genetic studies of this species have been performed. We therefore conducted a study of genetic variability within 32 individual samples collected from different locations in Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany, and analysed genetic diversity among geographic groups. Four selected inter-simple sequence repeat primers allowed the amplification of 127 polymorphic loci which, based on analysis of variance, made it possible to identify 85 % of the genetic diversity within studied bilberry populations, being in agreement with the mixed-mating system of bilberry. Significant correlations were obtained between geographic and genetic distances for the entire set of samples. The analyses also highlighted the presence of a north–south genetic gradient, which is in accordance with recent findings on phenotypic traits of bilberry. PMID:26483325

  17. Genetic diversity and structure in the Endangered Allen Cays Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura inornata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Aplasca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Endangered Allen Cays Rock Iguana (Cyclura cychlura inornata is endemic to the Allen Cays, a tiny cluster of islands in the Bahamas. Naturally occurring populations exist on only two cays (<4 ha each. However, populations of unknown origin were recently discovered on four additional cays. To investigate patterns of genetic variation among these populations, we analyzed nuclear and mitochondrial markers for 268 individuals. Analysis of three mitochondrial gene regions (2,328 bp and data for eight nuclear microsatellite loci indicated low genetic diversity overall. Estimates of effective population sizes based on multilocus genotypes were also extremely low. Despite low diversity, significant population structuring and variation in genetic diversity measures were detected among cays. Genetic data confirm the source population for an experimentally translocated population while raising concerns regarding other, unauthorized, translocations. Reduced heterozygosity is consistent with a documented historical population decline due to overharvest. This study provides the first range-wide genetic analysis of this subspecies. We suggest strategies to maximize genetic diversity during ongoing recovery including additional translocations to establish assurance populations and additional protective measures for the two remaining natural populations.

  18. Genotypic diversity and clonal structure of Erigeron annuus (Asteraceae in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunaitienė, Virginija

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the clonal structure and genetic diversity of alien herbaceous plant species Erigeron annuus. The global warming and changes in agriculture practice in the past few decades were favourable for the expansion of this species in Lithuania. We used RAPD and ISSR assays to assess genetic variation within and among 29 populations of E. annuus. A total of 278 molecular markers were revealed. Our study detected reduced level of genetic diversity of invasive populations of E. annuus. Significant differences in DNA polymorphism among populations of E. annuus were also found. Some populations of this species are composed of genetically identical plants, while others were polymorphic. Clonal diversity of study populations ranged from 0.083 to 0.4 for both DNA marker systems. The Simpsons diversity index values ranged from 0.0 to 0.636. The average number of genotypes per population established using both assays was about 1.7. Out of 328 E. annuus individuals only 16 showed unique RAPD and 14 unique ISSR banding patterns. The remaining plants were clones of different size. The most common genotype of E. annuus identified in our study was represented by predominate in nine populations.

  19. LiDAR Individual Tree Detection for Assessing Structurally Diverse Forest Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeronimo, Sean

    Contemporary forest management on public land incorporates a focus on restoration and maintenance of ecological functions through silvicultural manipulation of forest structure on a landscape scale. Incorporating reference conditions into restoration treatment planning and monitoring can improve treatment efficacy, but the typical ground-based methods of quantifying reference condition data---and comparing it to pre- and post-treatment stands---are expensive, time-consuming, and limited in scale. Airborne LiDAR may be part of the solution to this problem, since LiDAR acquisitions have both broad coverage and high resolution. I evaluated the ability of LiDAR Individual Tree Detection (ITD) to describe forest structure across a structurally variable landscape in support of large-scale forest restoration. I installed nineteen 0.25 ha stem map plots across a range of structural conditions in potential reference areas (Yosemite National Park) and potential restoration treatment areas (Sierra National Forest) in the Sierra Nevada of California. I used the plots to evaluate a common ITD algorithm, the watershed transform, compare it to past uses of ITD, and determine which aspects of forest structure contributed to errors in ITD. I found that ITD across this structurally diverse landscape was generally less accurate than across the smaller and less diverse areas over which it has previously been studied. However, the pattern of tree recognition is consistent: regardless of forest structure, canopy dominants are almost always detected and relatively shorter trees are almost never detected. Correspondingly, metrics dominated by large trees, such as biomass, basal area, and spatial heterogeneity, can be measured using ITD, while metrics dominated by smaller trees, such as stand density, cannot. Bearing these limitations in mind, ITD can be a powerful tool for describing forest structure across heterogeneous landscape restoration project areas.

  20. Parasites affect food web structure primarily through increased diversity and complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Dunne

    Full Text Available Comparative research on food web structure has revealed generalities in trophic organization, produced simple models, and allowed assessment of robustness to species loss. These studies have mostly focused on free-living species. Recent research has suggested that inclusion of parasites alters structure. We assess whether such changes in network structure result from unique roles and traits of parasites or from changes to diversity and complexity. We analyzed seven highly resolved food webs that include metazoan parasite data. Our analyses show that adding parasites usually increases link density and connectance (simple measures of complexity, particularly when including concomitant links (links from predators to parasites of their prey. However, we clarify prior claims that parasites "dominate" food web links. Although parasites can be involved in a majority of links, in most cases classic predation links outnumber classic parasitism links. Regarding network structure, observed changes in degree distributions, 14 commonly studied metrics, and link probabilities are consistent with scale-dependent changes in structure associated with changes in diversity and complexity. Parasite and free-living species thus have similar effects on these aspects of structure. However, two changes point to unique roles of parasites. First, adding parasites and concomitant links strongly alters the frequency of most motifs of interactions among three taxa, reflecting parasites' roles as resources for predators of their hosts, driven by trophic intimacy with their hosts. Second, compared to free-living consumers, many parasites' feeding niches appear broader and less contiguous, which may reflect complex life cycles and small body sizes. This study provides new insights about generic versus unique impacts of parasites on food web structure, extends the generality of food web theory, gives a more rigorous framework for assessing the impact of any species on trophic

  1. Parasites affect food web structure primarily through increased diversity and complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Jennifer A.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Hechinger, Ryan F.; Kuris, Armand M.; Martinez, Neo D.; McLaughlin, John P.; Mouritsen, Kim N.; Poulin, Robert; Reise, Karsten; Stouffer, Daniel B.; Thieltges, David W.; Williams, Richard J.; Zander, Claus Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Comparative research on food web structure has revealed generalities in trophic organization, produced simple models, and allowed assessment of robustness to species loss. These studies have mostly focused on free-living species. Recent research has suggested that inclusion of parasites alters structure. We assess whether such changes in network structure result from unique roles and traits of parasites or from changes to diversity and complexity. We analyzed seven highly resolved food webs that include metazoan parasite data. Our analyses show that adding parasites usually increases link density and connectance (simple measures of complexity), particularly when including concomitant links (links from predators to parasites of their prey). However, we clarify prior claims that parasites ‘‘dominate’’ food web links. Although parasites can be involved in a majority of links, in most cases classic predation links outnumber classic parasitism links. Regarding network structure, observed changes in degree distributions, 14 commonly studied metrics, and link probabilities are consistent with scale-dependent changes in structure associated with changes in diversity and complexity. Parasite and free-living species thus have similar effects on these aspects of structure. However, two changes point to unique roles of parasites. First, adding parasites and concomitant links strongly alters the frequency of most motifs of interactions among three taxa, reflecting parasites’ roles as resources for predators of their hosts, driven by trophic intimacy with their hosts. Second, compared to free-living consumers, many parasites’ feeding niches appear broader and less contiguous, which may reflect complex life cycles and small body sizes. This study provides new insights about generic versus unique impacts of parasites on food web structure, extends the generality of food web theory, gives a more rigorous framework for assessing the impact of any species on trophic

  2. Light habitat, structure, diversity and dynamic of the tropical dry forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Melo-Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical dry forests are complex and fragile ecosystems with high anthropic intervention and restricted reproductive cycles. These have unique richness, structural diversity, physiological and phenological . This research was executed  in the Upper Magdalena Valley, in four forest fragments with different successional stages. In each fragment four permanent plots of 0.25 ha were established and lighting habitat associated with richness, relative abundance and rarity of species. The forest dynamics included the mortality, recruitment and diameter growth for a period of 5.25 years. The species rischness found in the mature riparian forestis higher than that reported in other studies of similar areas in Valle del Cauca and the Atlantic coast.  The values of richness, diversity and rarity species are more evidenced  than the magnitudes found in  drier areas of Tolima. The structure, diversity and dynamics of forests were correlated with the lighting habitat, showing differences in canopy architecture and its role in the capture and absorption of radiation. Forests with dense canopy have limited availability of photosynthetically active radiation in understory related low species richness, while illuminated undergrowth are richer and heterogeneous.

  3. Mechanisms shaping size structure and functional diversity of phytoplankton communities in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Brandt, Gunnar; Bruggeman, Jorn; Merico, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    The factors regulating phytoplankton community composition play a crucial role in structuring aquatic food webs. However, consensus is still lacking about the mechanisms underlying the observed biogeographical differences in cell size composition of phytoplankton communities. Here we use a trait-based model to disentangle these mechanisms in two contrasting regions of the Atlantic Ocean. In our model, the phytoplankton community can self-assemble based on a trade-off emerging from relationships between cell size and (1) nutrient uptake, (2) zooplankton grazing, and (3) phytoplankton sinking. Grazing ‘pushes’ the community towards larger cell sizes, whereas nutrient uptake and sinking ‘pull’ the community towards smaller cell sizes. We find that the stable environmental conditions of the tropics strongly balance these forces leading to persistently small cell sizes and reduced size diversity. In contrast, the seasonality of the temperate region causes the community to regularly reorganize via shifts in species composition and to exhibit, on average, bigger cell sizes and higher size diversity than in the tropics. Our results raise the importance of environmental variability as a key structuring mechanism of plankton communities in the ocean and call for a reassessment of the current understanding of phytoplankton diversity patterns across latitudinal gradients. PMID:25747280

  4. Changes in Bacterial And Archaeal Community Structure And Functional Diversity Along a Geochemically Variable Soil Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansel, C.M.; Fendorf, S.; Jardine, P.M.; Francis, C.A.

    2009-05-18

    Spatial heterogeneity in physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils allows for the proliferation of diverse microbial communities. Factors influencing the structuring of microbial communities, including availability of nutrients and water, pH, and soil texture, can vary considerably with soil depth and within soil aggregates. Here we investigated changes in the microbial and functional communities within soil aggregates obtained along a soil profile spanning the surface, vadose zone, and saturated soil environments. The composition and diversity of microbial communities and specific functional groups involved in key pathways in the geochemical cycling of nitrogen, Fe, and sulfur were characterized using a coupled approach involving cultivation-independent analysis of both 16S rRNA (bacterial and archaeal) and functional genes (amoA and dsrAB) as well as cultivation-based analysis of Fe(III)-reducing organisms. Here we found that the microbial communities and putative ammonia-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing communities varied greatly along the soil profile, likely reflecting differences in carbon availability, water content, and pH. In particular, the Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA sequences are largely unique to each horizon, sharing a distribution and diversity similar to those of the putative (amoA-based) ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community. Anaerobic microenvironments within soil aggregates also appear to allow for both anaerobic- and aerobic-based metabolisms, further highlighting the complexity and spatial heterogeneity impacting microbial community structure and metabolic potential within soils.

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure of Lantana camara in India indicates multiple introductions and gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, A; Quader, S

    2014-05-01

    Lantana camara is a highly invasive plant, which has spread over 60 countries and island groups of Asia, Africa and Australia. In India, it was introduced in the early nineteenth century, since when it has expanded and gradually established itself in almost every available ecosystem. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of this plant in India in order to understand its introduction, subsequent range expansion and gene flow. A total of 179 individuals were sequenced at three chloroplast loci and 218 individuals were genotyped for six nuclear microsatellites. Both chloroplasts (nine haplotypes) and microsatellites (83 alleles) showed high genetic diversity. Besides, each type of marker confirmed the presence of private polymorphism. We uncovered low to medium population structure in both markers, and found a faint signal of isolation by distance with microsatellites. Bayesian clustering analyses revealed multiple divergent genetic clusters. Taken together, these findings (i.e. high genetic diversity with private alleles and multiple genetic clusters) suggest that Lantana was introduced multiple times and gradually underwent spatial expansion with recurrent gene flow. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Fungal endophytes of aquatic macrophytes: diverse host-generalists characterized by tissue preferences and geographic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Dustin C; Battista, Lorna J; Arnold, A Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    Most studies of endophytic symbionts have focused on terrestrial plants, neglecting the ecologically and economically important plants present in aquatic ecosystems. We evaluated the diversity, composition, host and tissue affiliations, and geographic structure of fungal endophytes associated with common aquatic plants in lentic waters in northern Arizona, USA. Endophytes were isolated in culture from roots and photosynthetic tissues during two growing seasons. A total of 226 isolates representing 60 putative species was recovered from 9,600 plant tissue segments. Although isolation frequency was low, endophytes were phylogenetically diverse and species-rich. Comparisons among the most thoroughly sampled species and reservoirs revealed that isolation frequency and diversity did not differ significantly between collection periods, among species, among reservoirs, or as a function of depth. However, community structure differed significantly among reservoirs and tissue types. Phylogenetic analyses of a focal genus (Penicillium) corroborated estimates of species boundaries and informed community analyses, highlighting clade- and genotype-level affiliations of aquatic endophytes with both sediment- and waterborne fungi, and endophytes of proximate terrestrial plants. Together these analyses provide a first quantitative examination of endophytic associations in roots and foliage of aquatic plants and can be used to optimize survey strategies for efficiently capturing fungal biodiversity at local and regional scales.

  7. Genetic diversity and structure of Brazilian ginger germplasm (Zingiber officinale) revealed by AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Eleonora Zambrano; Bajay, Miklos Maximiliano; Siqueira, Marcos Vinícius Bohrer Monteiro; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Pinheiro, José Baldin

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is a vegetable with medicinal and culinary properties widely cultivated in the Southern and Southeastern Brazil. The knowledge of ginger species' genetic variability is essential to direct correctly future studies of conservation and genetic improvement, but in Brazil, little is known about this species' genetic variability. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity and structure of 55 Brazilian accessions and 6 Colombian accessions of ginger, using AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) molecular markers. The molecular characterization was based on 13 primers combinations, which generated an average of 113.5 polymorphic loci. The genetic diversity estimates of Nei (Hj), Shannon-Weiner index (I) and an effective number of alleles (n e ) were greater in the Colombian accessions in relation to the Brazilian accessions. The analysis of molecular variance showed that most of the genetic variation occurred between the two countries while in the Brazilian populations there is no genetic structure and probably each region harbors 100 % of genetic variation found in the samples. The bayesian model-based clustering and the dendrogram using the dissimilarity's coefficient of Jaccard were congruent with each other and showed that the Brazilian accessions are highly similar between themselves, regardless of the geographic region of origin. We suggested that the exploration of the interspecific variability and the introduction of new varieties of Z.officinale are viable alternatives for generating diversity in breeding programs in Brazil. The introduction of new genetic materials will certainly contribute to a higher genetic basis of such crop.

  8. Novel Moraxella catarrhalis prophages display hyperconserved non-structural genes despite their genomic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariff, Amir; Wise, Michael J; Kahler, Charlene M; Tay, Chin Yen; Peters, Fanny; Perkins, Timothy T; Chang, Barbara J

    2015-10-24

    Moraxella catarrhalis is an important pathogen that often causes otitis media in children, a disease that is not currently vaccine preventable. Asymptomatic colonisation of the human upper respiratory tract is common and lack of clearance by the immune system is likely due to the emergence of seroresistant genetic lineages. No active bacteriophages or prophages have been described in this species. This study was undertaken to identify and categorise prophages in M. catarrhalis, their genetic diversity and the relationship of such diversity with the host-species phylogeny. This study presents a comparative analysis of 32 putative prophages identified in 95 phylogenetically variable, newly sequenced M. catarrhalis genomes. The prophages were genotypically classified into four diverse clades. The genetic synteny of each clade is similar to the group 1 phage family Siphoviridae, however, they form genotypic clusters that are distinct from other members of this family. No core genetic sequences exist across the 32 prophages despite clades 2, 3, and 4 sharing the most sequence identity. The analysis of non-structural prophage genes (coding the integrase, and terminase), and portal gene showed that the respective genes were identical for clades 2, 3, and 4, but unique for clade 1. Empirical analysis calculated that these genes are unexpectedly hyperconserved, under purifying selection, suggesting a tightly regulated functional role. As such, it is improbable that the prophages are decaying remnants but stable components of a fluctuating, flexible and unpredictable system ultimately maintained by functional constraints on non-structural and packaging genes. Additionally, the plate encoding genes were well conserved across all four prophage clades, and the tail fibre genes, commonly responsible for receptor recognition, were clustered into three major groups distributed across the prophage clades. A pan-genome of 283,622 bp was identified, and the prophages were mapped

  9. The impact of structural diversity and parameterization on maps of the protein universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Daniel; Singh, Rahul

    2013-12-20

    Low dimensional maps of protein structure space (MPSS) provide a powerful global representation of all proteins. In such mappings structural relationships are depicted through spatial adjacency of points, each of which represents a molecule. MPSS can help in understanding the local and global topological characteristics of the structure space, as well as elucidate structure-function relationships within and between sets of proteins. A number of meta- and method-dependent parameters are involved in creating MPSS. However, at the state-of-the-art, a systematic investigation of the influence of these parameters on MPSS construction has yet to be carried out. Further, while specific cases in which MPSS out-perform pairwise distances for prediction of functional annotations have been noted, no general explanation for this phenomenon has yet been advanced. We address the above questions within the technical context of creating MPSS by utilizing multidimensional scaling (MDS) for obtaining low-dimensional projections of structure alignment distances. MDS is demonstrated as an effective method for construction of MPSS where related structures are co-located, even when their functional and evolutionary proximity cannot be deduced from distributions of pairwise comparisons alone. In particular, we show that MPSS exceed pairwise distance distributions in predictive capability for those annotations of shared function or origin which are characterized by a high level of structural diversity. We also determine the impact of the choice of structure alignment and MDS algorithms on the accuracy of such predictions.

  10. Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier, 1797) in the Mediterranean Sea: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Daniele; Catanese, Gaetano; Procaccini, Gabriele; Fiorito, Graziano

    2016-01-01

    The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris Cuvier 1797, is a largely exploited cephalopod species in the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, as well as along the coasts of Africa, Brazil and Japan, where its taxonomic identity is still debated. The assessment of its genetic structure is a pressing need to correctly manage the resource and to avoid overfishing and collapsing of local stocks. Here we analysed genetic variation and population structure of O. vulgaris using thirteen microsatellite loci in seven sampling localities from the Mediterranean Sea and one from the Atlantic Ocean. We also used a DNA barcoding approach by COI gene fragment to understand the phylogenetic relationships among the specimens here investigated and the ones whose sequences are available in literature. Our results reveal high levels of allelic richness and moderate heterozygosity in all samples investigated, and a pronounced differentiation of the Atlantic and Sicilian specimens. This latter aspect seems to support the isolation of the biota within the Strait of Messina. A certain degree of differentiation was detected among the other geographic samples within the Mediterranean Sea, which is more compatible with an island model than isolation by distance. The occurrence of null alleles affected more genetic diversity indices than population structure estimations. This study provides new insights about the genetic diversity and structure of O. vulgaris in the area of interest, which can be used as guidelines for a fisheries management perspective.

  11. Anatomically diverse butterfly scales all produce structural colours by coherent scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O; Quinn, Tim; Torres, Rodolfo H

    2006-02-01

    The structural colours of butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) have been attributed to a diversity of physical mechanisms, including multilayer interference, diffraction, Bragg scattering, Tyndall scattering and Rayleigh scattering. We used fibre optic spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 2D Fourier analysis to investigate the physical mechanisms of structural colour production in twelve lepidopteran species from four families, representing all of the previously proposed anatomical and optical classes of butterfly nanostructure. The 2D Fourier analyses of TEMs of colour producing butterfly scales document that all species are appropriately nanostructured to produce visible colours by coherent scattering, i.e. differential interference and reinforcement of scattered, visible wavelengths. Previously hypothesized to produce a blue colour by incoherent, Tyndall scattering, the scales of Papilio zalmoxis are not appropriately nanostructured for incoherent scattering. Rather, available data indicate that the blue of P. zalmoxis is a fluorescent pigmentary colour. Despite their nanoscale anatomical diversity, all structurally coloured butterfly scales share a single fundamental physical color production mechanism - coherent scattering. Recognition of this commonality provides a new perspective on how the nanostructure and optical properties of structurally coloured butterfly scales evolved and diversified among and within lepidopteran clades.

  12. Stand Structure and Substrate Diversity as Two Major Drivers for Bryophyte Distribution in a Temperate Montane Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the major drivers of bryophyte distribution is the first step to protecting bryophyte diversity. Topography, forest, substrates (ground, tree trunks, roots, rocks, and rotten wood, and spatial factor, which factors are the major drivers of bryophyte distribution? In this study, 53 plots were set in 400 m2 along the elevation gradient in Xiaoqinling, China. All bryophytes in the plots were collected and identified. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between bryophyte and substrate diversity. We compared the patterns of overall bryophyte diversity and diversity of bryophytes found on the ground, tree, and rock along elevational gradients. Canonical correspondence analysis was applied to relate species composition to selected environmental variables. The importance of topography, forest, substrates, and spatial factors was determined by variance partitioning. A total of 1378 bryophyte specimens were collected, and 240 species were identified. Bryophyte diversity was closely related to substrate diversity. The overall bryophyte diversity significantly increased with elevation; however, the response varied among ground, tree, and rock bryophytes. Tree diversity and herb layer were considered important environmental factors in determining bryophyte distribution. Species abundance was best explained by stand structure (17%, and species diversity was best explained by stand structure (35% and substrate (40%. Results directly indicated that substrate diversity can improve bryophyte species diversity. The effects of micro-habitat formed by stand structure and substrate diversity were higher than those of spatial processes and topography factors on bryophyte distribution. This study proved that the determinant factors influencing bryophyte diversity reflect the trends in recent forest management, providing a real opportunity to improve forest biodiversity conservation.

  13. Diversity and Structure of the Gama Gallery Forest in Central Brazil in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tramontina Araujo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the diversity and structure of the tree community of the Gama gallery forest, in the Federal District, in 2009. A total of 151 permanent plots of 10×20 m were allocated continually along ten lines perpendicular to the watercourse. All individuals with diameter at breast height (DBH equal or greater than 10 cm were tagged and measured. In total, 114 species in 52 families and 96 genera were identified. The density was 643 ind.ha-1, the basal area was 31.52 m2.ha-1 and 13 species were frequently at least in 25% of the plots. The Shannon index was 3.91 nats.ind-1 and the Pielou index was 82%, expressing the good conservation condition and the high diversity of the vegetation. The diameter distribution curve showed an "inverted J" pattern.

  14. Forest structure, diversity and regeneration potential along altitudinal gradient in Dhanaulti of Garhwal Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Saha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The aim of the present study was to understatnd the forest composition, structure, diversity and regeneration potential along altitudinal gradient. Area of study: The study was carried out in Dhanaulti forest which falls under temperate region of Garhwal Himalaya in Uttarakhand state, India. Material and Methods: Vegetation analysis was carried out using 10 quadrats at each altitude using a quadrate size of 10×10 m2. In each quadrate, categories of trees >30 cm cbh were considered as trees, 10-30cm cbh as saplings and <10 cm cbh as seedlings. The data were quantitatively analyzed. Main results: In upper and middle altitudes, Cedrus deodara was reported dominant tree whereas, in lower altitude Quercus leucotrichophora was reported dominant. Tree density was highest in lower altitude which reduced middle and upper altitudes whereas, total basal cover increased with increasing altitude. The increasing total basal cover with altitude could be because of the presence of Cedrus deodara trees having higher girth classes. In tree, sapling and seedling layers, diversity (H and equitabiltiy (EC decreased with increasing altitude. However, concentrations of dominace (CD and beta diversity (BD have shown reverse trend with H and EC which increased with increasing altitudes, in each layer of tree, sapling and seedling. The distribution pattern of most species in all layers of trees, saplings and seedlings was contagious. The regeneration potential of the species has shown that some of the species in the absence of tree layer are still regenerating particularly, Rhododendron arboreum, Benthamidia capitata, Neolitsea pallens etc. It indicates that most of the species are shifting upward as they are getting suitable conditions. Research highlights: Altitude influence species composition, diversity and regeneration potential of species. Key words: Distribution pattern; tree diversity; regeneration; mountains; temperate; Himalaya.

  15. Earthworm-mycorrhiza interactions can affect the diversity, structure and functioning of establishing model grassland communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann G Zaller

    demonstrates that belowground-aboveground linkages involving earthworms and AMF are important mediators of the diversity, structure and functioning of plant communities.

  16. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  17. Molecular genetic diversity and population structure of Ethiopian white lupin landraces: Implications for breeding and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnaf, Mulugeta; Yao, Nasser; Martina, Kyalo; Dagne, Kifle; Wegary, Dagne; Tesfaye, Kassahun

    2017-01-01

    White lupin is one of the four economically important species of the Lupinus genus and is an important grain legume in the Ethiopian farming system. However, there has been limited research effort to characterize the Ethiopian white lupin landraces. Fifteen polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of 212 Ethiopian white lupin (Lupinus albus) landraces and two genotypes from different species (Lupinus angustifolius and Lupinus mutabilis) were used as out-group. The SSR markers revealed 108 different alleles, 98 of them from 212 landraces and 10 from out-group genotypes, with an average of 6.5 alleles per locus. The average gene diversity was 0.31. Twenty eight landraces harbored one or more private alleles from the total of 28 private alleles identified in the 212 white lupin accessions. Seventy-seven rare alleles with a frequency of less than 5% were identified and accounted for 78.6% of the total alleles detected. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 92% of allelic diversity was attributed to individual accessions within populations while only 8% was distributed among populations. At 70% similarity level, the UPGMA dendrogram resulted in the formation of 13 clusters comprised of 2 to 136 landraces, with the out-group genotypes and five landraces remaining distinct and ungrouped. Population differentiation and genetic distance were relatively high between Gondar and Ethiopian white lupin populations collected by Australians. A model-based population structure analysis divided the white lupin landraces into two populations. All Ethiopian white lupin landrace populations, except most of the landraces collected by Australians (77%) and about 44% from Awi, were grouped together with significant admixtures. The study also suggested that 34 accessions, as core collections, were sufficient to retain 100% of SSR diversity. These accessions (core G-34) represent 16% of the whole 212

  18. Forest structure, diversity and soil properties in a dry tropical forest in Rajasthan, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Nirmal Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Structure, species composition, and soil properties of a dry tropical forest in Rajasthan Western India, were examined by establishment of 25 plots. The forest was characterized by a relatively low canopy and a large number of small-diameter trees. Mean canopy height for this forest was 10 m and stands contained an average of 995 stems ha-1 (= 3.0 cm DBH; 52% of those stems were smaller than 10 cm DBH. The total basal area was 46.35 m2ha-1, of which Tectona grandis L. contributed 48%. The forest showed high species diversity of trees. 50 tree species (= 3.0 cm DBH from 29 families were identified in the 25 sampling plots. T. grandis (20.81% and Butea monosperma (9% were the dominant and subdominant species in terms of importance value. The mean tree species diversity indices for the plots were 1.08 for Shannon diversity index (H´, 0.71 for equitability index (J´ and 5.57 for species richness index (S´, all of which strongly declined with the increase of importance value of the dominant, T. grandis. Measures of soil nutrients indicated low fertility, extreme heterogeneity. Regression analysis showed that stem density and the dominant tree height were significantly correlated with soil pH. There was a significant positive relationship between species diversity index and soil available P, exchangeable K+, Ca2+ (all p values < 0.001 and a negative relationship with N, C, C:N and C:P ratio. The results suggest that soil properties are major factors influencing forest composition and structure within the dry tropical forest in Rajasthan.

  19. Forest structure in low-diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ostertag

    Full Text Available The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai'i Island. We compared the species diversity, tree density, basal area, biomass, and size class distributions between the two forest types. We then examined these variables across tropical forests within the CTFS network. Consistent with other island forests, the Hawai'i forests were characterized by low species richness and very high relative dominance. The two Hawai'i forests were floristically distinct, yet similar in species richness (15 vs. 21 species and stem density (3078 vs. 3486/ha. While these forests were selected for their low invasive species cover relative to surrounding forests, both forests averaged 5->50% invasive species cover; ongoing removal will be necessary to reduce or prevent competitive impacts, especially from woody species. The montane wet forest had much larger trees, resulting in eightfold higher basal area and above-ground biomass. Across the CTFS network, the Hawaiian montane wet forest was similar to other tropical forests with respect to diameter distributions, density, and aboveground biomass, while the Hawai'i lowland dry forest was similar in density to tropical forests with much higher diversity. These findings suggest that forest structural variables can be similar across tropical forests independently of species richness. The inclusion of low-diversity Pacific Island forests in the CTFS network provides an ∼80-fold range in species richness (15-1182 species, six-fold variation in mean annual rainfall (835-5272 mm yr(-1 and 1.8-fold variation in mean annual temperature (16.0-28.4°C. Thus, the Hawaiian forest plots expand the global forest plot network to enable testing of ecological

  20. T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Nielsen, Morten Schak; Salomonsson, Max

    2017-01-01

    L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels are considered to be the primary source of calcium influx during the myogenic response. However, many vascular beds also express T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels. Recent studies suggest that these channels may also play a role in autoregulation. At low...

  1. 5,6-EET potently inhibits T-type calcium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazade, M.; Bidaud, I.; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard

    2014-01-01

    T-type calcium channels (T-channels) are important actors in neuronal pacemaking, in heart rhythm, and in the control of the vascular tone. T-channels are regulated by several endogenous lipids including the primary eicosanoid arachidonic acid (AA), which display an important role in vasodilation...

  2. Orientation of aromatic residues in amyloid cores: Structural insights into prion fiber diversity

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, Anna

    2014-11-17

    Structural conversion of one given protein sequence into different amyloid states, resulting in distinct phenotypes, is one of the most intriguing phenomena of protein biology. Despite great efforts the structural origin of prion diversity remains elusive, mainly because amyloids are insoluble yet noncrystalline and therefore not easily amenable to traditional structural-biology methods. We investigate two different phenotypic prion strains, weak and strong, of yeast translation termination factor Sup35 with respect to angular orientation of tyrosines using polarized light spectroscopy. By applying a combination of alignment methods the degree of fiber orientation can be assessed, which allows a relatively accurate determination of the aromatic ring angles. Surprisingly, the strains show identical average orientations of the tyrosines, which are evenly spread through the amyloid core. Small variations between the two strains are related to the local environment of a fraction of tyrosines outside the core, potentially reflecting differences in fibril packing.

  3. Fine structure of Tibetan kefir grains and their yeast distribution, diversity, and shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Man; Wang, Xingxing; Sun, Guowei; Qin, Bing; Xiao, Jinzhou; Yan, Shuling; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan kefir grains (TKGs), a kind of natural starter for fermented milk in Tibet, China, host various microorganisms of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, and occasionally acetic acid bacteria in a polysaccharide/protein matrix. In the present study, the fine structure of TKGs was studied to shed light on this unusual symbiosis with stereomicroscopy and thin sections. The results reveal that TKGs consist of numerous small grain units, which are characterized by a hollow globular structure with a diameter between 2.0 and 9.0 mm and a wall thickness of approximately 200 µm. A polyhedron-like net structure, formed mainly by the bacteria, was observed in the wall of the grain units, which has not been reported previously to our knowledge. Towards the inside of the grain unit, the polyhedron-like net structures became gradually larger in diameter and fewer in number. Such fine structures may play a crucial role in the stability of the grains. Subsequently, the distribution, diversity, and shift of yeasts in TKGs were investigated based on thin section, scanning electron microscopy, cloning and sequencing of D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene, real-time quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization with specific fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These show that (i) yeasts appear to localize on the outer surface of the grains and grow normally together to form colonies embedded in the bacterial community; (ii) the diversity of yeasts is relatively low on genus level with three dominant species--Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica; (iii) S. cerevisiae is the stable predominant yeast species, while the composition of Kluyveromyces and Yarrowia are subject to change over time. Our results indicate that TKGs are relatively stable in structure, and culture conditions to some extent shape the microbial community and interaction in kefir grains. These findings pave the way for further study of the specific symbiotic associations between S

  4. Fine structure of Tibetan kefir grains and their yeast distribution, diversity, and shift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Lu

    Full Text Available Tibetan kefir grains (TKGs, a kind of natural starter for fermented milk in Tibet, China, host various microorganisms of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, and occasionally acetic acid bacteria in a polysaccharide/protein matrix. In the present study, the fine structure of TKGs was studied to shed light on this unusual symbiosis with stereomicroscopy and thin sections. The results reveal that TKGs consist of numerous small grain units, which are characterized by a hollow globular structure with a diameter between 2.0 and 9.0 mm and a wall thickness of approximately 200 µm. A polyhedron-like net structure, formed mainly by the bacteria, was observed in the wall of the grain units, which has not been reported previously to our knowledge. Towards the inside of the grain unit, the polyhedron-like net structures became gradually larger in diameter and fewer in number. Such fine structures may play a crucial role in the stability of the grains. Subsequently, the distribution, diversity, and shift of yeasts in TKGs were investigated based on thin section, scanning electron microscopy, cloning and sequencing of D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene, real-time quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization with specific fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These show that (i yeasts appear to localize on the outer surface of the grains and grow normally together to form colonies embedded in the bacterial community; (ii the diversity of yeasts is relatively low on genus level with three dominant species--Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica; (iii S. cerevisiae is the stable predominant yeast species, while the composition of Kluyveromyces and Yarrowia are subject to change over time. Our results indicate that TKGs are relatively stable in structure, and culture conditions to some extent shape the microbial community and interaction in kefir grains. These findings pave the way for further study of the specific symbiotic

  5. Horizontal, but not vertical canopy structure is related to stand functional diversity in a subtropical slope forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, A.C.; Härdtle, W.; Bruelheide, H.; Kröber, W.; Schröter, M.; Wehrden, von H.; Oheimb, von G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the relation of horizontal and vertical canopy structure to tree functional diversity of a highly diverse subtropical broad-leaved slope forest, stratified for different successional stages. This is of particular interest because many key ecosystem processes and

  6. Examining the Relationships among Classroom Goal Structure, Achievement Goal Orientation, Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning for Ethnically Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, David; Salisbury-Glennon, Jill; Shores, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the learning strategies used by ethnically diverse learners and to investigate the relationships among the constructs of classroom goal structure, achievement goal orientation, motivation and self-regulated learning in an ethnically diverse population of fourth and fifth grade learners (n = 396). Goal…

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces from the East African highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asfaw, A.; Blair, M.W.; Almekinders, C.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The East African highlands are a region of important common bean production and high varietal diversity for the crop. The objective of this study was to uncover the diversity and population structure of 192 landraces from Ethiopia and Kenya together with four genepool control genotypes using

  8. Structure, diversity, and biophysical properties of old-growth forestsin the Klamath region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Starr, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The diverse old-growth forests in Klamath region of northern California and southern Oregon provide valuable ecosystem services (e.g., maintaining watersheds, wildlife habitat, recreation), but may be vulnerable to a wide range of stressors, including invasive species, disrupted disturbance regimes, and climatic change. Yet our understanding of how forest structure in the Klamath region relates to the current physical environment is limited. Here we provide present-day benchmarks for old-growth forest structure across a climatic gradient ranging from coastal to dry interior sites. We established 16 large (1 ha) forest plots where all stems > 5 cm in diameter were identified to species and mapped. Climate across these sites was highly variable, with estimated actual evapotranspiration correlated to several basic measures of forest structure, including plot basal area, stem size-class inequality, tree species diversity and, to a lesser extent, tree species richness. Analyses of the spatial arrangement of stems indicated a high degree of non-uniformity, with 75% of plots showing significant stem clumping at small spatial scales (0 to 10 m). Downscaled predictions of future site water balance suggest changes will be dominated by rapidly increasing climatic water deficit (D, a biologically meaningful index of drought). While these plots give a picture of current conditions, continued monitoring of these stands is needed to describe forest dynamics and to detect forest responses to ongoing and future stressors.

  9. P450s and UGTs: Key Players in the Structural Diversity of Triterpenoid Saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Hikaru; Tamura, Keita; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2015-08-01

    The recent spread of next-generation sequencing techniques has facilitated transcriptome analyses of non-model plants. As a result, many of the genes encoding enzymes related to the production of specialized metabolites have been identified. Compounds derived from 2,3-oxidosqualene (the common precursor of sterols, steroids and triterpenoids), a linear compound of 30 carbon atoms produced through the mevalonate pathway, are called triterpenes. These include essential sterols, which are structural components of biomembranes; steroids such as the plant hormones, brassinolides and the toxin in potatoes, solanine; as well as the structurally diverse triterpenoids. Triterpenoids containing one or more sugar moieties attached to triterpenoid aglycones are called triterpenoid saponins. Triterpenoid saponins have been shown to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, anticancerogenic and antiviral effects. This review summarizes the recent progress in gene discovery and elucidates the biochemical functions of biosynthetic enzymes in triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis. Special focus is placed on key players in generating the structural diversity of triterpenoid saponins, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) and the UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases (UGTs). Perspectives on further gene discovery and the use of biosynthetic genes for the microbial production of plant-derived triterpenoid saponins are also discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. High genetic diversity and low population structure in Porter's sunflower (Helianthus porteri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Scott D; Mandel, Jennifer R; Burke, John M; Donovan, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    Granite outcrops in the southeastern United States are rare and isolated habitats that support edaphically controlled communities dominated by herbaceous plants. They harbor rare and endemic species that are expected to have low genetic variability and high population structure due to small population sizes and their disjunct habitat. We test this expectation for an annual outcrop endemic, Helianthus porteri (Porter's sunflower). Contrary to expectation, H. porteri has relatively high genetic diversity (H e = 0.681) and relatively low genetic structure among the native populations (F ST = 0.077) when compared to 5 other Helianthus species (N = 288; 18 expressed sequence tag-SSR markers). These findings suggest greater gene flow than expected. The potential for gene flow is supported by the analysis of transplant populations established with propagules from a common source in 1959. One population established close to a native population (1.5 km) at the edge of the natural range is genetically similar to and shares rare alleles with the adjacent native population and is distinct from the central source population. In contrast, a transplant population established north of the native range has remained similar to the source population. The relatively high genetic diversity and low population structure of this species, combined with the long-term success of transplanted populations, bode well for its persistence as long as the habitat persists.

  11. Biomechanical Diversity of Mating Structures among Harvestmen Species Is Consistent with a Spectrum of Precopulatory Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Burns

    Full Text Available Diversity in reproductive structures is frequently explained by selection acting at individual to generational timescales, but interspecific differences predicted by such models (e.g., female choice or sexual conflict are often untestable in a phylogenetic framework. An alternative approach focuses on clade- or function-specific hypotheses that predict evolutionary patterns in terms neutral to specific modes of sexual selection. Here we test a hypothesis that diversity of reproductive structures in leiobunine harvestmen (daddy longlegs of eastern North America reflects two sexually coevolved but non-overlapping precopulatory strategies, a primitive solicitous strategy (females enticed by penis-associated nuptial gifts, and a multiply derived antagonistic strategy (penis exerts mechanical force against armature of the female pregenital opening. Predictions of sexual coevolution and fidelity to precopulatory categories were tested using 10 continuously varying functional traits from 28 species. Multivariate analyses corroborated sexual coevolution but failed to partition species by precopulatory strategy, with multiple methods placing species along a spectrum of mechanical antagonistic potential. These findings suggest that precopulatory features within species reflect different co-occurring levels of solicitation and antagonism, and that gradualistic evolutionary pathways exist between extreme strategies. The ability to quantify antagonistic potential of precopulatory structures invites comparison with ecological variables that may promote evolutionary shifts in precopulatory strategies.

  12. Is benthic food web structure related to diversity of marine macrobenthic communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, A.; Wołowicz, M.; Asmus, H.; Asmus, R.; Carlier, A.; Gasiunaité, Z.; Grémare, A.; Hummel, H.; Lesutiené, J.; Razinkovas, A.; Renaud, P. E.; Richard, P.; Kędra, M.

    2012-08-01

    Numerical structure and the organisation of food webs within macrozoobenthic communities has been assessed in the European waters (Svalbard, Barents Sea, Baltic Sea, North Sea, Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea) to address the interactions between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Abundance and classical species diversity indices (S, H', J) of macrofaunal communities were related to principal attributes of food webs (relative trophic level and food chain length, FCL) that were determined from carbon and nitrogen stable isotope values. Structure of marine macrobenthos varies substantially at a geographical scale; total abundance ranges from 63 ind. m-2 to 34,517 ind. m-2, species richness varies from 3 to 166 and the Shannon-Weaver diversity index from 0.26 to 3.26 while Pielou's evenness index is below 0.73. The major source of energy for macrobenthic communities is suspended particulate organic matter, consisting of phytoplankton and detrital particles, sediment particulate organic matter, and microphytobenthos in varying proportions. These food sources support the presence of suspension- and deposit-feeding communities, which dominate numerically on the sea floor. Benthic food webs include usually four to five trophic levels (FCL varies from 3.08 to 4.86). Most species are assigned to the second trophic level (primary consumers), fewer species are grouped in the third trophic level (secondary consumers), and benthic top predators are the least numerous. Most species cluster primarily at the lowest trophic level that is consistent with the typical organization of pyramidal food webs. Food chain length increases with biodiversity, highlighting a positive effect of more complex community structure on food web organisation. In more diverse benthic communities, energy is transferred through more trophic levels while species-poor communities sustain a shorter food chain.

  13. Structural diversity of water-limited savanna and ecosystem response to climatological variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosshi, M. I.; Brunsell, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Determining the sensitivity of ecosystem response to environmental variability is fundamental to understand the capacity of ecosystems to resist and recover from change. Despite limitations to infer about biotic mechanisms, remote sensing has the advantage of high temporal resolution, over long records, to address fundamental challenges in ecology in an environmental context. The degree of structural diversity in water-limited savanna changes across a climatological gradient over the sand covered area in interior southern Africa, between 29° S to the equator and 14° E to 28° E. To determine the coupling between structural diversity and ecosystem function in water-limited ecosystems, we use a 15-year record of daily precipitation, and satellite data for Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), matching the same time period (2001-2015), along the Kalahari sand sheet. Savanna ecosystems show a varied temporal sensitivity to environmental fluctuation going from 200 mm to 750 mm of mean annual precipitation. Increasing grass cover results in higher sensitivity to intra-annual dynamics, while an increased woody cover reflects purely annual patterns. Lagged correlations suggest a similar sensitivity at the extreme ends of the gradient, but highest in the middle, between 400 mm and 450 mm of mean annual precipitation. The vegetation in this region, described as a wooded grassland, has contributions to net primary productivity more equally shared by trees and grasses. In particular, the role of rainfall seasonality, magnitude, and frequency is examined in the different savanna, against different indices of ecosystem stability. Finally, using the savanna example to better understand trade-offs, such as how resistance versus recovery, and similarly, stress avoidance versus resource use optimization under a gradient of conditions, highlights the importance of structural diversity in determining ecosystem response to environmental variability.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of 20 North European cattle breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    kantanen, J; Olsaker, Ingrid; Holm, Lars-Erik

    2000-01-01

    population structures. The microsatellites BoLA-DRBP1 and CSSM66 were nonneutral markers according to the Ewens-Watterson test, suggesting some kind of selection imposed on these loci. North European cattle breeds displayed generally similar levels of multilocus heterozygosity and allelic diversity. However...... and geographical divisions of native breeding regions of indigenous cattle. Divergence estimates between Icelandic cattle and indigenous breeds suggested a separation time of more than 1,000 years between Icelandic cattle and Norwegian native breeds, a finding consistent with historical evidence....

  15. Genetic diversity and population structure of faba bean (Vicia faba) from Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Göl, Şurhan; DOĞANLAR, Sami; FRARY, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is an important food and feed legume because of the nutritional value of its seed protein and starch content, good biomass, and high efficiency nitrogen fixation.This study analyzed the molecular genetic diversity and population structure of 101 Turkish faba bean accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers.A total of 32 SSR markers yielded 281 loci of which 277 (98.6%) were polymorphic.Mean dissimilarity between genotypes was 0.355, a relatively high value ...

  16. IMPACT OF STAND STRUCTURE TO THE DIVERSITY OF TREE SAPLING IN RUBBER AGROFOREST SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saida Rasnovi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of stand structure of rubber agroforest system and its effect on tree sapling diversity was carried out in Bungo District, Jambi Province from August 2004 to August 2005. Basal area (BA and tree density were surveyed using variable-area transect method. Tree sapling species was surveyed using standard plots combined with circular elementary subplots laid along 60 m transect line. The result shown that BA and tree density of rubber agroforest system were lower significantly with forest at the diameter class > 30 cm, but at the diameter class < 30 cm there were not differ significantly. PCA analysis shown there was a positive correlation between BA non rubber tree with the species diversity and richness indices of tree sapling in rubber agroforest system and there was no correlation between density of non rubber tree and the indices. However, in the forest, BA and tree density were have a negative correlation with the species diversity and richness indices of tree sapling.

  17. Drove roads: Keystone structures that promote ant diversity in Mediterranean forest landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, Francisco M.; Seoane, Javier; Castro, Sara; Peco, Begoña

    2013-05-01

    Drove roads are the traditional corridors used by pastoralists for seasonal movements of livestock (transhumance). They cover a considerable land area in Mediterranean countries and, although they are an obvious source of landscape diversity, their influence on the diversity and composition of animal assemblages has not been documented. Ant communities were studied on four active drove roads, two in forests (submediterranean and conifer) and two in open environments (croplands and rangelands). They were compared with the respective matrix communities and their contribution to local species richness was evaluated. The effects were heavily dependent on the open or closed nature of the matrix. In forest environments, drove roads increased ant species richness at the local scale, acting as clear keystone structures. Their species richness and functional diversity were highest on the fine scale, species composition was different, and a slight edge effect in the matrix was detected. In contrast, drove roads had little or even a negative effect in open environment locations. We conclude that drove roads have a high conservation value for ants in Mediterranean forest environments, in addition to their importance as reservoirs of plant biodiversity and generators of ecological goods and services.

  18. Population Structure of Pseudocercospora fijiensis in Costa Rica Reveals Shared Haplotype Diversity with Southeast Asian Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Amanda; Charles, Melodi; Chavan, Suchitra; Muñoz, Miguel; Gómez-Alpizar, Luis; Ristaino, Jean Beagle

    2017-12-01

    Pseudocercospora fijiensis is the causal pathogen of black Sigatoka, a devastating disease of banana that can cause 20 to 80% yield loss in the absence of fungicides in banana crops. The genetic structure of populations of P. fijiensis in Costa Rica was examined and compared with Honduran and global populations to better understand migration patterns and inform management strategies. In total, 118 isolates of P. fijiensis collected from Costa Rica and Honduras from 2010 to 2014 were analyzed using multilocus genotyping of six loci and compared with a previously published global dataset of populations of P. fijiensis. The Costa Rican and Honduran populations shared haplotype diversity with haplotypes from Southeast Asia, Oceania, and the Americas but not Africa for all but one of the six loci studied. Gene flow and shared haplotype diversity was found in Honduran and Costa Rican populations of the pathogen. The data indicate that the haplotypic diversity observed in Costa Rican populations of P. fijiensis is derived from dispersal from initial outbreak sources in Honduras and admixtures between genetically differentiated sources from Southeast Asia, Oceania, and the Americas.

  19. Fundamental differences in diversity and genomic population structure between Atlantic and Pacific Prochlorococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtan, Nadav; Roggensack, Sara E; Berta-Thompson, Jessie W; Grinberg, Maor; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2017-09-01

    The Atlantic and Pacific Oceans represent different biogeochemical regimes in which the abundant marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus thrives. We have shown that Prochlorococcus populations in the Atlantic are composed of hundreds of genomically, and likely ecologically, distinct coexisting subpopulations with distinct genomic backbones. Here we ask if differences in the ecology and selection pressures between the Atlantic and Pacific are reflected in the diversity and genomic composition of their indigenous Prochlorococcus populations. We applied large-scale single-cell genomics and compared the cell-by-cell genomic composition of wild populations of co-occurring cells from samples from Station ALOHA off Hawaii, and from Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Station off Bermuda. We reveal fundamental differences in diversity and genomic structure of populations between the sites. The Pacific populations are more diverse than those in the Atlantic, composed of significantly more coexisting subpopulations and lacking dominant subpopulations. Prochlorococcus from the two sites seem to be composed of mostly non-overlapping distinct sets of subpopulations with different genomic backbones-likely reflecting different sets of ocean-specific micro-niches. Furthermore, phylogenetically closely related strains carry ocean-associated nutrient acquisition genes likely reflecting differences in major selection pressures between the oceans. This differential selection, along with geographic separation, clearly has a significant role in shaping these populations.

  20. Genetic diversity and structure in semiwild and domesticated chiles (Capsicum annuum; Solanaceae) from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Meléndez, Araceli; Morrell, Peter L; Roose, Mikeal L; Kim, Seung-Chul

    2009-06-01

    The chile of Mesoamerica, Capsicum annuum, is one of five domesticated chiles in the Americas. Among the chiles, it varies the most in size, form, and color of its fruits. Together with maize, C. annuum is one of the principal elements of the neotropical diets of Mesoamerican civilizations. Despite the great economic and cultural importance of C. annuum both worldwide and in Mexico, however, very little is known about its geographic origin and number of domestications. Here we sampled a total of 80 accessions from Mexico (58 semiwild and 22 domesticated) and examined nucleotide sequence diversity at three single- or low-copy nuclear loci, Dhn, G3pdh, and Waxy. Across the three loci, we found an average reduction of ca. 10% in the diversity of domesticates relative to semiwild chiles and geographic structure within Mexican populations. The Yucatan Peninsula contained a large number of haplotypes, many of which were unique, suggesting an important region of chile domestication and center of diversity. The present sampling of loci did not conclusively resolve the number and location of domestications, but several lines of evidence suggest multiple independent domestications from widely distributed progenitor populations.

  1. Population structure and genetic diversity of New World maize races assessed by DNA microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Yves; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Goodman, Major M; Sánchez G, Jesús; Doebley, John

    2008-10-01

    Because of the economic importance of maize and its scientific importance as a model system for studies of domestication, its evolutionary history is of general interest. We analyzed the population genetic structure of maize races by genotyping 964 individual plants, representing almost the entire set of ∼350 races native to the Americas, with 96 microsatellites. Using Bayesian clustering, we detected four main clusters consisting of highland Mexican, northern United States (US), tropical lowland, and Andean races. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the southwestern US was an intermediary stepping stone between Mexico and the northern US. Furthermore, southeastern US races appear to be of mixed northern flint and tropical lowland ancestry, while lowland middle South American races are of mixed Andean and tropical lowland ancestry. Several cases of post-Columbian movement of races were detected, most notably from the US to South America. Of the four main clusters, the highest genetic diversity occurs in highland Mexican races, while diversity is lowest in the Andes and northern US. Isolation by distance appears to be the main factor underlying the historical diversification of maize. We identify highland Mexico and the Andes as potential sources of genetic diversity underrepresented among elite lines used in maize breeding programs.

  2. Petroleum-influenced beach sediments of the Campeche Bank, Mexico: diversity and bacterial community structure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosano-Hernández, María C; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo; Fernández-Linares, Luis

    2012-03-01

    The bacterial diversity and community structure were surveyed in intertidal petroleum-influenced sediments of ≈ 100 km of a beach, in the southern Gulf of Mexico. The beach was divided in twenty sampling sites according to high, moderate and low petroleum influence. Densities of cultured heterotrophic (HAB) and hydrocarbon degrading bacteria (HDB) were highly variable in sediments, with little morphological assortment in colonies. PCR-RISA banding patterns differentiated distinct communities along the beach, and the bacterial diversity changed inversely to the degree of petroleum hydrocarbon influence: the higher TPH concentration, the lower genotype diversity. Seven DNA sequences (Genbank EF191394 -EF191396 and EF191398 -EF191401) were affiliated to uncultured members of Gemmatimonas, Acidobacterium, Desulfobacteraceae, Rubrobacterales, Actinobacterium and the Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria group; all the above taxa are known for having members with active roles in biogeochemical transformations. The remaining sequences (EF191388 - EF191393 and EF191397) affiliated to Pseudoalteromonas, and to oil-degrading genera such as Pseudomonas, Vibrio and Marinobacter, being the last one an obligate oil-degrading bacterium. An exchange of bacteria between the beach and the oil seep environment, and the potential cleaning-up role of bacteria at the southern Gulf of Mexico are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimating genetic structure and diversity of cyanobacterial communities in Atlantic forest phyllosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigonato, Janaina; Gonçalves, Natalia; Andreote, Ana Paula Dini; Lambais, Marcio Rodrigues; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2016-06-20

    Cyanobacterial communities on the phyllosphere of 4 plant species inhabiting the endangered Brazilian Atlantic Forest biome were evaluated using cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Total genomic DNA was extracted from cells detached from the surface of leaves of Euterpe edulis, Guapira opposita, Garcinia gardneriana, and Merostachys neesii sampled in 2 Brazilian Atlantic Forest locations along an elevational gradient, i.e., lowland and montane forest. The DNA fingerprinting method PCR-DGGE revealed that the cyanobacterial phyllosphere community structures were mainly influenced by the plant species; geographical location of the plant had little effect. The 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained by clone libraries showed a predominance of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria of the order Nostocales, even though the majority of retrieved operational taxonomic units (∼60% of the sequences) showed similarity only to uncultured cyanobacteria phylotypes. The leaf surface of Guapira opposita had the highest richness and diversity of cyanobacteria, whereas the M. neesii (bamboo) had the largest number of copies of cyanobacterial 16S rRNA gene per cm(2) of leaf. This study investigated cyanobacteria diversity and its distribution pattern in Atlantic forest phyllosphere. The results indicated that plant species is the main driver of cyanobacteria community assemblage in the phyllosphere and that these communities are made up of a high diversity of cyanobacterial taxa that need to be discovered.

  4. Genetic structure and diversity in Juniperus communis populations in Saxony, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reim Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, land use changes led to a rapid decline and fragmentation of J. communis populations in Germany. Population isolation may lead to a restricted gene flow and, further, to negative effects on genetic variation. In this study, genetic diversity and population structure in seven fragmented J. communis populations in Saxony, Germany, were investigated using nuclear microsatellites (nSSR and chloroplast single nucleotide polymorphism (cpSNP. In all Saxony J. communis populations, a high genetic diversity was determined but no population differentiation could be detected whatever method was applied (Bayesian cluster analysis, F-statistics, AMOVA. The same was true for three J. communis out-group samples originating from Italy, Slovakia and Norway, which also showed high genetic diversity and low genetic differences regarding other J. communis populations. Low genetic differentiation among the J. communis populations ascertained with nuclear and chloroplast markers indicated high levels of gene flow by pollen and also by seeds between the sampled locations. Low genetic differentiation may also provide an indicator of Juniper survival during the last glacial maximum (LGM in Europe. The results of this study serve as a basis for the implementation of appropriate conservation measures in Saxony.

  5. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) diversity, activity density, and community structure in a diversified agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, J D; Dosdall, L M; Clayton, G W; Harker, K N; O'Donovan, J T

    2012-02-01

    Diversity and abundance of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) can be enhanced in vegetable and field intercropping systems, but the complexity of polycultures precludes the application of generalized assumptions of effects for novel intercropping combinations. In a field experiment conducted at Lacombe and Ellerslie, Alberta, Canada, in 2005 and 2006, we investigated the effects of intercropping canola (Brassica napus L.) with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) on the diversity and community structure of carabid beetles, and on the activity density responses of individual carabid species. Shannon-Wiener diversity index scores and species evenness increased significantly as the proportion of wheat comprising total crop plant populations increased in one site-year of the study, indicating a positive response to enhanced crop plant species evenness in the intercrops, and in that same site-year, ground beetle communities in intercrops shifted to more closely approximate those in wheat monocultures as the percentage of wheat in the intercrops increased. Individual carabid species activity densities showed differing responses to intercropping, although activity densities of some potential root maggot (Delia spp.) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) predators were greater in intercrops with high proportions of wheat than in canola monocultures. The activity density of Pterostichus melanarius (Illiger), the most abundant species collected, tended to be greater in canola monocultures than high-wheat intercrops or wheat monocultures. We conclude that intercrops of canola and wheat have the potential to enhance populations of some carabid species, therefore possibly exerting increased pressure on some canola insect pests.

  6. Microbial community structure and diversity within hypersaline Keke Salt Lake environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Jing; Long, Qifu; Chen, Laisheng; Liu, Deli; Zhu, Derui

    2017-11-01

    Keke Salt Lake is located in the Qaidamu Basin of China. It is a unique magnesium sulfate-subtype hypersaline lake that exhibits a halite domain ecosystem, yet its microbial diversity has remained unstudied. Here, the microbial community structure and diversity was investigated via high-throughput sequencing of the V3-V5 regions of 16S rRNA genes. A high diversity of operational taxonomic units was detected for Bacteria and Archaea (734 and 747, respectively), comprising 21 phyla, 43 classes, and 201 genera of Bacteria and 4 phyla, 4 classes, and 39 genera of Archaea. Salt-saturated samples were dominated by the bacterial genera Bacillus (51.52%-58.35% relative abundance), Lactococcus (9.52%-10.51%), and Oceanobacillus (8.82%-9.88%) within the Firmicutes phylum (74.81%-80.99%), contrasting with other hypersaline lakes. The dominant Archaea belonged to the Halobacteriaceae family, and in particular, the genera (with an abundance of >10% of communities) Halonotius, Halorubellus, Halapricum, Halorubrum, and Natronomonas. Additionally, we report the presence of Nanohaloarchaeota and Woesearchaeota in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau lakes, which has not been previously documented. Total salinity (especially Mg 2+ , Cl - , Na + , and K + ) mostly correlated with taxonomic distribution across samples. These results expand our understanding of microbial resource utilization within hypersaline lakes and the potential adaptations of dominant microorganisms that allow them to inhabit such environments.

  7. Characterization of Linkage Disequilibrium and Population Structure in a Mungbean Diversity Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Noble

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L. R. Wilczek var. radiata] is an important grain legume globally, providing a high-quality plant protein source largely produced and consumed in South and East Asia. This study aimed to characterize a mungbean diversity panel consisting of 466 cultivated accessions and demonstrate its utility by conducting a pilot genome-wide association study of seed coat color. In addition 16 wild accessions were genotyped for comparison and in total over 22,000 polymorphic genome-wide SNPs were identified and used to analyze the genetic diversity, population structure, linkage disequilibrium (LD of mungbean. Polymorphism was lower in the cultivated accessions in comparison to the wild accessions, with average polymorphism information content values 0.174, versus 0.305 in wild mungbean. LD decayed in ∼100 kb in cultivated lines, a distance higher than the linkage decay of ∼60 kb estimated in wild mungbean. Four distinct subgroups were identified within the cultivated lines, which broadly corresponded to geographic origin and seed characteristics. In a pilot genome-wide association mapping study of seed coat color, five genomic regions associated were identified, two of which were close to seed coat color genes in other species. This mungbean diversity panel constitutes a valuable resource for genetic dissection of important agronomical traits to accelerate mungbean breeding.

  8. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Collard Landraces and their Relationship to Other Brassica oleracea Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra E. Pelc

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Landraces have the potential to provide a reservoir of genetic diversity for crop improvement to combat the genetic erosion of the food supply. A landrace collection of the vitamin-rich specialty crop collard ( L. var. was genetically characterized to assess its potential for improving the diverse crop varieties of . We used the Illumina 60K SNP BeadChip array with 52,157 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to (i clarify the relationship of collard to the most economically important crop types, (ii evaluate genetic diversity and population structure of 75 collard landraces, and (iii assess the potential of the collection for genome-wide association studies (GWAS through characterization of genomic patterns of linkage disequilibrium. Confirming the collection as a valuable genetic resource, the collard landraces had twice the polymorphic markers (11,322 SNPs and 10 times the variety-specific alleles (521 alleles of the remaining crop types examined in this study. On average, linkage disequilibrium decayed to background levels within 600 kilobase (kb, allowing for sufficient coverage of the genome for GWAS using the physical positions of the 8273 SNPs polymorphic among the landraces. Although other relationships varied, the previous placement of collard with the cabbage family was confirmed through phylogenetic analysis and principal coordinates analysis (PCoA.

  9. Forest structure, diversity and regeneration potential along altitudinal gradient in Dhanaulti of Garhwal Himalaya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, S.; Rajwar, G.S.; Kumar, M.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: The aim of the present study was to understatnd the forest composition, structure, diversity and regeneration potential along altitudinal gradient. Area of study: The study was carried out in Dhanaulti forest which falls under temperate region of Garhwal Himalaya in Uttarakhand state, India. Material and Methods: Vegetation analysis was carried out using 10 quadrats at each altitude using a quadrate size of 10×10 m2. In each quadrate, categories of trees >30 cm cbh were considered as trees, 10-30cm cbh as saplings and <10 cm cbh as seedlings. The data were quantitatively analyzed. Main results: In upper and middle altitudes, Cedrus deodara was reported dominant tree whereas, in lower altitude Quercus leucotrichophora was reported dominant. Tree density was highest in lower altitude which reduced middle and upper altitudes whereas, total basal cover increased with increasing altitude. The increasing total basal cover with altitude could be because of the presence of Cedrus deodara trees having higher girth classes. In tree, sapling and seedling layers, diversity (H) and equitabiltiy (EC) decreased with increasing altitude. However, concentrations of dominace (CD) and beta diversity (BD have shown reverse trend with H and EC which increased with increasing altitudes, in each layer of tree, sapling and seedling. The distribution pattern of most species in all layers of trees, saplings and seedlings was contagious. The regeneration potential of the species has shown that some of the species in the absence of tree layer are still regenerating particularly, Rhododendron arboreum, Benthamidia capitata, Neolitsea pallens etc. It indicates that most of the species are shifting upward as they are getting suitable conditions. Research highlights: Altitude influence species composition, diversity and regeneration potential of species. (Author)

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of Miscanthus sinensis germplasm in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhao

    Full Text Available Miscanthus is a perennial rhizomatous C4 grass native to East Asia. Endowed with great biomass yield, high ligno-cellulose composition, efficient use of radiation, nutrient and water, as well as tolerance to stress, Miscanthus has great potential as an excellent bioenergy crop. Despite of the high potential for biomass production of the allotriploid hybrid M. ×giganteus, derived from M. sacchariflorus and M. sinensis, other options need to be explored to improve the narrow genetic base of M. ×giganteus, and also to exploit other Miscanthus species, including M. sinensis (2n = 2x = 38, as bioenergy crops. In the present study, a large number of 459 M. sinensis accessions, collected from the wide geographical distribution regions in China, were genotyped using 23 SSR markers transferable from Brachypodium distachyon. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed. High genetic diversity and differentiation of the germplasm were observed, with 115 alleles in total, a polymorphic rate of 0.77, Nei's genetic diversity index (He of 0.32 and polymorphism information content (PIC of 0.26. Clustering of germplasm accessions was primarily in agreement with the natural geographic distribution. AMOVA and genetic distance analyses confirmed the genetic differentiation in the M. sinensis germplasm and it was grouped into five clusters or subpopulations. Significant genetic variation among subpopulations indicated obvious genetic differentiation in the collections, but within-subpopulation variation (83% was substantially greater than the between-subpopulation variation (17%. Considerable phenotypic variation was observed for multiple traits among 300 M. sinensis accessions. Nine SSR markers were found to be associated with heading date and biomass yield. The diverse Chinese M. sinensis germplasm and newly identified SSR markers were proved to be valuable for breeding Miscanthus varieties with desired bioenergy traits.

  11. Predicting acute aquatic toxicity of structurally diverse chemicals in fish using artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2013-09-01

    The research aims to develop global modeling tools capable of categorizing structurally diverse chemicals in various toxicity classes according to the EEC and European Community directives, and to predict their acute toxicity in fathead minnow using set of selected molecular descriptors. Accordingly, artificial intelligence approach based classification and regression models, such as probabilistic neural networks (PNN), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPN), radial basis function neural network (RBFN), support vector machines (SVM), gene expression programming (GEP), and decision tree (DT) were constructed using the experimental toxicity data. Diversity and non-linearity in the chemicals' data were tested using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. Predictive and generalization abilities of various models constructed here were compared using several statistical parameters. PNN and GRNN models performed relatively better than MLPN, RBFN, SVM, GEP, and DT. Both in two and four category classifications, PNN yielded a considerably high accuracy of classification in training (95.85 percent and 90.07 percent) and validation data (91.30 percent and 86.96 percent), respectively. GRNN rendered a high correlation between the measured and model predicted -log LC50 values both for the training (0.929) and validation (0.910) data and low prediction errors (RMSE) of 0.52 and 0.49 for two sets. Efficiency of the selected PNN and GRNN models in predicting acute toxicity of new chemicals was adequately validated using external datasets of different fish species (fathead minnow, bluegill, trout, and guppy). The PNN and GRNN models showed good predictive and generalization abilities and can be used as tools for predicting toxicities of structurally diverse chemical compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Population structure and diversity of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates in Hunan province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Cui; Yao, Run-Xian; Li, Fang; Dai, Su-Ming; Licciardello, Grazia; Catara, Antonino; Gentile, Alessandra; Deng, Zi-Niu

    2017-02-01

    Stem-pitting (SP) is the main type of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) that causes severe damage to citrus trees, especially those of sweet orange, in Hunan province, China. Understanding the local CTV population structure should provide clues for effective mild strain cross-protection (MSCP) of the SP strain of CTV. In this study, markers for the p23 gene, multiple molecular markers (MMMs), and sequence analysis of the three silencing suppressor genes (p20, p23 and p25) were employed to analyze the genetic diversity and genotype composition of the CTV population based on 51 CTV-positive samples collected from 14 citrus orchards scattered around six major citrus-growing areas of Hunan. The results indicated that the CTV population structure was extremely complex and that infection was highly mixed. In total, p23 gene markers resulted in six profiles, and MMMs demonstrated 25 profiles. The severe VT and T3 types appeared to be predominantly associated with SP, while the mild T30 and RB types were related to asymptomatic samples. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences of p20, p23 and p25, 19 representative CTV samples were classified into seven recently established CTV groups and a potentially novel one. A high level of genetic diversity, as well as potential recombination, was revealed among different CTV isolates. Five pure SP severe and two pure mild strains were identified by genotype composition analysis. Taken together, the results update the genetic diversity of CTV in Hunan with the detection of one possible novel strain, and this information might be applicable for the selection of appropriate mild CTV strains for controlling citrus SP disease through cross-protection.

  13. Combinatorial Synthesis of Structurally Diverse Triazole-Bridged Flavonoid Dimers and Trimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Han Sum

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are a large family of compounds associated with a broad range of biologically useful properties. In recent years, synthetic compounds that contain two flavonoid units linked together have attracted attention in drug discovery and development projects. Numerous flavonoid dimer systems, incorporating a range of monomers attached via different linkers, have been reported to exhibit interesting bioactivities. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, the 1,2,3-triazole ring system has been identified as a particularly attractive linker moiety in dimeric derivatives (owing to several favourable attributes including proven biological relevance and metabolic stability and triazole-bridged flavonoid dimers possessing anticancer and antimalarial activities have recently been reported. However, there are relatively few examples of libraries of triazole-bridged flavonoid dimers and the diversity of flavonoid subunits present within these is typically limited. Thus, this compound type arguably remains underexplored within drug discovery. Herein, we report a modular strategy for the synthesis of novel and biologically interesting triazole-bridged flavonoid heterodimers and also very rare heterotrimers from readily available starting materials. Application of this strategy has enabled step-efficient and systematic access to a library of structurally diverse compounds of this sort, with a variety of monomer units belonging to six different structural subclasses of flavonoid successfully incorporated.

  14. Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations for seed quality traits in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badigannavar, Ashok; Myers, Gerald O

    2015-03-01

    Cottonseed contains 16% seed oil and 23% seed protein by weight. High levels of palmitic acid provides a degree of stability to the oil, while the presence of bound gossypol in proteins considerably changes their properties, including their biological value. This study uses genetic principles to identify genomic regions associated with seed oil, protein and fibre content in upland cotton cultivars. Cotton association mapping panel representing the US germplasm were genotyped using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, yielding 234 polymorphic DNA fragments. Phenotypic analysis showed high genetic variability for the seed traits, seed oil range from 6.47-25.16%, protein from 1.85-28.45% and fibre content from 15.88-37.12%. There were negative correlations between seed oil and protein content.With reference to genetic diversity, the average estimate of FST was 8.852 indicating a low level of genetic differentiation among subpopulations. The AMOVA test revealed that variation was 94% within and 6% among subpopulations. Bayesian population structure identified five subpopulations and was in agreement with their geographical distribution. Among the mixed models analysed, mixed linear model (MLM) identified 21 quantitative trait loci for lint percentage and seed quality traits, such as seed protein and oil. Establishing genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations for the seed quality traits could be valuable in understanding the genetic relationships and their utilization in breeding programmes.

  15. Combinatorial Synthesis of Structurally Diverse Triazole-Bridged Flavonoid Dimers and Trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, Tze Han; Sum, Tze Jing; Galloway, Warren R J D; Collins, Súil; Twigg, David G; Hollfelder, Florian; Spring, David R

    2016-09-16

    Flavonoids are a large family of compounds associated with a broad range of biologically useful properties. In recent years, synthetic compounds that contain two flavonoid units linked together have attracted attention in drug discovery and development projects. Numerous flavonoid dimer systems, incorporating a range of monomers attached via different linkers, have been reported to exhibit interesting bioactivities. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, the 1,2,3-triazole ring system has been identified as a particularly attractive linker moiety in dimeric derivatives (owing to several favourable attributes including proven biological relevance and metabolic stability) and triazole-bridged flavonoid dimers possessing anticancer and antimalarial activities have recently been reported. However, there are relatively few examples of libraries of triazole-bridged flavonoid dimers and the diversity of flavonoid subunits present within these is typically limited. Thus, this compound type arguably remains underexplored within drug discovery. Herein, we report a modular strategy for the synthesis of novel and biologically interesting triazole-bridged flavonoid heterodimers and also very rare heterotrimers from readily available starting materials. Application of this strategy has enabled step-efficient and systematic access to a library of structurally diverse compounds of this sort, with a variety of monomer units belonging to six different structural subclasses of flavonoid successfully incorporated.

  16. Knowing Beyond the Structure: Maximizing Social Power through a Synergistic, Values-based Approach on Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Neškovic

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a principal place is given to the question of how the ways we conceptualize the use of our mind influence the generation of social power. We define social power as the potency of socially integrated individuals to accomplish specific predetermined values. These values can be related to anything from concrete material prosperity to abstract social and cultural goals. How are the goals accomplished? Are there principles or laws that govern the process? What is the role of the individual in this process? We argue that the development of social power requires an understanding not only of the heterogeneity of individual and social structure, but also of the subtle phenomena that give dynamism to the structure itself. We assume this intangible factor to be the container of social energy and consider that stimulating unique individual capacities to its maximum expression is crucial for the production of social power. Accordingly, we ask ourselves what progress in the way we think can bring us closer to the maximum expression of individual capacity. Maximum contribution of each individual in diverse aspects of social functioning is an applied form of unity in diversity—diversity referring to a unique capacity of each individual, and unity being a harmonious collective of unique individuals. As a case study, we choose the phenomenon of multicultural environment, as a context in which the highest variety of individual frameworks are brought into relationship with one another.

  17. Structural Basis for Inhibition of Histamine N-Methyltransferase by Diverse Drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton,J.; Sawada, K.; Nishibori, M.; Cheng, X.

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, histamine action is terminated through metabolic inactivation by histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) and diamine oxidase. In addition to three well-studied pharmacological functions, smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, and stimulation of gastric acid secretion, histamine plays important roles in neurotransmission, immunomodulation, and regulation of cell proliferation. The histamine receptor H1 antagonist diphenhydramine, the antimalarial drug amodiaquine, the antifolate drug metoprine, and the anticholinesterase drug tacrine (an early drug for Alzheimer's disease) are surprisingly all potent HNMT inhibitors, having inhibition constants in the range of 10-100 nM. We have determined the structural mode of interaction of these four inhibitors with HNMT. Despite their structural diversity, they all occupy the histamine-binding site, thus blocking access to the enzyme's active site. Near the N terminus of HNMT, several aromatic residues (Phe9, Tyr15, and Phe19) adopt different rotamer conformations or become disordered in the enzyme-inhibitor complexes, accommodating the diverse, rigid hydrophobic groups of the inhibitors. The maximized shape complementarity between the protein aromatic side-chains and aromatic ring(s) of the inhibitors are responsible for the tight binding of these varied inhibitors.

  18. Tree Species Diversity and Population Structure in the Tropical Forests of North Central Eastern Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumpa PREMAVANI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The tree species diversity and population structure were studied in four stands of the tropical forests in the north-central Eastern Ghats, based on tree inventories conducted on four 1-ha plots. In the four independent plots, two 5 x 1000 m transects were established and all trees with ≥ 15 cm girth at breast height were enumerated. The density, frequency, basal area and IVI along with diversity indices viz. Shannon index, species richness, equitability and species dominance were computed to see the variation in tree community. A total of 92 species representing 73 genera under 40 families of angiosperms were recorded. Tree species richness was as low as 34 species per hectare plot in Geddapalli to as high as 48 species in Koruturu. Tree density ranged from 360 stems per hectare in plot Geddapalli to 526 stems in plot Chintapalli and that of total basal area from 16.31 m2 ha-1 in Koruturu to 31.15 m2 ha-1 in Chintapalli. The number of species and stems decreased from the smaller to the largest girth classes. The tree inventories of the study area when compared to those of the other tropical forests showed great differences in density and basal area. This may probably be due to differences in geography and annual rainfall patterns. The information on tree species structure and function can provide baseline information for conservation of the biodiversity.

  19. Ecological-network models link diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Alelio, Domenico; Libralato, Simone; Wyatt, Timothy; Ribera d’Alcalà, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    A planktonic food-web model including sixty-three functional nodes (representing auto- mixo- and heterotrophs) was developed to integrate most trophic diversity present in the plankton. The model was implemented in two variants - which we named ‘green’ and ‘blue’ - characterized by opposite amounts of phytoplankton biomass and representing, respectively, bloom and non-bloom states of the system. Taxonomically disaggregated food-webs described herein allowed to shed light on how components of the plankton community changed their trophic behavior in the two different conditions, and modified the overall functioning of the plankton food web. The green and blue food-webs showed distinct organizations in terms of trophic roles of the nodes and carbon fluxes between them. Such re-organization stemmed from switches in selective grazing by both metazoan and protozoan consumers. Switches in food-web structure resulted in relatively small differences in the efficiency of material transfer towards higher trophic levels. For instance, from green to blue states, a seven-fold decrease in phytoplankton biomass translated into only a two-fold decrease in potential planktivorous fish biomass. By linking diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web, we discuss the role of internal mechanisms, relying on species-specific functionalities, in driving the ‘adaptive’ responses of plankton communities to perturbations. PMID:26883643

  20. Evidence of hidden biodiversity, ongoing speciation and diverse patterns of genetic structure in giant Antarctic amphipods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Helena P; Miller, Karen J; Stark, Jonathan S

    2011-08-01

    Recent molecular research on Antarctic benthic organisms has challenged traditional taxonomic classifications, suggesting that our current perceptions of Antarctic biodiversity and species distributions must be thoroughly revised. Furthermore, genetic differentiation at the intraspecific level remains poorly understood, particularly in eastern Antarctica. We addressed these issues using DNA sequence data for two sibling amphipod species that could be collected on a circum-Antarctic scale: Eusirus perdentatus and Eusirus giganteus. Haplotype networks and Bayesian phylogenies based on mitochondrial (COI, CytB) and nuclear (ITS2) DNA provided strong evidence of multiple cryptic species of Eusirus, with several occurring in sympatry and at least one likely to have a true circum-Antarctic distribution. Within species, gene flow was often highly restricted, consistent with a brooding life history and in some cases suggestive of current or future allopatric speciation. Patterns of genetic structure were not always predictable: one cryptic species showed preliminary evidence of high genetic differentiation across ∼150 km in eastern Antarctica (F(ST) > 0.47, P Antarctic amphipods that are neither apparent from previous taxonomic or ecological studies nor predictable from their life history. Such genetic diversity and structure may reflect different modes of survival for Antarctic benthic organisms during historic glacial cycles, and/or subsequent re-establishment of populations on the shelf, and highlight our misunderstanding of Antarctic marine species diversity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Population structure and genetic diversity of the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis in Bristol, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawksworth, Joseph; Levy, Max; Smale, Chloe; Cheung, Dean; Whittle, Alice; Longhurst, Denise; Muir, Peter; Gibson, Wendy

    2015-08-01

    The protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis, an extremely common, but non-life-threatening, sexually-transmitted disease throughout the world. Recent population genetics studies of T. vaginalis have detected high genetic diversity and revealed a two-type population structure, associated with phenotypic differences in sensitivity to metronidazole, the drug commonly used for treatment, and presence of T. vaginalis virus. There is currently a lack of data on UK isolates; most isolates examined to date are from the US. Here we used a recently described system for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of T. vaginalis to study diversity of clinical isolates from Bristol, UK. We used MLST to characterise 23 clinical isolates of T. vaginalis collected from female patients during 2013. Seven housekeeping genes were PCR-amplified for each isolate and sequenced. The concatenated sequences were then compared with data from other MLST-characterised isolates available from http://tvaginalis.mlst.net/ to analyse the population structure and construct phylogenetic trees. Among the 23 isolates from the Bristol population of T. vaginalis, we found 23 polymorphic nucleotide sites, 25 different alleles and 19 sequence types (genotypes). Most isolates had a unique genotype, in agreement with the high levels of heterogeneity observed elsewhere in the world. A two-type population structure was evident from population genetic analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction split the isolates into two major clades. Tests for recombination in the Bristol population of T. vaginalis gave conflicting results, suggesting overall a clonal pattern of reproduction. We conclude that the Bristol population of T. vaginalis parasites conforms to the two-type population structure found in most other regions of the world. We found the MLST scheme to be an efficient genotyping method. The online MLST database provides a useful repository and resource that will prove

  2. Levels and Patterns of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Domestic Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Sandra; Lopes, Susana; Garreau, Hervé; Boucher, Samuel; Allain, Daniel; Queney, Guillaume; Esteves, Pedro J.; Bolet, Gerard; Ferrand, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Over thousands of years humans changed the genetic and phenotypic composition of several organisms and in the process transformed wild species into domesticated forms. From this close association, domestic animals emerged as important models in biomedical and fundamental research, in addition to their intrinsic economical and cultural value. The domestic rabbit is no exception but few studies have investigated the impact of domestication on its genetic variability. In order to study patterns of genetic structure in domestic rabbits and to quantify the genetic diversity lost with the domestication process, we genotyped 45 microsatellites for 471 individuals belonging to 16 breeds and 13 wild localities. We found that both the initial domestication and the subsequent process of breed formation, when averaged across breeds, culminated in losses of ~20% of genetic diversity present in the ancestral wild population and domestic rabbits as a whole, respectively. Despite the short time elapsed since breed diversification we uncovered a well-defined structure in domestic rabbits where the FST between breeds was 22%. However, we failed to detect deeper levels of structure, probably consequence of a recent and single geographic origin of domestication together with a non-bifurcating process of breed formation, which were often derived from crosses between two or more breeds. Finally, we found evidence for intrabreed stratification that is associated with demographic and selective causes such as formation of strains, colour morphs within the same breed, or country/breeder of origin. These additional layers of population structure within breeds should be taken into account in future mapping studies. PMID:26689909

  3. Structural diversity of the vastus intermedius origin revealed by analysis of isolated muscle specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shuntaro; Ichimura, Koichiro; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    The quadriceps femoris (QF), a major extensor of the knee joint, plays an important role in human movement. However, descriptions of the three vastus muscles of the QF in anatomy textbooks remain confusing. We analyzed 33 QFs by a novel approach, using isolated muscle specimens to clarify the structures of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), and vastus intermedius (VI) origins. The origins of the VL and VM were quite constant in shape and location, but the VI was much more structurally diverse. In typical cases (23 of 33), the origin of the VI attached muscularly to the anterior and lateral surface of the femoral shaft. It adjoined the origin of the VL at the lateral lip (LL) of the linea aspera to form a common origin. In some cases (10 of 33), the muscle belly and origin of the VI were much smaller than those in the typical cases; the origin of the VI attached only to the anterior surface of the femur and did not contact the LL. In addition, the muscle belly of the VI was narrow and almost corresponded to the width of the femoral shaft. The isolated muscle specimen is a useful tool for analyzing individual muscle structures, which can be difficult to observe by routine dissection. Using this method, it became clear that the VI is more structurally diverse in its origin than the VL and VM. Clin. Anat. 30:98-105, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Clinical Anatomy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Clinical Anatomists.

  4. Diversity of Algerian oases date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L., Arecaceae): Heterozygote excess and cryptic structure suggest farmer management had a major impact on diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussouni, Souhila; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe; Vigouroux, Yves; Bouguedoura, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Date palm (Phoenix dactyliferaL.) is the mainstay of oasis agriculture in the Saharan region. It is cultivated in a large part of the Mediterranean coastal area of the Sahara and in most isolated oases in the Algerian desert. We sampled 10 oases in Algeria to understand the structure of date palm diversity from the coastal area to a very isolated desert location. We used 18 microsatellite markers and a chloroplast minisatellite to characterize 414 individual palm trees corresponding to 114 named varieties. We found a significant negative inbreeding coefficient, suggesting active farmer selection for heterozygous individuals. Three distinct genetic clusters were identified, a ubiquitous set of varieties found across the different oases, and two clusters, one of which was specific to the northern area, and the other to the drier southern area of the Algerian Sahara. The ubiquitous cluster presented very striking chloroplast diversity, signing the frequency of haplotypes found in Saudi Arabia, the most eastern part of the date palm range. Exchanges of Middle Eastern and Algerian date palms are known to have occurred and could have led to the introduction of this particular chlorotype. However, Algerian nuclear diversity was not of eastern origin. Our study strongly suggests that the peculiar chloroplastic diversity of date palm is maintained by farmers and could originate from date palms introduced from the Middle East a long time ago, which since then, hasbeen strongly introgressed. This study illustrates the complex structure of date palm diversity in Algerian oases and the role of farmers in shaping such cryptic diversity.

  5. Diversity of Algerian oases date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L., Arecaceae: Heterozygote excess and cryptic structure suggest farmer management had a major impact on diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhila Moussouni

    Full Text Available Date palm (Phoenix dactyliferaL. is the mainstay of oasis agriculture in the Saharan region. It is cultivated in a large part of the Mediterranean coastal area of the Sahara and in most isolated oases in the Algerian desert. We sampled 10 oases in Algeria to understand the structure of date palm diversity from the coastal area to a very isolated desert location. We used 18 microsatellite markers and a chloroplast minisatellite to characterize 414 individual palm trees corresponding to 114 named varieties. We found a significant negative inbreeding coefficient, suggesting active farmer selection for heterozygous individuals. Three distinct genetic clusters were identified, a ubiquitous set of varieties found across the different oases, and two clusters, one of which was specific to the northern area, and the other to the drier southern area of the Algerian Sahara. The ubiquitous cluster presented very striking chloroplast diversity, signing the frequency of haplotypes found in Saudi Arabia, the most eastern part of the date palm range. Exchanges of Middle Eastern and Algerian date palms are known to have occurred and could have led to the introduction of this particular chlorotype. However, Algerian nuclear diversity was not of eastern origin. Our study strongly suggests that the peculiar chloroplastic diversity of date palm is maintained by farmers and could originate from date palms introduced from the Middle East a long time ago, which since then, hasbeen strongly introgressed. This study illustrates the complex structure of date palm diversity in Algerian oases and the role of farmers in shaping such cryptic diversity.

  6. The relationship between species diversity and genetic structure in the rare Picea chihuahuana tree species community, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simental-Rodríguez, Sergio Leonel; Quiñones-Pérez, Carmen Zulema; Moya, Daniel; Hernández-Tecles, Enrique; López-Sánchez, Carlos Antonio; Wehenkel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity and genetic diversity, the most basic elements of biodiversity, have long been treated as separate topics, although populations evolve within a community context. Recent studies on community genetics and ecology have suggested that genetic diversity is not completely independent of species diversity. The Mexican Picea chihuahuana Martínez is an endemic species listed as "Endangered" on the Red List. Forty populations of Chihuahua spruce have been identified. This species is often associated with tree species of eight genera in gallery forests. This rare Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area no more than 300 ha and has been subject of several studies involving different topics such as ecology, genetic structure and climate change. The overall aim of these studies was to obtain a dataset for developing management tools to help decision makers implement preservation and conservation strategies. However, this unique forest tree community may also represent an excellent subject for helping us to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes in determining community structure and dynamics. The AFLP technique and species composition data were used together to test the hypothesis that species diversity is related to the adaptive genetic structure of some dominant tree species (Picea chihuahuana, Pinus strobiformis, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Populus tremuloides) of the Picea chihuahuana tree community at fourteen locations. The Hill numbers were used as a diversity measure. The results revealed a significant correlation between tree species diversity and genetic structure in Populus tremuloides. Because the relationship between the two levels of diversity was found to be positive for the putative adaptive AFLP detected, genetic and species structures of the tree community were possibly simultaneously adapted to a combination of ecological or environmental factors. The present findings indicate that interactions between

  7. Higher stability in forest-atmosphere exchange observed in a structurally diverse forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, R.; Rayment, M.; Moyano, F.; Herbst, M.; Mund, M.; Knohl, A.

    2016-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that structurally diverse forests have greater stability on exchange processes with the atmosphere compared to forests with less diverse structure. In a case study, we assessed how net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and normalized maximum assimilation (Amax) varied over time in two forests in Germany based on 11 years of continuous eddy flux measurements. The two sites differ in structure as well as in species composition: one (Hainich) is an unmanaged, uneven-aged and heterogeneous mixed beech forest (65% beech), the other (Leinefelde) is a managed, even-aged and homogeneous pure beech stand. The two selected forests are of similar mean ages (about 130 years old) and exposed to similar air temperatures and vapour pressure deficits. Even though Hainich (the unmanaged forest) received higher rainfall (720 ± 134 mm vs 599±166 mm), the soil water availability showed no significant difference between both sites. Based on detailed biomass inventory, trees in Hainich are well distributed in all diameter at breast height (dbh) classes (10 to 90cm dbh) whereas in Leinefelde (the managed forest) trees are mostly confined to dbh classes of 40 to 55 cm. Our results showed a strong difference in inter-annual variability of NEE, which was lower in the unmanaged than in the managed site (coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.13 and 0.27, respectively). The lowest NEE was observed in both sites in 2004, a mast year and a year after the strong summer drought of 2003. The variation in the inter-annual normalized maximum assimilation (Amax) was lower in Hainich (standard deviation of 2.5 compared to 3.9 µmol m-2 s-1). Also, the seasonal course of Amax differed between the two forests which could explain why the mixed forest was more affected by the late summer drought of 2003, despite showing a more conservative carbon budget than the pure stand in the long term. The interannual anomaly in Amax was correlated with fruit production, the latter being larger in

  8. Role of T-type calcium channels in myogenic tone of skeletal muscle resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanBavel, Ed; Sorop, Oana; Andreasen, Ditte

    2002-01-01

    T-type calcium channels may be involved in the maintenance of myogenic tone. We tested their role in isolated rat cremaster arterioles obtained after CO(2) anesthesia and decapitation. Total RNA was analyzed by RT-PCR and Southern blotting for calcium channel expression. We observed expression......); K(+) -5.4 +/- 0.3 (n = 4); all log(IC(50)) P maintenance of myogenic tone in rat cremaster muscle arterioles....

  9. Inflammatory mediator bradykinin increases population of sensory neurons expressing functional T-type Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Liang, Ce; Zhang, Fan; Men, Hongchao; Du, Xiaona; Gamper, Nikita; Zhang, Hailin

    2016-04-29

    T-type Ca(2+) channels are important regulators of peripheral sensory neuron excitability. Accordingly, T-type Ca(2+) currents are often increased in various pathological pain conditions, such as inflammation or nerve injury. Here we investigated effects of inflammation on functional expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels in small-diameter cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that overnight treatment of DRG cultures with a cocktail of inflammatory mediators bradykinin (BK), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), norepinephrine (NE) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) strongly increased the population size of the small-diameter neurons displaying low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) Ca(2+) currents while having no effect on the peak LVA current amplitude. When applied individually, BK and ATP also increased the population size of LVA-positive neurons while NE and PGE2 had no effect. The PLC inhibitor U-73122 and B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe-140, both abolished the increase of the population of LVA-positive DRG neurons. Inflammatory treatment did not affect CaV3.2 mRNA or protein levels in DRG cultures. Furthermore, an ubiquitination inhibitor, MG132, did not increase the population of LVA-positive neurons. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediators BK and ATP increase the abundance of LVA-positive DRG neurons in total neuronal population by stimulating the recruitment of a 'reserve pool' of CaV3.2 channels, particularly in neurons that do not display measurable LVA currents under control conditions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Calmodulin regulates Cav3 T-type channels at their gating brake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Jean; Taiakina, Valentina; Monteil, Arnaud; Piazza, Michael; Guan, Wendy; Stephens, Robert F; Kitmitto, Ashraf; Pang, Zhiping P; Dolphin, Annette C; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, Joseph Guy; Spafford, J David

    2017-09-25

    Calcium (Cav1 and Cav2) and sodium channels possess homologous CaM-binding motifs, known as IQ motifs in their C-termini, which associate with calmodulin (CaM), a universal calcium sensor. Cav3 T-type channels, which serve as pacemakers of the mammalian brain and heart, lack a C-terminal IQ motif. We illustrate that T-type channels associate with CaM using co-immunoprecipitation experiments and single particle cryo-electron microscopy. We demonstrate that protostome invertebrate (LCav3) and human Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3 T-type channels specifically associate with CaM at helix 2 of the gating brake in the I-II linker of the channels. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that the gating brake and CaM bind each other with high nanomolar affinity. We show that the gating brake assumes a helical conformation upon binding CaM, with associated conformational changes to both CaM lobes as indicated by amide chemical shifts of the amino acids of CaM in 1H-15N HSQC NMR spectra. Intact Ca2+-binding sites on CaM and an intact gating brake sequence (first 39 aa of the I-II linker) were required in Cav3.2 channels to prevent the runaway gating phenotype, a hyperpolarizing shift in voltage sensitivities and faster gating kinetics. We conclude that the presence of high-nanomolar affinity binding sites for CaM at its universal gating brake and its unique form of regulation via the tuning of the voltage range of activity could influence the participation of Cav3 T-type channels in heart and brain rhythms. Our findings may have implications for arrhythmia disorders arising from mutations in the gating brake or CaM. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Molecular genetic diversity and population structure of Ethiopian white lupin landraces: Implications for breeding and conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulugeta Atnaf

    Full Text Available White lupin is one of the four economically important species of the Lupinus genus and is an important grain legume in the Ethiopian farming system. However, there has been limited research effort to characterize the Ethiopian white lupin landraces. Fifteen polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of 212 Ethiopian white lupin (Lupinus albus landraces and two genotypes from different species (Lupinus angustifolius and Lupinus mutabilis were used as out-group. The SSR markers revealed 108 different alleles, 98 of them from 212 landraces and 10 from out-group genotypes, with an average of 6.5 alleles per locus. The average gene diversity was 0.31. Twenty eight landraces harbored one or more private alleles from the total of 28 private alleles identified in the 212 white lupin accessions. Seventy-seven rare alleles with a frequency of less than 5% were identified and accounted for 78.6% of the total alleles detected. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA showed that 92% of allelic diversity was attributed to individual accessions within populations while only 8% was distributed among populations. At 70% similarity level, the UPGMA dendrogram resulted in the formation of 13 clusters comprised of 2 to 136 landraces, with the out-group genotypes and five landraces remaining distinct and ungrouped. Population differentiation and genetic distance were relatively high between Gondar and Ethiopian white lupin populations collected by Australians. A model-based population structure analysis divided the white lupin landraces into two populations. All Ethiopian white lupin landrace populations, except most of the landraces collected by Australians (77% and about 44% from Awi, were grouped together with significant admixtures. The study also suggested that 34 accessions, as core collections, were sufficient to retain 100% of SSR diversity. These accessions (core G-34 represent 16% of the

  12. Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskites: Structural Diversity and Opportunities for Semiconductor Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzi, David

    Photovoltaic (PV) devices based on three-dimensional perovskites, (Cs, MA, FA)Pb(I, Br)3 (MA =methylammonium, FA =formamidinium), have attracted substantial recent interest, because of the unprecedented rise in power conversion efficiency to values above 20%, which in turn is made possible by the near ideal band gap, strong optical absorption, high carrier mobilities, long minority carrier lifetimes, and relatively benign defects and grain boundaries for the absorbers. Some of the same properties that render these materials near-ideal for PV, also make them attractive for LED and other optoelectronic applications. Despite the high levels of device performance, the incorporation of the heavy metal lead, coupled with issues of device stability and electrical hysteresis pose challenges for commercializing these exciting technologies. This talk will provide a perspective on and discuss recent advances related to the broader perovskite family, focusing on the extraordinary structural/chemical diversity, including ability to control structural/electronic dimensionality, substitute on the organic cation, metal or halogen sites, and prospects of multi-functionality arising from separately engineered organic/inorganic structural components (e.g., see). Further exploration within this perovskite structural and chemical space offers exciting opportunities for future energy and electronic materials design. This work has been financially supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Dept. of Energy, under Award Number DE-EE0006712.

  13. The fungal community structure of barley malts from diverse geographical regions correlates with malt quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Bowman, John P; Stewart, Doug C; Evans, David E

    2015-12-23

    Malt is a preferred base for fermentations that produce beer or whisky. Barley for malt is grown under diverse environments in different geographical locations. Malt provides an ecological niche for a varied range of microorganisms with both positive and negative effects on its quality for brewing. Little information exists in the literature on the microbial community structure of Australian malt as well as broader global geographical differences in the associated fungal and bacterial communities. The aims of the present study were to compare the bacterial and fungal community structures of Australian commercial malt with its international counterparts originating from different geographical regions using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) fingerprinting and clone library analyses of ribosomal RNA genes. Further, the relationship between malt associated microbial communities and conventional malt quality parameters was also compared. Results showed that differences in fungal communities of malts from different geographical location were more pronounced than bacterial communities. TRFLP analysis discriminated high quality commercial malts with low fungal loads from malts deliberately infected with fungal inocula (Fusarium/Penicillium). Malt moisture, beta-amylase, α-amylase and limit dextrinase contents showed significant correlations with fungal community structure. This investigation concluded that fungal community structure was more important to subsequent malt quality outcomes than bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemical and Conformational Diversity of Modified Nucleosides Affects tRNA Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Y. P. Väre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RNAs are central to all gene expression through the control of protein synthesis. Four major nucleosides, adenosine, guanosine, cytidine and uridine, compose RNAs and provide sequence variation, but are limited in contributions to structural variation as well as distinct chemical properties. The ability of RNAs to play multiple roles in cellular metabolism is made possible by extensive variation in length, conformational dynamics, and the over 100 post-transcriptional modifications. There are several reviews of the biochemical pathways leading to RNA modification, but the physicochemical nature of modified nucleosides and how they facilitate RNA function is of keen interest, particularly with regard to the contributions of modified nucleosides. Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are the most extensively modified RNAs. The diversity of modifications provide versatility to the chemical and structural environments. The added chemistry, conformation and dynamics of modified nucleosides occurring at the termini of stems in tRNA’s cloverleaf secondary structure affect the global three-dimensional conformation, produce unique recognition determinants for macromolecules to recognize tRNAs, and affect the accurate and efficient decoding ability of tRNAs. This review will discuss the impact of specific chemical moieties on the structure, stability, electrochemical properties, and function of tRNAs.

  15. Curli functional amyloid systems are phylogenetically widespread and display large diversity in operon and protein structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten S Dueholm

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli and a few other members of the Enterobacteriales can produce functional amyloids known as curli. These extracellular fibrils are involved in biofilm formation and studies have shown that they may act as virulence factors during infections. It is not known whether curli fibrils are restricted to the Enterobacteriales or if they are phylogenetically widespread. The growing number of genome-sequenced bacteria spanning many phylogenetic groups allows a reliable bioinformatic investigation of the phylogenetic diversity of the curli system. Here we show that the curli system is phylogenetically much more widespread than initially assumed, spanning at least four phyla. Curli fibrils may consequently be encountered frequently in environmental as well as pathogenic biofilms, which was supported by identification of curli genes in public metagenomes from a diverse range of habitats. Identification and comparison of curli subunit (CsgA/B homologs show that these proteins allow a high degree of freedom in their primary protein structure, although a modular structure of tightly spaced repeat regions containing conserved glutamine, asparagine and glycine residues has to be preserved. In addition, a high degree of variability within the operon structure of curli subunits between bacterial taxa suggests that the curli fibrils might have evolved to fulfill specific functions. Variations in the genetic organization of curli genes are also seen among different bacterial genera. This suggests that some genera may utilize alternative regulatory pathways for curli expression. Comparison of phylogenetic trees of Csg proteins and the 16S rRNA genes of the corresponding bacteria showed remarkably similar overall topography, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer is a minor player in the spreading of the curli system.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling for predicting blood-brain barrier permeability of structurally diverse chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Singh, K P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, structure-activity relationship (SAR) models have been established for qualitative and quantitative prediction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of chemicals. The structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear structure in the data were tested. The predictive and generalization ability of the developed SAR models were tested through internal and external validation procedures. In complete data, the QSAR models rendered ternary classification accuracy of >98.15%, while the quantitative SAR models yielded correlation (r(2)) of >0.926 between the measured and the predicted BBB permeability values with the mean squared error (MSE) 82.7% and r(2) > 0.905 (MSE quantitative models for predicting the BBB permeability of chemicals. Moreover, these models showed predictive performance superior to those reported earlier in the literature. This demonstrates the appropriateness of the developed SAR models to reliably predict the BBB permeability of new chemicals, which can be used for initial screening of the molecules in the drug development process.

  17. Spatial Structure of Soil Macrofauna Diversity and Tree Canopy in Riparian Forest of Maroon River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sayad

    2017-02-01

    with a mean temperature of 24.5oc. Plant cover, mainly comprises Populus euphratica Olivie and Tamarix arceuthoides Bge and Lycium shawii Roemer & Schultes. Soil macrofauna were sampled using 175 sampling point along parallel transects (perpendicular to the river. The distance between transects was 100m. We considered distance between samples as 50 m. tree canopy were measured in 5* 5 plots. soil macrofauna were extracted from 50 cm×50 cm×10 cm soil monolith by hand-sorting procedure. All soil macrofauna were identified to family level. Evenness (Sheldon index, richness (Menhinich index and diversity (Shannon H’ index by using PAST version 1.39, were determined in each sample. Classical statistical parameters, i.e. mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, minimum and maximum, were calculated using SPSS17 software. For analysis of the relationship between Soil macrofauna diversity indices and tree canopy (Total canopy, Populous canopy, Tamarix canopy and Serim canopy we calculated the correlation among soil properties and macrofauna using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Next, to determining the spatial structure, we calculated the semivariances. Semivariance quantifies the spatial dependence of spatially ordered variable values. In order to gather information about the spatial connection between any two variables, and to compare the similarity of their spatial structure patterns, cross-variograms were constructed. Cross-variograms are plots of cross-semivariance against the lag distance. Results and Discussion: Soil macrofauna communities were dominated by earthworm, diplopods, coleoptera, gastropoda, araneae, and insect larvae. Correlation analysis of soil macrofauna and tree canopy indicated weak relationships between them. Weak, but significant relationships were found between macrofauna diversity, evenness, richness and total canopy, Populous canopy and Tamarix canopy (positive. Macrofauna indices and tree canopy(excepted Tamarix canopy were

  18. Investigation of weed species diversity and community structure in saffron fields of Khorasan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surur Khorramdel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Weedy flora of agroecosystems is composed of many species that have evolved in response to cropping system practices by occupying the niches left available in agroecosystems. In order to study weed species diversity and community structure in the saffron fields of Khorasan province, a survey trial was carried out in seven counties (including Mashhad, Neyshabur, Birjandn, Ghaen, Gonabad, Torbat-e Jam and Torbat-e Heydari during 2014 and 2015 from vegetative growth, dormant to flowering stages of saffron randomly dropped 1×1 m2 quadrates in 50 fields based on a systematic method as W pattern. The counties were clustered by the hierarchical complete linkage method based on Euclidean. Biodiversity indices such as stability coefficient, Simpson, Shannon–Wiener, Margalef and Menhinick were computed. The results indicated that the dominant weeds in saffron fields belong to 19 families and 50 species. Poaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae and Fabaceae were dominant families with 11, 9, 8 and 6 species, respectively. The majority of weed species were dicotyledonous, C3, noxious and annual plants. The highest stability coefficients in the stages of growth of saffron were calculated in Alhagi camelorum, Avena fatua and Achillea millefolium to be 30.81, 24.11 and 12.14, respectively. All weed species except for Alhagi camelorum (sustainable species and Avena fatua (temporary species were recognized as causal species. The maximum diversity indices for weed species were recorded at the vegetative phase of saffron. Correlation coefficient between weed density and yield loss of saffron was computed as R2=0.98. Based on diversity indices for weed species, different counties were clustered in three groups at 75% similarity level.

  19. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasindrazana, Beza; Dellagi, Koussay; Lagadec, Erwan; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Goodman, Steven M.; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae); a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae) embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae), Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae), and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae). We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors. PMID:26751792

  20. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beza Ramasindrazana

    Full Text Available We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae; a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae, Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae, and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae. We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors.

  1. Genetic diversity and structure of elite cotton germplasm (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using genome-wide SNP data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, XianTao; Liang, YaJun; Wang, JunDuo; Zheng, JuYun; Gong, ZhaoLong; Guo, JiangPing; Li, XueYuan; Qu, YanYing

    2017-10-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is the most important natural textile fiber crop, and Gossypium hirsutum L. is responsible for 90% of the annual cotton crop in the world. Information on cotton genetic diversity and population structure is essential for new breeding lines. In this study, we analyzed population structure and genetic diversity of 288 elite Gossypium hirsutum cultivar accessions collected from around the world, and especially from China, using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers. The average polymorphsim information content (PIC) was 0.25, indicating a relatively low degree of genetic diversity. Population structure analysis revealed extensive admixture and identified three subgroups. Phylogenetic analysis supported the subgroups identified by STRUCTURE. The results from both population structure and phylogenetic analysis were, for the most part, in agreement with pedigree information. Analysis of molecular variance revealed a larger amount of variation was due to diversity within the groups. Establishment of genetic diversity and population structure from this study could be useful for genetic and genomic analysis and systematic utilization of the standing genetic variation in upland cotton.

  2. Species diversity of remnant calcareous grasslands in south eastern Germany depends on litter cover and landscape structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stephanie; Huber, Birgit; Stahl, Silvia; Schmid, Christoph; Reisch, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Species diversity depends on, often interfering, multiple ecological drivers. Comprehensive approaches are hence needed to understand the mechanisms determining species diversity. In this study, we analysed the impact of vegetation structure, soil properties and fragmentation on the plant species diversity of remnant calcareous grasslands, therefore, in a comparative approach. We determined plant species diversity of 18 calcareous grasslands in south eastern Germany including all species and grassland specialists separately. Furthermore, we analysed the spatial structure of the grasslands as a result of fragmentation during the last 150 years (habitat area, distance to the nearest calcareous grassland and connectivity in 1830 and 2013). We also collected data concerning the vegetation structure (height of the vegetation, cover of bare soil, grass and litter) and the soil properties (content of phosphorous and potassium, ratio of carbon and nitrogen) of the grassland patches. Data were analysed using Bayesian multiple regressions. We observed a habitat loss of nearly 80% and increasing isolation between grasslands since 1830. In the Bayesian multiple regressions the species diversity of the studied grasslands depended negatively on cover of litter and to a lower degree on the distance to the nearest calcareous grassland in 2013, whereas soil properties had no significant impact. Our study supports the observation that vegetation structure, which strongly depends on land use, is often more important for the species richness of calcareous grasslands than fragmentation or soil properties. Even small and isolated grasslands may, therefore, contribute significantly to the conservation of species diversity, when they are still grazed.

  3. Structural and Functional Diversity of Weed Species in Organic and Conventional Rice Agro-Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Mousawi Toghani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diversity reflects the complexity of a system and can maintain its sustainability. Higherdiversity, results in higher inherent complexity of agro-ecosystems and strengthen their processes. It is necessary to realize the spatial distribution and temporal properties of the biodiversity components in agro-ecosystems, for the conservation and optimal utilization. Since weeds as a complementary component of agro-ecosystems and are inseparable, so the study of species, their functional and structural diversity of them can play an important role in weed management and balance in ecological systems. Materials and Methods This study was performed to determine the effects of different management systems on structural, and functional diversity of paddy weeds in Mazandaran province. Three rice fields, ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 ha, were chosen for each management system. Samples were collected from three fields running under each selected management system (organic and conventional. Data (number of weed species and their density were randomly gathered from 9 quadrates (1m×1m per each field in four stages (tillering, stem elongation, grain filling and after harvest. The diversity, evenness, frequency and similarity indices for weeds were determined at genera and species level. Data analysis carried out through T-test and grouping performed via cluster analysis as hierarchy. Results and Discussion All monitored weeds can be classified into four plant family including cereals (Poaceae, sedges (Cyperaceae, plantain (Plantaginaceae and chicory (Asteraceae.Under conventional systems the values of weed diversity indices were higher during tillering and stem elongation compared with organic ones, and were lower during grain filling and after harvest stages. However indices of weed evenness showed contrary tendency. Both Sympson and Shanon-Wiener diversity indices, consist of two clusters in 76% similarity. Evenness indices of Kamargo and Smith

  4. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND STRUCTURE OF Oenocarpus mapora GERMPLASM CONSERVED AT EASTERN AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELISA FERREIRA MOURA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and structure in the germoplasm of Oenocarpus mapora conserved at Eastern Amazon. Thus, 88 individuals were genotyped with five microsatellite loci. These individuals belong to 24 accessions that were sampled in eight sample places of three Brazilian Amazon states conserved at the Active Germplasm Bank (AGB of Embrapa Eastern Amazon. All loci were polymorphic and they generated 85 alleles with an average of 17 alleles per loci. Total genetic diversity (HE was 0.48. Sample places were considered genetically distinct, with ?p = 0.354. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA identified that the genetic portion among areas was of 36.14% and within 63.86%. The Nei distances varied from 0.091 between Abaetetuba and Santo Antônio do Tauá, both in the state of Pará (PA, to 4.18, between Parintins, AM and Rio Branco, AC. By means of Bayesian analysis, it was identified nine clusters that compose the accessions of the germplasm bank, with different distributions among individuals. The study showed high fixation rates per sample area, which indicates that there may have been significant inbreeding or crossing among parental individuals. It suggests that future samples should be made of different plants in natural populations. Even though, it was verified that there is considerable genetic variation in the germplasm of O. mapora.

  5. Population Structure, Genetic Diversity, and Evolutionary History of Kleinia neriifolia (Asteraceae on the Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kleinia neriifolia Haw. is an endemic species on the Canarian archipelago, this species is widespread in the coastal thicket of all the Canarian islands. In the present study, genetic diversity and population structure of K. neriifolia were investigated using chloroplast gene sequences and nuclear SSR (simple sequence repeat. The differentiation among island populations, the historical demography, and the underlying evolutionary scenarios of this species are further tested based on the genetic data. Chloroplast diversity reveals a strong genetic divergence between eastern islands (Gran Canaria, Fuerteventura, and Lanzarote and western islands (EI Hierro, La Palma, La Gomera, Tenerife, this west–east genetic divergence may reflect a very beginning of speciation. The evolutionary scenario with highest posterior probabilities suggests Gran Canaria as oldest population with a westward colonization path to Tenerife, La Gomera, La Palma, and EI Hierro, and eastward dispersal path to Lanzarote through Fuerteventura. In the western islands, there is a slight decrease in the effective population size toward areas of recent colonization. However, in the eastern islands, the effective population size increase in Lanzarote relative to Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura. These results further our understanding of the evolution of widespread endemic plants within Canarian archipelago.

  6. Surprising prokaryotic and eukaryotic diversity, community structure and biogeography of Ethiopian soda lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Lanzén

    Full Text Available Soda lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. This makes them valuable model systems for studying the connection between community structure and abiotic parameters such as pH and salinity. For the first time, we apply high-throughput sequencing to accurately estimate phylogenetic richness and composition in five soda lakes, located in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. The lakes were selected for their contrasting pH, salinities and stratification and several depths or spatial positions were covered in each lake. DNA was extracted and analyzed from all lakes at various depths and RNA extracted from two of the lakes, analyzed using both amplicon- and shotgun sequencing. We reveal a surprisingly high biodiversity in all of the studied lakes, similar to that of freshwater lakes. Interestingly, diversity appeared uncorrelated or positively correlated to pH and salinity, with the most "extreme" lakes showing the highest richness. Together, pH, dissolved oxygen, sodium- and potassium concentration explained approximately 30% of the compositional variation between samples. A diversity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic taxa could be identified, including several putatively involved in carbon-, sulfur- or nitrogen cycling. Key processes like methane oxidation, ammonia oxidation and 'nitrifier denitrification' were also confirmed by mRNA transcript analyses.

  7. Modeling microbial community structure and functional diversity across time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter E; Gibbons, Sean M; Gilbert, Jack A

    2012-07-01

    Microbial communities exhibit exquisitely complex structure. Many aspects of this complexity, from the number of species to the total number of interactions, are currently very difficult to examine directly. However, extraordinary efforts are being made to make these systems accessible to scientific investigation. While recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have improved accessibility to the taxonomic and functional diversity of complex communities, monitoring the dynamics of these systems over time and space - using appropriate experimental design - is still expensive. Fortunately, modeling can be used as a lens to focus low-resolution observations of community dynamics to enable mathematical abstractions of functional and taxonomic dynamics across space and time. Here, we review the approaches for modeling bacterial diversity at both the very large and the very small scales at which microbial systems interact with their environments. We show that modeling can help to connect biogeochemical processes to specific microbial metabolic pathways. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diversity, Population Structure, and Above Ground Biomass in Woody Species on Ngomakurira Mountain, Domboshawa, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemence Zimudzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity, structure, species composition, and above ground biomass of woody plants on Ngomakurira mountain in Zimbabwe were studied. A systematic random sampling approach was adopted to establish 52 sampling plots measuring 10 × 10 m across 3 study strata in the 1266 ha study area. Woody species occurring in each plot were identified and the circumferences of trees with diameters >8.0 cm at 1.3 m height were measured. A total of 91 species belonging to 74 genera and 39 families were identified in the sample plots. A Shannon-Wiener index mean value of 3.12 was obtained indicating high species diversity on the mountain. The DBH size class distribution showed inverse J distribution patterns across the three study strata, but with only 3 individual plants with DBH > 30 cm. Mean basal area was 15.21 m2 ha−1 with U. kirkiana and J. globiflora contributing approximately 30% of the basal area. The estimated above ground biomass ranged from 34.5 to 65.1 t ha−1. Kruskal-Wallis-H test showed no significant differences in species richness, stem density, basal area, above ground biomass, and evenness, across the study strata (p<0.05. Ngomakurira woodland has potential to regenerate due to the presence of many stems in the small diameter size classes.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of the Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus, Rodentia, caviidae in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Burgos-Paz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to establish the genetic diversity and population structure of three guinea pig lines, from seven production zones located in Nariño, southwest Colombia. A total of 384 individuals were genotyped with six microsatellite markers. The measurement of intrapopulation diversity revealed allelic richness ranging from 3.0 to 6.56, and observed heterozygosity (Ho from 0.33 to 0.60, with a deficit in heterozygous individuals. Although statistically significant (p < 0.05, genetic differentiation between population pairs was found to be low. Genetic distance, as well as clustering of guinea-pig lines and populations, coincided with the historical and geographical distribution of the populations. Likewise, high genetic identity between improved and native lines was established. An analysis of group probabilistic assignment revealed that each line should not be considered as a genetically homogeneous group. The findings corroborate the absorption of native genetic material into the improved line introduced into Colombia from Peru. It is necessary to establish conservation programs for native-line individuals in Nariño, and control genealogical and production records in order to reduce the inbreeding values in the populations.

  10. The complexity and structural diversity of ant venom peptidomes is revealed by mass spectrometry profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchard, Axel; Koh, Jennifer M S; Aili, Samira R; Dejean, Alain; Nicholson, Graham M; Orivel, Jérôme; Escoubas, Pierre

    2015-03-15

    Compared with other animal venoms, ant venoms remain little explored. Ants have evolved complex venoms to rapidly immobilize arthropod prey and to protect their colonies from predators and pathogens. Many ants have retained peptide-rich venoms that are similar to those of other arthropod groups. With the goal of conducting a broad and comprehensive survey of ant venom peptide diversity, we investigated the peptide composition of venoms from 82 stinging ant species from nine subfamilies using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). We also conducted an in-depth investigation of eight venoms using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) separation coupled with offline MALDI-TOFMS. Our results reveal that the peptide compositions of ant venom peptidomes from both poneroid and formicoid ant clades comprise hundreds of small peptides (4 kDa) are also present in the venom of formicoids. Chemical reduction revealed the presence of disulfide-linked peptides in most ant subfamilies, including peptides structured by one, two or three disulfide bonds as well as dimeric peptides reticulated by three disulfide bonds. The biochemical complexity of ant venoms, associated with an enormous ecological and taxonomic diversity, suggests that stinging ant venoms constitute a promising source of bioactive molecules that could be exploited in the search for novel drug and biopesticide leads. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Structure-activity relationships of diverse xanthones against multidrug resistant human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwen; Ma, Chenyao; Ma, Yun; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jianwei

    2017-02-01

    Thirteen xanthones were isolated naturally from the stem of Securidaca inappendiculata Hassk, and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of these compounds were comparatively predicted for their cytotoxic activity against three human multidrug resistant (MDR) cell lines MCF-7/ADR, SMMC-7721/Taxol, and A549/Taxol cells. The results showed that the selected xanthones exhibited different potent cytotoxic activity against the growth of different human tumor cell lines, and most of the xanthones exhibited selective cytotoxicity against SMMC-7721/Taxol cells. Furthermore, some tested xanthones showed stronger cytotoxicity than Cisplatin, which has been used in clinical application extensively. The SARs analysis revealed that the cytotoxic activities of diverse xanthones were affected mostly by the number and position of methoxyl and hydroxyl groups. Xanthones with more free hydroxyl and methoxyl groups increased the cytotoxic activity significantly, especially for those with the presence of C-3 hydroxyl and C-4 methoxyl groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial functional diversity alters the structure and sensitivity of oxygen deficient zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Justin; Weber, Thomas; Deutsch, Curtis

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) below the ocean surface regulate marine productivity by removing bioavailable nitrogen (N). A complex microbial community mediates N loss, but the interplay of its diverse metabolisms is poorly understood. We present an ecosystem model of the North Pacific ODZ that reproduces observed chemical distributions yet predicts different ODZ structure, rates, and climatic sensitivity compared to traditional geochemical models. An emergent lower O2 limit for aerobic nitrification lies below the upper O2 threshold for anaerobic denitrification, creating a zone of microbial coexistence that causes a larger ODZ but slower total rates of N loss. The O2-dependent competition for the intermediate nitrite produces gradients in its oxidation versus reduction, anammox versus heterotrophic denitrification, and the net ecological stoichiometry of N loss. The latter effect implies that an externally driven ODZ expansion should favor communities that more efficiently remove N, increasing the sensitivity of the N cycle to climate change.

  13. Structural determinants of phenotypic diversity and replication rate of human prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri G Safar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The infectious pathogen responsible for prion diseases is the misfolded, aggregated form of the prion protein, PrPSc. In contrast to recent progress in studies of laboratory rodent-adapted prions, current understanding of the molecular basis of human prion diseases and, especially, their vast phenotypic diversity is very limited. Here, we have purified proteinase resistant PrPSc aggregates from two major phenotypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, determined their conformational stability and replication tempo in vitro, as well as characterized structural organization using recently emerged approaches based on hydrogen/deuterium (H/D exchange coupled with mass spectrometry. Our data clearly demonstrate that these phenotypically distant prions differ in a major way with regard to their structural organization, both at the level of the polypeptide backbone (as indicated by backbone amide H/D exchange data as well as the quaternary packing arrangements (as indicated by H/D exchange kinetics for histidine side chains. Furthermore, these data indicate that, in contrast to previous observations on yeast and some murine prion strains, the replication rate of sCJD prions is primarily determined not by conformational stability but by specific structural features that control the growth rate of prion protein aggregates.

  14. Anthraquinones and Derivatives from Marine-Derived Fungi: Structural Diversity and Selected Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Fouillaud

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinones and their derivatives constitute a large group of quinoid compounds with about 700 molecules described. They are widespread in fungi and their chemical diversity and biological activities recently attracted attention of industries in such fields as pharmaceuticals, clothes dyeing, and food colorants. Their positive and/or negative effect(s due to the 9,10-anthracenedione structure and its substituents are still not clearly understood and their potential roles or effects on human health are today strongly discussed among scientists. As marine microorganisms recently appeared as producers of an astonishing variety of structurally unique secondary metabolites, they may represent a promising resource for identifying new candidates for therapeutic drugs or daily additives. Within this review, we investigate the present knowledge about the anthraquinones and derivatives listed to date from marine-derived filamentous fungi′s productions. This overview highlights the molecules which have been identified in microorganisms for the first time. The structures and colors of the anthraquinoid compounds come along with the known roles of some molecules in the life of the organisms. Some specific biological activities are also described. This may help to open doors towards innovative natural substances.

  15. A Conserved Structural Module Regulates Transcriptional Responses to Diverse Stress Signals in Eubacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell,E.; Greenwell, R.; Anthony, J.; Wang, S.; Lim, L.; Das, K.; Sofia, H.; Donohue, T.; Darst, S.

    2007-01-01

    A transcriptional response to singlet oxygen in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is controlled by the group IV {sigma} factor {sigma}{sup E} and its cognate anti-{sigma} ChrR. Crystal structures of the {sigma}{sup E}/ChrR complex reveal a modular, two-domain architecture for ChrR. The ChrR N-terminal anti-{sigma} domain (ASD) binds a Zn{sup 2+} ion, contacts {sigma}{sup E}, and is sufficient to inhibit {sigma}{sup E}-dependent transcription. The ChrR C-terminal domain adopts a cupin fold, can coordinate an additional Zn{sup 2+}, and is required for the transcriptional response to singlet oxygen. Structure-based sequence analyses predict that the ASD defines a common structural fold among predicted group IV anti-{sigma}s. These ASDs are fused to diverse C-terminal domains that are likely involved in responding to specific environmental signals that control the activity of their cognate {sigma} factor.

  16. Diversity and structure of Chironomidae communities in relation to water quality differences in the Swartkops River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odume, O. N.; Muller, W. J.

    The Swartkops River is an important freshwater ecosystem in South Africa. But owing to its location, it suffers varying degrees of human induced impacts which include industrial and domestic effluent discharges, deforestation as well as agricultural land use which have negatively impacted on the water quality. Diversity and community composition of aquatic insects are frequently used to assess environmental water quality status. Chironomids occupy extremely varied biotopes. Their extraordinary ecological range and environmental sensitivity make them particularly useful for assessing and interpreting changes in water quality of aquatic ecosystems. The community structure of chironomid larvae was investigated at four sites in the Swartkops River and effects of different chemical and physical variables on their distribution were explored. Chironomid larvae were collected using the South African Scoring System version 5 (SASS5) protocol. A total of 26 taxa from four sampling sites in the Swartkops River were identified. Margalef’s species richness index, equitability, Shannon and Simpson diversity indices were highest at site 1 (reference site). The downstream sites contained 6-20 taxa compared to the 25 taxa at site 1. Site 1 was characterised by the subfamilies Orthocladiinae, Tanypodinae and the tribe Tanytarsini while the impacted sites were characterised by Orthocladiinae and Chironomini. Chironomus spp., Dirotendipes sp., Kiefferulus sp. and Tanypus sp. seemed to be tolerant to pollution, occurring in high abundance at sites 2, 3 and 4. In contrast, Polypedilum sp., Tanytarsus sp., Orthocladius sp., Cricotopus spp. and Ablabesmyia sp. appeared to be more sensitive taxa, being less common at the impacted sites (sites 2, 3 and 4). Five days biochemical oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, orthophosphate-phosphorus and total inorganic nitrogen were among the important variables that determine the observed chironomid community structure

  17. Temporal genetic patterns of diversity and structure evidence chaotic genetic patchiness in a spiny lobster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacorta-Rath, Cecilia; Souza, Carla A; Murphy, Nicholas P; Green, Bridget S; Gardner, Caleb; Strugnell, Jan M

    2018-01-01

    Population structure of many marine organisms is spatially patchy and varies within and between years, a phenomenon defined as chaotic genetic patchiness. This results from the combination of planktonic larval dispersal and environmental stochasticity. Additionally, in species with bi-partite life, postsettlement selection can magnify these genetic differences. The high fecundity (up to 500,000 eggs annually) and protracted larval duration (12-24 months) and dispersal of the southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, make it a good test species for chaotic genetic patchiness and selection during early benthic life. Here, we used double digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) to investigate chaotic genetic patchiness and postsettlement selection in this species. We assessed differences in genetic structure and diversity of recently settled pueruli across four settlement years and between two sites in southeast Australia separated by approximately 1,000 km. Postsettlement selection was investigated by identifying loci under putative positive selection between recently settled pueruli and postpueruli and quantifying differences in the magnitude and strength of the selection at each year and site. Genetic differences within and among sites through time in neutral SNP markers indicated chaotic genetic patchiness. Recently settled puerulus at the southernmost site exhibited lower genetic diversity during years of low puerulus catches, further supporting this hypothesis. Finally, analyses of outlier SNPs detected fluctuations in the magnitude and strength of the markers putatively under positive selection over space and time. One locus under putative positive selection was consistent at both locations during the same years, suggesting the existence of weak postsettlement selection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Analysis of genetic diversity and structure in Ethiopian populations of Phytolacca dodecandra using RAPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semagn, K; Stedje, B; Bjornstad, A

    2001-01-01

    The genetic diversity and structure in 17 wild populations (249 individuals) of Phytolacca dodecandra (endod) sampled along altitudinal gradients of 1600-3000 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.) in Ethiopia was studied using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). A total of 70 polymorphic loci (P) scored from 12 RAPD primers were used to calculate different diversity indices within and between populations, habitats, geographical regions, climatic zones and altitude groups. The number of polymorphic loci and overall Shannon information measure (H) in the populations varied from 30 to 55 and from 0.228 to 0.418, respectively. In general, differences in population variability were found significantly correlated to effective population size. Both P and H were significantly higher in an undisturbed than in a disturbed habitat, and in the lowland and central-highland than in the highland altitude group. However, for both parameters the differences were not statistically significant between regions and climatic zones. Genetic distance between populations varied from 0.301 to 0.628. Cluster analysis performed using the genetic distance matrix revealed a clear separation of the highland populations (2501-3000 m.a.s.l.) from those of the lowland/central-highlands (1600-2500 m.a.s.l.) irrespective of their geographical regions and climatic zones. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that differences in habitat, geographical regions and climatic zones explained 4.6%, 2.5% and 4.6%, respectively. But none of these differences were significant. Altitude explained 17.2% of the total variance and was highly significant. The data, therefore, clearly indicated the association of genetic structure in endod with altitude. The proportion of RAPD variation found among populations (21.2-35.0%) was somewhat intermediate between values reported for selfing and outcrossing species. The fixation index (FST) values (0.350 to 0.384) indicated very high genetic differentiation among

  19. Population Structure and Phylogenetic Relationships in a Diverse Panel of Brassica rapa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Kevin A.; An, Hong; Gazave, Elodie; Gore, Michael A.; Pires, J. Chris; Robertson, Larry D.; Labate, Joanne A.

    2017-01-01

    The crop species Brassica rapa L. has significant economic importance around the world. However, the global distribution and complex evolutionary history of the species has made investigating its genetic population structure difficult. Crop domestication and improvement has resulted in extreme phenotypic diversity and subspecies that are used for oilseed, food for human consumption, and fodder for livestock. These subspecies include the oilseed morphotypes. oleifera (turnip rape), ssp. dichotoma (brown sarson/toria), ssp. trilocularis (yellow sarson); ssp. rapa (turnip); and Asian leafy vegetables ssp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage), ssp. chinensis (bok choy), ssp. nipposinica (mizuna/mibuna), ssp. rapifera (rapini/broccoli rabe), ssp. narinosa (tatsoi), ssp parachinensis (choy sum), and ssp. perviridis (komatsuna). To date, studies have had insufficient sampling to determine the relationship of all morphotypes, especially oilseed morphotypes, and questions remain over the contribution of morphotype and geographic origin to population structure. We used genotyping-by-sequencing to score 18,272 single nucleotide polymorphism markers in a globally diverse panel of 333 B. rapa National Plant Germplasm System accessions that included 10 recognized subspecies. Our population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were broadly congruent and revealed five subpopulations that were largely reflective of morphotype and geography. These subpopulations were 1. European turnips/oilseed, 2. Asian turnips/oilseed, 3. yellow/brown sarson (ssp. trilocularis and ssp. dichotoma), 4. Chinese cabbage (ssp. pekinensis), and 5. bok choy, choy sum, and tatsoi (ssp. chinensis, ssp. parachinensis, ssp. narinosa). Additionally, we found evidence of polyphyly and/or paraphyly, particularly for oilseed morphotypes (ssp. oleifera and ssp. dichotoma) and turnips. The results of this study have provided improved resolution to the genetic and phylogenetic relationships of subspecies within the species B

  20. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  1. [Structural and physiological diversity among cystlike resting cells of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muliukin, A L; Suzina, N E; Duda, V I; El'-Registan, G I

    2008-01-01

    Cystlike resting cells (CRC) of non-spore-forming gram-negative bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas, P. aurantiaca and P. fluorescens, were obtained and characterized for the first time; their physiological and morphological diversity was demonstrated. The following properties were common for all the revealed types of CRC as dormant forms: (1) long-term (up to 6 months or longer) maintenance of viability in the absence of culture growth and cell respiration; (2) absence of an experimentally detectable level of metabolism; (3) higher resistance to damage and autolysis under the action of provoking factors than in metabolically active vegetative cells; and (4) specific features of ultrastructural organization absent in vegetative cells: thickened and lamellar envelopes, clumpy structure of the cytoplasm, and condensed DNA in nucleoid. The differences in various types of CRC concern the thickness and lamellar structure of cell envelopes, as well as the presence and thickness of the capsular layer. In particular, forms ultrastructurally similar to typical bacterial cysts were revealed in pseudomonad populations growing on soil agar. Physiological diversity was revealed in different levels of viability preservation and thermal resistance in various types of CRC and depended on the conditions of their formation. The optimal conditions and procedures for obtaining P. aurantiaca and P. fluorescens CRC that retain the ability to form colonies on standard nutrient media are as follows: (1) a twofold decrease of nitrogen content in the growth medium; (2) an increased level of anabiosis autoinducer (C12-AHB, 10(-4) M) in stationary cultures; (3) transfer of the cells from stationary cultures to a starvation medium with silica; (4) cultivation in soil extract; and (5) development of cultures on soil agar. The CRC from the cultures grown in soil extract or starvation medium with silica proved to be resistant to heat treatment (60 degrees C, 5 min). In the CRC formed in nitrogen

  2. Structural diversity and biological significance of lipoteichoic acid in Gram-positive bacteria: focusing on beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Yokota, Shinichi; Fukiya, Satoru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell surface molecules are at the forefront of host-bacterium interactions. Teichoic acids are observed only in Gram-positive bacteria, and they are one of the main cell surface components. Teichoic acids play important physiological roles and contribute to the bacterial interaction with their host. In particular, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) anchored to the cell membrane has attracted attention as a host immunomodulator. Chemical and biological characteristics of LTA from various bacteria have been described. However, most of the information concerns pathogenic bacteria, and information on beneficial bacteria, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria, is insufficient. LTA is structurally diverse. Strain-level structural diversity of LTA is suggested to underpin its immunomodulatory activities. Thus, the structural information on LTA in probiotics, in particular strain-associated diversity, is important for understanding its beneficial roles associated with the modulation of immune response. Continued accumulation of structural information is necessary to elucidate the detailed physiological roles and significance of LTA. In this review article, we summarize the current state of knowledge on LTA structure, in particular the structure of LTA from lactic acid bacteria. We also describe the significance of structural diversity and biological roles of LTA.

  3. The structural diversity and photoluminescent properties of cadmium thiophenedicarboxylate coordination polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Li-Ping; Chang, Xin-Hong; Li, Shi-Hui; Ma, Lu-Fang; Wang, Li-Ya

    2014-05-21

    Two series of Cd(II) coordination polymers (CPs), {[Cd(bimm)2(H2O)2][(3,4-tdc)2][H2O]2}n (1a), [Cd(3,4-tdc)(bimb)]n (2a), [Cd(3,4-tdc)(bimpy)(H2O)]n (3a) and [Cd(2,3-Htdc)2(bimm)2]n (1b), {[Cd(2,3-tdc)(bimb)](H2O)}n (2b), [Cd(2,3-tdc)(bimpy)(H2O)]n (3b) where H2tdc = thiophenedicarboxylic acid, bimm = 1,2-bis(imidazol-1'-yl)methane, bimb = 1,2-bis(imidazol-1'-yl)butane and bimpy = 3,5-bis(imidazol-1'-yl)pyridine, have been synthesized by using Cd(II) acetate with H2tdc and N-donor ligands under hydrothermal conditions. Two related isomeric thiophenedicarboxylic acids were chosen to examine the positional isomeric effect on the construction of these CPs with distinct dimensionality and connectivity. The structure of 1a is a one-dimensional (1D) cationic double chain further forming a two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular network via hydrogen-bonding interactions, while 1b exhibits a neutral double chain structure. Interestingly, a three-dimensional (3D) 4-connected cds network for 2a as well as a 1D neutral double chain structure for 2b were obtained in the presence of bimb. When the rigid tripodal bimpy was introduced, isomorphous 3a and 3b with 3D (3,5)-connected (6(2)·8) (6(7)·8(3)) nets were constructed. The structural diversity of 1a-2b mainly stems from the positional isomeric effect of thiophenedicarboxylate, while 3a and 3b are well regulated by rigid bimpy. Moreover, the thermal stability and photoluminescence of 1a-3b are investigated.

  4. Structural diversity and photoluminescent properties of zinc benzotriazole-5-carboxylate coordination polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Tan, Yan-Xi; Wang, Fei; Kang, Yao; Zhang, Jian

    2014-02-03

    A series of zinc(II) compounds, [Zn2(btca)2(im)2]·(DMA) (1; H2btca = benzotriazole-5-carboxylate acid, im = imidazole, and DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide), [Zn(btca)(im)]·(DMF) (2; DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), [Zn2(btca)2(tmdpy)]·2(DMF)·5(H2O) [3; tmdpy = 1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane], and [H2N(CH3)2]2[Zn3(btca)4]·(DMF) (4), have been successfully synthesized via rational control of experimental conditions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that compounds 1 and 2 are isomers, and both of them exhibit two-dimensional structures with the same uninodal 3-connected fes topology. Additionally, the three-dimensional (3D) structure of 3 was obtained by using tmdpy instead of an im ligand under synthesis conditions similar to those of compound 2. Interestingly, compound 3 presents a pillared-layer structure with a (3,4)-connected (4.8(2).10(3))(4.8(2)) topology. When 4,4'-bipyridine was used to replace tmdpy, the assembly between Zn(2+) ions and H2btca ligands produced a chiral 3D framework of 4. Furthermore, compound 4 showed a new (3,4)-connected topology with a vertex symbol of (4.6.8(4))2(4.6.8)(4.8(2))(6.8(2))2(6.8(5)). A comparison of all compounds suggested that the structural diversity of the compounds could be tuned by altering the auxiliary ligand. In addition, the photoluminescent properties of compounds 1-4 were measured.

  5. Structural and sequence diversity of the transposon Galileo in the Drosophila willistoni genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Juliana W; Valiati, Victor Hugo; Delprat, Alejandra; Valente, Vera L S; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2014-09-13

    Galileo is one of three members of the P superfamily of DNA transposons. It was originally discovered in Drosophila buzzatii, in which three segregating chromosomal inversions were shown to have been generated by ectopic recombination between Galileo copies. Subsequently, Galileo was identified in six of 12 sequenced Drosophila genomes, indicating its widespread distribution within this genus. Galileo is strikingly abundant in Drosophila willistoni, a neotropical species that is highly polymorphic for chromosomal inversions, suggesting a role for this transposon in the evolution of its genome. We carried out a detailed characterization of all Galileo copies present in the D. willistoni genome. A total of 191 copies, including 133 with two terminal inverted repeats (TIRs), were classified according to structure in six groups. The TIRs exhibited remarkable variation in their length and structure compared to the most complete copy. Three copies showed extended TIRs due to internal tandem repeats, the insertion of other transposable elements (TEs), or the incorporation of non-TIR sequences into the TIRs. Phylogenetic analyses of the transposase (TPase)-encoding and TIR segments yielded two divergent clades, which we termed Galileo subfamilies V and W. Target-site duplications (TSDs) in D. willistoni Galileo copies were 7- or 8-bp in length, with the consensus sequence GTATTAC. Analysis of the region around the TSDs revealed a target site motif (TSM) with a 15-bp palindrome that may give rise to a stem-loop secondary structure. There is a remarkable abundance and diversity of Galileo copies in the D. willistoni genome, although no functional copies were found. The TIRs in particular have a dynamic structure and extend in different ways, but their ends (required for transposition) are more conserved than the rest of the element. The D. willistoni genome harbors two Galileo subfamilies (V and W) that diverged ~9 million years ago and may have descended from an ancestral

  6. Wide diversity in structure and expression profiles among members of the Caenorhabditis elegans globin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinogradov Serge

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of high throughput genome sequencing facilities and powerful high performance bioinformatic tools has highlighted hitherto unexpected wide occurrence of globins in the three kingdoms of life. In silico analysis of the genome of C. elegans identified 33 putative globin genes. It remains a mystery why this tiny animal might need so many globins. As an inroad to understanding this complexity we initiated a structural and functional analysis of the globin family in C. elegans. Results All 33 C. elegans putative globin genes are transcribed. The translated sequences have the essential signatures of single domain bona fide globins, or they contain a distinct globin domain that is part of a larger protein. All globin domains can be aligned so as to fit the globin fold, but internal interhelical and N- and C-terminal extensions and a variety of amino acid substitutions generate much structural diversity among the globins of C. elegans. Likewise, the encoding genes lack a conserved pattern of intron insertion positioning. We analyze the expression profiles of the globins during the progression of the life cycle, and we find that distinct subsets of globins are induced, or repressed, in wild-type dauers and in daf-2(e1370/insulin-receptor mutant adults, although these animals share several physiological features including resistance to elevated temperature, oxidative stress and hypoxic death. Several globin genes are upregulated following oxygen deprivation and we find that HIF-1 and DAF-2 each are required for this response. Our data indicate that the DAF-2 regulated transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO positively modulates hif-1 transcription under anoxia but opposes expression of the HIF-1 responsive globin genes itself. In contrast, the canonical globin of C. elegans, ZK637.13, is not responsive to anoxia. Reduced DAF-2 signaling leads to enhanced transcription of this globin and DAF-16 is required for this effect

  7. The structural diversity and promise of antiparasitic marine invertebrate-derived small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Katharine R; Tenney, Karen; Crews, Phillip

    2010-12-01

    This review focuses on six important parasitic diseases that adversely affect the health and lives of over one billion people worldwide. In light of the global human impact of these neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), several initiatives and campaigns have been mounted to eradicate these infections once and for all. Currently available therapeutics summarized herein are either ineffective and/or have severe and deleterious side effects. Resistant strains continue to emerge and there is an overall unmet and urgent need for new antiparasitic drugs. Marine-derived small molecules (MDSMs) from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. New discoveries of marine natural product privileged structures and compound classes that are being made via natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays are highlighted. It is striking to note that for the first time in history the entire genomes of all six parasites have been sequenced and additional transcriptome and proteomic analyses are available. Furthermore, open and shared, publicly available databases of the genome sequences, compounds, screening assays, and druggable molecular targets are being used by the worldwide research community. A combined assessment of all of the above factors, especially of current discoveries in marine natural products, implies a brighter future with more effective, affordable, and benign antiparasitic therapeutics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Temporal Control over Transient Chemical Systems using Structurally Diverse Chemical Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack L-Y; Maiti, Subhabrata; Fortunati, Ilaria; Ferrante, Camilla; Prins, Leonard J

    2017-08-25

    The next generation of adaptive, intelligent chemical systems will rely on a continuous supply of energy to maintain the functional state. Such systems will require chemical methodology that provides precise control over the energy dissipation process, and thus, the lifetime of the transiently activated function. This manuscript reports on the use of structurally diverse chemical fuels to control the lifetime of two different systems under dissipative conditions: transient signal generation and the transient formation of self-assembled aggregates. The energy stored in the fuels is dissipated at different rates by an enzyme, which installs a dependence of the lifetime of the active system on the chemical structure of the fuel. In the case of transient signal generation, it is shown that different chemical fuels can be used to generate a vast range of signal profiles, allowing temporal control over two orders of magnitude. Regarding self-assembly under dissipative conditions, the ability to control the lifetime using different fuels turns out to be particularly important as stable aggregates are formed only at well-defined surfactant/fuel ratios, meaning that temporal control cannot be achieved by simply changing the fuel concentration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Structural predestination of individual diversity in the course and severity of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Sergey N

    2002-01-23

    Infectious diseases can be manifested by a spectrum of clinical signs and resultant clinical courses that range from acute to chronic and possible persistence in the victim in a latent form. Until recently, the origins of this kind of biodiversity were poorly understood, but advances in immunology--especially in identifying the constitutional mechanisms of immunity--have contributed to our understanding of the origins of biodiversity in infectious diseases. Infectious diseases affect only focal areas in the affected organisms, and the amounts and distribution of infectious lesions vary from patient to patient. In a population attacked by an infectious agent, individuals can be conveniently divided into three categories: totally resistant organisms which contain no susceptible structures and are not affected; mildly susceptible organisms in which a few foci appear and in which the infection runs a benign course; organisms in which the number of constitutionally susceptible structures is high and the infectious process develops in a severe form. The diversity is determined by the differences in susceptibility of various parts of the organism under consideration.

  10. Structural Predestination of Individual Diversity in the Course and Severity of Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Rumyantsev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases can be manifested by a spectrum of clinical signs and resultant clinical courses that range from acute to chronic and possible persistence in the victim in a latent form. Until recently, the origins of this kind of biodiversity were poorly understood, but advances in immunology — especially in identifying the constitutional mechanisms of immunity — have contributed to our understanding of the origins of biodiversity in infectious diseases. Infectious diseases affect only focal areas in the affected organisms, and the amounts and distribution of infectious lesions vary from patient to patient. In a population attacked by an infectious agent, individuals can be conveniently divided into three categories: totally resistant organisms which contain no susceptible structures and are not affected; mildly susceptible organisms in which a few foci appear and in which the infection runs a benign course; organisms in which the number of constitutionally susceptible structures is high and the infectious process develops in a severe form. The diversity is determined by the differences in susceptibility of various parts of the organism under consideration.

  11. Driving forces of soil bacterial community structure, diversity, and function in temperate grasslands and forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Kristin; Wemheuer, Bernd; Korolkow, Vera; Wemheuer, Franziska; Nacke, Heiko; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    Soil bacteria provide a large range of ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling. Despite their important role in soil systems, compositional and functional responses of bacterial communities to different land use and management regimes are not fully understood. Here, we assessed soil bacterial communities in 150 forest and 150 grassland soils derived from three German regions by pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Land use type (forest and grassland) and soil edaphic properties strongly affected bacterial community structure and function, whereas management regime had a minor effect. In addition, a separation of soil bacterial communities by sampling region was encountered. Soil pH was the best predictor for bacterial community structure, diversity and function. The application of multinomial log-linear models revealed distinct responses of abundant bacterial groups towards pH. Predicted functional profiles revealed that differences in land use not only select for distinct bacterial populations but also for specific functional traits. The combination of 16S rRNA data and corresponding functional profiles provided comprehensive insights into compositional and functional adaptations to changing environmental conditions associated with differences in land use and management.

  12. Two-Element PIFA Array Structure for Polarization Diversity in UMTS Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hamouz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to strongly modify the radiated fields of a UMTS handset by using a phased two-element PIFA array. The structure is composed of a 100x40 mm2 metallic ground plane acting as the Printed Circuit Board (PCB of the mobile phone. Two UMTS PIFAs are located at the top edge of this PCB. They are fed by a double Quasi-Lumped Coupler able to provide a 360 phase difference between its two outputs. By properly choosing the DC bias of the double QuasiLumped Coupler, we can set a specific phase difference between the two PIFAs. In this way the two-element array is able to radiate different electromagnetic fields. Simulated and measured radiation patterns in the two main planes of the chassis are presented for different phase differences. It is especially revealed that the novel twoantenna structure is able to radiate vertically-polarized electric fields in the azimuthal plane of the phone and horizontally-polarized electric fields in the same plane when changing the phase shift between the antennas from 0 to 180. Potential applications are polarization-diversity techniques and Specific Absorption Rate reduction for handsets.

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of Polish Arabian horses assessed through breeding and microsatellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głażewska, Iwona; Gralak, Barbara; Naczk, Aleksandra M; Prusak, Beata

    2018-02-02

    Polish Arabian horses are one of the most important populations of this breed in the world. Their post-war history can be divided into two periods, with the dominant role of state studs until 1989, and the increasing significance of private breeding in the next years. The goal of the study was to evaluate genetic diversity and structure of the population under a new breeding policy. The analyses of breeding and microsatellite data from 1996 to 2012 provide a coherent picture of the population with constant flow of horses only in one direction from state to private studs. An increase in the number of broodmares was observed, from 396 mares in 1996 to 1021 mares in 2012. The proportion of foreign sires used in Polish studs also increased, from 7.1% to 37.0%. An increasing number of alleles and progressive differentiation in mares were observed. STRUCTURE analysis indicated that the Polish horses were clearly separated from foreign horses used in Polish breeding, although only one of the 75 alleles found can be considered as typically Polish. The high heterozygosity is an important feature of the Polish population; however, the decrease of heterozygosity in state broodmares was noted. This issue needs to be studied further. © 2018 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Generation of antigenic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by structured rearrangement of Var genes during mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Claessens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ∼60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7-72.4% yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle.

  15. Structurally diverse MDM2-p53 antagonists act as modulators of MDR-1 function in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Zhao, Y; Halliday, G C; Berry, P; Rousseau, R F; Middleton, S A; Nichols, G L; Del Bello, F; Piergentili, A; Newell, D R; Lunec, J; Tweddle, D A

    2014-08-12

    A frequent mechanism of acquired multidrug resistance in human cancers is overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as the Multi-Drug Resistance Protein 1 (MDR-1). Nutlin-3, an MDM2-p53 antagonist, has previously been reported to be a competitive MDR-1 inhibitor. This study assessed whether the structurally diverse MDM2-p53 antagonists, MI-63, NDD0005, and RG7388 are also able to modulate MDR-1 function, particularly in p53 mutant neuroblastoma cells, using XTT-based cell viability assays, western blotting, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Verapamil and the MDM2-p53 antagonists potentiated vincristine-mediated growth inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner when used in combination with high MDR-1-expressing p53 mutant neuroblastoma cell lines at concentrations that did not affect the viability of cells when given alone. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses showed that verapamil, Nutlin-3, MI-63 and NDD0005, but not RG7388, led to increased intracellular levels of vincristine in high MDR-1-expressing cell lines. These results show that in addition to Nutlin-3, other structurally unrelated MDM2-p53 antagonists can also act as MDR-1 inhibitors and reverse MDR-1-mediated multidrug resistance in neuroblastoma cell lines in a p53-independent manner. These findings are important for future clinical trial design with MDM2-p53 antagonists when used in combination with agents that are MDR-1 substrates.

  16. Structurally Diverse Metabolites from the Soft Coral Sinularia verruca Collected in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weiping; Cheng, Shimiao; Fu, Weitao; Zhao, Min; Li, Xiubao; Cai, Yuepiao; Dong, Jianyong; Huang, Kexin; Gustafson, Kirk R; Yan, Pengcheng

    2016-04-22

    Nineteen metabolites with diverse structures, including the rare pyrroloindoline alkaloid verrupyrroloindoline (1), the unprecedented highly fused benzosesquiterpenoid verrubenzospirolactone (2), the new asteriscane-type sesquiterpenoid 10-deoxocapillosanane D (3), and the two new cyclopentenone derivatives (4S*,5S*)-4-hydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2,3-dimethyl-4-pentylcyclopent-2-en-1-one (4) and (S)-4-hydroxy-5-methylene-2,3-dimethyl-4-pentylcyclopent-2-en-1-one (5), were isolated from a South China Sea collection of the soft coral Sinularia verruca. Eleven previously described marine metabolites (7-15, 18, and 19) were also obtained as well as three new EtOH-adduct artifacts (6, 16, and 17). The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with previously reported data. Compounds 4, 5, and 16 showed protection against the cytopathic effects of HIV-1 infection with EC50 values of 5.8-34 μM, and 4, 6, and 16 exhibited inhibition against LPS-induced NO production with IC50 values of 24-28 μM.

  17. Tree structure and diversity in human-impacted littoral forests, madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, J Carter; Whittaker, Robert J; Dawson, Terence P

    2005-06-01

    This research surveyed human-impacted littoral forests in southeastern Madagascar to determine (i) how forest structural features, indicative of human impact, are related to total, utilitarian, and endemic tree diversity; (ii) the distribution, abundance, and demographics of tree species groups (i.e., total, useful, endemic) across the landscape; and (iii) the amount of basal area available per human use category. We also use these data to consider issues of sustainable use and how human impact may influence littoral forest tree community composition across the landscape. Within 22 transects of 400 m2 each, we recorded a total of 135 tree species and 2155 individuals. Seventy-nine species (58%) were utilitarian and 56 (42%) were nonutilitarian species. Of the 2155 individuals, 1827 (84%) trees were utilitarian species. We recorded 23 endemic species (17% of the total species) and 17 (74%) of these were utilitarian species. Basal area was significantly correlated with Shannon Weiner Index values for total (r = 0.64, P forest structure. Utilitarian species constituted 84% of the total basal area. The use category contributing the highest amount of basal area to the landscape was firewood. The results presented herein demonstrate that the landscape of southeastern Madagascar, commonly perceived as degraded, retains high value for both global conservation purposes and for local livelihoods. Thus, valuable opportunities may exist for developing conservation incentives that leverage both global and local conservation needs.

  18. Allelic Diversity and Population Structure in Oenococcus oeni as Determined from Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Marcobal, Ángela; Muñoz, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is the organism of choice for promoting malolactic fermentation in wine. The population biology of O. oeni is poorly understood and remains unclear. For a better understanding of the mode of genetic variation within this species, we investigated by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) with the gyrB, pgm, ddl, recP, and mleA genes the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among 18 O. oeni strains isolated in various years from wines of the United States, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. These strains have also been characterized by ribotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region (ISR). Ribotyping grouped the strains into two groups; however, the RFLP analysis of the ISRs showed no differences in the strains analyzed. In contrast, MLST in oenococci had a good discriminatory ability, and we have found a higher genetic diversity than indicated by ribotyping analysis. All sequence types were represented by a single strain, and all the strains could be distinguished from each other because they had unique combinations of alleles. Strains assumed to be identical showed the same sequence type. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a panmictic population structure in O. oeni. Sequences were analyzed for evidence of recombination by split decomposition analysis and analysis of clustered polymorphisms. All results indicated that recombination plays a major role in creating the genetic heterogeneity of O. oeni. A low standardized index of association value indicated that the O. oeni genes analyzed are close to linkage equilibrium. This study constitutes the first step in the development of an MLST method for O. oeni and the first example of the application of MLST to a nonpathogenic food production bacteria. PMID:15574919

  19. Ethnolinguistic structuring of sorghum genetic diversity in Africa and the role of local seed systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westengen, Ola T; Okongo, Mark Atam; Onek, Leo; Berg, Trygve; Upadhyaya, Hari; Birkeland, Siri; Kaur Khalsa, Siri Dharma; Ring, Kristoffer H; Stenseth, Nils C; Brysting, Anne K

    2014-09-30

    Sorghum is a drought-tolerant crop with a vital role in the livelihoods of millions of people in marginal areas. We examined genetic structure in this diverse crop in Africa. On the continent-wide scale, we identified three major sorghum populations (Central, Southern, and Northern) that are associated with the distribution of ethnolinguistic groups on the continent. The codistribution of the Central sorghum population and the Nilo-Saharan language family supports a proposed hypothesis about a close and causal relationship between the distribution of sorghum and languages in the region between the Chari and the Nile rivers. The Southern sorghum population is associated with the Bantu languages of the Niger-Congo language family, in agreement with the farming-language codispersal hypothesis as it has been related to the Bantu expansion. The Northern sorghum population is distributed across early Niger-Congo and Afro-Asiatic language family areas with dry agroclimatic conditions. At a finer geographic scale, the genetic substructure within the Central sorghum population is associated with language-group expansions within the Nilo-Saharan language family. A case study of the seed system of the Pari people, a Western-Nilotic ethnolinguistic group, provides a window into the social and cultural factors involved in generating and maintaining the continent-wide diversity patterns. The age-grade system, a cultural institution important for the expansive success of this ethnolinguistic group in the past, plays a central role in the management of sorghum landraces and continues to underpin the resilience of their traditional seed system.

  20. Huanglongbing alters the structure and functional diversity of microbial communities associated with citrus rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pankaj; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Albrigo, Gene; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Nian

    2012-01-01

    The diversity and stability of bacterial communities present in the rhizosphere heavily influence soil and plant quality and ecosystem sustainability. The goal of this study is to understand how ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (known to cause Huanglongbing, HLB) influences the structure and functional potential of microbial communities associated with the citrus rhizosphere. Clone library sequencing and taxon/group-specific quantitative real-time PCR results showed that ‘Ca. L. asiaticus' infection restructured the native microbial community associated with citrus rhizosphere. Within the bacterial community, phylum Proteobacteria with various genera typically known as successful rhizosphere colonizers were significantly greater in clone libraries from healthy samples, whereas phylum Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, typically more dominant in the bulk soil were higher in ‘Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected samples. A comprehensive functional microarray GeoChip 3.0 was used to determine the effects of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus' infection on the functional diversity of rhizosphere microbial communities. GeoChip analysis showed that HLB disease has significant effects on various functional guilds of bacteria. Many genes involved in key ecological processes such as nitrogen cycling, carbon fixation, phosphorus utilization, metal homeostasis and resistance were significantly greater in healthy than in the ‘Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected citrus rhizosphere. Our results showed that the microbial community of the ‘Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected citrus rhizosphere has shifted away from using more easily degraded sources of carbon to the more recalcitrant forms. Overall, our study provides evidence that the change in plant physiology mediated by ‘Ca. L. asiaticus' infection could elicit shifts in the composition and functional potential of rhizosphere microbial communities. In the long term, these fluctuations might have important implications for the productivity and

  1. Plasmids of carotenoid-producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - structure, diversity and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i) plasmid replication, (ii) stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families) and (iii) mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families). A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes) containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase). The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria.

  2. Plasmids of carotenoid-producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria - structure, diversity and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maj

    Full Text Available Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria: P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i plasmid replication, (ii stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families and (iii mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families. A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase. The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria.

  3. DIVERSITY AND GENETIC STRUCTURE OF NATURAL POPULATIONS OF ARAÇÁ (Psidium guineense Sw.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDSON FERREIRA DA SILVA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psidium guineense Sw , popularly known as araçá, is a fruit tree there is widely distributed in Brazil and belongs to the Myrtaceae family. In northeastern Brazil, araçá occurs along coast and in the Zona da Mata; its fruit looks like guava but is more acidic and has a stronger smell. There is a little information about this species, which increases the difficulty of conserving its genetic resources and exploiting araçá as an economic resource. The objective of this research was the evaluation of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of P. guineense from Pernambuco’s Zona da Mata. One hundred and fourteen individuals and 18 isozyme loci were evaluated, showing 28 alleles. The percentage of polymorphic loci ( and the average number of alleles per locus ( were 0.5 and 1.5, respectively, in this population. The expected heterozygosity , which corresponds to the genetic diversity, ranged from 0.22 to 0.23, a high value when considering that isozymes mark access from the functional genome. The differentiation index among the population was ( = 0.015; therefore, the populations were not different among the sampled places. The inbreeding values ( ranged from - 0.549 to - 0.794, indicating an absence of inbreeding and a greater - than - expected heterozygosity in all the studied populations. The estimated gene flow ( N m for a pair of this population ranged from 3.23 to 20.77, sufficient to avoid genetic differentiation among the population and in accordance with the values of genetic divergence found in this study.

  4. Y-Chromosome Structural Diversity in the Bonobo and Chimpanzee Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjens, Matthew T; Shen, Feichen; Emery, Sarah B; Zou, Zhengting; Kidd, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-03

    The male-specific regions of primate Y-chromosomes (MSY) are enriched for multi-copy genes highly expressed in the testis. These genes are located in large repetitive sequences arranged as palindromes, inverted-, and tandem repeats termed amplicons. In humans, these genes have critical roles in male fertility and are essential for the production of sperm. The structure of human and chimpanzee amplicon sequences show remarkable difference relative to the remainder of the genome, a difference that may be the result of intense selective pressure on male fertility. Four subspecies of common chimpanzees have undergone extended periods of isolation and appear to be in the early process of subspeciation. A recent study found amplicons enriched for testis-expressed genes on the primate X-chromosome the target of hard selective sweeps, and male-fertility genes on the Y-chromosome may also be the targets of selection. However, little is understood about Y-chromosome amplicon diversity within and across chimpanzee populations. Here, we analyze nine common chimpanzee (representing three subspecies: Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, Pan troglodytes ellioti, and Pan troglodytes verus) and two bonobo (Pan paniscus) male whole-genome sequences to assess Y ampliconic copy-number diversity across the Pan genus. We observe that the copy number of Y chromosome amplicons is variable among chimpanzees and bonobos, and identify several lineage-specific patterns, including variable copy number of azoospermia candidates RBMY and DAZ We detect recurrent switchpoints of copy-number change along the ampliconic tracts across chimpanzee populations, which may be the result of localized genome instability or selective forces. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Epiplankton in the Barents sea: Summer variations of mesozooplankton biomass, community structure and diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoretsky, Vladimir G.; Dvoretsky, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    Zooplankton link primary producers (phytoplankton) and higher trophic levels (fish, marine mammals, and seabirds) and are considered to be an important component in pelagic marine systems. In this paper we analyze a mesozooplankton data set obtained in the Barents Sea from 2003 to 2009 to test for climatic influences on some important parameters of the epi-zooplankton community in summer. The maxima of both mean water temperature in the upper 100 m layer and averaged chlorophyll a concentration in the surface strata were recorded in 2006, which may be considered as an anomalously-warm year. Total mesozooplankton biomass ranged from 743±106 mg C m-2 in the southern region to 3716±664 mg C m-2 in the northern region. The proportions of herbivores and large zooplankters (animals with total length of 2.7-7.0 mm) were highest in 2006 and tended to increase with temperature. Diversity, evaluated as the Shannon index of the mesozooplankton communities, was weakly correlated in time with environmental variables, and the mean and total number of taxa increased with water temperature in the southern and central Barents Sea. Most of the biological characteristics of the mesozooplankton community were only weakly correlated in time with the NAO and AO indices; however, the proportion of animals in 1.0-2.7 mm and 2.7-7.0 mm size classes tended to increase with increases in the monthly PC-based NAO index for August. Our data suggest that the complex zooplankton parameters (biomass, trophic and size structure, and diversity) can be useful in studying climatic impacts on marine ecosystems.

  6. How taxonomic diversity, community structure, and sample size determine the reliability of higher taxon surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeson, Thomas M; Van Rijn, Itai; Mandelik, Yael

    2013-07-01

    Ecologists and paleontologists often rely on higher taxon surrogates instead of complete inventories of biological diversity. Despite their intrinsic appeal, the performance of these surrogates has been markedly inconsistent across empirical studies, to the extent that there is no consensus on appropriate taxonomic resolution (i.e., whether genus- or family-level categories are more appropriate) or their overall usefulness. A framework linking the reliability of higher taxon surrogates to biogeographic setting would allow for the interpretation of previously published work and provide some needed guidance regarding the actual application of these surrogates in biodiversity assessments, conservation planning, and the interpretation of the fossil record. We developed a mathematical model to show how taxonomic diversity, community structure, and sampling effort together affect three measures of higher taxon performance: the correlation between species and higher taxon richness, the relative shapes and asymptotes of species and higher taxon accumulation curves, and the efficiency of higher taxa in a complementarity-based reserve-selection algorithm. In our model, higher taxon surrogates performed well in communities in which a few common species were most abundant, and less well in communities with many equally abundant species. Furthermore, higher taxon surrogates performed well when there was a small mean and variance in the number of species per higher taxa. We also show that empirically measured species-higher-taxon correlations can be partly spurious (i.e., a mathematical artifact), except when the species accumulation curve has reached an asymptote. This particular result is of considerable practical interest given the widespread use of rapid survey methods in biodiversity assessment and the application of higher taxon methods to taxa in which species accumulation curves rarely reach an asymptote, e.g., insects.

  7. Diversity and Structure of Diazotrophic Communities in Mangrove Rhizosphere, Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanying Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Diazotrophic communities make an essential contribution to the productivity through providing new nitrogen. However, knowledge of the roles that both mangrove tree species and geochemical parameters play in shaping mangove rhizosphere diazotrophic communities is still elusive. Here, a comprehensive examination of the diversity and structure of microbial communities in the rhizospheres of three mangrove species, Rhizophora apiculata, Avicennia marina, and Ceriops tagal, was undertaken using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Our results revealed a great diversity of both the total microbial composition and the diazotrophic composition specifically in the mangrove rhizosphere. Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were both ubiquitous and dominant, comprising an average of 45.87 and 86.66% of total microbial and diazotrophic communities, respectively. Sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to the Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were the dominant diazotrophs. Community statistical analyses suggested that both mangrove tree species and additional environmental variables played important roles in shaping total microbial and potential diazotroph communities in mangrove rhizospheres. In contrast to the total microbial community investigated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, most of the dominant diazotrophic groups identified by nifH gene sequences were significantly different among mangrove species. The dominant diazotrophs of the family Desulfobacteraceae were positively correlated with total phosphorus, but negatively correlated with the nitrogen to phosphorus ratio. The Pseudomonadaceae were positively correlated with the concentration of available potassium, suggesting that diazotrophs potentially play an important role in biogeochemical cycles, such as those of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and potassium, in the mangrove ecosystem.

  8. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Muyang

    2012-06-01

    exhibiting a diversity of lignin structures and compositions could be linked to quantifiable changes in the composition of the cell wall and properties of the lignin including apparent content of the p-hydroxycinnamates while the limitations of S/G estimation in grasses is highlighted.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of Musa accessions in ex situ conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Onildo Nunes; Silva, Sebastião de Oliveira E; Amorim, Edson Perito; Ferreira, Claudia Fortes; de Campos, José Marcello Salabert; Silva, Gabriela de Gaspari; Figueira, Antonio

    2013-03-12

    Banana cultivars are mostly derived from hybridization between wild diploid subspecies of Musa acuminata (A genome) and M. balbisiana (B genome), and they exhibit various levels of ploidy and genomic constitution. The Embrapa ex situ Musa collection contains over 220 accessions, of which only a few have been genetically characterized. Knowledge regarding the genetic relationships and diversity between modern cultivars and wild relatives would assist in conservation and breeding strategies. Our objectives were to determine the genomic constitution based on Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions polymorphism and the ploidy of all accessions by flow cytometry and to investigate the population structure of the collection using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci as co-dominant markers based on Structure software, not previously performed in Musa. From the 221 accessions analyzed by flow cytometry, the correct ploidy was confirmed or established for 212 (95.9%), whereas digestion of the ITS region confirmed the genomic constitution of 209 (94.6%). Neighbor-joining clustering analysis derived from SSR binary data allowed the detection of two major groups, essentially distinguished by the presence or absence of the B genome, while subgroups were formed according to the genomic composition and commercial classification. The co-dominant nature of SSR was explored to analyze the structure of the population based on a Bayesian approach, detecting 21 subpopulations. Most of the subpopulations were in agreement with the clustering analysis. The data generated by flow cytometry, ITS and SSR supported the hypothesis about the occurrence of homeologue recombination between A and B genomes, leading to discrepancies in the number of sets or portions from each parental genome. These phenomenons have been largely disregarded in the evolution of banana, as the "single-step domestication" hypothesis had long predominated. These findings will have an impact in future breeding approaches

  10. Remarkably low mtDNA control-region diversity and shallow population structure in Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M; Lu, Z C; Gao, T X; Yanagimoto, T; Sakurai, Y

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the genetic diversity and describe the population structure in Gadus macrocephalus, a 452 base pair (bp) fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region was analysed in 259 individuals. The results showed remarkably low nucleotide diversity and a lack of genealogical structure. Small but significant genetic differentiations, however, were detected among north-western Pacific populations, but no large-scale regional differences were detected. These results indicate that populations of G. macrocephalus in the north-western Pacific are genetically subdivided and represent evolutionary lineages that should be managed individually. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  11. Phylogeography and population structure of the grape powdery mildew fungus, Erysiphe necator, from diverse Vitis species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewer Marin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The grape powdery mildew fungus, Erysiphe necator, was introduced into Europe more than 160 years ago and is now distributed everywhere that grapes are grown. To understand the invasion history of this pathogen we investigated the evolutionary relationships between introduced populations of Europe, Australia and the western United States (US and populations in the eastern US, where E. necator is thought to be native. Additionally, we tested the hypothesis that populations of E. necator in the eastern US are structured based on geography and Vitis host species. Results We sequenced three nuclear gene regions covering 1803 nucleotides from 146 isolates of E. necator collected from the eastern US, Europe, Australia, and the western US. Phylogeographic analyses show that the two genetic groups in Europe represent two separate introductions and that the genetic groups may be derived from eastern US ancestors. Populations from the western US and Europe share haplotypes, suggesting that the western US population was introduced from Europe. Populations in Australia are derived from European populations. Haplotype richness and nucleotide diversity were significantly greater in the eastern US populations than in the introduced populations. Populations within the eastern US are geographically differentiated; however, no structure was detected with respect to host habitat (i.e., wild or cultivated. Populations from muscadine grapes, V. rotundifolia, are genetically distinct from populations from other Vitis host species, yet no differentiation was detected among populations from other Vitis species. Conclusions Multilocus sequencing analysis of the grape powdery mildew fungus is consistent with the hypothesis that populations in Europe, Australia and the western US are derived from two separate introductions and their ancestors were likely from native populations in the eastern US. The invasion history of E. necator follows a pattern

  12. High genetic diversity and structured populations of the oriental fruit moth in its range of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Peng, Xiong; Liu, Gaoming; Pan, Hongyan; Dorn, Silvia; Chen, Maohua

    2013-01-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita ( = Cydia) molesta is a key fruit pest globally. Despite its economic importance, little is known about its population genetics in its putative native range that includes China. We used five polymorphic microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial gene sequences to characterize the population genetic diversity and genetic structure of G. molesta from nine sublocations in three regions of a major fruit growing area of China. Larval samples were collected throughout the season from peach, and in late season, after host switch by the moth to pome fruit, also from apple and pear. We found high numbers of microsatellite alleles and mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in all regions, together with a high number of private alleles and of haplotypes at all sublocations, providing strong evidence that the sampled area belongs to the origin of this species. Samples collected from peach at all sublocations were geographically structured, and a significant albeit weak pattern of isolation-by-distance was found among populations, likely reflecting the low flight capacity of this moth. Interestingly, populations sampled from apple and pear in the late season showed a structure differing from that of populations sampled from peach throughout the season, indicating a selective host switch of a certain part of the population only. The recently detected various olfactory genotypes in G. molesta may underly this selective host switch. These genetic data yield, for the first time, an understanding of population dynamics of G. molesta in its native range, and of a selective host switch from peach to pome fruit, which may have a broad applicability to other global fruit production areas for designing suitable pest management strategies.

  13. High genetic diversity and structured populations of the oriental fruit moth in its range of origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zheng

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit moth Grapholita ( = Cydia molesta is a key fruit pest globally. Despite its economic importance, little is known about its population genetics in its putative native range that includes China. We used five polymorphic microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial gene sequences to characterize the population genetic diversity and genetic structure of G. molesta from nine sublocations in three regions of a major fruit growing area of China. Larval samples were collected throughout the season from peach, and in late season, after host switch by the moth to pome fruit, also from apple and pear. We found high numbers of microsatellite alleles and mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in all regions, together with a high number of private alleles and of haplotypes at all sublocations, providing strong evidence that the sampled area belongs to the origin of this species. Samples collected from peach at all sublocations were geographically structured, and a significant albeit weak pattern of isolation-by-distance was found among populations, likely reflecting the low flight capacity of this moth. Interestingly, populations sampled from apple and pear in the late season showed a structure differing from that of populations sampled from peach throughout the season, indicating a selective host switch of a certain part of the population only. The recently detected various olfactory genotypes in G. molesta may underly this selective host switch. These genetic data yield, for the first time, an understanding of population dynamics of G. molesta in its native range, and of a selective host switch from peach to pome fruit, which may have a broad applicability to other global fruit production areas for designing suitable pest management strategies.

  14. Biogeographical boundaries, functional group structure and diversity of Rocky Shore communities along the Argentinean coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evie A Wieters

    Full Text Available We investigate the extent to which functional structure and spatial variability of intertidal communities coincide with major biogeographical boundaries, areas where extensive compositional changes in the biota are observed over a limited geographic extension. We then investigate whether spatial variation in the biomass of functional groups, over geographic (10's km and local (10's m scales, could be associated to species diversity within and among these groups. Functional community structure expressed as abundance (density, cover and biomass and composition of major functional groups was quantified through field surveys at 20 rocky intertidal shores spanning six degrees of latitude along the southwest Atlantic coast of Argentina and extending across the boundaries between the Argentinean and Magellanic Provinces. Patterns of abundance of individual functional groups were not uniformly matched with biogeographical regions. Only ephemeral algae showed an abrupt geographical discontinuity coincident with changes in biogeographic boundaries, and this was limited to the mid intertidal zone. We identified 3-4 main 'groups' of sites in terms of the total and relative abundance of the major functional groups, but these did not coincide with biogeographical boundaries, nor did they follow latitudinal arrangement. Thus, processes that determine the functional structure of these intertidal communities are insensitive to biogeographical boundaries. Over both geographical and local spatial scales, and for most functional groups and tidal levels, increases in species richness within the functional group was significantly associated to increased total biomass and reduced spatial variability of the group. These results suggest that species belonging to the same functional group are sufficiently uncorrelated over space (i.e. metres and site-to-site to stabilize patterns of biomass variability and, in this manner, provide a buffer, or "insurance", against

  15. Flying Under the LiDAR: Relating Forest Structure to Bat Community Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, A. C.; Weishampel, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Bats are important to many ecological processes such as pollination, insect (and by proxy, disease) control, and seed dispersal and can be used to monitor ecosystem health. However, they are facing unprecedented extinction risks from habitat degradation as well as pressures from pathogens (e.g., white-nose syndrome) and wind turbines. LiDAR allows ecologists to measure structural variables of forested landscapes with increased precision and accuracy at broader spatial scales than previously possible. This study used airborne LiDAR to classify forest habitat/canopy structure at the Ordway-Swisher Biological Station (OSBS) in north central Florida. LiDAR data were acquired by the NEON airborne observation platform in summer 2014. OSBS consists of open-canopy pine savannas, closed-canopy hardwood hammocks, and seasonally wet prairies. Multiple forest structural parameters (e.g., mean, maximum, and standard deviation of height returns) were derived from LiDAR point clouds using the USDA software program FUSION. K-means clustering was used to segregate each 5x5 m raster across the ~3765 ha OSBS area into six different clusters based on the derived canopy metrics. Cluster averages for maximum, mean, and standard deviation of return heights ranged from 0 to 19.4 m, 0 to 15.3 m, and 0 to 3.0 m, respectively. To determine the relationships among these landscape-canopy features and bat species diversity and abundances, AnaBat II bat detectors were deployed from May to September in 2015 stratified by these distinct clusters. Bat calls were recorded from sunset to sunrise during each sampling period. Species were identified using AnalookW. A statistical regression model selection approach was performed in order to evaluate how forest attributes such as understory clutter, open regions, open and closed canopy, etc. influence bat communities. This knowledge provides a deeper understanding of habitat-species interactions to better manage survival of these species.

  16. Evaluation of a Diverse, Worldwide Collection of Wild, Cultivated, and Landrace Pepper (Capsicum annuum) for Resistance to Phytophthora Fruit Rot, Genetic Diversity, and Population Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegele, R P; Tomlinson, A J; Hausbeck, M K

    2015-01-01

    Pepper is the third most important solanaceous crop in the United States and fourth most important worldwide. To identify sources of resistance for commercial breeding, 170 pepper genotypes from five continents and 45 countries were evaluated for Phytophthora fruit rot resistance using two isolates of Phytophthora capsici. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed on a subset of 157 genotypes using 23 polymorphic simple sequence repeats. Partial resistance and isolate-specific interactions were identified in the population at both 3 and 5 days postinoculation (dpi). Plant introductions (PIs) 640833 and 566811 were the most resistant lines evaluated at 5 dpi to isolates 12889 and OP97, with mean lesion areas less than Criollo de Morelos. Genetic diversity was moderate (0.44) in the population. The program STRUCTURE inferred four genetic clusters with moderate to very great differentiation among clusters. Most lines evaluated were susceptible or moderately susceptible at 5 dpi, and no lines evaluated were completely resistant to Phytophthora fruit rot. Significant population structure was detected when pepper varieties were grouped by predefined categories of disease resistance, continent, and country of origin. Moderately resistant or resistant PIs to both isolates of P. capsici at 5 dpi were in genetic clusters one and two.

  17. Microbiomes structure and diversity in different horizons of full soil profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Timofey; Tkhakakhova, Azida; Zhelezova, Alena; Semenov, Mikhail; Kutovaya, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Topsoil is a most common object for soil metagenomic studies; sometimes soil profile is being formally split in layers by depth. However, Russian Soil Science School formulated the idea of soil profile as a complex of soil horizons, which can differ in their properties and genesis. In this research we analyzed 57 genetic soil horizons of 8 different soils from European part of Russia: Albeluvisol, Greyzemic Phaeozem, three Chermozems (different land use - till, fallow, wind-protecting tree line), Rhodic Cambisol, Haplic Kastanozem and Salic Solonetz (WRB classification). Sampling was performed from all genetic horizons in each soil profile starting from topsoil until subsoil. Total DNA was extracted and 16S rRNA sequencing was provided together with chemical analysis of soil (pH measurement, C and N contents, etc.). Structure and diversity of prokaryotic community are significantly different in those soil horizons, which chemical properties and processes of origin are contrasting with nearest horizons: Na-enriched horizon of Solonetz, eluvial horizon of Albeluvisol, plough pan of Agrochernozem. Actinobacteria were abundant in top horizons of soils in warm and dry climate, while Acidobacteria had the highest frequency in soils of moist and cold regions. Concerning Archaea, Thaumarchaeota prevailed in all studied soils. Their rate was higher in microbiomes of upper horizons of steppe soils and it was reducing with depth down the profile. Prokaryotic communities in Chernozems were clustered by soil horizons types: microbiomes of A (organic topsoil) and B (mineral) horizons formed non-overlapping clusters by principal component analysis, cluster formed by prokaryotic communities of transitional soil horizons (AB) take place between clusters of A and B horizons. Moreover, prokaryotic communities of A horizons differ from each other strongly, while microbiomes of B horizons formed a narrow small cluster. It must be explaned by more diverse conditions in upper A horizons

  18. Microbial Community Structure and Diversity in Hydrate Ridge Gas Hydrates (Cascadia Margin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösekann, T.; Knittel, K.; Boetius, A.; Amann, R.

    2003-04-01

    Here, we present the first quantitative study investigating microorganisms physically associated with Hydrate Ridge gas hydrates. Previous studies have shown that the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in methane enriched surface sediments of Hydrate Ridge is apparently mediated by highly structured microbial consortia (Boetius et al., 2000). These AOM consortia consist of an inner core of methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME2-group) and an outer shell of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). However, recently other microbial associations have been found capable of oxidizing methane anaerobically (e.g. Michaelis et al., 2002; Orphan et al., 2002). Only little is known about microorganisms mediating AOM in direct association with gas hydrates (Lanoil et al., 2001). The microbial community in pure melted gas hydrates sampled at the southern summit of Hydrate Ridge, coast off Oregon (USA), was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Additionally, microbial diversity was studied using 16S rDNA clone libraries for Bacteria and Archaea. First FISH experiments confirm the abundance of AMNE1-group archaea and ANME2-group archaea in pure melted Hydrate Ridge gas hydrates. The abundance of these AOM mediating groups seems to be orders of magnitude lower than in the gas hydrate surrounding sediment. ANME1-cells were detected as filamentous free-living rods. Archaea of the ANME2-group were found in associations. In contrast to the known highly structured Hydrate ridge consortia, these cells are only loosly aggregated. The obtained molecular data will be compared with results of previous studies, which dealt with the microbial diversity in methane enriched surface sediments of Hydrate Ridge. References: Boetius, A., Ravenschlag, K. , Schubert, C., Rickert, D., Widdel, F., Gieseke, A., Amann, R., Jørgensen, B. B., Witte, U. &Pfannkuche, O.: A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature 407, 623

  19. Habitat fragmentation, tree diversity, and plant invasion interact to structure forest caterpillar communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stireman, John O; Devlin, Hilary; Doyle, Annie L

    2014-09-01

    Habitat fragmentation and invasive species are two of the most prominent threats to terrestrial ecosystems. Few studies have examined how these factors interact to influence the diversity of natural communities, particularly primary consumers. Here, we examined the effects of forest fragmentation and invasion of exotic honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii, Caprifoliaceae) on the abundance and diversity of the dominant forest herbivores: woody plant-feeding Lepidoptera. We systematically surveyed understory caterpillars along transects in 19 forest fragments over multiple years in southwestern Ohio and evaluated how fragment area, isolation, tree diversity, invasion by honeysuckle and interactions among these factors influence species richness, diversity and abundance. We found strong seasonal variation in caterpillar communities, which responded differently to fragmentation and invasion. Abundance and richness increased with fragment area, but these effects were mitigated by high levels of honeysuckle, tree diversity, landscape forest cover, and large recent changes in area. Honeysuckle infestation was generally associated with decreased caterpillar abundance and diversity, but these effects were strongly dependent on other fragment traits. Effects of honeysuckle on abundance were moderated when fragment area, landscape forest cover and tree diversity were high. In contrast, negative effects of honeysuckle invasion on caterpillar diversity were most pronounced in fragments with high tree diversity and large recent increases in area. Our results illustrate the complex interdependencies of habitat fragmentation, plant diversity and plant invasion in their effects on primary consumers and emphasize the need to consider these processes in concert to understand the consequences of anthropogenic habitat change for biodiversity.

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure of two important medicinal plant species Schisandra chinensis and Schisandra sphenanthera revealed by nuclear microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Wen, Xiangying; Huang, Hongwen

    2011-04-01

    Seven polymorphic and transferable nuclear microsatellites were used to investigate the population structure of genetic diversity of Schisandra chinensis and Schisandra sphenanthera for facilitating their conservation and sustainable utilization. High levels of gene diversity were revealed in these two medicinal species, the majority of genetic diversity was harbored within populations, and population structure was might due to restricted gene flow among populations. Isolation by distance was close to significance in S. chinensis but not in S. sphenanthera. In S. chinensis, null alleles were identified as a cause for excess of homozygotes at loci G24 and WGA60, but inbreeding might also be partly responsible for the positive F ( IS ) values in this species. In contrast, null allele frequencies were high at all the seven loci in S. sphenanthera and resulted in overestimation of fixation index. The strategy for ex situ conservation of these two medicinal species is discussed based on the genetic results.

  1. Woody plant diversity and structure of shade-grown-coffee plantations in Northern Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Soto-Pinto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Shade-grown coffee is an agricultural system that contains some forest-like characteristics. However, structure and diversity are poorly known in shade coffee systems. In 61 coffee-growers’ plots of Chiapas, Mexico, structural variables of shade vegetation and coffee yields were measured, recording species and their use. Coffee stands had five vegetation strata. Seventy seven woody species mostly used as wood were found (mean density 371.4 trees per hectare. Ninety percent were native species (40% of the local flora, the remaining were introduced species, mainly fruit trees/shrubs. Diametric distribution resembles that of a secondary forest. Principal Coordinates Analysis grouped plots in four classes by the presence of Inga, however the majority of plots are diverse. There was no difference in equitability among groups or coffee yields. Coffee yield was 835 g clean coffee per shrub, or ca. 1668 kg ha-1. There is a significant role of shade-grown coffee as diversity refuge for woody plants and presumably associated fauna, as well as an opportunity for shade-coffee growers to participate in the new biodiversity-friendly-coffee marketEl café bajo sombra es un sistema agrícola que contiene algunas características de los bosques. Sin embargo, las características estructurales y de diversidad de la sombra del café son poco conocidas. En 61 parcelas de productores del norte de Chiapas, Mexico, se midieron variables estructurales de la vegetación de sombra y los rendimientos de café, registrando las especies y sus usos. Los cafetales presentaron cinco estratos de vegetación. Se encontraron 77 especies leñosas, la mayoría de uso maderable (densidad promedio de 371.4 árboles por hectárea. Noventa por ciento fueron especies nativas (40% de la flora local, el porcentaje restante fueron especies introducidas, principalmente árboles o arbustos frutales. La distribución diamétrica se asemeja a la distribución típica de bosques secundarios

  2. Early impact of alternative thinning approaches on structure diversity and complexity at stand level in two beech forests in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Becagli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stand structure, tree density as well as tree spatial pattern define natural dynamics and competition process. They are therefore parameters used to define any silvicultural management type. This work aims to report first data resulting from a silvicultural experiment in beech forests. The objective of the trial is testing the structure manipulation in terms of diversity and the reduction of inter-tree competition of different thinning approaches. Alternative thinning methods have been applied in two independent experimental sites located in the pre-Alps and Southern Apennines, in Italy. Specific goals were to: (i verify the impact early after thinning implementation on forest structure through a set of diversity and competition metrics resulting from a literature review; (ii the sensitivity of tested indexes to effectively detect thinning manipulation. Main result show the low sensitivity of stand structure indexes and the ability of competition metrics to detect thinning outcome.

  3. Genetic diversity and structure in Leishmania infantum populations from southeastern Europe revealed by microsatellite analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The dynamic re-emergence of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in south Europe and the northward shift to Leishmania-free European countries are well-documented. However, the epidemiology of VL due to Leishmania infantum in southeastern (SE) Europe and the Balkans is inadequately examined. Herein, we aim to re-evaluate and compare the population structure of L. infantum in SE and southwestern (SW) Europe. Methods Leishmania strains collected from humans and canines in Turkey, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania and Croatia, were characterized by the K26-PCR assay and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Genetic diversity was assessed by multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) and MLM Types were analyzed by model- and distance- based algorithms to infer the population structure of 128 L. infantum strains. Results L. infantum MON-1 was found predominant in SE Europe, whilst 16.8% of strains were MON-98. Distinct genetic populations revealed clear differentiation between SE and SW European strains. Interestingly, Cypriot canine isolates were genetically isolated and formed a monophyletic group, suggesting the constitution of a clonal MON-1 population circulating among dogs. In contrast, two highly heterogeneous populations enclosed all MON-1 and MON-98 strains from the other SE European countries. Structure sub-clustering, phylogenetic and Splitstree analysis also revealed two distinct Croatian subpopulations. A mosaic of evolutionary effects resulted in consecutive sub-structuring, which indicated substantial differentiation and gene flow among strains of both zymodemes. Conclusions This is the first population genetic study of L. infantum in SE Europe and the Balkans. Our findings demonstrate the differentiation between SE and SW European strains; revealing the partition of Croatian strains between these populations and the genetic isolation of Cypriot strains. This mirrors the geographic position of Croatia located in central Europe and the natural

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of six species of Capparis in Tunisia using AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichi-Yousfi, Haifa; Bahri, Bochra Amina; Medini, Maher; Rouz, Slim; Nejib Rejeb, Mohamed; Ghrabi-Gammar, Zeineb

    In order to study the genetic diversity, the phylogeographic pattern and hybridization between six Tunisian Capparis species, 213 accessions of Caper were genotyped with three primer combinations of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Out of 750 fragments generated, 636 were polymorphic and 407 of them were restricted to a single species. STRUCTURE and PCoA analyses clearly separated morphologically different populations into six distinct genetic ones. The UPGMA analysis grouped the species into three main clusters: G1 grouped C. spinosa subsp. spinosa var. spinosa and C. sicula subsp. sicula; G2 grouped C. ovata subsp. ovata and C. orientalis and G3 clustered C. zoharyi and C. aegyptia. Populations from G1, G2 and G3 were mainly distributed in arid, subhumid, and semi-arid bioclimates, respectively. Additional genetic studies on Capparis could help to identify genes underlying speciation events and local adaptation to geographic areas leading to the development of breeding programs. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Tropical Refuges with Exceptionally High Phylogenetic Diversity Reveal Contrasting Phylogenetic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Pugliesi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of phylogenetic diversity (PD has gained increasing attention in conservation biology. However, PD is not equally distributed in a phylogeny and can be better assessed when species relatedness (phylogenetic structure: PS is also considered. Here, we investigate PD and PS in two refuges of biodiversity in northeastern Brazil: the Bahia Costal Forest (BCF in the Atlantic Forest domain and Chapada Diamantina (CD in the Caatinga domain. We used geographic data of 205 species at two spatial scales and a chronogram of Apocynaceae based on matK sequences to estimate PD and PS. Our results show an exceptionally high PD in both refuges, overdispersed in BCF and clustered in CD, although this difference is less evident or absent for recent relationships, especially at a smaller spatial scale. Overall, PS suggests long-term competitive exclusion under climatic stability, currently balanced by habitat filtering, in BCF, and biome conservatism and limited dispersal leading to in situ diversification and high density of microendemics in CD. The phylogenetically clustered flora in CD, also threatened by climate changes, are naturally more vulnerable than BCF. Therefore, while in situ conservation may ensure protection of biodiversity in BCF, emergency ex situ conservation is strongly recommended in CD.

  6. Structural diversity and African origin of the 17q21.31 inversion polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Karyn Meltz; Antonacci, Francesca; Sudmant, Peter H; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Campbell, Catarina D; Vives, Laura; Malig, Maika; Scheinfeldt, Laura; Beggs, William; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Lema, Godfrey; Nyambo, Thomas B; Omar, Sabah A; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Froment, Alain; Donnelly, Michael P; Kidd, Kenneth K; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Eichler, Evan E

    2012-07-01

    The 17q21.31 inversion polymorphism exists either as direct (H1) or inverted (H2) haplotypes with differential predispositions to disease and selection. We investigated its genetic diversity in 2,700 individuals, with an emphasis on African populations. We characterize eight structural haplotypes due to complex rearrangements that vary in size from 1.08-1.49 Mb and provide evidence for a 30-kb H1-H2 double recombination event. We show that recurrent partial duplications of the KANSL1 gene have occurred on both the H1 and H2 haplotypes and have risen to high frequency in European populations. We identify a likely ancestral H2 haplotype (H2') lacking these duplications that is enriched among African hunter-gatherer groups yet essentially absent from West African populations. Whereas H1 and H2 segmental duplications arose independently and before human migration out of Africa, they have reached high frequencies recently among Europeans, either because of extraordinary genetic drift or selective sweeps.

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of native maize populations in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Claudia A.; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Hearne, Sarah; Franco, Jorge; Mir, Celine; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Taba, Suketoshi; Charcosset, Alain; Warburton, Marilyn L.

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the genetic diversity and population structure of 194 native maize populations from 23 countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. The germplasm, representing 131 distinct landraces, was genetically characterized as population bulks using 28 SSR markers. Three main groups of maize germplasm were identified. The first, the Mexico and Southern Andes group, highlights the Pre-Columbian and modern exchange of germplasm between North and South America. The second group, Mesoamerica lowland, supports the hypothesis that two separate human migration events could have contributed to Caribbean maize germplasm. The third, the Andean group, displayed early introduction of maize into the Andes, with little mixing since then, other than a regional interchange zone active in the past. Events and activities in the pre- and post-Columbian Americas including the development and expansion of pre-Columbian cultures and the arrival of Europeans to the Americas are discussed in relation to the history of maize migration from its point of domestication in Mesoamerica to South America and the Caribbean through sea and land routes. PMID:28403177

  8. The Diversity and Geographical Structure of Orientia tsutsugamushi Strains from Scrub Typhus Patients in Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Sonthayanon, Piengchan; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Paris, Daniel H; Newton, Paul N; Feil, Edward J; Day, Nicholas P J

    2015-01-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi is the causative agent of scrub typhus, a disease transmitted by Leptotrombidium mites which is responsible for a severe and under-reported public health burden throughout Southeast Asia. Here we use multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to characterize 74 clinical isolates from three geographic locations in the Lao PDR (Laos), and compare them with isolates described from Udon Thani, northeast Thailand. The data confirm high levels of diversity and recombination within the natural O. tsutsugamushi population, and a rate of mixed infection of ~8%. We compared the relationships and geographical structuring of the strains and populations using allele based approaches (eBURST), phylogenetic approaches, and by calculating F-statistics (FST). These analyses all point towards low levels of population differentiation between isolates from Vientiane and Udon Thani, cities which straddle the Mekong River which defines the Lao/Thai border, but with a very distinct population in Salavan, southern Laos. These data highlight how land use, as well as the movement of hosts and vectors, may impact on the epidemiology of zoonotic infections.

  9. The Diversity and Geographical Structure of Orientia tsutsugamushi Strains from Scrub Typhus Patients in Laos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattanaphone Phetsouvanh

    Full Text Available Orientia tsutsugamushi is the causative agent of scrub typhus, a disease transmitted by Leptotrombidium mites which is responsible for a severe and under-reported public health burden throughout Southeast Asia. Here we use multilocus sequence typing (MLST to characterize 74 clinical isolates from three geographic locations in the Lao PDR (Laos, and compare them with isolates described from Udon Thani, northeast Thailand. The data confirm high levels of diversity and recombination within the natural O. tsutsugamushi population, and a rate of mixed infection of ~8%. We compared the relationships and geographical structuring of the strains and populations using allele based approaches (eBURST, phylogenetic approaches, and by calculating F-statistics (FST. These analyses all point towards low levels of population differentiation between isolates from Vientiane and Udon Thani, cities which straddle the Mekong River which defines the Lao/Thai border, but with a very distinct population in Salavan, southern Laos. These data highlight how land use, as well as the movement of hosts and vectors, may impact on the epidemiology of zoonotic infections.

  10. Molecular structure and diversity of PBAN/Pyrokinin family peptides in ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Yeon eChoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are the largest group of insect hormones. They are produced in the central and peripheral nervous systems and affect insect development, reproduction, feeding and behavior. A variety of neuropeptide families have been identified in insects. One of these families is the PBAN/pyrokinin family defined by a common FXPRLamide or similar amino acid fragment at the C-terminal end. These peptides, found in all insects studied thus far, have been conserved throughout evolution. The most well studied physiological function is regulation of moth sex pheromone biosynthesis through the Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neurohormone (PBAN, although several developmental functions have also been reported. Over the past years we have extended knowledge of the PBAN/pyrokinin family of peptides to ants, focusing mainly on the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. The fire ant is one of the most studied social insects and over the last 60 years a great deal has been learned about many aspects of this ant, including the behaviors and chemistry of pheromone communication. However, virtually nothing is known about the regulation of these pheromone systems. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of PBAN/pyrokinin immunoreactive neurons in the fire ant, and identified and characterized PBAN and additional neuropeptides. We have mapped the fire ant PBAN gene structure and determined the tissue expression level in the central nervous system of the ant. We review here our research to date on the molecular structure and diversity of ant PBAN/pyrokinin peptides in preparation for determining the function of the neuropeptides in ants and other social insects.

  11. Population genetic structure in six sympatric and widespread aquatic plants inhabiting diverse lake environments in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian-Jin; Mei, Fang-Fang; Wang, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Many aquatic plant species are distributed over large areas and diverse environments with populations interconnected by abiotic and biotic mediators. Here, we examined differences and similarities in the population genetic structure of six sympatric and widespread aquatic plant species. We sampled the aquatic species from six Chinese lakes found on plateaus, plains, and different river systems and analyzed them using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Samples originating from each lake tended to cluster together. Of the six species, only Nymphoides peltata and Myriophyllum spicatum could be divided into plateau and plain groups, once Taihu Lake individuals were excluded. Genetic similarities between populations connected by the Yangtze River were not consistently higher than unconnected populations. Populations from Taihu Lake and/or Weishanhu Lake were distant from other lake populations for all species except Potamogeton lucens . The Taihu and Weishanhu populations clustered for Ceratophyllum demersum and Typha latifolia . Hydrophilous C. demersum had the lowest gene flow ( Nm  = 0.913), whereas the entomophilous Hydrocharis dubia ( Nm  = 2.084) and N. peltata ( Nm  = 2.204) had the highest gene flow. The genetic relationships among distant populations of aquatic plants reflect the comprehensive effects of environmental selection pressure and biotic and abiotic connectivity. Differences in environmental factors between plateau and plain lakes and long distance hydrochory have limited importance on aquatic plant genetic structures. Among multiple evolutionary forces, gene flow mediated by birds may play the most important role in the formation of genetic patterns in the six species examined. For example, the close genetic relationship between Taihu Lake and Weishanhu Lake populations, each in different river systems and with different climates, may be related to the migration routes of birds. Differences in gene flow among the six aquatic plants

  12. Clonal growth strategy, diversity and structure: A spatiotemporal response to sedimentation in tropical Cyperus papyrus swamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremew, Addisie; Stiers, Iris; Sierens, Tim; Kefalew, Alemayehu; Triest, Ludwig

    2018-01-01

    Land degradation and soil erosion in the upper catchments of tropical lakes fringed by papyrus vegetation can result in a sediment load gradient from land to lakeward. Understanding the dynamics of clonal modules (ramets and genets) and growth strategies of plants on such a gradient in both space and time is critical for exploring a species adaptation and processes regulating population structure and differentiation. We assessed the spatial and temporal dynamics in clonal growth, diversity, and structure of an emergent macrophyte, Cyperus papyrus (papyrus), in response to two contrasting sedimentation regimes by combining morphological traits and genotype data using 20 microsatellite markers. A total of 636 ramets from six permanent plots (18 x 30 m) in three Ethiopian papyrus swamps, each with discrete sedimentation regimes (high vs. low) were sampled for two years. We found that ramets under the high sedimentation regime (HSR) were significantly clumped and denser than the sparse and spreading ramets under the low sedimentation regime (LSR). The HSR resulted in significantly different ramets with short culm height and girth diameter as compared to the LSR. These results indicated that C. papyrus ameliorates the effect of sedimentation by shifting clonal growth strategy from guerrilla (in LSR) to phalanx (in HSR). Clonal richness, size, dominance, and clonal subrange differed significantly between sediment regimes and studied time periods. Each swamp under HSR revealed a significantly high clonal richness (R = 0.80) as compared to the LSR (R = 0.48). Such discrepancy in clonal richness reflected the occurrence of initial and repeated seedling recruitment strategies as a response to different sedimentation regimes. Overall, our spatial and short-term temporal observations highlighted that HSR enhances clonal richness and decreases clonal subrange owing to repeated seedling recruitment and genets turnover.

  13. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Lolium Species Surveyed on Nuclear Simple Sequence Repeat and Cytoplasmic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Cai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the genetic diversity and population structure of Lolium species, we used 32 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR markers and 7 cytoplasmic gene markers to analyze a total of 357 individuals from 162 accessions of 9 Lolium species. This survey revealed a high level of polymorphism, with an average number of alleles per locus of 23.59 and 5.29 and an average PIC-value of 0.83 and 0.54 for nuclear SSR markers and cytoplasmic gene markers, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 16.27 and 16.53% of the total variation was due to differences among species, with the remaining 56.35 and 83.47% due to differences within species and 27.39 and 0% due to differences within individuals in 32 nuclear SSR markers set and 6 chloroplast gene markers set, respectively. The 32 nuclear SSR markers detected three subpopulations among 357 individuals, whereas the 6 chloroplast gene markers revealed three subpopulations among 160 accessions in the STRUCTURE analysis. In the clustering analysis, the three inbred species clustered into a single group, whereas the outbreeding species were clearly divided, especially according to nuclear SSR markers. In addition, almost all Lolium multiflorum populations were clustered into group C4, which could be further divided into three subgroups, whereas Lolium perenne populations primarily clustered into two groups (C2 and C3, with a few lines that instead grouped with L. multiflorum (C4 or Lolium rigidum (C6. Together, these results will useful for the use of Lolium germplasm for improvement and increase the effectiveness of ryegrass breeding.

  14. Clonal growth strategy, diversity and structure: A spatiotemporal response to sedimentation in tropical Cyperus papyrus swamps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addisie Geremew

    Full Text Available Land degradation and soil erosion in the upper catchments of tropical lakes fringed by papyrus vegetation can result in a sediment load gradient from land to lakeward. Understanding the dynamics of clonal modules (ramets and genets and growth strategies of plants on such a gradient in both space and time is critical for exploring a species adaptation and processes regulating population structure and differentiation. We assessed the spatial and temporal dynamics in clonal growth, diversity, and structure of an emergent macrophyte, Cyperus papyrus (papyrus, in response to two contrasting sedimentation regimes by combining morphological traits and genotype data using 20 microsatellite markers. A total of 636 ramets from six permanent plots (18 x 30 m in three Ethiopian papyrus swamps, each with discrete sedimentation regimes (high vs. low were sampled for two years. We found that ramets under the high sedimentation regime (HSR were significantly clumped and denser than the sparse and spreading ramets under the low sedimentation regime (LSR. The HSR resulted in significantly different ramets with short culm height and girth diameter as compared to the LSR. These results indicated that C. papyrus ameliorates the effect of sedimentation by shifting clonal growth strategy from guerrilla (in LSR to phalanx (in HSR. Clonal richness, size, dominance, and clonal subrange differed significantly between sediment regimes and studied time periods. Each swamp under HSR revealed a significantly high clonal richness (R = 0.80 as compared to the LSR (R = 0.48. Such discrepancy in clonal richness reflected the occurrence of initial and repeated seedling recruitment strategies as a response to different sedimentation regimes. Overall, our spatial and short-term temporal observations highlighted that HSR enhances clonal richness and decreases clonal subrange owing to repeated seedling recruitment and genets turnover.

  15. Diversity of eukaryotic DNA replication origins revealed by genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Berbenetz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA replication origins differ both in their efficiency and in the characteristic time during S phase when they become active. The biological basis for these differences remains unknown, but they could be a consequence of chromatin structure. The availability of genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions has led to an explosion of information about how nucleosomes are assembled at transcription start sites, but no similar maps exist for DNA replication origins. Here we combine high-resolution genome-wide nucleosome maps with comprehensive annotations of DNA replication origins to identify patterns of nucleosome occupancy at eukaryotic replication origins. On average, replication origins contain a nucleosome depleted region centered next to the ACS element, flanked on both sides by arrays of well-positioned nucleosomes. Our analysis identified DNA sequence properties that correlate with nucleosome occupancy at replication origins genome-wide and that are correlated with the nucleosome-depleted region. Clustering analysis of all annotated replication origins revealed a surprising diversity of nucleosome occupancy patterns. We provide evidence that the origin recognition complex, which binds to the origin, acts as a barrier element to position and phase nucleosomes on both sides of the origin. Finally, analysis of chromatin reconstituted in vitro reveals that origins are inherently nucleosome depleted. Together our data provide a comprehensive, genome-wide view of chromatin structure at replication origins and suggest a model of nucleosome positioning at replication origins in which the underlying sequence occludes nucleosomes to permit binding of the origin recognition complex, which then (likely in concert with nucleosome modifiers and remodelers positions nucleosomes adjacent to the origin to promote replication origin function.

  16. Changes in structural and functional diversity of nematode communities during a spring phytoplankton bloom in the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanaverbeke, J.; Steyaert, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Rousseau, V.; van Gansbeke, D.; Parent, J-Y.; Vincx, M.

    2004-01-01

    The response of nematode communities to the sedimentation of a spring phytoplankton bloom in a sandy, well-oxygenated sediment at a single station (station 330) in the Southern North Sea was investigated monthly from early March to July 1999. Both structural (nematode density, diversity, vertical

  17. The Influence of Ethnic Diversity on Social Network Structure in a Common-Pool Resource System: Implications for Collaborative Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Barnes-Mauthe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Social networks have recently been identified as key features in facilitating or constraining collaborative arrangements that can enhance resource governance and adaptability in complex social-ecological systems. Nonetheless, the effect of ethnicity on social network structure in an ethnically diverse common-pool resource system is virtually unknown. We characterize the entire social network of Hawaii's longline fishery, an ethnically diverse competitive pelagic fishery, and investigate network homophily, network structure, and cross-scale linkages. Results show that ethnicity significantly influences social network structure and is responsible for a homophily effect, which can create challenges for stakeholder collaboration across groups. Our analysis also suggests that ethnicity influences the formation of diverse network structures, and can affect the level of linkages to outside industry leaders, government or management officials, and members of the scientific community. This study provides the first empirical examination of the impact of ethnic diversity on resource user's social networks in the common-pool resource literature, having important implications for collaborative resource management.

  18. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis of spinach by single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified through genotyping-by-sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., 2n=2x=12) is an economically important vegetable crop worldwide and one of the healthiest vegetables due to its high concentrations of nutrients and mineral compounds. The objective of this research is to conduct genetic diversity and population structure analysis of w...

  19. Lack of congruence in species diversity indices and community structures of planktonic groups based on local environmental factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Doi

    Full Text Available The importance of analyzing the determinants of biodiversity and community composition by using multiple trophic levels is well recognized; however, relevant data are lacking. In the present study, we investigated variations in species diversity indices and community structures of the plankton taxonomic groups-zooplankton, rotifers, ciliates, and phytoplankton-under a range of local environmental factors in pond ecosystems. For each planktonic group, we estimated the species diversity index by using linear models and analyzed the community structure by using canonical correspondence analysis. We showed that the species diversity indices and community structures varied among the planktonic groups and according to local environmental factors. The observed lack of congruence among the planktonic groups may have been caused by niche competition between groups with similar trophic guilds or by weak trophic interactions. Our findings highlight the difficulty of predicting total biodiversity within a system, based upon a single taxonomic group. Thus, to conserve the biodiversity of an ecosystem, it is crucial to consider variations in species diversity indices and community structures of different taxonomic groups, under a range of local conditions.

  20. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of an Epiphytic Bromeliad in Costa Rican Montane Secondary Forest Patches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cascante-Marín, A.; Oostermeijer, G.; Wolf, J.; Fuchs, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Information on genetic variation and its distribution in tropical plant populations relies mainly on studies of ground-rooted species, while genetic information of epiphytic plants is still limited. Particularly, the effect of forest successional condition on genetic diversity and structure of

  1. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Structure of Large Garlic (Allium sativum) Germplasm Bank, by Diversity Arrays Technology "Genotyping-by-Sequencing" Platform (DArTseq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Leticia A; Mérida-García, Rosa; Kilian, Andrzej; Hernandez, Pilar; Dorado, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Garlic ( Allium sativum ) is used worldwide in cooking and industry, including pharmacology/medicine and cosmetics, for its interesting properties. Identifying redundancies in germplasm blanks to generate core collections is a major concern, mostly in large stocks, in order to reduce space and maintenance costs. Yet, similar appearance and phenotypic plasticity of garlic varieties hinder their morphological classification. Molecular studies are challenging, due to the large and expected complex genome of this species, with asexual reproduction. Classical molecular markers, like isozymes, RAPD, SSR, or AFLP, are not convenient to generate germplasm core-collections for this species. The recent emergence of high-throughput genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approaches, like DArTseq, allow to overcome such limitations to characterize and protect genetic diversity. Therefore, such technology was used in this work to: (i) assess genetic diversity and structure of a large garlic-germplasm bank (417 accessions); (ii) create a core collection; (iii) relate genotype to agronomical features; and (iv) describe a cost-effective method to manage genetic diversity in garlic-germplasm banks. Hierarchical-cluster analysis, principal-coordinates analysis and STRUCTURE showed general consistency, generating three main garlic-groups, mostly determined by variety and geographical origin. In addition, high-resolution genotyping identified 286 unique and 131 redundant accessions, used to select a reduced size germplasm-bank core collection. This demonstrates that DArTseq is a cost-effective method to analyze species with large and expected complex genomes, like garlic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high-throughput genotyping of a large garlic germplasm. This is particularly interesting for garlic adaptation and improvement, to fight biotic and abiotic stresses, in the current context of climate change and global warming.

  2. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Structure of Large Garlic (Allium sativum) Germplasm Bank, by Diversity Arrays Technology “Genotyping-by-Sequencing” Platform (DArTseq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Leticia A.; Mérida-García, Rosa; Kilian, Andrzej; Hernandez, Pilar; Dorado, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is used worldwide in cooking and industry, including pharmacology/medicine and cosmetics, for its interesting properties. Identifying redundancies in germplasm blanks to generate core collections is a major concern, mostly in large stocks, in order to reduce space and maintenance costs. Yet, similar appearance and phenotypic plasticity of garlic varieties hinder their morphological classification. Molecular studies are challenging, due to the large and expected complex genome of this species, with asexual reproduction. Classical molecular markers, like isozymes, RAPD, SSR, or AFLP, are not convenient to generate germplasm core-collections for this species. The recent emergence of high-throughput genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approaches, like DArTseq, allow to overcome such limitations to characterize and protect genetic diversity. Therefore, such technology was used in this work to: (i) assess genetic diversity and structure of a large garlic-germplasm bank (417 accessions); (ii) create a core collection; (iii) relate genotype to agronomical features; and (iv) describe a cost-effective method to manage genetic diversity in garlic-germplasm banks. Hierarchical-cluster analysis, principal-coordinates analysis and STRUCTURE showed general consistency, generating three main garlic-groups, mostly determined by variety and geographical origin. In addition, high-resolution genotyping identified 286 unique and 131 redundant accessions, used to select a reduced size germplasm-bank core collection. This demonstrates that DArTseq is a cost-effective method to analyze species with large and expected complex genomes, like garlic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high-throughput genotyping of a large garlic germplasm. This is particularly interesting for garlic adaptation and improvement, to fight biotic and abiotic stresses, in the current context of climate change and global warming. PMID:28775737

  3. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Structure of Large Garlic (Allium sativum Germplasm Bank, by Diversity Arrays Technology “Genotyping-by-Sequencing” Platform (DArTseq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia A. Egea

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum is used worldwide in cooking and industry, including pharmacology/medicine and cosmetics, for its interesting properties. Identifying redundancies in germplasm blanks to generate core collections is a major concern, mostly in large stocks, in order to reduce space and maintenance costs. Yet, similar appearance and phenotypic plasticity of garlic varieties hinder their morphological classification. Molecular studies are challenging, due to the large and expected complex genome of this species, with asexual reproduction. Classical molecular markers, like isozymes, RAPD, SSR, or AFLP, are not convenient to generate germplasm core-collections for this species. The recent emergence of high-throughput genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS approaches, like DArTseq, allow to overcome such limitations to characterize and protect genetic diversity. Therefore, such technology was used in this work to: (i assess genetic diversity and structure of a large garlic-germplasm bank (417 accessions; (ii create a core collection; (iii relate genotype to agronomical features; and (iv describe a cost-effective method to manage genetic diversity in garlic-germplasm banks. Hierarchical-cluster analysis, principal-coordinates analysis and STRUCTURE showed general consistency, generating three main garlic-groups, mostly determined by variety and geographical origin. In addition, high-resolution genotyping identified 286 unique and 131 redundant accessions, used to select a reduced size germplasm-bank core collection. This demonstrates that DArTseq is a cost-effective method to analyze species with large and expected complex genomes, like garlic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high-throughput genotyping of a large garlic germplasm. This is particularly interesting for garlic adaptation and improvement, to fight biotic and abiotic stresses, in the current context of climate change and global warming.

  4. Scale-specific correlations between habitat heterogeneity and soil fauna diversity along a landscape structure gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbergen, Adam J; Watt, Allan D; Mitchell, Ruth; Truscott, Anne-Marie; Palmer, Stephen C F; Ivits, Eva; Eggleton, Paul; Jones, T Hefin; Sousa, José Paulo

    2007-09-01

    Habitat heterogeneity contributes to the maintenance of diversity, but the extent that landscape-scale rather than local-scale heterogeneity influences the diversity of soil invertebrates-species with small range sizes-is less clear. Using a Scottish habitat heterogeneity gradient we correlated Collembola and lumbricid worm species richness and abundance with different elements (forest cover, habitat richness and patchiness) and qualities (plant species richness, soil variables) of habitat heterogeneity, at landscape (1 km(2)) and local (up to 200 m(2)) scales. Soil fauna assemblages showed considerable turnover in species composition along this habitat heterogeneity gradient. Soil fauna species richness and turnover was greatest in landscapes that were a mosaic of habitats. Soil fauna diversity was hump-shaped along a gradient of forest cover, peaking where there was a mixture of forest and open habitats in the landscape. Landscape-scale habitat richness was positively correlated with lumbricid diversity, while Collembola and lumbricid abundances were negatively and positively related to landscape spatial patchiness. Furthermore, soil fauna diversity was positively correlated with plant diversity, which in turn peaked in the sites that were a mosaic of forest and open habitat patches. There was less evidence that local-scale habitat variables (habitat richness, tree cover, plant species richness, litter cover, soil pH, depth of organic horizon) affected soil fauna diversity: Collembola diversity was independent of all these measures, while lumbricid diversity positively and negatively correlated with vascular plant species richness and tree canopy density. Landscape-scale habitat heterogeneity affects soil diversity regardless of taxon, while the influence of habitat heterogeneity at local scales is dependent on taxon identity, and hence ecological traits, e.g. body size. Landscape-scale habitat heterogeneity by providing different niches and refuges, together

  5. Contrasting genetic diversity and population structure among three sympatric Madagascan shorebirds: parallels with rarity, endemism, and dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Luke J; Hoffman, Joseph I; Brede, Edward G; Zefania, Sama; Kamrad, Martina J; Székely, Tamás; Bruford, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the relative contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors to population structure and genetic diversity is a central goal of conservation and evolutionary genetics. One way to achieve this is through comparative population genetic analysis of sympatric sister taxa, which allows evaluation of intrinsic factors such as population demography and life history while controlling for phylogenetic relatedness and geography. We used ten conserved microsatellites to explore the population structure and genetic diversity of three sympatric and closely related plover species in southwestern Madagascar: Kittlitz's plover (Charadrius pecuarius), white-fronted plover (C. marginatus), and Madagascar plover (C. thoracicus). Bayesian clustering revealed strong population structure in the rare and endemic Madagascar plover, intermediate population structure in the white-fronted plover, and no detectable population structure in the geographically widespread Kittlitz's plover. In contrast, allelic richness and heterozygosity were highest for the Kittlitz's plover, intermediate for the white-fronted plover and lowest for the Madagascar plover. No evidence was found in support of the "watershed mechanism" proposed to facilitate vicariant divergence of Madagascan lemurs and reptiles, which we attribute to the vagility of birds. However, we found a significant pattern of genetic isolation by distance among populations of the Madagascar plover, but not for the other two species. These findings suggest that interspecific variation in rarity, endemism, and dispersal propensity may influence genetic structure and diversity, even in highly vagile species.

  6. Low genetic diversity and strong population structure shaped by anthropogenic habitat fragmentation in a critically endangered primate, Trachypithecus leucocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Qiao, Y; Li, S; Pan, W; Yao, M

    2017-06-01

    Habitat fragmentation may strongly impact population genetic structure and reduce the genetic diversity and viability of small and isolated populations. The white-headed langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus) is a critically endangered primate species living in a highly fragmented and human-modified habitat in southern China. We examined the population genetic structure and genetic diversity of the species and investigated the environmental and anthropogenic factors that may have shaped its population structure. We used 214 unique multi-locus genotypes from 41 social groups across the main distribution area of T. leucocephalus, and found strong genetic structure and significant genetic differentiation among local populations. Our landscape genetic analyses using a causal modelling framework suggest that a large habitat gap and geographical distance represent the primary landscape elements shaping genetic structure, yet high levels of genetic differentiation also exist between patches separated by a small habitat gap or road. This is the first comprehensive study that has evaluated the population genetic structure and diversity of T. leucocephalus using nuclear markers. Our results indicate strong negative impacts of anthropogenic land modifications and habitat fragmentation on primate genetic connectivity between forest patches. Our analyses suggest that two management units of the species could be defined, and indicate that habitat continuity should be enforced and restored to reduce genetic isolation and enhance population viability.

  7. Floristic diversity and structural characteristics of the mangrove forests of Raja Ampat,West Papua, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhardjono Prawiroatmodjo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied  the floristic composition and structure of mangrove forests and mangrove species distribution at the Raja Ampat Regency, West Papua. We sampled the forests using (10×10 m quadrats to record trees and saplings  laid out contiguously along 9 transects of 60 – 450 m long,  stretching perpendicularly from the coastlines or riverbanks to the landward borders. Seedlings were sampled using a 1×1 m subplot nested in each quadrat. The transects were established on the islands of  Batanta (6, Salawati  (2 and Waigeo (1.  Within quadrats and transects we recorded 17 mangrove species of trees with density of 768 stems/ha and basal area of  37.82 m2/ha and tree height of  10 – 30 m.   Two species possessed  the highest importance value  (IV , frequency, density and basal area  i.e. Rhizophora apiculata (IV = 168.06% and  Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (IV = 67.18%.  They also showed the highest similarity in their distribution,  indicating highest degree of association.  The mangrove at Raja Ampat may, therefore,  be designated as the Rhizophora apiculata – Bruguiera gymnorrhiza association. Other species with highest degree of distributional similarities but with low densities, basal areas and importance values were Barringtonia racemosa, Excoecaria agallocha, Hibiscus tiliaceus, Inocarpus fagifera, Lumnitzera littorea and Sterculia shillinglawii, of which four of them are not  true mangrove species, usually growing on less saline and more solid soils. The floristic composition of the transects in the three islands showed relatively high similarities of about 70% and at higher similarities the transects in Batanta Island formed four groups, Salawati Island two groups and Waigeo Island one group. The Bray-Curtis polar ordination  resulted in four groups  of transects, which were related to the habitat  conditions and the length of the transects. Species diversity in the islands was very low, where the  Shannon diversity

  8. Calcium-dependent inhibition of T-type calcium channels by TRPV1 activation in rat sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunanza, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio; Marcantoni, Andrea; Sher, Emanuele; Ursu, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    We studied the inhibitory effects of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) activation by capsaicin on low-voltage-activated (LVA, T-type) Ca(2+) channel and high-voltage-activated (HVA; L, N, P/Q, R) currents in rat DRG sensory neurons, as a potential mechanism underlying capsaicin-induced analgesia. T-type and HVA currents were elicited in whole-cell clamped DRG neurons using ramp commands applied before and after 30-s exposures to 1 μM capsaicin. T-type currents were estimated at the first peak of the I-V characteristics and HVA at the second peak, occurring at more positive potentials. Small and medium-sized DRG neurons responded to capsaicin producing transient inward currents of variable amplitudes, mainly carried by Ca(2+). In those cells responding to capsaicin with a large Ca(2+) influx (59% of the total), a marked inhibition of both T-type and HVA Ca(2+) currents was observed. The percentage of T-type and HVA channel inhibition was prevented by replacing Ca(2+) with Ba(2+) during capsaicin application or applying high doses of intracellular BAPTA (20 mM), suggesting that TRPV1-mediated inhibition of T-type and HVA channels is Ca(2+)-dependent and likely confined to membrane nano-microdomains. Our data are consistent with the idea that TRPV1-induced analgesia may derive from indirect inhibition of both T-type and HVA channels which, in turn, would reduce the threshold of nociceptive signals generation (T-type channel inhibition) and nociceptive synaptic transmission (HVA-channels inhibition).

  9. Conserving Tropical Tree Diversity and Forest Structure: The Value of Small Rainforest Patches in Moderately-Managed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ruedas, Manuel A.; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Meave, Jorge A.; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Ibarra-Manríquez, Guillermo; Martínez, Esteban; Jamangapé, Gilberto; Melo, Felipe P. L.; Santos, Bráulio A.

    2014-01-01

    Rainforests are undergoing severe deforestation and fragmentation worldwide. A huge amount of small forest patches are being created, but their value in conserving biodiversity and forest structure is still controversial. Here, we demonstrate that in a species-rich and moderately-managed Mexican tropical landscape small rainforest patches (<100 ha) can be highly valuable for the conservation of tree diversity and forest structure. These patches showed diverse communities of native plants, including endangered species, and a new record for the country. Although the number of logged trees increased in smaller patches, patch size was a poor indicator of basal area, stem density, number of species, genera and families, and community evenness. Cumulative species-area curves indicated that all patches had a similar contribution to the regional species diversity. This idea also was supported by the fact that patches strongly differed in floristic composition (high β-diversity), independently of patch size. Thus, in agreement with the land-sharing approach, our findings support that small forest patches in moderately-managed landscapes should be included in conservation initiatives to maintain landscape heterogeneity, species diversity, and ecosystem services. PMID:24901954

  10. Genetic diversity and structure of Dalmatian pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium Trevir./Sch./Bip., Asteraceae) within the Balkan refugium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grdiša, Martina; Liber, Zlatko; Radosavljević, Ivan; Carović-Stanko, Klaudija; Kolak, Ivan; Satovic, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    Dalmatian pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium Trevir./Sch./Bip.) is an outcrossing, perennial insecticidal plant, restricted to the eastern Adriatic coast (Mediterranean). Amplified fragment-length polymorphisms (AFLP) were used to investigate the genetic diversity and structure within and among 20 natural plant populations. The highest level of gene diversity, the number of private alleles and the frequency down-weighted marker values (DW) were found in northern Adriatic populations and gradually decreased towards the southern boundary of the species range. Genetic impoverishment of these southern populations is most likely the result of human-related activities. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that most of the genetic diversity was attributed to differences among individuals within populations (85.78%), which are expected due to the outcrossing nature of the species. A Bayesian analysis of the population structure identified two dominant genetic clusters. A spatial analysis of the genetic diversity indicated that 5.6% of the genetic differentiation resulted from isolation by distance (IBD), while 12.3% of the genetic differentiation among populations followed the pattern of isolation by environmental distance (IBED). Knowledge of the genetic diversity patterns of the natural populations and the mechanism behind these patterns is required for the exploitation and possible conservation management of this endemic and economically important species.

  11. The threatened epiphytic lichen Lobaria pulmonaria in the Iberian Peninsula: genetic diversity and structure across a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora, Mónica A G; Belinchón, Rocío; Prieto, María; Aragón, Gregorio; Izquierdo, Patricia; Martínez, Isabel

    2015-09-01

    The current genetic diversity and structure of a species plays a marked role in the species' future response to environmental changes. Identification of the factors that might ensure the long-term viability of populations along its distribution area is therefore important for conserving biodiversity. In this work, infraspecific genetic diversity and structure of the threatened lichen Lobaria pulmonaria was investigated along a latitudinal gradient, spanning the Spanish latitudinal range of L. pulmonaria. Eighteen populations in Northern, Central, and Southern Spain were analysed using six specific fungal microsatellites of L. pulmonaria. Genetic diversity indices were calculated and compared among populations. Genetic differentiation was assessed using AMOVA and Bayesian methods. Additionally, a redundancy analysis was used to estimate the relative importance of environmental factors on the genetic variation among populations. Annual precipitation was the only factor affecting the genetic diversity probably through its influence on population and thallus size of L. pulmonaria, and significantly higher levels of genetic diversity were detected in southern populations. Isolation by distance was not significant, being environmental variables most important factors controlling genetic variation in L. pulmonaria populations. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic diversity and structure of Dalmatian pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium Trevir./Sch./Bip., Asteraceae within the Balkan refugium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Grdiša

    Full Text Available Dalmatian pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium Trevir./Sch./Bip. is an outcrossing, perennial insecticidal plant, restricted to the eastern Adriatic coast (Mediterranean. Amplified fragment-length polymorphisms (AFLP were used to investigate the genetic diversity and structure within and among 20 natural plant populations. The highest level of gene diversity, the number of private alleles and the frequency down-weighted marker values (DW were found in northern Adriatic populations and gradually decreased towards the southern boundary of the species range. Genetic impoverishment of these southern populations is most likely the result of human-related activities. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicated that most of the genetic diversity was attributed to differences among individuals within populations (85.78%, which are expected due to the outcrossing nature of the species. A Bayesian analysis of the population structure identified two dominant genetic clusters. A spatial analysis of the genetic diversity indicated that 5.6% of the genetic differentiation resulted from isolation by distance (IBD, while 12.3% of the genetic differentiation among populations followed the pattern of isolation by environmental distance (IBED. Knowledge of the genetic diversity patterns of the natural populations and the mechanism behind these patterns is required for the exploitation and possible conservation management of this endemic and economically important species.

  13. Genetic diversity, seed size associations and population structure of a core collection of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; Díaz, Lucy M; Buendía, Hector F; Duque, Myriam C

    2009-10-01

    Cultivated common bean germplasm is especially diverse due to the parallel domestication of two genepools in the Mesoamerican and Andean centers of diversity and introgression between these gene pools. Classification into morphological races has helped to provide a framework for utilization of this cultivated germplasm. Meanwhile, core collections along with molecular markers are useful tools for organizing and analyzing representative sets of these genotypes. In this study, we evaluated 604 accessions from the CIAT core germplasm collection representing wide genetic variability from both primary and secondary centers of diversity with a newly developed, fluorescent microsatellite marker set of 36 genomic and gene-based SSRs to determine molecular diversity and with seed protein analysis to determine phaseolin alleles. The entire collection could be divided into two genepools and five predominant races with the division between the Mesoamerica race and the Durango-Jalisco group showing strong support within the Mesoamerican genepool and the Nueva Granada and Peru races showing less diversity overall and some between-group admixture within the Andean genepool. The Chile race could not be distinguished within the Andean genepool but there was support for the Guatemala race within the Mesoamerican genepool and this race was unique in its high level of diversity and distance from other Mesoamerican races. Based on this population structure, significant associations were found between SSR loci and seed size characteristics, some on the same linkage group as the phaseolin locus, which previously had been associated with seed size, or in other regions of the genome. In conclusion, this study has shown that common bean has very significant population structure that can help guide the construction of genetic crosses that maximize diversity as well as serving as a basis for additional association studies.

  14. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) inhibits voltage-gated T-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, M; Gilbert, G; Lory, P; Marthan, R; Quignard, J F; Savineau, J P

    2012-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form, DHEAS, are the most abundant steroid hormones in the mammalian blood flow. DHEA may have beneficial effects in various pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular diseases or deterioration of the sense of well-being. However to date, the cellular mechanism underlying DHEA action remains elusive and may involve ion channel modulation. In this study, we have characterized the effect of DHEA on T-type voltage-activated calcium channels (T-channels), which are involved in several cardiovascular and neuronal diseases. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that DHEA inhibits the three recombinant T-channels (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2 and Ca(V)3.3) expressed in NG108-15 cell line, as well as native T-channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. This effect of DHEA is both concentration (IC(50) between 2 and 7μM) and voltage-dependent and results in a significant shift of the steady-state inactivation curves toward hyperpolarized potentials. Consequently, DHEA reduces window T-current and inhibits membrane potential oscillations induced by Ca(V)3 channels. DHEA inhibition is not dependent on the activation of nuclear androgen or estrogen receptors and implicates a PTX-sensitive Gi protein pathway. Functionally, DHEA and the T-type inhibitor NNC 55-0396 inhibited KCl-induced contraction of pulmonary artery rings and their effect was not cumulative. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that DHEA inhibits T-channels by a Gi protein dependent pathway. DHEA-induced alteration in T-channel activity could thus account for its therapeutic action and/or physiological effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of historical and contemporary processes on phylogeographic structure and genetic diversity in the Northern Cardinal, Cardinalis cardinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro-Sigüenza Adolfo G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earth history events such as climate change are believed to have played a major role in shaping patterns of genetic structure and diversity in species. However, there is a lag between the time of historical events and the collection of present-day samples that are used to infer contemporary population structure. During this lag phase contemporary processes such as dispersal or non-random mating can erase or reinforce population differences generated by historical events. In this study we evaluate the role of both historical and contemporary processes on the phylogeography of a widespread North American songbird, the Northern Cardinal, Cardinalis cardinalis. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed deep mtDNA structure with six lineages across the species' range. Ecological niche models supported the same geographic breaks revealed by the mtDNA. A paleoecological niche model for the Last Glacial Maximum indicated that cardinals underwent a dramatic range reduction in eastern North America, whereas their ranges were more stable in México. In eastern North America cardinals expanded out of glacial refugia, but we found no signature of decreased genetic diversity in areas colonized after the Last Glacial Maximum. Present-day demographic data suggested that population growth across the expansion cline is positively correlated with latitude. We propose that there was no loss of genetic diversity in areas colonized after the Last Glacial Maximum because recent high-levels of gene flow across the region have homogenized genetic diversity in eastern North America. Conclusion We show that both deep historical events as well as demographic processes that occurred following these events are critical in shaping genetic pattern and diversity in C. cardinalis. The general implication of our results is that patterns of genetic diversity are best understood when information on species history, ecology, and demography are considered

  16. Genetic diversity and structure of the zombi pea (Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich) gene pool based on SSR marker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachapak, Sujinna; Somta, Prakit; Poonchaivilaisak, Supalak; Yimram, Tarika; Srinives, Peerasak

    2017-04-01

    Zombi pea (Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich) is an underutilized legume species and a useful gene source for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, although there is little understanding on its genetic diversity and structure. In this study, 422 (408 wild and 14 cultivated) accessions of zombi pea from diverse origins (201 from Africa, 126 from America, 85 from Australia, 5 from Asia and 5 from unknown origin) were analyzed with 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to determine its genetic diversity and genetic structure. The SSR markers detected 273 alleles in total with a mean of 13.6 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content values of the markers varied from 0.58 to 0.90 with an average of 0.76. Overall gene diversity was 0.715. Gene diversity and average allelic richness was highest in Africa (0.749 and 8.08, respectively) and lowest in America (0.435 and 4.10, respectively). Nei's genetic distance analysis revealed that the highest distance was between wild Australia and cultivated Africa (0.559), followed by wild West Africa and wild Australia (0.415). STRUCTURE, neighbor-joining (NJ), and principal coordinate analyses consistently showed that these zombi pea accessions were clustered into three major groups, viz. America, Africa and Asia, and Australia. NJ tree also suggested that American and Australian accessions are originated from East African zombi peas, and that the cultivated accessions from Africa and Asia were genetically distinct, while those from America were clustered with some cultivated accessions from Africa. These results suggest that Africa is the center of origin and diversity of zombi pea, and that domestication of this pea took place more than once in different regions.

  17. Bacterial diversity and community structure of a sub-surface aquifer exposed to realistic low herbicide concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipthay, Julia R. de; Johnsen, Kaare; Albrechtsen, H.-J.

    2004-01-01

    -surface aquifers to realistic low concentrations of herbicides may alter the overall structure of a natural bacterial community, although significant effects on the genetic diversity and carbon substrate usage cannot be detected. The observed impact was probably due to indirect effects. In future investigations...... community analyses. In contrast, no significant effect was found on the bacterial diversity, except for the culturable fraction where a significantly increased richness and Shannon index was found in the herbicide acclimated sediments. The results of this study show that in situ exposure of sub...

  18. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis of spinach by single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified through genotyping-by-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainong Shi

    Full Text Available Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., 2n = 2x = 12 is an economically important vegetable crop worldwide and one of the healthiest vegetables due to its high concentrations of nutrients and minerals. The objective of this research was to conduct genetic diversity and population structure analysis of a collection of world-wide spinach genotypes using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs markers. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS was used to discover SNPs in spinach genotypes. Three sets of spinach genotypes were used: 1 268 USDA GRIN spinach germplasm accessions originally collected from 30 countries; 2 45 commercial spinach F1 hybrids from three countries; and 3 30 US Arkansas spinach cultivars/breeding lines. The results from this study indicated that there was genetic diversity among the 343 spinach genotypes tested. Furthermore, the genetic background in improved commercial F1 hybrids and in Arkansas cultivars/lines had a different structured populations from the USDA germplasm. In addition, the genetic diversity and population structures were associated with geographic origin and germplasm from the US Arkansas breeding program had a unique genetic background. These data could provide genetic diversity information and the molecular markers for selecting parents in spinach breeding programs.

  19. Development of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moges, Asmare D.; Admassu, Belayneh; Belew, Derbew; Yesuf, Mohammed; Njuguna, Joyce; Kyalo, Martina; Ghimire, Sita R.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for citrus plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and were used to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of 163 isolates from four different geographical regions of Ethiopia. These loci produced a total of 118 alleles with an average of 5.13 alleles per microsatellite marker. The polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.104 to 0.597 with an average of 0.371. The average observed heterozygosity across all loci varied from 0.046 to 0.058. The gene diversity among the loci ranged from 0.106 to 0.664. Unweighted Neighbor-joining and population structure analysis grouped these 163 isolates into three major groups. The clusters were not according to the geographic origin of the isolates. Analysis of molecular variance showed 85% of the total variation within populations and only 5% among populations. There was low genetic differentiation in the total populations (FST = 0.049) as evidenced by high level of gene flow estimate (Nm = 4.8 per generation) among populations. The results show that Ethiopian C. gloeosporioides populations are generally characterized by a low level of genetic diversity. The newly developed microsatellite markers were useful in analyzing the genetic diversity and population structure of the C. gloeosporioides populations. Information obtained from this study could be useful as a base to design strategies for better management of leaf and fruit spot disease of citrus in Ethiopia. PMID:26978654

  20. PHACCS, an online tool for estimating the structure and diversity of uncultured viral communities using metagenomic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salamon Peter

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phages, viruses that infect prokaryotes, are the most abundant microbes in the world. A major limitation to studying these viruses is the difficulty of cultivating the appropriate prokaryotic hosts. One way around this limitation is to directly clone and sequence shotgun libraries of uncultured viral communities (i.e., metagenomic analyses. PHACCS http://phage.sdsu.edu/phaccs, Phage Communities from Contig Spectrum, is an online bioinformatic tool to assess the biodiversity of uncultured viral communities. PHACCS uses the contig spectrum from shotgun DNA sequence assemblies to mathematically model the structure of viral communities and make predictions about diversity. Results PHACCS builds models of possible community structure using a modified Lander-Waterman algorithm to predict the underlying contig spectrum. PHACCS finds the most appropriate structure model by optimizing the model parameters until the predicted contig spectrum is as close as possible to the experimental one. This model is the basis for making estimates of uncultured viral community richness, evenness, diversity index and abundance of the most abundant genotype. Conclusion PHACCS analysis of four different environmental phage communities suggests that the power law is an important rank-abundance form to describe uncultured viral community structure. The estimates support the fact that the four phage communities were extremely diverse and that phage community biodiversity and structure may be correlated with that of their hosts.

  1. Microsatellite based genetic diversity and population structure of the endangered Spanish Guadarrama goat breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurado Juan J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessing genetic biodiversity and population structure of minor breeds through the information provided by neutral molecular markers, allows determination of their extinction risk and to design strategies for their management and conservation. Analysis of microsatellite loci is known to be highly informative in the reconstruction of the historical processes underlying the evolution and differentiation of animal populations. Guadarrama goat is a threatened Spanish breed which actual census (2008 consists of 3057 females and 203 males distributed in 22 populations more or less isolated. The aim of this work is to study the genetic status of this breed through the analysis of molecular data from 10 microsatellites typed in historic and actual live animals. Results The mean expected heterozygosity across loci within populations ranged from 0.62 to 0.77. Genetic differentiation measures were moderate, with a mean FST of 0.074, GST of 0.081 and RST of 0.085. Percentages of variation among and within populations were 7.5 and 92.5, respectively. Bayesian clustering analyses pointed out a population subdivision in 16 clusters, however, no correlation between geographical distances and genetic differences was found. Management factors such as the limited exchange of animals between farmers (estimated gene flow Nm = 3.08 mostly due to sanitary and social constraints could be the major causes affecting Guadarrama goat population subdivision. Conclusion Genetic diversity measures revealed a good status of biodiversity in the Guadarrama goat breed. Since diseases are the first cause affecting the census in this breed, population subdivision would be an advantage for its conservation. However, to maintain private alleles present at low frequencies in such small populations minimizing the inbreeding rate, it would necessitate some mating designs of animals carrying such alleles among populations. The systematic use of molecular markers will

  2. [Diversity and bacteria community structure of activated carbon used in advanced drinking water treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Shang, Hai-tao; Hao, Chun-bo; Luo, Peng; Gu, Jun-nong

    2011-05-01

    Two granular activated carbon (GAC) samples with 1.5 a and 5 a age were collected, Bacterial genome DNA was extracted for the 16S rDNA gene amplification, and then a bacterial 16S rDNA gene clone library was constructed. After the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences, bacterial diversity and community structure of two activated carbon biofilm sample were studied. The results showed the bacteria in GAC with 5 a age could be divided into 11 groups, which were as follows alpha-Proteobacteria (26.5%), beta-Proteobacteria (16.3%), delta-Proteobacteria (16.3%), Planctomycetes (12.2%), Gemmatimonadetes (6.1%), Acidobacteria (4.1%), Nitrospira (2.0%), gamma-Proteobacteria (2.0%), Bacteroidetes (2.0%), Actinobacteria (2.0%), Unclassified Bacteria (10.2%). The bacteria in GAC with 1.5 a age could be divided into 10 groups, which were as follows alpha-Proteobacteria (21.6%), Planctomycetes( 10.8%), Bacteroidetes (10.8%), beta-Proteobacteria (9.0%), Acidobacteria (9.0%), Nitrospira (7.2%), detla-Proteobacteria (7.2%), Unclassified Proteobacteria (5.4%), Gemmatimonadetes (3.6%), Unclassified Bacteria (14.4%). The results revealed a variety of bacterial divisions on the studied GAC biofilm. Proteobacteria had the highest share in the two total clones, and alpha- and beta-Proteobacteria were on a dominant position. A relatively high proportion of delta-Proteobacteria was observed in the biofilm of GAC with 5 a age, and Nitrospira was in a minor proportion. However, a totally converse condition appeared in GAC with 1.5 a age. Two pathogenic bacteria, Afipia and Chryseobacterium, were detected in analyzed GACs, which implies a potential microbial risk in water supply.

  3. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Diverse Models of Structural Variations in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Caixia; Zhou, Yong; Li, Hongyi; Xiong, Teng; Li, Shuaicheng; Bi, Yanghui; Kong, Pengzhou; Wang, Fang; Cui, Heyang; Li, Yaoping; Fang, Xiaodong; Yan, Ting; Li, Yike; Wang, Juan; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Ling; Jia, Zhiwu; Song, Bin; Hu, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Qiu, Haile; Zhang, Gehong; Liu, Jing; Xu, Enwei; Shi, Ruyi; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Haiyan; He, Chanting; Zhao, Zhenxiang; Qian, Yu; Rong, Ruizhou; Han, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yanlin; Luo, Wen; Wang, Jiaqian; Peng, Shaoliang; Yang, Xukui; Li, Xiangchun; Li, Lin; Fang, Hu; Liu, Xingmin; Ma, Li; Chen, Yunqing; Guo, Shiping; Chen, Xing; Xi, Yanfeng; Li, Guodong; Liang, Jianfang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Jiansheng; Jia, JunMei; Li, Qingshan; Cheng, Xiaolong; Zhan, Qimin; Cui, Yongping

    2016-02-04

    Comprehensive identification of somatic structural variations (SVs) and understanding their mutational mechanisms in cancer might contribute to understanding biological differences and help to identify new therapeutic targets. Unfortunately, characterization of complex SVs across the whole genome and the mutational mechanisms underlying esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is largely unclear. To define a comprehensive catalog of somatic SVs, affected target genes, and their underlying mechanisms in ESCC, we re-analyzed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data from 31 ESCCs using Meerkat algorithm to predict somatic SVs and Patchwork to determine copy-number changes. We found deletions and translocations with NHEJ and alt-EJ signature as the dominant SV types, and 16% of deletions were complex deletions. SVs frequently led to disruption of cancer-associated genes (e.g., CDKN2A and NOTCH1) with different mutational mechanisms. Moreover, chromothripsis, kataegis, and breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) were identified as contributing to locally mis-arranged chromosomes that occurred in 55% of ESCCs. These genomic catastrophes led to amplification of oncogene through chromothripsis-derived double-minute chromosome formation (e.g., FGFR1 and LETM2) or BFB-affected chromosomes (e.g., CCND1, EGFR, ERBB2, MMPs, and MYC), with approximately 30% of ESCCs harboring BFB-derived CCND1 amplification. Furthermore, analyses of copy-number alterations reveal high frequency of whole-genome duplication (WGD) and recurrent focal amplification of CDCA7 that might act as a potential oncogene in ESCC. Our findings reveal molecular defects such as chromothripsis and BFB in malignant transformation of ESCCs and demonstrate diverse models of SVs-derived target genes in ESCCs. These genome-wide SV profiles and their underlying mechanisms provide preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications for ESCCs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Microsatellite based genetic diversity and population structure of the endangered Spanish Guadarrama goat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Magdalena; Calvo, Jorge H; Martínez, Marta; Marcos-Carcavilla, Ane; Cuevas, Javier; González, Carmen; Jurado, Juan J; de Tejada, Paloma Díez

    2009-09-29

    Assessing genetic biodiversity and population structure of minor breeds through the information provided by neutral molecular markers, allows determination of their extinction risk and to design strategies for their management and conservation. Analysis of microsatellite loci is known to be highly informative in the reconstruction of the historical processes underlying the evolution and differentiation of animal populations. Guadarrama goat is a threatened Spanish breed which actual census (2008) consists of 3057 females and 203 males distributed in 22 populations more or less isolated. The aim of this work is to study the genetic status of this breed through the analysis of molecular data from 10 microsatellites typed in historic and actual live animals. The mean expected heterozygosity across loci within populations ranged from 0.62 to 0.77. Genetic differentiation measures were moderate, with a mean FST of 0.074, GST of 0.081 and RST of 0.085. Percentages of variation among and within populations were 7.5 and 92.5, respectively. Bayesian clustering analyses pointed out a population subdivision in 16 clusters, however, no correlation between geographical distances and genetic differences was found. Management factors such as the limited exchange of animals between farmers (estimated gene flow Nm = 3.08) mostly due to sanitary and social constraints could be the major causes affecting Guadarrama goat population subdivision. Genetic diversity measures revealed a good status of biodiversity in the Guadarrama goat breed. Since diseases are the first cause affecting the census in this breed, population subdivision would be an advantage for its conservation. However, to maintain private alleles present at low frequencies in such small populations minimizing the inbreeding rate, it would necessitate some mating designs of animals carrying such alleles among populations. The systematic use of molecular markers will facilitate the comprehensive management of these

  5. Diversity and community structure of cyanobacteria and other microbes in recycling irrigation reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Richardson, Patricia; Hong, Chuanxue

    2017-01-01

    Recycling irrigation reservoirs (RIRs) are emerging aquatic environments of global significance to crop production, water conservation and environmental sustainability. This study characterized the diversity and population structure of cyanobacteria and other detected microbes in water samples from eight RIRs and one adjacent runoff-free stream at three ornamental crop nurseries in eastern (VA1 and VA3) and central (VA2) Virginia after cloning and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene targeting cyanobacteria and chloroplast of eukaryotic phytoplankton. VA1 and VA2 utilize a multi-reservoir recycling irrigation system with runoff channeled to a sedimentation reservoir which then overflows into transition and retention reservoirs where water was pumped for irrigation. VA3 has a single sedimentation reservoir which was also used for irrigation. A total of 208 operational taxonomic units (OTU) were identified from clone libraries of the water samples. Among them, 53 OTUs (358 clones) were cyanobacteria comprising at least 12 genera dominated by Synechococcus species; 59 OTUs (387 clones) were eukaryotic phytoplankton including green algae and diatoms; and 96 were other bacteria (111 clones). Overall, cyanobacteria were dominant in sedimentation reservoirs, while eukaryotic phytoplankton and other bacteria were dominant in transition/retention reservoirs and the stream, respectively. These results are direct evidence demonstrating the negative impact of nutrient-rich horticultural runoff, if not contained, on natural water resources. They also help in understanding the dynamics of water quality in RIRs and have practical implications. Although both single- and multi-reservoir recycling irrigation systems reduce the environmental footprint of horticultural production, the former is expected to have more cyanobacterial blooming, and consequently water quality issues, than the latter. Thus, a multi-reservoir recycling irrigation system should be preferred where feasible.

  6. Population Structure, Diversity and Reproductive Mode of the Grape Phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae across Its Native Range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl T Lund

    Full Text Available Grape Phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, is a gall-forming insect that feeds on the leaves and roots of many Vitis species. The roots of the cultivated V. vinifera cultivars and hybrids are highly susceptible to grape phylloxera feeding damage. The native range of this insect covers most of North America, and it is particularly abundant in the eastern and central United States. Phylloxera was introduced from North America to almost all grape-growing regions across five of the temperate zone continents. It devastated vineyards in each of these regions causing large-scale disruptions to grape growers, wine makers and national economies. In order to understand the population diversity of grape phylloxera in its native range, more than 500 samples from 19 States and 34 samples from the introduced range (northern California, Europe and South America were genotyped with 32 simple sequence repeat markers. STRUCTURE, a model based clustering method identified five populations within these samples. The five populations were confirmed by a neighbor-joining tree and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA. These populations were distinguished by their Vitis species hosts and their geographic locations. Samples collected from California, Europe and South America traced back to phylloxera sampled in the northeastern United States on V. riparia, with some influence from phylloxera collected along the Atlantic Coast and Central Plains on V. vulpina. Reproductive statistics conclusively confirmed that sexual reproduction is common in the native range and is combined with cyclical parthenogenesis. Native grape phylloxera populations were identified to be under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The identification of admixed samples between many of these populations indicates that shared environments facilitate sexual reproduction between different host associated populations to create new genotypes of phylloxera. This study also found that assortative mating might

  7. Southeast Asian diversity: first insights into the complex mtDNA structure of Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Martin; Zimmermann, Bettina; Röck, Alexander; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Horst, David; Horst, Basil; Sengchanh, Sourideth; Sanguansermsri, Torpong; Horst, Jürgen; Krämer, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M; Parson, Walther

    2011-02-18

    Vast migrations and subsequent assimilation processes have shaped the genetic composition of Southeast Asia, an area of close contact between several major ethnic groups. To better characterize the genetic variation of this region, we analyzed the entire mtDNA control region of 214 unrelated donors from Laos according to highest forensic quality standards. To detail the phylogeny, we inspected selected SNPs from the mtDNA coding region. For a posteriori data quality control, quasi-median network constructions and autosomal STR typing were performed. In order to describe the mtDNA setup of Laos more thoroughly, the data were subjected to population genetic comparisons with 16 East Asian groups. The Laos sample exhibited ample mtDNA diversity, reflecting the huge number of ethnic groups listed. We found several new, so far undescribed mtDNA lineages in this dataset and surrounding populations. The Laos population was characteristic in terms of haplotype composition and genetic structure, however, genetic comparisons with other Southeast Asian populations revealed limited, but significant genetic differentiation. Notable differences in the maternal relationship to the major indigenous Southeast Asian ethnolinguistic groups were detected. In this study, we portray the great mtDNA variety of Laos for the first time. Our findings will contribute to clarify the migration history of the region. They encourage setting up regional and subpopulation databases, especially for forensic applications. The Laotian sequences will be incorporated into the collaborative EMPOP mtDNA database http://www.empop.org upon publication and will be available as the first mtDNA reference data for this country.

  8. Southeast Asian diversity: first insights into the complex mtDNA structure of Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Jürgen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vast migrations and subsequent assimilation processes have shaped the genetic composition of Southeast Asia, an area of close contact between several major ethnic groups. To better characterize the genetic variation of this region, we analyzed the entire mtDNA control region of 214 unrelated donors from Laos according to highest forensic quality standards. To detail the phylogeny, we inspected selected SNPs from the mtDNA coding region. For a posteriori data quality control, quasi-median network constructions and autosomal STR typing were performed. In order to describe the mtDNA setup of Laos more thoroughly, the data were subjected to population genetic comparisons with 16 East Asian groups. Results The Laos sample exhibited ample mtDNA diversity, reflecting the huge number of ethnic groups listed. We found several new, so far undescribed mtDNA lineages in this dataset and surrounding populations. The Laos population was characteristic in terms of haplotype composition and genetic structure, however, genetic comparisons with other Southeast Asian populations revealed limited, but significant genetic differentiation. Notable differences in the maternal relationship to the major indigenous Southeast Asian ethnolinguistic groups were detected. Conclusions In this study, we portray the great mtDNA variety of Laos for the first time. Our findings will contribute to clarify the migration history of the region. They encourage setting up regional and subpopulation databases, especially for forensic applications. The Laotian sequences will be incorporated into the collaborative EMPOP mtDNA database http://www.empop.org upon publication and will be available as the first mtDNA reference data for this country.

  9. Serum albumin binding of structurally diverse neutral organic compounds: data and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoshi; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2011-12-19

    Binding to serum albumin has a strong influence on freely dissolved, unbound concentrations of chemicals in vivo and in vitro. For neutral organic solutes, previous studies have suggested a log-log correlation between the albumin-water partition coefficient and the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) and postulated highly nonspecific binding that is mechanistically analogous to dissolution into solvents. These relationships and concepts were further explored in this study. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-water partition coefficients (K(BSA/w)) were measured for 83 structurally diverse neutral organic chemicals in consistent experimental conditions. The correlation between log K(BSA/w) and log K(ow) was moderate, with R(2) = 0.76 and SD = 0.43. The log K(BSA/w) of low-polarity compounds including a series of chlorobenzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons increased with log K(ow) linearly up to log K(ow) = 4-5, but then the linear relationship apparently broke off, and the increase became gradual. The fitting of polyparameter linear free energy relationship models with five solute descriptors was just comparable to that of the log K(ow) model (R(2) = 0.78-0.79, SD = 0.41-0.42); the relatively high SD obtained suggests that solvent dissolution models are not capable of modeling albumin binding accurately. A size limitation of the binding site(s) of albumin is suggested as a possible reason for the high SD. An equilibrium distribution model indicates that serum albumin generally has high contributions to the binding in the serum of polar compounds and relatively small low-polarity compounds, whereas albumin binding for large low-polarity compounds is outcompeted by the strong partitioning into lipids due to low relative affinity of albumin for these compounds. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Diversity and community structure of cyanobacteria and other microbes in recycling irrigation reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kong

    Full Text Available Recycling irrigation reservoirs (RIRs are emerging aquatic environments of global significance to crop production, water conservation and environmental sustainability. This study characterized the diversity and population structure of cyanobacteria and other detected microbes in water samples from eight RIRs and one adjacent runoff-free stream at three ornamental crop nurseries in eastern (VA1 and VA3 and central (VA2 Virginia after cloning and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene targeting cyanobacteria and chloroplast of eukaryotic phytoplankton. VA1 and VA2 utilize a multi-reservoir recycling irrigation system with runoff channeled to a sedimentation reservoir which then overflows into transition and retention reservoirs where water was pumped for irrigation. VA3 has a single sedimentation reservoir which was also used for irrigation. A total of 208 operational taxonomic units (OTU were identified from clone libraries of the water samples. Among them, 53 OTUs (358 clones were cyanobacteria comprising at least 12 genera dominated by Synechococcus species; 59 OTUs (387 clones were eukaryotic phytoplankton including green algae and diatoms; and 96 were other bacteria (111 clones. Overall, cyanobacteria were dominant in sedimentation reservoirs, while eukaryotic phytoplankton and other bacteria were dominant in transition/retention reservoirs and the stream, respectively. These results are direct evidence demonstrating the negative impact of nutrient-rich horticultural runoff, if not contained, on natural water resources. They also help in understanding the dynamics of water quality in RIRs and have practical implications. Although both single- and multi-reservoir recycling irrigation systems reduce the environmental footprint of horticultural production, the former is expected to have more cyanobacterial blooming, and consequently water quality issues, than the latter. Thus, a multi-reservoir recycling irrigation system should be preferred where

  11. Microsatellite-based genetic diversity and population structure of domestic sheep in northern Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Miika; Ozerov, Mikhail; Tapio, Ilma; Toro, Miguel A; Marzanov, Nurbiy; Cinkulov, Mirjana; Goncharenko, Galina; Kiselyova, Tatyana; Murawski, Maziek; Kantanen, Juha

    2010-08-10

    Identification of global livestock diversity hotspots and their importance in diversity maintenance is essential for making global conservation efforts. We screened 52 sheep breeds from the Eurasian subcontinent with 20 microsatellite markers. By estimating and weighting differently within- and between-breed genetic variation our aims were to identify genetic diversity hotspots and prioritize the importance of each breed for conservation, respectively. In addition we estimated how important within-species diversity hotspots are in livestock conservation. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed three genetic clusters, termed Nordic, Composite and Fat-tailed. Southern breeds from close to the region of sheep domestication were more variable, but less genetically differentiated compared with more northern populations. Decreasing weight for within-breed diversity component led to very high representation of genetic clusters or regions containing more diverged breeds, but did not increase phenotypic diversity among the high ranked breeds. Sampling populations throughout 14 regional groups was suggested for maximized total genetic diversity. During initial steps of establishing a livestock conservation program populations from the diversity hot-spot area are the most important ones, but for the full design our results suggested that approximately equal population presentation across environments should be considered. Even in this case, higher per population emphasis in areas of high diversity is appropriate. The analysis was based on neutral data, but we have no reason to think the general trend is limited to this type of data. However, a comprehensive valuation of populations should balance production systems, phenotypic traits and available genetic information, and include consideration of probability of success.

  12. Towards universal structure-based prediction of class II MHC epitopes for diverse allotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Bordner

    Full Text Available The binding of peptide fragments of antigens to class II MHC proteins is a crucial step in initiating a helper T cell immune response. The discovery of these peptide epitopes is important for understanding the normal immune response and its misregulation in autoimmunity and allergies and also for vaccine design. In spite of their biomedical importance, the high diversity of class II MHC proteins combined with the large number of possible peptide sequences make comprehensive experimental determination of epitopes for all MHC allotypes infeasible. Computational methods can address this need by predicting epitopes for a particular MHC allotype. We present a structure-based method for predicting class II epitopes that combines molecular mechanics docking of a fully flexible peptide into the MHC binding cleft followed by binding affinity prediction using a machine learning classifier trained on interaction energy components calculated from the docking solution. Although the primary advantage of structure-based prediction methods over the commonly employed sequence-based methods is their applicability to essentially any MHC allotype, this has not yet been convincingly demonstrated. In order to test the transferability of the prediction method to different MHC proteins, we trained the scoring method on binding data for DRB1*0101 and used it to make predictions for multiple MHC allotypes with distinct peptide binding specificities including representatives from the other human class II MHC loci, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, as well as for two murine allotypes. The results showed that the prediction method was able to achieve significant discrimination between epitope and non-epitope peptides for all MHC allotypes examined, based on AUC values in the range 0.632-0.821. We also discuss how accounting for peptide binding in multiple registers to class II MHC largely explains the systematically worse performance of prediction methods for class II MHC compared with

  13. Expanding Diversity in Molecular Structures and Functions of the IL-6/IL-12 Heterodimeric Cytokine Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Hasegawa

    2016-11-01

    , promiscuity within the IL-6/IL-12 family cytokines complicates structural and functional clarification and assignment of individual cytokines. A better understanding of the recent advances and expanding diversity in molecular structures and functions of the IL-6/IL-12 family cytokines could allow the creation of novel therapeutic strategies by using them as tools and targeted molecules.

  14. Exploring the determinants of phylogenetic diversity and assemblage structure in conifers across temporal, spatial, and taxonomic scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Borchsenius, Finn; Sandel, Brody Steven

    -environmental models are important elements in this framework. Here, we integrate both types of data in order to explore the determinants of forest tree diversity using the conifers as a model group. Conifers are an old, diverse (ca. 650 spp. in 6 families) and widespread group of woody plants of high ecological...... and economic importance. They are better studied than most other globally distributed groups of forest trees, allowing integrative studies with high phylogenetic and spatial resolution. We analyse phylogenetic diversity, assemblage structure, and diversification rates for regional conifer assemblages...... throughout the natural range of the group (269 TDWG3 “botanical countries”) to infer the effects of current and past climate . To explore the effects of taxonomic and spatial scale, we deconstruct the overall pattern into families and perform a fine-scale analysis for one particular lineage (the genus Pinus...

  15. Is spatial structure the key to promote plant diversity in Mediterranean forets plantations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González-Moreno, P.; Quero, J.L.; Poorter, L.; Bonet, F.J.; Zamora, R.

    2011-01-01

    Mediterranean forest plantations are currently under an intense debate related to their ecological function, sustainability and future performance. In several Mediterranean countries, efforts are directed to convert pine plantations into mixed and more diverse forests. This research aims to evaluate

  16. The Liana assemblage of a Congolian rainforest : diversity, structure and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewango Ekokinya, Corneille

    2010-01-01

    Key words: Liana assemblage, species composition, community, dynamics, canopy openness, Manniophyton fulvum, functional traits, population density, pervasive change. This study analyzes the diversity, composition, and dynamics of the liana assemblage of the Ituri rain forest in northeastern DR

  17. Clonal diversity and structure within a population of the pondweed Potamogeton pectinatus foraged by Bewick's swans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangelbroek, H.H.; Ouborg, N.J.; Santamaría, L.; Schwenk, K.

    2002-01-01

    Clonal diversity within plant populations is affected by factors that influence genet (clone) survival and seed recruitment, such as resource availability, disturbance, seed dispersal mechanism, propagule predation and the age of the population. Here we studied a population of Potamogeton

  18. Grazing intensity affects insect diversity via sward structure and heterogeneity in a long‐term experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jerrentrup, Jana Sabrina; Wrage‐Mönnig, Nicole; Röver, Klaus‐Ulrich; Isselstein, Johannes; McKenzie, Ailsa

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, we investigate the long‐term influence of grazing and the potential for spatial patterns created by different grazing intensities to enhance insect diversity. In a long‐term experiment (2002–2011...

  19. Three-component assembly of structurally diverse 2-aminopyrimidine-5-carbonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val, Cristina; Crespo, Abel; Yaziji, Vicente; Coelho, Alberto; Azuaje, Jhonny; El Maatougui, Abdelaziz; Carbajales, Carlos; Sotelo, Eddy

    2013-07-08

    An expedient route for the synthesis of libraries of diversely decorated 2-aminopyrimidine-5-carbonitriles is reported. This approach is based on a three-component reaction followed by spontaneous aromatization.

  20. Bacterial diversity and community structure of supragingival plaques in adults with dental health or caries revealed by 16S pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries has a polymicrobial etiology within the complex oral microbial ecosystem. However, the overall diversity and structure of supragingival plaque microbiota in adult dental health and caries are not well understood. Here, 160 supragingival plaque samples from patients with dental health and different severities of dental caries were collected for bacterial genomic DNA extraction, pyrosequencing by amplification of the 16S rDNA V1–V3 hypervariable regions, and bioinformatic analysis. High-quality sequences (2,261,700 clustered into 10,365 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% identity, representing 453 independent species belonging to 122 genera, 66 families, 34 orders, 21 classes, and 12 phyla. All groups shared 7522 OTUs, indicating the presence of a core plaque microbiome. Smooth rarefaction curves were suggestive of plaque microbial diversity. α diversity analysis showed that healthy plaque microbial diversity exceeded that of dental caries, with the diversity decreasing gradually with the severity of caries. The dominant phyla of plaque microbiota included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, and TM7. The dominant genera included Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Corynebacterium, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Rothia, and Leptotrichia. β diversity analysis showed that the plaque microbial community structure was similar in all groups and that group members were relatively constant, only showing differences in abundance. Analysis of composition differences identified 10 health-related and 21 caries-related genera. Key genera (27 that potentially contributed to plaque microbiota distributions between groups were identified. Finally, co-occurrence network analysis and function prediction were performed. Treatment strategies directed toward modulating microbial interactions and their functional output should be further developed.

  1. Characterization of the known T-type dwarfs towards the σ Orionis cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Ramírez, K.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Béjar, V. J. S.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: The detailed study of T-type candidate members of the young σ Orionis cluster (~3 Myr, ~352 pc, solar metallicity) is fundamental to properly assess the objects' cluster membership and their contribution to the definition of the substellar mass function. Methods: A total of three T-type candidates (S Ori 70, S Ori 73, and S Ori J053804.65-021352.5) lying in the line of sight towards σ Orionis were characterized by means of near-infrared photometric, astrometric, and spectroscopic studies. H-band methane images were collected for all three sources and an additional sample of 15 field T-type dwarfs using the LIRIS instrument on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). J-band spectra of resolution of ~500 were obtained for S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 with the ISAAC spectrograph on the 8 m Very Large Telescope (VLT), and JH spectra of resolution of ~50 acquired with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were employed for the spectroscopic classification of S Ori 70 and 73. Accurate proper motions with a typical uncertainty of ±3 mas yr-1 and a time interval of ~7-9 yr were derived using old images and new data collected with ISAAC/VLT and WFC3/HST. Results: Using the LIRIS observations of the field T dwarfs, we calibrated this imager for T spectral typing via methane photometry. The three S Ori objects were spectroscopically classified as T4.5 ± 0.5 (S Ori 73), T5 ± 0.5 (S Ori J053804.65-021352.5), and T7 +0.5-1.0 (S Ori 70). These spectral types agree with the measured H-band methane colors. The similarity between the observed JH spectra and the methane colors and the data of field ultra-cool dwarfs of related classifications suggests that S Ori 70, 73, and S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 do not deviate significantly in surface gravity in relation to the field. Additionally, the detection of K I at ~1.25 μm in S Ori J053804.65-021352.5 points to a high-gravity atmosphere. Only the K-band reddish nature of S Ori 70 may be

  2. [Investigation of the microbial diversity and structure of biological activated carbon from different sources in drinking water treatment process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Er-Deng; Zheng, Lu; Feng, Xin-Xin; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2014-11-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technology was used to investigate the microbial diversity and structure of biological activated carbon (BAC) from different sources in drinking water advanced treatment process. Diversity indices of samples A, B and C, with relatively high tannic acid and humic acid adsorption capacity, were close to each other, which meant higher microbial diversity. However, samples D and E had relatively lower diversity indices with the low tannic acid and humic acid adsorption capacity. There were five species including β-Proteobacteria, α-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, γ-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes in the phylogenetic tree of BAC samples. Among them, β-Proteobacteria and α-Proteobacteria were the dominant microbial species in these BAC samples, which played an important role in organic matter removal. Planctomycetes, γ-Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the non-dominant microbial species. Bacteroidetes only existed in samples A, B, C and D, while did not occur in sample E. The BAC samples with the higher tannic acid and humic acid adsorption capacity had higher microbial diversity. This research should deepen the understanding of microbial community in BAC, and provide a theoretical basis for the safety of drinking water.

  3. Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Sesame Accessions from Africa and Asia as Major Centers of Its Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komivi Dossa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sesame is an important oil crop widely cultivated in Africa and Asia. Understanding the genetic diversity of accessions from these continents is critical to designing breeding methods and for additional collection of sesame germplasm. To determine the genetic diversity in relation to geographical regions, 96 sesame accessions collected from 22 countries distributed over six geographic regions in Africa and Asia were genotyped using 33 polymorphic SSR markers. Large genetic variability was found within the germplasm collection. The total number of alleles was 137, averaging 4.15 alleles per locus. The accessions from Asia displayed more diversity than those from Africa. Accessions from Southern Asia (SAs, Eastern Asia (EAs, and Western Africa (WAf were highly diversified, while those from Western Asia (WAs, Northern Africa (NAf, and Southeastern Africa (SAf had the lowest diversity. The analysis of molecular variance revealed that more than 44% of the genetic variance was due to diversity among geographic regions. Five subpopulations, including three in Asia and two in Africa, were cross-identified through phylogenetic, PCA, and STRUCTURE analyses. Most accessions clustered in the same population based on their geographical origins. Our results provide technical guidance for efficient management of sesame genetic resources in breeding programs and further collection of sesame germplasm from these different regions.

  4. Uncertainty of large-area estimates of indicators of forest structural gamma diversity: A study based on national forest inventory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanne Winter; Andreas Böck; Ronald E. McRoberts

    2012-01-01

    Tree diameter and height are commonly measured forest structural variables, and indicators based on them are candidates for assessing forest diversity. We conducted our study on the uncertainty of estimates for mostly large geographic scales for four indicators of forest structural gamma diversity: mean tree diameter, mean tree height, and standard deviations of tree...

  5. Linking Remotely Sensed Functional Diversity of Structural Traits to the Radiative Regime of a Temperate Mixed Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. D.; Morsdorf, F.; Furrer, R.; Schmid, B.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Patterns of functional diversity reflect the inter- and intraspecific variability of plant traits and are linked to other aspects of biodiversity, environmental factors and ecosystem function. To study the patterns at plot and stand level, spatially continuous trait measurements are required. Remote sensing methods based on airborne observations can offer such continuous high-resolution measurements, resolving individual trees of a forest at a regional extent. The study was performed at the Laegern forest, a temperate mixed forest dominated by deciduous and coniferous trees (Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies; 47°28'42.0" N, 8°21'51.8" E, 682 m asl; Switzerland). Canopy height, plant area index and foliage height diversity were derived from full-waveform airborne laser scanning data. These structural traits were used to calculate functional richness, functional evenness and functional divergence at a range of scales. A Bayesian multiresolution scale analysis was used to infer the scales at which functional diversity patterns occur. The radiative regime of the forest was simulated using the 3D radiative transfer model DART. Using a voxel-based forest reconstruction allowed us to derive top of canopy, bottom of canopy and absorbed photosynthetically active radiation. The results of this study will provide new insights on linking forest canopy structure to the radiative regime of the forest. Light availability is a critical factor determining plant growth and competition. Within canopy light scattering is mainly driven by the arrangement of leaves and their leaf optical properties. Therefore, we expect a link between the structural complexity of the forest as encompassed by functional diversity and the light availability within and below the canopy. Ultimately, this information can be used in dynamic ecosystem models such as ED2, allowing us to predict the influence of functional diversity and radiative properties on ecosystem functioning under current conditions and

  6. Relative importance of coral cover, habitat complexity and diversity in determining the structure of reef fish communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriya Komyakova

    Full Text Available The structure of coral reef habitat has a pronounced influence on the diversity, composition and abundance of reef-associated fishes. However, the particular features of the habitat that are most critical are not always known. Coral habitats can vary in many characteristics, notably live coral cover, topographic complexity and coral diversity, but the relative effects of these habitat characteristics are often not distinguished. Here, we investigate the strength of the relationships between these habitat features and local fish diversity, abundance and community structure in the lagoon of Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef. In a spatial comparison using sixty-six 2m(2 quadrats, fish species richness, total abundance and community structure were examined in relation to a wide range of habitat variables, including topographic complexity, habitat diversity, coral diversity, coral species richness, hard coral cover, branching coral cover and the cover of corymbose corals. Fish species richness and total abundance were strongly associated with coral species richness and cover, but only weakly associated with topographic complexity. Regression tree analysis showed that coral species richness accounted for most of the variation in fish species richness (63.6%, while hard coral cover explained more variation in total fish abundance (17.4%, than any other variable. In contrast, topographic complexity accounted for little spatial variation in reef fish assemblages. In degrading coral reef environments, the potential effects of loss of coral cover and topographic complexity are often emphasized, but these findings suggest that reduced coral biodiversity may ultimately have an equal, or greater, impact on reef-associated fish communities.

  7. Relative importance of coral cover, habitat complexity and diversity in determining the structure of reef fish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komyakova, Valeriya; Munday, Philip L; Jones, Geoffrey P

    2013-01-01

    The structure of coral reef habitat has a pronounced influence on the diversity, composition and abundance of reef-associated fishes. However, the particular features of the habitat that are most critical are not always known. Coral habitats can vary in many characteristics, notably live coral cover, topographic complexity and coral diversity, but the relative effects of these habitat characteristics are often not distinguished. Here, we investigate the strength of the relationships between these habitat features and local fish diversity, abundance and community structure in the lagoon of Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef. In a spatial comparison using sixty-six 2m(2) quadrats, fish species richness, total abundance and community structure were examined in relation to a wide range of habitat variables, including topographic complexity, habitat diversity, coral diversity, coral species richness, hard coral cover, branching coral cover and the cover of corymbose corals. Fish species richness and total abundance were strongly associated with coral species richness and cover, but only weakly associated with topographic complexity. Regression tree analysis showed that coral species richness accounted for most of the variation in fish species richness (63.6%), while hard coral cover explained more variation in total fish abundance (17.4%), than any other variable. In contrast, topographic complexity accounted for little spatial variation in reef fish assemblages. In degrading coral reef environments, the potential effects of loss of coral cover and topographic complexity are often emphasized, but these findings suggest that reduced coral biodiversity may ultimately have an equal, or greater, impact on reef-associated fish communities.

  8. Relative Importance of Coral Cover, Habitat Complexity and Diversity in Determining the Structure of Reef Fish Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komyakova, Valeriya; Munday, Philip L.; Jones, Geoffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of coral reef habitat has a pronounced influence on the diversity, composition and abundance of reef-associated fishes. However, the particular features of the habitat that are most critical are not always known. Coral habitats can vary in many characteristics, notably live coral cover, topographic complexity and coral diversity, but the relative effects of these habitat characteristics are often not distinguished. Here, we investigate the strength of the relationships between these habitat features and local fish diversity, abundance and community structure in the lagoon of Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef. In a spatial comparison using sixty-six 2m2 quadrats, fish species richness, total abundance and community structure were examined in relation to a wide range of habitat variables, including topographic complexity, habitat diversity, coral diversity, coral species richness, hard coral cover, branching coral cover and the cover of corymbose corals. Fish species richness and total abundance were strongly associated with coral species richness and cover, but only weakly associated with topographic complexity. Regression tree analysis showed that coral species richness accounted for most of the variation in fish species richness (63.6%), while hard coral cover explained more variation in total fish abundance (17.4%), than any other variable. In contrast, topographic complexity accounted for little spatial variation in reef fish assemblages. In degrading coral reef environments, the potential effects of loss of coral cover and topographic complexity are often emphasized, but these findings suggest that reduced coral biodiversity may ultimately have an equal, or greater, impact on reef-associated fish communities. PMID:24349455

  9. [Vegetation diversity, composition and structure in a cattle agro-landscape of Matiguás, Nicaragua].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlos, Dalia Sánchez; Harvey, Celia A; Grijalva, Alfredo; Medina, Arnulfo; Vílchez, Sergio; Hernández, Blas

    2005-01-01

    The diversity, composition and structure of vegetation in a cattle landscape in Matiguás, Nicaragua was characterized, and the floristic and structural differences of six types of habitats (secondary forests, riparian forests, charrales, live fences and pastures with high and low tree cover) were compared. A total of 3 949 trees of 180 species and 52 families were recorded. Forty six percent of the total trees reported for the landscape were represented by Guazuma ulmifolia (18.5%), Bursera simaruha (13.2%), Tabebuia rosea (6.3%), Enterolobium cyclocarpum (4.2%) and Albizia saman (3.4%). Many of the dominant species in the landscape were typical of open and disturbed areas. There were significant differences between the different habitats in the patterns of tree species richness, abundance, diversity, structure and floristic composition. The riparian forests had greater tree richness (p=0.0001) and diversity (p=0.0009) than other habitats. The floristic composition varied across habitats. with pairs of habitats sharing between 18.4 and 51.6% of the same tree species, and with clear differences in composition between the forested (riparian and secondary forests) and agricultural habitats. Of the habitats studied, the riparian forests and secondary forests seem to have greatest value for the conservation of the flora in the agropaisaje because they have the greatest species richness, and maintain small populations of endangered species. On the basis of the study, we recommend including agricultural landscapes in strategies to conserve tree diversity and suggest measures to ensure the maintenance of tree diversity in the Matiguas landscape.

  10. Geographical structuring of genetic diversity across the whole distribution range of Narcissus longispathus, a habitat-specialist, Mediterranean narrow endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Mónica; Herrera, Carlos M

    2008-08-01

    High mountain ranges of the Mediterranean Basin harbour a large number of narrowly endemic plants. In this study an investigation is made of the levels and partitioning of genetic diversity in Narcissus longispathus, a narrow endemic of south-eastern Spanish mountains characterized by a naturally fragmented distribution due to extreme specialization on a rare habitat type. By using dense sampling of populations across the species' whole geographical range, genetic structuring at different geographical scales is also examined. Using horizontal starch-gel electrophoresis, allozyme variability was screened at 19 loci for a total of 858 individuals from 27 populations. The data were analysed by means of standard statistical approaches in order to estimate gene diversity and the genetic structure of the populations. Narcissus longispathus displayed high levels of genetic diversity and extensive diversification among populations. At the species level, the percentage of polymorphic loci was 68 %, with average values of 2.1, 0.11 and 0.14 for the number of alleles per locus, observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity, respectively. Southern and more isolated populations tended to have less genetic variability than northern and less-isolated populations. A strong spatial patterning of genetic diversity was found at the various spatial scales. Gene flow/drift equilibrium occurred over distances <4 km. Beyond that distance divergence was relatively more influenced by drift. The populations studied seem to derive from three panmictic units or 'gene pools', with levels of admixture being greatest in the central and south-eastern portions of the species' range. In addition to documenting a case of high genetic diversity in a narrow endemic plant with naturally fragmented populations, the results emphasize the need for dense population sampling and examination of different geographical scales for understanding population genetic structure in habitat specialists

  11. Functional and structural diversities of C-reactive proteins present in horseshoe crab hemolymph plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, D; Osaki, T; Mizunoe, Y; Wai, S N; Iwanaga, S; Kawabata, S

    1999-09-01

    CRPs and with templates including genomic DNA and cDNA of hemocytes or hepatopancreas derived from one individual. The translation products of the tCRP clones possess high molecular diversity which falls into three related groups, consistent with classification based on their biological activities. Only tCRP-3 contained a unique hydrophobic nonapeptide sequence that appears in the transmembrane domain of a major histocompatibility complex class I heavy chain of rainbow trout, suggesting the importance of the hydrophobic patch to the hemolytic activity of tCRP-3. The structural and functional diversities of tCRPs provide a good model for studying the properties of innate immunity in invertebrates, which survive without the benefit of acquired immunity.

  12. Relational diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorius, Hans-Rolf

    2009-03-07

    In biology, the measurement of diversity traditionally focusses on reporting number of unambiguously distinguishable types, thus referring to qualitative (discontinuously varying) traits. Inclusion of frequencies or other weights has produced a large variety of diversity indices. Quantitative (continuously varying) traits do not readily fit into this perspective. In fact, in the context of quantitative traits, the concept of diversity is not always clearly distinguished from the (statistical) notion of dispersion. In many cases the ambiguity even extends to qualitative traits. This is at variance with the broad spectrum of diversity issues ranging, e.g., from ecological and genetic aspects of diversity to functional, structural, systematic, or evolutionary (including phylogenetic) aspects. In view of the urgent need for a more consistent perspective, it is called to attention that all of these aspects, whether of qualitative or quantitative nature, can be gathered under the common roof of binary relations (for qualitative traits two objects are related, for example, if they share the same trait state). A comprehensive concept of (relational) diversity can be developed in two steps: (1) determine the number of unrelated pairs of objects among all admissible pairs as a measure of implicit (relative) diversity, (2) invoke the concept of effective number to transform the implicit measure of diversity into an explicit (absolute) measure. The transformation operates by equating the observed implicit diversity to the implicit diversity obtained for the ideal model of an equivalence relation with classes of equal size. The number of these classes specifies the effective number as an explicit measure of diversity. The wealth of problems that can be treated from this unified perspective is briefly addressed by classifying and interpreting established diversity indices in the light of relational diversity. Desirable applications to the above-mentioned aspects are specified

  13. Structural basis for diverse N-glycan recognition by HIV-1-neutralizing V1-V2-directed antibody PG16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancera, Marie; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McLellan, Jason S.; Bailer, Robert T.; Dai, Kaifan; Loesgen, Sandra; Louder, Mark K.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Blinn, Julie; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Amin, Mohammed N.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D. [NIH; (Scripps); (Duke); (Maryland-MED); (IAVI)

    2013-08-05

    HIV-1 uses a diverse N-linked-glycan shield to evade recognition by antibody. Select human antibodies, such as the clonally related PG9 and PG16, recognize glycopeptide epitopes in the HIV-1 V1–V2 region and penetrate this shield, but their ability to accommodate diverse glycans is unclear. Here we report the structure of antibody PG16 bound to a scaffolded V1–V2, showing an epitope comprising both high mannose–type and complex-type N-linked glycans. We combined structure, NMR and mutagenesis analyses to characterize glycan recognition by PG9 and PG16. Three PG16-specific residues, arginine, serine and histidine (RSH), were critical for binding sialic acid on complex-type glycans, and introduction of these residues into PG9 produced a chimeric antibody with enhanced HIV-1 neutralization. Although HIV-1–glycan diversity facilitates evasion, antibody somatic diversity can overcome this and can provide clues to guide the design of modified antibodies with enhanced neutralization.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Casablanca, a Moroccan city with high incidence of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazi, Loubna; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Lesjean, Sarah; Locht, Camille; Supply, Philip; Tibayrenc, Michel; Bañuls, Anne-Laure

    2004-01-01

    Although lower-resource countries have by far the highest burden of tuberculosis, knowledge of Mycobacterium tuberculosis population structure and genetic diversity in these regions remains almost nonexistent. In this paper, 150 Moroccan M. tuberculosis isolates circulating in Casablanca were genotyped by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis using 10 different primers and by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats typing at 12 loci. The population genetic tests revealed a basically clonal structure for this population, without excluding rare genetic exchanges. Genetic analysis also showed a notable genetic polymorphism for the species M. tuberculosis, a weak cluster individualization, and an unexpected genetic diversity for a population in such a high-incidence community. Phylogenetic analyses of this Moroccan sample also supported that these isolates are genetically heterogeneous.

  15. Design and construction of diverse structures of coordination polymers: Photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yu, E-mail: wuyuhlj@163.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Institute of Functional Materials, Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Lu, Lu [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Institute of Functional Materials, Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Feng, Jianshen [Institute of Functional Materials, Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Li, Yulong; Sun, Yanchun [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Institute of Functional Materials, Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Ma, Aiqing, E-mail: maqandght@126.com [School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan 523808 (China)

    2017-01-15

    The reaction of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O/Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O with 4′-(4-(3,5-dicarboxylphenoxy)phenyl)-4,2′:6′,4′′-terpyridine (H{sub 2}dbp) gave [Cu{sub 0.5}(Hdbp)]{sub n} (1) and [Ni(dbp)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), while the reactions of Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O with H{sub 2}dbp in the presence of 4,4′-bipy and 2,2′-bpy generated [Co(dbp)(4,4′-bipy)]{sub n} (3) and ([Co(dbp)(2,2′-bipy)]{sub n}·H{sub 2}O) (4), respectively (4,4′-bipy=4.4′-pyridine and 2,2′-bipy=2,2′-bipyridine). X-Ray single-crystal analyses reveal that 1 contains a 1D double chain. 2 possesses a 3D architecture with (4.6{sup 2}0.8{sup 3}){sub 2} topology that is interpenetrated with each other to form a 2-fold network. In 3, the 2D [Co(dbp)]n sheets are pillared by 4,4′-bpy to form a 3D framework with 1D open channel. Compound 4 consists of a 1D ladder-like chain. The results showed that the structural diversity of the coordination polymers resulted from the different geometries of metal ions and effect of assistant ligands. Furthermore, the photocatalytic properties of 1–4 for degradation of the methyl violet (MV) have been examined. - Graphical abstract: The photocatalytic activity and selectivity of complexes 1–4 prove that they may be good and stable photocatalysts for degradation of organic dyes.

  16. Modulation of T-type Ca2+ channels by Lavender and Rosemary extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaymae El Alaoui

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants represent a significant reservoir of unexplored substances for early-stage drug discovery. Of interest, two flowering Mediterranean plants have been used for thousands of years for their beneficial effects on nervous disorders, including anxiety and mood. However, the therapeutic potential of these plants regarding their ability to target ion channels and neuronal excitability remains largely unknown. Towards this goal, we have investigated the ability of Lavender and Rosemary to modulate T-type calcium channels (TTCCs. TTCCs play important roles in neuronal excitability, neuroprotection, sensory processes and sleep. These channels are also involved in epilepsy and pain. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we have characterized how Lavender and Rosemary extracts, as well as their major active compounds Linalool and Rosmarinic acid, modulate the electrophysiological properties of recombinant TTCCs (CaV3.2 expressed in HEK-293T cells. Both the methanolic and essential oil extracts as well as the active compounds of these plants inhibit Cav3.2 current in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, these products also induce a negative shift of the steady-state inactivation of CaV3.2 current with no change in the activation properties. Taken together, our findings reveal that TTCCs are a molecular target of the Lavender and Rosemary compounds, suggesting that inhibition of TTCCs could contribute to the anxiolytic and the neuroprotective effects of these plants.

  17. Modulation of T-type Ca2+ channels by Lavender and Rosemary extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Alaoui, Chaymae; Chemin, Jean; Fechtali, Taoufiq; Lory, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Medicinal plants represent a significant reservoir of unexplored substances for early-stage drug discovery. Of interest, two flowering Mediterranean plants have been used for thousands of years for their beneficial effects on nervous disorders, including anxiety and mood. However, the therapeutic potential of these plants regarding their ability to target ion channels and neuronal excitability remains largely unknown. Towards this goal, we have investigated the ability of Lavender and Rosemary to modulate T-type calcium channels (TTCCs). TTCCs play important roles in neuronal excitability, neuroprotection, sensory processes and sleep. These channels are also involved in epilepsy and pain. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we have characterized how Lavender and Rosemary extracts, as well as their major active compounds Linalool and Rosmarinic acid, modulate the electrophysiological properties of recombinant TTCCs (CaV3.2) expressed in HEK-293T cells. Both the methanolic and essential oil extracts as well as the active compounds of these plants inhibit Cav3.2 current in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, these products also induce a negative shift of the steady-state inactivation of CaV3.2 current with no change in the activation properties. Taken together, our findings reveal that TTCCs are a molecular target of the Lavender and Rosemary compounds, suggesting that inhibition of TTCCs could contribute to the anxiolytic and the neuroprotective effects of these plants.

  18. Functional expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in spinal motoneurons of the adult turtle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Canto-Bustos

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV channels are transmembrane proteins comprising three subfamilies named CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3. The CaV3 channel subfamily groups the low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels (LVA or T-type a significant role in regulating neuronal excitability. CaV3 channel activity may lead to the generation of complex patterns of action potential firing such as the postinhibitory rebound (PIR. In the adult spinal cord, these channels have been found in dorsal horn interneurons where they control physiological events near the resting potential and participate in determining excitability. In motoneurons, CaV3 channels have been found during development, but their functional expression has not yet been reported in adult animals. Here, we show evidence for the presence of CaV3 channel-mediated PIR in motoneurons of the adult turtle spinal cord. Our results indicate that Ni2+ and NNC55-0396, two antagonists of CaV3 channel activity, inhibited PIR in the adult turtle spinal cord. Molecular biology and biochemical assays revealed the expression of the CaV3.1 channel isotype and its localization in motoneurons. Together, these results provide evidence for the expression of CaV3.1 channels in the spinal cord of adult animals and show also that these channels may contribute to determine the excitability of motoneurons.

  19. Control of Grid Connected Photovoltaic System Using Three-Level T-Type Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorig, Abdelmalik; Belkeiri, Mohammed; Barkat, Said; Rabhi, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    Three-level T-Type inverter (3LT2I) topology has numerous advantageous compared to three-level neutral-point-clamped (NPC) inverter. The main benefits of 3LT2I inverter are the efficiency, inverter cost, switching losses, and the quality of output voltage waveforms. In this paper, a photovoltaic distributed generation system based on dual-stage topology of DC-DC boost converter and 3LT2I is introduced. To that end, a decoupling control strategy of 3LT2I is proposed to control the current injected into the grid, reactive power compensation, and DC-link voltage. The resulting system is able to extract the maximum power from photovoltaic generator, to achieve sinusoidal grid currents, and to ensure reactive power compensation. The voltage-balancing control of two split DC capacitors of the 3LT2I is achieved using three-level space vector modulation with balancing strategy based on the effective use of the redundant switching states of the inverter voltage vectors. The proposed system performance is investigated at different operating conditions.

  20. Cd(II)-coordination polymers based on tetracarboxylic acid and diverse bis(imidazole) ligands: Synthesis, structural diversity and photoluminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arıcı, Mürsel, E-mail: marici@ogu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Eskişehir (Turkey); Yeşilel, Okan Zafer [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eskişehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Eskişehir (Turkey); Taş, Murat [Department of Science Education, Education Faculty, Ondokuz Mayıs University, 55139 Samsun (Turkey)

    2017-01-15

    Three new Cd(II)-coordination polymers, namely, ([Cd{sub 2}(μ{sub 6}-ao{sub 2}btc)(μ-1,5-bipe){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Cd{sub 2}(μ{sub 6}-ao{sub 2}btc)(μ-1,4-bix){sub 2}]{sub n}·2DMF) (2) and ([Cd{sub 2}(μ{sub 8}-abtc)(μ-1,4-betix)]·DMF·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (ao{sub 2}btc=di-oxygenated form of 3,3′,5,5′-azobenzenetetracarboxylate, 1,5-bipe: 1,5-bis(imidazol-1yl)pentane, 1,4-bix=1,4-bis(imidazol-1ylmethyl)benzene, 1,4-betix=1,4-bis(2-ethylimidazol-1ylmethyl)benzene) were synthesized with 3,3′,5,5′-azobenzenetetracarboxylic acid and flexible, semi-flexible and semi-flexible substituted bis(imidazole) linkers. They were characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffractions (PXRD) and thermal analyses (TG/DTA). Complexes 1–3 exhibited structural diversities depending on flexible, semi-flexible and semi-flexible substituted bis(imidazole) ligands. Complex 1 was 2D structure with 3,6L18 topology. Complex 2 had a 3D pillar-layered framework with the rare sqc27 topology. When semi-flexible substituted bis(imidazole) linker was used, 3D framework of complex 3 was obtained with the paddlewheel Cd{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 4}-type binuclear SBU. Moreover, thermal and photoluminescence properties of the complexes were determined in detailed. - Graphical abstract: In this study, three novel Cd(II)-coordination polymers were synthesized with 3,3′,5,5′-azobenzenetetracarboxylic acid and flexible, semi-flexible and semi-flexible substituted bis(imidazole) linkers. They were characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffractions (PXRD) and thermal analyses (TG/DTA). Complexes 1–3 exhibited structural diversities depending on flexible, semi-flexible and semi-flexible substituted bis(imidazole) ligands. Complex 1 was 2D structure with 3,6L18 topology. Complex 2 had a 3D pillar-layered framework with the rare sqc27 topology. When semi

  1. Diversity, distribution and spatial structure of the cold-water coral fauna of the Azores (NE Atlantic)

    OpenAIRE

    Braga-Henriques, A.; F.M. PORTEIRO; Ribeiro, P A; V. de Matos; Í. Sampaio; Ocaña, O.; Santos, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Cold-water corals are widely considered as important structural components of benthic habitats, potentially enhancing local abundance in a variety of fish and invertebrate species. Yet, current knowledge of the taxonomic diversity and distribution patterns of these vulnerable, slow-growing organisms is scarce and fragmented, limiting the effectiveness of spatial management and conservation measures. We have conducted an exhaustive compilation of records of alcyonaceans, antipatharians, s...

  2. Diversity, distribution and spatial structure of the cold-water coral fauna of the Azores (NE Atlantic)

    OpenAIRE

    Braga-Henriques, A.; F.M. PORTEIRO; Ribeiro, P A; V. de Matos; Sampaio, Í.; Ocaña, O.; Santos, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Cold-water corals are widely considered as important structural components of benthic habitats, potentially enhancing local abundance in a variety of fish and invertebrate species. Yet, current knowledge of the taxonomic diversity and distribution patterns of these vulnerable, slow-growing organisms is scarce and fragmented, limiting the effectiveness of spatial management and conservation measures. We have conducted an exhaustive compilation of records of alcyonaceans, antipatharians, sclera...

  3. Low Genetic Diversity and Structuring of the Arapaima (Osteoglossiformes, Arapaimidae) Population of the Araguaia-Tocantins Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Carla A; Nogueira, Fabrícia; Souza, Issakar L; Araripe, Juliana; Venere, Paulo C

    2017-01-01

    The arapaima, Arapaima gigas, is a fish whose populations are threatened by both overfishing and the ongoing destruction of its natural habitats. In the Amazon basin, varying levels of population structure have been found in A. gigas, although no data are available on the genetic diversity or structure of the populations found in the Araguaia-Tocantins basin, which has a topographic profile, hydrological regime, and history of fishing quite distinct from those of the Amazon. In this context, microsatellite markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and connectivity of five wild A. gigas populations in the Araguaia-Tocantins basin. The results of the analysis indicated low levels of genetic diversity in comparison with other A. gigas populations, studied in the Amazon basin. The AMOVA revealed that the Arapaima populations of the Araguaia-Tocantins basin are structured significantly. No correlation was found between pairwise FST values and the geographical distance among populations. The low level of genetic variability and the evidence of restricted gene flow may both be accounted for by overfishing, as well as the other human impacts that these populations have been exposed to over the years. The genetic fragility of these populations demands attention, given that future environmental changes (natural or otherwise) may further reduce these indices and eventually endanger these populations. The results of this study emphasize the need to take the genetic differences among the study populations into account when planning management measures and conservation strategies for the arapaima stocks of the Araguaia-Tocantins basin.

  4. Diversity, abundance and community structure of benthic macro- and megafauna on the Beaufort shelf and slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Nephin

    Full Text Available Diversity and community patterns of macro- and megafauna were compared on the Canadian Beaufort shelf and slope. Faunal sampling collected 247 taxa from 48 stations with box core and trawl gear over the summers of 2009-2011 between 50 and 1,000 m in depth. Of the 80 macrofaunal and 167 megafaunal taxa, 23% were uniques, present at only one station. Rare taxa were found to increase proportional to total taxa richness and differ between the shelf (< 100 m where they tended to be sparse and the slope where they were relatively abundant. The macrofauna principally comprised polychaetes with nephtyid polychaetes dominant on the shelf and maldanid polychaetes (up to 92% in relative abundance/station dominant on the slope. The megafauna principally comprised echinoderms with Ophiocten sp. (up to 90% in relative abundance/station dominant on the shelf and Ophiopleura sp. dominant on the slope. Macro- and megafauna had divergent patterns of abundance, taxa richness (α diversity and β diversity. A greater degree of macrofaunal than megafaunal variation in abundance, richness and β diversity was explained by confounding factors: location (east-west, sampling year and the timing of sampling with respect to sea-ice conditions. Change in megafaunal abundance, richness and β diversity was greatest across the depth gradient, with total abundance and richness elevated on the shelf compared to the slope. We conclude that megafaunal slope taxa were differentiated from shelf taxa, as faunal replacement not nestedness appears to be the main driver of megafaunal β diversity across the depth gradient.

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure in cultivated sunflower and a comparison to its wild progenitor, Helianthus annuus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, J R; Dechaine, J M; Marek, L F; Burke, J M

    2011-09-01

    Crop germplasm collections are valuable resources for ongoing plant breeding efforts. To fully utilize such collections, however, researchers need detailed information about the amount and distribution of genetic diversity present within collections. Here, we report the results of a population genetic analysis of the primary gene pool of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) based on a broad sampling of 433 cultivated accessions from North America and Europe, as well as a range-wide collection of 24 wild sunflower populations. Gene diversity across the cultivars was 0.47, as compared with 0.70 in the wilds, indicating that cultivated sunflower harbors roughly two-thirds of the total genetic diversity present in wild sunflower. Population structure analyses revealed that wild sunflower can be subdivided into four genetically distinct population clusters throughout its North American range, whereas the cultivated sunflower gene pool could be split into two main clusters separating restorer lines from the balance of the gene pool. Use of a maximum likelihood method to estimate the contribution of the wild gene pool to the cultivated sunflower germplasm revealed that the bulk of the cultivar diversity is derived from two wild sunflower population genetic clusters that are primarily composed of individuals from the east-central United States, the same general region in which sunflower domestication is believed to have occurred. We also identified a nested subset of accessions that capture as much of the allelic diversity present within the sampled cultivated sunflower germplasm collection as possible. At the high end, a core set of 288 captured nearly 90% of the alleles present in the full set of 433, whereas a core set of just 12 accessions was sufficient to capture nearly 50% of the total allelic diversity present within this sample of cultivated sunflower.

  6. On diversity performance of two-element coupling element based antenna structure for mobile terminal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Hadi, Azremi Abdullah; Toivanen, Juha; Laitinen, Tommi

    2010-01-01

    In wireless communication systems, multipath interference has a significant impact on system design and performance. Fast fading is caused by the coherent summation of one or more echoes from many reflection points reaching the receive antenna. Antenna diversity can be used to mitigate multipath...... of efficiencies, envelope correlation, and apparent and effective diversity gains in isotropic (i.e. statistically uniform) propagation channel, using spherical near-field technique in an ideal line-of-sight environment (anechoic chamber) and inside reverberation chamber. The envelope correlation is less than 0...

  7. A Preliminary Study on Vegetation Structure and Mangrove Diversity in Irakkandy Lagoon, Trincomalee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Krishnanantham

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out during the period from May to July 2014 to assess the vegetation pattern and to estimate biomass of the mangroves in Irakkandy Lagoon, Trincomalee. Five belt-transects of 10 m in width were laid perpendicular to the shoreline. Data were collected on tree diameter at breast height (dbh and tree height from each sub-plot (100 m2 in belt transects using standard methods. Above ground biomass, basal area and relative density of the mangroves were also estimated. Diversity and evenness of each sub-plot was calculated using Shannon-Wiener diversity index and Pielou’s evenness index respectively. Results revealed that the study site is composed of 5 true mangrove species and highest density was recorded for Avicennia marina (414 trees/ha, 700 saplings/ha, 2354 seedlings/ha, followed by Lumnitzera racemosa, Excoecaria agallocha, Rhizophora apiculata and Heritiera littoralis. The greatest mangrove diversity (1.28 was observed in subplot 1 of transect 2. The least mangrove diversity (0 was found in transect 5. There is a significant difference among transects concerning the diversity and evenness (P<0.05. The results showed that Avicennia marina was the dominant species with Height (H and dbh of 3.65±1.43 m and 5.06±1.07 cm respectively, followed by Lumnitzera racemosa (3.36±1.19 m and 5.81±1.06 cm, Excoecaria agallocha (4.92±2.45 m and 5.31±1.93 cm, Rhizophora apiculata (4.56±1.70 m and 4.89±0.96 cm and Heritiera littoralis (8.80±0.849 m and 26.50±4.95 cm. The above ground biomass of Lumnitzera racemosa was recorded as 8334.89 kg/ha and Avicennia marina was recorded as 1361.13 kg/ha. Species diversity (H’ of whole mangrove area studied was 0.86 and evenness (E was 0.54. It reveals that Irakkandy Lagoon consists of fairly high biological diversity (Diversity index=0.86 of mangroves and extremely valuable for stability of the ecosystem.

  8. Pheno-morphological variation, genetic diversity and population structure of Tunisian Echinus Medic (Medicago ciliaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabri, C; Sbei, H; Zitouna, N; Trifi-Farah, N; Zoghlami Khelil, A

    2016-08-26

    Medicago ciliaris L., considered as a valuable genetic resource, is a good candidate for the improvement of marginal or degraded lands with low fertility or high salinity. In this study, the pheno-morphological and genetic diversity were investigated in 14 Tunisian populations of M. ciliaris for the first time. Fourteen morphological traits showed significant differentiation between populations and high levels of diversity. Two amplified fragment length polymorphism primer combinations (E-AGC/M-CAA; E-AAG/M-CTG) were analyzed using an automated capillary electrophoresis system. A total of 528 loci were generated, of which 54% were polymorphic. Allelic polymorphism ranged from 0.02 to 0.5. Significant variation between populations was found for gene diversity, mean number of alleles per locus and Shannon index for which mean values were 0.17, 0.26, and 1.57, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance revealed a high rate of genetic variation within populations. Principal component analysis and genotypic clustering discriminated M. ciliaris populations according to their geographical origin. M. ciliaris clustered into three main groups. The first group was associated with high inland and cold areas, the second was defined by low areas with mild winters while the third described low coastal areas. Similarity of morphological and molecular results indicated that either markers could be used for the study of genetic diversity in this species.

  9. Phylogeny, Function and evolution of the cupins, a structurally conserved, functionally diverse superfamily of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khuri, S.; Bakker, F.T.; Dunwell, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The cupin superfamily is a group of functionally diverse proteins that are found in all three kingdoms of life, Archaea, Eubacteria, and Eukaryota. These proteins have a characteristic signature domain comprising two histidine- containing motifs separated by an intermotif region of variable length.

  10. Structure and diversity of small mammal communities of mountain forests in Western Carpathians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchomel, J.; Purchart, L.; Čepelka, L.; Heroldová, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 3 (2014), s. 481-490 ISSN 1612-4669 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH72075 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : species diversity * Rodents * Insectivores * Mountain forests * Carpathians Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.095, year: 2014

  11. Mitochondrial genome diversity and population structure of the giant squid Architeuthis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Inger Eleanor Hall; Campos, Paula; Strugnell, Jan

    2013-01-01

    techniques, considerable controversy exists with regard to topics as varied as their taxonomy, biology and even behaviour. In this study, we have characterized the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) diversity of 43 Architeuthis samples collected from across the range of the species, in order to use genetic...

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of leafy kale and Brassica rupestris Raf. in south Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggioni, Lorenzo; von Bothmer, Roland; Poulsen, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Local varieties of leafy kales (Brassica oleracea L.) are grown in home gardens in Calabria and Sicily for self-consumption, in the same area where the wild relative Brassica rupestris Raf. also grows. With the use of AFLP markers, comparisons were made of the genetic diversity and population str...

  13. Fire frequency and tree canopy structure influence plant species diversity in a forest-grassland ecotone

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Peterson; Peter B. Reich

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances and environmental heterogeneity are two factors thought to influence plant species diversity, but their effects are still poorly understood in many ecosystems. We surveyed understory vegetation and measured tree canopy cover on permanent plots spanning an experimental fire frequency gradient to test fire frequency and tree canopy effects on plant species...

  14. Population structure and phylogenetic relationships in a diverse panel of Brassica rapa L

    Science.gov (United States)

    The crop species Brassica rapa L. has significant economic importance around the globe. Crop domestication and improvement has resulted in extreme phenotypic diversity and subspecies that are used for oilseed, food for human consumption and fodder for livestock. However, the global distribution and ...

  15. Genetic structure of wild bonobo populations: diversity of mitochondrial DNA and geographical distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshi Kawamoto

    Full Text Available Bonobos (Pan paniscus inhabit regions south of the Congo River including all areas between its southerly tributaries. To investigate the genetic diversity and evolutionary relationship among bonobo populations, we sequenced mitochondrial DNA from 376 fecal samples collected in seven study populations located within the eastern and western limits of the species' range. In 136 effective samples from different individuals (range: 7-37 per population, we distinguished 54 haplotypes in six clades (A1, A2, B1, B2, C, D, which included a newly identified clade (D. MtDNA haplotypes were regionally clustered; 83 percent of haplotypes were locality-specific. The distribution of haplotypes across populations and the genetic diversity within populations thus showed highly geographical patterns. Using population distance measures, seven populations were categorized in three clusters: the east, central, and west cohorts. Although further elucidation of historical changes in the geological setting is required, the geographical patterns of genetic diversity seem to be shaped by paleoenvironmental changes during the Pleistocene. The present day riverine barriers appeared to have a weak effect on gene flow among populations, except for the Lomami River, which separates the TL2 population from the others. The central cohort preserves a high genetic diversity, and two unique clades of haplotypes were found in the Wamba/Iyondji populations in the central cohort and in the TL2 population in the eastern cohort respectively. This knowledge may contribute to the planning of bonobo conservation.

  16. Species composition, diversity and structure of novel forests of Castilla elastica in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Fonseca da Silva; NO-VALUE

    2014-01-01

    Attributes of novel forests (secondary forests containing introduced species) were compared with those of native secondary forests of similar age. The study area was the biological reserve called El Tallonal, in Puerto Rico. Species composition, tree density, basal area and soil bulk density were characterized; Importance value index (IVI), Shannon’s diversity index (H...

  17. The Benefits of SiC MOSFETs in a T-Type Inverter for Grid-Tie Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Alexander; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    at the expense of increased switching losses since these outer switches must now block the full DC link voltage. Silicon Carbide (SiC) MOSFET devices potentially offer substantial advantage in this context with their lower switching losses, but the benefit of replacing all switching devices in a T-Type inverter...... with SiC MOSFETs is not so clear-cut. This paper now explores this issue by presenting a detailed comparison of the use of Si and SiC devices for a three-level T-Type inverter operating in grid-tie applications. The study uses datasheet values, switching loss measurements and calibrated heat sink thermal...

  18. Dynamics of soil diazotrophic community structure, diversity, and functioning during the cropping period of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sandhya; Singh, Dileep Kumar; Annapurna, Kannepalli

    2015-01-01

    The soil sampled at different growth stages along the cropping period of cotton were analyzed using various molecular tools: restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and cloning-sequencing. The cluster analysis of the diazotrophic community structure of early sampled soil (0, 15, and 30 days) was found to be more closely related to each other than the later sampled one. Phylogenetic and diversity analysis of sequences obtained from the first (0 Day; C0) and last soil sample (180 day; C180) confirmed the data. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that C0 was having more unique sequences than C180 (presence of γ-Proteobacteria exclusively in C0). A relatively higher richness of diazotrophic community sequences was observed in C0 (S(ACE) : 30.76; S(Chao1) : 20.94) than C180 (S(ACE) : 18.00; S(Chao1) : 18.00) while the evenness component of Shannon diversity index increased from C0 (0.97) to C180 (1.15). The impact of routine agricultural activities was more evident based on diazotrophic activity (measured by acetylene reduction assay) than its structure and diversity. The nitrogenase activity of C0 (1264.85 ± 35.7 ηmol of ethylene production g(-1) dry soil h(-1) ) was statistically higher when compared to all other values (p structure/diversity and N2 fixation rates. Thus, considerable functional redundancy of nifH was concluded to be existing at the experimental site. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Diversity and genetic structure of the Mexican endemic epiphyte Tillandsia achyrostachys E. Morr. ex Baker var. achyrostachys (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Astorga, Jorge; Cruz-Angón, Andrea; Flores-Palacios, Alejandro; Vovides, Andrew P

    2004-10-01

    The monoecious, bird-pollinated epiphytic Tillandsia achyrostachys E. Morr. ex Baker var. achyrostachys is an endemic bromeliad of the tropical dry forests of Mexico with clonal growth. In the Sierra de Huautla Natural Reserve this species shows a host preference for Bursera copallifera (Sessé & Moc ex. DC) Bullock. As a result of deforestation in the study area, B. copallifera has become a rare tree species in the remaining forest patches. This human-induced disturbance has directly affected the population densities of T. achyrostachys. In this study the genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation were assessed by comparing the genetic diversity, gene flow and genetic differentiation in six populations of T. achyrostachys in the Sierra de Huautla Natural Reserve, Mexico. Allozyme electrophoresis of sixteen loci (eleven polymorphic and five monomorphic) were used. The data were analysed with standard statistical approximations for obtaining diversity, genetic structure and gene flow. Genetic diversity and allelic richness were: HE = 0.21 +/- 0.02, A = 1.86 +/- 0.08, respectively. F-statistics revealed a deficiency of heterozygous plants in all populations (Fit = 0.65 +/- 0.02 and Fis = 0.43 +/- 0.06). Significant genetic differentiation between populations was detected (Fst = 0.39 +/- 0.07). Average gene flow between pairs of populations was relatively low and had high variation (Nm = 0.46 +/- 0.21), which denotes a pattern of isolation by distance. The genetic structure of populations of T. achyrostachys suggests that habitat fragmentation has reduced allelic richness and genetic diversity, and increased significant genetic differentiation (by approx. 40 %) between populations. The F-statistic values (>0) and the level of gene flow found suggest that habitat fragmentation has broken up the former population structure. In this context, it is proposed that the host trees of T. achyrostachys should be considered as a conservation priority, since they represent the

  20. High levels of diversity and population structure in the potato late blight pathogen at the Mexico centre of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianan; Fernández-Pavía, Sylvia P; Larsen, Meredith M; Garay-Serrano, Edith; Gregorio-Cipriano, Rosario; Rodríguez-Alvarado, Gerardo; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Goss, Erica M

    2017-02-01

    Globally destructive crop pathogens often emerge by migrating out of their native ranges. These pathogens are often diverse at their centre of origin and may exhibit adaptive variation in the invaded range via multiple introductions from different source populations. However, source populations are generally unidentified or poorly studied compared to invasive populations. Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight, is one of the most costly pathogens of potato and tomato worldwide. Mexico is the centre of origin and diversity of P. infestans and migration events out of Mexico have enormously impacted disease dynamics in North America and Europe. The debate over the origin of the pathogen, and population studies of P. infestans in Mexico, has focused on the Toluca Valley, whereas neighbouring regions have been little studied. We examined the population structure of P. infestans across central Mexico, including samples from Michoacán, Tlaxcala and Toluca. We found high levels of diversity consistent with sexual reproduction in Michoacán and Tlaxcala and population subdivision that was strongly associated with geographic region. We determined that population structure in central Mexico has contributed to diversity in introduced populations based on relatedness of U.S. clonal lineages to Mexican isolates from different regions. Our results suggest that P. infestans exists as a metapopulation in central Mexico, and this population structure could be contributing to the repeated re-emergence of P. infestans in the United States and elsewhere. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genetic diversity, population structure and marker-trait associations for agronomic and grain traits in wild diploid wheat Triticum urartu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Luo, Guangbin; Yang, Wenlong; Li, Yiwen; Sun, Jiazhu; Zhan, Kehui; Liu, Dongcheng; Zhang, Aimin

    2017-07-01

    Wild diploid wheat, Triticum urartu (T. urartu) is the progenitor of bread wheat, and understanding its genetic diversity and genome function will provide considerable reference for dissecting genomic information of common wheat. In this study, we investigated the morphological and genetic diversity and population structure of 238 T. urartu accessions collected from different geographic regions. This collection had 19.37 alleles per SSR locus and its polymorphic information content (PIC) value was 0.76, and the PIC and Nei's gene diversity (GD) of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs) were 0.86 and 0.88, respectively. UPGMA clustering analysis indicated that the 238 T. urartu accessions could be classified into two subpopulations, of which Cluster I contained accessions from Eastern Mediterranean coast and those from Mesopotamia and Transcaucasia belonged to Cluster II. The wide range of genetic diversity along with the manageable number of accessions makes it one of the best collections for mining valuable genes based on marker-trait association. Significant associations were observed between simple sequence repeats (SSR) or HMW-GSs and six morphological traits: heading date (HD), plant height (PH), spike length (SPL), spikelet number per spike (SPLN), tiller angle (TA) and grain length (GL). Our data demonstrated that SSRs and HMW-GSs were useful markers for identification of beneficial genes controlling important traits in T. urartu, and subsequently for their conservation and future utilization, which may be useful for genetic improvement of the cultivated hexaploid wheat.

  2. Population structure and genetic diversity in a rice core collection (Oryza sativa L. investigated with SSR markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available The assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of a core collection would benefit to make use of these germplasm as well as applying them in association mapping. The objective of this study were to (1 examine the population structure of a rice core collection; (2 investigate the genetic diversity within and among subgroups of the rice core collection; (3 identify the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD of the rice core collection. A rice core collection consisting of 150 varieties which was established from 2260 varieties of Ting's collection of rice germplasm were genotyped with 274 SSR markers and used in this study. Two distinct subgroups (i.e. SG 1 and SG 2 were detected within the entire population by different statistical methods, which is in accordance with the differentiation of indica and japonica rice. MCLUST analysis might be an alternative method to STRUCTURE for population structure analysis. A percentage of 26% of the total markers could detect the population structure as the whole SSR marker set did with similar precision. Gene diversity and MRD between the two subspecies varied considerably across the genome, which might be used to identify candidate genes for the traits under domestication and artificial selection of indica and japonica rice. The percentage of SSR loci pairs in significant (P<0.05 LD is 46.8% in the entire population and the ratio of linked to unlinked loci pairs in LD is 1.06. Across the entire population as well as the subgroups and sub-subgroups, LD decays with genetic distance, indicating that linkage is one main cause of LD. The results of this study would provide valuable information for association mapping using the rice core collection in future.

  3. Extensive genetic diversity, unique population structure and evidence of genetic exchange in the sexually transmitted parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa D Conrad

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of human trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection world-wide. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the genetic diversity and population structure of this haploid parasite due to the lack of appropriate tools. The development of a panel of microsatellite makers and SNPs from mining the parasite's genome sequence has paved the way to a global analysis of the genetic structure of the pathogen and association with clinical phenotypes.Here we utilize a panel of T. vaginalis-specific genetic markers to genotype 235 isolates from Mexico, Chile, India, Australia, Papua New Guinea, Italy, Africa and the United States, including 19 clinical isolates recently collected from 270 women attending New York City sexually transmitted disease clinics. Using population genetic analysis, we show that T. vaginalis is a genetically diverse parasite with a unique population structure consisting of two types present in equal proportions world-wide. Parasites belonging to the two types (type 1 and type 2 differ significantly in the rate at which they harbor the T. vaginalis virus, a dsRNA virus implicated in parasite pathogenesis, and in their sensitivity to the widely-used drug, metronidazole. We also uncover evidence of genetic exchange, indicating a sexual life-cycle of the parasite despite an absence of morphologically-distinct sexual stages.Our study represents the first robust and comprehensive evaluation of global T. vaginalis genetic diversity and population structure. Our identification of a unique two-type structure, and the clinically relevant phenotypes associated with them, provides a new dimension for understanding T. vaginalis pathogenesis. In addition, our demonstration of the possibility of genetic exchange in the parasite has important implications for genetic research and control of the disease.

  4. Extensive Genetic Diversity, Unique Population Structure and Evidence of Genetic Exchange in the Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Melissa D.; Gorman, Andrew W.; Schillinger, Julia A.; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Arroyo, Rossana; Malla, Nancy; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Gonzalez, Jorge; Blank, Susan; Secor, William E.; Carlton, Jane M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of human trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection world-wide. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the genetic diversity and population structure of this haploid parasite due to the lack of appropriate tools. The development of a panel of microsatellite makers and SNPs from mining the parasite's genome sequence has paved the way to a global analysis of the genetic structure of the pathogen and association with clinical phenotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we utilize a panel of T. vaginalis-specific genetic markers to genotype 235 isolates from Mexico, Chile, India, Australia, Papua New Guinea, Italy, Africa and the United States, including 19 clinical isolates recently collected from 270 women attending New York City sexually transmitted disease clinics. Using population genetic analysis, we show that T. vaginalis is a genetically diverse parasite with a unique population structure consisting of two types present in equal proportions world-wide. Parasites belonging to the two types (type 1 and type 2) differ significantly in the rate at which they harbor the T. vaginalis virus, a dsRNA virus implicated in parasite pathogenesis, and in their sensitivity to the widely-used drug, metronidazole. We also uncover evidence of genetic exchange, indicating a sexual life-cycle of the parasite despite an absence of morphologically-distinct sexual stages. Conclusions/Significance Our study represents the first robust and comprehensive evaluation of global T. vaginalis genetic diversity and population structure. Our identification of a unique two-type structure, and the clinically relevant phenotypes associated with them, provides a new dimension for understanding T. vaginalis pathogenesis. In addition, our demonstration of the possibility of genetic exchange in the parasite has important implications for genetic research and control of the disease. PMID:22479659

  5. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2013-11-27

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (I T) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I H) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with I T generating a rebound burst and I H controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing I H to increase the efficacy of I T and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect

  6. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D.T. Engbers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs. In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH are activated during trains of IPSPs. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT, and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect effects on

  7. Phenotypic diversity, population structure and stress protein-based capacitoring in populations of Xeropicta derbentina, a heat-tolerant land snail species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lellis, Maddalena A; Sereda, Sergej; Geißler, Anna; Picot, Adrien; Arnold, Petra; Lang, Stefanie; Troschinski, Sandra; Dieterich, Andreas; Hauffe, Torsten; Capowiez, Yvan; Mazzia, Christophe; Knigge, Thomas; Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Krais, Stefanie; Wilke, Thomas; Triebskorn, Rita; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2014-11-01

    The shell colour of many pulmonate land snail species is highly diverse. Besides a genetic basis, environmentally triggered epigenetic mechanisms including stress proteins as evolutionary capacitors are thought to influence such phenotypic diversity. In this study, we investigated the relationship of stress protein (Hsp70) levels with temperature stress tolerance, population structure and phenotypic diversity within and among different populations of a xerophilic Mediterranean snail species (Xeropicta derbentina). Hsp70 levels varied considerably among populations, and were significantly associated with shell colour diversity: individuals in populations exhibiting low diversity expressed higher Hsp70 levels both constitutively and under heat stress than those of phenotypically diverse populations. In contrast, population structure (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene) did not correlate with phenotypic diversity. However, genetic parameters (both within and among population differences) were able to explain variation in Hsp70 induction at elevated but non-pathologic temperatures. Our observation that (1) population structure had a high explanatory potential for Hsp70 induction and that (2) Hsp70 levels, in turn, correlated with phenotypic diversity while (3) population structure and phenotypic diversity failed to correlate provides empirical evidence for Hsp70 to act as a mediator between genotypic variation and phenotype and thus for chaperone-driven evolutionary capacitance in natural populations.

  8. Patterns of shrub diversity and tree regeneration across topographic and stand-structural gradients in a Mediterranean forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Tiscar-Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: This study aimed to determine the influence of topography and stand-structure on the characteristics of shrub communities and tree regeneration in a Mediterranean forest. Area of study: The Navahondona forest in Cazorla mountain range (SE Spain. Material and Methods: Data from 298 inventory plots were analysed by means of Generalized Linear Models (GLM to test the effects of aspect, altitude and stand basal area on shrub cover and diversity. Likewise, the effects of these three factors plus shrub cover on the recruitment of Spanish black pine (Pinus nigra spp. salzmannii and two oak species (Quercus ilex and Q. faginea were analysed by GLMs. Additionally, the influence of topography and forest structure on the specific distribution of shrub species was analysed with multivariate methods. Main results: Shrub cover and diversity were generally low and did not change across the topographic gradient. Tree density was the only study variable affecting (negatively shrub cover. However, shrub composition changed with aspect and altitude. Both pine and oak regeneration benefited from partial tree cover at intermediate values of stand density, but only oak regeneration was facilitated by shrubs. Research highlights: Altitude, aspect and stand basal area influence the characteristics of shrub communities and tree regeneration. Proactive management of dense pinewoods might be needed to increase shrub and tree diversity.

  9. Relationship between land use pattern and the structure and diversity of soil meso-micro arthropod community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limin; Zhang, Xueping; Cui, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Soil arthropod communities can provide valuable information regarding the impacts of human disturbances on ecosystem structure. Our study evaluated the structure, composition and diversity of soil meso-micro arthropod communities, in six different vegetation types and assessed the impacts of human activity. A completely randomized design, including 3 replicates from 6 sites (mowing steppe, natural grassland, severe degradation grassland, farmland, artificial shelter forest, and wetland) was used. Soil samples from the depth of 0 to 20 cm were collected during May, July, and September 2007. Soil meso-micro arthropod were separated using the Tullgren funnels method, and were identified and counted. Soil pH value, organic matter, and total nitrogen were measured in topsoil (0-20 cm) from each site. A total of 5,602 soil meso-micro arthropod individuals were collected, representing 4 classes, 14 orders, and 57 families. Most soil arthropods were widely distributed; however, some species appeared to be influenced by environment variables, and might serve as bioindicators of adverse human impacts. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated the soil arthropod distribution in the severely degraded grassland, mowing steppe, farmland, and shelter forest differed from the natural grassland. Arthropod density and diversity were greatest in May, and the forestland community was the most stable. Because of the vital role soil arthropods have in maintaining a healthy ecosystem, mechanisms to maintain their abundance and diversity should be further evaluated.

  10. Vegetation types, dominant compositions, woody plant diversity and stand structure in Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary of Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Koushik; Datta, B K

    2015-03-01

    Present study was carried out to assess the vegetation types, diversity and phytosociological status of woody plants in Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary of Tripura, Northeast India. Vegetation data was derived by 25 line transects (10 m wide and 500 m length, each 0.5 ha size). All woody species at >10 cm gbh (Girth at Breast Height) within each plots were measured and counted. A total of six forest types were classified by cluster analysis using Importance Value Index (IVI) of 289 woody species. Species diversity, forest structure and woody community associations were evaluated and discussed. One way ANOVA revealed significant differences in all species diversity measures and stand structure along the forest types. Distribution of stem density at ten different gbh classes showed reverse J-shaped curves. Population status of woody plants was also examined through grouping of all individuals into four population age stages viz. sapling ( or = 30 - 120 - 210 cm gbh) and old (> or =210 cm). To observe dominant composition and species population trend, IVI of top ten dominant species from all forest types were tabulated. The present study suggested that Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary is an important habitat in Tripura from floristic point of view and it should be conserved on priority basis for remaining wildlife endurances and monitor for forest livelihoods products for sustainable biodiversity conservation in this region.

  11. Identifying the genetic diversity, genetic structure and a core collection of Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba accessions using microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoqun; Gao, Jiao; Du, Zengfeng; Li, Dengke; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yingyue; Pang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Ziziphus is a genus of spiny shrubs and small trees in the Rhamnaceae family. This group has a controversial taxonomy, with more than 200 species described, including Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. var. jujuba) and Indian jujube (Z. mauritiana), as well as several other important cultivated fruit crops. Using 24 SSR markers distributed across the Chinese jujube genome, 962 jujube accessions from the two largest germplasm repositories were genotyped with the aim of analyzing the genetic diversity and structure and constructing a core collection that retain high genetic diversity. A molecular profile comparison revealed 622 unique genotypes, among which 123 genotypes were genetically identical to at least one other accessions. STRUCTURE analysis and multivariate analyses (Cluster and PCoA) roughly divided the accessions into three major groups, with some admixture among groups. A simulated annealing algorithm and a heuristic algorithm were chosen to construct the core collection. A final core of 150 accessions was selected, comprising 15.6% of the analyzed accessions and retaining more than 99.5% of the total alleles detected. We found no significant differences in allele frequency distributions or in genetic diversity parameters between the chosen core accessions and the 622 genetically unique accessions. This work contributes to the understanding of Chinese jujube diversification and the protection of important germplasm resources. PMID:27531220

  12. Ciliate diversity, community structure, and novel taxa in lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Vick-Majors, Trista; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael; Priscu, John C; Amaral-Zettler, Linda

    2014-10-01

    We report an in-depth survey of next-generation DNA sequencing of ciliate diversity and community structure in two permanently ice-covered McMurdo Dry Valley lakes during the austral summer and autumn (November 2007 and March 2008). We tested hypotheses on the relationship between species richness and environmental conditions including environmental extremes, nutrient status, and day length. On the basis of the unique environment that exists in these high-latitude lakes, we expected that novel taxa would be present. Alpha diversity analyses showed that extreme conditions-that is, high salinity, low oxygen, and extreme changes in day length-did not impact ciliate richness; however, ciliate richness was 30% higher in samples with higher dissolved organic matter. Beta diversity analyses revealed that ciliate communities clustered by dissolved oxygen, depth, and salinity, but not by season (i.e., day length). The permutational analysis of variance test indicated that depth, dissolved oxygen, and salinity had significant influences on the ciliate community for the abundance matrices of resampled data, while lake and season were not significant. This result suggests that the vertical trends in dissolved oxygen concentration and salinity may play a critical role in structuring ciliate communities. A PCR-based strategy capitalizing on divergent eukaryotic V9 hypervariable region ribosomal RNA gene targets unveiled two new genera in these lakes. A novel taxon belonging to an unknown class most closely related to Cryptocaryon irritans was also inferred from separate gene phylogenies. © 2014 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  13. Microbial community structure of two freshwater sponges using Illumina MiSeq sequencing revealed high microbial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Swapnil; Shouche, Yogesh S; Gade, Wasudev N

    2016-12-01

    Sponges are primitive metazoans that are known to harbour diverse and abundant microbes. All over the world attempts are being made to exploit these microbes for their biotechnological potential to produce, bioactive compounds and antimicrobial peptides. However, the majority of the studies are focussed on the marine sponges and studies on the freshwater sponges have been neglected so far. To increase our understanding of the microbial community structure of freshwater sponges, microbiota of two fresh water sponges namely, Eunapius carteri and Corvospongilla lapidosa is explored for the first time using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology. Overall the microbial composition of these sponges comprises of 14 phyla and on an average, more than 2900 OTUs were obtained from C. lapidosa while E. carteri showed 980 OTUs which is higher than OTUs obtained in the marine sponges. Thus, our study showed that, fresh water sponges also posses highly diverse microbial community than previously thought and it is distinct from the marine sponge microbiota. The present study also revealed that microbial community structure of both the sponges is significantly different from each other and their respective water samples. In the present study, we have detected many bacterial lineages belonging to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, etc. that are known to produce compounds of biotechnological importance. Overall, this study gives insight into the microbial composition of the freshwater sponges which is highly diverse and needs to be studied further to exploit their biotechnological capabilities.

  14. Culture independent analysis using gnd as a target gene to assess Escherichia coli diversity and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Adrian L; Biggs, Patrick J; Marshall, Jonathan C; Reynolds, Angela; Collis, Rose M; French, Nigel P; Brightwell, Gale

    2017-04-12

    Current culture methods to investigate changes in Escherichia coli community structure are often slow and laborious. Genes such as gnd (6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase) have a highly variable nucleotide sequence and may provide a target for E. coli microbiome analysis using culture-independent methods. Metabarcoded PCR primers were used to generate separate libraries from calf faecal samples for high throughput sequencing. Although a total of 348 separate gnd sequence types (gSTs) were identified, 188 were likely to be due to sequencing errors. Of the remaining 160 gSTs, 92 did not match those in a database of 319 separate gnd sequences. 'Animal' was the main determinant of E. coli diversity with limited impact of sample type or DNA extraction method on intra-host E. coli community variation from faeces and recto-anal mucosal swab samples. This culture-independent study has addressed the difficulties of quantifying bacterial intra-species diversity and revealed that, whilst individual animals may harbour >50 separate E. coli strains, communities are dominated by <10 strains alongside a large pool of subdominant strains present at low abundances. This method will be useful for characterising the diversity and population structure of E. coli in experimental studies designed to assess the impact of interventions on the gut microbiome.

  15. Population genetic structure and genetic diversity of soybean aphid collections from the USA, South Korea, and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Tae-Hwan; Michel, Andrew P; Wenger, Jacob A; Kang, Sung-Taeg; Mian, M A Rouf

    2013-06-01

    Following its recent invasion of North America, the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) has become the number one insect pest of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in the north central states of the USA. A few studies have been conducted on the population genetic structure and genetic diversity of the soybean aphid and the source of its invasion in North America. Molecular markers, such as simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are very useful in the evaluation of population structure and genetic diversity. We used 18 SSR markers to assess the genetic diversity of soybean aphid collections from the USA, South Korea, and Japan. The aphids were collected from two sites in the USA (Indiana and South Dakota), two sites in South Korea (Yeonggwang district and Cheonan city), and one site in Japan (Utsunomiya). The SSR markers were highly effective in differentiating among aphid collections from different countries. The level of differentiation within each population and among populations from the same country was limited, even in the case of the USA where the two collection sites were more than 1200 km apart.

  16. SPECIES DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF FRUIT-FEEDING BUTTERFLIES (LEPIDOPTERA: NYMPHALIDAE IN AN EASTERN AMAZONIAN FOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCAS PEREIRA MARTINS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Deforestation has negative impacts on diversity and community patterns of several taxa. In the eastern Amazon, where much deforestation is predicted for the coming years, forests patches may be ess