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Sample records for structurally conserved ribosomal

  1. [Family of ribosomal proteins S1 contains unique conservative domain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deriusheva, E I; Machulin, A V; Selivanova, O M; Serdiuk, I N

    2010-01-01

    Different representatives of bacteria have different number of amino acid residues in the ribosomal proteins S1. This number varies from 111 (Spiroplasma kunkelii) to 863 a.a. (Treponema pallidum). Traditionally and for lack of this protein three-dimensional structure, its architecture is represented as repeating S1 domains. Number of these domains depends on the protein's length. Domain's quantity and its boundaries data are contained in the specialized databases, such as SMART, Pfam and PROSITE. However, for the same object these data may be very different. For search of domain's quantity and its boundaries, new approach, based on the analysis of dicted secondary structure (PsiPred), was used. This approach allowed us to reveal structural domains in amino acid sequences of S1 proteins and at that number varied from one to six. Alignment of S1 proteins, containing different domain's number, with the S1 RNAbinding domain of Escherichia coli PNPase elicited a fact that in family of ribosomal proteins SI one domain has maximal homology with S1 domain from PNPase. This conservative domain migrates along polypeptide chain and locates in proteins, containing different domain's number, according to specified pattern. In this domain as well in the S1 domain from PNPase, residues Phe-19, Phe-22, His-34, Asp-64 and Arg-68 are clustered on the surface and formed RNA binding site.

  2. Structure of Ribosomal Silencing Factor Bound to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Qingan; Jiang, Cai; Yang, Kailu; Hung, Li-Wei; Zhang, Junjie; Sacchettini, James C

    2015-10-06

    The ribosomal silencing factor RsfS slows cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis during periods of diminished nutrient availability. The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) RsfS, together with the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of the large subunit 50S of Mtb ribosome, reveals how inhibition of protein synthesis by RsfS occurs. RsfS binds to the 50S at L14, which, when occupied, blocks the association of the small subunit 30S. Although Mtb RsfS is a dimer in solution, only a single subunit binds to 50S. The overlap between the dimer interface and the L14 binding interface confirms that the RsfS dimer must first dissociate to a monomer in order to bind to L14. RsfS interacts primarily through electrostatic and hydrogen bonding to L14. The EM structure shows extended rRNA density that it is not found in the Escherichia coli ribosome, the most striking of these being the extended RNA helix of H54a. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides whose members target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed by three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here, we describe the detailed structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases, MdnC and MdnB, interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein/protein interactions key to the chemistry, suggest an origin of the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds. PMID:27669417

  4. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein-protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  5. Cryo-EM structure of the archaeal 50S ribosomal subunit in complex with initiation factor 6 and implications for ribosome evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka

    2012-01-01

    additional components of the translation machinery with eukaryotes that are absent in bacteria. One of these translation factors is initiation factor 6 (IF6), which associates with the large ribosomal subunit. We have reconstructed the 50S ribosomal subunit from the archaeon Methanothermobacter...... between this archaeal ribosome and eukaryotic ribosomes but are mostly absent in bacteria and in some archaeal lineages. Furthermore, the structure reveals that, in spite of highly divergent evolutionary trajectories of the ribosomal particle and the acquisition of novel functions of IF6 in eukaryotes......, the molecular binding of IF6 on the ribosome is conserved between eukaryotes and archaea. The structure also provides a snapshot of the reductive evolution of the archaeal ribosome and offers new insights into the evolution of the translation system in archaea....

  6. Cryo-EM Structure of the Archaeal 50S Ribosomal Subunit in Complex with Initiation Factor 6 and Implications for Ribosome Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J.; Boehringer, Daniel; Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Crnkovic, Ana; Ibba, Michael; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana; Ban, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Translation of mRNA into proteins by the ribosome is universally conserved in all cellular life. The composition and complexity of the translation machinery differ markedly between the three domains of life. Organisms from the domain Archaea show an intermediate level of complexity, sharing several additional components of the translation machinery with eukaryotes that are absent in bacteria. One of these translation factors is initiation factor 6 (IF6), which associates with the large ribosomal subunit. We have reconstructed the 50S ribosomal subunit from the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus in complex with archaeal IF6 at 6.6 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy (EM). The structure provides detailed architectural insights into the 50S ribosomal subunit from a methanogenic archaeon through identification of the rRNA expansion segments and ribosomal proteins that are shared between this archaeal ribosome and eukaryotic ribosomes but are mostly absent in bacteria and in some archaeal lineages. Furthermore, the structure reveals that, in spite of highly divergent evolutionary trajectories of the ribosomal particle and the acquisition of novel functions of IF6 in eukaryotes, the molecular binding of IF6 on the ribosome is conserved between eukaryotes and archaea. The structure also provides a snapshot of the reductive evolution of the archaeal ribosome and offers new insights into the evolution of the translation system in archaea. PMID:22306461

  7. Structure based hypothesis of a mitochondrial ribosome rescue mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynen Martijn A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background mtRF1 is a vertebrate mitochondrial protein with an unknown function that arose from a duplication of the mitochondrial release factor mtRF1a. To elucidate the function of mtRF1, we determined the positions that are conserved among mtRF1 sequences but that are different in their mtRF1a paralogs. We subsequently modeled the 3D structure of mtRF1a and mtRF1 bound to the ribosome, highlighting the structural implications of these differences to derive a hypothesis for the function of mtRF1. Results Our model predicts, in agreement with the experimental data, that the 3D structure of mtRF1a allows it to recognize the stop codons UAA and UAG in the A-site of the ribosome. In contrast, we show that mtRF1 likely can only bind the ribosome when the A-site is devoid of mRNA. Furthermore, while mtRF1a will adopt its catalytic conformation, in which it functions as a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase in the ribosome, only upon binding of a stop codon in the A-site, mtRF1 appears specifically adapted to assume this extended, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolyzing conformation in the absence of mRNA in the A-site. Conclusions We predict that mtRF1 specifically recognizes ribosomes with an empty A-site and is able to function as a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase in those situations. Stalled ribosomes with empty A-sites that still contain a tRNA bound to a peptide chain can result from the translation of truncated, stop-codon less mRNAs. We hypothesize that mtRF1 recycles such stalled ribosomes, performing a function that is analogous to that of tmRNA in bacteria. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Eugene Koonin, Prof. Knud H. Nierhaus (nominated by Dr. Sarah Teichmann and Dr. Shamil Sunyaev.

  8. The Complete Structure of the Mycobacterium smegmatis 70S Ribosome

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    Jendrik Hentschel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ribosome carries out the synthesis of proteins in every living cell. It consequently represents a frontline target in anti-microbial therapy. Tuberculosis ranks among the leading causes of death worldwide, due in large part to the combination of difficult-to-treat latency and antibiotic resistance. Here, we present the 3.3-Å cryo-EM structure of the 70S ribosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis, a close relative to the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure reveals two additional ribosomal proteins and localizes them to the vicinity of drug-target sites in both the catalytic center and the decoding site of the ribosome. Furthermore, we visualized actinobacterium-specific rRNA and protein expansions that extensively remodel the ribosomal surface with implications for polysome organization. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the idiosyncrasies of mycobacterial translation and reveal atomic details of the structure that will facilitate the design of anti-tubercular therapeutics.

  9. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

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    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  10. Defining the structural requirements for a helix in 23 S ribosomal RNA that confers erythromycin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Powers, T; Lee, J Y

    1989-01-01

    The helix spanning nucleotides 1198 to 1247 (helix 1200-1250) in Escherichia coli 23 S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is functionally important in protein synthesis, and deletions in this region confer erythromycin resistance. In order to define the structural requirements for resistance, we have dissected...... deletion mutants show a sensitive phenotype. Deletions that extend into the base-pairing between GCC1208 and GGU1240 result in non-functional 23 S RNAs, which consequently do not confer resistance. A number of phylogenetically conserved nucleotides have been shown to be non-essential for 23 S RNA function....... However, removal of either these or non-conserved nucleotides from helix 1200-1250 measurably reduces the efficiency of 23 S RNA in forming functional ribosomes. We have used chemical probing and a modified primer extension method to investigate erythromycin binding to wild-type and resistant ribosomes...

  11. The complete structure of the large subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; Bieri, Philipp; Leitner, Alexander; Schmitz, Nikolaus; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ban, Nenad

    2014-11-13

    Mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) are extensively modified ribosomes of bacterial descent specialized for the synthesis and insertion of membrane proteins that are critical for energy conversion and ATP production inside mitochondria. Mammalian mitoribosomes, which comprise 39S and 28S subunits, have diverged markedly from the bacterial ribosomes from which they are derived, rendering them unique compared to bacterial, eukaryotic cytosolic and fungal mitochondrial ribosomes. We have previously determined at 4.9 Å resolution the architecture of the porcine (Sus scrofa) 39S subunit, which is highly homologous to the human mitoribosomal large subunit. Here we present the complete atomic structure of the porcine 39S large mitoribosomal subunit determined in the context of a stalled translating mitoribosome at 3.4 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy and chemical crosslinking/mass spectrometry. The structure reveals the locations and the detailed folds of 50 mitoribosomal proteins, shows the highly conserved mitoribosomal peptidyl transferase active site in complex with its substrate transfer RNAs, and defines the path of the nascent chain in mammalian mitoribosomes along their idiosyncratic exit tunnel. Furthermore, we present evidence that a mitochondrial tRNA has become an integral component of the central protuberance of the 39S subunit where it architecturally substitutes for the absence of the 5S ribosomal RNA, a ubiquitous component of all cytoplasmic ribosomes.

  12. Structures of the E. coli translating ribosome with SRP and its receptor and with the translocon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-25

    Co-translational protein targeting to membranes is a universally conserved process. Central steps include cargo recognition by the signal recognition particle and handover to the Sec translocon. Here we present snapshots of key co-translational-targeting complexes solved by cryo-electron microscopy at near-atomic resolution, establishing the molecular contacts between the Escherichia coli translating ribosome, the signal recognition particle and the translocon. Our results reveal the conformational changes that regulate the latching of the signal sequence, the release of the heterodimeric domains of the signal recognition particle and its receptor, and the handover of the signal sequence to the translocon. We also observe that the signal recognition particle and the translocon insert-specific structural elements into the ribosomal tunnel to remodel it, possibly to sense nascent chains. Our work provides structural evidence for a conformational state of the signal recognition particle and its receptor primed for translocon binding to the ribosome-nascent chain complex.

  13. The Complete Structure of the Mycobacterium smegmatis 70S Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Jendrik; Burnside, Chloe; Mignot, Ingrid; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2017-07-05

    The ribosome carries out the synthesis of proteins in every living cell. It consequently represents a frontline target in anti-microbial therapy. Tuberculosis ranks among the leading causes of death worldwide, due in large part to the combination of difficult-to-treat latency and antibiotic resistance. Here, we present the 3.3-Å cryo-EM structure of the 70S ribosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis, a close relative to the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure reveals two additional ribosomal proteins and localizes them to the vicinity of drug-target sites in both the catalytic center and the decoding site of the ribosome. Furthermore, we visualized actinobacterium-specific rRNA and protein expansions that extensively remodel the ribosomal surface with implications for polysome organization. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the idiosyncrasies of mycobacterial translation and reveal atomic details of the structure that will facilitate the design of anti-tubercular therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural insights into methyltransferase KsgA function in 30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Daniel; O'Farrell, Heather C; Rife, Jason P; Ban, Nenad

    2012-03-23

    The assembly of the ribosomal subunits is facilitated by ribosome biogenesis factors. The universally conserved methyltransferase KsgA modifies two adjacent adenosine residues in the 3'-terminal helix 45 of the 16 S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). KsgA recognizes its substrate adenosine residues only in the context of a near mature 30S subunit and is required for the efficient processing of the rRNA termini during ribosome biogenesis. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of KsgA bound to a nonmethylated 30S ribosomal subunit. The structure reveals that KsgA binds to the 30S platform with the catalytic N-terminal domain interacting with substrate adenosine residues in helix 45 and the C-terminal domain making extensive contacts to helix 27 and helix 24. KsgA excludes the penultimate rRNA helix 44 from adopting its position in the mature 30S subunit, blocking the formation of the decoding site and subunit joining. We suggest that the activation of methyltransferase activity and subsequent dissociation of KsgA control conformational changes in helix 44 required for final rRNA processing and translation initiation.

  15. Structural Insights into Methyltransferase KsgA Function in 30S Ribosomal Subunit Biogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Daniel; O'Farrell, Heather C.; Rife, Jason P.; Ban, Nenad

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of the ribosomal subunits is facilitated by ribosome biogenesis factors. The universally conserved methyltransferase KsgA modifies two adjacent adenosine residues in the 3′-terminal helix 45 of the 16 S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). KsgA recognizes its substrate adenosine residues only in the context of a near mature 30S subunit and is required for the efficient processing of the rRNA termini during ribosome biogenesis. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of KsgA bound to a nonmethylated 30S ribosomal subunit. The structure reveals that KsgA binds to the 30S platform with the catalytic N-terminal domain interacting with substrate adenosine residues in helix 45 and the C-terminal domain making extensive contacts to helix 27 and helix 24. KsgA excludes the penultimate rRNA helix 44 from adopting its position in the mature 30S subunit, blocking the formation of the decoding site and subunit joining. We suggest that the activation of methyltransferase activity and subsequent dissociation of KsgA control conformational changes in helix 44 required for final rRNA processing and translation initiation. PMID:22308031

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of a conserved sequence motif in the ribosomal genes of the ciliate Paramecium

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    Lynch Michael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In protozoa, the identification of preserved motifs by comparative genomics is often impeded by difficulties to generate reliable alignments for non-coding sequences. Moreover, the evolutionary dynamics of regulatory elements in 3' untranslated regions (both in protozoa and metazoa remains a virtually unexplored issue. Results By screening Paramecium tetraurelia's 3' untranslated regions for 8-mers that were previously found to be preserved in mammalian 3' UTRs, we detect and characterize a motif that is distinctly conserved in the ribosomal genes of this ciliate. The motif appears to be conserved across Paramecium aurelia species but is absent from the ribosomal genes of four additional non-Paramecium species surveyed, including another ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Motif-free ribosomal genes retain fewer paralogs in the genome and appear to be lost more rapidly relative to motif-containing genes. Features associated with the discovered preserved motif are consistent with this 8-mer playing a role in post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions Our observations 1 shed light on the evolution of a putative regulatory motif across large phylogenetic distances; 2 are expected to facilitate the understanding of the modulation of ribosomal genes expression in Paramecium; and 3 reveal a largely unexplored--and presumably not restricted to Paramecium--association between the presence/absence of a DNA motif and the evolutionary fate of its host genes.

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of a conserved sequence motif in the ribosomal genes of the ciliate Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Francesco; Lynch, Michael

    2010-05-04

    In protozoa, the identification of preserved motifs by comparative genomics is often impeded by difficulties to generate reliable alignments for non-coding sequences. Moreover, the evolutionary dynamics of regulatory elements in 3' untranslated regions (both in protozoa and metazoa) remains a virtually unexplored issue. By screening Paramecium tetraurelia's 3' untranslated regions for 8-mers that were previously found to be preserved in mammalian 3' UTRs, we detect and characterize a motif that is distinctly conserved in the ribosomal genes of this ciliate. The motif appears to be conserved across Paramecium aurelia species but is absent from the ribosomal genes of four additional non-Paramecium species surveyed, including another ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Motif-free ribosomal genes retain fewer paralogs in the genome and appear to be lost more rapidly relative to motif-containing genes. Features associated with the discovered preserved motif are consistent with this 8-mer playing a role in post-transcriptional regulation. Our observations 1) shed light on the evolution of a putative regulatory motif across large phylogenetic distances; 2) are expected to facilitate the understanding of the modulation of ribosomal genes expression in Paramecium; and 3) reveal a largely unexplored--and presumably not restricted to Paramecium--association between the presence/absence of a DNA motif and the evolutionary fate of its host genes.

  18. Ribosome. The complete structure of the 55S mammalian mitochondrial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J; Bieri, Philipp; Leibundgut, Marc; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2015-04-17

    Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) synthesize mitochondrially encoded membrane proteins that are critical for mitochondrial function. Here we present the complete atomic structure of the porcine 55S mitoribosome at 3.8 angstrom resolution by cryo-electron microscopy and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry. The structure of the 28S subunit in the complex was resolved at 3.6 angstrom resolution by focused alignment, which allowed building of a detailed atomic structure including all of its 15 mitoribosomal-specific proteins. The structure reveals the intersubunit contacts in the 55S mitoribosome, the molecular architecture of the mitoribosomal messenger RNA (mRNA) binding channel and its interaction with transfer RNAs, and provides insight into the highly specialized mechanism of mRNA recruitment to the 28S subunit. Furthermore, the structure contributes to a mechanistic understanding of aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ribosome hibernation promoting factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, Heather; Berry, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of ribosome hibernation promoting factor from V. cholerae has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal was phased by two-wavelength MAD using cocrystallized cobalt. The X-ray crystal structure of ribosome hibernation promoting factor (HPF) from Vibrio cholerae is presented at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal was phased by two-wavelength MAD using cocrystallized cobalt. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of HPF linked by four Co atoms. The metal-binding sites observed in the crystal are probably not related to biological function. The structure of HPF has a typical β–α–β–β–β–α fold consistent with previous structures of YfiA and HPF from Escherichia coli. Comparison of the new structure with that of HPF from E. coli bound to the Thermus thermophilus ribosome [Polikanov et al. (2012 ▶), Science, 336, 915–918] shows that no significant structural changes are induced in HPF by binding

  20. Evolutionary conservation of nuclear and nucleolar targeting sequences in yeast ribosomal protein S6A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsius, Edgar; Walter, Korden; Leicher, Torsten; Phlippen, Wolfgang; Bisotti, Marc-Angelo; Kruppa, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Over 1 billion years ago, the animal kingdom diverged from the fungi. Nevertheless, a high sequence homology of 62% exists between human ribosomal protein S6 and S6A of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate whether this similarity in primary structure is mirrored in corresponding functional protein domains, the nuclear and nucleolar targeting signals were delineated in yeast S6A and compared to the known human S6 signals. The complete sequence of S6A and cDNA fragments was fused to the 5'-end of the LacZ gene, the constructs were transiently expressed in COS cells, and the subcellular localization of the fusion proteins was detected by indirect immunofluorescence. One bipartite and two monopartite nuclear localization signals as well as two nucleolar binding domains were identified in yeast S6A, which are located at homologous regions in human S6 protein. Remarkably, the number, nature, and position of these targeting signals have been conserved, albeit their amino acid sequences have presumably undergone a process of co-evolution with their corresponding rRNAs

  1. Unstable structure of ribosomal particles synthesized in. gamma. -irradiated Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, H; Morita, K [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1975-06-01

    Stability of Escherichia coli ribosomes newly synthesized after ..gamma..-irradiation was compared with that of normal ribosomes. The ribosomal particles around 70-S synthesized in irradiated cells were more sensitive to digestion by pancreatic ribonuclease A. A larger number of the salt-unstable '50-S' precursor particles existed in the extract from irradiated cells than in the extract from unirradiated cells. These facts suggest that ribosomal particles, synthesized during an earlier stage in irradiated cells, maintain an incomplete structure even though they are not distinguishable from normal ribosomes by means of sucrose density-gradient centrifugation.

  2. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, C. E. [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lockyer, M. [Arrow Therapeutics Ltd, Britannia House, Trinity Street, Borough, London SE1 1DA (United Kingdom); Charles, I. G. [The Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, The Cruciform Building, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hawkins, A. R. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Stammers, D. K., E-mail: daves@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  3. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, C. E.; Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K.; Lockyer, M.; Charles, I. G.; Hawkins, A. R.; Stammers, D. K.

    2007-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs

  4. Primary structures of ribosomal proteins from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui and the eubacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus.

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    Arndt, E; Scholzen, T; Krömer, W; Hatakeyama, T; Kimura, M

    1991-06-01

    Approximately 40 ribosomal proteins from each Halobacterium marismortui and Bacillus stearothermophilus have been sequenced either by direct protein sequence analysis or by DNA sequence analysis of the appropriate genes. The comparison of the amino acid sequences from the archaebacterium H marismortui with the available ribosomal proteins from the eubacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms revealed four different groups of proteins: 24 proteins are related to both eubacterial as well as eukaryotic proteins. Eleven proteins are exclusively related to eukaryotic counterparts. For three proteins only eubacterial relatives-and for another three proteins no counterpart-could be found. The similarities of the halobacterial ribosomal proteins are in general somewhat higher to their eukaryotic than to their eubacterial counterparts. The comparison of B stearothermophilus proteins with their E coli homologues showed that the proteins evolved at different rates. Some proteins are highly conserved with 64-76% identity, others are poorly conserved with only 25-34% identical amino acid residues.

  5. Conservative fragments in bacterial 16S rRNA genes and primer design for 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons in metagenomic studies

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) amplicons have been widely used in the classification of uncultured bacteria inhabiting environmental niches. Primers targeting conservative regions of the rDNAs are used to generate amplicons of variant regions

  6. A conserved chloramphenicol binding site at the entrance to the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S; Porse, Bo T

    2003-01-01

    , of E.coli 23S rRNA and G2084 (2058 in E.coli numbering) in domain V of H.halobium 23S rRNA. The modification sites overlap with a portion of the macrolide binding site and cluster at the entrance to the peptide exit tunnel. The data correlate with the recently reported chloramphenicol binding site...... on an archaeal ribosome and suggest that a similar binding site is present on the E.coli ribosome....

  7. Structural Studies of RNA Helicases Involved in Eukaryotic Pre-mRNA Splicing, Ribosome Biogenesis, and Translation Initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yangzi

    and ligates the neighbouring exons to generate mature mRNAs. Prp43 is an RNA helicase of the DEAH/RHA family. In yeast, once mRNAs are released, Prp43 catalyzes the disassembly of spliceosomes. The 18S, 5.8S and 25S rRNAs are transcribed as a single polycistronic transcript—the 35S pre......-rRNA. It is nucleolytically cleaved and chemically modified to generate mature rRNAs, which assemble with ribosomal proteins to form the ribosome. Prp43 is required for the processing of the 18S rRNA. Using X-ray crystallography, I determined a high resolution structure of Prp43 bound to ADP, the first structure of a DEAH....../RHA helicase. It defined the conserved structural features of all DEAH/RHA helicases, and unveiled a novel nucleotide binding site. Additionally a preliminary low resolution structure of a ternary complex comprising Prp43, a non-hydrolyzable ATP analogue, and a single-stranded RNA, was obtained. The ribosome...

  8. Structure of the quaternary complex between SRP, SR, and translocon bound to the translating ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Fu, Yu-Hsien Hwang; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; Shan, Shu-Ou; Ban, Nenad

    2017-05-19

    During co-translational protein targeting, the signal recognition particle (SRP) binds to the translating ribosome displaying the signal sequence to deliver it to the SRP receptor (SR) on the membrane, where the signal peptide is transferred to the translocon. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we have determined the structure of a quaternary complex of the translating Escherichia coli ribosome, the SRP-SR in the 'activated' state and the translocon. Our structure, supported by biochemical experiments, reveals that the SRP RNA adopts a kinked and untwisted conformation to allow repositioning of the 'activated' SRP-SR complex on the ribosome. In addition, we observe the translocon positioned through interactions with the SR in the vicinity of the ribosome exit tunnel where the signal sequence is extending beyond its hydrophobic binding groove of the SRP M domain towards the translocon. Our study provides new insights into the mechanism of signal sequence transfer from the SRP to the translocon.

  9. Probing the structure of ribosome assembly intermediates in vivo using DMS and hydroxyl radical footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulscher, Ryan M; Bohon, Jen; Rappé, Mollie C; Gupta, Sayan; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Sullivan, Michael; Ralston, Corie Y; Chance, Mark R; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of the Escherichia coli ribosome has been widely studied and characterized in vitro. Despite this, ribosome biogenesis in living cells is only partly understood because assembly is coupled with transcription, modification and processing of the pre-ribosomal RNA. We present a method for footprinting and isolating pre-rRNA as it is synthesized in E. coli cells. Pre-rRNA synthesis is synchronized by starvation, followed by nutrient upshift. RNA synthesized during outgrowth is metabolically labeled to facilitate isolation of recent transcripts. Combining this technique with two in vivo RNA probing methods, hydroxyl radical and DMS footprinting, allows the structure of nascent RNA to be probed over time. Together, these can be used to determine changes in the structures of ribosome assembly intermediates as they fold in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The primary structures of ribosomal proteins S14 and S16 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui. Comparison with eubacterial and eukaryotic ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, J; Kimura, M

    1987-09-05

    The amino acid sequences of two ribosomal proteins, S14 and S16, from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui have been determined. Sequence data were obtained by the manual and solid-phase sequencing of peptides derived from enzymatic digestions with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and Staphylococcus aureus protease as well as by chemical cleavage with cyanogen bromide. Proteins S14 and S16 contain 109 and 126 amino acid residues and have Mr values of 11,964 and 13,515, respectively. Comparison of the sequences with those of ribosomal proteins from other organisms demonstrates that S14 has a significant homology with the rat liver ribosomal protein S11 (36% identity) as well as with the Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S17 (37%), and that S16 is related to the yeast ribosomal protein YS22 (40%) and proteins S8 from E. coli (28%) and Bacillus stearothermophilus (30%). A comparison of the amino acid residues in the homologous regions of halophilic and nonhalophilic ribosomal proteins reveals that halophilic proteins have more glutamic acids, asparatic acids, prolines, and alanines, and less lysines, arginines, and isoleucines than their nonhalophilic counterparts. These amino acid substitutions probably contribute to the structural stability of halophilic ribosomal proteins.

  11. Cloning, periplasmic expression, purification and structural characterization of human ribosomal protein L10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Larissa Miranda

    2009-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L10 (RP L10) is a strong candidate to be included in the class of tumor suppressor proteins. This protein, also denominated as QM, is known to participate in the binding of ribosomal subunits 60S and 40S and the translation of mRNAs. It has a molecular weight that varies between 24 and 26 kDa and an isoelectric point of (pI) 10.5. The sequence of the protein QM is highly conserved in mammals, plants, invertebrates, insects and yeast which indicates its critical functions in a cell. As a tumor suppressor, RP L10 has been studied in strains of Wilm's tumor (WT-1) and tumor cells in the stomach, where was observed a decrease in the amount of its mRNA. More recently, the RP L10 was found in low amounts in the early stages of prostate adenoma and showed some mutation in ovarian cancer, what indicates its role as a suppressor protein in the development of these diseases. It has also been described that this protein interacts with c-Jun and c-Yes inhibiting growth factors and consequently, cell division. This work has an important role on the establishment of soluble expression of QM to give base information for further studies on expression that aim to evaluate the specific regions where it acts binding the 60S and 40S ribosomal subunits and translation, as well as its binding to proto-oncogenes. The cDNA for QM protein was amplified by PCR and cloned into periplasmic expression vector p3SN8. The QM protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) in the region of cytoplasm and periplasm, the best condition was obtained from the expression of the recombinant plasmid QM p1813 Q M at 25 degree C or 30 degree C, the soluble protein was obtained with small amounts of contaminants. The assays of secondary structure showed that the QM protein is predominantly alpha-helix, but when it loses the folding, this condition changes and the protein is replaced by β- sheet feature. (author)

  12. Structural and functional organization of ribosomal genes within the mammalian cell nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzini, Massimo; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Ploton, Dominique; Thiry, Marc

    2006-02-01

    Data on the in situ structural-functional organization of ribosomal genes in the mammalian cell nucleolus are reviewed here. Major findings on chromatin structure in situ come from investigations carried out using the Feulgen-like osmium ammine reaction as a highly specific electron-opaque DNA tracer. Intranucleolar chromatin shows three different levels of organization: compact clumps, fibers ranging from 11 to 30 nm, and loose agglomerates of extended DNA filaments. Both clumps and fibers of chromatin exhibit a nucleosomal organization that is lacking in the loose agglomerates of extended DNA filaments. In fact, these filaments constantly show a thickness of 2-3 nm, the same as a DNA double-helix molecule. The loose agglomerates of DNA filaments are located in the fibrillar centers, the interphase counterpart of metaphase NORs, therefore being constituted by ribosomal DNA. The extended, non-nucleosomal configuration of this rDNA has been shown to be independent of transcriptional activity and characterizes ribosome genes that are either transcribed or transcriptionally silent. Data reviewed are consistent with a model of control for ribosome gene activity that is not mediated by changes in chromatin structure. The presence of rDNA in mammalian cells always structurally ready for transcription might facilitate a more rapid adjustment of the ribosome production in response to the metabolic needs of the cell.

  13. The primary structure of rat liver ribosomal protein L37. Homology with yeast and bacterial ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A; McNally, J; Wool, I G

    1983-09-10

    The covalent structure of the rat liver 60 S ribosomal subunit protein L37 was determined. Twenty-four tryptic peptides were purified and the sequence of each was established; they accounted for all 111 residues of L37. The sequence of the first 30 residues of L37, obtained previously by automated Edman degradation of the intact protein, provided the alignment of the first 9 tryptic peptides. Three peptides (CN1, CN2, and CN3) were produced by cleavage of protein L37 with cyanogen bromide. The sequence of CN1 (65 residues) was established from the sequence of secondary peptides resulting from cleavage with trypsin and chymotrypsin. The sequence of CN1 in turn served to order tryptic peptides 1 through 14. The sequence of CN2 (15 residues) was determined entirely by a micromanual procedure and allowed the alignment of tryptic peptides 14 through 18. The sequence of the NH2-terminal 28 amino acids of CN3 (31 residues) was determined; in addition the complete sequences of the secondary tryptic and chymotryptic peptides were done. The sequence of CN3 provided the order of tryptic peptides 18 through 24. Thus the sequence of the three cyanogen bromide peptides also accounted for the 111 residues of protein L37. The carboxyl-terminal amino acids were identified after carboxypeptidase A treatment. There is a disulfide bridge between half-cystinyl residues at positions 40 and 69. Rat liver ribosomal protein L37 is homologous with yeast YP55 and with Escherichia coli L34. Moreover, there is a segment of 17 residues in rat L37 that occurs, albeit with modifications, in yeast YP55 and in E. coli S4, L20, and L34.

  14. Studies of the effects of ultraviolet radiation on the structural integrities of ribosomal RNA components of the Escherichia coli 50S ribosomal subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelic, L.; Parker, D.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of 254-nm radiation on the structural integrities of free and 50S ribosome-bound 5S and 23S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNA) have been elucidated. Irradiation of aqueous solutions of Escherichia coli 50S ribosomes with 253.7-nm radiation results in the formation of single-strand breaks in double-stranded regions of the 23S rRNA component, but not in rRNA chain scission, and destabilization of the secondary structure of the 23S rRNA toward denaturation. The minimum doses of 253.7-nm radiation required for the first detection of the two effects are 7 x 10 19 quanta for the production of single-strand breaks in double-stranded regions of the 23S rRNA, and 19 quanta for destabilization of the 23S rRNA secondary structure. Free 23S rRNA is resistant toward photoinduced chain breakage at doses of 253.7-nm radiation up to at least 2.3 x 10 20 and is much less sensitive toward destabilization of secondary structure than ribosome-bound 23S rRNA. In contrast to the photosensitivity of 50S ribosome-bound 23S rRNA toward chain breakage, 50S ribosome-bound 5S rRNA is resistant toward chain breakage at doses of 253.7-nm radiation up to at least 2.3 x 10 20 quanta. Ribosome-bound 5S and 23S rRNA are also not photosensitive toward intermolecular 5S/23S rRNA cross-linkage

  15. Linezolid-Dependent Function and Structure Adaptation of Ribosomes in a Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain Exhibiting Linezolid Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkori, Sofia; Apostolidi, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios; Pournaras, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    Linezolid-dependent growth was recently reported in Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical strains carrying mutations associated with linezolid resistance. To investigate this unexpected behavior at the molecular level, we isolated active ribosomes from one of the linezolid-dependent strains and we compared them with ribosomes isolated from a wild-type strain. Both strains were grown in the absence and presence of linezolid. Detailed biochemical and structural analyses revealed essential differences in the function and structure of isolated ribosomes which were assembled in the presence of linezolid. The catalytic activity of peptidyltransferase was found to be significantly higher in the ribosomes derived from the linezolid-dependent strain. Interestingly, the same ribosomes exhibited an abnormal ribosomal subunit dissociation profile on a sucrose gradient in the absence of linezolid, but the profile was restored after treatment of the ribosomes with an excess of the antibiotic. Our study suggests that linezolid most likely modified the ribosomal assembly procedure, leading to a new functional ribosomal population active only in the presence of linezolid. Therefore, the higher growth rate of the partially linezolid-dependent strains could be attributed to the functional and structural adaptations of ribosomes to linezolid. PMID:24890589

  16. Evolutionary Conservation of the Ribosomal Biogenesis Factor Rbm19/Mrd1: Implications for Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kallberg, Yvonne; Segerstolpe, Åsa; Lackmann, Fredrik; Persson, Bengt; Wieslander, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotes requires coordinated folding and assembly of a pre-rRNA into sequential pre-rRNA-protein complexes in which chemical modifications and RNA cleavages occur. These processes require many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and proteins. Rbm19/Mrd1 is one such protein that is built from multiple RNA-binding domains (RBDs). We find that Rbm19/Mrd1 with five RBDs is present in all branches of the eukaryotic phylogenetic tree, except in animals and Choanoflagellates, th...

  17. The ribosome structure controls and directs mRNA entry, translocation and exit dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurkcuoglu, Ozge; Doruker, Pemra; Jernigan, Robert L; Sen, Taner Z; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The protein-synthesizing ribosome undergoes large motions to effect the translocation of tRNAs and mRNA; here, the domain motions of this system are explored with a coarse-grained elastic network model using normal mode analysis. Crystal structures are used to construct various model systems of the 70S complex with/without tRNA, elongation factor Tu and the ribosomal proteins. Computed motions reveal the well-known ratchet-like rotational motion of the large subunits, as well as the head rotation of the small subunit and the high flexibility of the L1 and L7/L12 stalks, even in the absence of ribosomal proteins. This result indicates that these experimentally observed motions during translocation are inherently controlled by the ribosomal shape and only partially dependent upon GTP hydrolysis. Normal mode analysis further reveals the mobility of A- and P-tRNAs to increase in the absence of the E-tRNA. In addition, the dynamics of the E-tRNA is affected by the absence of the ribosomal protein L1. The mRNA in the entrance tunnel interacts directly with helicase proteins S3 and S4, which constrain the mRNA in a clamp-like fashion, as well as with protein S5, which likely orients the mRNA to ensure correct translation. The ribosomal proteins S7, S11 and S18 may also be involved in assuring translation fidelity by constraining the mRNA at the exit site of the channel. The mRNA also interacts with the 16S 3' end forming the Shine–Dalgarno complex at the initiation step; the 3' end may act as a 'hook' to reel in the mRNA to facilitate its exit

  18. Crystal Structure of the Oxazolidinone Antibiotic Linezolid Bound to the 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito,J.; Kanyo, Z.; Wang, D.; Franceschi, F.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.; Duffy, E.

    2008-01-01

    The oxazolidinone antibacterials target the 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes. To gain insight into their mechanism of action, the crystal structure of the canonical oxazolidinone, linezolid, has been determined bound to the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. Linezolid binds the 50S A-site, near the catalytic center, which suggests that inhibition involves competition with incoming A-site substrates. These results provide a structural basis for the discovery of improved oxazolidinones active against emerging drug-resistant clinical strains.

  19. Molecular mechanism and structure of Trigger Factor bound to the translating ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Frieder; Boehringer, Daniel; Schaffitzel, Christiane; Preissler, Steffen; Hoffmann, Anja; Maier, Timm; Rutkowska, Anna; Lozza, Jasmin; Ban, Nenad; Bukau, Bernd; Deuerling, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Ribosome-associated chaperone Trigger Factor (TF) initiates folding of newly synthesized proteins in bacteria. Here, we pinpoint by site-specific crosslinking the sequence of molecular interactions of Escherichia coli TF and nascent chains during translation. Furthermore, we provide the first full-length structure of TF associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes by using cryo-electron microscopy. In its active state, TF arches over the ribosomal exit tunnel accepting nascent chains in a protective void. The growing nascent chain initially follows a predefined path through the entire interior of TF in an unfolded conformation, and even after folding into a domain it remains accommodated inside the protective cavity of ribosome-bound TF. The adaptability to accept nascent chains of different length and folding states may explain how TF is able to assist co-translational folding of all kinds of nascent polypeptides during ongoing synthesis. Moreover, we suggest a model of how TF's chaperoning function can be coordinated with the co-translational processing and membrane targeting of nascent polypeptides by other ribosome-associated factors. PMID:18497744

  20. Structural similarities between prokaryotic and eukaryotic 5S ribosomal RNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welfle, H.; Boehm, S.; Damaschun, G.; Fabian, H.; Gast, K.; Misselwitz, R.; Mueller, J.J.; Zirwer, D.; Filimonov, V.V.; Venyaminov, S.Yu.; Zalkova, T.N.

    1986-01-01

    5S RNAs from rat liver and E. coli have been studied by diffuse X-ray and dynamic light scattering and by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Identical structures at a resolution of 1 nm can be deduced from the comparison of the experimental X-ray scattering curves and electron distance distribution functions and from the agreement of the shape parameters. A flat shape model with a compact central region and two protruding arms was derived. Double helical stems are eleven-fold helices with a mean base pair distance of 0.28 nm. The number of base pairs (26 GC, 9 AU for E. coli; 27 GC, 9 AU for rat liver) and the degree of base stacking are the same within the experimental error. A very high regularity in the ribophosphate backbone is indicated for both 5S RNAs. The observed structural similarity and the consensus secondary structure pattern derived from comparative sequence analyses suggest the conclusion that prokaryotic and eukaryotic 5S RNAs are in general very similar with respect to their fundamental structural features. (author)

  1. Structure of a prehandover mammalian ribosomal SRP·SRP receptor targeting complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kan; Jomaa, Ahmad; Lee, Jae Ho; Chandrasekar, Sowmya; Boehringer, Daniel; Shan, Shu-Ou; Ban, Nenad

    2018-04-20

    Signal recognition particle (SRP) targets proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). SRP recognizes the ribosome synthesizing a signal sequence and delivers it to the SRP receptor (SR) on the ER membrane followed by the transfer of the signal sequence to the translocon. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the mammalian translating ribosome in complex with SRP and SR in a conformation preceding signal sequence handover. The structure visualizes all eukaryotic-specific SRP and SR proteins and reveals their roles in stabilizing this conformation by forming a large protein assembly at the distal site of SRP RNA. We provide biochemical evidence that the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis of SRP·SR is delayed at this stage, possibly to provide a time window for signal sequence handover to the translocon. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Harish

    Full Text Available The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17 and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world.

  3. U2504 Determines the Species Specificity of the A-site Cleft Antibiotics: The sStructures of Tiamulin, Homoharringtonine and Bruceantin Bound to the Ribosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurel, G.; Blaha, G; Moore, P; Steitz,

    2009-01-01

    Structures have been obtained for the complexes that tiamulin, homoharringtonine, and bruceantin form with the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui at resolutions ranging from 2.65 to 3.2 {angstrom}. They show that all these inhibitors block protein synthesis by competing with the amino acid side chains of incoming aminoacyl-tRNAs for binding in the A-site cleft in the peptidyl-transferase center, which is universally conserved. In addition, these structures support the hypothesis that the species specificity exhibited by the A-site cleft inhibitors is determined by the interactions they make, or fail to make, with a single nucleotide, U2504 (Escherichia coli). In the ribosome, the position of U2504 is controlled by its interactions with neighboring nucleotides, whose identities vary among kingdoms.

  4. U2504 determines the species specificity of the A-site cleft antibiotics: the structures of tiamulin, homoharringtonine, and bruceantin bound to the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Güliz; Blaha, Gregor; Moore, Peter B; Steitz, Thomas A

    2009-05-29

    Structures have been obtained for the complexes that tiamulin, homoharringtonine, and bruceantin form with the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui at resolutions ranging from 2.65 to 3.2 A. They show that all these inhibitors block protein synthesis by competing with the amino acid side chains of incoming aminoacyl-tRNAs for binding in the A-site cleft in the peptidyl-transferase center, which is universally conserved. In addition, these structures support the hypothesis that the species specificity exhibited by the A-site cleft inhibitors is determined by the interactions they make, or fail to make, with a single nucleotide, U2504 (Escherichia coli). In the ribosome, the position of U2504 is controlled by its interactions with neighboring nucleotides, whose identities vary among kingdoms.

  5. U2504 Determines the Species Specificity of the A-site Cleft Antibiotics. The Structures of Tiamulin, Homoharringtonine and Bruceantin Bound to the Ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Güliz; Blaha, Gregor; Moore, Peter B.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Structures have been obtained for the complexes tiamulin, homoharringtonine and bruceatin form with the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui at resolutions ranging from 2.8 to 3.2 Å. They show that these inhibitors all block protein synthesis by competing with the amino acid side chains of incoming aminoacyl-tRNAs for binding in the A-site cleft in the peptidyl transferase center, which is universally conserved. In addition these structures support the hypothesis that the species-specificity exhibited by the A-site cleft inhibitors is determined by the interactions they make, or fail to make, with a single nucleotide, U2504 (E. coli). In the ribosome, the position of U2504 is controlled by its interactions with neighboring nucleotides, whose identities vary among kingdoms. PMID:19362093

  6. U2504 Determines the Species Specificity of the A-Site Cleft Antibiotics: The Structures of Tiamulin, Homoharringtonine, and Bruceantin Bound to the Ribosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gürel, Güliz; Blaha, Gregor; Moore, Peter B.; Steitz, Thomas A.; Yale

    2009-06-30

    Structures have been obtained for the complexes that tiamulin, homoharringtonine, and bruceantin form with the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui at resolutions ranging from 2.65 to 3.2 {angstrom}. They show that all these inhibitors block protein synthesis by competing with the amino acid side chains of incoming aminoacyl-tRNAs for binding in the Asite cleft in the peptidyl-transferase center, which is universally conserved. In addition, these structures support the hypothesis that the species specificity exhibited by the A-site cleft inhibitors is determined by the interactions they make, or fail to make, with a single nucleotide, U2504 (Escherichia coli). In the ribosome, the position of U2504 is controlled by its interactions with neighboring nucleotides, whose identities vary among kingdoms.

  7. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Thomas A. Steitz and the structure of the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Over the past 200 years, there have been countless groundbreaking discoveries in biology and medicine at Yale University. However, one particularly noteworthy discovery with profoundly important and broad consequences happened here in just the past two decades. In 2009, Thomas Steitz, the Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "studies of the structure and function of the ribosome," along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. This article covers the historical context of Steitz's important discovery, the techniques his laboratory used to study the ribosome, and the impact that this research has had, and will have, on the future of biological and medical research.

  8. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  9. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus: Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemons, William M. Jr.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2001-01-01

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 (angstrom) resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 (angstrom) resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  10. Ribosome-dependent ATPase interacts with conserved membrane protein in Escherichia coli to modulate protein synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    Full Text Available Elongation factor RbbA is required for ATP-dependent deacyl-tRNA release presumably after each peptide bond formation; however, there is no information about the cellular role. Proteomic analysis in Escherichia coli revealed that RbbA reciprocally co-purified with a conserved inner membrane protein of unknown function, YhjD. Both proteins are also physically associated with the 30S ribosome and with members of the lipopolysaccharide transport machinery. Genome-wide genetic screens of rbbA and yhjD deletion mutants revealed aggravating genetic interactions with mutants deficient in the electron transport chain. Cells lacking both rbbA and yhjD exhibited reduced cell division, respiration and global protein synthesis as well as increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting the ETC and the accuracy of protein synthesis. Our results suggest that RbbA appears to function together with YhjD as part of a regulatory network that impacts bacterial oxidative phosphorylation and translation efficiency.

  11. Secondary structure of prokaryotic 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Garrett, R A

    1981-01-01

    The structures of 5S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus were examined by using ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom ribonuclease. By using both 5' and 3'-32P-end labeling methods and selecting for digested but intact 5S RNA molecules...... evidence for three of the helical regions of the Fox and Woese model of 5S RNA [Fox, G. E., & Woese, C. (1975) Nature (London) 256, 505] and support other important structural features which include a nucleotide looped out from a helical region which has been proposed as a recognition site for protein L18....

  12. Structural Basis for Linezolid Binding Site Rearrangement in the Staphylococcus aureus Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousoff, Matthew J; Eyal, Zohar; Radjainia, Mazdak; Ahmed, Tofayel; Bamert, Rebecca S; Matzov, Donna; Bashan, Anat; Zimmerman, Ella; Mishra, Satabdi; Cameron, David; Elmlund, Hans; Peleg, Anton Y; Bhushan, Shashi; Lithgow, Trevor; Yonath, Ada

    2017-05-09

    An unorthodox, surprising mechanism of resistance to the antibiotic linezolid was revealed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) in the 70S ribosomes from a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus This high-resolution structural information demonstrated that a single amino acid deletion in ribosomal protein uL3 confers linezolid resistance despite being located 24 Å away from the linezolid binding pocket in the peptidyl-transferase center. The mutation induces a cascade of allosteric structural rearrangements of the rRNA that ultimately results in the alteration of the antibiotic binding site. IMPORTANCE The growing burden on human health caused by various antibiotic resistance mutations now includes prevalent Staphylococcus aureus resistance to last-line antimicrobial drugs such as linezolid and daptomycin. Structure-informed drug modification represents a frontier with respect to designing advanced clinical therapies, but success in this strategy requires rapid, facile means to shed light on the structural basis for drug resistance (D. Brown, Nat Rev Drug Discov 14:821-832, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd4675). Here, detailed structural information demonstrates that a common mechanism is at play in linezolid resistance and provides a step toward the redesign of oxazolidinone antibiotics, a strategy that could thwart known mechanisms of linezolid resistance. Copyright © 2017 Belousoff et al.

  13. Linezolid-Dependent Function and Structure Adaptation of Ribosomes in a Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain Exhibiting Linezolid Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkori, Sofia; Apostolidi, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios; Pournaras, Spyros; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Dinos, George

    2014-01-01

    Linezolid-dependent growth was recently reported in Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical strains carrying mutations associated with linezolid resistance. To investigate this unexpected behavior at the molecular level, we isolated active ribosomes from one of the linezolid-dependent strains and we compared them with ribosomes isolated from a wild-type strain. Both strains were grown in the absence and presence of linezolid. Detailed biochemical and structural analyses revealed essential differe...

  14. Cryo-EM structures of the 80S ribosomes from human parasites Trichomonas vaginalis and Toxoplasma gondii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifei Li; Qiang Guo; Lvqin Zheng; Yongsheng Ji; Yi-Ting Xie; De-Hua Lai; Zhao-Rong Lun; Xun Suo; Ning Gao

    2017-01-01

    As an indispensable molecular machine universal in all living organisms,the ribosome has been selected by evolution to be the natural target of many antibiotics and small-molecule inhibitors.High-resolution structures of pathogen ribosomes are crucial for understanding the general and unique aspects of translation control in disease-causing microbes.With cryo-electron microscopy technique,we have determined structures of the cytosolic ribosomes from two human parasites,Trichomonas vaginalis and Toxoplasma gondii,at resolution of 3.2-3.4,(A).Although the ribosomal proteins from both pathogens are typical members of eukaryotic families,with a co-evolution pattern between certain species-specific insertions/extensions and neighboring ribosomal RNA (rRNA) expansion segments,the sizes of their rRNAs are sharply different.Very interestingly,rRNAs of T.vaginalis are in size comparable to prokaryotic counterparts,with nearly all the eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments missing.These structures facilitate the dissection of evolution path for ribosomal proteins and RNAs,and may aid in design of novel translation inhibitors.

  15. Requirement for a conserved, tertiary interaction in the core of 23S ribosomal RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, C; Douthwaite, S

    1994-01-01

    RNA. Every substitution that disrupts the potential for Watson-Crick base pairing between these positions reduces or abolishes the participation of 23S rRNA in protein synthesis. All mutant 23S rRNAs are assembled into 50S subunits, but the mutant subunits are less able to stably interact with 30S subunits...... is nonfunctional. In contrast to the considerable effect the mutations have on function, they impart only slight structural changes on the naked rRNA, and these are limited to the immediate vicinity of the mutations. The data show that positions 1262 and 2017 pair in a Watson-Crick manner, but the data also...

  16. From DNA to proteins via the ribosome: Structural insights into the workings of the translation machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agirrezabala Xabier

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Understanding protein synthesis in bacteria and humans is important for understanding the origin of many human diseases and devising treatments for them. Over the past decade, the field of structural biology has made significant advances in the visualisation of the molecular machinery involved in protein synthesis. It is now possible to discern, at least in outline, the way that interlocking ribosomal components and factors adapt their conformations throughout this process. The determination of structures in various functional contexts, along with the application of kinetic and fluorescent resonance energy transfer approaches to the problem, has given researchers the frame of reference for what remains as the greatest challenge: the complete dynamic portrait of protein synthesis in the cell.

  17. Understanding structural conservation through materials science:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuster-López, Laura; Krarup Andersen, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    with tools to avoid future problems, it should be present in all conservation-restoration training programs to help promote students’ understanding of the degradation mechanisms in cultural materials (and their correlation with chemical and biological degradation) as well as the implications behind......Mechanical properties and the structure of materials are key elements in understanding how structural interventions in conservation treatments affect cultural heritage objects. In this context, engineering mechanics can help determine the strength and stability found in art objects as it can...... provide both explanation and prediction of failure in materials. It has therefore shown to be an effective method for developing useful solutions to conservation problems. Since materials science and mechanics can help conservators predict the long term consequences of their treatments and provide them...

  18. Cryo-EM structure of Hepatitis C virus IRES bound to the human ribosome at 3.9-Å resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Nick; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; van den Heuvel, Joop; Ban, Nenad

    2015-07-08

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a widespread human pathogen, is dependent on a highly structured 5'-untranslated region of its mRNA, referred to as internal ribosome entry site (IRES), for the translation of all of its proteins. The HCV IRES initiates translation by directly binding to the small ribosomal subunit (40S), circumventing the need for many eukaryotic translation initiation factors required for mRNA scanning. Here we present the cryo-EM structure of the human 40S ribosomal subunit in complex with the HCV IRES at 3.9 Å resolution, determined by focused refinement of an 80S ribosome-HCV IRES complex. The structure reveals the molecular details of the interactions between the IRES and the 40S, showing that expansion segment 7 (ES7) of the 18S rRNA acts as a central anchor point for the HCV IRES. The structural data rationalizes previous biochemical and genetic evidence regarding the initiation mechanism of the HCV and other related IRESs.

  19. Modeling of the structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the archaeon Haloarcula marismortui

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskaya, N. A.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Vakhrusheva, A. V.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui proliferates in the Dead Sea at extremely high salt concentrations (higher than 3 M). This is the only archaeon, for which the crystal structure of the ribosomal 50S subunit was determined. However, the structure of the functionally important side protuberance containing the abnormally negatively charged protein L1 (HmaL1) was not visualized. Attempts to crystallize HmaL1 in the isolated state or as its complex with RNA using normal salt concentrations (≤500 mM) failed. A theoretical model of HmaL1 was built based on the structural data for homologs of the protein L1 from other organisms, and this model was refined by molecular dynamics methods. Analysis of this model showed that the protein HmaL1 can undergo aggregation due to the presence of a cluster of positive charges unique for proteins L1. This cluster is located at the RNA-protein interface, which interferes with the crystallization of HmaL1 and the binding of the latter to RNA.

  20. Structure of the Human Mitochondrial Ribosome Studied In Situ by Cryoelectron Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englmeier, Robert; Pfeffer, Stefan; Förster, Friedrich

    2017-10-03

    Mitochondria maintain their own genome and its corresponding protein synthesis machine, the mitochondrial ribosome (mitoribosome). Mitoribosomes primarily synthesize highly hydrophobic proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recent studies revealed the complete structure of the isolated mammalian mitoribosome, but its mode of membrane association remained hypothetical. In this study, we used cryoelectron tomography to visualize human mitoribosomes in isolated mitochondria. The subtomogram average of the membrane-associated human mitoribosome reveals a single major contact site with the inner membrane, mediated by the mitochondria-specific protein mL45. A second rRNA-mediated contact site that is present in yeast is absent in humans, resulting in a more variable association of the human mitoribosome with the inner membrane. Despite extensive structural differences of mammalian and fungal mitoribosomal structure, the principal organization of peptide exit tunnel and the mL45 homolog remains invariant, presumably to align the mitoribosome with the membrane-embedded insertion machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ribosomal DNA sequence heterogeneity reflects intraspecies phylogenies and predicts genome structure in two contrasting yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Claire; James, Stephen A; Davey, Robert P; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N

    2014-07-01

    The ribosomal RNA encapsulates a wealth of evolutionary information, including genetic variation that can be used to discriminate between organisms at a wide range of taxonomic levels. For example, the prokaryotic 16S rDNA sequence is very widely used both in phylogenetic studies and as a marker in metagenomic surveys and the internal transcribed spacer region, frequently used in plant phylogenetics, is now recognized as a fungal DNA barcode. However, this widespread use does not escape criticism, principally due to issues such as difficulties in classification of paralogous versus orthologous rDNA units and intragenomic variation, both of which may be significant barriers to accurate phylogenetic inference. We recently analyzed data sets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, characterizing rDNA sequence variation within multiple strains of the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its nearest wild relative Saccharomyces paradoxus in unprecedented detail. Notably, both species possess single locus rDNA systems. Here, we use these new variation datasets to assess whether a more detailed characterization of the rDNA locus can alleviate the second of these phylogenetic issues, sequence heterogeneity, while controlling for the first. We demonstrate that a strong phylogenetic signal exists within both datasets and illustrate how they can be used, with existing methodology, to estimate intraspecies phylogenies of yeast strains consistent with those derived from whole-genome approaches. We also describe the use of partial Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, a type of sequence variation found only in repetitive genomic regions, in identifying key evolutionary features such as genome hybridization events and show their consistency with whole-genome Structure analyses. We conclude that our approach can transform rDNA sequence heterogeneity from a problem to a useful source of evolutionary information, enabling the estimation of highly accurate phylogenies of

  2. Conservative fragments in bacterial 16S rRNA genes and primer design for 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons in metagenomic studies

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2009-10-09

    Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) amplicons have been widely used in the classification of uncultured bacteria inhabiting environmental niches. Primers targeting conservative regions of the rDNAs are used to generate amplicons of variant regions that are informative in taxonomic assignment. One problem is that the percentage coverage and application scope of the primers used in previous studies are largely unknown. In this study, conservative fragments of available rDNA sequences were first mined and then used to search for candidate primers within the fragments by measuring the coverage rate defined as the percentage of bacterial sequences containing the target. Thirty predicted primers with a high coverage rate (>90%) were identified, which were basically located in the same conservative regions as known primers in previous reports, whereas 30% of the known primers were associated with a coverage rate of <90%. The application scope of the primers was also examined by calculating the percentages of failed detections in bacterial phyla. Primers A519-539, E969- 983, E1063-1081, U515 and E517, are highly recommended because of their high coverage in almost all phyla. As expected, the three predominant phyla, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Proteobacteria, are best covered by the predicted primers. The primers recommended in this report shall facilitate a comprehensive and reliable survey of bacterial diversity in metagenomic studies. © 2009 Wang, Qian.

  3. The importance of highly conserved nucleotides in the binding region of chloramphenicol at the peptidyl transfer centre of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Birte; Garrett, Roger Antony

    1988-01-01

    in vivo on a plasmid-encoded rRNA (rrnB) operon and each one yielded dramatically altered phenotypes. Cells exhibiting A2060----C or A2450----C transversions were inviable and it was shown by inserting the mutated genes after a temperature-inducible promoter that the mutant RNAs were directly responsible...... into 50S subunits, but while the two lethal mutant RNAs were strongly selected against in 70S ribosomes, the plasmid-encoded A2503----C RNA was preferred over the chromosome-encoded RNA, contrary to current regulatory theories. The results establish the critical structural and functional importance...

  4. The complete structure of the chloroplast 70S ribosome in complex with translation factor pY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Philipp; Leibundgut, Marc; Saurer, Martin; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2017-02-15

    Chloroplasts are cellular organelles of plants and algae that are responsible for energy conversion and carbon fixation by the photosynthetic reaction. As a consequence of their endosymbiotic origin, they still contain their own genome and the machinery for protein biosynthesis. Here, we present the atomic structure of the chloroplast 70S ribosome prepared from spinach leaves and resolved by cryo-EM at 3.4 Å resolution. The complete structure reveals the features of the 4.5S rRNA, which probably evolved by the fragmentation of the 23S rRNA, and all five plastid-specific ribosomal proteins. These proteins, required for proper assembly and function of the chloroplast translation machinery, bind and stabilize rRNA including regions that only exist in the chloroplast ribosome. Furthermore, the structure reveals plastid-specific extensions of ribosomal proteins that extensively remodel the mRNA entry and exit site on the small subunit as well as the polypeptide tunnel exit and the putative binding site of the signal recognition particle on the large subunit. The translation factor pY, involved in light- and temperature-dependent control of protein synthesis, is bound to the mRNA channel of the small subunit and interacts with 16S rRNA nucleotides at the A-site and P-site, where it protects the decoding centre and inhibits translation by preventing tRNA binding. The small subunit is locked by pY in a non-rotated state, in which the intersubunit bridges to the large subunit are stabilized. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  5. Structure of the hepatitis C virus IRES bound to the human 80S ribosome: remodeling of the HCV IRES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Daniel; Thermann, Rolf; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Lewis, Joe D; Stark, Holger

    2005-11-01

    Initiation of translation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein is driven by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNA that bypasses much of the eukaryotic translation initiation machinery. Here, single-particle electron cryomicroscopy has been used to study the mechanism of HCV IRES-mediated initiation. A HeLa in vitro translation system was used to assemble human IRES-80S ribosome complexes under near physiological conditions; these were stalled before elongation. Domain 2 of the HCV IRES is bound to the tRNA exit site, touching the L1 stalk of the 60S subunit, suggesting a mechanism for the removal of the HCV IRES in the progression to elongation. Domain 3 of the HCV IRES positions the initiation codon in the ribosomal mRNA binding cleft by binding helix 28 at the head of the 40S subunit. The comparison with the previously published binary 40S-HCV IRES complex reveals structural rearrangements in the two pseudoknot structures of the HCV IRES in translation initiation.

  6. A Deconvolution Protocol for ChIP-Seq Reveals Analogous Enhancer Structures on the Mouse and Human Ribosomal RNA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Clement Mars

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and Massively Parallel Sequencing, or ChIP-Seq, has greatly advanced our genome-wide understanding of chromatin and enhancer structures. However, its resolution at any given genetic locus is limited by several factors. In applying ChIP-Seq to the study of the ribosomal RNA genes, we found that a major limitation to resolution was imposed by the underlying variability in sequence coverage that very often dominates the protein–DNA interaction profiles. Here, we describe a simple numerical deconvolution approach that, in large part, corrects for this variability, and significantly improves both the resolution and quantitation of protein–DNA interaction maps deduced from ChIP-Seq data. This approach has allowed us to determine the in vivo organization of the RNA polymerase I preinitiation complexes that form at the promoters and enhancers of the mouse (Mus musculus and human (Homo sapiens ribosomal RNA genes, and to reveal a phased binding of the HMG-box factor UBF across the rDNA. The data identify and map a “Spacer Promoter” and associated stalled polymerase in the intergenic spacer of the human ribosomal RNA genes, and reveal a very similar enhancer structure to that found in rodents and lower vertebrates.

  7. A comparison of structural and evolutionary attributes of Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunits: signatures of thermal adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurav Mallik

    Full Text Available Here we compare the structural and evolutionary attributes of Thermus thermophilus and Escherichia coli small ribosomal subunits (SSU. Our results indicate that with few exceptions, thermophilic 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA is densely packed compared to that of mesophilic at most of the analogous spatial regions. In addition, we have located species-specific cavity clusters (SSCCs in both species. E. coli SSCCs are numerous and larger compared to T. thermophilus SSCCs, which again indicates densely packed thermophilic 16S rRNA. Thermophilic ribosomal proteins (r-proteins have longer disordered regions than their mesophilic homologs and they experience larger disorder-to-order transitions during SSU-assembly. This is reflected in the predicted higher conformational changes of thermophilic r-proteins compared to their mesophilic homologs during SSU-assembly. This high conformational change of thermophilic r-proteins may help them to associate with the 16S ribosomal RNA with high complementary interfaces, larger interface areas, and denser molecular contacts, compared to those of mesophilic. Thus, thermophilic protein-rRNA interfaces are tightly associated with 16S rRNA than their mesophilic homologs. Densely packed 16S rRNA interior and tight protein-rRNA binding of T. thermophilus (compared to those of E. coli are likely the signatures of its thermal adaptation. We have found a linear correlation between the free energy of protein-RNA interface formation, interface size, and square of conformational changes, which is followed in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic SSU. Disorder is associated with high protein-RNA interface polarity. We have found an evolutionary tendency to maintain high polarity (thereby disorder at protein-rRNA interfaces, than that at rest of the protein structures. However, some proteins exhibit exceptions to this general trend.

  8. Identification, characterization and structure analysis of a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from Sapium sebiferum (Euphorbiaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ying [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering and Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China); College of Food and Bioengineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023, Henan (China); Mao, Yingji [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering and Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China); Jin, Shan; Hou, Jinyan; Du, Hua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering and Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); Yang, Minglei, E-mail: yml888@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering and Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); Wu, Lifang, E-mail: lfwu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering and Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China)

    2015-08-07

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases (EC3.2.2.22) that universally inactivate the ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein biosynthesis. In this study, a novel type I RIPs named SEBIN was identified in Sapium sebiferum. Nuclear acid depurine experiment showed that SEBIN had rRNA N-Glycosidase activity. Further experiment indicated that SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development as well as resulted in worm cell apoptosis. This is the first report to evaluate RIPs toxicity using C. elegans. We proposed that SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner besides traditional protein synthesis inhibition approach. The predicted 3D structure was modeled using threading and ab initio modeling, and the r-RNA binding residue of SEBIN was identified through the protein-ligand docking approach. It showed the amino acid residues, Glu195, Asn81, Ala82, Tyr83, Glu164, Ser163, Ile159 and Arg167, played critical roles in catalytic process. Our results provided the theoretical foundation of structure–function relationships between enzymatic properties, toxicity and structural characterization of SEBIN. - Graphical abstract: Superposition of main chains of ricin (cyan) and SEBIN (brown), and adenine binding site residues of SEBIN. - Highlights: • A Ribosome-inactivating proteins gene (SEBIN) was isolated from Sapium sebiferum. • SEBIN had DNase activity besides widely reported ribosome inactivation via N-glycosidases activity. • SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development in vivo. • SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner with the aid of mutant strains hus-1 and clk-2. • The possible active sites between SEBIN and the adenine of rRNA were predicted.

  9. Identification, characterization and structure analysis of a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from Sapium sebiferum (Euphorbiaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ying; Mao, Yingji; Jin, Shan; Hou, Jinyan; Du, Hua; Yang, Minglei; Wu, Lifang

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases (EC3.2.2.22) that universally inactivate the ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein biosynthesis. In this study, a novel type I RIPs named SEBIN was identified in Sapium sebiferum. Nuclear acid depurine experiment showed that SEBIN had rRNA N-Glycosidase activity. Further experiment indicated that SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development as well as resulted in worm cell apoptosis. This is the first report to evaluate RIPs toxicity using C. elegans. We proposed that SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner besides traditional protein synthesis inhibition approach. The predicted 3D structure was modeled using threading and ab initio modeling, and the r-RNA binding residue of SEBIN was identified through the protein-ligand docking approach. It showed the amino acid residues, Glu195, Asn81, Ala82, Tyr83, Glu164, Ser163, Ile159 and Arg167, played critical roles in catalytic process. Our results provided the theoretical foundation of structure–function relationships between enzymatic properties, toxicity and structural characterization of SEBIN. - Graphical abstract: Superposition of main chains of ricin (cyan) and SEBIN (brown), and adenine binding site residues of SEBIN. - Highlights: • A Ribosome-inactivating proteins gene (SEBIN) was isolated from Sapium sebiferum. • SEBIN had DNase activity besides widely reported ribosome inactivation via N-glycosidases activity. • SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development in vivo. • SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner with the aid of mutant strains hus-1 and clk-2. • The possible active sites between SEBIN and the adenine of rRNA were predicted

  10. Specific structural probing of plasmid-coded ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, C; Rosendahl, G; Dam, M

    1991-01-01

    The preferred method for construction and in vivo expression of mutagenised Escherichia coli ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) is via high copy number plasmids. Transcription of wild-type rRNA from the seven chromosomal rrn operons in strains harbouring plasmid-coded mutant rRNAs leads to a heterogeneous...

  11. A ribosome without RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold S Bernhardt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It was Francis Crick who first asked why the ribosome contains so much RNA, and discussed the implications of this for the direct flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. Remarkable advances in our understanding of the ribosome and protein synthesis, including the recent publication of two mammalian mitochondrial ribosome structures, have shed new light on this intriguing aspect of evolution in molecular biology. We examine here whether RNA is indispensable for coded protein synthesis, or whether an all-protein ‘ribosome’ (or ‘synthosome’ might be possible, with a protein enzyme catalyzing peptide synthesis, and release factor-like protein adaptors able to read a message composed of deoxyribonucleotides. We also compare the RNA world hypothesis with the alternative ‘proteins first’ hypothesis in terms of their different understandings of the evolution of the ribosome, and whether this might have been preceded by an ancestral form of nonribosomal peptide synthesis catalyzed by protein enzymes.

  12. Compact structure of ribosomal protein S4 in solution as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdyuk, I.N.; Sarkisyan, M.A.; Gogia, Z.V.

    1981-01-01

    The authors report the results of a small-angle X-ray scattering study of ribosomal protein preparations obtained by neutron scattering method. The theoretical resolution of the diffractometer (Kratky camera, the entrance slit 80 μm, the receiving slit 190 μm, the sample-detector distance 20.4 cm) was the same as the resolution of X-ray diffractometers, on which high rsub(g) values for ribosomal proteins were obtained. They used protein S4 adjusted to 20 mg/ml without any essential loss of solubility. The scattering indicatrix obtained in a wide range of angles has demonstrated that the X-ray rsub(g) obtained here coincides with the earlier obtained neutron rsub(g) and the outer part of the scattering curve is similar to that of slightly elongated compact bodies. They conclude that all discrepancies between their data on the study of ribosomal protein structure in solution and other data are not connected with the characteristics of the instruments used but only with the quality of the protein preparations. (Auth.)

  13. Conservation of concrete structures according to fib Model Code 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, S.; Bigaj-Van Vliet, A.; Ueda, T.

    2013-01-01

    Conservation of concrete structures forms an essential part of the fib Model Code for Concrete Structures 2010 (fib Model Code 2010). In particular, Chapter 9 of fib Model Code 2010 addresses issues concerning conservation strategies and tactics, conservation management, condition surveys, condition

  14. RNA-binding domain of the A protein component of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein analyzed by NMR spectroscopy is structurally similar to ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.W.; Query, C.C.; Golden, B.L.; White, S.W.; Keene, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    An RNA recognition motif (RRM) of ∼80 amino acids constitutes the core of RNA-binding domains found in a large family of proteins involved in RNA processing. The U1 RNA-binding domain of the A protein component of the human U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which encompasses the RRM sequence, was analyzed by using NMR spectroscopy. The domain of the A protein is a highly stable monomer in solution consisting of four antiparallel β-strands and two α-helices. The highly conserved RNP1 and RNP2 consensus sequences, containing residues previously suggested to be involved in nucleic acid binding, are juxtaposed in adjacent β-strands. Conserved aromatic side chains that are critical for RNA binding are clustered on the surface to the molecule adjacent to a variable loop that influences recognition of specific RNA sequences. The secondary structure and topology of the RRM are similar to those of ribosomal proteins L12 and L30, suggesting a distant evolutionary relationship between these two types of RNA-associated proteins

  15. Expanding the ribosomal universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinman, Jonathan D; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2009-12-09

    In this issue of Structure, Taylor et al. (2009) present the most complete model of an eukaryotic ribosome to date. This achievement represents a critical milestone along the path to structurally defining the unique aspects of the eukaryotic protein synthetic machinery.

  16. Cloning, periplasmic expression, purification and structural characterization of human ribosomal protein L10; Clonagem, expressao, purificacao e caracterizacao estrutural da proteina ribossomal L10 humana recombinante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Larissa Miranda

    2009-07-01

    The ribosomal protein L10 (RP L10) is a strong candidate to be included in the class of tumor suppressor proteins. This protein, also denominated as QM, is known to participate in the binding of ribosomal subunits 60S and 40S and the translation of mRNAs. It has a molecular weight that varies between 24 and 26 kDa and an isoelectric point of (pI) 10.5. The sequence of the protein QM is highly conserved in mammals, plants, invertebrates, insects and yeast which indicates its critical functions in a cell. As a tumor suppressor, RP L10 has been studied in strains of Wilm's tumor (WT-1) and tumor cells in the stomach, where was observed a decrease in the amount of its mRNA. More recently, the RP L10 was found in low amounts in the early stages of prostate adenoma and showed some mutation in ovarian cancer, what indicates its role as a suppressor protein in the development of these diseases. It has also been described that this protein interacts with c-Jun and c-Yes inhibiting growth factors and consequently, cell division. This work has an important role on the establishment of soluble expression of QM to give base information for further studies on expression that aim to evaluate the specific regions where it acts binding the 60S and 40S ribosomal subunits and translation, as well as its binding to proto-oncogenes. The cDNA for QM protein was amplified by PCR and cloned into periplasmic expression vector p3SN8. The QM protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) in the region of cytoplasm and periplasm, the best condition was obtained from the expression of the recombinant plasmid QM p1813{sub Q}M at 25 degree C or 30 degree C, the soluble protein was obtained with small amounts of contaminants. The assays of secondary structure showed that the QM protein is predominantly alpha-helix, but when it loses the folding, this condition changes and the protein is replaced by {beta}- sheet feature. (author)

  17. Energy conservation through thermally insulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Dayyeh, Ayoub

    2006-01-01

    The propose of this paper is to explicate its title through investigating the different available thermal insulating materials and the various techniques of application, as practiced in Jordan, in particular, and as practiced in many parts of the world in general, which will satisfy Jordanian standards in terms of heat transmittance and thermal comfort. A brief comparison with international standards will shed some light on the stringent measures enforced in the developed world and on our striving aspirations to keep pace. The paper consists of four main parts, pseudoally divided. The first part will deal with the mechanism of heat loss and heat gain in structures during summer and winter. It will also explain the Time-lag phenomenon which is vital for providing thermal comfort inside the dwellings. The second part will evaluate the damages induced by the temperature gradients on the different elements of the structure, particularly next to exterior opening. The paper will also demonstrate the damages induced by water condensation and fungus growth on the internal surfaces of the structure and within its skeleton. A correlation between condensation and thermal insulation will be established. The third part of the paper will evaluate the different available thermal insulating materials and the application techniques which will satisfy the needs for thermal insulating and thermal comfort at the least cost possible. The criteria of an economical design shall be established. As a conclusion, the paper infers answers to the following different criteria discussed throughout the different parts of the paper. The main theme of questions can be summarized as follows: 1)How energy conservation is possible due to thermal insulation? 2)The feasibility of investing in thermal insulation? 3)Is thermal comfort and a healthy atmosphere possible inside the dwellings during all season! What are the conditions necessary to sustain them? 4)What environmental impacts can exist due to

  18. Relative Stabilities of Conserved and Non-Conserved Structures in the OB-Fold Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei T. Alexandrescu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The OB-fold is a diverse structure superfamily based on a β-barrel motif that is often supplemented with additional non-conserved secondary structures. Previous deletion mutagenesis and NMR hydrogen exchange studies of three OB-fold proteins showed that the structural stabilities of sites within the conserved β-barrels were larger than sites in non-conserved segments. In this work we examined a database of 80 representative domain structures currently classified as OB-folds, to establish the basis of this effect. Residue-specific values were obtained for the number of Cα-Cα distance contacts, sequence hydrophobicities, crystallographic B-factors, and theoretical B-factors calculated from a Gaussian Network Model. All four parameters point to a larger average flexibility for the non-conserved structures compared to the conserved β-barrels. The theoretical B-factors and contact densities show the highest sensitivity.Our results suggest a model of protein structure evolution in which novel structural features develop at the periphery of conserved motifs. Core residues are more resistant to structural changes during evolution since their substitution would disrupt a larger number of interactions. Similar factors are likely to account for the differences in stability to unfolding between conserved and non-conserved structures.

  19. Structural basis for ribosome protein S1 interaction with RNA in trans-translation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Dai, Yazhuang; Hou, Meijing; Wang, Huilin; Yao, Hongwei; Guo, Chenyun; Lin, Donghai; Liao, Xinli

    2017-05-27

    Ribosomal protein S1 (RpsA), the largest 30S protein in ribosome, plays a significant role in translation and trans-translation. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the C-terminus of RpsA is known as tuberculosis drug target of pyrazinoic acid, which inhibits the interaction between MtRpsA and tmRNA in trans-translation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction of MtRpsA with tmRNA remains unknown. We herein analyzed the interaction of the C-terminal domain of MtRpsA with three RNA fragments poly(A), sMLD and pre-sMLD. NMR titration analysis revealed that the RNA binding sites on MtRpsA CTD are mainly located in the β2, β3 and β5 strands and the adjacent L3 loop of the S1 domain. Fluorescence experiments determined the MtRpsA CTD binding to RNAs are in the micromolar affinity range. Sequence analysis also revealed conserved residues in the mapped RNA binding region. Residues L304, V305, G308, F310, H322, I323, R357 and I358 were verified to be the key residues influencing the interaction between MtRpsA CTD and pre-sMLD. Molecular docking further confirmed that the poly(A)-like sequence and sMLD of tmRNA are all involved in the protein-RNA interaction, through charged interaction and hydrogen bonds. The results will be beneficial for designing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The structure of additive conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmut Reen

    1979-01-01

    All additive conserved quantities are listed for a system with short range central force interaction between the particles: a special case shows up in Boltzmann H-theorem and his derivation of the Maxwell velocity distribution. It is concluded that in classical mechanics of mass points there are no other additive conservation laws besides of energy, momentum, angular momentum and center of mass motion. A generator is considered of a symmetry transformation defined as integral over a conserved local current density where the latter, in general, needs not be covariant under translations

  1. Atomic resolution structure of cucurmosin, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Xiaomin; Meehan, Edward J.; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing (UAH); (Fujian); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2008-10-27

    A novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) designated cucurmosin was isolated from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata (pumpkin). Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, cucurmosin exhibits strong cytotoxicities to three cancer cell lines of both human and murine origins, but low toxicity to normal cells. Plant genomic DNA extracted from the tender leaves was amplified by PCR between primers based on the N-terminal sequence and X-ray sequence of the C-terminal. The complete mature protein sequence was obtained from N-terminal protein sequencing and partial DNA sequencing, confirmed by high resolution crystal structure analysis. The crystal structure of cucurmosin has been determined at 1.04 {angstrom}, a resolution that has never been achieved before for any RIP. The structure contains two domains: a large N-terminal domain composed of seven {alpha}-helices and eight {beta}-strands, and a smaller C-terminal domain consisting of three {alpha}-helices and two {beta}-strands. The high resolution structure established a glycosylation pattern of GlcNAc{sub 2}Man3Xyl. Asn225 was identified as a glycosylation site. Residues Tyr70, Tyr109, Glu158 and Arg161 define the active site of cucurmosin as an RNA N-glycosidase. The structural basis of cytotoxicity difference between cucurmosin and trichosanthin is discussed.

  2. Structural model of the 50S subunit of E.Coli ribosomes from solution scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svergun, D.I.; Koch, M.H.J. [Hamburg Outstation (Germany); Pedersen, J.S. [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); Serdyuk, I.N. [Inst. of Protein Research, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The application of new methods of small-angle scattering data interpretation to a contrast variation study of the 50S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli in solution is described. The X-ray data from contrast variation with sucrose are analyzed in terms of the basic scattering curves from the volume inaccessible to sucrose and from the regions inside this volume occupied mainly by RNA and by proteins. From these curves models of the shape of the 50S and its RNA-rich core are evaluated and positioned so that their difference produces a scattering curve which is in good agreement with the scattering from the protein moiety. Basing on this preliminary model, the X-ray and neutron contrast variation data of the 50S subunit in aqueous solutions are interpreted in the frame of the advanced two-phase model described by the shapes of the 50S subunit and its RNA-rich core taking into account density fluctuations inside the RNA and the protein moiety. The shape of the envelope of the 50S subunit and of the RNA-rich core are evaluated with a resolution of about 40A. The shape of the envelope is in good agreement with the models of the 50S subunit obtained from electron microscopy on isolated particles. The shape of the RNA-rich core correlates well with the model of the entire particle determined by the image reconstruction from ordered sheets indicating that the latter model which is based on the subjective contouring of density maps is heavily biased towards the RNA.

  3. Structural model of the 50S subunit of E.Coli ribosomes from solution scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svergun, D.I.; Koch, M.H.J.; Pedersen, J.S.; Serdyuk, I.N.

    1994-01-01

    The application of new methods of small-angle scattering data interpretation to a contrast variation study of the 50S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli in solution is described. The X-ray data from contrast variation with sucrose are analyzed in terms of the basic scattering curves from the volume inaccessible to sucrose and from the regions inside this volume occupied mainly by RNA and by proteins. From these curves models of the shape of the 50S and its RNA-rich core are evaluated and positioned so that their difference produces a scattering curve which is in good agreement with the scattering from the protein moiety. Basing on this preliminary model, the X-ray and neutron contrast variation data of the 50S subunit in aqueous solutions are interpreted in the frame of the advanced two-phase model described by the shapes of the 50S subunit and its RNA-rich core taking into account density fluctuations inside the RNA and the protein moiety. The shape of the envelope of the 50S subunit and of the RNA-rich core are evaluated with a resolution of about 40A. The shape of the envelope is in good agreement with the models of the 50S subunit obtained from electron microscopy on isolated particles. The shape of the RNA-rich core correlates well with the model of the entire particle determined by the image reconstruction from ordered sheets indicating that the latter model which is based on the subjective contouring of density maps is heavily biased towards the RNA

  4. Higher-order structure in the 3'-terminal domain VI of the 23 S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, R A; Christensen, A; Douthwaite, S

    1984-01-01

    An experimental approach was used to determine, and compare, the higher-order structure within domain VI of the 23 S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus. This domain, which encompasses approximately 300 nucleotides at the 3' end of the RNAs, consists of two large ...

  5. 5SRNAdb: an information resource for 5S ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Maciej; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Barciszewski, Jan; Erdmann, Volker A; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2016-01-04

    Ribosomal 5S RNA (5S rRNA) is the ubiquitous RNA component found in the large subunit of ribosomes in all known organisms. Due to its small size, abundance and evolutionary conservation 5S rRNA for many years now is used as a model molecule in studies on RNA structure, RNA-protein interactions and molecular phylogeny. 5SRNAdb (http://combio.pl/5srnadb/) is the first database that provides a high quality reference set of ribosomal 5S RNAs (5S rRNA) across three domains of life. Here, we give an overview of new developments in the database and associated web tools since 2002, including updates to database content, curation processes and user web interfaces. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Auerbach-Nevo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  7. Tilapia and human CLIC2 structures are highly conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiao; Li, Zhengjun; Lui, Eei Yin; Lam, Siew Hong; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2018-01-08

    Chloride intracellular channels (CLICs) exist in soluble and membrane bound forms. We have determined the crystal structure of soluble Clic2 from the euryhaline teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus. Structural comparison of tilapia and human CLIC2 with other CLICs shows that these proteins are highly conserved. We have also compared the expression levels of clic2 in selected osmoregulatory organs of tilapia, acclimated to freshwater, seawater and hypersaline water. Structural conservation of vertebrate CLICs implies that they might play conserved roles. Also, tissue-specific responsiveness of clic2 suggests that it might be involved in iono-osmoregulation under extreme conditions in tilapia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure of the JmjC domain-containing protein NO66 complexed with ribosomal protein Rpl8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chengliang [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Zhang, Qiongdi [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Hang, Tianrong [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Tao, Yue [Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, 1678 Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120, People’s Republic of (China); Ma, Xukai [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Wu, Minhao; Zhang, Xuan, E-mail: xuanzbin@ustc.edu.cn; Zang, Jianye, E-mail: xuanzbin@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China)

    2015-08-28

    The structure of the complex of NO66 and Rpl8 was solved in the native state and NO66 recognizes the consensus motif NHXH . Tetramerization is required for efficient substrate binding and catalysis by NO66. The JmjC domain-containing proteins belong to a large family of oxygenases possessing distinct substrate specificities which are involved in the regulation of different biological processes, such as gene transcription, RNA processing and translation. Nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) is a JmjC domain-containing protein which has been reported to be a histone demethylase and a ribosome protein 8 (Rpl8) hydroxylase. The present biochemical study confirmed the hydroxylase activity of NO66 and showed that oligomerization is required for NO66 to efficiently catalyze the hydroxylation of Rpl8. The structures of NO66{sup 176–C} complexed with Rpl8{sup 204–224} in a tetrameric form and of the mutant protein M2 in a dimeric form were solved. Based on the results of structural and biochemical analyses, the consensus sequence motif NHXH recognized by NO66 was confirmed. Several potential substrates of NO66 were found by a BLAST search according to the consensus sequence motif. When binding to substrate, the relative positions of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer shift. Oligomerization may facilitate the motion of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer and affect the catalytic activity.

  9. Strategies for measuring evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofacker Ivo L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structure is a typical feature of many functional non-coding RNAs. Since almost all of the available methods used for prediction and annotation of non-coding RNA genes rely on this evolutionary signature, accurate measures for structural conservation are essential. Results We systematically assessed the ability of various measures to detect conserved RNA structures in multiple sequence alignments. We tested three existing and eight novel strategies that are based on metrics of folding energies, metrics of single optimal structure predictions, and metrics of structure ensembles. We find that the folding energy based SCI score used in the RNAz program and a simple base-pair distance metric are by far the most accurate. The use of more complex metrics like for example tree editing does not improve performance. A variant of the SCI performed particularly well on highly conserved alignments and is thus a viable alternative when only little evolutionary information is available. Surprisingly, ensemble based methods that, in principle, could benefit from the additional information contained in sub-optimal structures, perform particularly poorly. As a general trend, we observed that methods that include a consensus structure prediction outperformed equivalent methods that only consider pairwise comparisons. Conclusion Structural conservation can be measured accurately with relatively simple and intuitive metrics. They have the potential to form the basis of future RNA gene finders, that face new challenges like finding lineage specific structures or detecting mis-aligned sequences.

  10. Conservation-dissipation structure of chemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Wen-An

    2012-12-01

    In this Brief Report, we show that balanced chemical reaction systems governed by the law of mass action have an elegant conservation-dissipation structure. From this structure a number of important conclusions can be easily deduced. In particular, with the help of this structure we can rigorously justify the classical partial equilibrium approximation in chemical kinetics.

  11. Chromatin structure of ribosomal RNA genes in dipterans and its relationship to the location of nucleolar organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madalena, Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez; Díez, José Luís; Gorab, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoli, nuclear organelles in which ribosomal RNA is synthesized and processed, emerge from nucleolar organizers (NORs) located in distinct chromosomal regions. In polytene nuclei of dipterans, nucleoli of some species can be observed under light microscopy exhibiting distinctive morphology: Drosophila and chironomid species display well-formed nucleoli in contrast to the fragmented and dispersed nucleoli seen in sciarid flies. The available data show no apparent relationship between nucleolar morphology and location of NORs in Diptera. The regulation of rRNA transcription involves controlling both the transcription rate per gene as well as the proportion of rRNA genes adopting a proper chromatin structure for transcription, since active and inactive rRNA gene copies coexist in NORs. Transcription units organized in nucleosomes and those lacking canonical nucleosomes can be analyzed by the method termed psoralen gel retarding assay (PGRA), allowing inferences on the ratio of active to inactive rRNA gene copies. In this work, possible connections between chromosomal location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes were studied in Drosophila melanogaster, and in chironomid and sciarid species. The data suggested a link between location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes since the copy number showing nucleosomal organization predominates when NORs are located in the pericentric heterochromatin. The results presented in this work are in agreement with previous data on the chromatin structure of rRNA genes from distantly related eukaryotes, as assessed by the PGRA.

  12. Chromatin structure of ribosomal RNA genes in dipterans and its relationship to the location of nucleolar organizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez Madalena

    Full Text Available Nucleoli, nuclear organelles in which ribosomal RNA is synthesized and processed, emerge from nucleolar organizers (NORs located in distinct chromosomal regions. In polytene nuclei of dipterans, nucleoli of some species can be observed under light microscopy exhibiting distinctive morphology: Drosophila and chironomid species display well-formed nucleoli in contrast to the fragmented and dispersed nucleoli seen in sciarid flies. The available data show no apparent relationship between nucleolar morphology and location of NORs in Diptera. The regulation of rRNA transcription involves controlling both the transcription rate per gene as well as the proportion of rRNA genes adopting a proper chromatin structure for transcription, since active and inactive rRNA gene copies coexist in NORs. Transcription units organized in nucleosomes and those lacking canonical nucleosomes can be analyzed by the method termed psoralen gel retarding assay (PGRA, allowing inferences on the ratio of active to inactive rRNA gene copies. In this work, possible connections between chromosomal location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes were studied in Drosophila melanogaster, and in chironomid and sciarid species. The data suggested a link between location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes since the copy number showing nucleosomal organization predominates when NORs are located in the pericentric heterochromatin. The results presented in this work are in agreement with previous data on the chromatin structure of rRNA genes from distantly related eukaryotes, as assessed by the PGRA.

  13. The primary structures of ribosomal proteins L16, L23 and L33 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, T; Hatakeyama, T; Kimura, M

    1988-11-21

    The complete amino acid sequences of ribosomal proteins L16, L23 and L33 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui were determined. The sequences were established by manual sequencing of peptides produced with several proteases as well as by cleavage with dilute HCl. Proteins L16, L23 and L33 consist of 119, 154 and 69 amino acid residues, and their molecular masses are 13,538, 16,812 and 7620 Da, respectively. The comparison of their sequences with those of ribosomal proteins from other organisms revealed that L23 and L33 are related to eubacterial ribosomal proteins from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus, while protein L16 was found to be homologous to a eukaryotic ribosomal protein from yeast. These results provide information about the special phylogenetic position of archaebacteria.

  14. The primary structure of L37--a rat ribosomal protein with a zinc finger-like motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y L; Paz, V; Olvera, J; Wool, I G

    1993-04-30

    The amino acid sequence of the rat 60S ribosomal subunit protein L37 was deduced from the sequence of nucleotides in a recombinant cDNA. Ribosomal protein L37 has 96 amino acids, the NH2-terminal methionine is removed after translation of the mRNA, and has a molecular weight of 10,939. Ribosomal protein L37 has a single zinc finger-like motif of the C2-C2 type. Hybridization of the cDNA to digests of nuclear DNA suggests that there are 13 or 14 copies of the L37 gene. The mRNA for the protein is about 500 nucleotides in length. Rat L37 is related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein YL35 and to Caenorhabditis elegans L37. We have identified in the data base a DNA sequence that encodes the chicken homolog of rat L37.

  15. 5S rRNA and ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongadze, G M

    2011-12-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the ribosome of all living organisms. It is known that the ribosome without 5S rRNA is functionally inactive. However, the question about the specific role of this RNA in functioning of the translation apparatus is still open. This review presents a brief history of the discovery of 5S rRNA and studies of its origin and localization in the ribosome. The previously expressed hypotheses about the role of this RNA in the functioning of the ribosome are discussed considering the unique location of 5S rRNA in the ribosome and its intermolecular contacts. Based on analysis of the current data on ribosome structure and its functional complexes, the role of 5S rRNA as an intermediary between ribosome functional domains is discussed.

  16. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein-protein interactions within late pre-40S ribosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody G Campbell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome assembly in eukaryotic organisms requires more than 200 assembly factors to facilitate and coordinate rRNA transcription, processing, and folding with the binding of the ribosomal proteins. Many of these assembly factors bind and dissociate at defined times giving rise to discrete assembly intermediates, some of which have been partially characterized with regards to their protein and RNA composition. Here, we have analyzed the protein-protein interactions between the seven assembly factors bound to late cytoplasmic pre-40S ribosomes using recombinant proteins in binding assays. Our data show that these factors form two modules: one comprising Enp1 and the export adaptor Ltv1 near the beak structure, and the second comprising the kinase Rio2, the nuclease Nob1, and a regulatory RNA binding protein Dim2/Pno1 on the front of the head. The GTPase-like Tsr1 and the universally conserved methylase Dim1 are also peripherally connected to this second module. Additionally, in an effort to further define the locations for these essential proteins, we have analyzed the interactions between these assembly factors and six ribosomal proteins: Rps0, Rps3, Rps5, Rps14, Rps15 and Rps29. Together, these results and previous RNA-protein crosslinking data allow us to propose a model for the binding sites of these seven assembly factors. Furthermore, our data show that the essential kinase Rio2 is located at the center of the pre-ribosomal particle and interacts, directly or indirectly, with every other assembly factor, as well as three ribosomal proteins required for cytoplasmic 40S maturation. These data suggest that Rio2 could play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic maturation steps.

  18. Analysis of Conserved Structural Features of Selenoprotein K | Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selenium plays important roles in human health and these roles may be exerted through its presence in selenoproteins. Among the 25 selenoproteins in human is selenoprotein K (SelK) whose exact function is still unclear. Here, we investigated the conserved structural features of SelK using bioinformatics as an approach ...

  19. Detection and Quantification of Ribosome Inhibition by Aminoglycoside Antibiotics in Living Bacteria Using an Orthogonal Ribosome-Controlled Fluorescent Reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shijie; Zhu, Xuechen; Melançon, Charles E

    2016-01-15

    The ribosome is the quintessential antibacterial drug target, with many structurally and mechanistically distinct classes of antibacterial agents acting by inhibiting ribosome function. Detecting and quantifying ribosome inhibition by small molecules and investigating their binding modes and mechanisms of action are critical to antibacterial drug discovery and development efforts. To develop a ribosome inhibition assay that is operationally simple, yet provides direct information on the drug target and the mechanism of action, we have developed engineered E. coli strains harboring an orthogonal ribosome-controlled green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter that produce fluorescent signal when the orthogonal ribosome is inhibited. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate that these strains, when coexpressing homogeneous populations of aminoglycoside resistant ribosomes, act as sensitive and quantitative detectors of ribosome inhibition by a set of 12 structurally diverse aminoglycoside antibiotics. We suggest that this strategy can be extended to quantifying ribosome inhibition by other drug classes.

  20. Structural and functional implications in the eubacterial ribosome as revealed by protein-rRNA and antibiotic contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann-Liebold, B; Uhlein, M; Urlaub, H; Müller, E C; Otto, A; Bischof, O

    1995-01-01

    Contact sites between protein and rRNA in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus were investigated at the molecular level using UV and 2-iminothiolane as cross-linkers. Thirteen ribosomal proteins (S3, S4, S7, S14, S17, L2, L4, L6, L14, L27, L28, L29, and L36) from these organisms were cross-linked in direct contact with the RNAs, and the peptide stretches as well as amino acids involved were identified. Further, the binding sites of puromycin and spiramycin were established at the peptide level in several proteins that were found to constitute the antibiotic-binding sites. Peptide stretches of puromycin binding were identified from proteins S7, S14, S18, L18, AND L29; those of spiramycin attachment were derived from proteins S12, S14, L17, L18, L27, and L35. Comparison of the RNA-peptide contact sites with the peptides identified for antibiotic binding and with those altered in antibiotic-resistant mutants clearly showed identical peptide areas to be involved and, hence, demonstrated the functional importance of these peptides. Further evidence for a functional implication of ribosomal proteins in the translational process came from complementation experiments in which protein L2 from Halobacterium marismortui was incorporated into the E. coli ribosomes that were active. The incorporated protein was present in 50S subunits and 70S particles, in disomes, and in higher polysomes. These results clearly demonstrate the functional implication of protein L2 in protein biosynthesis. Incorporation studies with a mutant of HmaL2 with a replacement of histidine-229 by glycine completely abolished the functional activity of the ribosome. Accordingly, protein L2 with histidine-229 is a crucial element of the translational machinery.

  1. Mutational analysis of S12 protein and implications for the accuracy of decoding by the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Cukras, Anthony R; Rogers, Elizabeth J; Southworth, Daniel R; Green, Rachel

    2007-12-07

    The fidelity of aminoacyl-tRNA selection by the ribosome depends on a conformational switch in the decoding center of the small ribosomal subunit induced by cognate but not by near-cognate aminoacyl-tRNA. The aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin bind to the decoding center and induce related structural rearrangements that explain their observed effects on miscoding. Structural and biochemical studies have identified ribosomal protein S12 (as well as specific nucleotides in 16S ribosomal RNA) as a critical molecular contributor in distinguishing between cognate and near-cognate tRNA species as well as in promoting more global rearrangements in the small subunit, referred to as "closure." Here we use a mutational approach to define contributions made by two highly conserved loops in S12 to the process of tRNA selection. Most S12 variant ribosomes tested display increased levels of fidelity (a "restrictive" phenotype). Interestingly, several variants, K42A and R53A, were substantially resistant to the miscoding effects of paromomycin. Further characterization of the compromised paromomycin response identified a probable second, fidelity-modulating binding site for paromomycin in the 16S ribosomal RNA that facilitates closure of the small subunit and compensates for defects associated with the S12 mutations.

  2. Inhibition of peptide bond formation by pleuromutilins: the structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with tiamulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlünzen, Frank; Pyetan, Erez; Fucini, Paola; Yonath, Ada; Harms, Jörg M

    2004-12-01

    Tiamulin, a prominent member of the pleuromutilin class of antibiotics, is a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis in bacteria. Up to now the effect of pleuromutilins on the ribosome has not been determined on a molecular level. The 3.5 A structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with tiamulin provides for the first time a detailed picture of its interactions with the 23S rRNA, thus explaining the molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of the pleuromutilin class of antibiotics. Our results show that tiamulin is located within the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of the 50S ribosomal subunit with its tricyclic mutilin core positioned in a tight pocket at the A-tRNA binding site. Also, the extension, which protrudes from its mutilin core, partially overlaps with the P-tRNA binding site. Thereby, tiamulin directly inhibits peptide bond formation. Comparison of the tiamulin binding site with other PTC targeting drugs, like chloramphenicol, clindamycin and streptogramins, may facilitate the design of modified or hybridized drugs that extend the applicability of this class of antibiotics.

  3. Structural Features of the Seneca Valley Virus Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) Element: a Picornavirus with a Pestivirus-Like IRES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willcocks, Margaret M.; Locker, Nicolas; Gomwalk, Zarmwa

    2011-01-01

    The RNA genome of Seneca Valley virus (SVV), a recently identified picornavirus, contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element which has structural and functional similarity to that from classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and hepatitis C virus, members of the FLAVIVIRIDAE: The SVV IRES...... has an absolute requirement for the presence of a short region of virus-coding sequence to allow it to function either in cells or in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. The IRES activity does not require the translation initiation factor eIF4A or intact eIF4G. The predicted secondary structure indicates...

  4. A structured blood conservation program in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak, A B; McCusker, K; Gunaydin, S

    2017-03-01

    The limitation of alternative transfusion practices in infants increases the benefits of blood conservation. We analyzed the efficacy of a structured program to reduce transfusions and transfusion-associated complications in cardiac surgery PATIENTS AND METHODS: Our pediatric surgery database was reviewed retrospectively, comparing outcomes from two different time periods, after the implementation of an effective blood conservation program beginning in March 2014. A total of 214 infants (8.1±3.4 months) who underwent biventricular repair utilizing CPB (Group 1 - Blood conservation) were studied in a 12-month period (March 2014-February 2015) after the implementation of the new program, and compared with 250 infants (7.91±3.2 months) (Group 2 - Control-No blood conservation) of the previous 12-month period (March 2013-February 2014). The proportion of patients transfused with red blood cells was 75.2% (N=188) in control group and reduced by 16.4% in the study group (58.8% - 126 patients, p blood products, justify blood conservation in pediatric cardiac operations. Circuit miniaturization, ultrafiltration, and reduced postoperative bleeding, presumably secondary to higher fibrinogen and other coagulation factor levels, contributed to this outcome.

  5. Trapping the ribosome to control gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2007-09-21

    Protein synthesis is often regulated by structured mRNAs that interact with ribosomes. In this issue of Cell, Marzi et al. (2007) provide insights into the autoregulation of protein S15 by visualizing the folded repressor mRNA on the ribosome stalled in the preinitiation state. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of translation initiation in general.

  6. Cryo-EM structure of the E. coli translating ribosome in complex with SRP and its receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrozi, Leandro F.; Boehringer, Daniel; Shan, Shu-ou; Ban, Nenad; Schaffitzel, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    We report the early conformation of the E. coli signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor FtsY bound to the translating ribosome by cryo-electron microscopy. FtsY binds to the tetraloop of the SRP RNA whereas the NG-domains of the SRP protein and FtsY interact weakly in this conformation. Our results suggest that optimal positioning of the SRP RNA tetraloop and the Ffh NG-domain leads to FtsY recruitment. PMID:21151118

  7. Molecular interactions within the halophilic, thermophilic, and mesophilic prokaryotic ribosomal complexes: clues to environmental adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Using the available crystal structures of 50S ribosomal subunits from three prokaryotic species: Escherichia coli (mesophilic), Thermus thermophilus (thermophilic), and Haloarcula marismortui (halophilic), we have analyzed different structural features of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), proteins, and of their interfaces. We have correlated these structural features with the environmental adaptation strategies of the corresponding species. While dense intra-rRNA packing is observed in thermophilic, loose intra-rRNA packing is observed in halophilic (both compared to mesophilic). Interestingly, protein-rRNA interfaces of both the extremophiles are densely packed compared to that of the mesophilic. The intersubunit bridge regions are almost devoid of cavities, probably ensuring the proper formation of each bridge (by not allowing any loosely packed region nearby). During rRNA binding, the ribosomal proteins experience some structural transitions. Here, we have analyzed the intrinsically disordered and ordered regions of the ribosomal proteins, which are subjected to such transitions. The intrinsically disordered and disorder-to-order transition sites of the thermophilic and mesophilic ribosomal proteins are simultaneously (i) highly conserved and (ii) slowly evolving compared to rest of the protein structure. Although high conservation is observed at such sites of halophilic ribosomal proteins, but slow rate of evolution is absent. Such differences between thermophilic, mesophilic, and halophilic can be explained from their environmental adaptation strategy. Interestingly, a universal biophysical principle evident by a linear relationship between the free energy of interface formation, interface area, and structural changes of r-proteins during assembly is always maintained, irrespective of the environmental conditions.

  8. Trans-kingdom mimicry underlies ribosome customization by a poxvirus kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sujata; Rollins, Madeline G; Fuchs, Gabriele; Procter, Dean J; Hall, Elizabeth A; Cozzolino, Kira; Sarnow, Peter; Savas, Jeffrey N; Walsh, Derek

    2017-06-29

    Ribosomes have the capacity to selectively control translation through changes in their composition that enable recognition of specific RNA elements. However, beyond differential subunit expression during development, evidence for regulated ribosome specification within individual cells has remained elusive. Here we report that a poxvirus kinase phosphorylates serine/threonine residues in the human small ribosomal subunit protein, receptor for activated C kinase (RACK1), that are not phosphorylated in uninfected cells or cells infected by other viruses. These modified residues cluster in an extended loop in RACK1, phosphorylation of which selects for translation of viral or reporter mRNAs with 5' untranslated regions that contain adenosine repeats, so-called polyA-leaders. Structural and phylogenetic analyses revealed that although RACK1 is highly conserved, this loop is variable and contains negatively charged amino acids in plants, in which these leaders act as translational enhancers. Phosphomimetics and inter-species chimaeras have shown that negative charge in the RACK1 loop dictates ribosome selectivity towards viral RNAs. By converting human RACK1 to a charged, plant-like state, poxviruses remodel host ribosomes so that adenosine repeats erroneously generated by slippage of the viral RNA polymerase confer a translational advantage. Our findings provide insight into ribosome customization through trans-kingdom mimicry and the mechanics of species-specific leader activity that underlie poxvirus polyA-leaders.

  9. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Slavov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs, some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function.

  10. Synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate for 60S ribosomal protein kinase from yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Gasior, E; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic studies on the 60S protein kinase were conducted with synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate. Peptide RRREEESDDD proved to be the best synthetic substrate for this enzyme. The peptide has a sequence of amino acids which most closely resembles the structure of potential...... phosphorylation sites in natural substrates, i.e., acidic ribosomal proteins. The superiority of certain kinetic parameters for 60S kinase obtained with the native whole 80S ribosomes over those of the isolated fraction of acidic ribosomal proteins indicates that the affinity of 60S kinase to the specific protein...

  11. Emerging functions of ribosomal proteins in gene-specific transcription and translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, Mikael S.

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins have remained highly conserved during evolution presumably reflecting often critical functions in ribosome biogenesis or mature ribosome function. In addition, several ribosomal proteins possess distinct extra-ribosomal functions in apoptosis, DNA repair and transcription. An increasing number of ribosomal proteins have been shown to modulate the trans-activation function of important regulatory proteins such as NF-κB, p53, c-Myc and nuclear receptors. Furthermore, a subset of ribosomal proteins can bind directly to untranslated regions of mRNA resulting in transcript-specific translational control outside of the ribosome itself. Collectively, these findings suggest that ribosomal proteins may have a wider functional repertoire within the cell than previously thought. The future challenge is to identify and validate these novel functions in the background of an often essential primary function in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth.

  12. Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noteboom, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The IUCN/WWF Plants Conservation Programme 1984 — 1985. World Wildlife Fund chose plants to be the subject of their fund-raising campaign in the period 1984 — 1985. The objectives were to: 1. Use information techniques to achieve the conservation objectives of the Plants Programme – to save plants;

  13. Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  14. Systems of conservation laws with third-order Hamiltonian structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferapontov, Evgeny V.; Pavlov, Maxim V.; Vitolo, Raffaele F.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate n-component systems of conservation laws that possess third-order Hamiltonian structures of differential-geometric type. The classification of such systems is reduced to the projective classification of linear congruences of lines in P^{n+2} satisfying additional geometric constraints. Algebraically, the problem can be reformulated as follows: for a vector space W of dimension n+2 , classify n-tuples of skew-symmetric 2-forms A^{α } \\in Λ ^2(W) such that φ _{β γ }A^{β }\\wedge A^{γ }=0, for some non-degenerate symmetric φ.

  15. Alterations at the peptidyl transferase centre of the ribosome induced by the synergistic action of the streptogramins dalfopristin and quinupristin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucini Paola

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial ribosome is a primary target of several classes of antibiotics. Investigation of the structure of the ribosomal subunits in complex with different antibiotics can reveal the mode of inhibition of ribosomal protein synthesis. Analysis of the interactions between antibiotics and the ribosome permits investigation of the specific effect of modifications leading to antimicrobial resistances. Streptogramins are unique among the ribosome-targeting antibiotics because they consist of two components, streptogramins A and B, which act synergistically. Each compound alone exhibits a weak bacteriostatic activity, whereas the combination can act bactericidal. The streptogramins A display a prolonged activity that even persists after removal of the drug. However, the mode of activity of the streptogramins has not yet been fully elucidated, despite a plethora of biochemical and structural data. Results The investigation of the crystal structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with the clinically relevant streptogramins quinupristin and dalfopristin reveals their unique inhibitory mechanism. Quinupristin, a streptogramin B compound, binds in the ribosomal exit tunnel in a similar manner and position as the macrolides, suggesting a similar inhibitory mechanism, namely blockage of the ribosomal tunnel. Dalfopristin, the corresponding streptogramin A compound, binds close to quinupristin directly within the peptidyl transferase centre affecting both A- and P-site occupation by tRNA molecules. Conclusions The crystal structure indicates that the synergistic effect derives from direct interaction between both compounds and shared contacts with a single nucleotide, A2062. Upon binding of the streptogramins, the peptidyl transferase centre undergoes a significant conformational transition, which leads to a stable, non-productive orientation of the universally conserved U2585. Mutations of this r

  16. Structures of conserved currents and mass spectra for scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Meiun.

    1979-05-01

    Considering the commutators between a scalar field and a conserved current, we shall clarify the connection between the mass spectrum for a scalar field and the structures of a current. For a special form of currents involving c-number functions, non-invariance of the vacuum under the corresponding transformation entails the existence of a massive mode. It is shown that once a type of currents is specified, the pole structures for sub(o) depend only on c-number parts of J sub(μ)(x). We shall show that non-vanishing Goldstone commutator does not automatically imply the degeneracy of the vacuum state, and discuss the applicability of the Goldstone theorem. (author)

  17. Ribosomal studies on the 70S ribosome of E.coli by means of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, N.

    1997-01-01

    Ribosomes are ribonucleo-protein complexes, which catalyse proteinbiosynthesis in all living organisms. Currently, most of the structural models of the prokaryotic 70S ribosome rely on electron microscopy and describe mainly the outer shape of the particle. Neutron scattering can provide information on the internal structure of the ribosome. Parts of the structure can be contrasted for neutrons by means of an isotopic exchange of the naturally occurring hydrogen ( 1 H) for deuterium ( 2 H), allowing direct measurements in situ. Specifically deuterium-labeled ribosomes (E. coli) were prepared and analysed with neutron scattering. The biochemical methods were established and combined to a generally applicable preparation system. This allows labeling of all ribosomal components in any combination. A systematic analysis of the protein and RNA phases resulted in the development of a new model for the 70S ribosome. This model describes not only the outer shape of the particle, but displays also an experimentally determined internal protein-RNA distribution and the border of subunits for the first time (four-phase model; resolution: 50A). Models of the 70S ribosome from other studies were evaluated and ranked according to consistency with the measured scattering data. Applying a new neutron scattering technique of particular sensitivity, the proton-spin contrast-variation, single proteins could be measured and localized. The positions of the proteins S6 and S10 were determined, providing the first coordinates of protein mass centers within the 70S ribosome. (orig.) [de

  18. Improved measurements of RNA structure conservation with generalized centroid estimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei eOkada

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Identification of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in genomes is acrucial task for not only molecular cell biology but alsobioinformatics. Secondary structures of ncRNAs are employed as a keyfeature of ncRNA analysis since biological functions of ncRNAs aredeeply related to their secondary structures. Although the minimumfree energy (MFE structure of an RNA sequence is regarded as the moststable structure, MFE alone could not be an appropriate measure foridentifying ncRNAs since the free energy is heavily biased by thenucleotide composition. Therefore, instead of MFE itself, severalalternative measures for identifying ncRNAs have been proposed such asthe structure conservation index (SCI and the base pair distance(BPD, both of which employ MFE structures. However, thesemeasurements are unfortunately not suitable for identifying ncRNAs insome cases including the genome-wide search and incur high falsediscovery rate. In this study, we propose improved measurements basedon SCI and BPD, applying generalized centroid estimators toincorporate the robustness against low quality multiple alignments.Our experiments show that our proposed methods achieve higher accuracythan the original SCI and BPD for not only human-curated structuralalignments but also low quality alignments produced by CLUSTALW. Furthermore, the centroid-based SCI on CLUSTAL W alignments is moreaccurate than or comparable with that of the original SCI onstructural alignments generated with RAF, a high quality structuralaligner, for which two-fold expensive computational time is requiredon average. We conclude that our methods are more suitable forgenome-wide alignments which are of low quality from the point of viewon secondary structures than the original SCI and BPD.

  19. Thermus Thermophilus as a Model System for the Study of Ribosomal Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Steven T.

    2018-03-01

    Ribosomes are the intracellular ribonucleoprotein machines responsible for the translation of mRNA sequence into protein sequence. As an essential cell component, the ribosome is the target of numerous antibiotics that bind to critical functional sites to impair protein synthesis. Mutations causing resistance to antibiotics arise in antibiotic binding sites, and an understanding of the basis of resistance will be an essential component of efforts to develop new antibiotics by rational drug design. We have identified a number of antibiotic-resistance mutations in ribosomal genes of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus. This species offers two primary advantages for examining the structural basis of antibiotic-resistance, in particular, its potential for genetic manipulation and the suitability of its ribosomes for analysis by X-ray crystallography. Mutations we have identified in this organism are in many instances identical to those found in other bacterial species, including important pathogens, a result of the extreme conservation of ribosome functional sites. Here I summarize the advantages of this organism as a model system to study antibiotic-resistance mechanisms at the molecular level.

  20. Translation activity of chimeric ribosomes composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Tsuji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome composition, consisting of rRNA and ribosomal proteins, is highly conserved among a broad range of organisms. However, biochemical studies focusing on ribosomal subunit exchangeability between organisms remain limited. In this study, we show that chimeric ribosomes, composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or E. coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits, are active for β-galactosidase translation in a highly purified E. coli translation system. Activities of the chimeric ribosomes showed only a modest decrease when using E. coli 30 S subunits, indicating functional conservation of the 50 S subunit between these bacterial species.

  1. Higher order structure in the 3'-minor domain of small subunit ribosomal RNAs from a gram negative bacterium, a gram positive bacterium and a eukaryote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1983-01-01

    of additional higher order structure in the renatured free RNA. It can be concluded that a high level of conservation of higher order structure has occurred during the evolution of the gram negative and gram positive eubacteria and the eukaryote in both the double helical regions and the "unstructured" regions...

  2. An unusual internal ribosomal entry site of inverted symmetry directs expression of a potato leafroll polerovirus replication-associated protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaag, Hannah Miriam; Kawchuk, Lawrence; Rohde, Wolfgang; Fischer, Rainer; Emans, Neil; Prüfer, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    Potato leafroll polerovirus (PLRV) genomic RNA acts as a polycistronic mRNA for the production of proteins P0, P1, and P2 translated from the 5′-proximal half of the genome. Within the P1 coding region we identified a 5-kDa replication-associated protein 1 (Rap1) essential for viral multiplication. An internal ribosome entry site (IRES) with unusual structure and location was identified that regulates Rap1 translation. Core structural elements for internal ribosome entry include a conserved AUG codon and a downstream GGAGAGAGAGG motif with inverted symmetry. Reporter gene expression in potato protoplasts confirmed the internal ribosome entry function. Unlike known IRES motifs, the PLRV IRES is located completely within the coding region of Rap1 at the center of the PLRV genome. PMID:12835413

  3. Identification and role of functionally important motifs in the 970 loop of Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiya, Ashesh A; Lamichhane, Tek N; Chow, Christine S; SantaLucia, John; Cunningham, Philip R

    2008-02-22

    The 970 loop (helix 31) of Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA contains two modified nucleotides, m(2)G966 and m(5)C967. Positions A964, A969, and C970 are conserved among the Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. The nucleotides present at positions 965, 966, 967, 968, and 971, however, are only conserved and unique within each domain. All organisms contain a modified nucleoside at position 966, but the type of the modification is domain specific. Biochemical and structure studies have placed this loop near the P site and have shown it to be involved in the decoding process and in binding the antibiotic tetracycline. To identify the functional components of this ribosomal RNA hairpin, the eight nucleotides of the 970 loop of helix 31 were subjected to saturation mutagenesis and 107 unique functional mutants were isolated and analyzed. Nonrandom nucleotide distributions were observed at each mutated position among the functional isolates. Nucleotide identity at positions 966 and 969 significantly affects ribosome function. Ribosomes with single mutations of m(2)G966 or m(5)C967 produce more protein in vivo than do wild-type ribosomes. Overexpression of initiation factor 3 specifically restored wild-type levels of protein synthesis to the 966 and 967 mutants, suggesting that modification of these residues is important for initiation factor 3 binding and for the proper initiation of protein synthesis.

  4. Architecture of the large subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Leitner, Alexander; Bieri, Philipp; Voigts-Hoffmann, Felix; Erzberger, Jan P; Leibundgut, Marc; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ban, Nenad

    2014-01-23

    Mitochondrial ribosomes synthesize a number of highly hydrophobic proteins encoded on the genome of mitochondria, the organelles in eukaryotic cells that are responsible for energy conversion by oxidative phosphorylation. The ribosomes in mammalian mitochondria have undergone massive structural changes throughout their evolution, including ribosomal RNA shortening and acquisition of mitochondria-specific ribosomal proteins. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of the 39S large subunit of the porcine mitochondrial ribosome determined by cryo-electron microscopy at 4.9 Å resolution. The structure, combined with data from chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry experiments, reveals the unique features of the 39S subunit at near-atomic resolution and provides detailed insight into the architecture of the polypeptide exit site. This region of the mitochondrial ribosome has been considerably remodelled compared to its bacterial counterpart, providing a specialized platform for the synthesis and membrane insertion of the highly hydrophobic protein components of the respiratory chain.

  5. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  6. Visualization of conserved structures by fusing highly variable datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Jonathan C; Chhadia, Ankur; Dech, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Reality (VR) environment. The accuracy of the fusions was determined qualitatively by comparing the transformed atlas overlaid on the appropriate CT. It was examined for where the transformed structure atlas was incorrectly overlaid (false positive) and where it was incorrectly not overlaid (false negative). According to this method, fusions 1 and 2 were correct roughly 50-75% of the time, while fusions 3 and 4 were correct roughly 75-100%. The CT dataset augmented with transformed dataset was viewed arbitrarily in user-centered perspective stereo taking advantage of features such as scaling, windowing and volumetric region of interest selection. This process of auto-coloring conserved structures in variable datasets is a step toward the goal of a broader, standardized automatic structure visualization method for radiological data. If successful it would permit identification, visualization or deletion of structures in radiological data by semi-automatically applying canonical structure information to the radiological data (not just processing and visualization of the data's intrinsic dynamic range). More sophisticated selection of control points and patterns of warping may allow for more accurate transforms, and thus advances in visualization, simulation, education, diagnostics, and treatment planning.

  7. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    The ribosomal "stalk" structure is a distinct lateral protuberance located on the large ribosomal subunit in prokaryotic, as well as in eukaryotic cells. In eukaryotes, this ribosomal structure is composed of the acidic ribosomal P proteins, forming two hetero-dimers (P1/P2) attached...

  8. Crystallization of ribosomes from Thermus thermophilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpova, E.A.; Serdyuk, I.N.; Tarkhovskii, Yu.S.; Orlova, E.V.; Borovyagin, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    An understanding of the molecular bases of the process of protein biosynthesis on the ribosome requires a knowledge of its structure with high three-dimensional resolution involving the method of x-ray crystallographic analysis. The authors report on the production of crystals of the 70S ribosomes from a new source - the highly thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus. Ribosomes for crystallization were obtained from Th. thermophilus strain HB8 by two washings in buffer with high ionic strength. The ribosome preparation was investigated for homogeneity by the method of high-speed sedimentation in a buffer containing 15 mM MgCl 2 , 50 mM NH 4 Cl, and 10 MM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5. Analysis showed that the preparation if homogeneous. The same preparation was investigated for intactness of ribosomal RNA by the method of gel electrophoresis in 2.75% acrylamide 0.5% agarose gel in a buffer containing 30 mM Tris, 30 mM NaH 2 PO 4 , 10 mM EDTA, 1-2% SDS, and 6 M urea. Analysis showed that the preparation possesses intact 16S and 23S RNA. The latter did not degrade, at least in a week of exposure of the ribosomes in buffer solution at 5 0 C. The ribosome preparation had no appreciable RNase activity, which was verified by incubating 4.5 micrograms of ribosomes with 3 micrograms of 14 C-labeled 16S rRna (50 0 C, 90 min) in a buffer containing 10 mM MgCl 2 , 100 mM NH 4 Cl, and 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH/sub 20 0 / 7.5. The incubated nonhydrolyzed RNA was precipitated with 5% trichloroacetic acid and applied on a GF/C filter. The radioactivity was determined in a toluene scintillator on an LS-100C counter

  9. Conservation status and community structure of cliff-nesting raptors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nesting raptor and raven populations resident in the mountains of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa. We also assess the conservation value of these populations to inform the future management of the newly-established Table Mountain National ...

  10. The ribosomal protein Rpl22 controls ribosome composition by directly repressing expression of its own paralog, Rpl22l1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique N O'Leary

    Full Text Available Most yeast ribosomal protein genes are duplicated and their characterization has led to hypotheses regarding the existence of specialized ribosomes with different subunit composition or specifically-tailored functions. In yeast, ribosomal protein genes are generally duplicated and evidence has emerged that paralogs might have specific roles. Unlike yeast, most mammalian ribosomal proteins are thought to be encoded by a single gene copy, raising the possibility that heterogenous populations of ribosomes are unique to yeast. Here, we examine the roles of the mammalian Rpl22, finding that Rpl22(-/- mice have only subtle phenotypes with no significant translation defects. We find that in the Rpl22(-/- mouse there is a compensatory increase in Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1 expression and incorporation into ribosomes. Consistent with the hypothesis that either ribosomal protein can support translation, knockdown of Rpl22l1 impairs growth of cells lacking Rpl22. Mechanistically, Rpl22 regulates Rpl22l1 directly by binding to an internal hairpin structure and repressing its expression. We propose that ribosome specificity may exist in mammals, providing evidence that one ribosomal protein can influence composition of the ribosome by regulating its own paralog.

  11. On the relationship between residue structural environment and sequence conservation in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jen-Wei; Lin, Jau-Ji; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Huang, Tsun-Tsao

    2017-09-01

    Residues that are crucial to protein function or structure are usually evolutionarily conserved. To identify the important residues in protein, sequence conservation is estimated, and current methods rely upon the unbiased collection of homologous sequences. Surprisingly, our previous studies have shown that the sequence conservation is closely correlated with the weighted contact number (WCN), a measure of packing density for residue's structural environment, calculated only based on the C α positions of a protein structure. Moreover, studies have shown that sequence conservation is correlated with environment-related structural properties calculated based on different protein substructures, such as a protein's all atoms, backbone atoms, side-chain atoms, or side-chain centroid. To know whether the C α atomic positions are adequate to show the relationship between residue environment and sequence conservation or not, here we compared C α atoms with other substructures in their contributions to the sequence conservation. Our results show that C α positions are substantially equivalent to the other substructures in calculations of various measures of residue environment. As a result, the overlapping contributions between C α atoms and the other substructures are high, yielding similar structure-conservation relationship. Take the WCN as an example, the average overlapping contribution to sequence conservation is 87% between C α and all-atom substructures. These results indicate that only C α atoms of a protein structure could reflect sequence conservation at the residue level. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. High-affinity interaction of hnRNP A1 with conserved RNA structural elements is required for translation and replication of enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levengood, Jeffrey D; Tolbert, Michele; Li, Mei-Ling; Tolbert, Blanton S

    2013-07-01

    Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an emerging pathogen of infectious disease and a serious threat to public health. Currently, there are no antivirals or vaccines to slow down or prevent EV71 infections, thus underscoring the urgency to better understand mechanisms of host-enterovirus interactions. EV71 uses a type I internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit via a pathway that requires the cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP A1, which acts as an IRES trans-activating factor. The mechanism of how hnRNP A1 trans activates EV71 RNA translation is unknown, however. Here, we report that the UP1 domain of hnRNP A1 interacts specifically with stem loop II (SLII) of the IRES, via a thermodynamically well-defined biphasic transition that involves conserved bulge 5'-AYAGY-3' and hairpin 5'-RY(U/A)CCA-3' loops. Calorimetric titrations of wild-type and mutant SLII constructs reveal these structural elements are essential to form a high-affinity UP1-SLII complex. Mutations that alter the bulge and hairpin primary or secondary structures abrogate the biphasic transition and destabilize the complex. Notably, mutations within the bulge that destabilize the complex correlate with a large reduction in IRES-dependent translational activity and impair EV71 replication. Taken together, this study shows that a conserved SLII structure is necessary to form a functional hnRNP A1-IRES complex, suggesting that small molecules that target this stem loop may have novel antiviral properties.

  13. Placeholder factors in ribosome biogenesis: please, pave my way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Espinar-Marchena

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes is an extraordinarily energy-demanding cellular activity that occurs progressively from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In the nucleolus, precursor rRNAs associate with a myriad of trans-acting factors and some ribosomal proteins to form pre-ribosomal particles. These factors include snoRNPs, nucleases, ATPases, GTPases, RNA helicases, and a vast list of proteins with no predicted enzymatic activity. Their coordinate activity orchestrates in a spatiotemporal manner the modification and processing of precursor rRNAs, the rearrangement reactions required for the formation of productive RNA folding intermediates, the ordered assembly of the ribosomal proteins, and the export of pre-ribosomal particles to the cytoplasm; thus, providing speed, directionality and accuracy to the overall process of formation of translation-competent ribosomes. Here, we review a particular class of trans-acting factors known as “placeholders”. Placeholder factors temporarily bind selected ribosomal sites until these have achieved a structural context that is appropriate for exchanging the placeholder with another site-specific binding factor. By this strategy, placeholders sterically prevent premature recruitment of subsequently binding factors, premature formation of structures, avoid possible folding traps, and act as molecular clocks that supervise the correct progression of pre-ribosomal particles into functional ribosomal subunits. We summarize the current understanding of those factors that delay the assembly of distinct ribosomal proteins or subsequently bind key sites in pre-ribosomal particles. We also discuss recurrent examples of RNA-protein and protein-protein mimicry between rRNAs and/or factors, which have clear functional implications for the ribosome biogenesis pathway.

  14. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: mapping of structural proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, and similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and Kelp fly virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Valles

    Full Text Available Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the structural proteins map to both ORF2 and the 3' end of ORF1, downstream of the sequence that encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The genome organization and structural protein expression strategy resemble those of Acyrthosiphon pisum virus (APV, an aphid virus. The capsid protein that is encoded by the 3' end of ORF1 in SINV-3 and APV is predicted to have a jelly-roll fold similar to the capsid proteins of picornaviruses and caliciviruses. The capsid-extension protein that is produced by frameshifting, includes the jelly-roll fold domain encoded by ORF1 as its N-terminus, while the C-terminus encoded by the 5' half of ORF2 has no clear homology with other viral structural proteins. A third protein, encoded by the 3' half of ORF2, is associated with purified virions at sub-stoichiometric ratios. Although the structural proteins can be translated from the genomic RNA, we show that SINV-3 also produces a subgenomic RNA encoding the structural proteins. Circumstantial evidence suggests that APV may also produce such a subgenomic RNA. Both SINV-3 and APV are unclassified picorna-like viruses distantly related to members of the order Picornavirales and the family Caliciviridae. Within this grouping, features of the genome organization and capsid domain structure of SINV-3 and APV appear more similar to caliciviruses, perhaps suggesting the basis for a "Calicivirales" order.

  15. The Legal Structure of Taiwan’s Wetland Conservation Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yuan Su

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In July of 2013, Taiwan passed its Wetland Conservation Act and will begin the implementation of the Act on 2 February 2015. With this Act, Taiwan has become the second Asian country to have specific legislation on wetland conservation and protection. This new law enables the society to achieve sustainable utilization on wetland ecological services. The core concepts of the Wetland Conversation Act include biological diversity conservation and wise use of wetland resources. Special political circumstances prevent Taiwan from registering its wetlands as a conservation priority under the Ramsar Convention. This new law allows the government to evaluate and assign a specific area as a “Wetland of Importance.” Under this status, any development activities within the designated area shall be prohibited unless the developer prepares a usage plan for review. The usage plan and the original usage of the natural resources within the wetland area shall also follow the “wise use” principle to protect the wetland and biological service system. However, this new law does not provide clear separation between the two different “wise use” standards. If the development is deemed necessary, new law provides compensation mitigation measures to extend the surface of the wetland and provides additional habitats for various species. Wetland conservation and management rely heavily on systematic research and fundamental data regarding Taiwan’s wetlands. Determining how to adopt these scientific methodologies and transfer them into enforceable mechanisms is a sizeable challenge for both biologists and lawyers as the Wetland Conservation Act creates many legal norms without clarifying definitions. This article will review the current wetland regulations from the legal perspective and provide suggestions for enforcement in the future.

  16. The identification and functional annotation of RNA structures conserved in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Mirza, Aashiq Hussain; Hansen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Structured elements of RNA molecules are essential in, e.g., RNA stabilization, localization and protein interaction, and their conservation across species suggests a common functional role. We computationally screened vertebrate genomes for Conserved RNA Structures (CRSs), leveraging structure-b......-structured counterparts. Our findings of transcribed uncharacterized regulatory regions that contain CRSs support their RNA-mediated functionality.......Structured elements of RNA molecules are essential in, e.g., RNA stabilization, localization and protein interaction, and their conservation across species suggests a common functional role. We computationally screened vertebrate genomes for Conserved RNA Structures (CRSs), leveraging structure......-based, rather than sequence-based, alignments. After careful correction for sequence identity and GC content, we predict ~516k human genomic regions containing CRSs. We find that a substantial fraction of human-mouse CRS regions (i) co-localize consistently with binding sites of the same RNA binding proteins...

  17. Variability in secondary structure of 18S ribosomal RNA as topological marker for identification of Paramecium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoori, Farah R; Tasneem, Fareeda; Al-Ghanim, K; Mahboob, S; Al-Misned, F; Jahan, Nusrat; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2014-12-01

    Besides cytological and molecular applications, Paramecium is being used in water quality assessment and for determination of saprobic levels. An unambiguous identification of these unicellular eukaryotes is not only essential, but its ecological diversity must also be explored in the local environment. 18SrRNA genes of all the strains of Paramecium species isolated from waste water were amplified, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these strains with 23 closely related Paramecium species from GenBank Database enabled identification of Paramecium multimicronucleatum and Paramecium jenningsi. Some isolates did not show significant close association with other Paramecium species, and because of their unique position in the phylogenetic tree, they were considered new to the field. In the present report, these isolates are being designated as Paramecium caudatum pakistanicus. In this article, secondary structure of 18SrRNA has also been analyzed as an additional and perhaps more reliable topological marker for species discrimination and for determining possible phylogenetic relationship between the ciliate species. On the basis of comparison of secondary structure of 18SrRNA of various isolated Paramacium strains, and among Paramecium caudatum pakistanicus, Tetrahymena thermophila, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens, it can be deduced that variable regions are more helpful in differentiating the species at interspecific level rather than at intraspecific level. It was concluded that V3 was the least variable region in all the organisms, V2 and V7 were the longest expansion segments of D. melanogaster and there was continuous mutational bias towards G.C base pairing in H. sapiens. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Macrolide antibiotic interaction and resistance on the bacterial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2003-02-01

    Our understanding of the fine structure of many antibiotic target sites has reached a new level of enlightenment in the last couple of years due to the advent, by X-ray crystallography, of high-resolution structures of the bacterial ribosome. Many classes of clinically useful antibiotics bind to the ribosome to inhibit bacterial protein synthesis. Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics form one of the largest groups, and bind to the same site on the 50S ribosomal subunit. Here, we review the molecular details of the ribosomal MLSB site to put into perspective the main points from a wealth of biochemical and genetic data that have been collected over several decades. The information is now available to understand, at atomic resolution, how macrolide antibiotics interact with their ribosomal target, how the target is altered to confer resistance, and in which directions we need to look if we are to rationally design better drugs to overcome the extant resistance mechanisms.

  19. Differential antibiotic sensitivity determined by the large ribosomal subunit in thermophilic archaea.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggero, D; Londei, P

    1996-01-01

    Hybrid ribosomes obtained by mixing the ribosomal subunits of the extremely thermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Desulfurococcus mobilis were tested for their sensitivity to selected antibiotics. It is shown that structural differences in the large ribosomal subunits determine qualitatively and quantitatively the patterns of response to alpha-sarcin and paromomycin in these species.

  20. The architecture of mammalian ribosomal protein promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Robert P

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian ribosomes contain 79 different proteins encoded by widely scattered single copy genes. Coordinate expression of these genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels is required to ensure a roughly equimolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins. To date, detailed studies of only a very few ribosomal protein (rp promoters have been made. To elucidate the general features of rp promoter architecture, I made a detailed sequence comparison of the promoter regions of the entire set of orthologous human and mouse rp genes. Results A striking evolutionarily conserved feature of most rp genes is the separation by an intron of the sequences involved in transcriptional and translational regulation from the sequences with protein encoding function. Another conserved feature is the polypyrimidine initiator, which conforms to the consensus (Y2C+1TY(T2(Y3. At least 60 % of the rp promoters contain a largely conserved TATA box or A/T-rich motif, which should theoretically have TBP-binding capability. A remarkably high proportion of the promoters contain conserved binding sites for transcription factors that were previously implicated in rp gene expression, namely upstream GABP and Sp1 sites and downstream YY1 sites. Over 80 % of human and mouse rp genes contain a transposable element residue within 900 bp of 5' flanking sequence; very little sequence identity between human and mouse orthologues was evident more than 200 bp upstream of the transcriptional start point. Conclusions This analysis has provided some valuable insights into the general architecture of mammalian rp promoters and has identified parameters that might coordinately regulate the transcriptional activity of certain subsets of rp genes.

  1. Structure-sequence based analysis for identification of conserved regions in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemla, Adam T; Zhou, Carol E; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2013-05-28

    Disclosed are computational methods, and associated hardware and software products for scoring conservation in a protein structure based on a computationally identified family or cluster of protein structures. A method of computationally identifying a family or cluster of protein structures in also disclosed herein.

  2. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2015-01-01

    of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping...

  3. In vitro degradation of ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, G; Rivas, A

    1976-12-01

    The cytoplasmic ribosomes from Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris are found to be of two types taking into consideration their stability "in vitro". In the group of unstable ribosomes the large subunit is degraded. The other group apparently does not suffer any degradation under the conditions described. However the RNAs extracted from both types of ribosomes are degraded during sucrose density gradients. The degradation of the largest RNA species has been reported previously, but no comment has been made about the stability of the ribosome itself.

  4. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei; Forouhar, Farhad; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Tong, Liang; Rossmann, Michael G. (SOIBC); (Purdue); (Columbia)

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.

  5. On the structure of the new electromagnetic conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgar, S Brian

    2004-01-01

    New electromagnetic conservation laws have recently been proposed: in the absence of electromagnetic currents, the trace of the Chevreton superenergy tensor, H ab is divergence free in four-dimensional (a) Einstein spacetimes for test fields, and (b) Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes. Subsequently it has been pointed out, in analogy with flat spaces, that for Ricci-flat spacetimes the trace of the Chevreton superenergy tensor H ab can be rearranged in the form of a generalized wave operator □ L acting on the energy-momentum tensor T ab of the test fields, i.e., H ab □ L T ab /2. In this letter we show, for Einstein-Maxwell spacetimes in the full nonlinear theory, that, although, the trace of the Chevreton superenergy tensor H ab can again be rearranged in the form of a generalized wave operator □ G acting on the electromagnetic energy-momentum tensor, in this case the result is also crucially dependent on Einstein's equations; hence we argue that the divergence-free property of the tensor H ab = □ G T ab /2 has significant independent content beyond that of the divergence-free property of T ab . (letter to the editor)

  6. Phylogeography, genetic variability and structure of Acanthamoeba metapopulations in Iran inferred by 18S ribosomal RNA sequences: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotin, Adel; Moslemzadeh, Hamid Reza; Mahami-Oskouei, Mahmoud; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Niyyati, Maryam; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Memari, Fatemeh; Noori, Jafar

    2017-09-01

    To verify phylogeography and genetic structure of Acanthamoeba populations among the Iranian clinical isolates and natural/artificial environments distributed in various regions of the country. We searched electronic databases including Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus and Google Scholar from 2005 to 2016. To explore the genetic variability of Acanthamoeba sp, 205 sequences were retrieved from keratitis patients, immunosuppressed cases and environmental sources as of various geographies of Iran. T4 genotype was the predominant strain in Iran, and the rare genotypes belonged to T2, T3, T5 (Acanthamoeba lenticulata), T6, T9, T11, T13 and T15 (Acanthamoeba jacobsi). A total of 47 unique haplotypes of T4 were identified. A parsimonious network of the sequence haplotypes demonstrated star-like feature containing haplogroups IR6 (34.1%) and IR7 (31.2%) as the most common haplotypes. In accordance with the analysis of molecular variance, the high value of haplotype diversity (0.612-0.848) of Acanthamoeba T4 represented genetic variability within populations. Neutrality indices of the 18S ribosomal RNA demonstrated negative values in all populations which represented a considerable divergence from neutrality. The majority of genetic diversity belonged to the infected contact lens and dust samples in immunodeficiency and ophthalmology wards, which indicated potential routes for exposure to a pathogenic Acanthamoeba sp. in at-risk individuals. A pairwise fixation index (F ST ) was from low to high values (0.02433-0.41892). The statistically F ST points out that T4 is genetically differentiated between north-west, north-south and central-south metapopulations, but not differentiated between west-central, west-south, central-south, and north-central isolates. An occurrence of IR6 and IR7 displays that possibly a gene flow of Acanthamoeba T4 occurred after the founder effect or bottleneck experience through ecological changes or host mobility. This is the first

  7. Yeast ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaka, E.; Kobata, K.

    1978-01-01

    The cytoplasmic 80s ribosomal proteins from the cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analyzed by SDS two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventyfour proteins were identified and consecutively numbered from 1 to 74. Upon oxidation of the 80s proteins with performic acid, ten proteins (no. 15, 20, 35, 40, 44, 46, 49, 51, 54 and 55) were dislocated on the gel without change of the total number of protein spots. Five proteins (no. 8, 14, 16, 36 and 74) were phosphorylated in vivo as seen in 32 P-labelling experiments. The large and small subunits separated in low magnesium medium were analyzed by the above gel electrophoresis. At least forty-five and twenty-eight proteins were assumed to be in the large and small subunits, respectively. All proteins found in the 80s ribosomes, except for no. 3, were detected in either subunit without appearance of new spots. The acidic protein no. 3 seems to be lost during subunit dissociation. (orig.) [de

  8. Effective in silico prediction of new oxazolidinone antibiotics: force field simulations of the antibiotic–ribosome complex supervised by experiment and electronic structure methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Grunenberg

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose several new and promising antibacterial agents for the treatment of serious Gram-positive infections. Our predictions rely on force field simulations, supervised by first principle calculations and available experimental data. Different force fields were tested in order to reproduce linezolid's conformational space in terms of a the isolated and b the ribosomal bound state. In a first step, an all-atom model of the bacterial ribosome consisting of nearly 1600 atoms was constructed and evaluated. The conformational space of 30 different ribosomal/oxazolidinone complexes was scanned by stochastic methods, followed by an evaluation of their enthalpic penalties or rewards and the mechanical strengths of the relevant hydrogen bonds (relaxed force constants; compliance constants. The protocol was able to reproduce the experimentally known enantioselectivity favoring the S-enantiomer. In a second step, the experimentally known MIC values of eight linezolid analogues were used in order to crosscheck the robustness of our model. In a final step, this benchmarking led to the prediction of several new and promising lead compounds. Synthesis and biological evaluation of the new compounds are on the way.

  9. Structure of the conserved hypothetical protein MAL13P1.257 from Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Margaret A.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Mehlin, Christopher; Boni, Erica; Earnest, Thomas N.; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Lauricella, Angela; Anderson, Lori; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Zucker, Frank; Schoenfeld, Lori W.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, MAL13P1.257 from P. falciparum, has been determined at 2.17 Å resolution. The structure represents a new protein fold and is the first structural representative for Pfam sequence family PF05907. The structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, PlasmoDB sequence MAL13P1.257 from Plasmodium falciparum, Pfam sequence family PF05907, has been determined as part of the structural genomics effort of the Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa consortium. The structure was determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion at 2.17 Å resolution. The structure is almost entirely β-sheet; it consists of 15 β-strands and one short 3 10 -helix and represents a new protein fold. The packing of the two monomers in the asymmetric unit indicates that the biological unit may be a dimer.

  10. Crystal Structure of the 23S rRNA Fragment Specific to r-Protein L1 and Designed Model of the Ribosomal L1 Stalk from Haloarcula marismortui

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azat Gabdulkhakov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the 92-nucleotide L1-specific fragment of 23S rRNA from Haloarcula marismortui (Hma has been determined at 3.3 Å resolution. Similar to the corresponding bacterial rRNA fragments, this structure contains joined helix 76-77 topped by an approximately globular structure formed by the residual part of the L1 stalk rRNA. The position of HmaL1 relative to the rRNA was found by its docking to the rRNA fragment using the L1-rRNA complex from Thermus thermophilus as a guide model. In spite of the anomalous negative charge of the halophilic archaeal protein, the conformation of the HmaL1-rRNA interface appeared to be very close to that observed in all known L1-rRNA complexes. The designed structure of the L1 stalk was incorporated into the H. marismortui 50S ribosomal subunit. Comparison of relative positions of L1 stalks in 50S subunits from H. marismortui and T. thermophilus made it possible to reveal the site of inflection of rRNA during the ribosome function.

  11. Defective ribosome assembly in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi C; Traynor, David; Basse, Nicolas; Kay, Robert R; Warren, Alan J

    2011-10-20

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), a recessive leukemia predisposition disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, skeletal abnormalities and poor growth, is caused by mutations in the highly conserved SBDS gene. Here, we test the hypothesis that defective ribosome biogenesis underlies the pathogenesis of SDS. We create conditional mutants in the essential SBDS ortholog of the ancient eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum using temperature-sensitive, self-splicing inteins, showing that mutant cells fail to grow at the restrictive temperature because ribosomal subunit joining is markedly impaired. Remarkably, wild type human SBDS complements the growth and ribosome assembly defects in mutant Dictyostelium cells, but disease-associated human SBDS variants are defective. SBDS directly interacts with the GTPase elongation factor-like 1 (EFL1) on nascent 60S subunits in vivo and together they catalyze eviction of the ribosome antiassociation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6), a prerequisite for the translational activation of ribosomes. Importantly, lymphoblasts from SDS patients harbor a striking defect in ribosomal subunit joining whose magnitude is inversely proportional to the level of SBDS protein. These findings in Dictyostelium and SDS patient cells provide compelling support for the hypothesis that SDS is a ribosomopathy caused by corruption of an essential cytoplasmic step in 60S subunit maturation.

  12. The identification and functional annotation of RNA structures conserved in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Mirza, Aashiq Hussain; Hansen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Structured elements of RNA molecules are essential in, e.g., RNA stabilization, localization and protein interaction, and their conservation across species suggests a common functional role. We computationally screened vertebrate genomes for Conserved RNA Structures (CRSs), leveraging structure...... (RBPs) or (ii) are transcribed in corresponding tissues. Additionally, a CaptureSeq experiment revealed expression of many of our CRS regions in human fetal brain, including 662 novel ones. For selected human and mouse candidate pairs, qRT-PCR and in vitro RNA structure probing supported both shared...... expression and shared structure despite low abundance and low sequence identity. About 30k CRS regions are located near coding or long non-coding RNA genes or within enhancers. Structured (CRS overlapping) enhancer RNAs and extended 3' ends have significantly increased expression levels over their non-structured...

  13. Nonstandard conserved Hamiltonian structures in dissipative/damped systems: Nonlinear generalizations of damped harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeep, R. Gladwin; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we point out the existence of a remarkable nonlocal transformation between the damped harmonic oscillator and a modified Emden-type nonlinear oscillator equation with linear forcing, xe+αxx+βx 3 +γx=0, which preserves the form of the time independent integral, conservative Hamiltonian, and the equation of motion. Generalizing this transformation we prove the existence of nonstandard conservative Hamiltonian structure for a general class of damped nonlinear oscillators including Lienard-type systems. Further, using the above Hamiltonian structure for a specific example, namely, the generalized modified Emden equation xe+αx q x+βx 2q+1 =0, where α, β, and q are arbitrary parameters, the general solution is obtained through appropriate canonical transformations. We also present the conservative Hamiltonian structure of the damped Mathews-Lakshmanan oscillator equation. The associated Lagrangian description for all the above systems is also briefly discussed.

  14. Distinct roles for the IIId2 sub-domain in pestivirus and picornavirus internal ribosome entry sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, Margaret M; Zaini, Salmah; Chamond, Nathalie; Ulryck, Nathalie; Allouche, Delphine; Rajagopalan, Noemie; Davids, Nana A; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Roberts, Lisa O; Sargueil, Bruno; Belsham, Graham J; Locker, Nicolas

    2017-12-15

    Viral internal ribosomes entry site (IRES) elements coordinate the recruitment of the host translation machinery to direct the initiation of viral protein synthesis. Within hepatitis C virus (HCV)-like IRES elements, the sub-domain IIId(1) is crucial for recruiting the 40S ribosomal subunit. However, some HCV-like IRES elements possess an additional sub-domain, termed IIId2, whose function remains unclear. Herein, we show that IIId2 sub-domains from divergent viruses have different functions. The IIId2 sub-domain present in Seneca valley virus (SVV), a picornavirus, is dispensable for IRES activity, while the IIId2 sub-domains of two pestiviruses, classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and border disease virus (BDV), are required for 80S ribosomes assembly and IRES activity. Unlike in SVV, the deletion of IIId2 from the CSFV and BDV IRES elements impairs initiation of translation by inhibiting the assembly of 80S ribosomes. Consequently, this negatively affects the replication of CSFV and BDV. Finally, we show that the SVV IIId2 sub-domain is required for efficient viral RNA synthesis and growth of SVV, but not for IRES function. This study sheds light on the molecular evolution of viruses by clearly demonstrating that conserved RNA structures, within distantly related RNA viruses, have acquired different roles in the virus life cycles. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. The Unexplored Mechanisms and Regulatory Functions of Ribosomal Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Jose Luis

    In every cell, protein synthesis is carried out by the ribosome, a complex macromolecular RNA-protein assembly. Decades of structural and kinetic studies have increased our understanding of ribosome initiation, decoding, translocation and termination. Yet, the underlying mechanism of these fundamental processes has yet to be fully delineated. Hence, the molecular basis of regulation remains obscure. Here, single-molecule fluorescence methods are applied to decipher the mechanism and regulatory roles of the multi-step process of directional substrate translocation on the ribosome that accompanies every round of protein synthesis. In Chapter 1, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is introduced as a tool for studying bacterial ribosome translocation. Chapter 2 details the experimental methods. In Chapter 3, the elongation factor G(EF-G)-catalyzed movement of substrates through the ribosome is examined from several perspectives or signals reporting on various degrees of freedom of ribosome dynamics. Two ribosomal states interconvert in the presence of EF-G(GDP), displaying novel head domain motions, until relocking takes place. In Chapter 4, in order to test if the mentioned fluctuations leading to relocking are correlated to the engagement of the P-site by the peptidyl-tRNA, the translocation of miscoded tRNAs is studied. Severe defects in the relocking stages of translocation reveal the correlation between this new stage of translocation and P-site tRNA engagement.

  16. Ribosomes: Ribozymes that Survived Evolution Pressures but Is Paralyzed by Tiny Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonath, Ada

    An impressive number of crystal structures of ribosomes, the universal cellular machines that translate the genetic code into proteins, emerged during the last decade. The determination of ribosome high resolution structure, which was widely considered formidable, led to novel insights into the ribosomal function, namely, fidelity, catalytic mechanism, and polymerize activities. They also led to suggestions concerning its origin and shed light on the action, selectivity and synergism of ribosomal antibiotics; illuminated mechanisms acquiring bacterial resistance and provided structural information for drug improvement and design. These studies required the pioneering and implementation of advanced technologies, which directly influenced the remarkable increase of the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank.

  17. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  18. Cross-species functionality of pararetroviral elements driving ribosome shunting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail M Pooggin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV belong to distinct genera of pararetroviruses infecting dicot and monocot plants, respectively. In both viruses, polycistronic translation of pregenomic (pg RNA is initiated by shunting ribosomes that bypass a large region of the pgRNA leader with several short (sORFs and a stable stem-loop structure. The shunt requires translation of a 5'-proximal sORF terminating near the stem. In CaMV, mutations knocking out this sORF nearly abolish shunting and virus viability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that two distant regions of the CaMV leader that form a minimal shunt configuration comprising the sORF, a bottom part of the stem, and a shunt landing sequence can be replaced by heterologous sequences that form a structurally similar configuration in RTBV without any dramatic effect on shunt-mediated translation and CaMV infectivity. The CaMV-RTBV chimeric leader sequence was largely stable over five viral passages in turnip plants: a few alterations that did eventually occur in the virus progenies are indicative of fine tuning of the chimeric sequence during adaptation to a new host. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate cross-species functionality of pararetroviral cis-elements driving ribosome shunting and evolutionary conservation of the shunt mechanism. We are grateful to Matthias Müller and Sandra Pauli for technical assistance. This work was initiated at Friedrich Miescher Institute (Basel, Switzerland. We thank Prof. Thomas Boller for hosting the group at the Institute of Botany.

  19. Ribosome slowed by mutation to streptomycin resistance. [Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galas, D J; Branscomb, E W

    1976-08-12

    The effect of mutation to streptomycin resistance on the speed of polypeptide elongation in Escherichia coli was investigated. Translation speed was determined by measuring the time required for the first newly synthesized ..beta..-galactosidase molecules to appear after induction of the lactose operon. The results showed that ribosome speed is not a fixed parameter inherent to the protein synthetic apparatus, but a variable determined by the kinetics of translation and ultimately by the structure of the ribosome. (HLW)

  20. The role of a topologically conserved isoleucine in glutathione transferase structure, stability and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Gildenhuys, Samantha; Fisher, Loren; Burke, Jonathan; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Sewell, B. Trevor; Fernandes, Manuel; Dirr, Heini W.

    2010-01-01

    The role of a topologically conserved isoleucine in the structure of glutathione transferase was investigated by replacing the Ile71 residue in human GSTA1-1 by alanine or valine. The common fold shared by members of the glutathione-transferase (GST) family has a topologically conserved isoleucine residue at the N-terminus of helix 3 which is involved in the packing of helix 3 against two β-strands in domain 1. The role of the isoleucine residue in the structure, function and stability of GST was investigated by replacing the Ile71 residue in human GSTA1-1 by alanine or valine. The X-ray structures of the I71A and I71V mutants resolved at 1.75 and 2.51 Å, respectively, revealed that the mutations do not alter the overall structure of the protein compared with the wild type. Urea-induced equilibrium unfolding studies using circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence suggest that the mutation of Ile71 to alanine or valine reduces the stability of the protein. A functional assay with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene shows that the mutation does not significantly alter the function of the protein relative to the wild type. Overall, the results suggest that conservation of the topologically conserved Ile71 maintains the structural stability of the protein but does not play a significant role in catalysis and substrate binding

  1. Symmetry and conservation law structures of some anti-self-dual ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-28

    Sep 28, 2016 ... (2016) 87: 64 c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12043-016-1258-y. Symmetry and conservation law structures of some anti-self-dual (ASD) manifolds. J BASINGWA1, A H KARA1,∗, ASHFAQUE H BOKHARI2, R A MOUSA2 and F D ZAMAN2. 1School of Mathematics, University of the ...

  2. Structure, function and management of semi-natural habitats for conservation biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holland, John M.; Bianchi, Felix J.J.A.; Entling, Martin H.; Moonen, Anna Camilla; Smith, Barbara M.; Jeanneret, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Different semi-natural habitats occur on farmland, and it is the vegetation's traits and structure that subsequently determine their ability to support natural enemies and their associated contribution to conservation biocontrol. New habitats can be created and existing ones improved with

  3. Symmetry and conservation law structures of some anti-self-dual

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ASD systems and manifolds have been studied via a number of approaches and their origins have been well documented. In this paper, we look at the symmetry structures, variational symmetries and related concepts around the associated conservation laws for a number of such manifolds.

  4. Generalized internal long wave equations: construction, hamiltonian structure and conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Some aspects of the theory of the internal long-wave equations (ILW) are considered. A general class of the ILW type equations is constructed by means of the Zakharov-Shabat ''dressing'' method. Hamiltonian structure and infinite numbers of conservation laws are introduced. The considered equations are shown to be Hamiltonian in the so-called second Hamiltonian structu

  5. Conservation success as a function of good alignment of social and ecological structures and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Orjan; Crona, Beatrice; Thyresson, Matilda; Golz, Anna-Lea; Tengö, Maria

    2014-10-01

    How to create and adjust governing institutions so that they align (fit) with complex ecosystem processes and structures across scales is an issue of increasing concern in conservation. It is argued that lack of such social-ecological fit makes governance and conservation difficult, yet progress in explicitly defining and rigorously testing what constitutes a good fit has been limited. We used a novel modeling approach and data from case studies of fishery and forest conservation to empirically test presumed relationships between conservation outcomes and certain patterns of alignment of social-ecological interdependences. Our approach made it possible to analyze conservation outcome on a systems level while also providing information on how individual actors are positioned in the complex web of social-ecological interdependencies. We found that when actors who shared resources were also socially linked, conservation at the level of the whole social-ecological system was positively affected. When the scales at which individual actors used resources and the scale at which ecological resources were interconnected to other ecological resources were aligned through tightened feedback loops, conservation outcome was better than when they were not aligned. The analysis of individual actors' positions in the web of social-ecological interdependencies was helpful in understanding why a system has a certain level of social-ecological fit. Results of analysis of positions showed that different actors contributed in very different ways to achieve a certain fit and revealed some underlying difference between the actors, for example in terms of actors' varying rights to access and use different ecological resources. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  6. The structure of a conserved Piezo channel domain reveals a novel beta sandwich fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a novel beta sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in Dehydrated Hereditary Stomatocytosis (DHS) patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels. PMID:25242456

  7. The N-terminal sequence of ribosomal protein L10 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui and its relationship to eubacterial protein L6 and other ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, J; van den Broek, R; Nasiulas, G; Beck, A; Reinhardt, R; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1987-08-01

    The amino-terminal sequence of ribosomal protein L10 from Halobacterium marismortui has been determined up to residue 54, using both a liquid- and a gas-phase sequenator. The two sequences are in good agreement. The protein is clearly homologous to protein HcuL10 from the related strain Halobacterium cutirubrum. Furthermore, a weaker but distinct homology to ribosomal protein L6 from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus can be detected. In addition to 7 identical amino acids in the first 36 residues in all four sequences a number of conservative replacements occurs, of mainly hydrophobic amino acids. In this common region the pattern of conserved amino acids suggests the presence of a beta-alpha fold as it occurs in ribosomal proteins L12 and L30. Furthermore, several potential cases of homology to other ribosomal components of the three ur-kingdoms have been found.

  8. GTPases and the origin of the ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Temple F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to trace the evolution of the ribosome through the evolution of the universal P-loop GTPases that are involved with the ribosome in translation and with the attachment of the ribosome to the membrane. The GTPases involved in translation in Bacteria/Archaea are the elongation factors EFTu/EF1, the initiation factors IF2/aeIF5b + aeIF2, and the elongation factors EFG/EF2. All of these GTPases also contain the OB fold also found in the non GTPase IF1 involved in initiation. The GTPase involved in the signal recognition particle in most Bacteria and Archaea is SRP54. Results 1 The Elongation Factors of the Archaea based on structural considerations of the domains have the following evolutionary path: EF1→ aeIF2 → EF2. The evolution of the aeIF5b was a later event; 2 the Elongation Factors of the Bacteria based on the topological considerations of the GTPase domain have a similar evolutionary path: EFTu→ IF→2→EFG. These evolutionary sequences reflect the evolution of the LSU followed by the SSU to form the ribosome; 3 the OB-fold IF1 is a mimic of an ancient tRNA minihelix. Conclusion The evolution of translational GTPases of both the Archaea and Bacteria point to the evolution of the ribosome. The elongation factors, EFTu/EF1, began as a Ras-like GTPase bringing the activated minihelix tRNA to the Large Subunit Unit. The initiation factors and elongation factor would then have evolved from the EFTu/EF1 as the small subunit was added to the evolving ribosome. The SRP has an SRP54 GTPase and a specific RNA fold in its RNA component similar to the PTC. We consider the SRP to be a remnant of an ancient form of an LSU bound to a membrane. Reviewers This article was reviewed by George Fox, Leonid Mirny and Chris Sander.

  9. Hydra meiosis reveals unexpected conservation of structural synaptonemal complex proteins across metazoans

    OpenAIRE

    Fraune, Johanna; Alsheimer, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Busch, Karoline; Fraune, Sebastian; Bosch, Thomas C. G.; Benavente, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a key structure of meiosis, mediating the stable pairing (synapsis) of homologous chromosomes during prophase I. Its remarkable tripartite structure is evolutionarily well conserved and can be found in almost all sexually reproducing organisms. However, comparison of the different SC protein components in the common meiosis model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Mus musculus revealed...

  10. Evidence for ribosomal frameshifting and a novel overlapping gene in the genomes of insect-specific flaviviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, Andrew E.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Wills, Norma M.; Miller, Cathy L.; Atkins, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Flaviviruses have a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of ∼11 kb, encoding a large polyprotein that is cleaved to produce ∼10 mature proteins. Cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus, Culex flavivirus and several recently discovered flaviviruses have no known vertebrate host and apparently infect only insects. We present compelling bioinformatic evidence for a 253-295 codon overlapping gene (designated fifo) conserved throughout these insect-specific flaviviruses and immunofluorescent detection of its product. Fifo overlaps the NS2A/NS2B coding sequence in the - 1/+ 2 reading frame and is most likely expressed as a trans-frame fusion protein via ribosomal frameshifting at a conserved GGAUUUY slippery heptanucleotide with 3'-adjacent RNA secondary structure (which stimulates efficient frameshifting in vitro). The discovery bears striking parallels to the recently discovered ribosomal frameshifting site in the NS2A coding sequence of the Japanese encephalitis serogroup of flaviviruses and suggests that programmed ribosomal frameshifting may be more widespread in flaviviruses than currently realized.

  11. Structural view of the helicase reveals that Zika virus uses a conserved mechanism for unwinding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Jin; Jia, Zhihui; Shaw, Neil

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies suggest a link between infection by Zika virus (ZIKV) and the development of neurological complications. The lack of ZIKV-specific therapeutics has alarmed healthcare professionals worldwide. Here, crystal structures of apo and AMPPNP- and Mn 2+ -bound forms of the essential helicase of ZIKV refined to 1.78 and 1.3 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. The structures reveal a conserved trimodular topology of the helicase. ATP and Mn 2+ are tethered between two RecA-like domains by conserved hydrogen-bonding interactions. The binding of ligands induces the movement of backbone Cα and side-chain atoms. Numerous solvent molecules are observed in the vicinity of the AMPPNP, suggesting a role in catalysis. These high-resolution structures could be useful for the design of inhibitors targeting the helicase of ZIKV for the treatment of infections caused by ZIKV.

  12. Ubiquitin--conserved protein or selfish gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catic, André; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2005-11-01

    The posttranslational modifier ubiquitin is encoded by a multigene family containing three primary members, which yield the precursor protein polyubiquitin and two ubiquitin moieties, Ub(L40) and Ub(S27), that are fused to the ribosomal proteins L40 and S27, respectively. The gene encoding polyubiquitin is highly conserved and, until now, those encoding Ub(L40) and Ub(S27) have been generally considered to be equally invariant. The evolution of the ribosomal ubiquitin moieties is, however, proving to be more dynamic. It seems that the genes encoding Ub(L40) and Ub(S27) are actively maintained by homologous recombination with the invariant polyubiquitin locus. Failure to recombine leads to deterioration of the sequence of the ribosomal ubiquitin moieties in several phyla, although this deterioration is evidently constrained by the structural requirements of the ubiquitin fold. Only a few amino acids in ubiquitin are vital for its function, and we propose that conservation of all three ubiquitin genes is driven not only by functional properties of the ubiquitin protein, but also by the propensity of the polyubiquitin locus to act as a 'selfish gene'.

  13. Agricultural Conservation Planning Framework: 3. Land Use and Field Boundary Database Development and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Mark D; James, David E; Sandoval-Green, Claudette M J

    2017-05-01

    Conservation planning information is important for identifying options for watershed water quality improvement and can be developed for use at field, farm, and watershed scales. Translation across scales is a key issue impeding progress at watershed scales because watershed improvement goals must be connected with implementation of farm- and field-level conservation practices to demonstrate success. This is particularly true when examining alternatives for "trap and treat" practices implemented at agricultural-field edges to control (or influence) water flows through fields, landscapes, and riparian corridors within agricultural watersheds. We propose that database structures used in developing conservation planning information can achieve translation across conservation-planning scales, and we developed the Agricultural Conservation Planning Framework (ACPF) to enable practical planning applications. The ACPF comprises a planning concept, a database to facilitate field-level and watershed-scale analyses, and an ArcGIS toolbox with Python scripts to identify specific options for placement of conservation practices. This paper appends two prior publications and describes the structure of the ACPF database, which contains land use, crop history, and soils information and is available for download for 6091 HUC12 watersheds located across Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, and parts of Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Wisconsin and comprises information on 2.74 × 10 agricultural fields (available through /). Sample results examining land use trends across Iowa and Illinois are presented here to demonstrate potential uses of the database. While designed for use with the ACPF toolbox, users are welcome to use the ACPF watershed data in a variety of planning and modeling approaches. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. Introgression from cultivated rice alters genetic structures of wild relative populations: implications for in situ conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Chen, Yu; Liu, Ping; Li, Chen; Cai, Xingxing; Rong, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Maintaining genetic integrity is essential for in situ and ex situ conservation of crop wild relative (CWR) species. However, introgression of crop alleles into CWR species/populations may change their genetic structure and diversity, resulting in more invasive weeds or, in contrast, the extinction of endangered populations. To determine crop-wild introgression and its consequences, we examined the genetic structure and diversity of six wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) populations under in situ conservation in China. Thirty-four simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 34 insertion/deletion markers were used to genotype the wild rice populations and two sets of rice cultivars (O. sativa), corresponding to the two types of molecular markers. Shared alleles and STRUCTURE analyses suggested a variable level of crop-wild introgression and admixture. Principal coordinates and cluster analyses indicated differentiation of wild rice populations, which was associated with the spatial distances to cultivated rice fields. The level of overall genetic diversity was comparable between wild rice populations and rice cultivars, but a great number of wild-specific alleles was detected in the wild populations. We conclude based on the results that crop-wild introgression can considerably alter the pattern of genetic structure and relationships of CWR populations. Appropriate measures should be taken for effective in situ conservation of CWR species under the scenario of crop-wild introgression. PMID:29308123

  15. Click chemistry for the conservation of cellular structures and fluorescent proteins: ClickOx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschberger, Anna; Niehörster, Thomas; Sauer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide, are known to cause structural damage not only in living, but also in fixed, cells. Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry) is known to produce ROS. Therefore, fluorescence imaging of cellular structures, such as the actin cytoskeleton, remains challenging when combined with click chemistry protocols. In addition, the production of ROS substantially weakens the fluorescence signal of fluorescent proteins. This led us to develop ClickOx, which is a new click chemistry protocol for improved conservation of the actin structure and better conservation of the fluorescence signal of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins. Herein we demonstrate that efficient oxygen removal by addition of an enzymatic oxygen scavenger system (ClickOx) considerably reduces ROS-associated damage during labeling of nascent DNA with ATTO 488 azide by Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. Standard confocal and super-resolution fluorescence images of phalloidin-labeled actin filaments and GFP/yellow fluorescent protein-labeled cells verify the conservation of the cytoskeleton microstructure and fluorescence intensity, respectively. Thus, ClickOx can be used advantageously for structure preservation in conventional and most notably in super-resolution microscopy methods. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Evolutionary conservation of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 primary structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schapira Marc

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 plays a critical role in recruiting leukocytes in inflammatory lesions by mediating leukocyte rolling on selectins. Core-2 O-glycosylation of a N-terminal threonine and sulfation of at least one tyrosine residue of PSGL-1 are required for L- and P-selectin binding. Little information is available on the intra- and inter-species evolution of PSGL-1 primary structure. In addition, the evolutionary conservation of selectin binding site on PSGL-1 has not been previously examined in detail. Therefore, we performed multiple sequence alignment of PSGL-1 amino acid sequences of 14 mammals (human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, bovine, pig, rat, tree-shrew, bushbaby, mouse, bat, horse, cat, sheep and dog and examined mammalian PSGL-1 interactions with human selectins. Results A signal peptide was predicted in each sequence and a propeptide cleavage site was found in 9/14 species. PSGL-1 N-terminus is poorly conserved. However, each species exhibits at least one tyrosine sulfation site and, except in horse and dog, a T [D/E]PP [D/E] motif associated to the core-2 O-glycosylation of a N-terminal threonine. A mucin-like domain of 250–280 amino acids long was disclosed in all studied species. It lies between the conserved N-terminal O-glycosylated threonine (Thr-57 in human and the transmembrane domain, and contains a central region exhibiting a variable number of decameric repeats (DR. Interspecies and intraspecies polymorphisms were observed. Transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences are well conserved. The moesin binding residues that serve as adaptor between PSGL-1 and Syk, and are involved in regulating PSGL-1-dependent rolling on P-selectin are perfectly conserved in all analyzed mammalian sequences. Despite a poor conservation of PSGL-1 N-terminal sequence, CHO cells co-expressing human glycosyltransferases and human, bovine, pig or rat PSGL-1 efficiently rolled on human L- or P

  17. Sequence, structure and function relationships in flaviviruses as assessed by evolutive aspects of its conserved non-structural protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Néli José; Lima Afonso, Marcelo Querino; Pedersolli, Natan Gonçalves; de Oliveira, Lucas Carrijo; Andrade, Dhiego Souto; Bleicher, Lucas

    2017-10-28

    Flaviviruses are responsible for serious diseases such as dengue, yellow fever, and zika fever. Their genomes encode a polyprotein which, after cleavage, results in three structural and seven non-structural proteins. Homologous proteins can be studied by conservation and coevolution analysis as detected in multiple sequence alignments, usually reporting positions which are strictly necessary for the structure and/or function of all members in a protein family or which are involved in a specific sub-class feature requiring the coevolution of residue sets. This study provides a complete conservation and coevolution analysis on all flaviviruses non-structural proteins, with results mapped on all well-annotated available sequences. A literature review on the residues found in the analysis enabled us to compile available information on their roles and distribution among different flaviviruses. Also, we provide the mapping of conserved and coevolved residues for all sequences currently in SwissProt as a supplementary material, so that particularities in different viruses can be easily analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein fold usage and evolutionary implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2006-03-15

    Background: Determining the complete repertoire of proteinstructures for all soluble, globular proteins in a single organism hasbeen one of the major goals of several structural genomics projects inrecent years. Results: We report that this goal has nearly been reachedfor several "minimal organisms"--parasites or symbionts with reducedgenomes--for which over 95 percent of the soluble, globular proteins maynow be assigned folds, overall 3-D backbone structures. We analyze thestructures of these proteins as they relate to cellular functions, andcompare conservation off old usage between functional categories. We alsocompare patterns in the conservation off olds among minimal organisms andthose observed between minimal organisms and other bacteria. Conclusion:We find that proteins performing essential cellular functions closelyrelated to transcription and translation exhibit a higher degree ofconservation in fold usage than proteins in other functional categories.Folds related to transcription and translation functional categories werealso over represented in minimal organisms compared to otherbacteria.

  19. Ribosomal protein S14 transcripts are edited in Oenothera mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, W; Unseld, M; Wissinger, B; Brennicke, A

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding ribosomal protein S14 (rps14) in Oenothera mitochondria is located upstream of the cytochrome b gene (cob). Sequence analysis of independently derived cDNA clones covering the entire rps14 coding region shows two nucleotides edited from the genomic DNA to the mRNA derived sequences by C to U modifications. A third editing event occurs four nucleotides upstream of the AUG initiation codon and improves a potential ribosome binding site. A CGG codon specifying arginine in a position conserved in evolution between chloroplasts and E. coli as a UGG tryptophan codon is not edited in any of the cDNAs analysed. An inverted repeat 3' of an unidentified open reading frame is located upstream of the rps14 gene. The inverted repeat sequence is highly conserved at analogous regions in other Oenothera mitochondrial loci. Images PMID:2326162

  20. The identification and functional annotation of RNA structures conserved in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Stefan E; Mirza, Aashiq H; Hansen, Claus; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus H; Garde, Christian; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Torarinsson, Elfar; Yao, Zizhen; Workman, Christopher T; Pociot, Flemming; Nielsen, Henrik; Tommerup, Niels; Ruzzo, Walter L; Gorodkin, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Structured elements of RNA molecules are essential in, e.g., RNA stabilization, localization, and protein interaction, and their conservation across species suggests a common functional role. We computationally screened vertebrate genomes for conserved RNA structures (CRSs), leveraging structure-based, rather than sequence-based, alignments. After careful correction for sequence identity and GC content, we predict ∼516,000 human genomic regions containing CRSs. We find that a substantial fraction of human-mouse CRS regions (1) colocalize consistently with binding sites of the same RNA binding proteins (RBPs) or (2) are transcribed in corresponding tissues. Additionally, a CaptureSeq experiment revealed expression of many of our CRS regions in human fetal brain, including 662 novel ones. For selected human and mouse candidate pairs, qRT-PCR and in vitro RNA structure probing supported both shared expression and shared structure despite low abundance and low sequence identity. About 30,000 CRS regions are located near coding or long noncoding RNA genes or within enhancers. Structured (CRS overlapping) enhancer RNAs and extended 3' ends have significantly increased expression levels over their nonstructured counterparts. Our findings of transcribed uncharacterized regulatory regions that contain CRSs support their RNA-mediated functionality. © 2017 Seemann et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Correlation between sequence conservation and structural thermodynamics of microRNA precursors from human, mouse, and chicken genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shengqi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that microRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs have considerably more stable secondary structures than other native RNAs (tRNA, rRNA, and mRNA and artificial RNA sequences. However, pre-miRNAs with ultra stable secondary structures have not been investigated. It is not known if there is a tendency in pre-miRNA sequences towards or against ultra stable structures? Furthermore, the relationship between the structural thermodynamic stability of pre-miRNA and their evolution remains unclear. Results We investigated the correlation between pre-miRNA sequence conservation and structural stability as measured by adjusted minimum folding free energies in pre-miRNAs isolated from human, mouse, and chicken. The analysis revealed that conserved and non-conserved pre-miRNA sequences had structures with similar average stabilities. However, the relatively ultra stable and unstable pre-miRNAs were more likely to be non-conserved than pre-miRNAs with moderate stability. Non-conserved pre-miRNAs had more G+C than A+U nucleotides, while conserved pre-miRNAs contained more A+U nucleotides. Notably, the U content of conserved pre-miRNAs was especially higher than that of non-conserved pre-miRNAs. Further investigations showed that conserved and non-conserved pre-miRNAs exhibited different structural element features, even though they had comparable levels of stability. Conclusions We proposed that there is a correlation between structural thermodynamic stability and sequence conservation for pre-miRNAs from human, mouse, and chicken genomes. Our analyses suggested that pre-miRNAs with relatively ultra stable or unstable structures were less favoured by natural selection than those with moderately stable structures. Comparison of nucleotide compositions between non-conserved and conserved pre-miRNAs indicated the importance of U nucleotides in the pre-miRNA evolutionary process. Several characteristic structural elements were

  2. Affinity labelling in situ of the bL12 protein on E. coli 70S ribosomes by means of a tRNA dialdehyde derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountondji, Codjo; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Le Caër, Jean-Pierre; Lancelot, Véronique; Cognet, Jean A H; Baouz, Soria

    2017-12-01

    In this report, we have used periodate-oxidized tRNA (tRNAox) as an affinity laleling reagent to demonstrate that: (i) the bL12 protein contacts the CCA-arm of P-site bound tRNA on the Escherichia coli 70S ribosomes; (ii) the stoichiometry of labelling is one molecule of tRNAox bound to one polypeptide chain of endogenous bL12; (iii) cross-linking in situ of bL12 with tRNAox on the ribosomes provokes the loss of activity; (iv) intact tRNA protects bL12 in the 70S ribosomes against cross-linking with tRNAox; (v) both tRNAox and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) compete for the same or for proximal cross-linking site(s) on bL12 inside the ribosome; (vi) the stoichiometry of cross-linking of PLP to the recombinant E. coli bL12 protein is one molecule of PLP covalently bound per polypeptide chain; (vii) the amino acid residue of recombinant bL12 cross-linked with PLP is Lys-65; (viii) Lys-65 of E. coli bL12 corresponds to Lys-53 of eL42 which was previously shown to cross-link with P-site bound tRNAox on human 80S ribosomes in situ; (ix) finally, E. coli bL12 and human eL42 proteins display significant primary structure similarities, which argues for evolutionary conservation of these two proteins located at the tRNA-CCA binding site on eubacterial and eukaryal ribosomes. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular characterization and population structure study of cambuci: strategy for conservation and genetic improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, D N; Nunes, C F; Setotaw, T A; Pio, R; Pasqual, M; Cançado, G M A

    2016-12-19

    Cambuci (Campomanesia phaea) belongs to the Myrtaceae family and is native to the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. It has ecological and social appeal but is exposed to problems associated with environmental degradation and expansion of agricultural activities in the region. Comprehensive studies on this species are rare, making its conservation and genetic improvement difficult. Thus, it is important to develop research activities to understand the current situation of the species as well as to make recommendations for its conservation and use. This study was performed to characterize the cambuci accessions found in the germplasm bank of Coordenadoria de Assistência Técnica Integral using inter-simple sequence repeat markers, with the goal of understanding the plant's population structure. The results showed the existence of some level of genetic diversity among the cambuci accessions that could be exploited for the genetic improvement of the species. Principal coordinate analysis and discriminant analysis clustered the 80 accessions into three groups, whereas Bayesian model-based clustering analysis clustered them into two groups. The formation of two cluster groups and the high membership coefficients within the groups pointed out the importance of further collection to cover more areas and more genetic variability within the species. The study also showed the lack of conservation activities; therefore, more attention from the appropriate organizations is needed to plan and implement natural and ex situ conservation activities.

  4. IRESPred: Web Server for Prediction of Cellular and Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Pandurang; Pataskar, Abhijeet; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Pal, Jayanta; Kulkarni, Abhijeet

    2016-01-01

    Cellular mRNAs are predominantly translated in a cap-dependent manner. However, some viral and a subset of cellular mRNAs initiate their translation in a cap-independent manner. This requires presence of a structured RNA element, known as, Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) in their 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Experimental demonstration of IRES in UTR remains a challenging task. Computational prediction of IRES merely based on sequence and structure conservation is also difficult, particularly for cellular IRES. A web server, IRESPred is developed for prediction of both viral and cellular IRES using Support Vector Machine (SVM). The predictive model was built using 35 features that are based on sequence and structural properties of UTRs and the probabilities of interactions between UTR and small subunit ribosomal proteins (SSRPs). The model was found to have 75.51% accuracy, 75.75% sensitivity, 75.25% specificity, 75.75% precision and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.51 in blind testing. IRESPred was found to perform better than the only available viral IRES prediction server, VIPS. The IRESPred server is freely available at http://bioinfo.net.in/IRESPred/. PMID:27264539

  5. gamma. radiation effect on the functional properties of the cotton ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, A P; Safarov, Sh

    1973-01-01

    A study is made of the action of radiation on the functional properties of ribosomes in irradiated organisms and on isolated ribosomes exposed to different doses. With increase in dose there occurs a reduction in the incorporation of labelled amino acids by the ribosomes released from irradiated sprouts and also during irradiation of isolated ribosomes. The study covered the functional activity of ribosomes irradiated at different doses with the use of synthetic poly-U and poly-A matrices synthesizing polyphenylalanine and polylysine, depending on the irradiation dose. The inhibition of the activity of the protein synthesis system at high doses is due to structural and functional changes in ribosomes and also to disturbance in the biosynthesis and functions of the messenger RNA.

  6. TRANSAT-- method for detecting the conserved helices of functional RNA structures, including transient, pseudo-knotted and alternative structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Nicholas J P; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2010-06-24

    The prediction of functional RNA structures has attracted increased interest, as it allows us to study the potential functional roles of many genes. RNA structure prediction methods, however, assume that there is a unique functional RNA structure and also do not predict functional features required for in vivo folding. In order to understand how functional RNA structures form in vivo, we require sophisticated experiments or reliable prediction methods. So far, there exist only a few, experimentally validated transient RNA structures. On the computational side, there exist several computer programs which aim to predict the co-transcriptional folding pathway in vivo, but these make a range of simplifying assumptions and do not capture all features known to influence RNA folding in vivo. We want to investigate if evolutionarily related RNA genes fold in a similar way in vivo. To this end, we have developed a new computational method, Transat, which detects conserved helices of high statistical significance. We introduce the method, present a comprehensive performance evaluation and show that Transat is able to predict the structural features of known reference structures including pseudo-knotted ones as well as those of known alternative structural configurations. Transat can also identify unstructured sub-sequences bound by other molecules and provides evidence for new helices which may define folding pathways, supporting the notion that homologous RNA sequence not only assume a similar reference RNA structure, but also fold similarly. Finally, we show that the structural features predicted by Transat differ from those assuming thermodynamic equilibrium. Unlike the existing methods for predicting folding pathways, our method works in a comparative way. This has the disadvantage of not being able to predict features as function of time, but has the considerable advantage of highlighting conserved features and of not requiring a detailed knowledge of the cellular

  7. Translation initiation in bacterial polysomes through ribosome loading on a standby site on a highly translated mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Irena

    2018-01-01

    During translation, consecutive ribosomes load on an mRNA and form a polysome. The first ribosome binds to a single-stranded mRNA region and moves toward the start codon, unwinding potential mRNA structures on the way. In contrast, the following ribosomes can dock at the start codon only when the first ribosome has vacated the initiation site. Here we show that loading of the second ribosome on a natural 38-nt-long 5′ untranslated region of lpp mRNA, which codes for the outer membrane lipoprotein from Escherichia coli, takes place before the leading ribosome has moved away from the start codon. The rapid formation of this standby complex depends on the presence of ribosomal proteins S1/S2 in the leading ribosome. The early recruitment of the second ribosome to the standby site before translation by the leading ribosome and the tight coupling between translation elongation by the first ribosome and the accommodation of the second ribosome can contribute to high translational efficiency of the lpp mRNA. PMID:29632209

  8. Crystal structure of AFV3-109, a highly conserved protein from crenarchaeal viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quevillon-Cheruel Sophie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The extraordinary morphologies of viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea clearly distinguish them from bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. Moreover, their genomes code for proteins that to a large extend have no related sequences in the extent databases. However, a small pool of genes is shared by overlapping subsets of these viruses, and the most conserved gene, exemplified by the ORF109 of the Acidianus Filamentous Virus 3, AFV3, is present on genomes of members of three viral familes, the Lipothrixviridae, Rudiviridae, and "Bicaudaviridae", as well as of the unclassified Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus, STIV. We present here the crystal structure of the protein (Mr = 13.1 kD, 109 residues encoded by the AFV3 ORF 109 in two different crystal forms at 1.5 and 1.3 Å resolution. The structure of AFV3-109 is a five stranded β-sheet with loops on one side and three helices on the other. It forms a dimer adopting the shape of a cradle that encompasses the best conserved regions of the sequence. No protein with a related fold could be identified except for the ortholog from STIV1, whose structure was deposited at the Protein Data Bank. We could clearly identify a well bound glycerol inside the cradle, contacting exclusively totally conserved residues. This interaction was confirmed in solution by fluorescence titration. Although the function of AFV3-109 cannot be deduced directly from its structure, structural homology with the STIV1 protein, and the size and charge distribution of the cavity suggested it could interact with nucleic acids. Fluorescence quenching titrations also showed that AFV3-109 interacts with dsDNA. Genomic sequence analysis revealed bacterial homologs of AFV3-109 as a part of a putative previously unidentified prophage sequences in some Firmicutes.

  9. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cren7, a novel chromatin protein conserved among Crenarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Feng, Yingang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Yao, Hongwei; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jinfeng; Huang, Li

    2008-03-01

    Archaea contain a variety of chromatin proteins consistent with the evolution of different genome packaging mechanisms. Among the two main kingdoms in the Archaea, Euryarchaeota synthesize histone homologs, whereas Crenarchaeota have not been shown to possess a chromatin protein conserved at the kingdom level. We report the identification of Cren7, a novel family of chromatin proteins highly conserved in the Crenarchaeota. A small, basic, methylated and abundant protein, Cren7 displays a higher affinity for double-stranded DNA than for single-stranded DNA, constrains negative DNA supercoils and is associated with genomic DNA in vivo. The solution structure and DNA-binding surface of Cren7 from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus were determined by NMR. The protein adopts an SH3-like fold. It interacts with duplex DNA through a beta-sheet and a long flexible loop, presumably resulting in DNA distortions through intercalation of conserved hydrophobic residues into the DNA structure. These data suggest that the crenarchaeal kingdom in the Archaea shares a common strategy in chromatin organization.

  10. (rehabilitating Heritage Places) Structural Repairs and Conservation Works for Astor Kolkata, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, S.; Fournier, L.

    2017-08-01

    Kolkata, formerly known as Calcutta in English, is the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal and is located in eastern India on the east bank of the River Hooghly. The city was a colonial city developed by the British East India Company and then by the British Empire. Kolkata was the capital of the British Indian empire until 1911 when the capital was relocated to Delhi. Kolkata grew rapidly in the 19th century to become the second city of the British Empire. This was accompanied by the development of a culture that fused European philosophies with Indian tradition. The city has been known by many names "Cultural Capital of India", "The City of Processions", "The City of Palaces", and the "City of Joy". Problems related to rapid urbanisation started to plaque Kolkata from the 1930s and the city remains an example of the urbanization challenges of the developing nations. The exercise included Archival research, Field surveys, Condition Mapping, structural evaluation and preparation of restoration & conservation solutions along with post conservation management plan. The Major challenges encountered were identifying the correct consolidation techniques using modern technology and incorporation of modern services. The Documentation and Mapping was used as a significant tool to guide towards the structural consolidation, conservation and Management strategy of the complex.

  11. An evolutionary model for protein-coding regions with conserved RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Forsberg, Roald; Meyer, Irmtraud Margret

    2004-01-01

    in the RNA structure. The overlap of these fundamental dependencies is sufficient to cause "contagious" context dependencies which cascade across many nucleotide sites. Such large-scale dependencies challenge the use of traditional phylogenetic models in evolutionary inference because they explicitly assume...... components of traditional phylogenetic models. We applied this to a data set of full-genome sequences from the hepatitis C virus where five RNA structures are mapped within the coding region. This allowed us to partition the effects of selection on different structural elements and to test various hypotheses......Here we present a model of nucleotide substitution in protein-coding regions that also encode the formation of conserved RNA structures. In such regions, apparent evolutionary context dependencies exist, both between nucleotides occupying the same codon and between nucleotides forming a base pair...

  12. Effects of using coding potential, sequence conservation and mRNA structure conservation for predicting pyrroly-sine containing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Zambach, Sine; Christiansen, Henning

    2013-01-01

    for prediction of pyrrolysine incorporating genes in genomes of bacteria and archaea leading to insights about the factors driving pyrrolysine translation and identification of new gene candidates. The method predicts known conserved genes with high recall and predicts several other promising candidates...... for experimental verification. The method is implemented as a computational pipeline which is available on request....

  13. Crystal Structure of VC0702 at 2.0 Angstrom: Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Vibrio Cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, S.; Forouhar, F.; Bussiere, D.; Robinson, H.; Kennedy, M.

    2006-01-01

    VC0702, a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function from Vibrio cholerae, resides in a three-gene operon containing the MbaA gene that encodes for a GGDEF and EAL domain-containing protein which is involved in regulating formation of the extracellular matrix of biofilms in Vibrio cholerae. The VC0702 crystal structure has been determined at 2.0 Angstroms and refined to R work = 22.8% and R free = 26.3%. VC0702 crystallized in an orthorhombic crystal lattice in the C2221 space group with dimensions of a = 66.61 Angstroms, b = 88.118 Angstroms, and c = 118.35 Angstroms with a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. VC0702, which forms a mixed α + β three-layered αβα sandwich, belongs to the Pfam DUF84 and COG1986 families of proteins. Sequence conservation within the DUF84 and COG1986 families was used to identify a conserved patch of surface residues that define a cleft and potential substrate-binding site in VC0702. The three-dimensional structure of VC0702 is similar to that of Mj0226 from Methanococcus janeschii, which has been identified as a novel NTPase that binds NTP in a deep cleft similarly located to the conserved patch of surface residues that define an analogous cleft in VC0702. Collectively, the data suggest that VC0702 may have a biochemical function that involves NTP binding and phosphatase activity of some kind, and is likely involved in regulation of the signaling pathway that controls biofilm formation and maintenance in Vibrio cholerae

  14. Dual binding mode of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex reveals a novel universal adapter site on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Markus; Spreter, Thomas; Beckmann, Roland; Beatrix, Birgitta

    2010-06-18

    Nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) was identified in eukaryotes as the first cytosolic factor that contacts the nascent polypeptide chain emerging from the ribosome. NAC is present as a homodimer in archaea and as a highly conserved heterodimer in eukaryotes. Mutations in NAC cause severe embryonically lethal phenotypes in mice, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NAC is quantitatively associated with ribosomes. Here we show that NAC contacts several ribosomal proteins. The N terminus of betaNAC, however, specifically contacts near the tunnel exit ribosomal protein Rpl31, which is unique to eukaryotes and archaea. Moreover, the first 23 amino acids of betaNAC are sufficient to direct an otherwise non-associated protein to the ribosome. In contrast, alphaNAC (Egd2p) contacts Rpl17, the direct neighbor of Rpl31 at the ribosomal tunnel exit site. Rpl31 was also recently identified as a contact site for the SRP receptor and the ribosome-associated complex. Furthermore, in Escherichia coli peptide deformylase (PDF) interacts with the corresponding surface area on the eubacterial ribosome. In addition to the previously identified universal adapter site represented by Rpl25/Rpl35, we therefore refer to Rpl31/Rpl17 as a novel universal docking site for ribosome-associated factors on the eukaryotic ribosome.

  15. FragKB: structural and literature annotation resource of conserved peptide fragments and residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish V Tendulkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: FragKB (Fragment Knowledgebase is a repository of clusters of structurally similar fragments from proteins. Fragments are annotated with information at the level of sequence, structure and function, integrating biological descriptions derived from multiple existing resources and text mining. METHODOLOGY: FragKB contains approximately 400,000 conserved fragments from 4,800 representative proteins from PDB. Literature annotations are extracted from more than 1,700 articles and are available for over 12,000 fragments. The underlying systematic annotation workflow of FragKB ensures efficient update and maintenance of this database. The information in FragKB can be accessed through a web interface that facilitates sequence and structural visualization of fragments together with known literature information on the consequences of specific residue mutations and functional annotations of proteins and fragment clusters. FragKB is accessible online at http://ubio.bioinfo.cnio.es/biotools/fragkb/. SIGNIFICANCE: The information presented in FragKB can be used for modeling protein structures, for designing novel proteins and for functional characterization of related fragments. The current release is focused on functional characterization of proteins through inspection of conservation of the fragments.

  16. The structure of a conserved piezo channel domain reveals a topologically distinct β sandwich fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens T; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C

    2014-10-07

    Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2,000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a topologically distinct β sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be-identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 20-Hydroxyecdysone stimulates nuclear accumulation of BmNep1, a nuclear ribosome biogenesis-related protein in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, M-M; Liu, A-Q; Sima, Y-H; Xu, S-Q

    2016-10-01

    The pathway of communication between endocrine hormones and ribosome biogenesis critical for physiological adaptation is largely unknown. Nucleolar essential protein 1 (Nep1) is an essential gene for ribosome biogenesis and is functionally conserved in many in vertebrate and invertebrate species. In this study, we cloned Bombyx mori Nep1 (BmNep1) due to its high expression in silk glands of silkworms on day 3 of the fifth instar. We found that BmNep1 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in silk glands during fourth-instar ecdysis and larval-pupal metamorphosis. By immunoprecipitation with the anti-BmNep1 antibody and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses, it was shown that BmNep1 probably interacts with proteins related to ribosome structure formation. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that BmNep1 is localized to the nuclei in Bombyx cells. Using BmN cells originally derived from ovaries, we demonstrated that 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced BmNep1 expression and stimulated nuclear accumulation of BmNep1. Under physiological conditions, BmNep1 was also upregulated in ovaries during larval-pupal metamorphosis. Overall, our results indicate that the endocrine hormone 20E facilitates nuclear accumulation of BmNep1, which is involved in nuclear ribosome biogenesis in Bombyx. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  18. Highly divergent 16S rRNA sequences in ribosomal operons of Scytonema hyalinum (Cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Johansen

    Full Text Available A highly divergent 16S rRNA gene was found in one of the five ribosomal operons present in a species complex currently circumscribed as Scytonema hyalinum (Nostocales, Cyanobacteria using clone libraries. If 16S rRNA sequence macroheterogeneity among ribosomal operons due to insertions, deletions or truncation is excluded, the sequence heterogeneity observed in S. hyalinum was the highest observed in any prokaryotic species thus far (7.3-9.0%. The secondary structure of the 16S rRNA molecules encoded by the two divergent operons was nearly identical, indicating possible functionality. The 23S rRNA gene was examined for a few strains in this complex, and it was also found to be highly divergent from the gene in Type 2 operons (8.7%, and likewise had nearly identical secondary structure between the Type 1 and Type 2 operons. Furthermore, the 16S-23S ITS showed marked differences consistent between operons among numerous strains. Both operons have promoter sequences that satisfy consensus requirements for functional prokaryotic transcription initiation. Horizontal gene transfer from another unknown heterocytous cyanobacterium is considered the most likely explanation for the origin of this molecule, but does not explain the ultimate origin of this sequence, which is very divergent from all 16S rRNA sequences found thus far in cyanobacteria. The divergent sequence is highly conserved among numerous strains of S. hyalinum, suggesting adaptive advantage and selective constraint of the divergent sequence.

  19. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  20. Hydra meiosis reveals unexpected conservation of structural synaptonemal complex proteins across metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraune, Johanna; Alsheimer, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Busch, Karoline; Fraune, Sebastian; Bosch, Thomas C G; Benavente, Ricardo

    2012-10-09

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a key structure of meiosis, mediating the stable pairing (synapsis) of homologous chromosomes during prophase I. Its remarkable tripartite structure is evolutionarily well conserved and can be found in almost all sexually reproducing organisms. However, comparison of the different SC protein components in the common meiosis model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Mus musculus revealed no sequence homology. This discrepancy challenged the hypothesis that the SC arose only once in evolution. To pursue this matter we focused on the evolution of SYCP1 and SYCP3, the two major structural SC proteins of mammals. Remarkably, our comparative bioinformatic and expression studies revealed that SYCP1 and SYCP3 are also components of the SC in the basal metazoan Hydra. In contrast to previous assumptions, we therefore conclude that SYCP1 and SYCP3 form monophyletic groups of orthologous proteins across metazoans.

  1. Variability and conservation of structural domains in divide-and-conquer approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, Thomas [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Gardiennet, Carole [CNRS, Université de Lorraine, CRM2, UMR 7036 (France); Cadalbert, Riccardo [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Lacabanne, Denis; Kunert, Britta; Terradot, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.terradot@ibcp.fr; Böckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    The use of protein building blocks for the structure determination of multidomain proteins and protein–protein complexes, also known as the “divide and conquer” approach, is an important strategy for obtaining protein structures. Atomic-resolution X-ray or NMR data of the individual domains are combined with lower-resolution electron microscopy maps or X-ray data of the full-length protein or the protein complex. Doing so, it is often assumed that the individual domain structures remain invariant in the context of the superstructure. In this work, we show the potentials and limitations of NMR to validate this approach at the example of the dodecameric DnaB helicase from Helicobacter pylori. We investigate how sequentially assigned spectra, as well as unassigned spectral fingerprints can be used to indicate the conservation of individual domains, and also to highlight conformational differences.

  2. Ribosome dynamics and tRNA movement by time-resolved electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2010-07-15

    The translocation step of protein synthesis entails large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome-transfer RNA (tRNA) complex. Here we have followed tRNA movement through the ribosome during translocation by time-resolved single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Unbiased computational sorting of cryo-EM images yielded 50 distinct three-dimensional reconstructions, showing the tRNAs in classical, hybrid and various novel intermediate states that provide trajectories and kinetic information about tRNA movement through the ribosome. The structures indicate how tRNA movement is coupled with global and local conformational changes of the ribosome, in particular of the head and body of the small ribosomal subunit, and show that dynamic interactions between tRNAs and ribosomal residues confine the path of the tRNAs through the ribosome. The temperature dependence of ribosome dynamics reveals a surprisingly flat energy landscape of conformational variations at physiological temperature. The ribosome functions as a Brownian machine that couples spontaneous conformational changes driven by thermal energy to directed movement.

  3. Characterization of Zebrafish von Willebrand Factor Reveals Conservation of Domain Structure, Multimerization, and Intracellular Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunima Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available von Willebrand disease (VWD is the most common inherited human bleeding disorder and is caused by quantitative or qualitative defects in von Willebrand factor (VWF. VWF is a secreted glycoprotein that circulates as large multimers. While reduced VWF is associated with bleeding, elevations in overall level or multimer size are implicated in thrombosis. The zebrafish is a powerful genetic model in which the hemostatic system is well conserved with mammals. The ability of this organism to generate thousands of offspring and its optical transparency make it unique and complementary to mammalian models of hemostasis. Previously, partial clones of zebrafish vwf have been identified, and some functional conservation has been demonstrated. In this paper we clone the complete zebrafish vwf cDNA and show that there is conservation of domain structure. Recombinant zebrafish Vwf forms large multimers and pseudo-Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs in cell culture. Larval expression is in the pharyngeal arches, yolk sac, and intestinal epithelium. These results provide a foundation for continued study of zebrafish Vwf that may further our understanding of the mechanisms of VWD.

  4. The application of mass and energy conservation laws in physiologically structured population models of heterotrophic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman; Kooi; Hallam

    1999-04-07

    Rules for energy uptake, and subsequent utilization, form the basis of population dynamics and, therefore, explain the dynamics of the ecosystem structure in terms of changes in standing crops and size distributions of individuals. Mass fluxes are concomitant with energy flows and delineate functional aspects of ecosystems by defining the roles of individuals and populations. The assumption of homeostasis of body components, and an assumption about the general structure of energy budgets, imply that mass fluxes can be written as weighted sums of three organizing energy fluxes with the weight coefficients determined by the conservation law of mass. These energy fluxes are assimilation, maintenance and growth, and provide a theoretical underpinning of the widely applied empirical method of indirect calorimetry, which relates dissipating heat linearly to three mass fluxes: carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption and N-waste production. A generic approach to the stoichiometry of population energetics from the perspective of the individual organism is proposed and illustrated for heterotrophic organisms. This approach indicates that mass transformations can be identified by accounting for maintenance requirements and overhead costs for the various metabolic processes at the population level. The theoretical background for coupling the dynamics of the structure of communities to nutrient cycles, including the water balance, as well as explicit expressions for the dissipating heat at the population level are obtained based on the conservation law of energy. Specifications of the general theory employ the Dynamic Energy Budget model for individuals. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Informing conservation management about structural versus functional connectivity: a case-study of Cross River gorillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imong, Inaoyom; Robbins, Martha M; Mundry, Roger; Bergl, Richard; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2014-10-01

    Connectivity among subpopulations is vital for the persistence of small and fragmented populations. For management interventions to be effective conservation planners have to make the critical distinction between structural connectivity (based on landscape structure) and functional connectivity (which considers both landscape structure and organism-specific behavioral attributes) which can differ considerably within a given context. We assessed spatial and temporal changes in structural and functional connectivity of the Cross River gorilla Gorilla gorilla diehli (CRG) population in a 12,000 km(2) landscape in the Nigeria-Cameroon border region over a 23-year period, comparing two periods: 1987-2000 and 2000-2010. Despite substantial forest connections between occupied areas, genetic evidence shows that only limited dispersal occurs among CRG subpopulations. We used remotely sensed land-cover data and simulated human pressure (using a spatially explicit agent-based model) to assess human impact on connectivity of the CRG population. We calculated cost-weighted distances between areas occupied by gorillas as measures of connectivity (structural based on land-cover only, functional based on both land-cover and simulated human pressure). Whereas structural connectivity decreased by 5% over the 23-year period, functional connectivity decreased by 11%, with both decreasing more during the latter compared to the earlier period. Our results highlight the increasing threat of isolation of CRG subpopulations due to human disturbance, and provide insight into how increasing human influence may lead to functional isolation of wildlife populations despite habitat continuity, a pressing and common issue in tropical Africa often not accounted for when deciding management interventions. In addition to quantifying threats to connectivity, our study provides crucial evidence for management authorities to identify actions that are more likely to be effective for conservation of

  6. Local conservation laws and the structure of the many-body localized states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbyn, Maksym; Papić, Z; Abanin, Dmitry A

    2013-09-20

    We construct a complete set of local integrals of motion that characterize the many-body localized (MBL) phase. Our approach relies on the assumption that local perturbations act locally on the eigenstates in the MBL phase, which is supported by numerical simulations of the random-field XXZ spin chain. We describe the structure of the eigenstates in the MBL phase and discuss the implications of local conservation laws for its nonequilibrium quantum dynamics. We argue that the many-body localization can be used to protect coherence in the system by suppressing relaxation between eigenstates with different local integrals of motion.

  7. Hierarchical recruitment of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors remodels nucleolar pre-60S ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedka, Stephanie; Micic, Jelena; Wilson, Daniel; Brown, Hailey; Diorio-Toth, Luke; Woolford, John L

    2018-04-24

    Ribosome biogenesis involves numerous preribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) processing events to remove internal and external transcribed spacer sequences, ultimately yielding three mature rRNAs. Removal of the internal transcribed spacer 2 spacer RNA is the final step in large subunit pre-rRNA processing and begins with endonucleolytic cleavage at the C 2 site of 27SB pre-rRNA. C 2 cleavage requires the hierarchical recruitment of 11 ribosomal proteins and 14 ribosome assembly factors. However, the function of these proteins in C 2 cleavage remained unclear. In this study, we have performed a detailed analysis of the effects of depleting proteins required for C 2 cleavage and interpreted these results using cryo-electron microscopy structures of assembling 60S subunits. This work revealed that these proteins are required for remodeling of several neighborhoods, including two major functional centers of the 60S subunit, suggesting that these remodeling events form a checkpoint leading to C 2 cleavage. Interestingly, when C 2 cleavage is directly blocked by depleting or inactivating the C 2 endonuclease, assembly progresses through all other subsequent steps. © 2018 Biedka et al.

  8. Interaction of pleuromutilin derivatives with the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, K. S.; Hansen, L. K.; Jakobsen, L.

    2006-01-01

    Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that is used in veterinary medicine. The recently published crystal structure of a tiamulin-50S ribosomal subunit complex provides detailed information about how this drug targets the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. To promote rational design...... mutant strain is resistant to tiamulin and pleuromutilin, but not valnemulin, implying that valnemulin is better able to withstand an altered rRNA binding surface around the mutilin core. This is likely due to additional interactions made between the valnemulin side chain extension and the rRNA binding...

  9. Functional evolution and structural conservation in chimeric cytochromes p450: calibrating a structure-guided approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otey, Christopher R; Silberg, Jonathan J; Voigt, Christopher A; Endelman, Jeffrey B; Bandara, Geethani; Arnold, Frances H

    2004-03-01

    Recombination generates chimeric proteins whose ability to fold depends on minimizing structural perturbations that result when portions of the sequence are inherited from different parents. These chimeric sequences can display functional properties characteristic of the parents or acquire entirely new functions. Seventeen chimeras were generated from two CYP102 members of the functionally diverse cytochrome p450 family. Chimeras predicted to have limited structural disruption, as defined by the SCHEMA algorithm, displayed CO binding spectra characteristic of folded p450s. Even this small population exhibited significant functional diversity: chimeras displayed altered substrate specificities, a wide range in thermostabilities, up to a 40-fold increase in peroxidase activity, and ability to hydroxylate a substrate toward which neither parent heme domain shows detectable activity. These results suggest that SCHEMA-guided recombination can be used to generate diverse p450s for exploring function evolution within the p450 structural framework.

  10. Insights into the Inhibition of the p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase (RSK) by the Flavonol Glycoside SL0101 from the 1.5 Å Crystal Structure of the N-Terminal Domain of RSK2 with Bound Inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Derewenda, Urszula; Olekhnovich, Natalya; Szukalska, Gabriela; Banerjee, Budhaditya; Hilinski, Michael K.; Lannigan, Deborah A.; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Derewenda, Zygmunt S. (Lodz - Poland); (UV)

    2012-09-11

    The p90 ribosomal S6 family of kinases (RSK) are potential drug targets, due to their involvement in cancer and other pathologies. There are currently only two known selective inhibitors of RSK, but the basis for selectivity is not known. One of these inhibitors is a naturally occurring kaempferol-a-l-diacetylrhamnoside, SL0101. Here, we report the crystal structure of the complex of the N-terminal kinase domain of the RSK2 isoform with SL0101 at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. The refined atomic model reveals unprecedented structural reorganization of the protein moiety, as compared to the nucleotide-bound form. The entire N-lobe, the hinge region, and the aD-helix undergo dramatic conformational changes resulting in a rearrangement of the nucleotide binding site with concomitant formation of a highly hydrophobic pocket spatially suited to accommodate SL0101. These unexpected results will be invaluable in further optimization of the SL0101 scaffold as a promising lead for a novel class of kinase inhibitors.

  11. Ana3 is a conserved protein required for the structural integrity of centrioles and basal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Naomi R; Dobbelaere, Jeroen; Wainman, Alan; Gergely, Fanni; Raff, Jordan W

    2009-11-02

    Recent studies have identified a conserved "core" of proteins that are required for centriole duplication. A small number of additional proteins have recently been identified as potential duplication factors, but it is unclear whether any of these proteins are components of the core duplication machinery. In this study, we investigate the function of one of these proteins, Drosophila melanogaster Ana3. We show that Ana3 is present in centrioles and basal bodies, but its behavior is distinct from that of the core duplication proteins. Most importantly, we find that Ana3 is required for the structural integrity of both centrioles and basal bodies and for centriole cohesion, but it is not essential for centriole duplication. We show that Ana3 has a mammalian homologue, Rotatin, that also localizes to centrioles and basal bodies and appears to be essential for cilia function. Thus, Ana3 defines a conserved family of centriolar proteins and plays an important part in ensuring the structural integrity of centrioles and basal bodies.

  12. Determining the drivers of population structure in a highly urbanized landscape to inform conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Henri A; Harrigan, Ryan J; Semple Delaney, Kathleen; Riley, Seth P D; Serieys, Laurel E K; Pease, Katherine; Wayne, Robert K; Smith, Thomas B

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the environmental contributors to population structure is of paramount importance for conservation in urbanized environments. We used spatially explicit models to determine genetic population structure under current and future environmental conditions across a highly fragmented, human-dominated environment in Southern California to assess the effects of natural ecological variation and urbanization. We focused on 7 common species with diverse habitat requirements, home-range sizes, and dispersal abilities. We quantified the relative roles of potential barriers, including natural environmental characteristics and an anthropogenic barrier created by a major highway, in shaping genetic variation. The ability to predict genetic variation in our models differed among species: 11-81% of intraspecific genetic variation was explained by environmental variables. Although an anthropogenically induced barrier (a major highway) severely restricted gene flow and movement at broad scales for some species, genetic variation seemed to be primarily driven by natural environmental heterogeneity at a local level. Our results show how assessing environmentally associated variation for multiple species under current and future climate conditions can help identify priority regions for maximizing population persistence under environmental change in urbanized regions. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  13. Comparative Annotation of Viral Genomes with Non-Conserved Gene Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas; Hein, Jotun

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Detecting genes in viral genomes is a complex task. Due to the biological necessity of them being constrained in length, RNA viruses in particular tend to code in overlapping reading frames. Since one amino acid is encoded by a triplet of nucleic acids, up to three genes may be coded...... allows for coding in unidirectional nested and overlapping reading frames, to annotate two homologous aligned viral genomes. Our method does not insist on conserved gene structure between the two sequences, thus making it applicable for the pairwise comparison of more distantly related sequences. Results...... and HIV2, as well as of two different Hepatitis Viruses, attaining results of ~87% sensitivity and ~98.5% specificity. We subsequently incorporate prior knowledge by "knowing" the gene structure of one sequence and annotating the other conditional on it. Boosting accuracy close to perfect we demonstrate...

  14. Cryo-EM structure of human adenovirus D26 reveals the conservation of structural organization among human adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaodi; Veesler, David; Campbell, Melody G; Barry, Mary E; Asturias, Francisco J; Barry, Michael A; Reddy, Vijay S

    2017-05-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) cause acute respiratory, ocular, and gastroenteric diseases and are also frequently used as gene and vaccine delivery vectors. Unlike the archetype human adenovirus C5 (HAdV-C5), human adenovirus D26 (HAdV-D26) belongs to species-D HAdVs, which target different cellular receptors, and is differentially recognized by immune surveillance mechanisms. HAdV-D26 is being championed as a lower seroprevalent vaccine and oncolytic vector in preclinical and human clinical studies. To understand the molecular basis for their distinct biological properties and independently validate the structures of minor proteins, we determined the first structure of species-D HAdV at 3.7 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. All the hexon hypervariable regions (HVRs), including HVR1, have been identified and exhibit a distinct organization compared to those of HAdV-C5. Despite the differences in the arrangement of helices in the coiled-coil structures, protein IX molecules form a continuous hexagonal network on the capsid exterior. In addition to the structurally conserved region (3 to 300) of IIIa, we identified an extra helical domain comprising residues 314 to 390 that further stabilizes the vertex region. Multiple (two to three) copies of the cleaved amino-terminal fragment of protein VI (pVIn) are observed in each hexon cavity, suggesting that there could be ≥480 copies of VI present in HAdV-D26. In addition, a localized asymmetric reconstruction of the vertex region provides new details of the three-pronged "claw hold" of the trimeric fiber and its interactions with the penton base. These observations resolve the previous conflicting assignments of the minor proteins and suggest the likely conservation of their organization across different HAdVs.

  15. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Mesoamerican Jaguars (Panthera onca): Implications for Conservation and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wultsch, Claudia; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Quigley, Howard; Rabinowitz, Salisa; Amato, George

    2016-01-01

    Mesoamerican jaguars (Panthera onca) have been extirpated from over 77% of their historic range, inhabiting fragmented landscapes at potentially reduced population sizes. Maintaining and restoring genetic diversity and connectivity across human-altered landscapes has become a major conservation priority; nonetheless large-scale genetic monitoring of natural populations is rare. This is the first regional conservation genetic study of jaguars to primarily use fecal samples collected in the wild across five Mesoamerican countries: Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. We genotyped 445 jaguar fecal samples and examined patterns of genetic diversity and connectivity among 115 individual jaguars using data from 12 microsatellite loci. Overall, moderate levels of genetic variation were detected (NA = 4.50 ± 1.05, AR = 3.43 ± 0.22, HE = 0.59 ± 0.04), with Mexico having the lowest genetic diversity, followed by Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, and Costa Rica. Population-based gene flow measures (FST = 0.09 to 0.15, Dest = 0.09 to 0.21), principal component analysis, and Bayesian clustering applied in a hierarchical framework revealed significant genetic structure in Mesoamerican jaguars, roughly grouping individuals into four genetic clusters with varying levels of admixture. Gene flow was highest among Selva Maya jaguars (northern Guatemala and central Belize), whereas genetic differentiation among all other sampling sites was moderate. Genetic subdivision was most pronounced between Selva Maya and Honduran jaguars, suggesting limited jaguar movement between these close geographic regions and ultimately refuting the hypothesis of contemporary panmixia. To maintain a critical linkage for jaguars dispersing through the Mesoamerican landscape and ensure long-term viability of this near threatened species, we recommend continued management and maintenance of jaguar corridors. The baseline genetic data provided by this study underscores the importance of

  16. Species Richness and Community Structure on a High Latitude Reef: Implications for Conservation and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Houston

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the wealth of research on the Great Barrier Reef, few detailed biodiversity assessments of its inshore coral communities have been conducted. Effective conservation and management of marine ecosystems begins with fine-scale biophysical assessments focused on diversity and the architectural species that build the structural framework of the reef. In this study, we investigate key coral diversity and environmental attributes of an inshore reef system surrounding the Keppel Bay Islands near Rockhampton in Central Queensland, Australia, and assess their implications for conservation and management. The Keppels has much higher coral diversity than previously found. The average species richness for the 19 study sites was ~40 with representatives from 68% of the ~244 species previously described for the southern Great Barrier Reef. Using scleractinian coral species richness, taxonomic distinctiveness and coral cover as the main criteria, we found that five out of 19 sites had particularly high conservation value. A further site was also considered to be of relatively high value. Corals at this site were taxonomically distinct from the others (representatives of two families were found here but not at other sites and a wide range of functionally diverse taxa were present. This site was associated with more stressful conditions such as high temperatures and turbidity. Highly diverse coral communities or biodiversity ‘hotspots’ and taxonomically distinct reefs may act as insurance policies for climatic disturbance, much like Noah’s Arks for reefs. While improving water quality and limiting anthropogenic impacts are clearly important management initiatives to improve the long-term outlook for inshore reefs, identifying, mapping and protecting these coastal ‘refugia’ may be the key for ensuring their regeneration against catastrophic climatic disturbance in the meantime.

  17. The Arabidopsis TOR Kinase Specifically Regulates the Expression of Nuclear Genes Coding for Plastidic Ribosomal Proteins and the Phosphorylation of the Cytosolic Ribosomal Protein S6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrenel, Thomas; Mancera-Martínez, Eder; Forzani, Céline; Azzopardi, Marianne; Davanture, Marlène; Moreau, Manon; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Chicher, Johana; Langella, Olivier; Zivy, Michel; Robaglia, Christophe; Ryabova, Lyubov A; Hanson, Johannes; Meyer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is an energy consuming process that has to be fine-tuned at both the cell and organism levels to match the availability of resources. The target of rapamycin kinase (TOR) is a key regulator of a large range of biological processes in response to environmental cues. In this study, we have investigated the effects of TOR inactivation on the expression and regulation of Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins at different levels of analysis, namely from transcriptomic to phosphoproteomic. TOR inactivation resulted in a coordinated down-regulation of the transcription and translation of nuclear-encoded mRNAs coding for plastidic ribosomal proteins, which could explain the chlorotic phenotype of the TOR silenced plants. We have identified in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of this set of genes a conserved sequence related to the 5' terminal oligopyrimidine motif, which is known to confer translational regulation by the TOR kinase in other eukaryotes. Furthermore, the phosphoproteomic analysis of the ribosomal fraction following TOR inactivation revealed a lower phosphorylation of the conserved Ser240 residue in the C-terminal region of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6). These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using an antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated Ser240 in RPS6. Finally, this antibody was used to follow TOR activity in plants. Our results thus uncover a multi-level regulation of plant ribosomal genes and proteins by the TOR kinase.

  18. Abundance, population structure and conservation of Podocnemis lewyana (Podocnemididae) at the Prado River, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Zarate, Adriana; Montenegro, Olga; Castano Mora, Olga Victoria; Vargas Ramirez Mario

    2014-01-01

    Along the Prado River, at southeast of Colombia, there is a population of Podocnemis lewyana, an endemic and endangered river turtle. Relative abundance, population structure and conservation threats were determined using field data obtained in 2007 and 2009. Relative abundance was estimated by turtle catch per unit of time, which was used to compare between the two sampling years. Additionally, turtles per kilometer were counted in 2009 alone, to compare with other populations distributed in the north of the country. The population structure was determined by the frequency of individuals of several size classes and sex ratio of captured animals. Sexual dimorphism was examined in adult animals by morphometry. One hundred and ten turtles were captured in 2007 and 72 in 2009. The relative abundance of individuals observed was an averaged of 54.46 sightings/km representing the most abundant population of the country so far. The population's structure was characterized by a higher frequency of individuals of 21-30 cm maximum straight carapace length SCL and absence of individuals of less than 10 cm SCL or greater than 40 cm SCL. Sex ratio was 2.52:1 for 2007 and 2.75:1 for 2009, being higher for females. The main identified threats to the population of P. lewyana at Prado River were (i) alterations of habitat, (ii) changes in the natural flow of the river, (iii) the use of inappropriate fishing arts and (iv) probable interruption of migrations. Prado River is hereby proposed as priority area for further research and conservation of Podocnemis lewyana in the upper Magdalena River basin.

  19. Multiple-Site Trimethylation of Ribosomal Protein L11 by the PrmA Methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirci,H.; Gregory, S.; Dahlberg, A.; Jogl, G.

    2008-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L11 is a universally conserved component of the large subunit, and plays a significant role during initiation, elongation, and termination of protein synthesis. In Escherichia coli, the lysine methyltransferase PrmA trimethylates the N-terminal a-amino group and the -amino groups of Lys3 and Lys39. Here, we report four PrmA-L11 complex structures in different orientations with respect to the PrmA active site. Two structures capture the L11 N-terminal a-amino group in the active site in a trimethylated postcatalytic state and in a dimethylated state with bound S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. Two other structures show L11 in a catalytic orientation to modify Lys39 and in a noncatalytic orientation. The comparison of complex structures in different orientations with a minimal substrate recognition complex shows that the binding mode remains conserved in all L11 orientations, and that substrate orientation is brought about by the unusual interdomain flexibility of PrmA.

  20. Structured decision making as a conceptual framework to identify thresholds for conservation and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.; Runge, M.C.; Nichols, J.D.; Lubow, B.C.; Kendall, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    Thresholds and their relevance to conservation have become a major topic of discussion in the ecological literature. Unfortunately, in many cases the lack of a clear conceptual framework for thinking about thresholds may have led to confusion in attempts to apply the concept of thresholds to conservation decisions. Here, we advocate a framework for thinking about thresholds in terms of a structured decision making process. The purpose of this framework is to promote a logical and transparent process for making informed decisions for conservation. Specification of such a framework leads naturally to consideration of definitions and roles of different kinds of thresholds in the process. We distinguish among three categories of thresholds. Ecological thresholds are values of system state variables at which small changes bring about substantial changes in system dynamics. Utility thresholds are components of management objectives (determined by human values) and are values of state or performance variables at which small changes yield substantial changes in the value of the management outcome. Decision thresholds are values of system state variables at which small changes prompt changes in management actions in order to reach specified management objectives. The approach that we present focuses directly on the objectives of management, with an aim to providing decisions that are optimal with respect to those objectives. This approach clearly distinguishes the components of the decision process that are inherently subjective (management objectives, potential management actions) from those that are more objective (system models, estimates of system state). Optimization based on these components then leads to decision matrices specifying optimal actions to be taken at various values of system state variables. Values of state variables separating different actions in such matrices are viewed as decision thresholds. Utility thresholds are included in the objectives

  1. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher A; Epperson, Megan L; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I; Fremont, Daved H

    2015-08-28

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection.

  2. Conservation and divergence of C-terminal domain structure in the retinoblastoma protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liban, Tyler J.; Medina, Edgar M.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R. William; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Duke); (MSU)

    2017-04-24

    The retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and the homologous pocket proteins p107 and p130 negatively regulate cell proliferation by binding and inhibiting members of the E2F transcription factor family. The structural features that distinguish Rb from other pocket proteins have been unclear but are critical for understanding their functional diversity and determining why Rb has unique tumor suppressor activities. We describe here important differences in how the Rb and p107 C-terminal domains (CTDs) associate with the coiled-coil and marked-box domains (CMs) of E2Fs. We find that although CTD–CM binding is conserved across protein families, Rb and p107 CTDs show clear preferences for different E2Fs. A crystal structure of the p107 CTD bound to E2F5 and its dimer partner DP1 reveals the molecular basis for pocket protein–E2F binding specificity and how cyclin-dependent kinases differentially regulate pocket proteins through CTD phosphorylation. Our structural and biochemical data together with phylogenetic analyses of Rb and E2F proteins support the conclusion that Rb evolved specific structural motifs that confer its unique capacity to bind with high affinity those E2Fs that are the most potent activators of the cell cycle.

  3. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements

    KAUST Repository

    Guturu, H.

    2013-11-11

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and \\'through-DNA\\' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  4. The Structure of a Conserved Domain of TamB Reveals a Hydrophobic β Taco Fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josts, Inokentijs; Stubenrauch, Christopher James; Vadlamani, Grishma; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Walker, Daniel; Lithgow, Trevor; Grinter, Rhys

    2017-12-05

    The translocation and assembly module (TAM) plays a role in the transport and insertion of proteins into the bacterial outer membrane. TamB, a component of this system spans the periplasmic space to engage with its partner protein TamA. Despite efforts to characterize the TAM, the structure and mechanism of action of TamB remained enigmatic. Here we present the crystal structure of TamB amino acids 963-1,138. This region represents half of the conserved DUF490 domain, the defining feature of TamB. TamB 963-1138 consists of a concave, taco-shaped β sheet with a hydrophobic interior. This β taco structure is of dimensions capable of accommodating and shielding the hydrophobic side of an amphipathic β strand, potentially allowing TamB to chaperone nascent membrane proteins from the aqueous environment. In addition, sequence analysis suggests that the structure of TamB 963-1138 is shared by a large portion of TamB. This architecture could allow TamB to act as a conduit for membrane proteins. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements

    KAUST Repository

    Guturu, H.; Doxey, A. C.; Wenger, A. M.; Bejerano, G.

    2013-01-01

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and 'through-DNA' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  6. Identification of multiple distinct Snf2 subfamilies with conserved structural motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaus, Andrew; Martin, David M A; Barton, Geoffrey J; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins includes the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes found in all eukaryotes. These act to regulate the structure and dynamic properties of chromatin and so influence a broad range of nuclear processes. We have exploited progress in genome sequencing to assemble a comprehensive catalogue of over 1300 Snf2 family members. Multiple sequence alignment of the helicase-related regions enables 24 distinct subfamilies to be identified, a considerable expansion over earlier surveys. Where information is known, there is a good correlation between biological or biochemical function and these assignments, suggesting Snf2 family motor domains are tuned for specific tasks. Scanning of complete genomes reveals all eukaryotes contain members of multiple subfamilies, whereas they are less common and not ubiquitous in eubacteria or archaea. The large sample of Snf2 proteins enables additional distinguishing conserved sequence blocks within the helicase-like motor to be identified. The establishment of a phylogeny for Snf2 proteins provides an opportunity to make informed assignments of function, and the identification of conserved motifs provides a framework for understanding the mechanisms by which these proteins function.

  7. An improved energy conserving implicit time integration algorithm for nonlinear dynamic structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, E.; Rouvray, A.L. de; Nguyen, Q.S.

    1977-01-01

    This study proposes a general nonlinear algorithm stability criterion; it introduces a nonlinear algorithm, easily implemented in existing incremental/iterative codes, and it applies the new scheme beneficially to problems of linear elastic dynamic snap buckling. Based on the concept of energy conservation, the paper outlines an algorithm which degenerates into the trapezoidal rule, if applied to linear systems. The new algorithm conserves energy in systems having elastic potentials up to the fourth order in the displacements. This is true in the important case of nonlinear total Lagrange formulations where linear elastic material properties are substituted. The scheme is easily implemented in existing incremental-iterative codes with provisions for stiffness reformation and containing the basic Newmark scheme. Numerical analyses of dynamic stability can be dramatically sensitive to amplitude errors, because damping algorithms may mask, and overestimating schemes may numerically trigger, the physical instability. The newly proposed scheme has been applied with larger time steps and less cost to the dynamic snap buckling of simple one and multi degree-of-freedom structures for various initial conditions

  8. Control of ribosome formation in rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Diabetes of 9 days duration produced a 17% diminution in the rate of total protein synthesis in rat hearts perfused as Langendorff preparations supplied with glucose, plasma levels of amino acids, and 400 μU/ml insulin. This reduction was attributable to a decrease in efficiency of protein synthesis and total RNA content. Total messenger RNA content decreased in diabetic hearts in proportion to the reduction in total RNA. Diabetes also resulted in diminished ribosome content as reflected by the induction in total RNA. Ribosome production was investigated by monitoring incorporation of [ 3 H]phenylalanine into the proteins of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Rates of ribosome formation in diabetic hearts were as fast as control rates in the presence of insulin, and were faster than control rates in the absence of the hormone. These results indicated that ribosome content fell in diabetic hearts despite unchanged or faster rates of ribosome formation

  9. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  10. Hypoxic stress-induced changes in ribosomes of maize seedling roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey-Serres, J.; Freeling, M.

    1990-01-01

    The hypoxic stress response of Zea mays L. seedling roots involves regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. We investigated the effect of hypoxia on the translational machinery of seedling roots. The levels of monoribosomes and ribosomal subunits increased dramatically within 1 hour of stress. Prolonged hypoxia resulted in continued accumulation of nontranslating ribosomes, as well as increased levels of small polyribosomes. The return of seedlings to normal aerobic conditions resulted in recovery of normal polyribosome levels. Comparison of ribosomal proteins from control and hypoxic roots revealed differences in quantity and electrophoretic mobility. In vivo labeling of roots with [ 35 S]methionine revealed variations in newly synthesized ribosomal proteins. In vivo labeling of roots with [ 32 P]orthophosphate revealed a major reduction in the phosphorylation of a 31 kilodalton ribosomal protein in hypoxic stressed roots. In vitro phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins by endogenous kinases was used to probe for differences in ribosome structure and composition. The patterns of in vitro kinased phosphoproteins of ribosomes from control and hypoxic roots were not identical. Variation in phosphoproteins of polyribosomes from control and hypoxic roots, as well as among polyribosomes from hypoxic roots were observed. These results indicate that modification of the translational machinery occurs in response to hypoxic stress

  11. Phylogeography and genetic structure of a Tertiary relict tree species, Tapiscia sinensis (Tapisciaceae): implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinju; Li, Zuozhou; Fritsch, Peter W; Tian, Hua; Yang, Aihong; Yao, Xiaohong

    2015-10-01

    The phylogeography of plant species in sub-tropical China remains largely unclear. This study used Tapiscia sinensis, an endemic and endangered tree species widely but disjunctly distributed in sub-tropical China, as a model to reveal the patterns of genetic diversity and phylogeographical history of Tertiary relict plant species in this region. The implications of the results are discussed in relation to its conservation management. Samples were taken from 24 populations covering the natural geographical distribution of T. sinensis. Genetic structure was investigated by analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and spatial analysis of molecular variance (SAMOVA). Phylogenetic relationships among haplotypes were constructed with maximum parsimony and haplotype network methods. Historical population expansion events were tested with pairwise mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests. Species potential range was deduced by ecological niche modelling (ENM). A low level of genetic diversity was detected at the population level. A high level of genetic differentiation and a significant phylogeographical structure were revealed. The mean divergence time of the haplotypes was approx. 1·33 million years ago. Recent range expansion in this species is suggested by a star-like haplotype network and by the results from the mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests. Climatic oscillations during the Pleistocene have had pronounced effects on the extant distribution of Tapiscia relative to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Spatial patterns of molecular variation and ENM suggest that T. sinensis may have retreated in south-western and central China and colonized eastern China prior to the LGM. Multiple montane refugia for T. sinense existing during the LGM are inferred in central and western China. The populations adjacent to or within these refugia of T. sinense should be given high priority in the development of conservation policies and management strategies for

  12. Genetic Structure and Selection of a Core Collection for Long Term Conservation of Avocado in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Luis F.; Machida-Hirano, Ryoko; Borrayo, Ernesto; Cortés-Cruz, Moisés; Espíndola-Barquera, María del Carmen; Heredia García, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Mexico, as the center of origin of avocado (Persea americama Mill.), harbors a wide genetic diversity of this species, whose identification may provide the grounds to not only understand its unique population structure and domestication history, but also inform the efforts aimed at its conservation. Although molecular characterization of cultivated avocado germplasm has been studied by several research groups, this had not been the case in Mexico. In order to elucidate the genetic structure of avocado in Mexico and the sustainable use of its genetic resources, 318 avocado accessions conserved in the germplasm collection in the National Avocado Genebank were analyzed using 28 markers [9 expressed sequence tag-Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) and 19 genomic SSRs]. Deviation from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium and high inter-locus linkage disequilibrium were observed especially in drymifolia, and guatemalensis. Total averages of the observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.59 and 0.75, respectively. Although clear genetic differentiation was not observed among 3 botanical races: americana, drymifolia, and guatemalensis, the analyzed Mexican population can be classified into two groups that correspond to two different ecological regions. We developed a core-collection by K-means clustering method. The selected 36 individuals as core-collection successfully represented more than 80% of total alleles and showed heterozygosity values equal to or higher than those of the original collection, despite its constituting slightly more than 10% of the latter. Accessions selected as members of the core collection have now become candidates to be introduced in cryopreservation implying a minimum loss of genetic diversity and a back-up for existing field collections of such important genetic resources. PMID:28286510

  13. Structural adaptation of extreme halophilic proteins through decrease of conserved hydrophobic contact surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Halophiles are extremophilic microorganisms growing optimally at high salt concentrations. There are two strategies used by halophiles to maintain proper osmotic pressure in their cytoplasm: accumulation of molar concentrations of potassium and chloride with extensive adaptation of the intracellular macromolecules ("salt-in" strategy) or biosynthesis and/or accumulation of organic osmotic solutes ("osmolyte" strategy). Our work was aimed at contributing to the understanding of the shared molecular mechanisms of protein haloadaptation through a detailed and systematic comparison of a sample of several three-dimensional structures of halophilic and non-halophilic proteins. Structural differences observed between the "salt-in" and the mesophilic homologous proteins were contrasted to those observed between the "osmolyte" and mesophilic pairs. Results The results suggest that haloadaptation strategy in the presence of molar salt concentration, but not of osmolytes, necessitates a weakening of the hydrophobic interactions, in particular at the level of conserved hydrophobic contacts. Weakening of these interactions counterbalances their strengthening by the presence of salts in solution and may help the structure preventing aggregation and/or loss of function in hypersaline environments. Conclusions Considering the significant increase of biotechnology applications of halophiles, the understanding of halophilicity can provide the theoretical basis for the engineering of proteins of great interest because stable at concentrations of salts that cause the denaturation or aggregation of the majority of macromolecules. PMID:22192175

  14. Structural adaptation of extreme halophilic proteins through decrease of conserved hydrophobic contact surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siglioccolo Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Halophiles are extremophilic microorganisms growing optimally at high salt concentrations. There are two strategies used by halophiles to maintain proper osmotic pressure in their cytoplasm: accumulation of molar concentrations of potassium and chloride with extensive adaptation of the intracellular macromolecules ("salt-in" strategy or biosynthesis and/or accumulation of organic osmotic solutes ("osmolyte" strategy. Our work was aimed at contributing to the understanding of the shared molecular mechanisms of protein haloadaptation through a detailed and systematic comparison of a sample of several three-dimensional structures of halophilic and non-halophilic proteins. Structural differences observed between the "salt-in" and the mesophilic homologous proteins were contrasted to those observed between the "osmolyte" and mesophilic pairs. Results The results suggest that haloadaptation strategy in the presence of molar salt concentration, but not of osmolytes, necessitates a weakening of the hydrophobic interactions, in particular at the level of conserved hydrophobic contacts. Weakening of these interactions counterbalances their strengthening by the presence of salts in solution and may help the structure preventing aggregation and/or loss of function in hypersaline environments. Conclusions Considering the significant increase of biotechnology applications of halophiles, the understanding of halophilicity can provide the theoretical basis for the engineering of proteins of great interest because stable at concentrations of salts that cause the denaturation or aggregation of the majority of macromolecules.

  15. Conserved elements within the genome of foot-and mouth disease virus; their influence on virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Jonas; Poulsen, Line D.; Vinther, Jeppe

    Objectives: Several conserved elements within the genome of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have been identified, e.g. the IRES. Such elements can be crucial for the efficient replication of the genomic RNA. Previously, SHAPE analysis of the entire FMDV genome (Poulsen et al., 2016 submitted......) has identified a conserved RNA structure within the 3Dpol coding region (the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase) which might have an important role in virus replication. The FMDV 2A peptide, another conserved element, is responsible for the primary “cleavage” at its own C-terminus (2A/2B junction......). It is believed that this “cleavage” is achieved by ribosomal skipping, in which the 2A peptide prevents the ribosome from linking the next amino acid (aa) to the growing polypeptide. The nature of this “cleavage” has so far not been investigated in the context of the full-length FMDV RNA within cells. Through...

  16. Conservation of forest birds: evidence of a shifting baseline in community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick D Rittenhouse

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying changes in forest bird diversity is an essential task for developing effective conservation actions. When subtle changes in diversity accumulate over time, annual comparisons may offer an incomplete perspective of changes in diversity. In this case, progressive change, the comparison of changes in diversity from a baseline condition, may offer greater insight because changes in diversity are assessed over longer periods of times. Our objectives were to determine how forest bird diversity has changed over time and whether those changes were associated with forest disturbance.We used North American Breeding Bird Survey data, a time series of Landsat images classified with respect to land cover change, and mixed-effects models to associate changes in forest bird community structure with forest disturbance, latitude, and longitude in the conterminous United States for the years 1985 to 2006. We document a significant divergence from the baseline structure for all birds of similar migratory habit and nest location, and all forest birds as a group from 1985 to 2006. Unexpectedly, decreases in progressive similarity resulted from small changes in richness (<1 species per route for the 22-year study period and modest losses in abundance (-28.7 - -10.2 individuals per route that varied by migratory habit and nest location. Forest disturbance increased progressive similarity for Neotropical migrants, permanent residents, ground nesting, and cavity nesting species. We also documented highest progressive similarity in the eastern United States.Contemporary forest bird community structure is changing rapidly over a relatively short period of time (e.g., approximately 22 years. Forest disturbance and forest regeneration are primary factors associated with contemporary forest bird community structure, longitude and latitude are secondary factors, and forest loss is a tertiary factor. Importantly, these findings suggest some regions of the United

  17. Conservation of forest birds: evidence of a shifting baseline in community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Chadwick D; Pidgeon, Anna M; Albright, Thomas P; Culbert, Patrick D; Clayton, Murray K; Flather, Curtis H; Huang, Chengquan; Masek, Jeffrey G; Stewart, Susan I; Radeloff, Volker C

    2010-08-02

    Quantifying changes in forest bird diversity is an essential task for developing effective conservation actions. When subtle changes in diversity accumulate over time, annual comparisons may offer an incomplete perspective of changes in diversity. In this case, progressive change, the comparison of changes in diversity from a baseline condition, may offer greater insight because changes in diversity are assessed over longer periods of times. Our objectives were to determine how forest bird diversity has changed over time and whether those changes were associated with forest disturbance. We used North American Breeding Bird Survey data, a time series of Landsat images classified with respect to land cover change, and mixed-effects models to associate changes in forest bird community structure with forest disturbance, latitude, and longitude in the conterminous United States for the years 1985 to 2006. We document a significant divergence from the baseline structure for all birds of similar migratory habit and nest location, and all forest birds as a group from 1985 to 2006. Unexpectedly, decreases in progressive similarity resulted from small changes in richness (<1 species per route for the 22-year study period) and modest losses in abundance (-28.7 - -10.2 individuals per route) that varied by migratory habit and nest location. Forest disturbance increased progressive similarity for Neotropical migrants, permanent residents, ground nesting, and cavity nesting species. We also documented highest progressive similarity in the eastern United States. Contemporary forest bird community structure is changing rapidly over a relatively short period of time (e.g., approximately 22 years). Forest disturbance and forest regeneration are primary factors associated with contemporary forest bird community structure, longitude and latitude are secondary factors, and forest loss is a tertiary factor. Importantly, these findings suggest some regions of the United States may

  18. Population genetic structure, linkage disequilibrium and effective population size of conserved and extensively raised village chicken populations of Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khulekhani Sedwell Khanyile

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Extensively raised village chickens are considered a valuable source of biodiversity, with genetic variability developed over thousands of years that ought to be characterised and utilized. Surveys that can reveal a population’s genetic structure and provide an insight into its demographic history will give valuable information to manage and conserve important indigenous animal genetic resources. This study reports population diversity and structure, linkage disequilibrium and effective population sizes of Southern African village chickens and conservation flocks from South Africa. DNA samples from 312 chickens from South African village and conservation flocks (n =146, Malawi (n =30 and Zimbabwe (n =136 were genotyped using the Illumina iSelect chicken SNP60K BeadChip. Population genetic structure analysis distinguished the four conservation flocks from the village chicken populations. Of the four flocks, the Ovambo clustered closer to the village chickens particularly those sampled from South Africa. Clustering of the village chickens followed a geographic gradient whereby South African chickens were closer to those from Zimbabwe than to chickens from Malawi. Different conservation flocks seemed to have maintained different components of the ancestral genomes with a higher proportion of village chicken diversity found in the Ovambo population. Overall population LD averaged over chromosomes ranged from 0.03 ± 0.07 to 0.58 ± 0.41 and averaged 0.15 ± 0.16. Higher LD, ranging from 0.29-0.36, was observed between SNP markers that were less than 10kb apart in the conservation flocks. LD in the conservation flocks steadily decreased to 0.15 (PK and 0.24 (VD at SNP marker interval of 500kb. Genomewide LD decay in the village chickens from Malawi, Zimbabwe and South Africa followed a similar trend as the conservation flocks although the mean LD values for the investigated SNP intervals were lower. The results suggest low effective population

  19. Some epitopes conservation in non structural 3 protein dengue virus serotype 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegar A. P. Siregar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Protein Non Struktural 3 (NS3 virus dengue menginduksi respon antibodi netralisasidan respon sel T CD4+ dan CD8+, serta berperan dalam replikasi virus. Protein NS3 memiliki epitopepitopsel T dan B yang terdapat perbedaan kelestarian pada berbagai strain virus dengue serotipe 4(DENV-4. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kelestarian epitop sel T dan B pada protein NS3DENV-4 strain-strain dunia dan keempat serotipe virus dengue strain Indonesia.Metode: Penelitian ini dilakukan di Departemen Mikrobiologi Fakultas Kedokteran UI sejak Juni 2013 - April2014. Sekuens asam amino NS3 DENV-4 strain 081 didapatkan setelah produk PCR gen NS3 DENV-4 081disekuensing. Epitop-epitop sel T dan sel B protein NS3 DENV-4 081 dianalisis dan dibandingkan dengansekuens asam amino protein NS3 dari 124 strain DENV-4 di dunia dan keempat serotipe DENV strain Indonesia.Strain-strain dunia merupakan strain yang ada di benua Amerika (Venezuela, Colombia, dll dan Asia (Cina,Singapura, dll. Referensi posisi epitop sel T dan B protein NS3 diperoleh dari laporan penelitian terdahulu.Hasil: Delapan epitop sel T dan 2 epitop sel B dari protein NS3 DENV-4 081 ternyata identik dan lestaripada protein NS3 dari 124 strain DENV-4 dunia. Epitop sel B di posisi asam amino 537-544 pada proteinNS3 DENV-4 081 ternyata identik dan lestari dengan epitop sel B protein NS3 dari keempat serotipeDENV strain Indonesia.Kesimpulan: Kelestarian yang luas dari epitop sel T dan B pada hampir seluruh strain DENV-4 dunia danserotipe-serotipe DENV strain Indonesia. (Health Science Journal of Indonesia 2015;6:126-31Kata kunci: virus dengue, protein NS3, epitop sel T, epitop sel B AbstractBackground: Non Structural 3 (NS3 protein of dengue virus (DENV is known to induce antibody, CD4+and CD8+ T cell responses, and playing role in viral replication. NS3 protein has T and B cell epitopes,which has conservation difference between DENV-4 strains. This study aimed to identify

  20. Detailed analysis of RNA-protein interactions within the bacterial ribosomal protein L5/5S rRNA complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Perederina, Anna; Nevskaya, Natalia; Nikonov, Oleg; Nikulin, Alexei; Dumas, Philippe; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao; Garber, Maria; Gongadze, George; Nikonov, Stanislav

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structure of ribosomal protein L5 from Thermus thermophilus complexed with a 34-nt fragment comprising helix III and loop C of Escherichia coli 5S rRNA has been determined at 2.5 A resolution. The protein specifically interacts with the bulged nucleotides at the top of loop C of 5S rRNA. The rRNA and protein contact surfaces are strongly stabilized by intramolecular interactions. Charged and polar atoms forming the network of conserved intermolecular hydrogen bonds are located in ...

  1. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  2. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ . • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ , which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics

  3. Comparison of S. cerevisiae F-BAR domain structures reveals a conserved inositol phosphate binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Alvarado, Diego; Schmitz, Karl R.; Kenniston, Jon A.; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY F-BAR domains control membrane interactions in endocytosis, cytokinesis, and cell signaling. Although generally thought to bind curved membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, numerous functional studies argue that differences in lipid-binding selectivities of F-BAR domains are functionally important. Here, we compare membrane-binding properties of the S. cerevisiae F-BAR domains in vitro and in vivo. Whereas some F-BAR domains (such as Bzz1p and Hof1p F-BARs) bind equally well to all phospholipids, the F-BAR domain from the RhoGAP Rgd1p preferentially binds phosphoinositides. We determined X-ray crystal structures of F-BAR domains from Hof1p and Rgd1p, the latter bound to an inositol phosphate. The structures explain phospholipid-binding selectivity differences, and reveal an F-BAR phosphoinositide binding site that is fully conserved in a mammalian RhoGAP called Gmip, and is partly retained in certain other F-BAR domains. Our findings reveal previously unappreciated determinants of F-BAR domain lipid-binding specificity, and provide a basis for its prediction from sequence. PMID:25620000

  4. High-throughput SHAPE analysis reveals structures in HIV-1 genomic RNA strongly conserved across distinct biological states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Wilkinson

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication and pathogenesis of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is tightly linked to the structure of its RNA genome, but genome structure in infectious virions is poorly understood. We invent high-throughput SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension technology, which uses many of the same tools as DNA sequencing, to quantify RNA backbone flexibility at single-nucleotide resolution and from which robust structural information can be immediately derived. We analyze the structure of HIV-1 genomic RNA in four biologically instructive states, including the authentic viral genome inside native particles. Remarkably, given the large number of plausible local structures, the first 10% of the HIV-1 genome exists in a single, predominant conformation in all four states. We also discover that noncoding regions functioning in a regulatory role have significantly lower (p-value < 0.0001 SHAPE reactivities, and hence more structure, than do viral coding regions that function as the template for protein synthesis. By directly monitoring protein binding inside virions, we identify the RNA recognition motif for the viral nucleocapsid protein. Seven structurally homologous binding sites occur in a well-defined domain in the genome, consistent with a role in directing specific packaging of genomic RNA into nascent virions. In addition, we identify two distinct motifs that are targets for the duplex destabilizing activity of this same protein. The nucleocapsid protein destabilizes local HIV-1 RNA structure in ways likely to facilitate initial movement both of the retroviral reverse transcriptase from its tRNA primer and of the ribosome in coding regions. Each of the three nucleocapsid interaction motifs falls in a specific genome domain, indicating that local protein interactions can be organized by the long-range architecture of an RNA. High-throughput SHAPE reveals a comprehensive view of HIV-1 RNA genome structure, and further

  5. Structural Equation and Mei Conserved Quantity of Mei Symmetry for Appell Equations in Holonomic Systems with Unilateral Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Liqun; Cui Jinchao; Zhang Yaoyu; Luo Shaokai

    2009-01-01

    Structural equation and Mei conserved quantity of Mei symmetry for Appell equations in holonomic systems with unilateral constraints are investigated. Appell equations and differential equations of motion for holonomic mechanic systems with unilateral constraints are established. The definition and the criterion of Mei symmetry for Appell equations in holonomic systems with unilateral constraints under the infinitesimal transformations of groups are also given. The expressions of the structural equation and Mei conserved quantity of Mei symmetry for Appell equations in holonomic systems with unilateral constraints expressed by Appell functions are obtained. An example is given to illustrate the application of the results. (general)

  6. Cytomolecular analysis of ribosomal DNA evolution in a natural allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum and its putative ancestors – dissecting complex repetitive structure of intergenic spacers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Borowska-Zuchowska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon associated with nuclear 35S rRNA genes and consists in selective suppression of gene loci inherited from one of the progenitors in the allopolyploid. Our understanding of the exact mechanisms that determine this process is still fragmentary, especially in case of the grass species. This study aimed to shed some light on the molecular basis of this genome-specific inactivation of 35S rDNA loci in an allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum (2n=30, which arose from the interspecific hybridization between two diploid ancestors that were very similar to modern B. distachyon (2n=10 and B. stacei (2n=20. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with 25S rDNA and chromosome-specific BAC clones as probes we revealed that the nucleolar dominance is present not only in meristematic root-tip cells but also in differentiated cell fraction of B. hybridum. Additionally, the intergenic spacers (IGSs from both of the putative ancestors and the allotetraploid were sequenced and analyzed. The presumptive transcription initiation sites, spacer promoters and repeated elements were identified within the IGSs. Two different length variants, 2.3 kb and 3.5 kb, of IGSs were identified in B. distachyon and B. stacei, respectively, however only the IGS that had originated from B. distachyon-like ancestor was present in the allotetraploid. The amplification pattern of B. hybridum IGSs suggests that some genetic changes occurred in inactive B. stacei-like rDNA loci during the evolution of the allotetraploid. We hypothesize that their preferential silencing is an effect of structural changes in the sequence rather than just the result of the sole inactivation at the epigenetic level.

  7. The ribosome uses two active mechanisms to unwind messenger RNA during translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wen, Jin-Der; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2011-07-06

    The ribosome translates the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA into protein. Folded structures in the coding region of an mRNA represent a kinetic barrier that lowers the peptide elongation rate, as the ribosome must disrupt structures it encounters in the mRNA at its entry site to allow translocation to the next codon. Such structures are exploited by the cell to create diverse strategies for translation regulation, such as programmed frameshifting, the modulation of protein expression levels, ribosome localization and co-translational protein folding. Although strand separation activity is inherent to the ribosome, requiring no exogenous helicases, its mechanism is still unknown. Here, using a single-molecule optical tweezers assay on mRNA hairpins, we find that the translation rate of identical codons at the decoding centre is greatly influenced by the GC content of folded structures at the mRNA entry site. Furthermore, force applied to the ends of the hairpin to favour its unfolding significantly speeds translation. Quantitative analysis of the force dependence of its helicase activity reveals that the ribosome, unlike previously studied helicases, uses two distinct active mechanisms to unwind mRNA structure: it destabilizes the helical junction at the mRNA entry site by biasing its thermal fluctuations towards the open state, increasing the probability of the ribosome translocating unhindered; and it mechanically pulls apart the mRNA single strands of the closed junction during the conformational changes that accompany ribosome translocation. The second of these mechanisms ensures a minimal basal rate of translation in the cell; specialized, mechanically stable structures are required to stall the ribosome temporarily. Our results establish a quantitative mechanical basis for understanding the mechanism of regulation of the elongation rate of translation by structured mRNAs. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  8. Origin and higher-level diversification of acariform mites - evidence from nuclear ribosomal genes, extensive taxon sampling, and secondary structure alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepato, A R; Klimov, P B

    2015-09-02

    traditionally regarded as the sister-group to Bdelloidea (Eupodina), but our analyses show their close relationships to Parasitengona. Non-trivial relationships recovered by our analyses with high support (i.e., basal arrangement of endeostigmatid lineages, the position of marine mites, polyphyly of Eupodina) had been proposed by previous underappreciated morphological studies. Thus, we update currently the accepted taxonomic classification to reflect these results: the superfamily Halacaroidea Murray, 1877 is moved from the infraorder Eupodina Krantz, 1978 to Anystina van der Hammen, 1972; and the subfamily Erythracarinae Oudemans, 1936 (formerly in Anystidae Oudemans, 1902) is elevated to family rank, Erythracaridae stat. ressur., leaving Anystidae only with the nominal subfamily. Our study also shows that a clade comprising early derivative Endeostigmata (Alycidae, Nanorchestidae, Nematalycidae, and maybe Alicorhagiidae) should be treated as a taxon with the same rank as Sarcoptiformes and Trombidiformes, and the scope of the superfamily Bdelloidea should be changed. Before turning those findings into nomenclatural changes, however, we consider that our study calls for (i) finding shared apomorphies of the early derivative Endeostigmata clade and the clade including the remaining Acariformes; (ii) a well-supported hypothesis for Alicorhagiidae placement; (iii) sampling the families Proterorhagiidae, Proteonematalycidae and Grandjeanicidae not yet included in molecular analyses; (iv) undertake a denser sampling of clades traditionally placed in Eupodina, Anystina (Trombidiformes) and Palaeosomata (Sarcoptiformes), since consensus networks and Internode certainty (IC) and IC All (ICA) indices indicate high levels of conflict in these tree regions. Our study shows that regions of ambiguous alignment may provide useful phylogenetic signal when secondary structure information is used to guide the alignment procedure and provides an R implementation to the Bayesian Relative Rates

  9. Heart structure-specific transcriptomic atlas reveals conserved microRNA-mRNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Hahne, Florian; Scheubel, Philippe; Marcellin, Magali; Dubost, Valerie; Westphal, Magdalena; Boeglen, Catherine; Büchmann-Møller, Stine; Cheung, Ming Sin; Cordier, André; De Benedetto, Christopher; Deurinck, Mark; Frei, Moritz; Moulin, Pierre; Oakeley, Edward; Grenet, Olivier; Grevot, Armelle; Stull, Robert; Theil, Diethilde; Moggs, Jonathan G; Marrer, Estelle; Couttet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play key roles in heart development and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we have characterized the expression and distribution of microRNAs across eight cardiac structures (left and right ventricles, apex, papillary muscle, septum, left and right atrium and valves) in rat, Beagle dog and cynomolgus monkey using microRNA sequencing. Conserved microRNA signatures enriched in specific heart structures across these species were identified for cardiac valve (miR-let-7c, miR-125b, miR-127, miR-199a-3p, miR-204, miR-320, miR-99b, miR-328 and miR-744) and myocardium (miR-1, miR-133b, miR-133a, miR-208b, miR-30e, miR-499-5p, miR-30e*). The relative abundance of myocardium-enriched (miR-1) and valve-enriched (miR-125b-5p and miR-204) microRNAs was confirmed using in situ hybridization. MicroRNA-mRNA interactions potentially relevant for cardiac functions were explored using anti-correlation expression analysis and microRNA target prediction algorithms. Interactions between miR-1/Timp3, miR-125b/Rbm24, miR-204/Tgfbr2 and miR-208b/Csnk2a2 were identified and experimentally investigated in human pulmonary smooth muscle cells and luciferase reporter assays. In conclusion, we have generated a high-resolution heart structure-specific mRNA/microRNA expression atlas for three mammalian species that provides a novel resource for investigating novel microRNA regulatory circuits involved in cardiac molecular physiopathology.

  10. Heart structure-specific transcriptomic atlas reveals conserved microRNA-mRNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Vacchi-Suzzi

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play key roles in heart development and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we have characterized the expression and distribution of microRNAs across eight cardiac structures (left and right ventricles, apex, papillary muscle, septum, left and right atrium and valves in rat, Beagle dog and cynomolgus monkey using microRNA sequencing. Conserved microRNA signatures enriched in specific heart structures across these species were identified for cardiac valve (miR-let-7c, miR-125b, miR-127, miR-199a-3p, miR-204, miR-320, miR-99b, miR-328 and miR-744 and myocardium (miR-1, miR-133b, miR-133a, miR-208b, miR-30e, miR-499-5p, miR-30e*. The relative abundance of myocardium-enriched (miR-1 and valve-enriched (miR-125b-5p and miR-204 microRNAs was confirmed using in situ hybridization. MicroRNA-mRNA interactions potentially relevant for cardiac functions were explored using anti-correlation expression analysis and microRNA target prediction algorithms. Interactions between miR-1/Timp3, miR-125b/Rbm24, miR-204/Tgfbr2 and miR-208b/Csnk2a2 were identified and experimentally investigated in human pulmonary smooth muscle cells and luciferase reporter assays. In conclusion, we have generated a high-resolution heart structure-specific mRNA/microRNA expression atlas for three mammalian species that provides a novel resource for investigating novel microRNA regulatory circuits involved in cardiac molecular physiopathology.

  11. Mitigating climate change: Decomposing the relative roles of energy conservation, technological change, and structural shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Gouri Shankar; Zakerinia, Saleh; Yeh, Sonia; Teter, Jacob; Morrison, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    We decompose the contribution of five drivers of energy use and CO 2 emissions reductions in achieving climate change goals over 2005–2100 for various climate policy scenarios. This study contributes to the decomposition literature in three ways. First, it disaggregates drivers of energy demand into technological progress and demand for energy services, represented in terms of useful energy, allowing us to estimate their contributions independently — an improvement over other economy-wide decomposition studies. Secondly, this approach reduces the ambiguity present in many previous measures of structural change. We delineate structural shifts into two separate measures: changes in fuel mix within a given resource or service pathway; and changes in mix among distinct energy resources or end-use services. Finally, this study applies decomposition methods to energy and emission trajectories from two mutually informing perspectives: (i) primary energy resources — crude oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and renewables; and (ii) end-uses of energy services — residential and commercial buildings, industry, and transportation. Our results show that technological improvements and energy conservation are important in meeting climate goals in the first half of the coming century; and that nuclear and renewable energy and CCS technology are crucial in meeting more stringent goals in the second half of the century. We examine the relative roles of the drivers in reducing CO 2 emissions separately for developed and developing regions. Although the majority of energy and emission growth – and by extension the greatest opportunities for mitigation – will occur in developing countries, the decomposition shows that the relative roles of the five drivers are broadly consistent between these two regions. - Highlights: • We decompose the contribution of five drivers of energy use and CO2 emissions reductions in achieving climate change goals • We analyze differences

  12. Analysis of the protein-protein interactions between the human acidic ribosomal P-proteins: evaluation by the two hybrid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, M; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O

    2000-01-01

    The surface acidic ribosomal proteins (P-proteins), together with ribosomal core protein P0 form a multimeric lateral protuberance on the 60 S ribosomal subunit. This structure, also called stalk, is important for efficient translational activity of the ribosome. In order to shed more light...... forms the 60 S ribosomal stalk: P0-(P1/P2)(2). Additionally, mutual interactions among human and yeast P-proteins were analyzed. Heterodimer formation could be observed between human P2 and yeast P1 proteins....

  13. Origins of the plant chloroplasts and mitochondria based on comparisons of 5S ribosomal RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delihas, N.; Fox, G. E.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, we provide macromolecular comparisons utilizing the 5S ribosomal RNA structure to suggest extant bacteria that are the likely descendants of chloroplast and mitochondria endosymbionts. The genetic stability and near universality of the 5S ribosomal gene allows for a useful means to study ancient evolutionary changes by macromolecular comparisons. The value in current and future ribosomal RNA comparisons is in fine tuning the assignment of ancestors to the organelles and in establishing extant species likely to be descendants of bacteria involved in presumed multiple endosymbiotic events.

  14. The 70S ribosome modulates the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli YchF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Marion; Gzyl, Katherine E; Altamirano, Alvin M; Vuong, Anthony; Urban, Kirstin; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2012-10-01

    YchF is one of two universally conserved GTPases with unknown cellular function. As a first step toward elucidating YchF's cellular role, we performed a detailed biochemical characterization of the protein from Escherichia coli. Our data from fluorescence titrations not only confirmed the surprising finding that YchFE.coli binds adenine nucleotides more efficiently than guanine nucleotides, but also provides the first evidence suggesting that YchF assumes two distinct conformational states (ATP- and ADP-bound) consistent with the functional cycle of a typical GTPase. Based on an in vivo pull-down experiment using a His-tagged variant of YchF from E. coli (YchFE.coli), we were able to isolate a megadalton complex containing the 70S ribosome. Based on this finding, we report the successful reconstitution of a YchF•70S complex in vitro, revealing an affinity (KD) of the YchFE.coli•ADPNP complex for 70S ribosomes of 3 μM. The in vitro reconstitution data also suggests that the identity of the nucleotide-bound state of YchF (ADP or ATP) modulates its affinity for 70S ribosomes. A detailed Michaelis-Menten analysis of YchF's catalytic activity in the presence and the absence of the 70S ribosome and its subunits revealed for the first time that the 70S ribosome is able to stimulate YchF's ATPase activity (~10-fold), confirming the ribosome as part of the functional cycle of YchF. Our findings taken together with previously reported data for the human homolog of YchF (hOLA1) indicate a high level of evolutionary conservation in the enzymatic properties of YchF and suggest that the ribosome is the main functional partner of YchF not only in bacteria.

  15. A Numbers Game: Ribosome Densities, Bacterial Growth, and Antibiotic-Mediated Stasis and Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R. Levin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We postulate that the inhibition of growth and low rates of mortality of bacteria exposed to ribosome-binding antibiotics deemed bacteriostatic can be attributed almost uniquely to these drugs reducing the number of ribosomes contributing to protein synthesis, i.e., the number of effective ribosomes. We tested this hypothesis with Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 and constructs that had been deleted for 1 to 6 of the 7 rRNA (rrn operons. In the absence of antibiotics, constructs with fewer rrn operons have lower maximum growth rates and longer lag phases than those with more ribosomal operons. In the presence of the ribosome-binding “bacteriostatic” antibiotics tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and azithromycin, E. coli strains with 1 and 2 rrn operons are killed at a substantially higher rate than those with more rrn operons. This increase in the susceptibility of E. coli with fewer rrn operons to killing by ribosome-targeting bacteriostatic antibiotics is not reflected in their greater sensitivity to killing by the bactericidal antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which does not target ribosomes, but also to killing by gentamicin, which does. Finally, when such strains are exposed to these ribosome-targeting bacteriostatic antibiotics, the time before these bacteria start to grow again when the drugs are removed, referred to as the post-antibiotic effect (PAE, is markedly greater for constructs with fewer rrn operons than for those with more rrn operons. We interpret the results of these other experiments reported here as support for the hypothesis that the reduction in the effective number of ribosomes due to binding to these structures provides a sufficient explanation for the action of bacteriostatic antibiotics that target these structures.

  16. Crystal structure of the conserved herpesvirus fusion regulator complex gH—gL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdary, Tirumala K.; Cairns, Tina M.; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E. [UPENN; (Tufts-MED)

    2015-02-09

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH–gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH–gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH–gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB–gH–gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB–gH–gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Conserved Herpes Virus Fusion Regulator Complex gH–gL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdary, T.; Cairns, T; Atanasiu, D; Cohen, G; Eisenberg, R; Heldwein, E

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  18. Crystal structure of the conserved herpes virus fusion regulator complex gH-gL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdary, Tirumala K; Cairns, Tina M; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Heldwein, Ekaterina E [UPENN; (Tufts-MED)

    2010-09-13

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  19. Social and Structural Patterns of Drought-Related Water Conservation and Rebound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Patricia; Ajami, Newsha

    2017-12-01

    Water use practices and conservation are the result of complex sociotechnical interactions of political, economic, hydroclimatic, and social factors. While the drivers of water demand have been extensively studied, they have traditionally been applied to models that assume stationary relationships between these various factors, and usually do not account for potential societal changes in response to increased scarcity awareness. For example, following a period of sustained low demand such as during a drought, communities often increase water use during a hydrologically wet period, a phenomenon known as "rebounding" water use. Previous experiences show the extent of this rebound is not a straightforward function of policy and efficiency improvements, but may also reflect short-term or long-lasting change in community behavior, which are not easily captured by models that assume stationarity. In this work, we develop a system dynamics model to represent water demand as a function of both structural and social factors. We apply this model to the analysis of three diverse water utilities in the San Francisco Bay Area between 1980 and 2017, identifying drought response trends and drivers over time. Our model is consistent with empirical patterns and historical context of water use in California, and provides important insights on the rebound phenomenon that can be extended to other locations. This comparative assessment indicates that policies, public outreach, and better data availability have played a key role in raising public awareness of water scarcity, especially with the raise of the internet era in recent years.

  20. Price-structure of electricity and district-heating. A background study for energy conservation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The present report deals with the pricing and price-structure of electricity and district-heating with their effects on energy saving. It constitutes part of the groundwork for the new Government Energy Conservation Programme. The report describes principles for the pricing of electricity and district-heating in Finland, and gives some examples of tariffs in foreign countries, which are interesting from the point of view of energy saving. Different utilities apply quite similar pricing principles but there are big differences in price levels between the utilities. The difference in consumer prices can be almost 100 % in the case of electricity and over 150 % as concerns district-heating. The change in retail prices in the last ten years has not had a big general impact on the consumption of electricity or on energy saving. On the other hand, when the price increases of individual utilities are studied, the impact on energy saving at least in the short term can be seen. It seems that an increase of the fixed charges in relation to energy rates has been as a general trend after 1990. To promote energy saving the changing energy rates should be given special emphasis in determining electricity and district-heating tariffs. The opening of the electricity market means that the electricity suppliers face a new situation also when pricing their products. Customers and their expectations will play an increasingly role. (orig.)

  1. Myrciaria dubia, an Amazonian fruit: population structure and its implications for germplasm conservation and genetic improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, C F; Setotaw, T A; Pasqual, M; Chagas, E A; Santos, E G; Santos, D N; Lima, C G B; Cançado, G M A

    2017-03-22

    Myrciaria dubia (camu-camu) is an Amazon tree that produces a tart fruit with high vitamin C content. It is probably the fruit with the highest vitamin C content among all Brazilian fruit crops and it can be used to supplement daily vitamin C dose. This property has attracted the attention of consumers and, consequently, encouraged fruit farmers to produce it. In order to identify and select potential accessions for commercial exploitation and breeding programs, M. dubia has received considerable research attention. The identification and characterization of genetic diversity, as well as identification of the population structure of accessions preserved in germplasm banks are fundamental for the success of any breeding program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability of 10 M. dubia populations obtained from the shores of Reis Lake, located in the municipality of Caracaraí, Roraima, Brazil. Fourteen polymorphic inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to study the population genetic diversity, which resulted in 108 identified alleles. Among the 14 primers, GCV, UBC810, and UBC827 produced the highest number of alleles. The study illustrated the suitability and efficiency of ISSR markers to study the genetic diversity of M. dubia accessions. We also revealed the existence of high genetic variability among both accessions and populations that can be exploited in future breeding programs and conservation activities of this species.

  2. Conserved residues and their role in the structure, function, and stability of acyl-coenzyme A binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Poulsen, K; Andersen, K V

    1999-01-01

    In the family of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins, a subset of 26 sequence sites are identical in all eukaryotes and conserved throughout evolution of the eukaryotic kingdoms. In the context of the bovine protein, the importance of these 26 sequence positions for structure, function, stability...

  3. Processes affecting genetic structure and conservation: a case study of wild and cultivated Brassica rapa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Naja Steen; Poulsen, Gert; Andersen, Bente Anni

    2009-01-01

    When planning optimal conservation strategies for wild and cultivated types of a plant species, a number of influencing biological and environmental factors should be considered from the outset. In the present study Brassica rapa was used to illustrate this: to develop Scandinavian conservation...

  4. Interleukin-11 binds specific EF-hand proteins via their conserved structural motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Alexei S; Sokolov, Andrei S; Vologzhannikova, Alisa A; Permyakova, Maria E; Khorn, Polina A; Ismailov, Ramis G; Denessiouk, Konstantin A; Denesyuk, Alexander I; Rastrygina, Victoria A; Baksheeva, Viktoriia E; Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Zinchenko, Dmitry V; Glazatov, Vladimir V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Mirzabekov, Tajib A; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a hematopoietic cytokine engaged in numerous biological processes and validated as a target for treatment of various cancers. IL-11 contains intrinsically disordered regions that might recognize multiple targets. Recently we found that aside from IL-11RA and gp130 receptors, IL-11 interacts with calcium sensor protein S100P. Strict calcium dependence of this interaction suggests a possibility of IL-11 interaction with other calcium sensor proteins. Here we probed specificity of IL-11 to calcium-binding proteins of various types: calcium sensors of the EF-hand family (calmodulin, S100B and neuronal calcium sensors: recoverin, NCS-1, GCAP-1, GCAP-2), calcium buffers of the EF-hand family (S100G, oncomodulin), and a non-EF-hand calcium buffer (α-lactalbumin). A specific subset of the calcium sensor proteins (calmodulin, S100B, NCS-1, GCAP-1/2) exhibits metal-dependent binding of IL-11 with dissociation constants of 1-19 μM. These proteins share several amino acid residues belonging to conservative structural motifs of the EF-hand proteins, 'black' and 'gray' clusters. Replacements of the respective S100P residues by alanine drastically decrease its affinity to IL-11, suggesting their involvement into the association process. Secondary structure and accessibility of the hinge region of the EF-hand proteins studied are predicted to control specificity and selectivity of their binding to IL-11. The IL-11 interaction with the EF-hand proteins is expected to occur under numerous pathological conditions, accompanied by disintegration of plasma membrane and efflux of cellular components into the extracellular milieu.

  5. Detailed analysis of RNA-protein interactions within the bacterial ribosomal protein L5/5S rRNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Nevskaya, Natalia; Nikonov, Oleg; Nikulin, Alexei; Dumas, Philippe; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao; Garber, Maria; Gongadze, George; Nikonov, Stanislav

    2002-12-01

    The crystal structure of ribosomal protein L5 from Thermus thermophilus complexed with a 34-nt fragment comprising helix III and loop C of Escherichia coli 5S rRNA has been determined at 2.5 A resolution. The protein specifically interacts with the bulged nucleotides at the top of loop C of 5S rRNA. The rRNA and protein contact surfaces are strongly stabilized by intramolecular interactions. Charged and polar atoms forming the network of conserved intermolecular hydrogen bonds are located in two narrow planar parallel layers belonging to the protein and rRNA, respectively. The regions, including these atoms conserved in Bacteria and Archaea, can be considered an RNA-protein recognition module. Comparison of the T. thermophilus L5 structure in the RNA-bound form with the isolated Bacillus stearothermophilus L5 structure shows that the RNA-recognition module on the protein surface does not undergo significant changes upon RNA binding. In the crystal of the complex, the protein interacts with another RNA molecule in the asymmetric unit through the beta-sheet concave surface. This protein/RNA interface simulates the interaction of L5 with 23S rRNA observed in the Haloarcula marismortui 50S ribosomal subunit.

  6. Multi-perspective smFRET reveals rate-determining late intermediates of ribosomal translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Michael R.; Alejo, Jose L.; Altman, Roger B.; Blanchard, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Directional translocation of the ribosome through the messenger RNA open reading frame is a critical determinant of translational fidelity. This process entails a complex interplay of large-scale conformational changes within the actively translating particle, which together coordinate the movement of transfer and messenger RNA substrates with respect to the large and small ribosomal subunits. Using pre-steady state, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging, we have tracked the nature and timing of these conformational events within the Escherichia coli ribosome from five structural perspectives. Our investigations reveal direct evidence of structurally and kinetically distinct, late intermediates during substrate movement, whose resolution is rate-determining to the translocation mechanism. These steps involve intra-molecular events within the EFG(GDP)-bound ribosome, including exaggerated, reversible fluctuations of the small subunit head domain, which ultimately facilitate peptidyl-tRNA’s movement into its final post-translocation position. PMID:26926435

  7. Multiperspective smFRET reveals rate-determining late intermediates of ribosomal translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Michael R; Alejo, Jose L; Altman, Roger B; Blanchard, Scott C

    2016-04-01

    Directional translocation of the ribosome through the mRNA open reading frame is a critical determinant of translational fidelity. This process entails a complex interplay of large-scale conformational changes within the actively translating particle, which together coordinate the movement of tRNA and mRNA substrates with respect to the large and small ribosomal subunits. Using pre-steady state, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging, we tracked the nature and timing of these conformational events within the Escherichia coli ribosome from five structural perspectives. Our investigations revealed direct evidence of structurally and kinetically distinct late intermediates during substrate movement, whose resolution determines the rate of translocation. These steps involve intramolecular events within the EF-G-GDP-bound ribosome, including exaggerated, reversible fluctuations of the small-subunit head domain, which ultimately facilitate peptidyl-tRNA's movement into its final post-translocation position.

  8. Characterization of the domains of E. coli initiation factor IF2 responsible for recognition of the ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Egebjerg Kristensen, Janni

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the interactions between the ribosome and the domains of Escherichia coli translation initiation factor 2, using an in vitro ribosomal binding assay with wild-type forms, N- and C-terminal truncated forms of IF2 as well as isolated structural domains. A deletion mutant of the factor...

  9. Characterization of the domains of E. coli initiation factor IF2 responsible for recognition of the ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Egebjerg Kristensen, Janni

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the interactions between the ribosome and the domains of Escherichia coli translation initiation factor 2, using an in vitro ribosomal binding assay with wild-type forms, N- and C-terminal truncated forms of IF2 as well as isolated structural domains. A deletion mutant of the fact...

  10. Crystal structures of two transcriptional regulators from Bacillus cereus define the conserved structural features of a PadR subfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guntur Fibriansah

    Full Text Available PadR-like transcriptional regulators form a structurally-related family of proteins that control the expression of genes associated with detoxification, virulence and multi-drug resistance in bacteria. Only a few members of this family have been studied by genetic, biochemical and biophysical methods, and their structure/function relationships are still largely undefined. Here, we report the crystal structures of two PadR-like proteins from Bacillus cereus, which we named bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 (products of gene loci BC4206 and BCE3449 in strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, respectively. BC4206, together with its neighboring gene BC4207, was previously shown to become significantly upregulated in presence of the bacteriocin AS-48. DNA mobility shift assays reveal that bcPadR1 binds to a 250 bp intergenic region containing the putative BC4206-BC4207 promoter sequence, while in-situ expression of bcPadR1 decreases bacteriocin tolerance, together suggesting a role for bcPadR1 as repressor of BC4206-BC4207 transcription. The function of bcPadR2 (48% identical in sequence to bcPadR1 is unknown, but the location of its gene just upstream from genes encoding a putative antibiotic ABC efflux pump, suggests a role in regulating antibiotic resistance. The bcPadR proteins are structurally similar to LmrR, a PadR-like transcription regulator in Lactococcus lactis that controls expression of a multidrug ABC transporter via a mechanism of multidrug binding and induction. Together these proteins define a subfamily of conserved, relatively small PadR proteins characterized by a single C-terminal helix for dimerization. Unlike LmrR, bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 lack a central pore for ligand binding, making it unclear whether the transcriptional regulatory roles of bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 involve direct ligand recognition and induction.

  11. Sequence and structural analysis of the chitinase insertion domain reveals two conserved motifs involved in chitin-binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitinases are prevalent in life and are found in species including archaea, bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They break down chitin, which is the second most abundant carbohydrate in nature after cellulose. Hence, they are important for maintaining a balance between carbon and nitrogen trapped as insoluble chitin in biomass. Chitinases are classified into two families, 18 and 19 glycoside hydrolases. In addition to a catalytic domain, which is a triosephosphate isomerase barrel, many family 18 chitinases contain another module, i.e., chitinase insertion domain. While numerous studies focus on the biological role of the catalytic domain in chitinase activity, the function of the chitinase insertion domain is not completely understood. Bioinformatics offers an important avenue in which to facilitate understanding the role of residues within the chitinase insertion domain in chitinase function.Twenty-seven chitinase insertion domain sequences, which include four experimentally determined structures and span five kingdoms, were aligned and analyzed using a modified sequence entropy parameter. Thirty-two positions with conserved residues were identified. The role of these conserved residues was explored by conducting a structural analysis of a number of holo-enzymes. Hydrogen bonding and van der Waals calculations revealed a distinct subset of four conserved residues constituting two sequence motifs that interact with oligosaccharides. The other conserved residues may be key to the structure, folding, and stability of this domain.Sequence and structural studies of the chitinase insertion domains conducted within the framework of evolution identified four conserved residues which clearly interact with the substrates. Furthermore, evolutionary studies propose a link between the appearance of the chitinase insertion domain and the function of family 18 chitinases in the subfamily A.

  12. JABAWS 2.2 distributed web services for Bioinformatics: protein disorder, conservation and RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Peter V; Procter, James B; Sherstnev, Alexander; Barton, Daniel L; Madeira, Fábio; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2018-06-01

    JABAWS 2.2 is a computational framework that simplifies the deployment of web services for Bioinformatics. In addition to the five multiple sequence alignment (MSA) algorithms in JABAWS 1.0, JABAWS 2.2 includes three additional MSA programs (Clustal Omega, MSAprobs, GLprobs), four protein disorder prediction methods (DisEMBL, IUPred, Ronn, GlobPlot), 18 measures of protein conservation as implemented in AACon, and RNA secondary structure prediction by the RNAalifold program. JABAWS 2.2 can be deployed on a variety of in-house or hosted systems. JABAWS 2.2 web services may be accessed from the Jalview multiple sequence analysis workbench (Version 2.8 and later), as well as directly via the JABAWS command line interface (CLI) client. JABAWS 2.2 can be deployed on a local virtual server as a Virtual Appliance (VA) or simply as a Web Application Archive (WAR) for private use. Improvements in JABAWS 2.2 also include simplified installation and a range of utility tools for usage statistics collection, and web services querying and monitoring. The JABAWS CLI client has been updated to support all the new services and allow integration of JABAWS 2.2 services into conventional scripts. A public JABAWS 2 server has been in production since December 2011 and served over 800 000 analyses for users worldwide. JABAWS 2.2 is made freely available under the Apache 2 license and can be obtained from: http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jabaws. g.j.barton@dundee.ac.uk.

  13. Chordotonal organs in hemipteran insects: unique peripheral structures but conserved central organization revealed by comparative neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Mukai, Hiromi; Takanashi, Takuma

    2016-12-01

    Hemipteran insects use sophisticated vibrational communications by striking body appendages on the substrate or by oscillating the abdominal tymbal. There has been, however, little investigation of sensory channels for processing vibrational signals. Using sensory nerve stainings and low invasive confocal analyses, we demonstrate the comprehensive neuronal mapping of putative vibration-responsive chordotonal organs (COs) in stink bugs (Pentatomidae and Cydinidae) and cicadas (Cicadidae). The femoral CO (FCO) in stink bugs consists of ventral and dorsal scoloparia, homologous to distal and proximal scoloparia in locusts, which are implicated in joint movement detection and vibration detection, respectively. The ligament of the dorsal scoloparium is distally attached to the accessory extensor muscle, whereas that of the ventral scoloparium is attached to a specialized tendon. Their afferents project to the dorso-lateral neuropil and the central region of the medial ventral association center (mVAC) in the ipsilateral neuromere, where presumed dorsal scoloparium afferents and subgenual organ afferents are largely intermingled. In contrast, FCOs in cicadas have decreased dorsal scoloparium neurons and lack projections to the mVAC. The tymbal CO of stink bugs contains four sensory neurons that are distally attached to fat body cells via a ligament. Their axons project intersegmentally to the dorsal region of mVACs in all neuromeres. Together with comparisons of COs in different insect groups, the results suggest that hemipteran COs have undergone structural modification for achieving faster signaling of resonating peripheral tissues. The conserved projection patterns of COs suggest functional importance of the FCO and subgenual organ for vibrational communications.

  14. Structural transitions in conserved, ordered Beclin 1 domains essential to regulating autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Karen; Li, Yue; Mukhopadhyay, Shreya; Leuthner, Zoe; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C. (NDSU); (IIT)

    2017-08-10

    Beclin 1 (BECN1) is a key regulator of autophagy, a critical catabolic homeostasis pathway that involves sequestration of selected cytoplasmic components by multilayered vesicles called autophagosomes, followed by lysosomal fusion and degradation. BECN1 is a core component of class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase complexes responsible for autophagosome nucleation. Without heterologous binding partners, BECN1 forms an antiparallel homodimer via its coiled-coil domain (CCD). However, the last 16 CCD residues, composing an “overlap helix” (OH), have been crystallized in two mutually exclusive states: either as part of the CCD or packed against the C-terminal β-α repeated, autophagy-specific domain (BARAD). Here, using CD spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that in the homodimeric state, the OH transitions between these two different packing states, with the predominant state comprising the OH packed against the BARAD, contrary to expectations based on known BECN1 interactions with heterologous partners. We confirmed this observation by comparing the impact of mutating four residues that mediate packing of the OH against both the CCD and BARAD on structure and stability of the CCD, the OH+BARAD, and the two-domain CCD–BARAD. Last, we used cellular assays to demonstrate that mutation of these OH-interface residues abrogates starvation-induced up-regulation of autophagy but does not affect basal autophagy. In summary, we have identified a BECN1 helical region that transitions between packing as part of either one of two conserved domains (i.e. the CCD or the BARAD). Our findings have important implications for the relative stability of autophagy-inactive and autophagy-active BECN1 complexes.

  15. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cren7, a novel chromatin protein conserved among Crenarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li; Feng, Yingang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Yao, Hongwei; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jinfeng; Huang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Archaea contain a variety of chromatin proteins consistent with the evolution of different genome packaging mechanisms. Among the two main kingdoms in the Archaea, Euryarchaeota synthesize histone homologs, whereas Crenarchaeota have not been shown to possess a chromatin protein conserved at the kingdom level. We report the identification of Cren7, a novel family of chromatin proteins highly conserved in the Crenarchaeota. A small, basic, methylated and abundant protein, Cren7 displays a high...

  16. tmRNA-mediated trans-translation as the major ribosome rescue system in a bacterial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyouta eHimeno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tmRNA (transfer messenger RNA; also known as 10Sa RNA or SsrA RNA is a small RNA molecule that is conserved among bacteria. It has structural and functional similarities to tRNA: it has an upper half of the tRNA-like structure, its 5’ end is processed by RNase P, it has typical tRNA-specific base modifications, it is aminoacylated with alanine, it binds to EF-Tu after aminoacylation and it enters the ribosome with EF-Tu and GTP. However, tmRNA lacks an anticodon, and instead it has a coding sequence for a short peptide called tag-peptide. An elaborate interplay of actions of tmRNA as both tRNA and mRNA with the help of a tmRNA-binding protein, SmpB, facilitates trans-translation, which produces a single polypeptide from two mRNA molecules. Initially alanyl-tmRNA in complex with EF-Tu and SmpB enters the vacant A-site of the stalled ribosome like aminoacyl-tRNA but without a codon-anticodon interaction, and subsequently truncated mRNA is replaced with the tag-encoding region of tmRNA. During these processes, not only tmRNA but also SmpB structurally and functionally mimics both tRNA and mRNA. Thus trans-translation rescues the stalled ribosome, thereby allowing recycling of the ribosome. Since the tag-peptide serves as a target of AAA+ proteases, the trans-translation products are preferentially degraded so that they do not accumulate in the cell. Although alternative rescue systems have recently been revealed, trans-translation is the only system that universally exists in bacteria. Furthermore, it is unique in that it employs a small RNA and that it prevents accumulation of nonfunctional proteins from truncated mRNA in the cell. It might play the major role in rescuing the stalled translation in the bacterial cell.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori; Takagi, Fumiko; Shimada, Takashi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2011-01-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We

  18. Ribosome evolution: Emergence of peptide synthesis machinery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    suggested the dynamic movement of ribosomal proteins. The L2 protein (a .... Such kinds of interactions are important in elucidating the evolution of RNA .... Tamura K 2009 Molecular handedness of life: significance of RNA aminoacylation.

  19. Is The Ribosome Targeted By Adaptive Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Fernandez, Alicia; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: RNA polymerase and ribosomes, composing the macromolecular synthesis machinery (MMSM), carry out the central processes of transcription and translation, but are usually seen as mechanical elements with no regulatory function. Extensive investigations of gene regulation and the high ...

  20. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-02-21

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance.

  1. Brachytherapy in the conservative treatment of soft tissue sarcomas extending to neurovascular structures: an analysis of 38 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.; Delannes, M.; Stoeckle, E.; Martel, P.; Pigneux, J.; Daly-Schveitzer, N.; Bui, B.N.; Chevreau, C.; Kantor, G.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the tolerance of neurovascular structures to brachytherapy, a retrospective review of our series was undertaken. Between May 1986 and January 1994, 85 patients with soft tissue sarcomas underwent conservative surgery and low-dose rate interstitial irradiation. Thirty-eight patients had tumors extending to neurovascular structures. Brachytherapy was part of initial treatment in 30 patients and was done in 7 cases for recurrent sarcomas. Afterloading catethers for brachytherapy were inserted intraoperatively and placed direct upon or under the neurovascular structures in the tumor bed. A mean dose of 20 Gy was delivered to the target volume. Thirty patients received 45 to 50 Gy of postoperative external irradiation. With a median follow-up of 39 months, the 3-year actuarial survival was 82.9%, the 3-year disease-free survival was 71.9% and the 3-year actuarial local control was 91%. The 3-year actuarial incidence of distant metastase was 28%. Acute side effects occurred in 12 patients requiring conservative surgical procedures in 6 cases. Significant late toxicity occurred in 8 patients : 2 lymphoedemas interfering with normal activity, 1 partial artery stenosis, 5 peripheral neuropathy (2 grade 2, 3 grade 3). Late toxicity has led to significant impairment of mobility in 4 patients. Limb preservation was achieved in every patient, no amputation was required. We conclude that integration of brachytherapy in the conservative treatment of soft tissue sarcomas extending to neurovascular structures can provide excellent local control with an acceptable level of toxicity

  2. p53- and ERK7-dependent ribosome surveillance response regulates Drosophila insulin-like peptide secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Hasygar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like signalling is a conserved mechanism that coordinates animal growth and metabolism with nutrient status. In Drosophila, insulin-producing median neurosecretory cells (IPCs regulate larval growth by secreting insulin-like peptides (dILPs in a diet-dependent manner. Previous studies have shown that nutrition affects dILP secretion through humoral signals derived from the fat body. Here we uncover a novel mechanism that operates cell autonomously in the IPCs to regulate dILP secretion. We observed that impairment of ribosome biogenesis specifically in the IPCs strongly inhibits dILP secretion, which consequently leads to reduced body size and a delay in larval development. This response is dependent on p53, a known surveillance factor for ribosome biogenesis. A downstream effector of this growth inhibitory response is an atypical MAP kinase ERK7 (ERK8/MAPK15, which is upregulated in the IPCs following impaired ribosome biogenesis as well as starvation. We show that ERK7 is sufficient and essential to inhibit dILP secretion upon impaired ribosome biogenesis, and it acts epistatically to p53. Moreover, we provide evidence that p53 and ERK7 contribute to the inhibition of dILP secretion upon starvation. Thus, we conclude that a cell autonomous ribosome surveillance response, which leads to upregulation of ERK7, inhibits dILP secretion to impede tissue growth under limiting dietary conditions.

  3. A structured blood conservation programme reduces transfusions and costs in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternström, Lisa; Hyllner, Monica; Backlund, Erika; Schersten, Henrik; Jeppsson, Anders

    2014-11-01

    Transfusions of blood products can be lifesaving, but they are also associated with considerable risks and adverse effects, including immune response and infections. In cardiac surgery, transfusions have also been associated with increased mortality. We prospectively studied the effects of a structured programme to reduce transfusions and transfusion-associated costs in cardiac surgery. The programme included: (i) education of all staff about the risks and benefits of blood transfusions; (ii) revised guidelines for transfusions; and (iii) a transfusion log where indication for transfusion, status of the patient and prescribing physician were registered. Transfusion prevalence, complications and costs for blood products were registered for all acute and elective cardiac operations during a 12-month period before (n = 1128) and after (n = 1034) the programme was started. The two time periods were compared. In addition, the prevalence of transfusions was registered for 2 more years after the programme was initiated. The first year after the programme was initiated the proportion of patients transfused with red blood cell concentrate decreased by 21.8% (from 58.2 to 45.5%, P platelets by 21.0% (from 20.5 to 16.2%, P = 0.010). Reoperations for bleeding (5.8 vs 5.0%), early complication rate and 30-day mortality (2.5 vs 2.6%) were not significantly different before and after the start date. Based on the 2009 institutional prices for red blood cell concentrate (102 €/unit), plasma (35 €/unit) and platelets (290 €/unit), the savings on blood products were €161,623 during the first 12 months after the programme was launched. The proportion of patients transfused with any blood product was 60.9% before the programme was started and 48.3, 54.0 and 50.7% 1-3 years after its start (all P conservation programme reduces transfusions and costs for blood products in cardiac surgery, without any signs of compromised medical safety. The effects of introducing such a programme

  4. Genetic structure and seed germination in Portuguese populations of Cheirolophus uliginosus (Asteraceae: Implications for conservation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitales, D.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cheirolophus uliginosus is a threatened species, endemic to the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula, where it occupies a few restricted localities. In our study we analysed the patterns of cpDNA haplotypes variation and reproductive success—germinability—among seven Portuguese populations of varying size. The aim was to examine the reproductive performance of Ch. uliginosus related to genetic structure and population size. The results showed very low within-population variability of cpDNA markers. Our study indicates that the germination rate is significantly reduced in small populations ( 250 individuals do not show any constraint. In the search for plausible causes explaining the lower germination success in the smallest populations, ecological concerns and genetic isolation must be taken into account. Besides, in large-sized populations of Ch. uliginosus (> 250 plants a higher incidence of predispersal seed predation was observed, maybe affecting their sexual reproductive response. Finally, smaller populations—presenting a reduced reproductive success—contain also the most evolutionary distant haplotypes, so their conservation should be a priority.Cheirolophus uliginosus es una especie amenazada endémica de la costa atlántica de la península ibérica, donde ocupa unas pocas y reducidas localidades. En nuestro estudio, analizamos los patrones de variación de los haplotipos de ADN cloroplástico y el éxito reproductivo —capacidad germinativa— en siete poblaciones portuguesas de diferente tamaño. El éxito reproductivo de Ch. uliginosus se ha examinado en relación con la estructura genética y el tamaño de sus poblaciones. Los resultados indican una variabilidad intrapoblacional muy baja para los marcadores cloroplásticos utilizados. Nuestro estudio muestra una tasa de germinación significativamente reducida en las poblaciones pequeñas ( 250 individuos. Para explicar este fenómeno, se deben tomar en consideración las

  5. FuncPatch: a web server for the fast Bayesian inference of conserved functional patches in protein 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Fei; Golding, G Brian

    2015-02-15

    A number of statistical phylogenetic methods have been developed to infer conserved functional sites or regions in proteins. Many methods, e.g. Rate4Site, apply the standard phylogenetic models to infer site-specific substitution rates and totally ignore the spatial correlation of substitution rates in protein tertiary structures, which may reduce their power to identify conserved functional patches in protein tertiary structures when the sequences used in the analysis are highly similar. The 3D sliding window method has been proposed to infer conserved functional patches in protein tertiary structures, but the window size, which reflects the strength of the spatial correlation, must be predefined and is not inferred from data. We recently developed GP4Rate to solve these problems under the Bayesian framework. Unfortunately, GP4Rate is computationally slow. Here, we present an intuitive web server, FuncPatch, to perform a fast approximate Bayesian inference of conserved functional patches in protein tertiary structures. Both simulations and four case studies based on empirical data suggest that FuncPatch is a good approximation to GP4Rate. However, FuncPatch is orders of magnitudes faster than GP4Rate. In addition, simulations suggest that FuncPatch is potentially a useful tool complementary to Rate4Site, but the 3D sliding window method is less powerful than FuncPatch and Rate4Site. The functional patches predicted by FuncPatch in the four case studies are supported by experimental evidence, which corroborates the usefulness of FuncPatch. The software FuncPatch is freely available at the web site, http://info.mcmaster.ca/yifei/FuncPatch golding@mcmaster.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Divergent population genetic structure of the endangered Helianthemum (Cistaceae) and its implication to conservation in northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhihao Su; Bryce A. Richardson; Li Zhuo; Xiaolong Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Population genetic studies provide a foundation for conservation planning, especially for endangered species. Three chloroplast SSRs (mtrnSf-trnGr, mtrnL2-trnF, and mtrnL5-trnL3) and the internal transcribed spacer were used to examine the population structure of Helianthemum in northwestern China. A total of 15 populations of the genus were collected. Nine chloroplast...

  7. Super-Hamiltonian Structures and Conservation Laws of a New Six-Component Super-Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucai You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A six-component super-Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur (-AKNS hierarchy is proposed by the zero curvature equation associated with Lie superalgebras. Supertrace identity is used to furnish the super-Hamiltonian structures for the resulting nonlinear superintegrable hierarchy. Furthermore, we derive the infinite conservation laws of the first two nonlinear super-AKNS equations in the hierarchy by utilizing spectral parameter expansions. PACS: 02.30.Ik; 02.30.Jr; 02.20.Sv.

  8. Assembly constraints drive co-evolution among ribosomal constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Akashi, Hiroshi; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-06-23

    Ribosome biogenesis, a central and essential cellular process, occurs through sequential association and mutual co-folding of protein-RNA constituents in a well-defined assembly pathway. Here, we construct a network of co-evolving nucleotide/amino acid residues within the ribosome and demonstrate that assembly constraints are strong predictors of co-evolutionary patterns. Predictors of co-evolution include a wide spectrum of structural reconstitution events, such as cooperativity phenomenon, protein-induced rRNA reconstitutions, molecular packing of different rRNA domains, protein-rRNA recognition, etc. A correlation between folding rate of small globular proteins and their topological features is known. We have introduced an analogous topological characteristic for co-evolutionary network of ribosome, which allows us to differentiate between rRNA regions subjected to rapid reconstitutions from those hindered by kinetic traps. Furthermore, co-evolutionary patterns provide a biological basis for deleterious mutation sites and further allow prediction of potential antibiotic targeting sites. Understanding assembly pathways of multicomponent macromolecules remains a key challenge in biophysics. Our study provides a 'proof of concept' that directly relates co-evolution to biophysical interactions during multicomponent assembly and suggests predictive power to identify candidates for critical functional interactions as well as for assembly-blocking antibiotic target sites. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of [ 125 I]iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis

  10. A new version of the RDP (Ribosomal Database Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidak, B. L.; Cole, J. R.; Parker, C. T. Jr; Garrity, G. M.; Larsen, N.; Li, B.; Lilburn, T. G.; McCaughey, M. J.; Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; hide

    1999-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II), previously described by Maidak et al. [ Nucleic Acids Res. (1997), 25, 109-111], is now hosted by the Center for Microbial Ecology at Michigan State University. RDP-II is a curated database that offers ribosomal RNA (rRNA) nucleotide sequence data in aligned and unaligned forms, analysis services, and associated computer programs. During the past two years, data alignments have been updated and now include >9700 small subunit rRNA sequences. The recent development of an ObjectStore database will provide more rapid updating of data, better data accuracy and increased user access. RDP-II includes phylogenetically ordered alignments of rRNA sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software programs for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (ftp.cme.msu. edu) and WWW (http://www.cme.msu.edu/RDP). The WWW server provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree. Additional utilities also exist at RDP-II, including distance matrix, T-RFLP, and a Java-based viewer of the phylogenetic trees that can be used to create subtrees.

  11. Geographic variation, genetic structure, and conservation unit designation in the Larch Mountain salamander (Plethodon larselli).

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Steven Wagner; Mark P. Miller; Charles M. Crisafulli; Susan M. Haig

    2005-01-01

    The Larch Mountain salamander (Plethodon larselli Burns, 1954) is an endemic species in the Pacific northwestern United States facing threats related to habitat destruction. To facilitate development of conservation strategies, we used DNA sequences and RAPDs (random amplified polymorphic DNA) to examine differences among populations of this...

  12. Dragonflies of freshwater pools in lignite spoil heaps: Restoration management, habitat structure and conservation value

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harabiš, F.; Tichánek, F.; Tropek, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 55, JUN 10 (2013), s. 51-61 ISSN 0925-8574 Grant - others:GA Czech University of Life Sciences Pragae(CZ) 42110/1312/3118 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : aquatic insect * biodiversity conservation * Odonata Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.041, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925857413000761

  13. Conserved structure and expression of hsp70 paralogs in teleost fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzger, David C.H.; Hansen, Jakob Hemmer; Schulte, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    present in the F. heteroclitus genome. Comparison of expression patterns in F. heteroclitus and Gasterosteus aculeatus demonstrates that hsp70-2 has a higher fold increase than hsp70-1 following heat shock in gill but not in muscle tissue, revealing a conserved difference in expression patterns between...

  14. Earthworm activity and soil structural changes under conservation agriculture in central Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos Navarrete, A.; Rodriguez-Aragonés, C.; Goede, de R.G.M.; Kooistra, M.J.; Sayre, K.D.; Brussaard, L.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Crop residue mulching combined with zero tillage and crop rotation, known as conservation agriculture (CA), is being promoted as an alternative system to revert soil degradation in maize-based farming in the central highlands of Mexico. The goal of this paper was to determine the effects of CA vs.

  15. Width of riparian buffer and structure of adjacent plantations influence occupancy of conservation priority birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry; T. Bently Wigley; M. Anthony Melchiors; Ronald E. Thill; Philip A. Tappe; Darren A. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Conservation of biodiversity on forest landscapes dominated by plantations has become an increasingly important topic, and opportunities to maintain or enhance biodiversity within these forests need to be recognized and applied. Riparian buffers of mature forest retained along streams in managed forest landscapes offer an opportunity to enhance biodiversity across...

  16. Prediction, conservation analysis, and structural characterization of mammalian mucin-type O-glycosylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julenius, Karin; Mølgaard, Anne; Gupta, Ramneek

    2005-01-01

    could be predicted from averaged properties together with the fact that glycosylation sites are not precisely conserved indicates that mucin-type glycosylation in most cases is a bulk property and not a very site-specific one. NetOGlyc 3.1 is made available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/netoglyc....

  17. Patterns of Assemblage Structure Indicate a Broader Conservation Potential of Focal Amphibians for Pond Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Soomets

    Full Text Available Small freshwater ponds host diverse and vulnerable biotic assemblages but relatively few conspicuous, specially protected taxa. In Europe, the amphibians Triturus cristatus and Pelobates fuscus are among a few species whose populations have been successfully restored using pond restoration and management activities at the landscape scale. In this study, we explored whether the ponds constructed for those two target species have wider conservation significance, particularly for other species of conservation concern. We recorded the occurrence of amphibians and selected aquatic macro-invertebrates (dragonflies; damselflies; diving beetles; water scavenger beetles in 66 ponds specially constructed for amphibians (up to 8 years post construction and, for comparison, in 100 man-made ponds (created by local people for cattle or garden watering, peat excavation, etc. and 65 natural ponds in Estonia. We analysed nestedness of the species assemblages and its dependence on the environment, and described the co-occurrence patterns between the target amphibians and other aquatic species. The assemblages in all ponds were significantly nested, but the environmental determinants of nestedness and co-occurrence of particular species differed among pond types. Constructed ponds were most species-rich irrespective of the presence of the target species; however, T. cristatus was frequent in those ponds and rare elsewhere, and it showed nested patterns in every type of pond. We thus conclude that pond construction for the protected amphibians can serve broader habitat conservation aims in the short term. However, the heterogeneity and inconsistent presence of species of conservation concern observed in other types of ponds implies that long-term perspectives on pond management require more explicit consideration of different habitat and biodiversity values. We also highlight nestedness analysis as a tool that can be used for the practical task of selecting focal

  18. Large structural modification with conserved conformation: analysis of delta(3)-fused aryl prolines in model beta-turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannotte, Guillaume; Lubell, William D

    2004-11-10

    For the first time, the influence of a fused Delta3-arylproline on peptide conformation has been studied by the synthesis and comparison of the conformations of peptides containing proline and pyrrolo-proline, 3 (PyPro). Pyrrolo-proline was demonstrated to be a conservative replacement for Pro in model beta-turns, 4 and 5, as shown by their similar DMSO titration curves, cis/trans-isomer populations, and NOESY spectral data. Pyrrolo-proline may thus be used for studying the structure activity relationships of Pro-containing peptides with minimal modification of secondary structures.

  19. Impact of communal land use and conservation on woody vegetation structure in the Lowveld savannas of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wessels, Konrad J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available @yahoo.co 0378-1127/ doi Please cite this article in press as: Wessels, K.J., et al., Impact of communal land use and conservation on woody vegetation structure in the Lowveld savannas of South Africa. Forest Ecol. Manage. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2010....09.012 d in revised form 24 August 2010 d 7 September 2010 y words: R l land use r National Park y vegetation structure l wood a Using airborne LiDAR from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO), we quantified and compared tree canopy cover...

  20. Assessing the structural conservation of protein pockets to study functional and allosteric sites: implications for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daura Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the classical, active-site oriented drug-development approach reaching its limits, protein ligand-binding sites in general and allosteric sites in particular are increasingly attracting the interest of medicinal chemists in the search for new types of targets and strategies to drug development. Given that allostery represents one of the most common and powerful means to regulate protein function, the traditional drug discovery approach of targeting active sites can be extended by targeting allosteric or regulatory protein pockets that may allow the discovery of not only novel drug-like inhibitors, but activators as well. The wealth of available protein structural data can be exploited to further increase our understanding of allosterism, which in turn may have therapeutic applications. A first step in this direction is to identify and characterize putative effector sites that may be present in already available structural data. Results We performed a large-scale study of protein cavities as potential allosteric and functional sites, by integrating publicly available information on protein sequences, structures and active sites for more than a thousand protein families. By identifying common pockets across different structures of the same protein family we developed a method to measure the pocket's structural conservation. The method was first parameterized using known active sites. We characterized the predicted pockets in terms of sequence and structural conservation, backbone flexibility and electrostatic potential. Although these different measures do not tend to correlate, their combination is useful in selecting functional and regulatory sites, as a detailed analysis of a handful of protein families shows. We finally estimated the numbers of potential allosteric or regulatory pockets that may be present in the data set, finding that pockets with putative functional and effector characteristics are widespread across

  1. Slow reaction of soil structure to conservation agriculture practices in Veneto silty soils (North-Easter Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Ilaria; Camarotto, Carlo; Lazzaro, Barbara; Furlan, Lorenzo; Morari, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Soil structure plays a pivotal role in soil functioning and can inform of the degradation of the soil ecosystem. Intensive and repeated tillage operations have been known to negatively affect the soil structure characteristics while conservation agriculture (CA) practices were demonstrated to improve soil structure and related ecosystem services. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of conservation agriculture practices on total porosity, pore size distribution, pore architecture and morphology on silty soils of Veneto low-lying plain (North-Eastern Italy). Experimental design was established in 2010 on 4 farms in North-Eastern Italy to compare conventional intensive tillage system "IT" versus conservation agriculture "CA" (no-tillage, cover-crop and residue retention). 96 samples were collected in 2015 at four depths down to 50 cm depth, and investigated for porosity from micro to macro by coupling mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) (0.0074-100 µm) and x-ray computed microtomography (µCT) (>26 µm). Pore morphology and architecture were studied from 3D images analysis and MIP pore size curve. Ultramicroporosity class (0.1-5 μm) positively responded to CA after 5-yr of practices adoption while no significant effects were observed in the x-ray µCT domain (> 26 µm). Silty soils of Veneto plain showed a slow reaction to conservation agriculture because of the low soil organic carbon content and poor aggregate stability. Nevertheless the positive influence of CA on ultramicroporosity, which is strictly linked to soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization, indicated that a virtuous cycle was initiated between SOC and porosity, hopefully leading to well-developed macropore systems and, in turn, enhanced soil functions and ecosystem services.

  2. Could a Proto-Ribosome Emerge Spontaneously in the Prebiotic World?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana C. Agmon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An indispensable prerequisite for establishing a scenario of life emerging by natural processes is the requirement that the first simple proto-molecules could have had a realistic probability of self-assembly from random molecular polymers in the prebiotic world. The vestige of the proto-ribosome, which is believed to be still embedded in the contemporary ribosome, is used to assess the feasibility of such spontaneous emergence. Three concentric structural elements of different magnitudes, having a dimeric nature derived from the symmetrical region of the ribosomal large subunit, were suggested to constitute the vestige of the proto-ribosome. It is assumed to have materialized spontaneously in the prebiotic world, catalyzing non-coded peptide bond formation and simple elongation. Probabilistic and energetic considerations are applied in order to evaluate the suitability of the three contenders for being the initial proto-ribosome. The analysis points to the simplest proto-ribosome, comprised of a dimer of tRNA-like molecules presently embedded in the core of the symmetrical region, as the only one having a realistic statistical likelihood of spontaneous emergence from random RNA chains. Hence it offers a feasible starting point for a continuous evolutionary path from the prebiotic matter, through natural processes, into the intricate modern translation system.

  3. Organization of proteins in mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes: accessibility to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denslow, N.D.; O'Brien, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    To assess the relative exposure of individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in the large and small subunits of the bovine mitochondrial ribosome, double label iodination technique was used. Regions of r-proteins exposed in purified ribosomal subunits were labeled with 131 I using the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination system, and additional reactive groups available upon denaturing the r-proteins in urea were labeled with 125 I using the chloramine-T mediated reaction. The ratio of 131 I to 125 I incorporated into individual proteins under these conditions is representative of the degree of exposure for each of the proteins in the subunits. In this manner, the r-proteins have been grouped into 3 classes depending on their degree of exposure: high exposure, intermediate exposure, and essentially buried. While both subunits have a few proteins in the highly exposed group, and a large number of proteins in the intermediate exposure group, only the large ribosomal subunit has an appreciable number of proteins which appear essentially buried. The more buried proteins may serve mainly structural roles, perhaps acting as assembly proteins, since many from this group bind to ribosomal RNA. The more superficially disposed proteins may comprise binding sites for macromolecules that interact with ribosomes during protein synthesis, as well as stabilizing the association of the large and small subribosomal particles

  4. The ribosome can prevent aggregation of partially folded protein intermediates: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bani Kumar Pathak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular chaperones that support de novo folding of proteins under non stress condition are classified as chaperone 'foldases' that are distinct from chaperone' holdases' that provide high affinity binding platform for unfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation specifically under stress conditions. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine can act as a foldase chaperone that can bind unfolded proteins and release them in folding competent state. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC located in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli ribosome (bDV RNA is the chaperoning center of the ribosome. It has been proposed that via specific interactions between the RNA and refolding proteins, the chaperone provides information for the correct folding of unfolded polypeptide chains. RESULTS: We demonstrate using Escherichia coli ribosome and variants of its domain V RNA that the ribosome can bind to partially folded intermediates of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCAII and lysozyme and suppress aggregation during their refolding. Using mutants of domain V RNA we demonstrate that the time for which the chaperone retains the bound protein is an important factor in determining its ability to suppress aggregation and/or support reactivation of protein. CONCLUSION: The ribosome can behave like a 'holdase' chaperone and has the ability to bind and hold back partially folded intermediate states of proteins from participating in the aggregation process. Since the ribosome is an essential organelle that is present in large numbers in all living cells, this ability of the ribosome provides an energetically inexpensive way to suppress cellular aggregation. Further, this ability of the ribosome might also be crucial in the context that the ribosome is one of the first chaperones to be encountered by a large nascent polypeptide chains that have a tendency to form partially folded intermediates immediately following their synthesis.

  5. Ribosomal studies on the 70S ribosome of E.coli by means of neutron scattering; Strukturuntersuchungen am 70S-Ribosom von E.coli unter Anwendung von Neutronenstreuung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, N. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    1997-12-31

    Ribosomes are ribonucleo-protein complexes, which catalyse proteinbiosynthesis in all living organisms. Currently, most of the structural models of the prokaryotic 70S ribosome rely on electron microscopy and describe mainly the outer shape of the particle. Neutron scattering can provide information on the internal structure of the ribosome. Parts of the structure can be contrasted for neutrons by means of an isotopic exchange of the naturally occurring hydrogen ({sup 1}H) for deuterium ({sup 2}H), allowing direct measurements in situ. Specifically deuterium-labeled ribosomes (E. coli) were prepared and analysed with neutron scattering. The biochemical methods were established and combined to a generally applicable preparation system. This allows labeling of all ribosomal components in any combination. A systematic analysis of the protein and RNA phases resulted in the development of a new model for the 70S ribosome. This model describes not only the outer shape of the particle, but displays also an experimentally determined internal protein-RNA distribution and the border of subunits for the first time (four-phase model; resolution: 50A). Models of the 70S ribosome from other studies were evaluated and ranked according to consistency with the measured scattering data. Applying a new neutron scattering technique of particular sensitivity, the proton-spin contrast-variation, single proteins could be measured and localized. The positions of the proteins S6 and S10 were determined, providing the first coordinates of protein mass centers within the 70S ribosome. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ribosomen sind Ribonukleinsaeure-Protein Komplexe, die in allen lebenden Organismen die Proteinbiosynthese katalysieren. Strukturmodelle fuer das prokaryontische 70S-Ribosom beruhen derzeit vorwiegend auf elektronenmikroskopischen Untersuchungen und beschreiben im wesentlichen die aeussere Oberflaeche des Partikels. Informationen ueber die innere Struktur des Ribosoms koennen Messungen mit

  6. Ribosomal studies on the 70S ribosome of E.coli by means of neutron scattering; Strukturuntersuchungen am 70S-Ribosom von E.coli unter Anwendung von Neutronenstreuung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, N [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    1998-12-31

    Ribosomes are ribonucleo-protein complexes, which catalyse proteinbiosynthesis in all living organisms. Currently, most of the structural models of the prokaryotic 70S ribosome rely on electron microscopy and describe mainly the outer shape of the particle. Neutron scattering can provide information on the internal structure of the ribosome. Parts of the structure can be contrasted for neutrons by means of an isotopic exchange of the naturally occurring hydrogen ({sup 1}H) for deuterium ({sup 2}H), allowing direct measurements in situ. Specifically deuterium-labeled ribosomes (E. coli) were prepared and analysed with neutron scattering. The biochemical methods were established and combined to a generally applicable preparation system. This allows labeling of all ribosomal components in any combination. A systematic analysis of the protein and RNA phases resulted in the development of a new model for the 70S ribosome. This model describes not only the outer shape of the particle, but displays also an experimentally determined internal protein-RNA distribution and the border of subunits for the first time (four-phase model; resolution: 50A). Models of the 70S ribosome from other studies were evaluated and ranked according to consistency with the measured scattering data. Applying a new neutron scattering technique of particular sensitivity, the proton-spin contrast-variation, single proteins could be measured and localized. The positions of the proteins S6 and S10 were determined, providing the first coordinates of protein mass centers within the 70S ribosome. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ribosomen sind Ribonukleinsaeure-Protein Komplexe, die in allen lebenden Organismen die Proteinbiosynthese katalysieren. Strukturmodelle fuer das prokaryontische 70S-Ribosom beruhen derzeit vorwiegend auf elektronenmikroskopischen Untersuchungen und beschreiben im wesentlichen die aeussere Oberflaeche des Partikels. Informationen ueber die innere Struktur des Ribosoms koennen Messungen mit

  7. Conserving tropical tree diversity and forest structure: the value of small rainforest patches in moderately-managed landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ruedas, Manuel A; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Meave, Jorge A; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Ibarra-Manríquez, Guillermo; Martínez, Esteban; Jamangapé, Gilberto; Melo, Felipe P L; Santos, Bráulio A

    2014-01-01

    Rainforests are undergoing severe deforestation and fragmentation worldwide. A huge amount of small forest patches are being created, but their value in conserving biodiversity and forest structure is still controversial. Here, we demonstrate that in a species-rich and moderately-managed Mexican tropical landscape small rainforest patches (<100 ha) can be highly valuable for the conservation of tree diversity and forest structure. These patches showed diverse communities of native plants, including endangered species, and a new record for the country. Although the number of logged trees increased in smaller patches, patch size was a poor indicator of basal area, stem density, number of species, genera and families, and community evenness. Cumulative species-area curves indicated that all patches had a similar contribution to the regional species diversity. This idea also was supported by the fact that patches strongly differed in floristic composition (high β-diversity), independently of patch size. Thus, in agreement with the land-sharing approach, our findings support that small forest patches in moderately-managed landscapes should be included in conservation initiatives to maintain landscape heterogeneity, species diversity, and ecosystem services.

  8. Structural and functional conservation of CLEC-2 with the species-specific regulation of transcript expression in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Ren, Shifang; Zhu, Haiyan; Zhang, Dongmei; Hao, Yuqing; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Lei; Lee, Chiayu; Qiu, Lin; Yun, Xiaojing; Xie, Jianhui

    2012-08-01

    CLEC-2 was first identified by sequence similarity to C-type lectin-like molecules with immune functions and has been reported as a receptor for the platelet-aggregating snake venom toxin rhodocytin and the endogenous sialoglycoprotein podoplanin. Recent researches indicate that CLEC-2-deficient mice were lethal at the embryonic stage associated with disorganized and blood-filled lymphatic vessels and severe edema. In view of a necessary role of CLEC-2 in the individual development, it is of interest to investigate its phylogenetic homology and highly conserved functional regions. In this work, we reported that CLEC-2 from different species holds with an extraordinary conservation by sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis. The functional structures including N-linked oligosaccharide sites and ligand-binding domain implement a structural and functional conservation in a variety of species. The glycosylation sites (N120 and N134) are necessary for the surface expression CLEC-2. CLEC-2 from different species possesses the binding activity of mouse podoplanin. Nevertheless, the expression of CLEC-2 is regulated with a species-specific manner. The alternative splicing of pre-mRNA, a regulatory mechanism of gene expression, and the binding sites on promoter for several key transcription factors vary between different species. Therefore, CLEC-2 shares high sequence homology and functional identity. However the transcript expression might be tightly regulated by different mechanisms in evolution.

  9. Systematic analysis and evolution of 5S ribosomal DNA in metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierna, J; Wehner, S; Höner zu Siederdissen, C; Martínez-Lage, A; Marz, M

    2013-11-01

    Several studies on 5S ribosomal DNA (5S rDNA) have been focused on a subset of the following features in mostly one organism: number of copies, pseudogenes, secondary structure, promoter and terminator characteristics, genomic arrangements, types of non-transcribed spacers and evolution. In this work, we systematically analyzed 5S rDNA sequence diversity in available metazoan genomes, and showed organism-specific and evolutionary-conserved features. Putatively functional sequences (12,766) from 97 organisms allowed us to identify general features of this multigene family in animals. Interestingly, we show that each mammal species has a highly conserved (housekeeping) 5S rRNA type and many variable ones. The genomic organization of 5S rDNA is still under debate. Here, we report the occurrence of several paralog 5S rRNA sequences in 58 of the examined species, and a flexible genome organization of 5S rDNA in animals. We found heterogeneous 5S rDNA clusters in several species, supporting the hypothesis of an exchange of 5S rDNA from one locus to another. A rather high degree of variation of upstream, internal and downstream putative regulatory regions appears to characterize metazoan 5S rDNA. We systematically studied the internal promoters and described three different types of termination signals, as well as variable distances between the coding region and the typical termination signal. Finally, we present a statistical method for detection of linkage among noncoding RNA (ncRNA) gene families. This method showed no evolutionary-conserved linkage among 5S rDNAs and any other ncRNA genes within Metazoa, even though we found 5S rDNA to be linked to various ncRNAs in several clades.

  10. An agglomeration payment for cost-effective biodiversity conservation in spatially structured landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Drechsler, Martin; Johst, Karin; Wätzold, Frank; Shogren, Jason F.

    2007-01-01

    Compensation schemes in which land owners receive payments for voluntarily managing their land in a biodiversity-enhancing manner have become one of the most important instruments for biodiversity conservation worldwide. One key challenge when designing such schemes is to account for the spatial arrangement of habitats bearing in mind that for given total habitat area connected habitats are ecologically more valuable than isolated habitats. To integrate the spatial dimension in compensation s...

  11. JDet: interactive calculation and visualization of function-related conservation patterns in multiple sequence alignments and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Thilo; García-Martín, Juan A; Rausell, Antonio; Juan, David; Valencia, Alfonso; Pazos, Florencio

    2012-02-15

    We have implemented in a single package all the features required for extracting, visualizing and manipulating fully conserved positions as well as those with a family-dependent conservation pattern in multiple sequence alignments. The program allows, among other things, to run different methods for extracting these positions, combine the results and visualize them in protein 3D structures and sequence spaces. JDet is a multiplatform application written in Java. It is freely available, including the source code, at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/JDet. The package includes two of our recently developed programs for detecting functional positions in protein alignments (Xdet and S3Det), and support for other methods can be added as plug-ins. A help file and a guided tutorial for JDet are also available.

  12. Integrable covariant law of energy-momentum conservation for a gravitational field with the absolute parallelism structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asanov, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown the description of gravitational field in the riemannian space-time by means of the absolute parallelism structure makes it possible to formulate an integrable covariant law of energy-momentum conservation for gravitational field, by imposing on the energy-momentum tensor the condition of vanishing of the covariant divergence (in the sense of the absolute parallelism). As a result of taking into account covariant constraints for the tetrads of the absolute parallelism, the Lagrangian density turns out to be not geometrised anymore and leads to the unambiguous conservation law of the type mentioned in the N-body problem. Covariant field equations imply the existence of the special euclidean coordinates outside of static neighbourhoods of gravitationing bodies. In these coordinates determined by the tetrads of the absolute parallelism, the linear approximation is not connected with any noncovariant assumptions

  13. Evolutionary conservation and network structure characterize genes of phenotypic relevance for mitosis in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Ostaszewski

    Full Text Available The impact of gene silencing on cellular phenotypes is difficult to establish due to the complexity of interactions in the associated biological processes and pathways. A recent genome-wide RNA knock-down study both identified and phenotypically characterized a set of important genes for the cell cycle in HeLa cells. Here, we combine a molecular interaction network analysis, based on physical and functional protein interactions, in conjunction with evolutionary information, to elucidate the common biological and topological properties of these key genes. Our results show that these genes tend to be conserved with their corresponding protein interactions across several species and are key constituents of the evolutionary conserved molecular interaction network. Moreover, a group of bistable network motifs is found to be conserved within this network, which are likely to influence the network stability and therefore the robustness of cellular functioning. They form a cluster, which displays functional homogeneity and is significantly enriched in genes phenotypically relevant for mitosis. Additional results reveal a relationship between specific cellular processes and the phenotypic outcomes induced by gene silencing. This study introduces new ideas regarding the relationship between genotype and phenotype in the context of the cell cycle. We show that the analysis of molecular interaction networks can result in the identification of genes relevant to cellular processes, which is a promising avenue for future research.

  14. Ribosomal protein L5 has a highly twisted concave surface and flexible arms responsible for rRNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, T; Yao, M; Kawamura, S; Iwasaki, K; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-05-01

    Ribosomal protein L5 is a 5S rRNA binding protein in the large subunit and plays an essential role in the promotion of a particular conformation of 5S rRNA. The crystal structure of the ribosomal protein L5 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. The molecule consists of a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and four alpha-helices, which fold in a way that is topologically similar to the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain. The molecular shape and electrostatic representation suggest that the concave surface and loop regions are involved in 5S rRNA binding. To identify amino acid residues responsible for 5S rRNA binding, we made use of Ala-scanning mutagenesis of evolutionarily conserved amino acids occurring in the beta-strands and loop regions. The mutations of Asn37 at the beta1-strand and Gln63 at the loop between helix 2 and beta3-strand as well as that of Phe77 at the tip of the loop structure between the beta2- and beta3-strands caused a significant reduction in 5S rRNA binding. In addition, the mutations of Thr90 on the beta3-strand and Ile141 and Asp144 at the loop between beta4- and beta5-strands moderately reduced the 5S rRNA-binding affinity. Comparison of these results with the more recently analyzed structure of the 50S subunit from Haloarcula marismortui suggests that there are significant differences in the structure at N- and C-terminal regions and probably in the 5S rRNA binding.

  15. Long non-coding RNA discovery across the genus anopheles reveals conserved secondary structures within and beyond the Gambiae complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Adam M; Waterhouse, Robert M; Muskavitch, Marc A T

    2015-04-23

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been defined as mRNA-like transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that lack significant protein-coding potential, and many of them constitute scaffolds for ribonucleoprotein complexes with critical roles in epigenetic regulation. Various lncRNAs have been implicated in the modulation of chromatin structure, transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation, and regulation of genomic stability in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this study is to identify the lncRNA landscape in the malaria vector An. gambiae and assess the evolutionary conservation of lncRNAs and their secondary structures across the Anopheles genus. Using deep RNA sequencing of multiple Anopheles gambiae life stages, we have identified 2,949 lncRNAs and more than 300 previously unannotated putative protein-coding genes. The lncRNAs exhibit differential expression profiles across life stages and adult genders. We find that across the genus Anopheles, lncRNAs display much lower sequence conservation than protein-coding genes. Additionally, we find that lncRNA secondary structure is highly conserved within the Gambiae complex, but diverges rapidly across the rest of the genus Anopheles. This study offers one of the first lncRNA secondary structure analyses in vector insects. Our description of lncRNAs in An. gambiae offers the most comprehensive genome-wide insights to date into lncRNAs in this vector mosquito, and defines a set of potential targets for the development of vector-based interventions that may further curb the human malaria burden in disease-endemic countries.

  16. Replication and meiotic transmission of yeast ribosomal RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, B J; Zakian, V A; Fangman, W L

    1980-11-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has approximately 120 genes for the ribosomal RNAs (rDNA) which are organized in tandem within chromosomal DNA. These multiple-copy genes are homogeneous in sequence but can undergo changes in copy number and topology. To determine if these changes reflect unusual features of rDNA metabolism, we have examined both the replication of rDNA in the mitotic cell cycle and the inheritance of rDNA during meiosis. The results indicate that rDNA behaves identically to chromosomal DNA: each rDNA unit is replicated once during the S phase of each cell cycle and each unit is conserved through meiosis. Therefore, the flexibility in copy number and topology of rDNA does not arise from the selective replication of units in each S phase nor by the selective inheritance of units in meiosis.

  17. Initiation of translation in bacteria by a structured eukaryotic IRES RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Zhu, Jianyu; Donohue, John Paul; Korostelev, Andrei A; Jaafar, Zane A; Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Noller, Harry F; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-05

    The central dogma of gene expression (DNA to RNA to protein) is universal, but in different domains of life there are fundamental mechanistic differences within this pathway. For example, the canonical molecular signals used to initiate protein synthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes are mutually exclusive. However, the core structures and conformational dynamics of ribosomes that are responsible for the translation steps that take place after initiation are ancient and conserved across the domains of life. We wanted to explore whether an undiscovered RNA-based signal might be able to use these conserved features, bypassing mechanisms specific to each domain of life, and initiate protein synthesis in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Although structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs can manipulate ribosomes to initiate translation in eukaryotic cells, an analogous RNA structure-based mechanism has not been observed in bacteria. Here we report our discovery that a eukaryotic viral IRES can initiate translation in live bacteria. We solved the crystal structure of this IRES bound to a bacterial ribosome to 3.8 Å resolution, revealing that despite differences between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes this IRES binds directly to both and occupies the space normally used by transfer RNAs. Initiation in both bacteria and eukaryotes depends on the structure of the IRES RNA, but in bacteria this RNA uses a different mechanism that includes a form of ribosome repositioning after initial recruitment. This IRES RNA bridges billions of years of evolutionary divergence and provides an example of an RNA structure-based translation initiation signal capable of operating in two domains of life.

  18. 5S ribosomal RNA database Y2K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, M; Barciszewska, M Z; Barciszewski, J; Erdmann, V A

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the updated version (Y2K) of the database of ribosomal 5S ribonucleic acids (5S rRNA) and their genes (5S rDNA), http://rose.man/poznan.pl/5SData/index.html. This edition of the database contains 1985primary structures of 5S rRNA and 5S rDNA. They include 60 archaebacterial, 470 eubacterial, 63 plastid, nine mitochondrial and 1383 eukaryotic sequences. The nucleotide sequences of the 5S rRNAs or 5S rDNAs are divided according to the taxonomic position of the source organisms.

  19. Molecular insight into human platelet antigens: structural and evolutionary conservation analyses offer new perspective to immunogenic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Meytal; Rosenberg, Nurit

    2011-03-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPAs) are polymorphisms in platelet membrane glycoproteins (GPs) that can stimulate production of alloantibodies once exposed to foreign platelets (PLTs) with different HPAs. These antibodies can cause neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, and PLT transfusion refractoriness. Most HPAs are localized on the main PLT receptors: 1) integrin αIIbβ3, known as the fibrinogen receptor; 2) the GPIb-IX-V complex that functions as the receptor for von Willebrand factor; and 3) integrin α2β1, which functions as the collagen receptor. We analyzed the structural location and the evolutionary conservation of the residues associated with the HPAs to characterize the features that induce immunologic responses but do not cause inherited diseases. We found that all HPAs reside in positions located on the protein surface, apart from the ligand-binding site, and are evolutionary variable. Disease-causing mutations often reside in highly conserved and buried positions. In contrast, the HPAs affect residues on the protein surface that were not conserved throughout evolution; this explains their naive effect on the protein function. Nonetheless, the HPAs involve substitutions of solvent-exposed positions that lead to altered interfaces on the surface of the protein and might present epitopes foreign to the immune system. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  20. Structure, function and management of semi-natural habitats for conservation biological control: a review of European studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John M; Bianchi, Felix Jja; Entling, Martin H; Moonen, Anna-Camilla; Smith, Barbara M; Jeanneret, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Different semi-natural habitats occur on farmland, and it is the vegetation's traits and structure that subsequently determine their ability to support natural enemies and their associated contribution to conservation biocontrol. New habitats can be created and existing ones improved with agri-environment scheme funding in all EU member states. Understanding the contribution of each habitat type can aid the development of conservation control strategies. Here we review the extent to which the predominant habitat types in Europe support natural enemies, whether this results in enhanced natural enemy densities in the adjacent crop and whether this leads to reduced pest densities. Considerable variation exists in the available information for the different habitat types and trophic levels. Natural enemies within each habitat were the most studied, with less information on whether they were enhanced in adjacent fields, while their impact on pests was rarely investigated. Most information was available for woody and herbaceous linear habitats, yet not for woodland which can be the most common semi-natural habitat in many regions. While the management and design of habitats offer potential to stimulate conservation biocontrol, we also identified knowledge gaps. A better understanding of the relationship between resource availability and arthropod communities across habitat types, the spatiotemporal distribution of resources in the landscape and interactions with other factors that play a role in pest regulation could contribute to an informed management of semi-natural habitats for biocontrol. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Structural and functional characterizations of SsgB, a conserved activator of developmental cell division in morphologically complex actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; Traag, Bjørn A; Willemse, Joost; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Minor, Wladek; Mommaas, A Mieke; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Shuren; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2009-09-11

    SsgA-like proteins (SALPs) are a family of homologous cell division-related proteins that occur exclusively in morphologically complex actinomycetes. We show that SsgB, a subfamily of SALPs, is the archetypal SALP that is functionally conserved in all sporulating actinomycetes. Sporulation-specific cell division of Streptomyces coelicolor ssgB mutants is restored by introduction of distant ssgB orthologues from other actinomycetes. Interestingly, the number of septa (and spores) of the complemented null mutants is dictated by the specific ssgB orthologue that is expressed. The crystal structure of the SsgB from Thermobifida fusca was determined at 2.6 A resolution and represents the first structure for this family. The structure revealed similarities to a class of eukaryotic "whirly" single-stranded DNA/RNA-binding proteins. However, the electro-negative surface of the SALPs suggests that neither SsgB nor any of the other SALPs are likely to interact with nucleotide substrates. Instead, we show that a conserved hydrophobic surface is likely to be important for SALP function and suggest that proteins are the likely binding partners.

  2. Structural and Functional Characterizations of SsgB, a Conserved Activator of Developmental Cell Division in Morphologically Complex Actinomycetes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; Traag, Bjørn A.; Willemse, Joost; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Minor, Wladek; Mommaas, A. Mieke; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Shuren; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2009-01-01

    SsgA-like proteins (SALPs) are a family of homologous cell division-related proteins that occur exclusively in morphologically complex actinomycetes. We show that SsgB, a subfamily of SALPs, is the archetypal SALP that is functionally conserved in all sporulating actinomycetes. Sporulation-specific cell division of Streptomyces coelicolor ssgB mutants is restored by introduction of distant ssgB orthologues from other actinomycetes. Interestingly, the number of septa (and spores) of the complemented null mutants is dictated by the specific ssgB orthologue that is expressed. The crystal structure of the SsgB from Thermobifida fusca was determined at 2.6 Å resolution and represents the first structure for this family. The structure revealed similarities to a class of eukaryotic “whirly” single-stranded DNA/RNA-binding proteins. However, the electro-negative surface of the SALPs suggests that neither SsgB nor any of the other SALPs are likely to interact with nucleotide substrates. Instead, we show that a conserved hydrophobic surface is likely to be important for SALP function and suggest that proteins are the likely binding partners. PMID:19567872

  3. Mutant forms of Escherichia coli protein L25 unable to bind to 5S rRNA are incorporated efficiently into the ribosome in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikaev, A Y; Korepanov, A P; Korobeinikova, A V; Kljashtorny, V G; Piendl, W; Nikonov, S V; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2014-08-01

    5S rRNA-binding ribosomal proteins of the L25 family are an evolutional acquisition of bacteria. Earlier we showed that (i) single replacements in the RNA-binding module of the protein of this family result in destabilization or complete impossibility to form a complex with 5S rRNA in vitro; (ii) ΔL25 ribosomes of Escherichia coli are less efficient in protein synthesis in vivo than the control ribosomes. In the present work, the efficiency of incorporation of the E. coli protein L25 with mutations in the 5S rRNA-binding region into the ribosome in vivo was studied. It was found that the mutations in L25 that abolish its ability to form the complex with free 5S rRNA do not prevent its correct and efficient incorporation into the ribosome. This is supported by the fact that even the presence of a very weakly retained mutant form of the protein in the ribosome has a positive effect on the activity of the translational machinery in vivo. All this suggests the existence of an alternative incorporation pathway for this protein into the ribosome, excluding the preliminary formation of the complex with 5S rRNA. At the same time, the stable L25-5S rRNA contact is important for the retention of the protein within the ribosome, and the conservative amino acid residues of the RNA-binding module play a key role in this.

  4. Structural insights into conserved L-arabinose metabolic enzymes reveal the substrate binding site of a thermophilic L-arabinose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sang-Jae; Kim, Seong-Bo; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2014-03-18

    Structural genomics demonstrates that despite low levels of structural similarity of proteins comprising a metabolic pathway, their substrate binding regions are likely to be conserved. Herein based on the 3D-structures of the α/β-fold proteins involved in the ara operon, we attempted to predict the substrate binding residues of thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase (GSAI) with no 3D-structure available. Comparison of the structures of L-arabinose catabolic enzymes revealed a conserved feature to form the substrate-binding modules, which can be extended to predict the substrate binding site of GSAI (i.e., D195, E261 and E333). Moreover, these data implicated that proteins in the l-arabinose metabolic pathway might retain their substrate binding niches as the modular structure through conserved molecular evolution even with totally different structural scaffolds. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acidic ribosomal proteins and histone H3 from Leishmania present a high rate of divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ysabel Montoya

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Another additional peculiarity in Leishmania will be discussed about of the amino acid divergence rate of three structural proteins: acidic ribosomal P1 and P2b proteins, and histone H3 by using multiple sequence alignment and dendrograms. These structural proteins present a high rate of divergence regarding to their homologous protein in Trypanosoma cruzi. At this regard, L. (V. peruviana P1 and T. cruzi P1 showed 57.4% of divergence rate. Likewise, L. (V. braziliensis histone H3 and acidic ribosomal P2 protein exhibited 31.8% and 41.7% respectively of rate of divergence in comparison with their homologous in T. cruzi.

  6. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Griffin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival.

  7. Insertion of the Biogenesis Factor Rei1 Probes the Ribosomal Tunnel during 60S Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil Johannes; Gerhardy, Stefan; Leitner, Alexander; Leibundgut, Marc; Salem, Michèle; Boehringer, Daniel; Leulliot, Nicolas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Panse, Vikram Govind; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-14

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis depends on several hundred assembly factors to produce functional 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. The final phase of 60S subunit biogenesis is cytoplasmic maturation, which includes the proofreading of functional centers of the 60S subunit and the release of several ribosome biogenesis factors. We report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the yeast 60S subunit in complex with the biogenesis factors Rei1, Arx1, and Alb1 at 3.4 Å resolution. In addition to the network of interactions formed by Alb1, the structure reveals a mechanism for ensuring the integrity of the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel. Arx1 probes the entire set of inner-ring proteins surrounding the tunnel exit, and the C terminus of Rei1 is deeply inserted into the ribosomal tunnel, where it forms specific contacts along almost its entire length. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that failure to insert the C terminus of Rei1 precludes subsequent steps of 60S maturation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional Dynamics within the Human Ribosome Regulate the Rate of Active Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Angelica; Wang, Leyi; Altman, Roger B; Terry, Daniel S; Juette, Manuel F; Burnett, Benjamin J; Alejo, Jose L; Dass, Randall A; Parks, Matthew M; Vincent, C Theresa; Blanchard, Scott C

    2015-11-05

    The regulation of protein synthesis contributes to gene expression in both normal physiology and disease, yet kinetic investigations of the human translation mechanism are currently lacking. Using single-molecule fluorescence imaging methods, we have quantified the nature and timing of structural processes in human ribosomes during single-turnover and processive translation reactions. These measurements reveal that functional complexes exhibit dynamic behaviors and thermodynamic stabilities distinct from those observed for bacterial systems. Structurally defined sub-states of pre- and post-translocation complexes were sensitive to specific inhibitors of the eukaryotic ribosome, demonstrating the utility of this platform to probe drug mechanism. The application of three-color single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) methods further revealed a long-distance allosteric coupling between distal tRNA binding sites within ribosomes bearing three tRNAs, which contributed to the rate of processive translation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli have disparate dependences on KsgA for growth and ribosome biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Farrell Heather C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The KsgA methyltransferase has been conserved throughout evolution, methylating two adenosines in the small subunit rRNA in all three domains of life as well as in eukaryotic organelles that contain ribosomes. Understanding of KsgA’s important role in ribosome biogenesis has been recently expanded in Escherichia coli; these studies help explain why KsgA is so highly conserved and also suggest KsgA’s potential as an antimicrobial drug target. Results We have analyzed KsgA’s contribution to ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Staphylococcus aureus. We found that deletion of ksgA in S. aureus led to a cold-sensitive growth phenotype, although KsgA was not as critical for ribosome biogenesis as it was shown to be in E. coli. Additionally, the ksgA knockout strain showed an increased sensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Overexpression of a catalytically inactive KsgA mutant was deleterious in the knockout strain but not the wild-type strain; this negative phenotype disappeared at low temperature. Conclusions This work extends the study of KsgA, allowing comparison of this aspect of ribosome biogenesis between a Gram-negative and a Gram-positive organism. Our results in S. aureus are in contrast to results previously described in E. coli, where the catalytically inactive protein showed a negative phenotype in the presence or absence of endogenous KsgA.

  10. Structural conservation, variability, and immunogenicity of the T6 backbone pilin of serotype M6 Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Paul G; Moreland, Nicole J; Loh, Jacelyn M; Bell, Anita; Atatoa Carr, Polly; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N

    2014-07-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) is a Gram-positive human pathogen that causes a broad range of diseases ranging from acute pharyngitis to the poststreptococcal sequelae of acute rheumatic fever. GAS pili are highly diverse, long protein polymers that extend from the cell surface. They have multiple roles in infection and are promising candidates for vaccine development. This study describes the structure of the T6 backbone pilin (BP; Lancefield T-antigen) from the important M6 serotype. The structure reveals a modular arrangement of three tandem immunoglobulin-like domains, two with internal isopeptide bonds. The T6 pilin lysine, essential for polymerization, is located in a novel VAKS motif that is structurally homologous to the canonical YPKN pilin lysine in other three- and four-domain Gram-positive pilins. The T6 structure also highlights a conserved pilin core whose surface is decorated with highly variable loops and extensions. Comparison to other Gram-positive BPs shows that many of the largest variable extensions are found in conserved locations. Studies with sera from patients diagnosed with GAS-associated acute rheumatic fever showed that each of the three T6 domains, and the largest of the variable extensions (V8), are targeted by IgG during infection in vivo. Although the GAS BP show large variations in size and sequence, the modular nature of the pilus proteins revealed by the T6 structure may aid the future design of a pilus-based vaccine. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Structural insights into the interaction of the conserved mammalian proteins GAPR-1 and Beclin 1, a key autophagy protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yue; Zhao, Yuting; Su, Minfei; Glover, Karen; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Colbert, Christopher L.; Levine, Beth; Sinha, Sangita C.

    2017-08-29

    Mammalian Golgi-associated plant pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GAPR-1) is a negative autophagy regulator that binds Beclin 1, a key component of the autophagosome nucleation complex. Beclin 1 residues 267–284 are required for binding GAPR-1. Here, sequence analyses, structural modeling, mutagenesis combined with pull-down assays, X-ray crystal structure determination and small-angle X-ray scattering were used to investigate the Beclin 1–GAPR-1 interaction. Five conserved residues line an equatorial GAPR-1 surface groove that is large enough to bind a peptide. A model of a peptide comprising Beclin 1 residues 267–284 docked onto GAPR-1, built using theCABS-dockserver, indicates that this peptide binds to this GAPR-1 groove. Mutation of the five conserved residues lining this groove, H54A/E86A/G102K/H103A/N138G, abrogates Beclin 1 binding. The 1.27 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of this pentad mutant GAPR-1 was determined. Comparison with the wild-type (WT) GAPR-1 structure shows that the equatorial groove of the pentad mutant is shallower and more positively charged, and therefore may not efficiently bind Beclin 1 residues 267–284, which include many hydrophobic residues. Both WT and pentad mutant GAPR-1 crystallize as dimers, and in each case the equatorial groove of one subunit is partially occluded by the other subunit, indicating that dimeric GAPR-1 is unlikely to bind Beclin 1. SAXS analysis of WT and pentad mutant GAPR-1 indicates that in solution the WT forms monomers, while the pentad mutant is primarily dimeric. Thus, changes in the structure of the equatorial groove combined with the improved dimerization of pentad mutant GAPR-1 are likely to abrogate binding to Beclin 1.

  12. Structure-Related Roles for the Conservation of the HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Sequence Revealed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Soraya; Huarte, Nerea; Rujas, Edurne; Andreu, David; Nieva, José L; Jiménez, María Angeles

    2017-10-17

    Despite extensive characterization of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) hydrophobic fusion peptide (FP), the structure-function relationships underlying its extraordinary degree of conservation remain poorly understood. Specifically, the fact that the tandem repeat of the FLGFLG tripeptide is absolutely conserved suggests that high hydrophobicity may not suffice to unleash FP function. Here, we have compared the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures adopted in nonpolar media by two FP surrogates, wtFP-tag and scrFP-tag, which had equal hydrophobicity but contained wild-type and scrambled core sequences LFLGFLG and FGLLGFL, respectively. In addition, these peptides were tagged at their C-termini with an epitope sequence that folded independently, thereby allowing Western blot detection without interfering with FP structure. We observed similar α-helical FP conformations for both specimens dissolved in the low-polarity medium 25% (v/v) 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP), but important differences in contact with micelles of the membrane mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC). Thus, whereas wtFP-tag preserved a helix displaying a Gly-rich ridge, the scrambled sequence lost in great part the helical structure upon being solubilized in DPC. Western blot analyses further revealed the capacity of wtFP-tag to assemble trimers in membranes, whereas membrane oligomers were not observed in the case of the scrFP-tag sequence. We conclude that, beyond hydrophobicity, preserving sequence order is an important feature for defining the secondary structures and oligomeric states adopted by the HIV FP in membranes.

  13. Effect of primary and secondary radicals on chain breaks in ribosomal RNA in E. coli ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.; Bishop, J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown previously that, in dilute aerated solutions, ribosomes are inactivated by OH radicals and by secondary radicals produced from added alcohols (Singh and Vadasz 1983 a). In de-aerated solutions, both radicalH and e - sub(aq) also inactivate ribosomes (Singh and Vadasz 1983 b). The results of these studies and other on different systems (Adams et al. 1973, Aldrich and Cundall 1969, Dewey and Stein 1970, Masuda et al. 1971, Nabben et al. 1982, 1983, Samuni et al. 1980, Singh and Singh 1982) have shown that damage to biological systems occurs by diverse mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves chain breaks in RNA (Pollard and Weller 1967). The purpose of this study was to determine which of the primary and secondary radicals cause chain breaks in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) within the ribosomes. (author)

  14. Distribution, structure and function of Nordic eelgrass (Zostera marina) ecosystems: implications for coastal management and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Christoffer; Baden, Susanne; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Dromph, Karsten; Fredriksen, Stein; Gustafsson, Camilla; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Möller, Tiia; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius; Olesen, Birgit; Olsen, Jeanine; Pihl, Leif; Rinde, Eli

    2014-06-01

    This paper focuses on the marine foundation eelgrass species, Zostera marina , along a gradient from the northern Baltic Sea to the north-east Atlantic. This vast region supports a minimum of 1480 km 2 eelgrass (maximum >2100 km 2 ), which corresponds to more than four times the previously quantified area of eelgrass in Western Europe.Eelgrass meadows in the low salinity Baltic Sea support the highest diversity (4-6 spp.) of angiosperms overall, but eelgrass productivity is low (borders. Nevertheless, ensuring awareness of their vulnerability remains challenging. Given the areal extent of Nordic eelgrass systems and the ecosystem services they provide, it is crucial to further develop incentives for protecting them. © 2014 The Authors. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Identification and classification of conserved RNA secondary structures in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Bejerano, Gill; Siepel, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The discoveries of microRNAs and riboswitches, among others, have shown functional RNAs to be biologically more important and genomically more prevalent than previously anticipated. We have developed a general comparative genomics method based on phylogenetic stochastic context-free grammars...... for identifying functional RNAs encoded in the human genome and used it to survey an eight-way genome-wide alignment of the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebra-fish, and puffer-fish genomes for deeply conserved functional RNAs. At a loose threshold for acceptance, this search resulted in a set......, the results nevertheless provide evidence for many new human functional RNAs and present specific predictions to facilitate their further characterization....

  16. Structural and functional characterization of the conserved salt bridge in mammalian paneth cell alpha-defensins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, K Johan; Daly, Norelle L; Fornander, Liselotte M

    2006-01-01

    alpha-Defensins are mediators of mammalian innate immunity, and knowledge of their structure-function relationships is essential for understanding their mechanisms of action. We report here the NMR solution structures of the mouse Paneth cell alpha-defensin cryptdin-4 (Crp4) and a mutant (E15D)-C...

  17. Plant Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins: Progesses, Challenges and Biotechnological Applications (and a Few Digressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Serena Fabbrini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP toxins are EC3.2.2.22 N-glycosidases, found among most plant species encoded as small gene families, distributed in several tissues being endowed with defensive functions against fungal or viral infections. The two main plant RIP classes include type I (monomeric and type II (dimeric as the prototype ricin holotoxin from Ricinus communis that is composed of a catalytic active A chain linked via a disulphide bridge to a B-lectin domain that mediates efficient endocytosis in eukaryotic cells. Plant RIPs can recognize a universally conserved stem-loop, known as the α-sarcin/ ricin loop or SRL structure in 23S/25S/28S rRNA. By depurinating a single adenine (A4324 in 28S rat rRNA, they can irreversibly arrest protein translation and trigger cell death in the intoxicated mammalian cell. Besides their useful application as potential weapons against infected/tumor cells, ricin was also used in bio-terroristic attacks and, as such, constitutes a major concern. In this review, we aim to summarize past studies and more recent progresses made studying plant RIPs and discuss successful approaches that might help overcoming some of the bottlenecks encountered during the development of their biomedical applications.

  18. Conserving Tropical Tree Diversity and Forest Structure: The Value of Small Rainforest Patches in Moderately-Managed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ruedas, Manuel A.; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Meave, Jorge A.; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Ibarra-Manríquez, Guillermo; Martínez, Esteban; Jamangapé, Gilberto; Melo, Felipe P. L.; Santos, Bráulio A.

    2014-01-01

    Rainforests are undergoing severe deforestation and fragmentation worldwide. A huge amount of small forest patches are being created, but their value in conserving biodiversity and forest structure is still controversial. Here, we demonstrate that in a species-rich and moderately-managed Mexican tropical landscape small rainforest patches (tree diversity and forest structure. These patches showed diverse communities of native plants, including endangered species, and a new record for the country. Although the number of logged trees increased in smaller patches, patch size was a poor indicator of basal area, stem density, number of species, genera and families, and community evenness. Cumulative species-area curves indicated that all patches had a similar contribution to the regional species diversity. This idea also was supported by the fact that patches strongly differed in floristic composition (high β-diversity), independently of patch size. Thus, in agreement with the land-sharing approach, our findings support that small forest patches in moderately-managed landscapes should be included in conservation initiatives to maintain landscape heterogeneity, species diversity, and ecosystem services. PMID:24901954

  19. Structure-Based Design of Hepatitis C Virus Vaccines That Elicit Neutralizing Antibody Responses to a Conserved Epitope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Brian G.; Boucher, Elisabeth N.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Ejemel, Monir; Rapp, Chelsea A.; Thomas, William D.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Weng, Zhiping; Wang, Yang; Diamond, Michael S.

    2017-08-09

    Despite recent advances in therapeutic options, hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a severe global disease burden, and a vaccine can substantially reduce its incidence. Due to its extremely high sequence variability, HCV can readily escape the immune response; thus, an effective vaccine must target conserved, functionally important epitopes. Using the structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody in complex with a conserved linear epitope from the HCV E2 envelope glycoprotein (residues 412 to 423; epitope I), we performed structure-based design of immunogens to induce antibody responses to this epitope. This resulted in epitope-based immunogens based on a cyclic defensin protein, as well as a bivalent immunogen with two copies of the epitope on the E2 surface. We solved the X-ray structure of a cyclic immunogen in complex with the HCV1 antibody and confirmed preservation of the epitope conformation and the HCV1 interface. Mice vaccinated with our designed immunogens produced robust antibody responses to epitope I, and their serum could neutralize HCV. Notably, the cyclic designs induced greater epitope-specific responses and neutralization than the native peptide epitope. Beyond successfully designing several novel HCV immunogens, this study demonstrates the principle that neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies can be induced by epitope-based, engineered vaccines and provides the basis for further efforts in structure-based design of HCV vaccines.

    IMPORTANCEHepatitis C virus is a leading cause of liver disease and liver cancer, with approximately 3% of the world's population infected. To combat this virus, an effective vaccine would have distinct advantages over current therapeutic options, yet experimental vaccines have not been successful to date, due in part to the virus's high sequence variability leading to immune escape. In this study, we rationally designed several vaccine immunogens based on the structure of a conserved epitope that

  20. Toxin structures as evolutionary tools: Using conserved 3D folds to study the evolution of rapidly evolving peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undheim, Eivind A B; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structures have been used to explore the evolution of proteins for decades, yet they have rarely been utilized to study the molecular evolution of peptides. Here, we highlight areas in which 3D structures can be particularly useful for studying the molecular evolution of peptide toxins. Although we focus our discussion on animal toxins, including one of the most widespread disulfide-rich peptide folds known, the inhibitor cystine knot, our conclusions should be widely applicable to studies of the evolution of disulfide-constrained peptides. We show that conserved 3D folds can be used to identify evolutionary links and test hypotheses regarding the evolutionary origin of peptides with extremely low sequence identity; construct accurate multiple sequence alignments; and better understand the evolutionary forces that drive the molecular evolution of peptides. Also watch the video abstract. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure of Prunus mira (Koehne from the Tibet plateau in China and recommended conservation strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenquan Bao

    Full Text Available Prunus mira Koehne, an important economic fruit crop with high breeding and medicinal values, and an ancestral species of many cultivated peach species, has recently been declared an endangered species. However, basic information about genetic diversity, population structure, and morphological variation is still limited for this species. In this study, we sampled 420 P. mira individuals from 21 wild populations in the Tibet plateau to conduct a comprehensive analysis of genetic and morphological characteristics. The results of molecular analyses based on simple sequence repeat (SSR markers indicated moderate genetic diversity and inbreeding (A = 3.8, Ae = 2.5, He = 0.52, Ho = 0.44, I = 0.95, FIS = 0.17 within P. mira populations. STRUCTURE, GENELAND, and phylogenetic analyses assigned the 21 populations to three genetic clusters that were moderately correlated with geographic altitudes, and this may have resulted from significantly different climatic and environmental factors at different altitudinal ranges. Significant isolation-by-distance was detected across the entire distribution of P. mira populations, but geographic altitude might have more significant effects on genetic structure than geographic distance in partial small-scale areas. Furthermore, clear genetic structure, high genetic differentiation, and restricted gene flow were detected between pairwise populations from different geographic groups, indicating that geographic barriers and genetic drift have significant effects on P. mira populations. Analyses of molecular variance based on the SSR markers indicated high variation (83.7% and 81.7%, whereas morphological analyses revealed low variation (1.30%-36.17% within the populations. Large and heavy fruits were better adapted than light fruits and nutlets to poor climate and environmental conditions at high altitudes. Based on the results of molecular and morphological analyses, we classified the area into three conservation units

  2. Ribosome Profiling Reveals Pervasive Translation Outside of Annotated Protein-Coding Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas T. Ingolia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome profiling suggests that ribosomes occupy many regions of the transcriptome thought to be noncoding, including 5′ UTRs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs. Apparent ribosome footprints outside of protein-coding regions raise the possibility of artifacts unrelated to translation, particularly when they occupy multiple, overlapping open reading frames (ORFs. Here, we show hallmarks of translation in these footprints: copurification with the large ribosomal subunit, response to drugs targeting elongation, trinucleotide periodicity, and initiation at early AUGs. We develop a metric for distinguishing between 80S footprints and nonribosomal sources using footprint size distributions, which validates the vast majority of footprints outside of coding regions. We present evidence for polypeptide production beyond annotated genes, including the induction of immune responses following human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection. Translation is pervasive on cytosolic transcripts outside of conserved reading frames, and direct detection of this expanded universe of translated products enables efforts at understanding how cells manage and exploit its consequences.

  3. A distinct group of hepacivirus/pestivirus-like internal ribosomal entry sites in members of diverse picornavirus genera: evidence for modular exchange of functional noncoding RNA elements by recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellen, Christopher U T; de Breyne, Sylvain

    2007-06-01

    The 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of the RNA genomes of Flaviviridae of the Hepacivirus and Pestivirus genera contain internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs) that are unrelated to the two principal classes of IRESs of Picornaviridae. The mechanism of translation initiation on hepacivirus/pestivirus (HP) IRESs, which involves factor-independent binding to ribosomal 40S subunits, also differs fundamentally from initiation on these picornavirus IRESs. Ribosomal binding to HP IRESs requires conserved sequences that form a pseudoknot and the adjacent IIId and IIIe domains; analogous elements do not occur in the two principal groups of picornavirus IRESs. Here, comparative sequence analysis was used to identify a subset of picornaviruses from multiple genera that contain 5' UTR sequences with significant similarities to HP IRESs. They are avian encephalomyelitis virus, duck hepatitis virus 1, duck picornavirus, porcine teschovirus, porcine enterovirus 8, Seneca Valley virus, and simian picornavirus. Their 5' UTRs are predicted to form several structures, in some of which the peripheral elements differ from the corresponding HP IRES elements but in which the core pseudoknot, domain IIId, and domain IIIe elements are all closely related. These findings suggest that HP-like IRESs have been exchanged between unrelated virus families by recombination and support the hypothesis that RNA viruses consist of modular coding and noncoding elements that can exchange and evolve independently.

  4. A Distinct Group of Hepacivirus/Pestivirus-Like Internal Ribosomal Entry Sites in Members of Diverse Picornavirus Genera: Evidence for Modular Exchange of Functional Noncoding RNA Elements by Recombination▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellen, Christopher U. T.; de Breyne, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    The 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of the RNA genomes of Flaviviridae of the Hepacivirus and Pestivirus genera contain internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs) that are unrelated to the two principal classes of IRESs of Picornaviridae. The mechanism of translation initiation on hepacivirus/pestivirus (HP) IRESs, which involves factor-independent binding to ribosomal 40S subunits, also differs fundamentally from initiation on these picornavirus IRESs. Ribosomal binding to HP IRESs requires conserved sequences that form a pseudoknot and the adjacent IIId and IIIe domains; analogous elements do not occur in the two principal groups of picornavirus IRESs. Here, comparative sequence analysis was used to identify a subset of picornaviruses from multiple genera that contain 5′ UTR sequences with significant similarities to HP IRESs. They are avian encephalomyelitis virus, duck hepatitis virus 1, duck picornavirus, porcine teschovirus, porcine enterovirus 8, Seneca Valley virus, and simian picornavirus. Their 5′ UTRs are predicted to form several structures, in some of which the peripheral elements differ from the corresponding HP IRES elements but in which the core pseudoknot, domain IIId, and domain IIIe elements are all closely related. These findings suggest that HP-like IRESs have been exchanged between unrelated virus families by recombination and support the hypothesis that RNA viruses consist of modular coding and noncoding elements that can exchange and evolve independently. PMID:17392358

  5. Structure of genes for dermaseptins B, antimicrobial peptides from frog skin. Exon 1-encoded prepropeptide is conserved in genes for peptides of highly different structures and activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouille, V; Amiche, M; Nicolas, P

    1997-09-01

    We cloned the genes of two members of the dermaseptin family, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides isolated from the skin of the arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. The dermaseptin gene Drg2 has a 2-exon coding structure interrupted by a small 137-bp intron, wherein exon 1 encoded a 22-residue hydrophobic signal peptide and the first three amino acids of the acidic propiece; exon 2 contained the 18 additional acidic residues of the propiece plus a typical prohormone processing signal Lys-Arg and a 32-residue dermaseptin progenitor sequence. The dermaseptin genes Drg2 and Drg1g2 have conserved sequences at both untranslated ends and in the first and second coding exons. In contrast, Drg1g2 comprises a third coding exon for a short version of the acidic propiece and a second dermaseptin progenitor sequence. Structural conservation between the two genes suggests that Drg1g2 arose recently from an ancestral Drg2-like gene through amplification of part of the second coding exon and 3'-untranslated region. Analysis of the cDNAs coding precursors for several frog skin peptides of highly different structures and activities demonstrates that the signal peptides and part of the acidic propieces are encoded by conserved nucleotides encompassed by the first coding exon of the dermaseptin genes. The organization of the genes that belong to this family, with the signal peptide and the progenitor sequence on separate exons, permits strikingly different peptides to be directed into the secretory pathway. The recruitment of such a homologous 'secretory' exon by otherwise non-homologous genes may have been an early event in the evolution of amphibian.

  6. Conservation and Divergence in the Candida Species Biofilm Matrix Mannan-Glucan Complex Structure, Function, and Genetic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Eddie; Zarnowski, Robert; Sanchez, Hiram; Covelli, Antonio S; Westler, William M; Azadi, Parastoo; Nett, Jeniel; Mitchell, Aaron P; Andes, David R

    2018-04-03

    Candida biofilms resist the effects of available antifungal therapies. Prior studies with Candida albicans biofilms show that an extracellular matrix mannan-glucan complex (MGCx) contributes to antifungal sequestration, leading to drug resistance. Here we implement biochemical, pharmacological, and genetic approaches to explore a similar mechanism of resistance for the three most common clinically encountered non- albicans Candida species (NAC). Our findings reveal that each Candida species biofilm synthesizes a mannan-glucan complex and that the antifungal-protective function of this complex is conserved. Structural similarities extended primarily to the polysaccharide backbone (α-1,6-mannan and β-1,6-glucan). Surprisingly, biochemical analysis uncovered stark differences in the branching side chains of the MGCx among the species. Consistent with the structural analysis, similarities in the genetic control of MGCx production for each Candida species also appeared limited to the synthesis of the polysaccharide backbone. Each species appears to employ a unique subset of modification enzymes for MGCx synthesis, likely accounting for the observed side chain diversity. Our results argue for the conservation of matrix function among Candida spp. While biogenesis is preserved at the level of the mannan-glucan complex backbone, divergence emerges for construction of branching side chains. Thus, the MGCx backbone represents an ideal drug target for effective pan- Candida species biofilm therapy. IMPORTANCE Candida species, the most common fungal pathogens, frequently grow as a biofilm. These adherent communities tolerate extremely high concentrations of antifungal agents, due in large part, to a protective extracellular matrix. The present studies define the structural, functional, and genetic similarities and differences in the biofilm matrix from the four most common Candida species. Each species synthesizes an extracellular mannan-glucan complex (MGCx) which

  7. rRNA maturation in yeast cells depleted of large ribosomal subunit proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Pöll

    Full Text Available The structural constituents of the large eukaryotic ribosomal subunit are 3 ribosomal RNAs, namely the 25S, 5.8S and 5S rRNA and about 46 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins. They assemble and mature in a highly dynamic process that involves more than 150 proteins and 70 small RNAs. Ribosome biogenesis starts in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm and is completed after nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation of the subunits in the cytoplasm. In this work we created 26 yeast strains, each of which conditionally expresses one of the large ribosomal subunit (LSU proteins. In vivo depletion of the analysed LSU r-proteins was lethal and led to destabilisation and degradation of the LSU and/or its precursors. Detailed steady state and metabolic pulse labelling analyses of rRNA precursors in these mutant strains showed that LSU r-proteins can be grouped according to their requirement for efficient progression of different steps of large ribosomal subunit maturation. Comparative analyses of the observed phenotypes and the nature of r-protein-rRNA interactions as predicted by current atomic LSU structure models led us to discuss working hypotheses on i how individual r-proteins control the productive processing of the major 5' end of 5.8S rRNA precursors by exonucleases Rat1p and Xrn1p, and ii the nature of structural characteristics of nascent LSUs that are required for cytoplasmic accumulation of nascent subunits but are nonessential for most of the nuclear LSU pre-rRNA processing events.

  8. Simulating movement of tRNA through the ribosome during hybrid-state formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Paul C; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-09-28

    Biomolecular simulations provide a means for exploring the relationship between flexibility, energetics, structure, and function. With the availability of atomic models from X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM), and rapid increases in computing capacity, it is now possible to apply molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to large biomolecular machines, and systematically partition the factors that contribute to function. A large biomolecular complex for which atomic models are available is the ribosome. In the cell, the ribosome reads messenger RNA (mRNA) in order to synthesize proteins. During this essential process, the ribosome undergoes a wide range of conformational rearrangements. One of the most poorly understood transitions is translocation: the process by which transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules move between binding sites inside of the ribosome. The first step of translocation is the adoption of a "hybrid" configuration by the tRNAs, which is accompanied by large-scale rotations in the ribosomal subunits. To illuminate the relationship between these rearrangements, we apply MD simulations using a multi-basin structure-based (SMOG) model, together with targeted molecular dynamics protocols. From 120 simulated transitions, we demonstrate the viability of a particular route during P/E hybrid-state formation, where there is asynchronous movement along rotation and tRNA coordinates. These simulations not only suggest an ordering of events, but they highlight atomic interactions that may influence the kinetics of hybrid-state formation. From these simulations, we also identify steric features (H74 and surrounding residues) encountered during the hybrid transition, and observe that flexibility of the single-stranded 3'-CCA tail is essential for it to reach the endpoint. Together, these simulations provide a set of structural and energetic signatures that suggest strategies for modulating the physical-chemical properties of protein synthesis by the

  9. Phylogenetic analysis and protein structure modelling identifies distinct Ca(2+)/Cation antiporters and conservation of gene family structure within Arabidopsis and rice species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Jon K; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2016-12-01

    The Ca(2+)/Cation Antiporter (CaCA) superfamily is an ancient and widespread family of ion-coupled cation transporters found in nearly all kingdoms of life. In animals, K(+)-dependent and K(+)-indendent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers (NCKX and NCX) are important CaCA members. Recently it was proposed that all rice and Arabidopsis CaCA proteins should be classified as NCX proteins. Here we performed phylogenetic analysis of CaCA genes and protein structure homology modelling to further characterise members of this transporter superfamily. Phylogenetic analysis of rice and Arabidopsis CaCAs in comparison with selected CaCA members from non-plant species demonstrated that these genes form clearly distinct families, with the H(+)/Cation exchanger (CAX) and cation/Ca(2+) exchanger (CCX) families dominant in higher plants but the NCKX and NCX families absent. NCX-related Mg(2+)/H(+) exchanger (MHX) and CAX-related Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-like (NCL) proteins are instead present. Analysis of genomes of ten closely-related rice species and four Arabidopsis-related species found that CaCA gene family structures are highly conserved within related plants, apart from minor variation. Protein structures were modelled for OsCAX1a and OsMHX1. Despite exhibiting broad structural conservation, there are clear structural differences observed between the different CaCA types. Members of the CaCA superfamily form clearly distinct families with different phylogenetic, structural and functional characteristics, and therefore should not be simply classified as NCX proteins, which should remain as a separate gene family.

  10. The conserved structures of the 5' nontranslated region of Citrus tristeza virus are involved in replication and virion assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowda, Siddarame; Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Ayllon, Maria A.; Moreno, Pedro; Flores, Ricardo; Dawson, William O.

    2003-01-01

    The genomic RNA of different isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) reveals an unusual pattern of sequence diversity: the 3' halves are highly conserved (homology >90%), while the 5' halves show much more dissimilarity, with the 5' nontranslated region (NTR) containing the highest diversity (homology as low as 42%). Yet, positive-sense sequences of the 5' NTR were predicted to fold into nearly identical structures consisting of two stem-loops (SL1 and SL2) separated by a short spacer region. The predicted most stable secondary structures of the negative-sense sequences were more variable. We introduced mutations into the 5' NTR of a CTV replicon to alter the sequence and/or the predicted secondary structures with or without additional compensatory changes designed to restore predicted secondary structures, and examined their effect on replication in transfected protoplasts. The results suggested that the predicted secondary structures of the 5' NTR were more important for replication than the primary structure. Most mutations that were predicted to disrupt the secondary structures fail to replicate, while compensatory mutations were allowed replication to resume. The 5' NTR mutations that were tolerated by the CTV replicon were examined in the full-length virus for effects on replication and production of the multiple subgenomic RNAs. Additionally, the ability of these mutants to produce virions was monitored by electron microscopy and by passaging the progeny nucleocapsids to another batch of protoplasts. Some of the mutants with compensatory sequence alterations predicted to rebuild similar secondary structures allowed replication at near wild-type levels but failed to passage, suggesting that the 5' NTR contains sequences required for both replication and virion assembly

  11. Discovery of endangered annual killifish Austrolebias cheradophilus (Aplocheiloidei: Rivulidae in Brazil, with comments on habitat, population structure and conservation status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Esteban Krause Lanés

    Full Text Available Austrolebias genus comprises about 40 small annual killifishes endemic to South America and their highest diversity occurs in southern Brazil and Uruguay, especially in drainages of Patos-Mirim system. Austrolebiasspecies are severely threatened with extinction because their life cycle and restricted ranges. Low dispersal ability and the extensive loss and fragmentation of freshwater wetlands contribute to this threat. Accurate information on the geographic distribution and ecology of the species, vital to plan conservation and management strategies, are scarce. In order to provide basic knowledge for annual fish conservation this paper reports the presence of Austrolebias cheradophilus and present data about its population structure (CPUA, size, sex ratio, length-weight relationships and condition factor and conservation status in southern Brazil. The estimated CPUA of populations was 0.86 fish/m2. Standard length (SL of males ranged between 32.14 and 49.17 mm and for females between 25.11 and 41.6 mm. There were no differences in SL between the sexes (t-test = - 1.678; P = 0.105, and Chi-squared test demonstrated marginal differences in proportions of sexes (2.25:1; χ2 = 3.846; P= 0.07. Allometric coefficient of the LWR was slightly hyperallometric (b = 3.08 and K of the specimens ranged from 1.84 to 2.42 (mean ± S.E. = 2.12 ± 0.04. Populations have low density and their biotopes are under critical threat, mainly due to suppression by agriculture, pastures for livestock and increase housing. The species is considered "Critically Endangered" in Brazil, furthermore is strongly recommended its inclusion on lists of endangered fauna and ensures the protection of their remaining habitats.

  12. Predators, Prey and Habitat Structure: Can Key Conservation Areas and Early Signs of Population Collapse Be Detected in Neotropical Forests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit de Thoisy

    Full Text Available Tropical forests with a low human population and absence of large-scale deforestation provide unique opportunities to study successful conservation strategies, which should be based on adequate monitoring tools. This study explored the conservation status of a large predator, the jaguar, considered an indicator of the maintenance of how well ecological processes are maintained. We implemented an original integrative approach, exploring successive ecosystem status proxies, from habitats and responses to threats of predators and their prey, to canopy structure and forest biomass. Niche modeling allowed identification of more suitable habitats, significantly related to canopy height and forest biomass. Capture/recapture methods showed that jaguar density was higher in habitats identified as more suitable by the niche model. Surveys of ungulates, large rodents and birds also showed higher density where jaguars were more abundant. Although jaguar density does not allow early detection of overall vertebrate community collapse, a decrease in the abundance of large terrestrial birds was noted as good first evidence of disturbance. The most promising tool comes from easily acquired LiDAR data and radar images: a decrease in canopy roughness was closely associated with the disturbance of forests and associated decreasing vertebrate biomass. This mixed approach, focusing on an apex predator, ecological modeling and remote-sensing information, not only helps detect early population declines in large mammals, but is also useful to discuss the relevance of large predators as indicators and the efficiency of conservation measures. It can also be easily extrapolated and adapted in a timely manner, since important open-source data are increasingly available and relevant for large-scale and real-time monitoring of biodiversity.

  13. The Ribosomal Protein uL22 Modulates the Shape of the Protein Exit Tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Davidovich, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Erythromycin is a clinically useful antibiotic that binds to an rRNA pocket in the ribosomal exit tunnel. Commonly, resistance to erythromycin is acquired by alterations of rRNA nucleotides that interact with the drug. Mutations in the β hairpin of ribosomal protein uL22, which is rather distal...... of the β hairpin of the mutated uL22 toward the interior of the exit tunnel, triggering a cascade of structural alterations of rRNA nucleotides that propagate to the erythromycin binding pocket. Our findings support recent studies showing that the interactions between uL22 and specific sequences within...

  14. Binding site of ribosomal proteins on prokaryotic 5S ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1982-01-01

    The binding sites of ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 on 5S RNA from Escherichia coli were probed with ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom endonuclease. The results for the protein-RNA complexes, which were compared with those for the free RNA [Douthwaite, S...... stearothermophilus 5S RNA. Several protein-induced changes in the RNA structures were identified; some are possibly allosteric in nature. The two prokaryotic 5S RNAs were also incubated with total 50S subunit proteins from E. coli and B. stearothermophilus ribosomes. Homologous and heterologous reconstitution....... stearothermophilus 5S RNA, which may have been due to a third ribosomal protein L5....

  15. Resistance to Linezolid Caused by Modifications at Its Binding Site on the Ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S.; Vester, Birte

    2012-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic in clinical use for the treatment of serious infections of resistant Gram-positive bacteria. It inhibits protein synthesis by binding to the peptidyl transferase center on the ribosome. Almost all known resistance mechanisms involve small alterations...... to the linezolid binding site, so this review will therefore focus on the various changes that can adversely affect drug binding and confer resistance. High-resolution structures of linezolid bound to the 50S ribosomal subunit show that it binds in a deep cleft that is surrounded by 23S rRNA nucleotides. Mutation...... of 23S rRNA has for some time been established as a linezolid resistance mechanism. Although ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 are located further away from the bound drug, mutations in specific regions of these proteins are increasingly being associated with linezolid resistance. However, very little...

  16. Conserved structural chemistry for incision activity in structurally non-homologous apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 and endonuclease IV DNA repair enzymes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Shin, David S.; Mol, Clifford D.; Izum, Tadahide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Mantha, Anil K.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Hosfield, David J.; Maiti, Buddhadev; Pique, Mike E.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cunningham, Richard P.; Mitra, Sankar; Tainer, John A.

    2013-03-22

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA form spontaneously and as DNA base excision repair intermediates are the most common toxic and mutagenic in vivo DNA lesion. For repair, AP sites must be processed by 5' AP endonucleases in initial stages of base repair. Human APE1 and bacterial Nfo represent the two conserved 5' AP endonuclease families in the biosphere; they both recognize AP sites and incise the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the lesion, yet they lack similar structures and metal ion requirements. Here, we determined and analyzed crystal structures of a 2.4 ? resolution APE1-DNA product complex with Mg(2+) and a 0.92 Nfo with three metal ions. Structural and biochemical comparisons of these two evolutionarily distinct enzymes characterize key APE1 catalytic residues that are potentially functionally similar to Nfo active site components, as further tested and supported by computational analyses. We observe a magnesium-water cluster in the APE1 active site, with only Glu-96 forming the direct protein coordination to the Mg(2+). Despite differences in structure and metal requirements of APE1 and Nfo, comparison of their active site structures surprisingly reveals strong geometric conservation of the catalytic reaction, with APE1 catalytic side chains positioned analogously to Nfo metal positions, suggesting surprising functional equivalence between Nfo metal ions and APE1 residues. The finding that APE1 residues are positioned to substitute for Nfo metal ions is supported by the impact of mutations on activity. Collectively, the results illuminate the activities of residues, metal ions, and active site features for abasic site endonucleases.

  17. The application of mass and energy conservation laws in physiologically structured population models of heterotrophic organisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, S.A.L.M.; Kooi, B.W.; Hallam, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    Rules for energy uptake, and subsequent utilization, form the basis of population dynamics and, therefore, explain the dynamics of the ecosystem structure in terms of changes in standing crops and size distributions of individuals. Mass fluxes are concomitant with energy flows and delineate

  18. Marsh Fritillary (Euphydryasaurinia) in the Czech Republic: monitoring, metapopulation structure, and conservation of an endangered butterfly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hůla, V.; Konvička, Martin; Pavlíčko, A.; Fric, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2004), s. 231-241 ISSN 0785-8760 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB6007306; GA ČR GD206/03/H034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : monitoring * metapopulation structure Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.298, year: 2004

  19. Structure-based functional annotation of putative conserved proteins having lyase activity from Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbaaz, Mohd; Ahmad, Faizan; Imtaiyaz Hassan, Md

    2015-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a small pleomorphic Gram-negative bacteria which causes several chronic diseases, including bacteremia, meningitis, cellulitis, epiglottitis, septic arthritis, pneumonia, and empyema. Here we extensively analyzed the sequenced genome of H. influenzae strain Rd KW20 using protein family databases, protein structure prediction, pathways and genome context methods to assign a precise function to proteins whose functions are unknown. These proteins are termed as hypothetical proteins (HPs), for which no experimental information is available. Function prediction of these proteins would surely be supportive to precisely understand the biochemical pathways and mechanism of pathogenesis of Haemophilus influenzae. During the extensive analysis of H. influenzae genome, we found the presence of eight HPs showing lyase activity. Subsequently, we modeled and analyzed three-dimensional structure of all these HPs to determine their functions more precisely. We found these HPs possess cystathionine-β-synthase, cyclase, carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase, pseudouridine synthase A and C, D-tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase and aminodeoxychorismate lyase-like features, indicating their corresponding functions in the H. influenzae. Lyases are actively involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of various hormones, metabolic pathways, signal transduction, and DNA repair. Lyases are also considered as a key player for various biological processes. These enzymes are critically essential for the survival and pathogenesis of H. influenzae and, therefore, these enzymes may be considered as a potential target for structure-based rational drug design. Our structure-function relationship analysis will be useful to search and design potential lead molecules based on the structure of these lyases, for drug design and discovery.

  20. Landscape structure in the northern coast of Paraná state, a hotspot for the brazilian Atlantic Forest conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Emed Kauano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The "Serra do Mar" region comprises the largest remnant of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. The coast of the Paraná State is part of the core area of the "Serra do Mar" corridor and where actions for biodiversity conservation must be planned. In this study we aimed at characterizing the landscape structure in the APA-Guaraqueçaba, the largest protected area in this region, in order to assist environmental policies of this region. Based on a supervised classification of a mosaic of LANDSAT-5-TM satellite images (from March 2009, we developed a map (1:75,000 scale with seven classes of land use and land cover and analyzed the relative quantities of forests and modified areas in slopes and lowlands. The APA-Guaraqueçaba is comprised mainly by the Dense Ombrophilous Forest (68.6% of total area and secondary forests (9.1%, indicating a forested landscape matrix; anthropogenic and bare soil areas (0.8% and the Pasture/Grasslands class (4.2% were less representative. Slopes were less fragmented and more preserved (96.3% of Dense Ombrophilous Forest and secondary forest than lowlands (71.3%, suggesting that restoration initiatives in the lowlands must be stimulated in this region. We concluded that most of the region sustains well-conserved ecosystems, highlighting the importance of Paraná northern coast for the biodiversity maintenance of the Atlantic Forest.

  1. Has energy conservation been an effective policy for Thailand? An input–output structural decomposition analysis from 1995 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supasa, Tharinya; Hsiau, Shu-San; Lin, Shih-Mo; Wongsapai, Wongkot; Wu, Jiunn-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Thailand has depended heavily on imported fossil fuels since the 1990s, which hindered the nation's economic development because it created uncertainty in the nation's fuel supply. An energy conservation policy was implemented in 1995 to require industries to reduce their energy intensity (EI) and consumption immediately. This study investigates the effectiveness of the policy between 1995 and 2010 using the hybrid input–output approach. Surprisingly, EI improvement was observed in only a few sectors, such as transportation, non-metallic, paper, and textile. An embodied energy decomposition analysis revealed that while households were the largest energy consumer in 1995, energy consumption in exports exceeded that of households in 2000, 2005 and 2010. In addition, structural decomposition analysis revealed the final demand effect was the strongest factor in determining the efficacy of energy conservation, whereas the energy efficiency effect was not an effective factor as expected for decreasing energy consumption. Policy barriers and conflicting economic plans were factors that affected the outcome of these energy policies. - Highlights: • The hybrid IO technique was employed to analyse energy intensity of Thailand. • No clear evident of EI improvement in most of industries, thus fail to achieve the policy target. • Household and export sector had played a crucial role in energy consumption increase. • IO SDA method found that energy efficiency was not an offset factor for consumption increase. • Policy barriers were conflicting economic plans, fuel subsidy policies and inefficient process.

  2. When Heterotrimeric G Proteins Are Not Activated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Structural Insights and Evolutionary Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiacomo, Vincent; Marivin, Arthur; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2018-01-23

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are signal-transducing switches conserved across eukaryotes. In humans, they work as critical mediators of intercellular communication in the context of virtually any physiological process. While G protein regulation by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is well-established and has received much attention, it has become recently evident that heterotrimeric G proteins can also be activated by cytoplasmic proteins. However, this alternative mechanism of G protein regulation remains far less studied than GPCR-mediated signaling. This Viewpoint focuses on recent advances in the characterization of a group of nonreceptor proteins that contain a sequence dubbed the "Gα-binding and -activating (GBA) motif". So far, four proteins present in mammals [GIV (also known as Girdin), DAPLE, CALNUC, and NUCB2] and one protein in Caenorhabditis elegans (GBAS-1) have been described as possessing a functional GBA motif. The GBA motif confers guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity on Gαi subunits in vitro and activates G protein signaling in cells. The importance of this mechanism of signal transduction is highlighted by the fact that its dysregulation underlies human diseases, such as cancer, which has made the proteins attractive new candidates for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss recent discoveries on the structural basis of GBA-mediated activation of G proteins and its evolutionary conservation and compare them with the better-studied mechanism mediated by GPCRs.

  3. Evolutionary conserved mechanisms pervade structure and transcriptional modulation of allograft inflammatory factor-1 from sea anemone Anemonia viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Angela; Ragusa, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Salvatore; Bennici, Carmelo; Colombo, Paolo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Nicosia, Aldo

    2017-08-01

    Gene family encoding allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is well conserved among organisms; however, there is limited knowledge in lower organisms. In this study, the first AIF-1 homologue from cnidarians was identified and characterised in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis. The full-length cDNA of AvAIF-1 was of 913 bp with a 5' -untranslated region (UTR) of 148 bp, a 3'-UTR of 315 and an open reading frame (ORF) of 450 bp encoding a polypeptide with149 amino acid residues and predicted molecular weight of about 17 kDa. The predicted protein possesses evolutionary conserved EF hand Ca 2+ binding motifs, post-transcriptional modification sites and a 3D structure which can be superimposed with human members of AIF-1 family. The AvAIF-1 transcript was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues of unchallenged sea anemone, suggesting that AvAIF-1 could serve as a general protective factor under normal physiological conditions. Moreover, we profiled the transcriptional activation of AvAIF-1 after challenges with different abiotic/biotic stresses showing induction by warming conditions, heavy metals exposure and immune stimulation. Thus, mechanisms associated to inflammation and immune challenges up-regulated AvAIF-1 mRNA levels. Our results suggest its involvement in the inflammatory processes and immune response of A. viridis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Virtual Ribosome - a comprehensive DNA translation tool with support for integration of sequence feature annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    of alternative start codons. ( ii) Integration of sequences feature annotation - in particular, native support for working with files containing intron/ exon structure annotation. The software is available for both download and online use at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/VirtualRibosome/....

  5. Ribosome-induced changes in elongation factor Tu conformation control GTP hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Elizabeth; Sengupta, Jayati; Trabuco, Leonard G.

    2009-01-01

    In translation, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) molecules deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs to the mRNA-programmed ribosome. The GTPase activity of EF-Tu is triggered by ribosome-induced conformational changes of the factor that play a pivotal role in the selection of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. We present a 6.......7-A cryo-electron microscopy map of the aminoacyl-tRNA x EF-Tu x GDP x kirromycin-bound Escherichia coli ribosome, together with an atomic model of the complex obtained through molecular dynamics flexible fitting. The model reveals the conformational changes in the conserved GTPase switch regions...... of EF-Tu that trigger hydrolysis of GTP, along with key interactions, including those between the sarcin-ricin loop and the P loop of EF-Tu, and between the effector loop of EF-Tu and a conserved region of the 16S rRNA. Our data suggest that GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu is controlled through a hydrophobic...

  6. Population genetic structure of savannah elephants in Kenya: conservation and management implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okello, John B A; Masembe, Charles; Rasmussen, Henrik B

    2008-01-01

    We investigated population genetic structure and regional differentiation among African savannah elephants in Kenya using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. We observed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide diversity of 1.68% and microsatellite variation in terms of average number of allele...... through male-mediated gene flow. Our results depicting 3 broad regional mtDNA groups and the observed population genetic differentiation as well as connectivity patterns should be incorporated in the planning of future management activities such as translocations....

  7. Unique C. elegans telomeric overhang structures reveal the evolutionarily conserved properties of telomeric DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Školáková, Petra; Foldynová-Trantírková, Silvie; Bednářová, Klára; Fiala, R.; Vorlíčková, Michaela; Trantírek, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 9 (2015), s. 4733-4745 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-28310S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/12/0466 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : NUCLEASE HYPERSENSITIVE ELEMENT * G-QUADRUPLEX STRUCTURES * I-MOTIF Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.202, year: 2015

  8. An Emerging Tick-Borne Disease of Humans Is Caused by a Subset of Strains with Conserved Genome Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Anthony F.; Al-Khedery, Basima; Stuen, Snorre; Granquist, Erik G.; Felsheim, Roderick F.; Munderloh, Ulrike G.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of tick-borne diseases is increasing worldwide. One such emerging disease is human anaplasmosis. The causative organism, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, is known to infect multiple animal species and cause human fatalities in the U.S., Europe and Asia. Although long known to infect ruminants, it is unclear why there are increasing numbers of human infections. We analyzed the genome sequences of strains infecting humans, animals and ticks from diverse geographic locations. Despite extensive variability amongst these strains, those infecting humans had conserved genome structure including the pfam01617 superfamily that encodes the major, neutralization-sensitive, surface antigen. These data provide potential targets to identify human-infective strains and have significance for understanding the selective pressures that lead to emergence of disease in new species. PMID:25437207

  9. Kinetic pathway of 40S ribosomal subunit recruitment to hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Gabriele; Petrov, Alexey N; Marceau, Caleb D; Popov, Lauren M; Chen, Jin; O'Leary, Seán E; Wang, Richard; Carette, Jan E; Sarnow, Peter; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-01-13

    Translation initiation can occur by multiple pathways. To delineate these pathways by single-molecule methods, fluorescently labeled ribosomal subunits are required. Here, we labeled human 40S ribosomal subunits with a fluorescent SNAP-tag at ribosomal protein eS25 (RPS25). The resulting ribosomal subunits could be specifically labeled in living cells and in vitro. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between RPS25 and domain II of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES), we measured the rates of 40S subunit arrival to the HCV IRES. Our data support a single-step model of HCV IRES recruitment to 40S subunits, irreversible on the initiation time scale. We furthermore demonstrated that after binding, the 40S:HCV IRES complex is conformationally dynamic, undergoing slow large-scale rearrangements. Addition of translation extracts suppresses these fluctuations, funneling the complex into a single conformation on the 80S assembly pathway. These findings show that 40S:HCV IRES complex formation is accompanied by dynamic conformational rearrangements that may be modulated by initiation factors.

  10. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-10-14

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3' domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3'-domain is unanchored and the 5'-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells.

  11. Primary structure and promoter analysis of leghemoglobin genes of the stem-nodulated tropical legume Sesbania rostrata: conserved coding sequences, cis-elements and trans-acting factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metz, B A; Welters, P; Hoffmann, H J

    1988-01-01

    The primary structure of a leghemoglobin (lb) gene from the stem-nodulated, tropical legume Sesbania rostrata and two lb gene promoter regions was analysed. The S. rostrata lb gene structure and Lb amino acid composition were found to be highly conserved with previously described lb genes and Lb ...

  12. Interaction of Pleuromutilin Derivatives with the Ribosomal Peptidyl Transferase Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Katherine S.; Hansen, Lykke H.; Jakobsen, Lene; Vester, Birte

    2006-01-01

    Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that is used in veterinary medicine. The recently published crystal structure of a tiamulin-50S ribosomal subunit complex provides detailed information about how this drug targets the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. To promote rational design of pleuromutilin-based drugs, the binding of the antibiotic pleuromutilin and three semisynthetic derivatives with different side chain extensions has been investigated using chemical footprinting. The nucleotides A2058, A2059, G2505, and U2506 are affected in all of the footprints, suggesting that the drugs are similarly anchored in the binding pocket by the common tricyclic mutilin core. However, varying effects are observed at U2584 and U2585, indicating that the side chain extensions adopt distinct conformations within the cavity and thereby affect the rRNA conformation differently. An Escherichia coli L3 mutant strain is resistant to tiamulin and pleuromutilin, but not valnemulin, implying that valnemulin is better able to withstand an altered rRNA binding surface around the mutilin core. This is likely due to additional interactions made between the valnemulin side chain extension and the rRNA binding site. The data suggest that pleuromutilin drugs with enhanced antimicrobial activity may be obtained by maximizing the number of interactions between the side chain moiety and the peptidyl transferase cavity. PMID:16569865

  13. Bactobolin resistance is conferred by mutations in the L2 ribosomal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Josephine R; Truong, Thao T; Silva, Patricia M; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Carr, Gavin; Radey, Matthew; Jacobs, Michael A; Sims, Elizabeth H; Clardy, Jon; Greenberg, E Peter

    2012-12-18

    Burkholderia thailandensis produces a family of polyketide-peptide molecules called bactobolins, some of which are potent antibiotics. We found that growth of B. thailandensis at 30°C versus that at 37°C resulted in increased production of bactobolins. We purified the three most abundant bactobolins and determined their activities against a battery of bacteria and mouse fibroblasts. Two of the three compounds showed strong activities against both bacteria and fibroblasts. The third analog was much less potent in both assays. These results suggested that the target of bactobolins might be conserved across bacteria and mammalian cells. To learn about the mechanism of bactobolin activity, we isolated four spontaneous bactobolin-resistant Bacillus subtilis mutants. We used genomic sequencing technology to show that each of the four resistant variants had mutations in rplB, which codes for the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein. Ectopic expression of a mutant rplB gene in wild-type B. subtilis conferred bactobolin resistance. Finally, the L2 mutations did not confer resistance to other antibiotics known to interfere with ribosome function. Our data indicate that bactobolins target the L2 protein or a nearby site and that this is not the target of other antibiotics. We presume that the mammalian target of bactobolins involves the eukaryotic homolog of L2 (L8e). Currently available antibiotics target surprisingly few cellular functions, and there is a need to identify novel antibiotic targets. We have been interested in the Burkholderia thailandensis bactobolins, and we sought to learn about the target of bactobolin activity by mapping spontaneous resistance mutations in the bactobolin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis. Our results indicate that the bactobolin target is the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein or a region of the ribosome affected by L2. Bactobolin-resistant mutants are not resistant to other known ribosome inhibitors. Our evidence indicates that bactobolins

  14. Ribosome Shunting, Polycistronic Translation, and Evasion of Antiviral Defenses in Plant Pararetroviruses and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail M. Pooggin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have compact genomes and usually translate more than one protein from polycistronic RNAs using leaky scanning, frameshifting, stop codon suppression or reinitiation mechanisms. Viral (pre-genomic RNAs often contain long 5′-leader sequences with short upstream open reading frames (uORFs and secondary structure elements, which control both translation initiation and replication. In plants, viral RNA and DNA are targeted by RNA interference (RNAi generating small RNAs that silence viral gene expression, while viral proteins are recognized by innate immunity and autophagy that restrict viral infection. In this review we focus on plant pararetroviruses of the family Caulimoviridae and describe the mechanisms of uORF- and secondary structure-driven ribosome shunting, leaky scanning and reinitiation after translation of short and long uORFs. We discuss conservation of these mechanisms in different genera of Caulimoviridae, including host genome-integrated endogenous viral elements, as well as in other viral families, and highlight a multipurpose use of the highly-structured leader sequence of plant pararetroviruses in regulation of translation, splicing, packaging, and reverse transcription of pregenomic RNA (pgRNA, and in evasion of RNAi. Furthermore, we illustrate how targeting of several host factors by a pararetroviral effector protein can lead to transactivation of viral polycistronic translation and concomitant suppression of antiviral defenses. Thus, activation of the plant protein kinase target of rapamycin (TOR by the Cauliflower mosaic virus transactivator/viroplasmin (TAV promotes reinitiation of translation after long ORFs on viral pgRNA and blocks antiviral autophagy and innate immunity responses, while interaction of TAV with the plant RNAi machinery interferes with antiviral silencing.

  15. Multidimensional Riemann problem with self-similar internal structure. Part II - Application to hyperbolic conservation laws on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Multidimensional Riemann solvers that have internal sub-structure in the strongly-interacting state have been formulated recently (D.S. Balsara (2012, 2014) [5,16]). Any multidimensional Riemann solver operates at the grid vertices and takes as its input all the states from its surrounding elements. It yields as its output an approximation of the strongly interacting state, as well as the numerical fluxes. The multidimensional Riemann problem produces a self-similar strongly-interacting state which is the result of several one-dimensional Riemann problems interacting with each other. To compute this strongly interacting state and its higher order moments we propose the use of a Galerkin-type formulation to compute the strongly interacting state and its higher order moments in terms of similarity variables. The use of substructure in the Riemann problem reduces numerical dissipation and, therefore, allows a better preservation of flow structures, like contact and shear waves. In this second part of a series of papers we describe how this technique is extended to unstructured triangular meshes. All necessary details for a practical computer code implementation are discussed. In particular, we explicitly present all the issues related to computational geometry. Because these Riemann solvers are Multidimensional and have Self-similar strongly-Interacting states that are obtained by Consistency with the conservation law, we call them MuSIC Riemann solvers. (A video introduction to multidimensional Riemann solvers is available on http://www.elsevier.com/xml/linking-roles/text/html". The MuSIC framework is sufficiently general to handle general nonlinear systems of hyperbolic conservation laws in multiple space dimensions. It can also accommodate all self-similar one-dimensional Riemann solvers and subsequently produces a multidimensional version of the same. In this paper we focus on unstructured triangular meshes. As examples of different systems of conservation laws we

  16. Biophysical investigation of type A PutAs reveals a conserved core oligomeric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korasick, David A. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Singh, Harkewal [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Pemberton, Travis A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Luo, Min [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Dhatwalia, Richa [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Tanner, John J. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA

    2017-08-01

    Many enzymes form homooligomers, yet the functional significance of self-association is seldom obvious. Herein, we examine the connection between oligomerization and catalytic function for proline utilization A (PutA) enzymes. PutAs are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze both reactions of proline catabolism. Type A PutAs are the smallest members of the family, possessing a minimal domain architecture consisting of N-terminal proline dehydrogenase and C-terminal l-glutamate-γ-semialdehyde dehydrogenase modules. Type A PutAs form domain-swapped dimers, and in one case (Bradyrhizobium japonicum PutA), two of the dimers assemble into a ring-shaped tetramer. Whereas the dimer has a clear role in substrate channeling, the functional significance of the tetramer is unknown. To address this question, we performed structural studies of four-type A PutAs from two clades of the PutA tree. The crystal structure of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus PutA covalently inactivated by N-propargylglycine revealed a fold and substrate-channeling tunnel similar to other PutAs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and analytical ultracentrifugation indicated that Bdellovibrio PutA is dimeric in solution, in contrast to the prediction from crystal packing of a stable tetrameric assembly. SAXS studies of two other type A PutAs from separate clades also suggested that the dimer predominates in solution. To assess whether the tetramer of B. japonicum PutA is necessary for catalytic function, a hot spot disruption mutant that cleanly produces dimeric protein was generated. The dimeric variant exhibited kinetic parameters similar to the wild-type enzyme. These results implicate the domain-swapped dimer as the core structural and functional unit of type A PutAs.

  17. Ising model with conserved magnetization on the human connectome: Implications on the relation structure-function in wakefulness and anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramaglia, S.; Pellicoro, M.; Angelini, L.; Amico, E.; Aerts, H.; Cortés, J. M.; Laureys, S.; Marinazzo, D.

    2017-04-01

    Dynamical models implemented on the large scale architecture of the human brain may shed light on how a function arises from the underlying structure. This is the case notably for simple abstract models, such as the Ising model. We compare the spin correlations of the Ising model and the empirical functional brain correlations, both at the single link level and at the modular level, and show that their match increases at the modular level in anesthesia, in line with recent results and theories. Moreover, we show that at the peak of the specific heat (the critical state), the spin correlations are minimally shaped by the underlying structural network, explaining how the best match between the structure and function is obtained at the onset of criticality, as previously observed. These findings confirm that brain dynamics under anesthesia shows a departure from criticality and could open the way to novel perspectives when the conserved magnetization is interpreted in terms of a homeostatic principle imposed to neural activity.

  18. Structure of Human cGAS Reveals a Conserved Family of Second-Messenger Enzymes in Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Kranzusch

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune recognition of foreign nucleic acids induces protective interferon responses. Detection of cytosolic DNA triggers downstream immune signaling through activation of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS. We report here the crystal structure of human cGAS, revealing an unanticipated zinc-ribbon DNA-binding domain appended to a core enzymatic nucleotidyltransferase scaffold. The catalytic core of cGAS is structurally homologous to the RNA-sensing enzyme, 2′-5′ oligo-adenylate synthase (OAS, and divergent C-terminal domains account for specific ligand-activation requirements of each enzyme. We show that the cGAS zinc ribbon is essential for STING-dependent induction of the interferon response and that conserved amino acids displayed within the intervening loops are required for efficient cytosolic DNA recognition. These results demonstrate that cGAS and OAS define a family of innate immunity sensors and that structural divergence from a core nucleotidyltransferase enables second-messenger responses to distinct foreign nucleic acids.

  19. Ribosomal protein NtRPL17 interacts with kinesin-12 family protein NtKRP and functions in the regulation of embryo/seed size and radicle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shujuan; Wu, Jingjing; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Xiaorong; Li, Fen; Wang, Zhaodan; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2017-11-28

    We previously reported that a novel motor protein belonging to the kinesin-12 family, NtKRP, displays critical roles in regulating embryo and seed size establishment. However, it remains unknown exactly how NtKRP contributes to this developmental process. Here, we report that a 60S ribosomal protein NtRPL17 directly interacts with NtKRP. The phenotypes of NtRPL17 RNAi lines show notable embryo and seed size reduction. Structural observations of the NtRPL17-silenced embryos/seeds reveal that the embryo size reduction is due to a decrease in cell number. In these embryos, cell division cycle progression is delayed at the G2/M transition. These phenotypes are similar to that in NtKRP-silenced embryos/seeds, indicating that NtKRP and NtRPL17 function as partners in the same regulatory pathway during seed development and specifically regulate cell cycle progression to control embryo/seed size. This work reveals that NtRPL17, as a widely distributed ribosomal protein, plays a critical role in seed development and provides a new clue in the regulation of seed size. Confirmation of the interaction between NtKRP and NtRPL17 and their co-function in the control of the cell cycle also suggests that the mechanism might be conserved in both plants and animals. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Critical 23S rRNA interactions for macrolide-dependent ribosome stalling on the ErmCL nascent peptide chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Miriam; Willi, Jessica; Pradère, Ugo; Hall, Jonathan; Polacek, Norbert

    2017-06-20

    The nascent peptide exit tunnel has recently been identified as a functional region of ribosomes contributing to translation regulation and co-translational protein folding. Inducible expression of the erm resistance genes depends on ribosome stalling at specific codons of an upstream open reading frame in the presence of an exit tunnel-bound macrolide antibiotic. The molecular basis for this translation arrest is still not fully understood. Here, we used a nucleotide analog interference approach to unravel important functional groups on 23S rRNA residues in the ribosomal exit tunnel for ribosome stalling on the ErmC leader peptide. By replacing single nucleobase functional groups or even single atoms we were able to demonstrate the importance of A2062, A2503 and U2586 for drug-dependent ribosome stalling. Our data show that the universally conserved A2062 and A2503 are capable of forming a non-Watson-Crick base pair that is critical for sensing and transmitting the stalling signal from the exit tunnel back to the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The nucleobases of A2062, A2503 as well as U2586 do not contribute significantly to the overall mechanism of protein biosynthesis, yet their elaborate role for co-translational monitoring of nascent peptide chains inside the exit tunnel can explain their evolutionary conservation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Population genetic structure and conservation genetics of threatened Okaloosa darters (Etheostoma okaloosae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, James D.; Jelks, Howard L.; Tate, Bill; Johnson, Aria R.; Jordan, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Imperiled Okaloosa darters (Etheostoma okaloosae) are small, benthic fish limited to six streams that flow into three bayous of Choctawhatchee Bay in northwest Florida, USA. We analyzed the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and 10 nuclear microsatellite loci for 255 and 273 Okaloosa darters, respectively. Bayesian clustering analyses and AMOVA reflect congruent population genetic structure in both mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA. This structure reveals historical isolation of Okaloosa darter streams nested within bayous. Most of the six streams appear to have exchanged migrants though they remain genetically distinct. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently reclassified Okaloosa darters from endangered to threatened status. Our genetic data support the reclassification of Okaloosa darter Evolutionary Significant Units (ESUs) in the larger Tom's, Turkey, and Rocky creeks from endangered to threatened status. However, the three smaller drainages (Mill, Swift, and Turkey Bolton creeks) remain at risk due to their small population sizes and anthropogenic pressures on remaining habitat. Natural resource managers now have the evolutionary information to guide recovery actions within and among drainages throughout the range of the Okaloosa darter.

  2. Genetic structure and conservation of Mountain Lions in the South-Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila S. Castilho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest, one of the most endangered ecosystems worldwide, is also among the most important hotspots as regards biodiversity. Through intensive logging, the initial area has been reduced to around 12% of its original size. In this study we investigated the genetic variability and structure of the mountain lion, Puma concolor. Using 18 microsatellite loci we analyzed evidence of allele dropout, null alleles and stuttering, calculated the number of allele/locus, PIC, observed and expected heterozygosity, linkage disequilibrium, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, F IS, effective population size and genetic structure (MICROCHECKER, CERVUS, GENEPOP, FSTAT, ARLEQUIN, ONESAMP, LDNe, PCAGEN, GENECLASS software,we also determine whether there was evidence of a bottleneck (HYBRIDLAB, BOTTLENECK software that might influence the future viability of the population in south Brazil. 106 alleles were identified, with the number of alleles/locus ranging from 2 to 11. Mean observed heterozygosity, mean number of alleles and polymorphism information content were 0.609, 5.89, and 0.6255, respectively. This population presented evidence of a recent bottleneck and loss of genetic variation. Persistent regional poaching constitutes an increasing in the extinction risk.

  3. Core genome conservation of Staphylococcus haemolyticus limits sequence based population structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline; Klingenberg, Claus; Hanssen, Anne-Merethe; Fredheim, Elizabeth Aarag; Francois, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Flægstad, Trond; Sollid, Johanna Ericson

    2012-06-01

    The notoriously multi-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus is an emerging pathogen causing serious infections in immunocompromised patients. Defining the population structure is important to detect outbreaks and spread of antimicrobial resistant clones. Currently, the standard typing technique is pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this study we describe novel molecular typing schemes for S. haemolyticus using multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and multi locus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis. Seven housekeeping genes (MLST) and five VNTR loci (MLVF) were selected for the novel typing schemes. A panel of 45 human and veterinary S. haemolyticus isolates was investigated. The collection had diverse PFGE patterns (38 PFGE types) and was sampled over a 20 year-period from eight countries. MLST resolved 17 sequence types (Simpsons index of diversity [SID]=0.877) and MLVF resolved 14 repeat types (SID=0.831). We found a low sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the isolates in three (MLST) and one (MLVF) clonal complexes, respectively. Taken together, neither the MLST nor the MLVF scheme was suitable to resolve the population structure of this S. haemolyticus collection. Future MLVF and MLST schemes will benefit from addition of more variable core genome sequences identified by comparing different fully sequenced S. haemolyticus genomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Conservation of RNA sequence and cross-linking ability in ribosomes from a higher eukaryote: photochemical cross-linking of the anticodon of P site bound tRNA to the penultimate cytidine of the UACACACG sequence in Artemia salina 18S rRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesiolka, J.; Nurse, K.; Klein, J.; Ofengand, J.

    1985-01-01

    The complex of Artemia salina ribosomes and Escherichia coli acetylvalyl-tRNA could be cross-linked by irradiation with near-UV light. Cross-linking required the presence of the codon GUU, GUA being ineffective. The acetylvalyl group could be released from the cross-linked tRNA by treatment with puromycin, demonstrating that cross-linking had occurred at the P site. This was true both for pGUU- and also for poly(U2,G)-dependent cross-linking. All of the cross-linking was to the 18S rRNA of the small ribosomal subunit. Photolysis of the cross-link at 254 nm occurred with the same kinetics as that for the known cyclobutane dimer between this tRNA and Escherichia coli 16S rRNA. T1 RNase digestion of the cross-linked tRNA yielded an oligonucleotide larger in molecular weight than any from un-cross-linked rRNA or tRNA or from a prephotolyzed complex. Extended electrophoresis showed this material to consist of two oligomers of similar mobility, a faster one-third component and a slower two-thirds component. Each oligomer yielded two components on 254-nm photolysis. The slower band from each was the tRNA T1 oligomer CACCUCCCUVACAAGp, which includes the anticodon. The faster band was the rRNA 9-mer UACACACCGp and its derivative UACACACUG. Unexpectedly, the dephosphorylated and slower moving 9-mer was derived from the faster moving dimer. Deamination of the penultimate C to U is probably due to cyclobutane dimer formation and was evidence for that nucleotide being the site of cross-linking. Direct confirmation of the cross-linking site was obtained by Z-gel analysis

  5. Verification of Ribosomal Proteins of Aspergillus fumigatus for Use as Biomarkers in MALDI-TOF MS Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sayaka; Sato, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We have previously proposed a rapid identification method for bacterial strains based on the profiles of their ribosomal subunit proteins (RSPs), observed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). This method can perform phylogenetic characterization based on the mass of housekeeping RSP biomarkers, ideally calculated from amino acid sequence information registered in public protein databases. With the aim of extending its field of application to medical mycology, this study investigates the actual state of information of RSPs of eukaryotic fungi registered in public protein databases through the characterization of ribosomal protein fractions extracted from genome-sequenced Aspergillus fumigatus strains Af293 and A1163 as a model. In this process, we have found that the public protein databases harbor problems. The RSP names are in confusion, so we have provisionally unified them using the yeast naming system. The most serious problem is that many incorrect sequences are registered in the public protein databases. Surprisingly, more than half of the sequences are incorrect, due chiefly to mis-annotation of exon/intron structures. These errors could be corrected by a combination of in silico inspection by sequence homology analysis and MALDI-TOF MS measurements. We were also able to confirm conserved post-translational modifications in eleven RSPs. After these verifications, the masses of 31 expressed RSPs under 20,000 Da could be accurately confirmed. These RSPs have a potential to be useful biomarkers for identifying clinical isolates of A. fumigatus .

  6. The ionic structure of liquid sodium obtained by numerical simulation from 'first principles' and ab initio 'norm-conserving' pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harchaoui, N; Hellal, S; Grosdidier, B; Gasser, J G

    2008-01-01

    The physical properties of disordered matter depend on the 'atomic structure' i.e. the arrangement of the atoms. This arrangement is described by the structure factor S (q) in reciprocal space and by the pair correlation function g(r) in real space. The structure factor is obtained experimentally while the numerical simulation enables us to obtain the pair correlation function. Liquid sodium is one of the elements the most studied and one can wonder about new scientific contribution appropriateness. The majority of theoretical calculations are compared with the experiment of Waseda. However two other posterior measurements have been published and give different results, in particular with regard to the height of the first peak of the structure factor. Three models of pseudopotential are considered to describe the electron-ion interaction. The first is a local pseudopotential with the alternative known as 'individual' of the model suggested by Fiolhais et al. The second model considered is that of Bachelet et al. This one, ab-initio and 'norm conserving', is non local. The last model is that proposed by Shaw known as 'first principles' and 'energy dependent'. Various static dielectric functions characteristic of the effects of exchange and correlation have been used and developed by Hellal et al. We calculated the form factors (pseudopotential in reciprocal space) and deduce the normalized energy-wave-number characteristic F N (q), the interatomic pair potential V eff (r), then the pair correlation function g(r) by molecular dynamics. The structure factor S(q) is obtained by Fourier transform and is compared with the experiment. Our calculations with the Bachelet and Shaw pseudopotentials are close to the last experiments of Greenfield et al. and of Huijben et al. Our results are discussed

  7. Oligomerisation status and evolutionary conservation of interfaces of protein structural domain superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhwal, Anshul; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2013-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important in carrying out many biological processes and functions. These interactions may be either permanent or of temporary nature. Several studies have employed tools like solvent accessibility and graph theory to identify these interactions, but still more studies need to be performed to quantify and validate them. Although we now have many databases available with predicted and experimental results on protein-protein interactions, we still do not have many databases which focus on providing structural details of the interacting complexes, their oligomerisation state and homologues. In this work, protein-protein interactions have been thoroughly investigated within the structural regime and quantified for their strength using calculated pseudoenergies. The PPCheck server, an in-house webserver, has been used for calculating the pseudoenergies like van der Waals, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic energy based on distances between atoms of amino acids from two interacting proteins. PPCheck can be visited at . Based on statistical data, as obtained by studying established protein-protein interacting complexes from earlier studies, we came to a conclusion that an average protein-protein interface consisted of about 51 to 150 amino acid residues and the generalized energy per residue ranged from -2 kJ mol(-1) to -6 kJ mol(-1). We found that some of the proteins have an exceptionally higher number of amino acids at the interface and it was purely because of their elaborate interface or extended topology i.e. some of their secondary structure regions or loops were either inter-mixing or running parallel to one another or they were taking part in domain swapping. Residue networks were prepared for all the amino acids of the interacting proteins involved in different types of interactions (like van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, electrostatic or intramolecular interactions) and were analysed between the query domain-interacting partner pair

  8. The Importance of Landscape Structure for the Long-Term Conservation of Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Sibly, Richard M; Forchhammer, Mads C.

    population recovery was affected by landscape structure for four species in an agricultural landscape: skylark (Alauda arvensis), vole (Microtus agrestis), a ground beetle (Bembidion lampros) and a linyphiid spider (Erigone atra). We characterized population persistence based on equilibrium population sizes...... (K) and the time it took populations to recover from perturbations. We separated the effects of corridors and patch arrangement by comparing results from a real landscape with results from two virtual landscapes: One where linear corridors were removed by homogenizing patch shapes, while leaving...... the spatial arrangement of the patches unaltered, and one where patches were shuffled around, while still leaving the landscape composition unaltered. Patch arrangement and the presence of corridors had a large effect on population dynamics for species whose local success depended on the identity...

  9. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins from rabbit reticulocytes by a ribosome-associated casein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1977-01-01

    Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacryl......Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  10. Molecular genetic diversity and population structure of Ethiopian white lupin landraces: Implications for breeding and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nasser; Martina, Kyalo; Dagne, Kifle; Wegary, Dagne; Tesfaye, Kassahun

    2017-01-01

    White lupin is one of the four economically important species of the Lupinus genus and is an important grain legume in the Ethiopian farming system. However, there has been limited research effort to characterize the Ethiopian white lupin landraces. Fifteen polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of 212 Ethiopian white lupin (Lupinus albus) landraces and two genotypes from different species (Lupinus angustifolius and Lupinus mutabilis) were used as out-group. The SSR markers revealed 108 different alleles, 98 of them from 212 landraces and 10 from out-group genotypes, with an average of 6.5 alleles per locus. The average gene diversity was 0.31. Twenty eight landraces harbored one or more private alleles from the total of 28 private alleles identified in the 212 white lupin accessions. Seventy-seven rare alleles with a frequency of less than 5% were identified and accounted for 78.6% of the total alleles detected. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 92% of allelic diversity was attributed to individual accessions within populations while only 8% was distributed among populations. At 70% similarity level, the UPGMA dendrogram resulted in the formation of 13 clusters comprised of 2 to 136 landraces, with the out-group genotypes and five landraces remaining distinct and ungrouped. Population differentiation and genetic distance were relatively high between Gondar and Ethiopian white lupin populations collected by Australians. A model-based population structure analysis divided the white lupin landraces into two populations. All Ethiopian white lupin landrace populations, except most of the landraces collected by Australians (77%) and about 44% from Awi, were grouped together with significant admixtures. The study also suggested that 34 accessions, as core collections, were sufficient to retain 100% of SSR diversity. These accessions (core G-34) represent 16% of the whole 212

  11. a Webgis for the Knowledge and Conservation of the Historical Wall Structures of the 13TH-18TH Centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, G.; Pili, D.; Fiorino, D. R.; Pintus, V.

    2017-05-01

    The presented work is part of the research project, titled "Tecniche murarie tradizionali: conoscenza per la conservazione ed il miglioramento prestazionale" (Traditional building techniques: from knowledge to conservation and performance improvement), with the purpose of studying the building techniques of the 13th-18th centuries in the Sardinia Region (Italy) for their knowledge, conservation, and promotion. The end purpose of the entire study is to improve the performance of the examined structures. In particular, the task of the authors within the research project was to build a WebGIS to manage the data collected during the examination and study phases. This infrastructure was entirely built using Open Source software. The work consisted of designing a database built in PostgreSQL and its spatial extension PostGIS, which allows to store and manage feature geometries and spatial data. The data input is performed via a form built in HTML and PHP. The HTML part is based on Bootstrap, an open tools library for websites and web applications. The implementation of this template used both PHP and Javascript code. The PHP code manages the reading and writing of data to the database, using embedded SQL queries. As of today, we surveyed and archived more than 300 buildings, belonging to three main macro categories: fortification architectures, religious architectures, residential architectures. The masonry samples investigated in relation to the construction techniques are more than 150. The database is published on the Internet as a WebGIS built using the Leaflet Javascript open libraries, which allows creating map sites with background maps and navigation, input and query tools. This too uses an interaction of HTML, Javascript, PHP and SQL code.

  12. A WEBGIS FOR THE KNOWLEDGE AND CONSERVATION OF THE HISTORICAL WALL STRUCTURES OF THE 13TH–18TH CENTURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vacca

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The presented work is part of the research project, titled "Tecniche murarie tradizionali: conoscenza per la conservazione ed il miglioramento prestazionale" (Traditional building techniques: from knowledge to conservation and performance improvement, with the purpose of studying the building techniques of the 13th–18th centuries in the Sardinia Region (Italy for their knowledge, conservation, and promotion. The end purpose of the entire study is to improve the performance of the examined structures. In particular, the task of the authors within the research project was to build a WebGIS to manage the data collected during the examination and study phases. This infrastructure was entirely built using Open Source software. The work consisted of designing a database built in PostgreSQL and its spatial extension PostGIS, which allows to store and manage feature geometries and spatial data. The data input is performed via a form built in HTML and PHP. The HTML part is based on Bootstrap, an open tools library for websites and web applications. The implementation of this template used both PHP and Javascript code. The PHP code manages the reading and writing of data to the database, using embedded SQL queries. As of today, we surveyed and archived more than 300 buildings, belonging to three main macro categories: fortification architectures, religious architectures, residential architectures. The masonry samples investigated in relation to the construction techniques are more than 150. The database is published on the Internet as a WebGIS built using the Leaflet Javascript open libraries, which allows creating map sites with background maps and navigation, input and query tools. This too uses an interaction of HTML, Javascript, PHP and SQL code.

  13. Gene expression in chicken reveals correlation with structural genomic features and conserved patterns of transcription in the terrestrial vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haisheng Nie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chicken is an important agricultural and avian-model species. A survey of gene expression in a range of different tissues will provide a benchmark for understanding expression levels under normal physiological conditions in birds. With expression data for birds being very scant, this benchmark is of particular interest for comparative expression analysis among various terrestrial vertebrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a gene expression survey in eight major chicken tissues using whole genome microarrays. A global picture of gene expression is presented for the eight tissues, and tissue specific as well as common gene expression were identified. A Gene Ontology (GO term enrichment analysis showed that tissue-specific genes are enriched with GO terms reflecting the physiological functions of the specific tissue, and housekeeping genes are enriched with GO terms related to essential biological functions. Comparisons of structural genomic features between tissue-specific genes and housekeeping genes show that housekeeping genes are more compact. Specifically, coding sequence and particularly introns are shorter than genes that display more variation in expression between tissues, and in addition intergenic space was also shorter. Meanwhile, housekeeping genes are more likely to co-localize with other abundantly or highly expressed genes on the same chromosomal regions. Furthermore, comparisons of gene expression in a panel of five common tissues between birds, mammals and amphibians showed that the expression patterns across tissues are highly similar for orthologous genes compared to random gene pairs within each pair-wise comparison, indicating a high degree of functional conservation in gene expression among terrestrial vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: The housekeeping genes identified in this study have shorter gene length, shorter coding sequence length, shorter introns, and shorter intergenic regions, there seems

  14. Conserved XPB Core Structure and Motifs for DNA Unwinding:Implications for Pathway Selection of Transcription or ExcisionRepair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Li; Arval, Andrew S.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Tainer, John A.

    2005-04-01

    The human xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) helicase is essential for transcription, nucleotide excision repair, and TFIIH functional assembly. Here, we determined crystal structures of an Archaeoglobus fulgidus XPB homolog (AfXPB) that characterize two RecA-like XPB helicase domains and discover a DNA damage recognition domain (DRD), a unique RED motif, a flexible thumb motif (ThM), and implied conformational changes within a conserved functional core. RED motif mutations dramatically reduce helicase activity, and the DRD and ThM, which flank the RED motif, appear structurally as well as functionally analogous to the MutS mismatch recognition and DNA polymerase thumb domains. Substrate specificity is altered by DNA damage, such that AfXPB unwinds dsDNA with 3' extensions, but not blunt-ended dsDNA, unless it contains a lesion, as shown for CPD or (6-4) photoproducts. Together, these results provide an unexpected mechanism of DNA unwinding with Implications for XPB damage verification in nucleotide excision repair.

  15. Conservation of Three-Dimensional Helix-Loop-Helix Structure through the Vertebrate Lineage Reopens the Cold Case of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Associated Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Sirkin, Daniela I; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle; Kamech, Nédia; Somoza, Gustavo M; Vissio, Paula G; Dufour, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    GnRH-associated peptide (GAP) is the C-terminal portion of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) preprohormone. Although it was reported in mammals that GAP may act as a prolactin-inhibiting factor and can be co-secreted with GnRH into the hypophyseal portal blood, GAP has been practically out of the research circuit for about 20 years. Comparative studies highlighted the low conservation of GAP primary amino acid sequences among vertebrates, contributing to consider that this peptide only participates in the folding or carrying process of GnRH. Considering that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a protein may define its function, the aim of this study was to evaluate if GAP sequences and 3D structures are conserved in the vertebrate lineage. GAP sequences from various vertebrates were retrieved from databases. Analysis of primary amino acid sequence identity and similarity, molecular phylogeny, and prediction of 3D structures were performed. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogeny analyses confirmed the large variation of GAP sequences throughout vertebrate radiation. In contrast, prediction of the 3D structure revealed a striking conservation of the 3D structure of GAP1 (GAP associated with the hypophysiotropic type 1 GnRH), despite low amino acid sequence conservation. This GAP1 peptide presented a typical helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure in all the vertebrate species analyzed. This HLH structure could also be predicted for GAP2 in some but not all vertebrate species and in none of the GAP3 analyzed. These results allowed us to infer that selective pressures have maintained GAP1 HLH structure throughout the vertebrate lineage. The conservation of the HLH motif, known to confer biological activity to various proteins, suggests that GAP1 peptides may exert some hypophysiotropic biological functions across vertebrate radiation.

  16. Conservation of Three-Dimensional Helix-Loop-Helix Structure through the Vertebrate Lineage Reopens the Cold Case of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Associated Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela I. Pérez Sirkin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available GnRH-associated peptide (GAP is the C-terminal portion of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH preprohormone. Although it was reported in mammals that GAP may act as a prolactin-inhibiting factor and can be co-secreted with GnRH into the hypophyseal portal blood, GAP has been practically out of the research circuit for about 20 years. Comparative studies highlighted the low conservation of GAP primary amino acid sequences among vertebrates, contributing to consider that this peptide only participates in the folding or carrying process of GnRH. Considering that the three-dimensional (3D structure of a protein may define its function, the aim of this study was to evaluate if GAP sequences and 3D structures are conserved in the vertebrate lineage. GAP sequences from various vertebrates were retrieved from databases. Analysis of primary amino acid sequence identity and similarity, molecular phylogeny, and prediction of 3D structures were performed. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogeny analyses confirmed the large variation of GAP sequences throughout vertebrate radiation. In contrast, prediction of the 3D structure revealed a striking conservation of the 3D structure of GAP1 (GAP associated with the hypophysiotropic type 1 GnRH, despite low amino acid sequence conservation. This GAP1 peptide presented a typical helix-loop-helix (HLH structure in all the vertebrate species analyzed. This HLH structure could also be predicted for GAP2 in some but not all vertebrate species and in none of the GAP3 analyzed. These results allowed us to infer that selective pressures have maintained GAP1 HLH structure throughout the vertebrate lineage. The conservation of the HLH motif, known to confer biological activity to various proteins, suggests that GAP1 peptides may exert some hypophysiotropic biological functions across vertebrate radiation.

  17. The amino terminal end determines the stability and assembling capacity of eukaryotic ribosomal stalk proteins P1 and P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Hendricka; Nusspaumer, Gretel; Abia, David; Briceño, Verónica; Remacha, Miguel; Ballesta, Juan P G

    2011-05-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal proteins P1 and P2 bind to protein P0 through their N-terminal domain to form the essential ribosomal stalk. A mutational analysis points to amino acids at positions 2 and 3 as determinants for the drastic difference of Saccharomyces cerevisiae P1 and P2 half-life, and suggest different degradation mechanisms for each protein type. Moreover, the capacity to form P1/P2 heterodimers is drastically affected by mutations in the P2β four initial amino acids, while these mutations have no effect on P1β. Binding of P2β and, to a lesser extent, P1β to the ribosome is also seriously affected showing the high relevance of the amino acids in the first turn of the NTD α-helix 1 for the stalk assembly. The negative effect of some mutations on ribosome binding can be reversed by the presence of the second P1/P2 couple in the ribosome, indicating a stabilizing structural influence between the two heterodimers. Unexpectedly, some mutations totally abolish heterodimer formation but allow significant ribosome binding and, therefore, a previous P1 and P2 association seems not to be an absolute requirement for stalk assembly. Homology modeling of the protein complexes suggests that the mutated residues can affect the overall protein conformation. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  20. Eukaryotic ribosome display with in situ DNA recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Edwards, Bryan M; Kastelic, Damjana; Taussig, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome display is a cell-free display technology for in vitro selection and optimisation of proteins from large diversified libraries. It operates through the formation of stable protein-ribosome-mRNA (PRM) complexes and selection of ligand-binding proteins, followed by DNA recovery from the selected genetic information. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosome display systems have been developed. In this chapter, we describe the eukaryotic rabbit reticulocyte method in which a distinct in situ single-primer RT-PCR procedure is used to recover DNA from the selected PRM complexes without the need for prior disruption of the ribosome.

  1. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Peacock

    Full Text Available We provide an expansive analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus circumpolar genetic variation during the last two decades of decline in their sea-ice habitat. We sought to evaluate whether their genetic diversity and structure have changed over this period of habitat decline, how their current genetic patterns compare with past patterns, and how genetic demography changed with ancient fluctuations in climate. Characterizing their circumpolar genetic structure using microsatellite data, we defined four clusters that largely correspond to current ecological and oceanographic factors: Eastern Polar Basin, Western Polar Basin, Canadian Archipelago and Southern Canada. We document evidence for recent (ca. last 1-3 generations directional gene flow from Southern Canada and the Eastern Polar Basin towards the Canadian Archipelago, an area hypothesized to be a future refugium for polar bears as climate-induced habitat decline continues. Our data provide empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. The direction of current gene flow differs from earlier patterns of gene flow in the Holocene. From analyses of mitochondrial DNA, the Canadian Archipelago cluster and the Barents Sea subpopulation within the Eastern Polar Basin cluster did not show signals of population expansion, suggesting these areas may have served also as past interglacial refugia. Mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA data from polar and the paraphyletic brown bear (U. arctos uncovered offset signals in timing of population expansion between the two species, that are attributed to differential demographic responses to past climate cycling. Mitogenomic structure of polar bears was shallow and developed recently, in contrast to the multiple clades of brown bears. We found no genetic signatures of recent hybridization between the species in our large, circumpolar sample, suggesting that recently observed hybrids represent localized events. Documenting changes in subpopulation

  2. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Elizabeth; Sonsthagen, Sarah A; Obbard, Martyn E; Boltunov, Andrei; Regehr, Eric V; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Aars, Jon; Atkinson, Stephen N; Sage, George K; Hope, Andrew G; Zeyl, Eve; Bachmann, Lutz; Ehrich, Dorothee; Scribner, Kim T; Amstrup, Steven C; Belikov, Stanislav; Born, Erik W; Derocher, Andrew E; Stirling, Ian; Taylor, Mitchell K; Wiig, Øystein; Paetkau, David; Talbot, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    We provide an expansive analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) circumpolar genetic variation during the last two decades of decline in their sea-ice habitat. We sought to evaluate whether their genetic diversity and structure have changed over this period of habitat decline, how their current genetic patterns compare with past patterns, and how genetic demography changed with ancient fluctuations in climate. Characterizing their circumpolar genetic structure using microsatellite data, we defined four clusters that largely correspond to current ecological and oceanographic factors: Eastern Polar Basin, Western Polar Basin, Canadian Archipelago and Southern Canada. We document evidence for recent (ca. last 1-3 generations) directional gene flow from Southern Canada and the Eastern Polar Basin towards the Canadian Archipelago, an area hypothesized to be a future refugium for polar bears as climate-induced habitat decline continues. Our data provide empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. The direction of current gene flow differs from earlier patterns of gene flow in the Holocene. From analyses of mitochondrial DNA, the Canadian Archipelago cluster and the Barents Sea subpopulation within the Eastern Polar Basin cluster did not show signals of population expansion, suggesting these areas may have served also as past interglacial refugia. Mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA data from polar and the paraphyletic brown bear (U. arctos) uncovered offset signals in timing of population expansion between the two species, that are attributed to differential demographic responses to past climate cycling. Mitogenomic structure of polar bears was shallow and developed recently, in contrast to the multiple clades of brown bears. We found no genetic signatures of recent hybridization between the species in our large, circumpolar sample, suggesting that recently observed hybrids represent localized events. Documenting changes in subpopulation connectivity will allow

  3. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Elizabeth; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Obbard, Martyn E.; Boltunov, Andrei N.; Regehr, Eric V.; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Aars, Jon; Atkinson, Stephen N.; Sage, George K.; Hope, Andrew G.; Zeyl, Eve; Bachmann, Lutz; Ehrich, Dorothee; Scribner, Kim T.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Belikov, Stanislav; Born, Erik W.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Stirling, Ian; Taylor, Mitchell K.; Wiig, Øystein; Paetkau, David; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an expansive analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) circumpolar genetic variation during the last two decades of decline in their sea-ice habitat. We sought to evaluate whether their genetic diversity and structure have changed over this period of habitat decline, how their current genetic patterns compare with past patterns, and how genetic demography changed with ancient fluctuations in climate. Characterizing their circumpolar genetic structure using microsatellite data, we defined four clusters that largely correspond to current ecological and oceanographic factors: Eastern Polar Basin, Western Polar Basin, Canadian Archipelago and Southern Canada. We document evidence for recent (ca. last 1–3 generations) directional gene flow from Southern Canada and the Eastern Polar Basin towards the Canadian Archipelago, an area hypothesized to be a future refugium for polar bears as climate-induced habitat decline continues. Our data provide empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. The direction of current gene flow differs from earlier patterns of gene flow in the Holocene. From analyses of mitochondrial DNA, the Canadian Archipelago cluster and the Barents Sea subpopulation within the Eastern Polar Basin cluster did not show signals of population expansion, suggesting these areas may have served also as past interglacial refugia. Mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA data from polar and the paraphyletic brown bear (U. arctos) uncovered offset signals in timing of population expansion between the two species, that are attributed to differential demographic responses to past climate cycling. Mitogenomic structure of polar bears was shallow and developed recently, in contrast to the multiple clades of brown bears. We found no genetic signatures of recent hybridization between the species in our large, circumpolar sample, suggesting that recently observed hybrids represent localized events. Documenting changes in subpopulation connectivity will

  4. Heavy ion effects on yeast: Inhibition of ribosomal RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, K.J.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.; Kraft, G.

    1990-01-01

    Diploid wild-type yeast cells were exposed to beams of heavy ions covering a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) (43-13,700 keV/microns). Synthesis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was assessed as a functional measure of damage produced by particle radiation. An exponential decrease of relative rRNA synthesis with particle fluence was demonstrated in all cases. The inactivation cross sections derived were found to increase with LET over the entire range of LET studied. The corresponding values for relative biological effectiveness were slightly less than unity. Maximum cross sections measured were close to 1 micron 2, implying that some larger structure within the yeast nucleus (e.g., the nucleolus) might represent the target for an impairment of synthetic activity by very heavy ions rather than the genes coding for rRNA. Where tested, an oxygen effect for rRNA synthesis could not be demonstrated

  5. Analysis of 90 Mb of the potato genome reveals conservation of gene structures and order with tomato but divergence in repetitive sequence composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Kimberly

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Solanaceae family contains a number of important crop species including potato (Solanum tuberosum which is grown for its underground storage organ known as a tuber. Albeit the 4th most important food crop in the world, other than a collection of ~220,000 Expressed Sequence Tags, limited genomic sequence information is currently available for potato and advances in potato yield and nutrition content would be greatly assisted through access to a complete genome sequence. While morphologically diverse, Solanaceae species such as potato, tomato, pepper, and eggplant share not only genes but also gene order thereby permitting highly informative comparative genomic analyses. Results In this study, we report on analysis 89.9 Mb of potato genomic sequence representing 10.2% of the genome generated through end sequencing of a potato bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clone library (87 Mb and sequencing of 22 potato BAC clones (2.9 Mb. The GC content of potato is very similar to Solanum lycopersicon (tomato and other dicotyledonous species yet distinct from the monocotyledonous grass species, Oryza sativa. Parallel analyses of repetitive sequences in potato and tomato revealed substantial differences in their abundance, 34.2% in potato versus 46.3% in tomato, which is consistent with the increased genome size per haploid genome of these two Solanum species. Specific classes and types of repetitive sequences were also differentially represented between these two species including a telomeric-related repetitive sequence, ribosomal DNA, and a number of unclassified repetitive sequences. Comparative analyses between tomato and potato at the gene level revealed a high level of conservation of gene content, genic feature, and gene order although discordances in synteny were observed. Conclusion Genomic level analyses of potato and tomato confirm that gene sequence and gene order are conserved between these solanaceous species and that

  6. In Profile: Models of Ribosome Biogenesis Defects and Regulation of Protein Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, P.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes are the mediators of protein synthesis in the cell and therefore crucial to proper cell function. In addition, ribosomes are highly abundant, with ribosomal RNA making up 80% of the RNA in the cell. A large amount of resources go into maintaining this pool of ribosomes, so ribosome

  7. A computational investigation on the connection between dynamics properties of ribosomal proteins and ribosome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Burton

    Full Text Available Assembly of the ribosome from its protein and RNA constituents has been studied extensively over the past 50 years, and experimental evidence suggests that prokaryotic ribosomal proteins undergo conformational changes during assembly. However, to date, no studies have attempted to elucidate these conformational changes. The present work utilizes computational methods to analyze protein dynamics and to investigate the linkage between dynamics and binding of these proteins during the assembly of the ribosome. Ribosomal proteins are known to be positively charged and we find the percentage of positive residues in r-proteins to be about twice that of the average protein: Lys+Arg is 18.7% for E. coli and 21.2% for T. thermophilus. Also, positive residues constitute a large proportion of RNA contacting residues: 39% for E. coli and 46% for T. thermophilus. This affirms the known importance of charge-charge interactions in the assembly of the ribosome. We studied the dynamics of three primary proteins from E. coli and T. thermophilus 30S subunits that bind early in the assembly (S15, S17, and S20 with atomic molecular dynamic simulations, followed by a study of all r-proteins using elastic network models. Molecular dynamics simulations show that solvent-exposed proteins (S15 and S17 tend to adopt more stable solution conformations than an RNA-embedded protein (S20. We also find protein residues that contact the 16S rRNA are generally more mobile in comparison with the other residues. This is because there is a larger proportion of contacting residues located in flexible loop regions. By the use of elastic network models, which are computationally more efficient, we show that this trend holds for most of the 30S r-proteins.

  8. Defining the bacteroides ribosomal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Udo; Horn, Nikki; Carding, Simon R

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, hosts a vast number of commensal microorganisms. Representatives of the genus Bacteroides are among the most abundant bacterial species in the human colon. Bacteroidetes diverged from the common line of eubacterial descent before other eubacterial groups. As a result, they employ unique transcription initiation signals and, because of this uniqueness, they require specific genetic tools. Although some tools exist, they are not optimal for studying the roles and functions of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Focusing on translation initiation signals in Bacteroides, we created a series of expression vectors allowing for different levels of protein expression in this genus, and we describe the use of pepI from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis as a novel reporter gene for Bacteroides. Furthermore, we report the identification of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides ovatus and analyze in detail its ribosomal binding site, thus defining a core region necessary for efficient translation, which we have incorporated into the design of our expression vectors. Based on the sequence logo information from the 5' untranslated region of other Bacteroidales ribosomal protein genes, we conclude that our findings are relevant to all members of this order.

  9. Analysis of Ribosome Inactivating Protein (RIP): A Bioinformatics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothi, G. Edward Gnana; Majilla, G. Sahaya Jose; Subhashini, D.; Deivasigamani, B.

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the medical advances in recent years, the world is in need of different sources to encounter certain health issues.Ribosome Inactivating Proteins (RIPs) were found to be one among them. In order to get easy access about RIPs, there is a need to analyse RIPs towards constructing a database on RIPs. Also, multiple sequence alignment was done towards screening for homologues of significant RIPs from rare sources against RIPs from easily available sources in terms of similarity. Protein sequences were retrieved from SWISS-PROT and are further analysed using pair wise and multiple sequence alignment.Analysis shows that, 151 RIPs have been characterized to date. Amongst them, there are 87 type I, 37 type II, 1 type III and 25 unknown RIPs. The sequence length information of various RIPs about the availability of full or partial sequence was also found. The multiple sequence alignment of 37 type I RIP using the online server Multalin, indicates the presence of 20 conserved residues. Pairwise alignment and multiple sequence alignment of certain selected RIPs in two groups namely Group I and Group II were carried out and the consensus level was found to be 98%, 98% and 90% respectively.

  10. Conservation of the primary structure, organization, and function of the human and mouse β-globin locus-activating regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, A.M.; Ley, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    DNA sequences located in a region 6-18 kilobases (kb) upstream from the human ε-globin gene are known as the locus-activating region (LAR) or dominant control region. This region is thought to play a key role in chromatin organization of the β-like globin gene cluster during erythroid development. Since the human β-globin LAR is functional in mice, the authors reasoned that critical LAR sequence elements might be conserved between mice and humans. They therefore cloned murine genomic sequences homologous to one portion of the human LAR. They found that this murine DNA fragment (mouse LAR site II) and sequences homologous to human LAR sites I and III are located upstream from the mouse β-like globin gene cluster and determined that their locations relative to the cluster are similar to that of their human counterparts. The homologous site II sequences are 70% identical between mice and humans over a stretch of ∼800 base pairs. These results suggest that primary structural elements endash and the spatial organization of these elements endash are important for function of the β-globin LAR

  11. Seasonal variation and community structure of fishes in the Mahananda River with special reference to conservation issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shams Muhammad Galib

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the Mahananda River from January to December 2013 with a view to determining the seasonal variation and community structure of fishes along with some conservation issues. Monthly sampling was carried out using traditional fishing gears and fishes were identified based on morphometric and meristic characters. A total of 4082 individuals of native fish species were captured, analyzed and classified into 62 species belonging to 46 genera, 25 families and 9 orders. Cypriniformes and Siluriformes were the dominant fish orders represented by 19 species each and the most abundant family was Cyprinidae (14 species. In addition to indigenous individuals, 9 individuals of 2 exotic fish species (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Pangasius hypophthalmus were also recorded. Among three sampling sites, S-1 was the most diversified in terms of not only the number of individual fish but also the number of species present represented by mean (±SE individuals of 151.50±25.22 and species of 25.58±3.91. Three distinct fish groups of fish families were revealed from the cluster analysis of similarity. To improve the situation, control of illegal fishing gears, establishment of sanctuaries and legal protection for threatened species are recommended.

  12. The Potential of Targeting Ribosome Biogenesis in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunfei Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overall survival for patients with ovarian cancer (OC has shown little improvement for decades meaning new therapeutic options are critical. OC comprises multiple histological subtypes, of which the most common and aggressive subtype is high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC. HGSOC is characterized by genomic structural variations with relatively few recurrent somatic mutations or dominantly acting oncogenes that can be targeted for the development of novel therapies. However, deregulation of pathways controlling homologous recombination (HR and ribosome biogenesis has been observed in a high proportion of HGSOC, raising the possibility that targeting these basic cellular processes may provide improved patient outcomes. The poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitor olaparib has been approved to treat women with defects in HR due to germline BRCA mutations. Recent evidence demonstrated the efficacy of targeting ribosome biogenesis with the specific inhibitor of ribosomal RNA synthesis, CX-5461 in v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC-driven haematological and prostate cancers. CX-5461 has now progressed to a phase I clinical trial in patients with haematological malignancies and phase I/II trial in breast cancer. Here we review the currently available targeted therapies for HGSOC and discuss the potential of targeting ribosome biogenesis as a novel therapeutic approach against HGSOC.

  13. Structured decision making for conservation of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Long Creek, Klamath River Basin, south-central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Joseph R.; McDonnell, Kevin; Dunham, Jason B.; Brignon, William R.; Peterson, James T.

    2017-06-21

    With the decline of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), managers face multiple, and sometimes contradictory, management alternatives for species recovery. Moreover, effective decision-making involves all stakeholders influenced by the decisions (such as Tribal, State, Federal, private, and non-governmental organizations) because they represent diverse objectives, jurisdictions, policy mandates, and opinions of the best management strategy. The process of structured decision making is explicitly designed to address these elements of the decision making process. Here we report on an application of structured decision making to a population of bull trout believed threatened by high densities of nonnative brook trout (S. fontinalis) and habitat fragmentation in Long Creek, a tributary to the Sycan River in the Klamath River Basin, south-central Oregon. This involved engaging stakeholders to identify (1) their fundamental objectives for the conservation of bull trout, (2) feasible management alternatives to achieve their objectives, and (3) biological information and assumptions to incorporate in a decision model. Model simulations suggested an overarching theme among the top decision alternatives, which was a need to simultaneously control brook trout and ensure that the migratory tactic of bull trout can be expressed. More specifically, the optimal management decision, based on the estimated adult abundance at year 10, was to combine the eradication of brook trout from Long Creek with improvement of downstream conditions (for example, connectivity or habitat conditions). Other top decisions included these actions independently, as well as electrofishing removal of brook trout. In contrast, translocating bull trout to a different stream or installing a barrier to prevent upstream spread of brook trout had minimal or negative effects on the bull trout population. Moreover, sensitivity analyses suggested that these actions were consistently identified as optimal across

  14. Population genetic structure of eelgrass (Zostera marina on the Korean coast: Current status and conservation implications for future management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hwan Kim

    Full Text Available Seagrasses provide numerous ecosystem services for coastal and estuarine environments, such as nursery functions, erosion protection, pollution filtration, and carbon sequestration. Zostera marina (common name "eelgrass" is one of the seagrass bed-forming species distributed widely in the northern hemisphere, including the Korean Peninsula. Recently, however, there has been a drastic decline in the population size of Z. marina worldwide, including Korea. We examined the current population genetic status of this species on the southern coast of Korea by estimating the levels of genetic diversity and genetic structure of 10 geographic populations using eight nuclear microsatellite markers. The level of genetic diversity was found to be significantly lower for populations on Jeju Island [mean allelic richness (AR = 1.92, clonal diversity (R = 0.51], which is located approximately 155 km off the southernmost region of the Korean Peninsula, than for those in the South Sea (mean AR = 2.69, R = 0.82, which is on the southern coast of the mainland. South Korean eelgrass populations were substantially genetically divergent from one another (FST = 0.061-0.573, suggesting that limited contemporary gene flow has been taking place among populations. We also found weak but detectable temporal variation in genetic structure within a site over 10 years. In additional depth comparisons, statistically significant genetic differentiation was observed between shallow (or middle and deep zones in two of three sites tested. Depleted genetic diversity, small effective population sizes (Ne and limited connectivity for populations on Jeju Island indicate that these populations may be vulnerable to local extinction under changing environmental conditions, especially given that Jeju Island is one of the fastest warming regions around the world. Overall, our work will inform conservation and restoration efforts, including transplantation for eelgrass populations at the

  15. Structural determinants of a conserved enantiomer-selective carvone binding pocket in the human odorant receptor OR1A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithe, Christiane; Protze, Jonas; Kreuchwig, Franziska; Krause, Gerd; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2017-11-01

    Chirality is a common phenomenon within odorants. Most pairs of enantiomers show only moderate differences in odor quality. One example for enantiomers that are easily discriminated by their odor quality is the carvones: humans significantly distinguish between the spearmint-like (R)-(-)-carvone and caraway-like (S)-(+)-carvone enantiomers. Moreover, for the (R)-(-)-carvone, an anosmia is observed in about 8% of the population, suggesting enantioselective odorant receptors (ORs). With only about 15% de-orphaned human ORs, the lack of OR crystal structures, and few comprehensive studies combining in silico and experimental approaches to elucidate structure-function relations of ORs, knowledge on cognate odorant/OR interactions is still sparse. An adjusted homology modeling approach considering OR-specific proline-caused conformations, odorant docking studies, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and subsequent functional studies with recombinant ORs in a cell-based, real-time luminescence assay revealed 11 amino acid positions to constitute an enantioselective binding pocket necessary for a carvone function in human OR1A1 and murine Olfr43, respectively. Here, we identified enantioselective molecular determinants in both ORs that discriminate between minty and caraway odor. Comparison with orthologs from 36 mammalian species demonstrated a hominid-specific carvone binding pocket with about 100% conservation. Moreover, we identified loss-of-function SNPs associated with the carvone binding pocket of OR1A1. Given carvone enantiomer-specific receptor activation patterns including OR1A1, our data suggest OR1A1 as a candidate receptor for constituting a carvone enantioselective phenotype, which may help to explain mechanisms underlying a (R)-(-)-carvone-specific anosmia in humans.

  16. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium BipA Exhibits Two Distinct Ribosome Binding Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLivron, M.; Robinson, V

    2008-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions to influence numerous cellular processes in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, BipA has been implicated in controlling bacterial motility, modulating attachment and effacement processes, and upregulating the expression of virulence genes and is also responsible for avoidance of host defense mechanisms. In addition, BipA is thought to be involved in bacterial stress responses, such as those associated with virulence, temperature, and symbiosis. Thus, BipA is necessary for securing bacterial survival and successful invasion of the host. Steady-state kinetic analysis and pelleting assays were used to assess the GTPase and ribosome-binding properties of S. enterica BipA. Under normal bacterial growth, BipA associates with the ribosome in the GTP-bound state. However, using sucrose density gradients, we demonstrate that the association of BipA and the ribosome is altered under stress conditions in bacteria similar to those experienced during virulence. The data show that this differential binding is brought about by the presence of ppGpp, an alarmone that signals the onset of stress-related events in bacteria.

  17. The highly conserved codon following the slippery sequence supports -1 frameshift efficiency at the HIV-1 frameshift site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneeth F Mathew

    Full Text Available HIV-1 utilises -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting to translate structural and enzymatic domains in a defined proportion required for replication. A slippery sequence, U UUU UUA, and a stem-loop are well-defined RNA features modulating -1 frameshifting in HIV-1. The GGG glycine codon immediately following the slippery sequence (the 'intercodon' contributes structurally to the start of the stem-loop but has no defined role in current models of the frameshift mechanism, as slippage is inferred to occur before the intercodon has reached the ribosomal decoding site. This GGG codon is highly conserved in natural isolates of HIV. When the natural intercodon was replaced with a stop codon two different decoding molecules-eRF1 protein or a cognate suppressor tRNA-were able to access and decode the intercodon prior to -1 frameshifting. This implies significant slippage occurs when the intercodon is in the (perhaps distorted ribosomal A site. We accommodate the influence of the intercodon in a model of frame maintenance versus frameshifting in HIV-1.

  18. The antibiotic thiostrepton inhibits a functional transition within protein L11 at the ribosomal GTPase centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Leviev, I; Mankin, A S

    1998-01-01

    A newly identified class of highly thiostrepton-resistant mutants of the archaeon Halobacterium halobium carry a missense mutation at codon 18 within the gene encoding ribosomal protein L11. In the mutant proteins, a proline, conserved in archaea and bacteria, is converted to either serine...... technique, demonstrated that a general tightening of the C-terminal domain occurred on rRNA binding, while thiostrepton produced a footprint centred on tyrosine 62 at the junction of the N and C-terminal domains of protein L11 complexed to rRNA. The intensity of this protein footprint was strongly reduced...

  19. Crystallization of the two-domain N-terminal fragment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L10(P0) in complex with a specific fragment of 23S rRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, O. V.; Mitroshin, I. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Nikonov, S. V.; Garber, M. B.

    2011-07-01

    Lateral L12-stalk (P1-stalk in Archaea, P1/P2-stalk in eukaryotes) is an obligatory morphological element of large ribosomal subunits in all organisms studied. This stalk is composed of the complex of ribosomal proteins L10(P0) and L12(P1) and interacts with 23S rRNA through the protein L10(P0). L12(P1)-stalk is involved in the formation of GTPase center of the ribosome and plays an important role in the ribosome interaction with translation factors. High mobility of this stalk puts obstacles in determination of its structure within the intact ribosome. Crystals of a two-domain N-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein L10(P0) from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii in complex with a specific fragment of rRNA from the same organism have been obtained. The crystals diffract X-rays at 3.2 Å resolution.

  20. Crystallization of the two-domain N-terminal fragment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L10(P0) in complex with a specific fragment of 23S rRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchenko, O. V.; Mitroshin, I. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Nikonov, S. V.; Garber, M. B., E-mail: garber@vega.protres.ru [Institute of Protein Research RAS (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Lateral L12-stalk (P1-stalk in Archaea, P1/P2-stalk in eukaryotes) is an obligatory morphological element of large ribosomal subunits in all organisms studied. This stalk is composed of the complex of ribosomal proteins L10(P0) and L12(P1) and interacts with 23S rRNA through the protein L10(P0). L12(P1)-stalk is involved in the formation of GTPase center of the ribosome and plays an important role in the ribosome interaction with translation factors. High mobility of this stalk puts obstacles in determination of its structure within the intact ribosome. Crystals of a two-domain N-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein L10(P0) from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii in complex with a specific fragment of rRNA from the same organism have been obtained. The crystals diffract X-rays at 3.2 Angstrom-Sign resolution.

  1. Mechanism of recycling of post-termination ribosomal complexes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    all pathway of ribosome recycling in eubacteria with especial reference to the important role of the initiation factor ... [Seshadri A and Varshney U 2006 Mechanism of recycling of post-termination ribosomal complexes in eubacteria: a new role of initiation factor 3 .... RRF binding results in a remarkable conformational change.

  2. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns that e...... in the nucleolus....

  3. Proto-ribosome: a theoretical approach based on RNA relics

    OpenAIRE

    Demongeot, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    We describe in this paper, based on already published articles, a contribution to the theory postulating the existence of a proto-ribosome, which could have appeared early at the origin of life and we discuss the interest of this notion in an evolutionary perspective, taking into account the existence of possible RNA relics of this proto-ribosome.

  4. The formation of a native-like structure containing eight conserved hydrophobic residues is rate limiting in two-state protein folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; Osmark, Peter; Neergaard, Thomas B.

    1999-01-01

    The acyl-coenzyme A-binding proteins (ACBPs) contain 26 highly conserved sequence positions. The majority of these have been mutated in the bovine protein, and their influence on the rate of two-state folding and unfolding has been measured. The results identify eight sequence positions, out of 24...... probed, that are critical for fast productive folding. The residues are all hydrophobic and located in the interface between the N- and C-terminal helices. The results suggest that one specific site dominated by conserved hydrophobic residues forms the structure of the productive rate-determining folding...... step and that a sequential framework model can describe the protein folding reaction....

  5. Cis-regulatory RNA elements that regulate specialized ribosome activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shifeng; Barna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that the ribosome itself can play a highly regulatory role in the specialized translation of specific subpools of mRNAs, in particular at the level of ribosomal proteins (RP). However, the mechanism(s) by which this selection takes place has remained poorly understood. In our recent study, we discovered a combination of unique RNA elements in the 5'UTRs of mRNAs that allows for such control by the ribosome. These mRNAs contain a Translation Inhibitory Element (TIE) that inhibits general cap-dependent translation, and an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) that relies on a specific RP for activation. The unique combination of an inhibitor of general translation and an activator of specialized translation is key to ribosome-mediated control of gene expression. Here we discuss how these RNA regulatory elements provide a new level of control to protein expression and their implications for gene expression, organismal development and evolution.

  6. On the structure on non-local conservation laws in the two-dimensional non-linear sigma-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamolodchikov, Al.B.

    1978-01-01

    The non-local conserved charges are supposed to satisfy a special multiplicative law in the space of asymptotic states of the non-linear sigma-model. This supposition leads to factorization equations for two-particle scattering matrix elements and determines to some extent the action of these charges in the asymptotic space. Their conservation turns out to be consistent with the factorized S-matrix of the non-linear sigma-model. It is shown also that the factorized sine-Gordon S-matrix is consistent with a similar family of conservation laws

  7. A bifunctional archaeal protein that is a component of 30S ribosomal subunits and interacts with C/D box small RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ciammaruconi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have identified a novel archaeal protein that apparently plays two distinct roles in ribosome metabolism. It is a polypeptide of about 18 kDa (termed Rbp18 that binds free cytosolic C/D box sRNAs in vivo and in vitro and behaves as a structural ribosomal protein, specifically a component of the 30S ribosomal subunit. As Rbp18 is selectively present in Crenarcheota and highly thermophilic Euryarchaeota, we propose that it serves to protect C/D box sRNAs from degradation and perhaps to stabilize thermophilic 30S subunits.

  8. Secondary structural analyses of ITS1 in Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshina, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal RNA gene operon is interrupted by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS2. Although the secondary structure of ITS2 has been widely investigated, less is known about ITS1 and its structure. In this study, the secondary structure of ITS1 sequences for Paramecium and other ciliates was predicted. Each Paramecium ITS1 forms an open loop with three helices, A through C. Helix B was highly conserved among Paramecium, and similar helices were found in other ciliates. A phylogenetic analysis using the ITS1 sequences showed high-resolution, implying that ITS1 is a good tool for species-level analyses.

  9. Control of Ribosome Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Meyenburg, K. von; Måløe, O.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of ribosome synthesis and accumulation in Escherichia coli during the transition after an energy source shift-down was analyzed. The shift was imposed on cultures of stringent and relaxed strains growing in glucose minimal medium by the addition of the glucose analogue {alpha...... and to estimate the transcription time for the rRNA operon under different conditions. In steady states of growth with growth rates ranging from 0.75 to 2.3 doublings/h, as well as during the transition after a shift-down, the transcription time of the rRNA operon was constant. The rate of synthesis of r......RNA correlated during this transition – in contrast to the rate of accumulation (M. T. Hansen et al., J. Bacteriol. 122: 585-591, 1975) – with the ppGpp pool in the same way as has been observed during partial amino acid starvation....

  10. Comparisons of Copy Number, Genomic Structure, and Conserved Motifs for α-Amylase Genes from Barley, Rice, and Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qisen Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Barley is an important crop for the production of malt and beer. However, crops such as rice and wheat are rarely used for malting. α-amylase is the key enzyme that degrades starch during malting. In this study, we compared the genomic properties, gene copies, and conserved promoter motifs of α-amylase genes in barley, rice, and wheat. In all three crops, α-amylase consists of four subfamilies designated amy1, amy2, amy3, and amy4. In wheat and barley, members of amy1 and amy2 genes are localized on chromosomes 6 and 7, respectively. In rice, members of amy1 genes are found on chromosomes 1 and 2, and amy2 genes on chromosome 6. The barley genome has six amy1 members and three amy2 members. The wheat B genome contains four amy1 members and three amy2 members, while the rice genome has three amy1 members and one amy2 member. The B genome has mostly amy1 and amy2 members among the three wheat genomes. Amy1 promoters from all three crop genomes contain a GA-responsive complex consisting of a GA-responsive element (CAATAAA, pyrimidine box (CCTTTT and TATCCAT/C box. This study has shown that amy1 and amy2 from both wheat and barley have similar genomic properties, including exon/intron structures and GA-responsive elements on promoters, but these differ in rice. Like barley, wheat should have sufficient amy activity to degrade starch completely during malting. Other factors, such as high protein with haze issues and the lack of husk causing Lauting difficulty, may limit the use of wheat for brewing.

  11. Children with chronic renal disease undergoing dialysis or conservative treatment--differences in structural and functional echocardiographic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavarda, Valeska Tavares; Pinheiro, Aurelio Carvalho; Costa, Symône Damasceno; de Andrade, Zélia Maria; Carvalhaes, João Tomás de Abreu; Campos, Orlando; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; Moises, Valdir Ambrosio

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac disease frequently occurs in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing dialysis (DI), but it is not well studied in patients undergoing conservative treatment (CT). The aim of our study was to use echocardiography to analyze and compare the cardiac involvement of children with CKD undergoing DI or CT. Seventy-one children with CKD were included; 41 undergoing DI and 30 undergoing CT. There were 33 controls. Measurements of arterial pressure and structural and functional echocardiographic variables were obtained; the children were followed up for 18 months. Tests of comparison and multiple regression were used; significant if P < 0.05. Arterial hypertension (AH) was present in 37 of 71 (52%) children with CKD: 27 (65.8%) in DI and 10 (33.3%) in CT (X2 = 8.7; P = 0.003). An abnormal left ventricular geometric pattern was present in 37/41 (90.3%) undergoing DI, 33 had left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and in 14/30 (46.7%) undergoing CT, 5 had LVH. Ejection fraction was normal in all groups; diastolic function alteration (DFA) occurred in 28/41 (68.3%) children on DI and in 10/30 (33.3%) on CT (X2 = 9.2; P = 0.002). For children with CKD, DI (P = 0.002) and hypertension (P = 0.04) were associated with LVH; among those on DI, only AH was associated with LVH (P = 0.02). During the follow-up, 18 (43.9%) children undergoing DI had at least one cardiovascular event. Children with CKD undergoing CT had less cardiac involvement than those undergoing DI. LVH was associated with DI and AH in all children with CKD and with AH in those on DI.

  12. The AAA-ATPase NVL2 is a component of pre-ribosomal particles that interacts with the DExD/H-box RNA helicase DOB1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahama, Masami; Yamazoe, Takeshi; Hara, Yoshimitsu; Tani, Katsuko; Tsuji, Akihiko; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear VCP/p97-like protein 2 (NVL2) is a member of the chaperone-like AAA-ATPase family with two conserved ATP-binding modules. Our previous studies have shown that NVL2 is localized to the nucleolus by interacting with ribosomal protein L5 and may participate in ribosome synthesis, a process involving various non-ribosomal factors including chaperones and RNA helicases. Here, we show that NVL2 is associated with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. Moreover, we used yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays to identify an NVL2-interacting protein that could yield insights into NVL2 function in ribosome biogenesis. We found that NVL2 interacts with DOB1, a DExD/H-box RNA helicase, whose yeast homologue functions in a late stage of the 60S subunit synthesis. DOB1 can interact with a second ATP-binding module mutant of NVL2, which shows a dominant negative effect on ribosome synthesis. In contrast, it cannot interact with a first ATP-binding module mutant, which does not show the dominant negative effect. When the dominant negative mutant of NVL2 was overexpressed in cells, DOB1 appeared to remain associated with nuclear pre-ribosomal particles. Such accumulation was not observed upon overexpression of wild-type NVL2 or a nondominant-negative mutant. Taken together, our results suggest that NVL2 might regulate the association/dissociation reaction of DOB1 with pre-ribosomal particles by acting as a molecular chaperone

  13. TIF-IA-dependent regulation of ribosome synthesis in drosophila muscle is required to maintain systemic insulin signaling and larval growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Ghosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The conserved TOR kinase signaling network links nutrient availability to cell, tissue and body growth in animals. One important growth-regulatory target of TOR signaling is ribosome biogenesis. Studies in yeast and mammalian cell culture have described how TOR controls rRNA synthesis-a limiting step in ribosome biogenesis-via the RNA Polymerase I transcription factor TIF-IA. However, the contribution of TOR-dependent ribosome synthesis to tissue and body growth in animals is less clear. Here we show in Drosophila larvae that ribosome synthesis in muscle is required non-autonomously to maintain normal body growth and development. We find that amino acid starvation and TOR inhibition lead to reduced levels of TIF-IA, and decreased rRNA synthesis in larval muscle. When we mimic this decrease in muscle ribosome synthesis using RNAi-mediated knockdown of TIF-IA, we observe delayed larval development and reduced body growth. This reduction in growth is caused by lowered systemic insulin signaling via two endocrine responses: reduced expression of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs from the brain and increased expression of Imp-L2-a secreted factor that binds and inhibits dILP activity-from muscle. We also observed that maintaining TIF-IA levels in muscle could partially reverse the starvation-mediated suppression of systemic insulin signaling. Finally, we show that activation of TOR specifically in muscle can increase overall body size and this effect requires TIF-IA function. These data suggest that muscle ribosome synthesis functions as a nutrient-dependent checkpoint for overall body growth: in nutrient rich conditions, TOR is required to maintain levels of TIF-IA and ribosome synthesis to promote high levels of systemic insulin, but under conditions of starvation stress, reduced muscle ribosome synthesis triggers an endocrine response that limits systemic insulin signaling to restrict growth and maintain homeostasis.

  14. Revealing −1 Programmed Ribosomal Frameshifting Mechanisms by Single-Molecule Techniques and Computational Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chun Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF serves as an intrinsic translational regulation mechanism employed by some viruses to control the ratio between structural and enzymatic proteins. Most viral mRNAs which use PRF adapt an H-type pseudoknot to stimulate −1 PRF. The relationship between the thermodynamic stability and the frameshifting efficiency of pseudoknots has not been fully understood. Recently, single-molecule force spectroscopy has revealed that the frequency of −1 PRF correlates with the unwinding forces required for disrupting pseudoknots, and that some of the unwinding work dissipates irreversibly due to the torsional restraint of pseudoknots. Complementary to single-molecule techniques, computational modeling provides insights into global motions of the ribosome, whose structural transitions during frameshifting have not yet been elucidated in atomic detail. Taken together, recent advances in biophysical tools may help to develop antiviral therapies that target the ubiquitous −1 PRF mechanism among viruses.

  15. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  16. Identification of quercitrin as an inhibitor of the p90 S6 ribosomal kinase (RSK): structure of its complex with the N-terminal domain of RSK2 at 1.8 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derewenda, Urszula; Artamonov, Mykhaylo; Szukalska, Gabriela; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Olekhnovich, Natalya [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Parikh, Hardik I.; Kellogg, Glen E. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0540 (United States); Somlyo, Avril V.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S., E-mail: zsd4n@virginia.edu [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The crystal structure of quercitrin, a naturally occurring flavonol glycoside, has been determined in a complex with the N-terminal kinase domain of murine RSK2. The structure revealed that quercitrin inhibits the RSK2 kinase in the same fashion as another known inhibitor, SL0101. Members of the RSK family of kinases constitute attractive targets for drug design, but a lack of structural information regarding the mechanism of selective inhibitors impedes progress in this field. The crystal structure of the N-terminal kinase domain (residues 45–346) of mouse RSK2, or RSK2{sup NTKD}, has recently been described in complex with one of only two known selective inhibitors, a rare naturally occurring flavonol glycoside, kaempferol 3-O-(3′′,4′′-di-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranoside), known as SL0101. Based on this structure, it was hypothesized that quercitrin (quercetin 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside), a related but ubiquitous and inexpensive compound, might also act as an RSK inhibitor. Here, it is demonstrated that quercitrin binds to RSK2{sup NTKD} with a dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 5.8 µM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry, and a crystal structure of the binary complex at 1.8 Å resolution is reported. The crystal structure reveals a very similar mode of binding to that recently reported for SL0101. Closer inspection shows a number of small but significant differences that explain the slightly higher K{sub d} for quercitrin compared with SL0101. It is also shown that quercitrin can effectively substitute for SL0101 in a biological assay, in which it significantly suppresses the contractile force in rabbit pulmonary artery smooth muscle in response to Ca{sup 2+}.

  17. Identification of quercitrin as an inhibitor of the p90 S6 ribosomal kinase (RSK): structure of its complex with the N-terminal domain of RSK2 at 1.8 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derewenda, Urszula; Artamonov, Mykhaylo; Szukalska, Gabriela; Utepbergenov, Darkhan; Olekhnovich, Natalya; Parikh, Hardik I.; Kellogg, Glen E.; Somlyo, Avril V.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of quercitrin, a naturally occurring flavonol glycoside, has been determined in a complex with the N-terminal kinase domain of murine RSK2. The structure revealed that quercitrin inhibits the RSK2 kinase in the same fashion as another known inhibitor, SL0101. Members of the RSK family of kinases constitute attractive targets for drug design, but a lack of structural information regarding the mechanism of selective inhibitors impedes progress in this field. The crystal structure of the N-terminal kinase domain (residues 45–346) of mouse RSK2, or RSK2 NTKD , has recently been described in complex with one of only two known selective inhibitors, a rare naturally occurring flavonol glycoside, kaempferol 3-O-(3′′,4′′-di-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranoside), known as SL0101. Based on this structure, it was hypothesized that quercitrin (quercetin 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside), a related but ubiquitous and inexpensive compound, might also act as an RSK inhibitor. Here, it is demonstrated that quercitrin binds to RSK2 NTKD with a dissociation constant (K d ) of 5.8 µM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry, and a crystal structure of the binary complex at 1.8 Å resolution is reported. The crystal structure reveals a very similar mode of binding to that recently reported for SL0101. Closer inspection shows a number of small but significant differences that explain the slightly higher K d for quercitrin compared with SL0101. It is also shown that quercitrin can effectively substitute for SL0101 in a biological assay, in which it significantly suppresses the contractile force in rabbit pulmonary artery smooth muscle in response to Ca 2+

  18. A comparative study of ribosomal proteins: linkage between amino acid distribution and ribosomal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, Brittany Burton; Wang, Yongmei; Nakazato, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the ribosome from its protein and RNA constituents must occur quickly and efficiently in order to synthesize the proteins necessary for all cellular activity. Since the early 1960’s, certain characteristics of possible assembly pathways have been elucidated, yet the mechanisms that govern the precise recognition events remain unclear. We utilize a comparative analysis to investigate the amino acid composition of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) with respect to their role in the assembly process. We compared small subunit (30S) r-protein sequences to those of other housekeeping proteins from 560 bacterial species and searched for correlations between r-protein amino acid content and factors such as assembly binding order, environmental growth temperature, protein size, and contact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in the 30S complex. We find r-proteins have a significantly high percent of positive residues, which are highly represented at rRNA contact sites. An inverse correlation between the percent of positive residues and r-protein size was identified and is mainly due to the content of Lysine residues, rather than Arginine. Nearly all r-proteins carry a net positive charge, but no statistical correlation between the net charge and the binding order was detected. Thermophilic (high-temperature) r-proteins contain increased Arginine, Isoleucine, and Tyrosine, and decreased Serine and Threonine compared to mesophilic (lower-temperature), reflecting a known distinction between thermophiles and mesophiles, possibly to account for protein thermostability. However, this difference in amino acid content does not extend to rRNA contact sites, as the proportions of thermophilic and mesophilic contact residues are not significantly different. Given the significantly higher level of positively charged residues in r-proteins and at contact sites, we conclude that ribosome assembly relies heavily on an electrostatic component of interaction. However, the binding order of

  19. On the control of ribosomal protein biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, J.; Marvaldi, J.; Coeroli, C.; Cozzone, A.; Marchis-Mouren, G.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of individual ribosomal protein synthesis relative to total protein synthesis has been determined in Escherichia coli rel + and rel - cells, under valyl-tRNA deprivation. These strains have a temperature-sensitive valyl-tRNA synthetase. Starvation was obtained following transfer of the cells to non-permissive temperature. Ribosomal proteins were obtained by treatment of either total lysates of freeze-thawed lysozyme spheroplasts or ammonium sulphate precipitate of ribosomes, with acetic acid. Differential labelling of the ribosomal proteins was observed in both strains: proteins from the rel + strain appear more labelled than those from the rel - strain, the rate of labelling of individual proteins being about the same in both strains. Moreover ribosomal proteins were found as stable during starvation as total protein. It is thus concluded that in starving cells individual ribosomal proteins are not synthesized at equal rates. This indicates that the synthesis of ribosomal proteins is not only under the control of the rel gene

  20. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosome biogenesis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle C. Kos-Braun

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are exposed to the constantly and often rapidly changing environment. As such they evolved mechanisms to balance their metabolism and energy expenditure with the resources available to them. When resources become scarce or conditions turn out to be unfavourable for growth, cells reduce their metabolism and energy usage to survive. One of the major energy consuming processes in the cell is ribosome biogenesis. Unsurprisingly, cells encountering adverse conditions immediately shut down production of new ribosomes. It is well established that nutrient depletion leads to a rapid repression of transcription of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins, ribosome biogenesis factors as well as ribosomal RNA (rRNA. However, if pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly are regulated post-transcriptionally remains largely unclear. We have recently uncovered that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly switches between two alternative pre-rRNA processing pathways depending on the environmental conditions. Our findings reveal a new level of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis.

  1. Yeast polypeptide exit tunnel ribosomal proteins L17, L35 and L37 are necessary to recruit late-assembling factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamalinda, Michael; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Babiano, Reyes; Talkish, Jason; de la Cruz, Jesús; Woolford, John L

    2013-02-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves the coordinated folding and processing of pre-rRNAs with assembly of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotes, these events are facilitated by trans-acting factors that propel ribosome maturation from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. However, there is a gap in understanding how ribosomal proteins configure pre-ribosomes in vivo to enable processing to occur. Here, we have examined the role of adjacent yeast r-proteins L17, L35 and L37 in folding and processing of pre-rRNAs, and binding of other proteins within assembling ribosomes. These three essential ribosomal proteins, which surround the polypeptide exit tunnel, are required for 60S subunit formation as a consequence of their role in removal of the ITS2 spacer from 27SB pre-rRNA. L17-, L35- and L37-depleted cells exhibit turnover of aberrant pre-60S assembly intermediates. Although the structure of ITS2 does not appear to be grossly affected in their absence, these three ribosomal proteins are necessary for efficient recruitment of factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing, namely, Nsa2 and Nog2, which associate with pre-60S ribosomal particles containing 27SB pre-rRNAs. Altogether, these data support that L17, L35 and L37 are specifically required for a recruiting step immediately preceding removal of ITS2.

  2. Complete amino acid sequences of the ribosomal proteins L25, L29 and L31 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, T; Kimura, M

    1988-03-15

    Ribosomal proteins were extracted from 50S ribosomal subunits of the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui by decreasing the concentration of Mg2+ and K+, and the proteins were separated and purified by ion-exchange column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Ten proteins were purified to homogeneity and three of these proteins were subjected to sequence analysis. The complete amino acid sequences of the ribosomal proteins L25, L29 and L31 were established by analyses of the peptides obtained by enzymatic digestion with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus protease, chymotrypsin and lysylendopeptidase. Proteins L25, L29 and L31 consist of 84, 115 and 95 amino acid residues with the molecular masses of 9472 Da, 12293 Da and 10418 Da respectively. A comparison of their sequences with those of other large-ribosomal-subunit proteins from other organisms revealed that protein L25 from H. marismortui is homologous to protein L23 from Escherichia coli (34.6%), Bacillus stearothermophilus (41.8%), and tobacco chloroplasts (16.3%) as well as to protein L25 from yeast (38.0%). Proteins L29 and L31 do not appear to be homologous to any other ribosomal proteins whose structures are so far known.

  3. The SmpB C-terminal tail helps tmRNA to recognize and enter stalled ribosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickey R. Miller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA and SmpB comprise the most common and effective system for rescuing stalled ribosomes. Ribosomes stall on mRNA transcripts lacking stop codons and are rescued as the defective mRNA is swapped for the tmRNA template in a process known as trans-translation. The tmRNA–SmpB complex is recruited to the ribosome independent of a codon–anticodon interaction. Given that the ribosome uses robust discriminatory mechanisms to select against non-cognate tRNAs during canonical decoding, it has been hard to explain how this can happen. Recent structural and biochemical studies show that SmpB licenses tmRNA entry through its interactions with the decoding center and mRNA channel. In particular, the C-terminal tail of SmpB promotes both EFTu activation and accommodation of tmRNA, the former through interactions with 16S rRNA nucleotide G530 and the latter through interactions with the mRNA channel downstream of the A site. Here we present a detailed model of the earliest steps in trans-translation, and in light of these mechanistic considerations, revisit the question of how tmRNA preferentially reacts with stalled, non-translating ribosomes.

  4. Sponge non-metastatic Group I Nme gene/protein - structure and function is conserved from sponges to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Nucleoside diphosphate kinases NDPK are evolutionarily conserved enzymes present in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, with human Nme1 the most studied representative of the family and the first identified metastasis suppressor. Sponges (Porifera) are simple metazoans without tissues, closest to the common ancestor of all animals. They changed little during evolution and probably provide the best insight into the metazoan ancestor's genomic features. Recent studies show that sponges have a wide repertoire of genes many of which are involved in diseases in more complex metazoans. The original function of those genes and the way it has evolved in the animal lineage is largely unknown. Here we report new results on the metastasis suppressor gene/protein homolog from the marine sponge Suberites domuncula, NmeGp1Sd. The purpose of this study was to investigate the properties of the sponge Group I Nme gene and protein, and compare it to its human homolog in order to elucidate the evolution of the structure and function of Nme. Results We found that sponge genes coding for Group I Nme protein are intron-rich. Furthermore, we discovered that the sponge NmeGp1Sd protein has a similar level of kinase activity as its human homolog Nme1, does not cleave negatively supercoiled DNA and shows nonspecific DNA-binding activity. The sponge NmeGp1Sd forms a hexamer, like human Nme1, and all other eukaryotic Nme proteins. NmeGp1Sd interacts with human Nme1 in human cells and exhibits the same subcellular localization. Stable clones expressing sponge NmeGp1Sd inhibited the migratory potential of CAL 27 cells, as already reported for human Nme1, which suggests that Nme's function in migratory processes was engaged long before the composition of true tissues. Conclusions This study suggests that the ancestor of all animals possessed a NmeGp1 protein with properties and functions similar to evolutionarily recent versions of the protein, even before the appearance of true tissues

  5. Duplication of the IGFBP-2 gene in teleost fish: protein structure and functionality conservation and gene expression divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2 is a secreted protein that binds and regulates IGF actions in controlling growth, development, reproduction, and aging. Elevated expression of IGFBP-2 is often associated with progression of many types of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the identification and characterization of two IGFBP-2 genes in zebrafish and four other teleost fish. Comparative genomics and structural analyses suggest that they are co-orthologs of the human IGFBP-2 gene. Biochemical assays show that both zebrafish igfbp-2a and -2b encode secreted proteins that bind IGFs. These two genes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. During embryogenesis, IGFBP-2a mRNA is initially detected in the lens, then in the brain boundary vasculature, and subsequently becomes highly expressed in the liver. In the adult stage, liver has the highest levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA, followed by the brain. Low levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA were detected in muscle and in the gonad in male adults only. IGFBP-2b mRNA is detected initially in all tissues at low levels, but later becomes abundant in the liver. In adult males, IGFBP-2b mRNA is only detected in the liver. In adult females, it is also found in the gut, kidney, ovary, and muscle. To gain insights into how the IGFBP-2 genes may have evolved through partitioning of ancestral functions, functional and mechanistic studies were carried out. Expression of zebrafish IGFBP-2a and -2b caused significant decreases in the growth and developmental rates and their effects are comparable to that of human IGFBP-2. IGFBP-2 mutants with altered IGF binding-, RGD-, and heparin-binding sites were generated and their actions examined. While mutating the RGD and heparin binding sites had little effect, altering the IGF binding site abolished its biological activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that IGFBP-2 is a conserved regulatory protein and it inhibits

  6. Ribosomal protein L5 has a highly twisted concave surface and flexible arms responsible for rRNA binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, T; Yao, M; Kawamura, S; Iwasaki, K; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L5 is a 5S rRNA binding protein in the large subunit and plays an essential role in the promotion of a particular conformation of 5S rRNA. The crystal structure of the ribosomal protein L5 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. The molecule consists of a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and four alpha-helices, which fold in a way that is topologically similar to the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain. The molecular shape and electrostatic ...

  7. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D

    1999-01-01

    antibiotics, which also interact with this region of rRNA. Mutations of certain nucleotides in rRNA reduce aminoglycoside binding affinity, as previously demonstrated using a model RNA oligonucleotide system. Here, predictions from the oligonucleotide system were tested in the ribosome by mutation...... for the aminoglycoside paromomycin, whereas no discernible reduction in affinity was observed with 1406 mutant ribosomes. These data are consistent with prior NMR structural determination of aminoglycoside interaction with the decoding region, and further our understanding of how aminoglycoside resistance can...

  8. Structural analysis of recombinant human protein QM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualberto, D.C.H.; Fernandes, J.L.; Silva, F.S.; Saraiva, K.W.; Affonso, R.; Pereira, L.M.; Silva, I.D.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The ribosomal protein QM belongs to a family of ribosomal proteins, which is highly conserved from yeast to humans. The presence of the QM protein is necessary for joining the 60S and 40S subunits in a late step of the initiation of mRNA translation. Although the exact extra-ribosomal functions of QM are not yet fully understood, it has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor. This protein was reported to interact with the transcription factor c-Jun and thereby prevent c-Jun actives genes of the cellular growth. In this study, the human QM protein was expressed in bacterial system, in the soluble form and this structure was analyzed by Circular Dichroism and Fluorescence. The results of Circular Dichroism showed that this protein has less alpha helix than beta sheet, as described in the literature. QM protein does not contain a leucine zipper region; however the ion zinc is necessary for binding of QM to c-Jun. Then we analyzed the relationship between the removal of zinc ions and folding of protein. Preliminary results obtained by the technique Fluorescence showed a gradual increase in fluorescence with the addition of increasing concentration of EDTA. This suggests that the zinc is important in the tertiary structure of the protein. More studies are being made for better understand these results. (author)

  9. Insulin/IGF1-PI3K-dependent nucleolar localization of a glycolytic enzyme--phosphoglycerate mutase 2, is necessary for proper structure of nucleolus and RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizak, Agnieszka; Grenda, Marcin; Mamczur, Piotr; Wisniewski, Janusz; Sucharski, Filip; Silberring, Jerzy; McCubrey, James A; Wisniewski, Jacek R; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-07-10

    Phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM), a conserved, glycolytic enzyme has been found in nucleoli of cancer cells. Here, we present evidence that accumulation of PGAM in the nucleolus is a universal phenomenon concerning not only neoplastically transformed but also non-malignant cells. Nucleolar localization of the enzyme is dependent on the presence of the PGAM2 (muscle) subunit and is regulated by insulin/IGF-1-PI3K signaling pathway as well as drugs influencing ribosomal biogenesis. We document that PGAM interacts with several 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins and that silencing of PGAM2 expression results in disturbance of nucleolar structure, inhibition of RNA synthesis and decrease of the mitotic index of squamous cell carcinoma cells. We conclude that presence of PGAM in the nucleolus is a prerequisite for synthesis and initial assembly of new pre-ribosome subunits.

  10. De novo design and engineering of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhüyük, Kenan A. J.; Fleischhacker, Florian; Linck, Annabell; Wesche, Frank; Tietze, Andreas; Niesert, Claus-Peter; Bode, Helge B.

    2018-03-01

    Peptides derived from non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) represent an important class of pharmaceutically relevant drugs. Methods to generate novel non-ribosomal peptides or to modify peptide natural products in an easy and predictable way are therefore of great interest. However, although the overall modular structure of NRPSs suggests the possibility of adjusting domain specificity and selectivity, only a few examples have been reported and these usually show a severe drop in production titre. Here we report a new strategy for the modification of NRPSs that uses defined exchange units (XUs) and not modules as functional units. XUs are fused at specific positions that connect the condensation and adenylation domains and respect the original specificity of the downstream module to enable the production of the desired peptides. We also present the use of internal condensation domains as an alternative to other peptide-chain-releasing domains for the production of cyclic peptides.

  11. Translational regulation of ribosomal protein S15 drives characteristic patterns of protein-mRNA epistasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Basu, Sudipto; Hait, Suman; Kundu, Sudip

    2018-04-21

    Do coding and regulatory segments of a gene co-evolve with each-other? Seeking answers to this question, here we analyze the case of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S15, that represses its own translation by specifically binding its messenger RNA (rpsO mRNA) and stabilizing a pseudoknot structure at the upstream untranslated region, thus trapping the ribosome into an incomplete translation initiation complex. In the absence of S15, ribosomal protein S1 recognizes rpsO and promotes translation by melting this very pseudoknot. We employ a robust statistical method to detect signatures of positive epistasis between residue site pairs and find that biophysical constraints of translational regulation (S15-rpsO and S1-rpsO recognition, S15-mediated rpsO structural rearrangement, and S1-mediated melting) are strong predictors of positive epistasis. Transforming the epistatic pairs into a network, we find that signatures of two different, but interconnected regulatory cascades are imprinted in the sequence-space and can be captured in terms of two dense network modules that are sparsely connected to each other. This network topology further reflects a general principle of how functionally coupled components of biological networks are interconnected. These results depict a model case, where translational regulation drives characteristic residue-level epistasis-not only between a protein and its own mRNA but also between a protein and the mRNA of an entirely different protein. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Conservative secondary structure motifs already present in early-stage folding (in silico) as found in serpines family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylinski, Michal; Konieczny, Leszek; Kononowicz, Andrzej; Roterman, Irena

    2008-03-21

    The well-known procedure implemented in ClustalW oriented on the sequence comparison was applied to structure comparison. The consensus sequence as well as consensus structure has been defined for proteins belonging to serpine family. The structure of early stage intermediate was the object for similarity search. The high values of W(sequence) appeared to be accordant with high values of W(structure) making possible structure comparison using common criteria for sequence and structure comparison. Since the early stage structural form has been created according to limited conformational sub-space which does not include the beta-structure (this structure is mediated by C7eq structural form), is particularly important to see, that the C7eq structural form may be treated as the seed for beta-structure present in the final native structure of protein. The applicability of ClustalW procedure to structure comparison makes these two comparisons unified.

  13. Organization of Replication of Ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Huberman, Joel A.

    1988-01-01

    Using recently developed replicon mapping techniques, we have analyzed the replication of the ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results show that (i) the functional origin of replication colocalizes with an autonomously replicating sequence element previously mapped to the

  14. Impact of communal land use and conservation on woody vegetation structure in the Lowveld savannas of South Africa – Lidar results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wessels, Konrad J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available use and conservation on woody vegetation structure in the Lowveld savannas of South Africa ? Lidar results. K.J. Wesselsa*, R. Mathieub, B.F.N. Erasmusc, G.P. Asnerd, I.P.J. Smite, J.A.N. Van Aardtf, R. Mainb, J. Fisherb,c a Remote Sensing... with related studies, suggest that communal land use have a higher impact on the woody cover below 5m than both elephants and fire. Keywords: Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO), Lidar, fuel wood, South Africa, Savannas, woody vegetation structure 1...

  15. Oxidative damage of 18S and 5S ribosomal RNA in digestive gland of mussels exposed to trace metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kournoutou, Georgia G; Giannopoulou, Panagiota C; Sazakli, Eleni; Leotsinidis, Michel; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2017-11-01

    Numerous studies have shown the ability of trace metals to accumulate in marine organisms and cause oxidative stress that leads to perturbations in many important intracellular processes, including protein synthesis. This study is mainly focused on the exploration of structural changes, like base modifications, scissions, and conformational changes, caused in 18S and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to 40μg/L Cu, 30μg/L Hg, or 100μg/L Cd, for 5 or 15days. 18S rRNA and 5S rRNA are components of the small and large ribosomal subunit, respectively, found in complex with ribosomal proteins, translation factors and other auxiliary components (metal ions, toxins etc). 18S rRNA plays crucial roles in all stages of protein synthesis, while 5S rRNA serves as a master signal transducer between several functional regions of 28S rRNA. Therefore, structural changes in these ribosomal constituents could affect the basic functions of ribosomes and hence the normal metabolism of cells. Especially, 18S rRNA along with ribosomal proteins forms the decoding centre that ensures the correct codon-anticodon pairing. As exemplified by ELISA, primer extension analysis and DMS footprinting analysis, each metal caused oxidative damage to rRNA, depending on the nature of metal ion and the duration of exposure. Interestingly, exposure of mussels to Cu or Hg caused structural alterations in 5S rRNA, localized in paired regions and within loops A, B, C, and E, leading to a continuous progressive loss of the 5S RNA structural integrity. In contrast, structural impairments of 5S rRNA in mussels exposed to Cd were accumulating for the initial 5days, and then progressively decreased to almost the normal level by day 15, probably due to the parallel elevation of metallothionein content that depletes the pools of free Cd. Regions of interest in 18S rRNA, such as the decoding centre, sites implicated in the binding of tRNAs (A- and P-sites) or

  16. On the intracellular trafficking of mouse S5 ribosomal protein from cytoplasm to nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matragkou, Ch; Papachristou, H; Karetsou, Z; Papadopoulos, G; Papamarcaki, T; Vizirianakis, I S; Tsiftsoglou, A S; Choli-Papadopoulou, T

    2009-10-09

    The non-ribosomal functions of mammalian ribosomal proteins have recently attracted worldwide attention. The mouse ribosomal protein S5 (rpS5) derived from ribosomal material is an assembled non-phosphorylated protein. The free form of rpS5 protein, however, undergoes phosphorylation. In this study, we have (a) investigated the potential role of phosphorylation in rpS5 protein transport into the nucleus and then into nucleoli and (b) determined which of the domains of rpS5 are involved in this intracellular trafficking. In vitro PCR mutagenesis of mouse rpS5 cDNA, complemented by subsequent cloning and expression of rpS5 truncated recombinant forms, produced in fusion with green fluorescent protein, permitted the investigation of rpS5 intracellular trafficking in HeLa cells using confocal microscopy complemented by Western blot analysis. Our results indicate the following: (a) rpS5 protein enters the nucleus via the region 38-50 aa that forms a random coil as revealed by molecular dynamic simulation. (b) Immunoprecipitation of rpS5 with casein kinase II and immobilized metal affinity chromatography analysis complemented by in vitro kinase assay revealed that phosphorylation of rpS5 seems to be indispensable for its transport from nucleus to nucleoli; upon entering the nucleus, Thr-133 phosphorylation triggers Ser-24 phosphorylation by casein kinase II, thus promoting entrance of rpS5 into the nucleoli. Another important role of rpS5 N-terminal region is proposed to be the regulation of protein's cellular level. The repetitively co-appearance of a satellite C-terminal band below the entire rpS5 at the late stationary phase, and not at the early logarithmic phase, of cell growth suggests a specific degradation balancing probably the unassembled ribosomal protein molecules with those that are efficiently assembled to ribosomal subunits. Overall, these data provide new insights on the structural and functional domains within the rpS5 molecule that contribute to its

  17. Conservation Value

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the significance of the concept of conservation value and discusses ways in which it is determined paying attention to views stemming from utilitarian ethics and from deontological ethics. The importance of user costs in relation to economic decisions about the conservation and use of natural resources is emphasised. Particular attention is given to competing views about the importance of conserving natural resources in order to achieve economic sustainability. This then l...

  18. Using genetic profiles of African forest elephants to infer population structure, movements, and habitat use in a conservation and development landscape in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, L S; Buij, R; Lee, M E; Campbell, P; Dallmeier, F; Fleischer, R C; Alonso, A; Maldonado, J E

    2014-02-01

    Conservation of wide-ranging species, such as the African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), depends on fully protected areas and multiple-use areas (MUA) that provide habitat connectivity. In the Gamba Complex of Protected Areas in Gabon, which includes 2 national parks separated by a MUA containing energy and forestry concessions, we studied forest elephants to evaluate the importance of the MUA to wide-ranging species. We extracted DNA from elephant dung samples and used genetic information to identify over 500 individuals in the MUA and the parks. We then examined patterns of nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial control-region sequences to infer population structure, movement patterns, and habitat use by age and sex. Population structure was weak but significant, and differentiation was more pronounced during the wet season. Within the MUA, males were more strongly associated with open habitats, such as wetlands and savannas, than females during the dry season. Many of the movements detected within and between seasons involved the wetlands and bordering lagoons. Our results suggest that the MUA provides year-round habitat for some elephants and additional habitat for others whose primary range is in the parks. With the continuing loss of roadless wilderness areas in Central Africa, well-managed MUAs will likely be important to the conservation of wide-ranging species. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Structural and functional determinants of conserved lipid interaction domains of inward rectifying Kir6.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine A; Jeliazkova, Iana; Nichols, Colin G

    2002-06-01

    All members of the inward rectifiier K(+) (Kir) channel family are activated by phosphoinositides and other amphiphilic lipids. To further elucidate the mechanistic basis, we examined the membrane association of Kir6.2 fragments of K(ATP) channels, and the effects of site-directed mutations of these fragments and full-length Kir6.2 on membrane association and K(ATP) channel activity, respectively. GFP-tagged Kir6.2 COOH terminus and GFP-tagged pleckstrin homology domain from phospholipase C delta1 both associate with isolated membranes, and association of each is specifically reduced by muscarinic m1 receptor-mediated phospholipid depletion. Kir COOH termini are predicted to contain multiple beta-strands and a conserved alpha-helix (residues approximately 306-311 in Kir6.2). Systematic mutagenesis of D307-F315 reveals a critical role of E308, I309, W311 and F315, consistent with residues lying on one side of a alpha-helix. Together with systematic mutation of conserved charges, the results define critical determinants of a conserved domain that underlies phospholipid interaction in Kir channels.

  20. Evolutional dynamics of 45S and 5S ribosomal DNA in ancient allohexaploid Atropa belladonna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Roman A; Panchuk, Irina I; Borisjuk, Nikolai V; Hosiawa-Baranska, Marta; Maluszynska, Jolanta; Hemleben, Vera

    2017-01-23

    Polyploid hybrids represent a rich natural resource to study molecular evolution of plant genes and genomes. Here, we applied a combination of karyological and molecular methods to investigate chromosomal structure, molecular organization and evolution of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in nightshade, Atropa belladonna (fam. Solanaceae), one of the oldest known allohexaploids among flowering plants. Because of their abundance and specific molecular organization (evolutionarily conserved coding regions linked to variable intergenic spacers, IGS), 45S and 5S rDNA are widely used in plant taxonomic and evolutionary studies. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of A. belladonna 45S rDNA repeats revealed a general structure characteristic of other Solanaceae species, and a very high sequence similarity of two length variants, with the only difference in number of short IGS subrepeats. These results combined with the detection of three pairs of 45S rDNA loci on separate chromosomes, presumably inherited from both tetraploid and diploid ancestor species, example intensive sequence homogenization that led to substitution/elimination of rDNA repeats of one parent. Chromosome silver-staining revealed that only four out of six 45S rDNA sites are frequently transcriptionally active, demonstrating nucleolar dominance. For 5S rDNA, three size variants of repeats were detected, with the major class represented by repeats containing all functional IGS elements required for transcription, the intermediate size repeats containing partially deleted IGS sequences, and the short 5S repeats containing severe defects both in the IGS and coding sequences. While shorter variants demonstrate increased rate of based substitution, probably in their transition into pseudogenes, the functional 5S rDNA variants are nearly identical at the sequence level, pointing to their origin from a single parental species. Localization of the 5S rDNA genes on two chromosome pairs further supports uniparental

  1. Structural basis for new pattern of conserved amino acid residues related to chitin-binding in the antifungal peptide from the coconut rhinoceros beetle Oryctes rhinoceros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, Hikaru; Ishibashi, Jun; Tomie, Tetsuya; Yamakawa, Minoru

    2003-06-20

    Scarabaecin isolated from hemolymph of the coconut rhinoceros beetle Oryctes rhinoceros is a 36-residue polypeptide that has antifungal activity. The solution structure of scarabaecin has been determined from twodimensional 1H NMR spectroscopic data and hybrid distance geometry-simulated annealing protocol calculation. Based on 492 interproton and 10 hydrogen-bonding distance restraints and 36 dihedral angle restraints, we obtained 20 structures. The average backbone root-mean-square deviation for residues 4-35 is 0.728 +/- 0.217 A from the mean structure. The solution structure consists of a two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet connected by a type-I beta-turn after a short helical turn. All secondary structures and a conserved disulfide bond are located in the C-terminal half of the peptide, residues 18-36. Overall folding is stabilized by a combination of a disulfide bond, seven hydrogen bonds, and numerous hydrophobic interactions. The structural motif of the C-terminal half shares a significant tertiary structural similarity with chitin-binding domains of plant and invertebrate chitin-binding proteins, even though scarabaecin has no overall sequence similarity to other peptide/polypeptides including chitin-binding proteins. The length of its primary structure, the number of disulfide bonds, and the pattern of conserved functional residues binding to chitin in scarabaecin differ from those of chitin-binding proteins in other invertebrates and plants, suggesting that scarabaecin does not share a common ancestor with them. These results are thought to provide further strong experimental evidence to the hypothesis that chitin-binding proteins of invertebrates and plants are correlated by a convergent evolution process.

  2. Klebsazolicin inhibits 70S ribosome by obstructing the peptide exit tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metelev, Mikhail; Osterman, Ilya A.; Ghilarov, Dmitry; Khabibullina, Nelli F.; Yakimov, Alexander; Shabalin, Konstantin; Utkina, Irina; Travin, Dmitry Y.; Komarova, Ekaterina S.; Serebryakova, Marina; Artamonova, Tatyana; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Konevega, Andrey L.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Severinov, Konstantin; Polikanov, Yury S.

    2017-08-28

    Whereas screening of the small-molecule metabolites produced by most cultivatable microorganisms often results in the rediscovery of known compounds, genome-mining programs allow researchers to harness much greater chemical diversity, and result in the discovery of new molecular scaffolds. Here we report the genome-guided identification of a new antibiotic, klebsazolicin (KLB), from Klebsiella pneumoniae that inhibits the growth of sensitive cells by targeting ribosomes. A ribosomally synthesized post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP), KLB is characterized by the presence of a unique N-terminal amidine ring that is essential for its activity. Biochemical in vitro studies indicate that KLB inhibits ribosomes by interfering with translation elongation. Structural analysis of the ribosome–KLB complex showed that the compound binds in the peptide exit tunnel overlapping with the binding sites of macrolides or streptogramin-B. KLB adopts a compact conformation and largely obstructs the tunnel. Engineered KLB fragments were observed to retain in vitro activity, and thus have the potential to serve as a starting point for the development of new bioactive compounds.

  3. Post-translational modification of ribosomally synthesized peptides by a radical SAM epimerase in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Guillot, Alain; Ruffié, Pauline; Leprince, Jérôme; Berteau, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Ribosomally synthesized peptides are built out of L-amino acids, whereas D-amino acids are generally the hallmark of non-ribosomal synthetic processes. Here we show that the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to produce a novel type of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide that contains D-amino acids, and which we propose to call epipeptides. We demonstrate that a two [4Fe-4S]-cluster radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme converts L-amino acids into their D-counterparts by catalysing Cα-hydrogen-atom abstraction and using a critical cysteine residue as the hydrogen-atom donor. Unexpectedly, these D-amino acid residues proved to be essential for the activity of a peptide that induces the expression of LiaRS, a major component of the bacterial cell envelope stress-response system. Present in B. subtilis and in several members of the human microbiome, these epipeptides and radical SAM epimerases broaden the landscape of peptidyl structures accessible to living organisms.

  4. Resistance to Linezolid Caused by Modifications at Its Binding Site on the Ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Katherine S.

    2012-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic in clinical use for the treatment of serious infections of resistant Gram-positive bacteria. It inhibits protein synthesis by binding to the peptidyl transferase center on the ribosome. Almost all known resistance mechanisms involve small alterations to the linezolid binding site, so this review will therefore focus on the various changes that can adversely affect drug binding and confer resistance. High-resolution structures of linezolid bound to the 50S ribosomal subunit show that it binds in a deep cleft that is surrounded by 23S rRNA nucleotides. Mutation of 23S rRNA has for some time been established as a linezolid resistance mechanism. Although ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 are located further away from the bound drug, mutations in specific regions of these proteins are increasingly being associated with linezolid resistance. However, very little evidence has been presented to confirm this. Furthermore, recent findings on the Cfr methyltransferase underscore the modification of 23S rRNA as a highly effective and transferable form of linezolid resistance. On a positive note, detailed knowledge of the linezolid binding site has facilitated the design of a new generation of oxazolidinones that show improved properties against the known resistance mechanisms. PMID:22143525

  5. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R; Firth, Andrew E; Baranov, Pavel V

    2016-09-06

    Genetic decoding is not 'frozen' as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational 'correction' of problem or 'savior' indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5' or 3' of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3' from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Defective replication initiation results in locus specific chromosome breakage and a ribosomal RNA deficiency in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Sanchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A form of dwarfism known as Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS is caused by recessive mutations in one of six different genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDC6, CDT1, and MCM5. These genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, which assembles at origins of replication prior to S phase. Also, variants in two additional replication initiation genes have joined the list of causative mutations for MGS (Geminin and CDC45. The identity of the causative MGS genetic variants strongly suggests that some aspect of replication is amiss in MGS patients; however, little evidence has been obtained regarding what aspect of chromosome replication is faulty. Since the site of one of the missense mutations in the human ORC4 alleles is conserved between humans and yeast, we sought to determine in what way this single amino acid change affects the process of chromosome replication, by introducing the comparable mutation into yeast (orc4Y232C. We find that yeast cells with the orc4Y232C allele have a prolonged S-phase, due to compromised replication initiation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus located on chromosome XII. The inability to initiate replication at the rDNA locus results in chromosome breakage and a severely reduced rDNA copy number in the survivors, presumably helping to ensure complete replication of chromosome XII. Although reducing rDNA copy number may help ensure complete chromosome replication, orc4Y232C cells struggle to meet the high demand for ribosomal RNA synthesis. This finding provides additional evidence linking two essential cellular pathways-DNA replication and ribosome biogenesis.

  7. Defective replication initiation results in locus specific chromosome breakage and a ribosomal RNA deficiency in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Joseph C; Kwan, Elizabeth X; Pohl, Thomas J; Amemiya, Haley M; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2017-10-01

    A form of dwarfism known as Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is caused by recessive mutations in one of six different genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDC6, CDT1, and MCM5). These genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, which assembles at origins of replication prior to S phase. Also, variants in two additional replication initiation genes have joined the list of causative mutations for MGS (Geminin and CDC45). The identity of the causative MGS genetic variants strongly suggests that some aspect of replication is amiss in MGS patients; however, little evidence has been obtained regarding what aspect of chromosome replication is faulty. Since the site of one of the missense mutations in the human ORC4 alleles is conserved between humans and yeast, we sought to determine in what way this single amino acid change affects the process of chromosome replication, by introducing the comparable mutation into yeast (orc4Y232C). We find that yeast cells with the orc4Y232C allele have a prolonged S-phase, due to compromised replication initiation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus located on chromosome XII. The inability to initiate replication at the rDNA locus results in chromosome breakage and a severely reduced rDNA copy number in the survivors, presumably helping to ensure complete replication of chromosome XII. Although reducing rDNA copy number may help ensure complete chromosome replication, orc4Y232C cells struggle to meet the high demand for ribosomal RNA synthesis. This finding provides additional evidence linking two essential cellular pathways-DNA replication and ribosome biogenesis.

  8. Effect of sodium fluoride on the amount of polyribosomes, single ribosomes and ribosomal subunits in a cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sameshima, M; Ito, K; Iwabuchi, M

    1972-01-01

    In the slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, when the rate of protein synthesis was decreased by NaF, free 80-S ribosomes accumulated at the expense of polyribosomes, while 60-S and 40-S ribosomal subunits remained almost constant. The same level of ribosomal subunits was also maintained in cells after incubation with cycloheximide or at the stationary phase of growth.

  9. Soil conservation measures: exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Tomás de; Fonseca, Felícia

    2009-01-01

    Exercises proposed under the topic of Soil Conservation Measures addresses to the design of structural measure, namely waterways in the context of a soil conservation plan. However, to get a better insight on the actual meaning of soil loss as a resource loss, a prior exercise is proposed to students. It concerns calculations of soil loss due to sheet (interrill) erosion and to gully erosion, and allows the perception through realistic number of the impact of these mechanism...

  10. Mitochondrial Genetic Structure and Matrilineal Origin of White Sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, in the Northeastern Pacific: Implications for Their Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate-González, Erick C; Rocha-Olivares, Axayácatl; Saavedra-Sotelo, Nancy C; Sosa-Nishizaki, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    White sharks (Carcharodon carcharias, WS henceforth) are globally and regionally threatened. Understanding their patterns of abundance and connectivity, as they relate to habitat use, is central for delineating conservation units and identifying priority areas for conservation. We analyzed mitochondrial data to test the congruence between patterns of genetic connectivity and of individual movements in the Northeastern Pacific (NEP) and to trace the matrilineal origin of immature WS from coastal California and Baja California to adult aggregation areas. We analyzed 186 mitochondrial control region sequences from sharks sampled in Central California (CC; n = 61), Southern California Bight (SCB; n = 25), Baja California Pacific coast (BCPC; n = 9), Bahía Vizcaíno (BV; n = 39), Guadalupe Island (GI; n = 45), and the Gulf of California (GC; n = 7). Significant mitochondrial differentiation between adult aggregation areas (CC, GI) revealed two reproductive populations in the NEP. We found general concordance between movement patterns of young and adult WS with genetic results. Young sharks from coastal California and Baja California were more likely born from females from GI. Mitochondrial differentiation of young-of-the-year from SCB and BV suggests philopatry to nursery areas in females from GI. These results provide a genetic basis of female reproductive behavior at a regional scale and point to a preponderance of sharks from GI in the use of the sampled coastal region as pupping habitat. These findings should be considered in Mexican and US management and conservation strategies of the WS NEP population. © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  12. Notes on Conservation Laws, Equations of Motion of Matter, and Particle Fields in Lorentzian and Teleparallel de Sitter Space-Time Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldyr A. Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the physics of interacting fields and particles living in a de Sitter Lorentzian manifold (dSLM, a submanifold of a 5-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean (5dPE equipped with a metric tensor inherited from the metric of the 5dPE space. The dSLM is naturally oriented and time oriented and is the arena used to study the energy-momentum conservation law and equations of motion for physical systems living there. Two distinct de Sitter space-time structures MdSL and MdSTP are introduced given dSLM, the first equipped with the Levi-Civita connection of its metric field and the second with a metric compatible parallel connection. Both connections are used only as mathematical devices. Thus, for example, MdSL is not supposed to be the model of any gravitational field in the General Relativity Theory (GRT. Misconceptions appearing in the literature concerning the motion of free particles in dSLM are clarified. Komar currents are introduced within Clifford bundle formalism permitting the presentation of Einstein equation as a Maxwell like equation and proving that in GRT there are infinitely many conserved currents. We prove that in GRT even when the appropriate Killing vector fields exist it is not possible to define a conserved energy-momentum covector as in special relativistic theories.

  13. Optimizing multiple sequence alignments using a genetic algorithm based on three objectives: structural information, non-gaps percentage and totally conserved columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Francisco M; Valenzuela, Olga; Rojas, Fernando; Pomares, Hector; Florido, Javier P; Urquiza, Jose M; Rojas, Ignacio

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) are widely used approaches in bioinformatics to carry out other tasks such as structure predictions, biological function analyses or phylogenetic modeling. However, current tools usually provide partially optimal alignments, as each one is focused on specific biological features. Thus, the same set of sequences can produce different alignments, above all when sequences are less similar. Consequently, researchers and biologists do not agree about which is the most suitable way to evaluate MSAs. Recent evaluations tend to use more complex scores including further biological features. Among them, 3D structures are increasingly being used to evaluate alignments. Because structures are more conserved in proteins than sequences, scores with structural information are better suited to evaluate more distant relationships between sequences. The proposed multiobjective algorithm, based on the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, aims to jointly optimize three objectives: STRIKE score, non-gaps percentage and totally conserved columns. It was significantly assessed on the BAliBASE benchmark according to the Kruskal-Wallis test (P algorithm also outperforms other aligners, such as ClustalW, Multiple Sequence Alignment Genetic Algorithm (MSA-GA), PRRP, DIALIGN, Hidden Markov Model Training (HMMT), Pattern-Induced Multi-sequence Alignment (PIMA), MULTIALIGN, Sequence Alignment Genetic Algorithm (SAGA), PILEUP, Rubber Band Technique Genetic Algorithm (RBT-GA) and Vertical Decomposition Genetic Algorithm (VDGA), according to the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P 0.05) with the advantage of being able to use less structures. Structural information is included within the objective function to evaluate more accurately the obtained alignments. The source code is available at http://www.ugr.es/~fortuno/MOSAStrE/MO-SAStrE.zip.

  14. Multidimensional Riemann problem with self-similar internal structure - part III - a multidimensional analogue of the HLLI Riemann solver for conservative hyperbolic systems

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    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Nkonga, Boniface

    2017-10-01

    Just as the quality of a one-dimensional approximate Riemann solver is improved by the inclusion of internal sub-structure, the quality of a multidimensional Riemann solver is also similarly improved. Such multidimensional Riemann problems arise when multiple states come together at the vertex of a mesh. The interaction of the resulting one-dimensional Riemann problems gives rise to a strongly-interacting state. We wish to endow this strongly-interacting state with physically-motivated sub-structure. The fastest way of endowing such sub-structure consists of making a multidimensional extension of the HLLI Riemann solver for hyperbolic conservation laws. Presenting such a multidimensional analogue of the HLLI Riemann solver with linear sub-structure for use on structured meshes is the goal of this work. The multidimensional MuSIC Riemann solver documented here is universal in the sense that it can be applied to any hyperbolic conservation law. The multidimensional Riemann solver is made to be consistent with constraints that emerge naturally from the Galerkin projection of the self-similar states within the wave model. When the full eigenstructure in both directions is used in the present Riemann solver, it becomes a complete Riemann solver in a multidimensional sense. I.e., all the intermediate waves are represented in the multidimensional wave model. The work also presents, for the very first time, an important analysis of the dissipation characteristics of multidimensional Riemann solvers. The present Riemann solver results in the most efficient implementation of a multidimensional Riemann solver with sub-structure. Because it preserves stationary linearly degenerate waves, it might also help with well-balancing. Implementation-related details are presented in pointwise fashion for the one-dimensional HLLI Riemann solver as well as the multidimensional MuSIC Riemann solver.

  15. Curli Fibers Are Highly Conserved between Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli with Respect to Operon Structure and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Bian, Zhao; Hammar, Mårten; Sierralta, Walter D.; Normark, Staffan

    1998-01-01

    Mouse-virulent Salmonella typhimurium strains SR-11 and ATCC 14028-1s express curli fibers, thin aggregative fibers, at ambient temperature on plates as judged by Western blot analysis and electron microscopy. Concomitantly with curli expression, cells develop a rough and dry colony morphology and bind the dye Congo red (called the rdar morphotype). Cloning and characterization of the two divergently transcribed operons required for curli biogenesis, csgBA(C) and csgDEFG, from S. typhimurium SR-11 revealed the same gene order and flanking genes as in Escherichia coli. The divergence of the curli region between S. typhimurium and E. coli at the nucleotide level is above average (22.4%). However, a high level of conservation at the protein level, which ranged from 86% amino acid homology for the fiber subunit CsgA to 99% homology for the lipoprotein CsgG, implies functional constraints on the gene products. Consequently, S. typhimurium genes on low-copy-number plasmids were able to complement respective E. coli mutants, although not always to wild-type levels. rpoS and ompR are required for transcriptional activation of (at least) the csgD promoter. The high degree of conservation at the protein level and the identical regulation patterns in E. coli and S. typhimurium suggest similar roles of curli fibers in the same ecological niche in the two species. PMID:9457880

  16. A synthesis of European seahorse taxonomy, population structure, and habitat use as a basis for assessment, monitoring and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Lucy C; Otero-Ferrer, Francisco; Correia, Miguel; Curtis, Janelle M R; Garrick-Maidment, Neil; Shaw, Paul W; Koldewey, Heather J

    2018-01-01

    Accurate taxonomy, population demography, and habitat descriptors inform species threat assessments and the design of effective conservation measures. Here we combine published studies with new genetic, morphological and habitat data that were collected from seahorse populations located along the European and North African coastlines to help inform management decisions for European seahorses. This study confirms the presence of only two native seahorse species ( Hippocampus guttulatus and H. hippocampus ) across Europe, with sporadic occurrence of non-native seahorse species in European waters. For the two native species, our findings demonstrate that highly variable morphological characteristics, such as size and presence or number of cirri, are unreliable for distinguishing species. Both species exhibit sex dimorphism with females being significantly larger. Across its range, H. guttulatus were larger and found at higher densities in cooler waters, and individuals in the Black Sea were significantly smaller than in other populations. H. hippocampus were significantly larger in Senegal. Hippocampus guttulatus tends to have higher density populations than H. hippocampus when they occur sympatrically. Although these species are often associated with seagrass beds, data show both species inhabit a wide variety of shallow habitats and use a mixture of holdfasts. We suggest an international mosaic of protected areas focused on multiple habitat types as the first step to successful assessment, monitoring and conservation management of these Data Deficient species.

  17. Structural and Sequence Similarities of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum A Protein to Human Homolog Suggest Early Evolution and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Barve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1 and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70 proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla.

  18. Molecular characterization of 5S ribosomal RNA genes and transcripts in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Rojas-Sánchez, Saúl; Vélez-Ramírez, Daniel E; Padilla-Mejía, Norma E; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa; Manning-Cela, Rebeca; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic 5S rRNA, synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit. Most organisms contain hundreds of 5S rRNA genes organized into tandem arrays. However, the genome of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major contains only 11 copies of the 5S rRNA gene, which are interspersed and associated with other Pol III-transcribed genes. Here we report that, in general, the number and order of the 5S rRNA genes is conserved between different species of Leishmania. While in most organisms 5S rRNA genes are normally associated with the nucleolus, combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence experiments showed that 5S rRNA genes are mainly located at the nuclear periphery in L. major. Similarly, the tandemly repeated 5S rRNA genes in Trypanosoma cruzi are dispersed throughout the nucleus. In contrast, 5S rRNA transcripts in L. major were localized within the nucleolus, and scattered throughout the cytoplasm, where mature ribosomes are located. Unlike other rRNA species, stable antisense RNA complementary to 5S rRNA is not detected in L. major.

  19. Ribosomes slide on lysine-encoding homopolymeric A stretches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutmou, Kristin S; Schuller, Anthony P; Brunelle, Julie L; Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Djuranovic, Sergej; Green, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Protein output from synonymous codons is thought to be equivalent if appropriate tRNAs are sufficiently abundant. Here we show that mRNAs encoding iterated lysine codons, AAA or AAG, differentially impact protein synthesis: insertion of iterated AAA codons into an ORF diminishes protein expression more than insertion of synonymous AAG codons. Kinetic studies in E. coli reveal that differential protein production results from pausing on consecutive AAA-lysines followed by ribosome sliding on homopolymeric A sequence. Translation in a cell-free expression system demonstrates that diminished output from AAA-codon-containing reporters results from premature translation termination on out of frame stop codons following ribosome sliding. In eukaryotes, these premature termination events target the mRNAs for Nonsense-Mediated-Decay (NMD). The finding that ribosomes slide on homopolymeric A sequences explains bioinformatic analyses indicating that consecutive AAA codons are under-represented in gene-coding sequences. Ribosome ‘sliding’ represents an unexpected type of ribosome movement possible during translation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05534.001 PMID:25695637

  20. The Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Protein in Lemna minor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewavas, A.

    1973-01-01

    Sterile cultures of Lemna minor have been labeled with 32P1, and the ribosomal proteins have been examined for radioactivity. In relatively short term labeling a radioactive protein was found which ran as a single component in both urea/acetic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Acid hydrolysis of the labeled protein permitted the isolation of serine phosphate. After labeling to equilibrium with 32P1, calculation indicated only 0.6 to 0.75 atom of this protein phosphorus per ribosome. The phosphorylated protein is found in both polysomes and “derived” monomers and appears to be located in the ribosomal small subunit. Its apparent molecular weight is 42,000. Addition of growth-inhibiting concentrations of abscisic acid does not alter the apparent degree of labeling of this protein in 5 hours, but after 24 hours of treatment the total protein phosphorus was reduced from 0.75 atom of phosphorus per ribosome to 0.36 atom of phosphorus per ribosome. PMID:16658405