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Sample records for structural parameters evolution

  1. Mixed integer evolution strategies for parameter optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Emmerich, Michael T M; Eggermont, Jeroen; Bäck, Thomas; Schütz, M; Dijkstra, J; Reiber, J H C

    2013-01-01

    Evolution strategies (ESs) are powerful probabilistic search and optimization algorithms gleaned from biological evolution theory. They have been successfully applied to a wide range of real world applications. The modern ESs are mainly designed for solving continuous parameter optimization problems. Their ability to adapt the parameters of the multivariate normal distribution used for mutation during the optimization run makes them well suited for this domain. In this article we describe and study mixed integer evolution strategies (MIES), which are natural extensions of ES for mixed integer optimization problems. MIES can deal with parameter vectors consisting not only of continuous variables but also with nominal discrete and integer variables. Following the design principles of the canonical evolution strategies, they use specialized mutation operators tailored for the aforementioned mixed parameter classes. For each type of variable, the choice of mutation operators is governed by a natural metric for this variable type, maximal entropy, and symmetry considerations. All distributions used for mutation can be controlled in their shape by means of scaling parameters, allowing self-adaptation to be implemented. After introducing and motivating the conceptual design of the MIES, we study the optimality of the self-adaptation of step sizes and mutation rates on a generalized (weighted) sphere model. Moreover, we prove global convergence of the MIES on a very general class of problems. The remainder of the article is devoted to performance studies on artificial landscapes (barrier functions and mixed integer NK landscapes), and a case study in the optimization of medical image analysis systems. In addition, we show that with proper constraint handling techniques, MIES can also be applied to classical mixed integer nonlinear programming problems.

  2. Temperature-dependent structure evolution in liquid gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.H.; Wang, X.D.; Yu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Sun, Y.; Cao, Q.P.; Xie, H.L.; Xiao, T.Q.; Zhang, D.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ho, K.M.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature-dependent atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium (Ga) has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Both experimental and theoretical results reveal the existence of a liquid structural change around 1000 K in liquid Ga. Below and above this temperature the liquid exhibits differences in activation energy for self-diffusion, temperature-dependent heat capacity, coordination numbers, density, viscosity, electric resistivity and thermoelectric power, which are reflected from structural changes of the bond-orientational order parameter Q_6, fraction of covalent dimers, averaged string length and local atomic packing. This finding will trigger more studies on the liquid-to-liquid crossover in metallic melts. - Graphical abstract: Atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, which both demonstrate the existence of a liquid structural change together with reported density, viscosity, electric resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power data.

  3. Topological representation of the porous structure and its evolution of reservoir sandstone under excavation-induced loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The porous structure of a reservoir rock greatly influences its evolutive deformation and fracture behavior during excavation of natural resources reservoirs. Most numerical models for porous structures have been used to predict the quasi-static mechanical properties, but few are available to accurately characterize the evolution process of the porous structure and its influence on the macroscopic properties of reservoir rocks. This study reports a novel method to characterize the porous structure of sandstone using its topological parameters and to determine the laws that govern the evolutive deformation and failure of the topological structure under various uniaxial compressive loads. A numerical model of the porous sandstone was established based on the pore characteristics that were acquired using computed tomography imaging techniques. The analytical method that integrates the grassfire algorithm and the maximum inscribed sphere algorithm was proposed to create the 3-D topological model of the deformed porous structure, through which the topological parameters of the structure were measured and identified. The evolution processes of the porous structure under various loads were characterized using its equivalent topological model and parameters. This study opens a new way to characterize the dynamic evolution of the pore structure of reservoir sandstone under excavation disturbance.

  4. Stellar Structure and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenhahn, Rudolf; Weiss, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This long-awaited second edition of the classical textbook on Stellar Structure and Evolution by Kippenhahn and Weigert is a thoroughly revised version of the original text. Taking into account modern observational constraints as well as additional physical effects such as mass loss and diffusion, Achim Weiss and Rudolf Kippenhahn have succeeded in bringing the book up to the state-of-the-art with respect to both the presentation of stellar physics and the presentation and interpretation of current sophisticated stellar models. The well-received and proven pedagogical approach of the first edition has been retained. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of the physics of the stellar interior and the underlying fundamental processes and parameters. The models developed to explain the stability, dynamics and evolution of the stars are presented and great care is taken to detail the various stages in a star’s life. Just as the first edition, which remained a standard work for more than 20 years after its...

  5. Harmony Search Based Parameter Ensemble Adaptation for Differential Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rammohan Mallipeddi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In differential evolution (DE algorithm, depending on the characteristics of the problem at hand and the available computational resources, different strategies combined with a different set of parameters may be effective. In addition, a single, well-tuned combination of strategies and parameters may not guarantee optimal performance because different strategies combined with different parameter settings can be appropriate during different stages of the evolution. Therefore, various adaptive/self-adaptive techniques have been proposed to adapt the DE strategies and parameters during the course of evolution. In this paper, we propose a new parameter adaptation technique for DE based on ensemble approach and harmony search algorithm (HS. In the proposed method, an ensemble of parameters is randomly sampled which form the initial harmony memory. The parameter ensemble evolves during the course of the optimization process by HS algorithm. Each parameter combination in the harmony memory is evaluated by testing them on the DE population. The performance of the proposed adaptation method is evaluated using two recently proposed strategies (DE/current-to-pbest/bin and DE/current-to-gr_best/bin as basic DE frameworks. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptation technique compared to the state-of-the-art DE based algorithms on a set of challenging test problems (CEC 2005.

  6. Subsurface defects structural evolution in nano-cutting of single crystal copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Quanlong; Bai, Qingshun; Chen, Jiaxuan; Sun, Yazhou; Guo, Yongbo; Liang, Yingchun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative analysis method is adopted to analyze nano-cutting process accurately. • A characteristic SFT and stair-rod dislocation are found in subsurface defect layer. • The formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated. • The local atomic structure of subsurface defects is introduced. - Abstract: In this work, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the subsurface defects structural distribution and its evolution during nano-cutting process of single crystal copper. The formation mechanism of chip and machined surface is interviewed by analyzing the dislocation evolution and atomic migration. The centro-symmetry parameter and spherical harmonics method are adopted to characterize the distribution and evolution of the subsurface defect structures and local atomic structures. The results show that stacking faults, dislocation loops, “V-shaped” dislocation loops, and plenty of point defects are formed during the machined surface being formed in shear-slip zone. In subsurface damage layers, stair-rod dislocation, stacking fault tetrahedra, atomic cluster defect, and vacancy defect are formed. And the formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated by atomic-scale structure evolution. The local atomic structures of subsurface defects are icosahedrons, hexagonal close packed, body-centered cubic, and defect face center cubic, and the variations of local atomic structures are investigated

  7. Subsurface defects structural evolution in nano-cutting of single crystal copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Quanlong [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Bai, Qingshun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Jiaxuan, E-mail: wangquanlong0@hit.edu.cn [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Yazhou [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Guo, Yongbo [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liang, Yingchun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • An innovative analysis method is adopted to analyze nano-cutting process accurately. • A characteristic SFT and stair-rod dislocation are found in subsurface defect layer. • The formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated. • The local atomic structure of subsurface defects is introduced. - Abstract: In this work, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the subsurface defects structural distribution and its evolution during nano-cutting process of single crystal copper. The formation mechanism of chip and machined surface is interviewed by analyzing the dislocation evolution and atomic migration. The centro-symmetry parameter and spherical harmonics method are adopted to characterize the distribution and evolution of the subsurface defect structures and local atomic structures. The results show that stacking faults, dislocation loops, “V-shaped” dislocation loops, and plenty of point defects are formed during the machined surface being formed in shear-slip zone. In subsurface damage layers, stair-rod dislocation, stacking fault tetrahedra, atomic cluster defect, and vacancy defect are formed. And the formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated by atomic-scale structure evolution. The local atomic structures of subsurface defects are icosahedrons, hexagonal close packed, body-centered cubic, and defect face center cubic, and the variations of local atomic structures are investigated.

  8. Stochastic evolution of cosmological parameters in the early universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We develop a stochastic formulation of cosmology in the early universe, after considering the scatter in the redshift-apparent magnitude diagram in the early epochs as an observational evidence for the non-deterministic evolution of early universe. We consider the stochastic evolution of density parameter in the early ...

  9. Evolution of dispersion fuel meat structure caused by interface reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2000-01-01

    In reactor operation, the resultant layers are formed by interdiffusion at the fuel particle-matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. This results in the evolution of meat structure. On the basis of Monte-Carlo method, the author developed simulation method of fuel meat, and simulated the stochastic space locations of spherical fuel particles in the meat. The fuel volume fraction is 43%, and the particles are in definite size distribution. For the 13551 simulated particle samples, the evolution of meat structure is calculated with layer thickness ranging from 0 to 16 μm. The parameters of meat structure include the U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, resultant layer volume fraction, Al matrix volume fraction, particle contact probability and overlap degree as functions of layer thickness

  10. Parameter Estimation of Damped Compound Pendulum Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Mohd Sazli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the parameter identification of damped compound pendulum using differential evolution algorithm. The procedure used to achieve the parameter identification of the experimental system consisted of input output data collection, ARX model order selection and parameter estimation using conventional method least square (LS and differential evolution (DE algorithm. PRBS signal is used to be input signal to regulate the motor speed. Whereas, the output signal is taken from position sensor. Both, input and output data is used to estimate the parameter of the ARX model. The residual error between the actual and predicted output responses of the models is validated using mean squares error (MSE. Analysis showed that, MSE value for LS is 0.0026 and MSE value for DE is 3.6601×10-5. Based results obtained, it was found that DE have lower MSE than the LS method.

  11. Evolution of operational parameters in a UASB wastewater plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this research was to establish the operational parameters of the plant and evolution of elimination of pollutants. Influent and effluent parameters used for this research, were oils, volatile fatty acidity, alkalinity, ammonium, bacteria, flow, chlorides, BOD, detergents, COD, phosphates, total nitrogen, pH, ...

  12. Stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippernhahn, R.; Weigert, A.

    1990-01-01

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included

  13. Study of the lattice parameter evolution of PWR irradiated MOX fuel by X-Ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavier, B.

    1995-01-01

    Fuel irradiation leads to a swelling resulting from the formation of gaseous (Kr, Xe) or solid fission products which are found either in solution or as solid inclusions in the matrix. This phenomena has to be evaluated to be taken into account in fuel cladding Interaction. Fuel swelling was studied as a function of burn up by measuring the corresponding cell constant evolution by X-Ray diffraction. This study was realized on Mixed Oxide Fuels (MOX) irradiated in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at different burn-up for 3 initial Pu contents. Lattice parameter evolutions were followed as a function of burn-up for the irradiated fuel with and without an annealing thermal treatment. These experimental evolutions are compared to the theoretical evolutions calculated from the hard sphere model, using the fission product concentrations determined by the APPOLO computer code. Contribution of varying parameters influencing the unit cell value is discussed. Thermal treatment effects were checked by metallography, X-Ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. After thermal treatment, no structural change was observed but a decrease of the lattice parameter was measured. This modification results essentially from self-irradiation defect annealing and not from stoichiometry variations. Microprobe analysis showed that about 15% of the formed Molybdenum is in solid solution In the oxide matrix. Micrographs showed the existence of Pu packs in the oxide matrix which induces a broadening of diffraction lines. The RIETVELD method used to analyze the X-Ray patterns did not allow to characterize independently the Pu packs and the oxide matrix lattice parameters. Nevertheless, with this method, the presence of micro-strains in the irradiated nuclear fuel could be confirmed. (author)

  14. EVOLUTION OF FAST MAGNETOACOUSTIC PULSES IN RANDOMLY STRUCTURED CORONAL PLASMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, D.; Li, B.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Keppens, R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of fast magnetoacoustic pulses in randomly structured plasmas, in the context of large-scale propagating waves in the solar atmosphere. We perform one-dimensional numerical simulations of fast wave pulses propagating perpendicular to a constant magnetic field in a low-β plasma with a random density profile across the field. Both linear and nonlinear regimes are considered. We study how the evolution of the pulse amplitude and width depends on their initial values and the parameters of the random structuring. Acting as a dispersive medium, a randomly structured plasma causes amplitude attenuation and width broadening of the fast wave pulses. After the passage of the main pulse, secondary propagating and standing fast waves appear. Width evolution of both linear and nonlinear pulses can be well approximated by linear functions; however, narrow pulses may have zero or negative broadening. This arises because narrow pulses are prone to splitting, while broad pulses usually deviate less from their initial Gaussian shape and form ripple structures on top of the main pulse. Linear pulses decay at an almost constant rate, while nonlinear pulses decay exponentially. A pulse interacts most efficiently with a random medium with a correlation length of about half of the initial pulse width. This detailed model of fast wave pulses propagating in highly structured media substantiates the interpretation of EIT waves as fast magnetoacoustic waves. Evolution of a fast pulse provides us with a novel method to diagnose the sub-resolution filamentation of the solar atmosphere

  15. Evolution of energy structures; Evolution des structures energetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifenecker, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2005-07-01

    Because of the big inertia and long time constants of energy systems, their long-time behaviour is mainly determined by their present day state and by the trends of their recent evolution. For this reason, it is of prime importance to foresee the evolution of the different energy production sources which may play an important role in the future. A status of the world energy consumption and production is made first using the energy statistics of the IEA. Then, using the trends observed since 1973, the consequences of a simple extrapolation of these trends is examined. Finally, the scenarios of forecasting of energy structures, like those supplied by the International institute for applied systems analysis (IIASA) are discussed. (J.S.)

  16. Optimum Parameters for Tuned Mass Damper Using Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessamoddin Meshkat Razavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is investigated the optimum parameters for a tuned mass damper (TMD under the seismic excitation. Shuffled complex evolution (SCE is a meta-heuristic optimization method which is used to find the optimum damping and tuning frequency ratio for a TMD. The efficiency of the TMD is evaluated by decreasing the structural displacement dynamic magnification factor (DDMF and acceleration dynamic magnification factor (ADMF for a specific vibration mode of the structure. The optimum TMD parameters and the corresponding optimized DDMF and ADMF are achieved for two control levels (displacement control and acceleration control, different structural damping ratio and mass ratio of the TMD system. The optimum TMD parameters are checked for a 10-storey building under earthquake excitations. The maximum storey displacement and acceleration obtained by SCE method are compared with the results of other existing approaches. The results show that the peak building response decreased with decreases of about 20% for displacement and 30% for acceleration of the top floor. To show the efficiency of the adopted algorithm (SCE, a comparison is also made between SCE and other meta-heuristic optimization methods such as genetic algorithm (GA, particle swarm optimization (PSO method and harmony search (HS algorithm in terms of success rate and computational processing time. The results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other meta-heuristic optimization methods.

  17. Petrophysical and transport parameters evolution during acid percolation through structurally different limestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Perez, Laura; Luquot, Linda

    2017-04-01

    Processes affecting geological media often show complex and unpredictable behavior due to the presence of heterogeneities. This remains problematic when facing contaminant transport problems, in the CO2 storage industry or dealing with the mechanisms underneath natural processes where chemical reactions can be observed during the percolation of rock non-equilibrated fluid (e.g. karst formation, seawater intrusion). To understand the mechanisms taking place in a porous medium as a result of this water-rock interaction, we need to know the flow parameters that control them, and how they evolve with time as a result of that concurrence. This is fundamental to ensure realistic predictions of the behavior of natural systems in response of reactive transport processes. We investigate the coupled influence of structural and hydrodynamic heterogeneities in limestone rock samples tracking its variations during chemical reactions. To do so we use laboratory petrophysical techniques such as helium porosimetry, gas permeability, centrifugue, electrical resistivity and sonic waves measurements to obtain the parameters that characterize flow within rock matrix (porosity, permeability, retention curve and pore size distribution, electrical conductivity, formation factor, cementation index and tortuosity) before and after percolation experiments. We built an experimental setup that allows injection of acid brine into core samples under well controlled conditions, monitor changes in hydrodynamic properties and obtain the chemical composition of the injected solution at different stages. 3D rock images were also acquired before and after the experiments using a micro-CT to locate the alteration processes and perform an acurate analysis of the structural changes. Two limestones with distinct textural classification and thus contrasting transport properties have been used in the laboratory experiments: a crinoid limestone and an oolithic limestone. Core samples dimensions were 1 inch

  18. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks

  19. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, Danielle S., E-mail: dsb@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Sage Center for the Study of the Mind, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T. [Department of Psychology and UCSB Brain Imaging Center, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Porter, Mason A. [Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); CABDyN Complexity Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 1HP (United Kingdom); Mucha, Peter J. [Carolina Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Applied Physical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  20. Influence of formulation parameters on the texturing and and the structural evolution of geo-polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steins, Prune

    2014-01-01

    In the context of conditioning of nuclear waste, geo-polymers represent a potential alternative to conventional hydraulic binders. Currently, it is recognized that the formation of geo-polymer proceeds according to a mechanism of dissolution - restructuring - polymerization resulting in a solid material. Despite the availability of many studies to understand these mechanisms, the precise relationship between the chemical nature of the activating solution, the geo-polymerization process and the final microstructure should be determined from the point of view of the texturing and the structural evolution of the material. In this work, several parameters were studied: the nature of the alkali activator, the silica concentration and the addition of an aluminum source. It appears that the chemical environment of the silicate or aluminosilicate precursors is controlled by the activating solution composition. During the consolidation of the geo-polymer network, these precursors play an important role on the dissolution rate of meta kaolin, the size, the rearrangement and the aggregation of aluminosilicate oligomers involved in the porous solid network formation. Subsequently, some characteristics of the porous network which are controlled by the size and the rearrangement of oligomers vary slightly over time. The refinement of the porosity associated to first, a densification of the solid network, and secondly, a partial closure of the porosity at the nanometer scale leads to an increase in the pore size and a decrease of the pore volume. (author) [fr

  1. Excitation of magnetic inhomogeneities in three-layer ferromagnetic structure with different parameters of the magnetic anisotropy and exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekomasov, E.G., E-mail: EkomasovEG@gmail.com [Bashkir State University, 32, Validy Str., Ufa, 450076 (Russian Federation); Murtazin, R.R. [Bashkir State University, 32, Validy Str., Ufa, 450076 (Russian Federation); Nazarov, V.N. [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics Ufa Research Centre of Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt Oktyabrya 151, Ufa, 450075 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    The generation and evolution of magnetic inhomogeneities, emerging in a thin flat layer with the parameters of the magnetic anisotropy and exchange interaction, with the parameters different from other two thick layers of the three-layer ferromagnetic structure, were investigated. The parameters ranges that determine the possibility of their existence were found. The possibility of the external magnetic field influence on the structure and dynamic properties of localized magnetic inhomogeneities was shown. - Highlights: • The generation of magnetic inhomogeneities in the three-layer ferromagnetic. • The influence of an external field on the parameters of magnetic inhomogeneities. • Numerical study of the structure and dynamics of magnetic inhomogeneities.

  2. Glucosinolate structures in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerbirk, Niels; Olsen, Carl Erik

    2012-05-01

    By 2000, around 106 natural glucosinolates (GSLs) were probably documented. In the past decade, 26 additional natural GSL structures have been elucidated and documented. Hence, the total number of documented GSLs from nature by 2011 can be estimated to around 132. A considerable number of additional suggested structures are concluded not to be sufficiently documented. In many cases, NMR spectroscopy would have provided the missing structural information. Of the GSLs documented in the past decade, several are of previously unexpected structures and occur at considerable levels. Most originate from just four species: Barbarea vulgaris, Arabidopsis thaliana, Eruca sativa and Isatis tinctoria. Acyl derivatives of known GSLs comprised 15 of the 26 newly documented structures, while the remaining exhibited new substitution patterns or chain length, or contained a mercapto group or related thio-functionality. GSL identification methods are reviewed, and the importance of using authentic references and structure-sensitive detection methods such as MS and NMR is stressed, especially when species with relatively unknown chemistry are analyzed. An example of qualitative GSL analysis is presented with experimental details (group separation and HPLC of both intact and desulfated GSLs, detection and structure determination by UV, MS, NMR and susceptibility to myrosinase) with emphasis on the use of NMR for structure elucidation of even minor GSLs and GSL hydrolysis products. The example includes identification of a novel GSL, (R)-2-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxyphenyl)ethylglucosinolate. Recent investigations of GSL evolution, based on investigations of species with well established phylogeny, are reviewed. From the relatively few such investigations, it is already clear that GSL profiles are regularly subject to evolution. This result is compatible with natural selection for specific GSL side chains. The probable existence of structure-specific GSL catabolism in intact plants suggests

  3. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  4. Relating structural parameters to leachability in a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, S. M.; Johnson, S. G.; Moschetti, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    Lattice parameters for a crystalline material can be obtained by several methods, notably by analyzing x-ray powder diffraction patterns. By utilizing a computer program to fit a pattern, one can follow the evolution or subtle changes in a structure of a crystalline species in different environments. This work involves such a study for an essential component of the ceramic waste form that is under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Zeolite 4A and zeolite 5A are used to produce two different types of waste forms: a glass-bonded sodalite and a glass-bonded zeolite, respectively. Changes in structure during production of the waste forms are discussed. Specific salt-loadings in the sodalite waste form are related to relative peak intensities of certain reflections in the XRD patterns. Structural parameters for the final waste forms will also be given and related to leachability under standard conditions

  5. Real parameter optimization by an effective differential evolution algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Wagdy Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an Effective Differential Evolution (EDE algorithm for solving real parameter optimization problems over continuous domain. The proposed algorithm proposes a new mutation rule based on the best and the worst individuals among the entire population of a particular generation. The mutation rule is combined with the basic mutation strategy through a linear decreasing probability rule. The proposed mutation rule is shown to promote local search capability of the basic DE and to make it faster. Furthermore, a random mutation scheme and a modified Breeder Genetic Algorithm (BGA mutation scheme are merged to avoid stagnation and/or premature convergence. Additionally, the scaling factor and crossover of DE are introduced as uniform random numbers to enrich the search behavior and to enhance the diversity of the population. The effectiveness and benefits of the proposed modifications used in EDE has been experimentally investigated. Numerical experiments on a set of bound-constrained problems have shown that the new approach is efficient, effective and robust. The comparison results between the EDE and several classical differential evolution methods and state-of-the-art parameter adaptive differential evolution variants indicate that the proposed EDE algorithm is competitive with , and in some cases superior to, other algorithms in terms of final solution quality, efficiency, convergence rate, and robustness.

  6. Thermally induced structural evolution and performance of mesoporous block copolymer-directed alumina perovskite solar cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Kwan Wee

    2014-04-11

    Structure control in solution-processed hybrid perovskites is crucial to design and fabricate highly efficient solar cells. Here, we utilize in situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the structural evolution and film morphologies of methylammonium lead tri-iodide/chloride (CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x)) in mesoporous block copolymer derived alumina superstructures during thermal annealing. We show the CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x) material evolution to be characterized by three distinct structures: a crystalline precursor structure not described previously, a 3D perovskite structure, and a mixture of compounds resulting from degradation. Finally, we demonstrate how understanding the processing parameters provides the foundation needed for optimal perovskite film morphology and coverage, leading to enhanced block copolymer-directed perovskite solar cell performance.

  7. Thermally induced structural evolution and performance of mesoporous block copolymer-directed alumina perovskite solar cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Kwan Wee; Moore, David T; Saliba, Michael; Sai, Hiroaki; Estroff, Lara A; Hanrath, Tobias; Snaith, Henry J; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Structure control in solution-processed hybrid perovskites is crucial to design and fabricate highly efficient solar cells. Here, we utilize in situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the structural evolution and film morphologies of methylammonium lead tri-iodide/chloride (CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x)) in mesoporous block copolymer derived alumina superstructures during thermal annealing. We show the CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x) material evolution to be characterized by three distinct structures: a crystalline precursor structure not described previously, a 3D perovskite structure, and a mixture of compounds resulting from degradation. Finally, we demonstrate how understanding the processing parameters provides the foundation needed for optimal perovskite film morphology and coverage, leading to enhanced block copolymer-directed perovskite solar cell performance.

  8. Thermally Induced Structural Evolution and Performance of Mesoporous Block Copolymer-Directed Alumina Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Structure control in solution-processed hybrid perovskites is crucial to design and fabricate highly efficient solar cells. Here, we utilize in situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the structural evolution and film morphologies of methylammonium lead tri-iodide/chloride (CH3NH3PbI3–xClx) in mesoporous block copolymer derived alumina superstructures during thermal annealing. We show the CH3NH3PbI3–xClx material evolution to be characterized by three distinct structures: a crystalline precursor structure not described previously, a 3D perovskite structure, and a mixture of compounds resulting from degradation. Finally, we demonstrate how understanding the processing parameters provides the foundation needed for optimal perovskite film morphology and coverage, leading to enhanced block copolymer-directed perovskite solar cell performance. PMID:24684494

  9. Social dilemmas in an online social network: The structure and evolution of cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Feng; Chen Xiaojie; Liu Lianghuan; Wang Long

    2007-01-01

    We investigate two paradigms for studying the evolution of cooperation-Prisoner's Dilemma and Snowdrift game in an online friendship network, obtained from a social networking site. By structural analysis, it is revealed that the empirical social network has small-world and scale-free properties. Besides, it exhibits assortative mixing pattern. Then, we study the evolutionary version of the two types of games on it. It is found that cooperation is substantially promoted with small values of game matrix parameters in both games. Whereas the competent cooperators induced by the underlying network of contacts will be dramatically inhibited with increasing values of the game parameters. Further, we explore the role of assortativity in evolution of cooperation by random edge rewiring. We find that increasing amount of assortativity will to a certain extent diminish the cooperation level. We also show that connected large hubs are capable of maintaining cooperation. The evolution of cooperation on empirical networks is influenced by various network effects in a combined manner, compared with that on model networks. Our results can help understand the cooperative behaviors in human groups and society

  10. Parameter extraction of different fuel cell models with transferred adaptive differential evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Wenyin; Yan, Xuesong; Liu, Xiaobo; Cai, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    To improve the design and control of FC (fuel cell) models, it is important to extract their unknown parameters. Generally, the parameter extraction problems of FC models can be transformed as nonlinear and multi-variable optimization problems. To extract the parameters of different FC models exactly and fast, in this paper, we propose a transferred adaptive DE (differential evolution) framework, in which the successful parameters of the adaptive DE solving previous problems are properly transferred to solve new optimization problems in the similar problem-domains. Based on this framework, an improved adaptive DE method (TRADE, in short) is presented as an illustration. To verify the performance of our proposal, TRADE is used to extract the unknown parameters of two types of fuel cell models, i.e., PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) and SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell). The results of TRADE are also compared with those of other state-of-the-art EAs (evolutionary algorithms). Even though the modification is very simple, the results indicate that TRADE can extract the parameters of both PEMFC and SOFC models exactly and fast. Moreover, the V–I characteristics obtained by TRADE agree well with the simulated and experimental data in all cases for both types of fuel cell models. Also, it improves the performance of the original adaptive DE significantly in terms of both the quality of final solutions and the convergence speed in all cases. Additionally, TRADE is able to provide better results compared with other EAs. - Highlights: • A framework of transferred adaptive differential evolution is proposed. • Based on the framework, an improved differential evolution (TRADE) is presented. • TRADE obtains very promising results to extract the parameters of PEMFC and SOFC models

  11. The evolution of lycopsid rooting structures: conservatism and disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, Alexander J; Dolan, Liam

    2017-07-01

    Contents 538 I. 538 II. 539 III. 541 IV. 542 543 References 543 SUMMARY: The evolution of rooting structures was a crucial event in Earth's history, increasing the ability of plants to extract water, mine for nutrients and anchor above-ground shoot systems. Fossil evidence indicates that roots evolved at least twice among vascular plants, in the euphyllophytes and independently in the lycophytes. Here, we review the anatomy and evolution of lycopsid rooting structures. Highlighting recent discoveries made with fossils we suggest that the evolution of lycopsid rooting structures displays two contrasting patterns - conservatism and disparity. The structures termed roots have remained structurally similar despite hundreds of millions of years of evolution - an example of remarkable conservatism. By contrast, and over the same time period, the organs that give rise to roots have diversified, resulting in the evolution of numerous novel and disparate organs. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Parameter identification of civil engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, J. N.; Sun, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of an identification method required in determining structural parameter variations for systems subjected to an extended exposure to the environment. The concept of structural identifiability of a large scale structural system in the absence of damping is presented. Three criteria are established indicating that a large number of system parameters (the coefficient parameters of the differential equations) can be identified by a few actuators and sensors. An eight-bay-fifteen-story frame structure is used as example. A simple model is employed for analyzing the dynamic response of the frame structure.

  13. An Efficient Binary Differential Evolution with Parameter Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongli Jia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Differential Evolution (DE has been applied to many scientific and engineering problems for its simplicity and efficiency. However, the standard DE cannot be used in a binary search space directly. This paper proposes an adaptive binary Differential Evolution algorithm, or ABDE, that has a similar framework as the standard DE but with an improved binary mutation strategy in which the best individual participates. To further enhance the search ability, the parameters of the ABDE are slightly disturbed in an adaptive manner. Experiments have been carried out by comparing ABDE with two binary DE variants, normDE and BDE, and the most used binary search technique, GA, on a set of 13 selected benchmark functions and the classical 0-1 knapsack problem. Results show that the ABDE performs better than, or at least comparable to, the other algorithms in terms of search ability, convergence speed, and solution accuracy.

  14. Thermal evolution of the crystal structure of the orthorhombic perovskite LaFeO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Charlotte A.L.; Kavanagh, Christopher M.; Knight, Kevin S.; Kockelmann, Winfried; Morrison, Finlay D.; Lightfoot, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The thermal evolution of the crystal structure of the prototypical orthorhombic perovskite LaFeO 3 has been studied in detail by powder neutron diffraction in the temperature range 25evolution of lattice metrics in the perovskite LaFeO 3 is rationalized from a detailed powder neutron diffraction study. - Highlights: • Crystal structure of the perovskite LaFeO 3 studied in detail by powder neutron diffraction. • Unusual thermal evolution of lattice metrics rationalized. • Contrasting behavior to Bi-doped LaFeO 3 . • Octahedral distortion/tilt parameters explain unusual a and c lattice parameter behavior

  15. Evolution of Pedostructure Parameters Under Tillage Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pedostructure (PS) concept is a physically-based method of soil characterization that defines a soil based on its structure and the relationship between structure and soil water behavior. There are 15 unique pedostructure parameters that define the macropore and micropore soil water behavior fo...

  16. A framework for scalable parameter estimation of gene circuit models using structural information

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-21

    Motivation: Systematic and scalable parameter estimation is a key to construct complex gene regulatory models and to ultimately facilitate an integrative systems biology approach to quantitatively understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning gene regulation. Results: Here, we report a novel framework for efficient and scalable parameter estimation that focuses specifically on modeling of gene circuits. Exploiting the structure commonly found in gene circuit models, this framework decomposes a system of coupled rate equations into individual ones and efficiently integrates them separately to reconstruct the mean time evolution of the gene products. The accuracy of the parameter estimates is refined by iteratively increasing the accuracy of numerical integration using the model structure. As a case study, we applied our framework to four gene circuit models with complex dynamics based on three synthetic datasets and one time series microarray data set. We compared our framework to three state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods and found that our approach consistently generated higher quality parameter solutions efficiently. Although many general-purpose parameter estimation methods have been applied for modeling of gene circuits, our results suggest that the use of more tailored approaches to use domain-specific information may be a key to reverse engineering of complex biological systems. The Author 2013.

  17. A framework for scalable parameter estimation of gene circuit models using structural information

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Fan, Ming; Wang, Suojin; Gao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Systematic and scalable parameter estimation is a key to construct complex gene regulatory models and to ultimately facilitate an integrative systems biology approach to quantitatively understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning gene regulation. Results: Here, we report a novel framework for efficient and scalable parameter estimation that focuses specifically on modeling of gene circuits. Exploiting the structure commonly found in gene circuit models, this framework decomposes a system of coupled rate equations into individual ones and efficiently integrates them separately to reconstruct the mean time evolution of the gene products. The accuracy of the parameter estimates is refined by iteratively increasing the accuracy of numerical integration using the model structure. As a case study, we applied our framework to four gene circuit models with complex dynamics based on three synthetic datasets and one time series microarray data set. We compared our framework to three state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods and found that our approach consistently generated higher quality parameter solutions efficiently. Although many general-purpose parameter estimation methods have been applied for modeling of gene circuits, our results suggest that the use of more tailored approaches to use domain-specific information may be a key to reverse engineering of complex biological systems. The Author 2013.

  18. Social dilemmas in an online social network: The structure and evolution of cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Feng [Center for Systems and Control, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: fufeng@pku.edu.cn; Chen Xiaojie; Liu Lianghuan [Center for Systems and Control, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Long [Center for Systems and Control, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: longwang@pku.edu.cn

    2007-11-05

    We investigate two paradigms for studying the evolution of cooperation-Prisoner's Dilemma and Snowdrift game in an online friendship network, obtained from a social networking site. By structural analysis, it is revealed that the empirical social network has small-world and scale-free properties. Besides, it exhibits assortative mixing pattern. Then, we study the evolutionary version of the two types of games on it. It is found that cooperation is substantially promoted with small values of game matrix parameters in both games. Whereas the competent cooperators induced by the underlying network of contacts will be dramatically inhibited with increasing values of the game parameters. Further, we explore the role of assortativity in evolution of cooperation by random edge rewiring. We find that increasing amount of assortativity will to a certain extent diminish the cooperation level. We also show that connected large hubs are capable of maintaining cooperation. The evolution of cooperation on empirical networks is influenced by various network effects in a combined manner, compared with that on model networks. Our results can help understand the cooperative behaviors in human groups and society.

  19. Uncertainties of Molecular Structural Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    Full text: The most fundamental property of a molecule is its three-dimensional (3D) structure formed by its constituent atoms (see, e.g., the perfectly regular hexagon associated with benzene). It is generally accepted that knowledge of the detailed structure of a molecule is a prerequisite to determine most of its other properties. What nowadays is a seemingly simple concept, namely that molecules have a structure, was introduced into chemistry in the 19th century. Naturally, the word changed its meaning over the years. Elemental analysis, simple structural formulae, two-dimensional and then 3D structures mark the development of the concept to its modern meaning. When quantum physics and quantum chemistry emerged in the 1920s, the simple concept associating structure with a three-dimensional object seemingly gained a firm support. Nevertheless, what seems self-explanatory today is in fact not so straightforward to justify within quantum mechanics. In quantum chemistry the concept of an equilibrium structure of a molecule is tied to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation but beyond the adiabatic separation of the motions of the nuclei and the electrons the meaning of a structure is still slightly obscured. Putting the conceptual difficulties aside, there are several experimental, empirical, and theoretical techniques to determine structures of molecules. One particular problem, strongly related to the question of uncertainties of “measured” or “computed” structural parameters, is that all the different techniques correspond to different structure definitions and thus yield different structural parameters. Experiments probing the structure of molecules rely on a number of structure definitions, to name just a few: r_0, r_g, r_a, r_s, r_m, etc., and one should also consider the temperature dependence of most of these structural parameters which differ from each other in the way the rovibrational motions of the molecules are treated and how the averaging is

  20. Topological structure of the solution set for evolution inclusions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yong; Peng, Li

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically presents the topological structure of solution sets and attractability for nonlinear evolution inclusions, together with its relevant applications in control problems and partial differential equations. It provides readers the background material needed to delve deeper into the subject and explore the rich research literature.  In addition, the book addresses many of the basic techniques and results recently developed in connection with this theory, including the structure of solution sets for evolution inclusions with m-dissipative operators; quasi-autonomous and non-autonomous evolution inclusions and control systems;evolution inclusions with the Hille-Yosida operator; functional evolution inclusions; impulsive evolution inclusions; and stochastic evolution inclusions. Several applications of evolution inclusions and control systems are also discussed in detail.  Based on extensive research work conducted by the authors and other experts over the past four years, the information p...

  1. Improved Differential Evolution Algorithm for Parameter Estimation to Improve the Production of Biochemical Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuii Khim Chong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an improved Differential Evolution algorithm (IDE which aims at improving its performance in estimating the relevant parameters for metabolic pathway data to simulate glycolysis pathway for yeast. Metabolic pathway data are expected to be of significant help in the development of efficient tools in kinetic modeling and parameter estimation platforms. Many computation algorithms face obstacles due to the noisy data and difficulty of the system in estimating myriad of parameters, and require longer computational time to estimate the relevant parameters. The proposed algorithm (IDE in this paper is a hybrid of a Differential Evolution algorithm (DE and a Kalman Filter (KF. The outcome of IDE is proven to be superior than Genetic Algorithm (GA and DE. The results of IDE from experiments show estimated optimal kinetic parameters values, shorter computation time and increased accuracy for simulated results compared with other estimation algorithms

  2. Studies in stellar evolution. 3. The internal structure constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejlesen, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    This is the third paper in a series describing the results of extensive stellar evolution calculations. The internal structure constants k j (j = 2, 3, 4) have been computed for a fine grid of stellar models covering the HR-diagram from the zero-age main sequence to the subgiant region. These constants represent the influence of the internal structure on the disturbing potentials of stars, and they are needed for prediction of theoretical apsidal motion rates in close eccentric binaries as well as for other tidal effects. Results for four different initial chemical compositions are presented. The opacity tables by Cox and Stewart (1969) have been adopted, and a mixing length parameter of l/H p = 2.0 has been used throughout. The results are compared with previous calculations. A comparison with observational data for eclipsing binaries will be published elsewhere

  3. Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution Molecules, Networks, Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bastolla, Ugo; Roman, H. Eduardo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Structural requirements constrain the evolution of biological entities at all levels, from macromolecules to their networks, right up to populations of biological organisms. Classical models of molecular evolution, however, are focused at the level of the symbols - the biological sequence - rather than that of their resulting structure. Now recent advances in understanding the thermodynamics of macromolecules, the topological properties of gene networks, the organization and mutation capabilities of genomes, and the structure of populations make it possible to incorporate these key elements into a broader and deeply interdisciplinary view of molecular evolution. This book gives an account of such a new approach, through clear tutorial contributions by leading scientists specializing in the different fields involved.

  4. Modeling Temporal Evolution and Multiscale Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    Many real-world networks exhibit both temporal evolution and multiscale structure. We propose a model for temporally correlated multifurcating hierarchies in complex networks which jointly capture both effects. We use the Gibbs fragmentation tree as prior over multifurcating trees and a change......-point model to account for the temporal evolution of each vertex. We demonstrate that our model is able to infer time-varying multiscale structure in synthetic as well as three real world time-evolving complex networks. Our modeling of the temporal evolution of hierarchies brings new insights...

  5. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, C.J.A.P., E-mail: Carlos.Martins@astro.up.pt [Centro de Astrofísica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Vielzeuf, P.E., E-mail: pvielzeuf@ifae.es [Institut de Física d' Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Martinelli, M., E-mail: martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Calabrese, E., E-mail: erminia.calabrese@astro.ox.ac.uk [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Pandolfi, S., E-mail: stefania@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-09

    We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant α in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent α measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying α. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical ΛCDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), together with more sensitive α measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios.

  6. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, C.J.A.P.; Vielzeuf, P.E.; Martinelli, M.; Calabrese, E.; Pandolfi, S.

    2015-01-01

    We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant α in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent α measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying α. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical ΛCDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), together with more sensitive α measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios

  7. Constraining the evolution of the Hubble Parameter using cosmic chronometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Hugh

    2017-08-01

    Substantial investment is being made in space- and ground-based missions with the goal of revealing the nature of the observed cosmic acceleration. This is one of the most important unsolved problems in cosmology today.We propose here to constrain the evolution of the Hubble parameter [H(z)] between 1.3 fundamental nature of dark energy.

  8. Bifurcation Observation of Combining Spiral Gear Transmission Based on Parameter Domain Structure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study considers the bifurcation evolutions for a combining spiral gear transmission through parameter domain structure analysis. The system nonlinear vibration equations are created with piecewise backlash and general errors. Gill’s numerical integration algorithm is implemented in calculating the vibration equation sets. Based on cell-mapping method (CMM, two-dimensional dynamic domain planes have been developed and primarily focused on the parameters of backlash, transmission error, mesh frequency and damping ratio, and so forth. Solution demonstrates that Period-doubling bifurcation happens as the mesh frequency increases; moreover nonlinear discontinuous jump breaks the periodic orbit and also turns the periodic state into chaos suddenly. In transmission error planes, three cell groups which are Period-1, Period-4, and Chaos have been observed, and the boundary cells are the sensitive areas to dynamic response. Considering the parameter planes which consist of damping ratio associated with backlash, transmission error, mesh stiffness, and external load, the solution domain structure reveals that the system step into chaos undergoes Period-doubling cascade with Period-2m (m: integer periodic regions. Direct simulations to obtain the bifurcation diagram and largest Lyapunov exponent (LE match satisfactorily with the parameter domain solutions.

  9. Constraining the evolution of the Hubble Parameter using cosmic chronometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlata, Claudia; Dickinson, Hugh

    2018-01-01

    The Lambda-CDM model of Big Bang cosmology relies heavily on the assumption that two components - dark energy and dark matter - encompass 95% of the energy density of the Universe. Despite the dominant influence of these components, their nature is still entirely unknown.We present the initial results from a project that aims to provide new insights regarding the Dark Energy component. We do this by deriving independent constraints on the time-evolution of the Hubble parameter (H_0) using the “cosmic chronometer” method.By analyzing the HST NIR spectra from a large archival sample of passively evolving galaxies in distinct redshift bins between 1.3 and 2 we measure the typical stellar population ages (A) for the galaxies in each bin. The differential evolution of stellar population age with redshift (dA/dz) can be used to infer the corresponding evolution of H_0 which will provide important constraints on the nature of Dark Energy and its equation of state.

  10. Parameter optimization of differential evolution algorithm for automatic playlist generation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamag, Kaye Melina Natividad B.; Addawe, Joel M.

    2017-11-01

    With the digitalization of music, the number of collection of music increased largely and there is a need to create lists of music that filter the collection according to user preferences, thus giving rise to the Automatic Playlist Generation Problem (APGP). Previous attempts to solve this problem include the use of search and optimization algorithms. If a music database is very large, the algorithm to be used must be able to search the lists thoroughly taking into account the quality of the playlist given a set of user constraints. In this paper we perform an evolutionary meta-heuristic optimization algorithm, Differential Evolution (DE) using different combination of parameter values and select the best performing set when used to solve four standard test functions. Performance of the proposed algorithm is then compared with normal Genetic Algorithm (GA) and a hybrid GA with Tabu Search. Numerical simulations are carried out to show better results from Differential Evolution approach with the optimized parameter values.

  11. Design and development of a learning progression about stellar structure and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Colantonio

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Astronomy Education Research.] In this paper we discuss the design and development of a learning progression (LP to describe and interpret students’ understanding about stellar structure and evolution (SSE. The LP is built upon three content dimensions: hydrostatic equilibrium; composition and aggregation state; functioning and evolution. The data to build up the levels of the hypothetical LP (LP1 came from a 45-minute, seven-question interview, with 33 high school students previously taught about the topic. The questions were adapted from an existing multiple-choice instrument. Data were analyzed using Minstrell’s “facets” approach. To assess the validity of LP1, we designed a twelve-hour teaching module featuring paper-and-pencil tasks and practical activities to estimate the stellar structure and evolution parameters. Twenty high school students were interviewed before and after the activities using the same interview protocol. Results informed a revision of LP1 (LP2 and, in parallel, of the module. The revised module included supplementary activities corresponding to changes made to LP1. We then assessed LP2 with 30 high school students through the same interview, submitted before and after the teaching intervention. A final version of the LP (LP3 was then developed drawing on students’ emerging reasoning strategies. This paper contributes to research in science education by providing an example of the iterative development of the instruction required to support the student thinking that LPs’ levels describe. Concerning astronomy education research, our findings can inform suitable instructional activities more responsive to students’ reasoning strategies about stellar structure and evolution.

  12. A framework for scalable parameter estimation of gene circuit models using structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Fan, Ming; Wang, Suojin; Gao, Xin

    2013-07-01

    Systematic and scalable parameter estimation is a key to construct complex gene regulatory models and to ultimately facilitate an integrative systems biology approach to quantitatively understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning gene regulation. Here, we report a novel framework for efficient and scalable parameter estimation that focuses specifically on modeling of gene circuits. Exploiting the structure commonly found in gene circuit models, this framework decomposes a system of coupled rate equations into individual ones and efficiently integrates them separately to reconstruct the mean time evolution of the gene products. The accuracy of the parameter estimates is refined by iteratively increasing the accuracy of numerical integration using the model structure. As a case study, we applied our framework to four gene circuit models with complex dynamics based on three synthetic datasets and one time series microarray data set. We compared our framework to three state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods and found that our approach consistently generated higher quality parameter solutions efficiently. Although many general-purpose parameter estimation methods have been applied for modeling of gene circuits, our results suggest that the use of more tailored approaches to use domain-specific information may be a key to reverse engineering of complex biological systems. http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Mixed-integer evolution strategies for parameter optimization and their applications to medical image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Rui

    2009-01-01

    The target of this work is to extend the canonical Evolution Strategies (ES) from traditional real-valued parameter optimization domain to mixed-integer parameter optimization domain. This is necessary because there exist numerous practical optimization problems from industry in which the set of

  14. Evolution of energy structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    2005-01-01

    Because of the big inertia and long time constants of energy systems, their long-time behaviour is mainly determined by their present day state and by the trends of their recent evolution. For this reason, it is of prime importance to foresee the evolution of the different energy production sources which may play an important role in the future. A status of the world energy consumption and production is made first using the energy statistics of the IEA. Then, using the trends observed since 1973, the consequences of a simple extrapolation of these trends is examined. Finally, the scenarios of forecasting of energy structures, like those supplied by the International institute for applied systems analysis (IIASA) are discussed. (J.S.)

  15. Dislocation structure evolution and characterization in the compression deformed Mn-Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Y.; Yin, F.; Sakaguchi, T.; Nagai, K.; Yang, K.

    2007-01-01

    Dislocation densities and dislocation structure arrangements in cold compressed polycrystalline commercial M2052 (Mn-20Cu-5Ni-2Fe) high damping alloy with various strains were determined in scanning mode by X-ray peak profile analysis and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The results indicate that the Mn-Cu-Ni-Fe alloy has an evolution behavior quite similar to the dislocation structure in copper. The dislocation arrangement parameter shows a local minimum in the transition range between stages III and IV that can be related to the transformation of the dislocation arrangement in the cell walls from a polarized dipole wall (PDW) into a polarized tile wall (PTW) structure. This evolution is further confirmed by the results of local misorientation determined by EBSD. In addition, during deformation, the multiplication of dislocation densities in the MnCu alloy is significantly slower than that in copper, and the transition of the dislocation structure is strongly retarded in the MnCu alloy compared with copper. These results can be explained by the mechanism of elastic anisotropy on the dislocation dynamics, as the elastic anisotropy in the MnCu alloy is larger than that in copper, which can strongly retard the multiplication of the dislocation population and the transformation of the dislocation structure. These results are important for research into the plastic working behavior of Mn-Cu-Ni-Fe high damping alloy

  16. Estimating reliability of degraded system based on the probability density evolution with multi-parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Ge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available System degradation was usually caused by multiple-parameter degradation. The assessment result of system reliability by universal generating function was low accurate when compared with the Monte Carlo simulation. And the probability density function of the system output performance cannot be got. So the reliability assessment method based on the probability density evolution with multi-parameter was presented for complexly degraded system. Firstly, the system output function was founded according to the transitive relation between component parameters and the system output performance. Then, the probability density evolution equation based on the probability conservation principle and the system output function was established. Furthermore, probability distribution characteristics of the system output performance was obtained by solving differential equation. Finally, the reliability of the degraded system was estimated. This method did not need to discrete the performance parameters and can establish continuous probability density function of the system output performance with high calculation efficiency and low cost. Numerical example shows that this method is applicable to evaluate the reliability of multi-parameter degraded system.

  17. Estimation of beech pyrolysis kinetic parameters by Shuffled Complex Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yanming; Wang, Changjian; Chaos, Marcos; Chen, Ruiyu; Lu, Shouxiang

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis kinetics of a typical biomass energy feedstock, beech, was investigated based on thermogravimetric analysis over a wide heating rate range from 5K/min to 80K/min. A three-component (corresponding to hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) parallel decomposition reaction scheme was applied to describe the experimental data. The resulting kinetic reaction model was coupled to an evolutionary optimization algorithm (Shuffled Complex Evolution, SCE) to obtain model parameters. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study in which SCE has been used in the context of thermogravimetry. The kinetic parameters were simultaneously optimized against data for 10, 20 and 60K/min heating rates, providing excellent fits to experimental data. Furthermore, it was shown that the optimized parameters were applicable to heating rates (5 and 80K/min) beyond those used to generate them. Finally, the predicted results based on optimized parameters were contrasted with those based on the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. On modeling micro-structural evolution using a higher order strain gradient continuum theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, S. A.; Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    is to improve the micro-structural response predicted using strain gradient crystal plasticity within a continuum mechanics framework. One approach to modeling the dislocation structures observed is through a back stress formulation, which can be related directly to the strain gradient energy. The present work...... the experimentally observed micro-structural behavior, within a framework based on continuous field quantities, poses obvious challenges, since the evolution of dislocation structures is inherently a discrete and discontinuous process. This challenge, in particular, motivates the present study, and the aim...... offers an investigation of constitutive equations for the back stress based on both considerations of the gradient energy, but also includes results obtained from a purely phenomenological starting point. The influence of model parameters is brought out in a parametric study, and it is demonstrated how...

  19. Determination of the Nonlinearity Parameter in the TNM Model of Structural Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Rozana; Simon, Sindee

    Structural recovery of non-equilibrium glassy materials takes place by evolution of volume and enthalpy as the glass attempts to reach to equilibrium. Structural recovery is nonlinear, nonexponential, and depends on thermal history and the process can be described by phenomenological models of structural recovery, such as the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Moynihan (TNM) and the Kovacs-Aklonis-Hutchinson-Ramos (KAHR) models. The goal of the present work is to analyze methods to determine the nonlinearity parameter x and activation energy Δh/R. The methods to determine x includes the inflectional analysis, time-temperature superposition, and two-step temperature jump methods. The activation energy Δh/R can also be obtained by the first two methods. The TNM model is used to simulate structural recovery data, which are then used to test the accuracy of the methods to determine x and Δh/R, with a particular interest in data obtained after cooling at high rates as can be obtained in the Flash DSC. The nonlinearity parameter x by the inflectional analysis and two-step temperature methods are accurate for exponential recovery. However, for real systems with nonexponential relaxation, methods to determine x are not reliable. The activation energy is well estimated by both the time-temperature superposition and inflectional analysis methods, with the former being slightly better.

  20. Structural evolution of silica sols modified with formamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenza R.F.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigated the influence of formamide on the acid-catalyzed sol-gel process by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Three silica sols were studied: Sol catalyzed with nitric acid without formamide, sol catalyzed with nitric acid containing formamide and sol catalyzed with a mixture of nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid and modified with formamide. Following the time evolution of both the Si-(OH stretching vibration at around 950 cm-1 and the Si-O-(Si vibration between 1040 cm-1 and 1200 cm-1 we were able to describe the structural evolution of each sol. The curve of evolution of Si-(OH stretching vibration corresponding to sol A has a simple asymptotic evolution. In the case of formamide containing sol, we observed a two-step structural evolution indicating that for the system containing formamide the polymerization goes through a temporary stabilization of oligomers, which can explain the non-variation of the Si-O(H bond wavenumber for a certain time. Gelation times were of several days for gels without formamide and few hours for gels containing additive. The presence of additive resulted in a highly interconnected gel.

  1. Structure and thermal evolution of spinning-down neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negreiros, R.; Schramm, S.; Weber, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we address the effects of spin-down on the cooling of neutron stars. During its evolution, stellar composition and structure might be substantially altered, as a result of spin-down and the consequent density increase. Since the timescale of cooling might be comparable to to that of the spin-evolution, the modifications to the structure/composition might have important effects on the thermal evolution of the object. We show that the direct Urca process might be delayed or supressed, when spin-down is taken into account. This leads to neutron stars with slow cooling, as opposed to enhanced cooling as would be the case if a "froze-in" structure and composition were considered. In conclusion we demonstrate that the inclusion of spin-down effects on the cooling of neutron stars have far-reaching implications for the interpretation of pulsars. (author)

  2. An analytically solvable model for rapid evolution of modular structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadav Kashtan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems often display modularity, in the sense that they can be decomposed into nearly independent subsystems. Recent studies have suggested that modular structure can spontaneously emerge if goals (environments change over time, such that each new goal shares the same set of sub-problems with previous goals. Such modularly varying goals can also dramatically speed up evolution, relative to evolution under a constant goal. These studies were based on simulations of model systems, such as logic circuits and RNA structure, which are generally not easy to treat analytically. We present, here, a simple model for evolution under modularly varying goals that can be solved analytically. This model helps to understand some of the fundamental mechanisms that lead to rapid emergence of modular structure under modularly varying goals. In particular, the model suggests a mechanism for the dramatic speedup in evolution observed under such temporally varying goals.

  3. Origin, structure and evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments of the origin, structure and evolution of galaxies have been reviewed. The contents of this book are: Inflationary Universe; Cosmic String; Active Galaxies; Intergalactic Medium; Waves in Disk Galaxies; Dark Matter; Gas Dynamics in Disk Galaxies; Equilibrium and Stability of Spiral Galaxies

  4. Parameter identification based on modified simulated annealing differential evolution algorithm for giant magnetostrictive actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Liu, Yongguang

    2018-01-01

    There is a serious nonlinear relationship between input and output in the giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA) and how to establish mathematical model and identify its parameters is very important to study characteristics and improve control accuracy. The current-displacement model is firstly built based on Jiles-Atherton (J-A) model theory, Ampere loop theorem and stress-magnetism coupling model. And then laws between unknown parameters and hysteresis loops are studied to determine the data-taking scope. The modified simulated annealing differential evolution algorithm (MSADEA) is proposed by taking full advantage of differential evolution algorithm's fast convergence and simulated annealing algorithm's jumping property to enhance the convergence speed and performance. Simulation and experiment results shows that this algorithm is not only simple and efficient, but also has fast convergence speed and high identification accuracy.

  5. Structural parameter identifiability analysis for dynamic reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidescu, Florin Paul; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2008-01-01

    method based on Lie derivatives. The proposed systematic two phase methodology is illustrated on a mass action based model for an enzymatically catalyzed reaction pathway network where only a limited set of variables is measured. The methodology clearly pinpoints the structurally identifiable parameters...... where for a given set of measured variables it is desirable to investigate which parameters may be estimated prior to spending computational effort on the actual estimation. This contribution addresses the structural parameter identifiability problem for the typical case of reaction network models....... The proposed analysis is performed in two phases. The first phase determines the structurally identifiable reaction rates based on reaction network stoichiometry. The second phase assesses the structural parameter identifiability of the specific kinetic rate expressions using a generating series expansion...

  6. Isothermal structural evolution of SnO2 monolithic porous xerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, G.E.S.; Pulcinelli, S.H.; Santilli, C.V.; Craievich, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    Monolithic samples of SnO 2 xerogel were produced by careful control of the gelation and drying steps of material preparation. In these samples, small and nanoporous aggregates stick together, yielding a monolithic (nonpowdered) material. The material was analyzed by in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) during isothermal treatment at temperatures ranging from 473 to 773 K. At 473 K, the SAXS intensity does not change significantly with time. All experimental scattering intensity functions for T > 473 K are composed of two wide peaks, which evolve with increasing time. Each of them was associated with one of the modes of a bimodal distribution of pore sizes corresponding to a fine (intra-aggregate) and a coarse (inter-aggregate) porosity. The SAXS intensities of the maxima of both peaks increase with increasing treatment time, while the position of their maxima, associated with an average correlation distance, decreases. The time dependences of the SAXS intensity corresponding to both families of pores qualitatively agree with those expected for a two-phase separating system exhibiting dynamic scaling properties. The time evolutions of the several moments of the structure function of samples heat treated at 773 K exhibit a good quantitative agreement with the theory of dynamic scaling for systems evolving by a coagulation mechanism. The kinetic parameters are the same for both peaks, indicating that the same mechanism is responsible for the structural evolution of both families of pores. (orig.)

  7. Parameter identification of PEMFC model based on hybrid adaptive differential evolution algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhe; Wang, Ning; Bi, Yunrui; Srinivasan, Dipti

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a HADE (hybrid adaptive differential evolution) algorithm is proposed for the identification problem of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell). Inspired by biological genetic strategy, a novel adaptive scaling factor and a dynamic crossover probability are presented to improve the adaptive and dynamic performance of differential evolution algorithm. Moreover, two kinds of neighborhood search operations based on the bee colony foraging mechanism are introduced for enhancing local search efficiency. Through testing the benchmark functions, the proposed algorithm exhibits better performance in convergent accuracy and speed. Finally, the HADE algorithm is applied to identify the nonlinear parameters of PEMFC stack model. Through experimental comparison with other identified methods, the PEMFC model based on the HADE algorithm shows better performance. - Highlights: • We propose a hybrid adaptive differential evolution algorithm (HADE). • The search efficiency is enhanced in low and high dimension search space. • The effectiveness is confirmed by testing benchmark functions. • The identification of the PEMFC model is conducted by adopting HADE.

  8. Differential evolution algorithm-based kernel parameter selection for Fukunaga-Koontz Transform subspaces construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binol, Hamidullah; Bal, Abdullah; Cukur, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    The performance of the kernel based techniques depends on the selection of kernel parameters. That's why; suitable parameter selection is an important problem for many kernel based techniques. This article presents a novel technique to learn the kernel parameters in kernel Fukunaga-Koontz Transform based (KFKT) classifier. The proposed approach determines the appropriate values of kernel parameters through optimizing an objective function constructed based on discrimination ability of KFKT. For this purpose we have utilized differential evolution algorithm (DEA). The new technique overcomes some disadvantages such as high time consumption existing in the traditional cross-validation method, and it can be utilized in any type of data. The experiments for target detection applications on the hyperspectral images verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Assessing the performance of a differential evolution algorithm in structural damage detection by varying the objective function

    OpenAIRE

    Villalba-Morales, Jesús Daniel; Laier, José Elias

    2014-01-01

    Structural damage detection has become an important research topic in certain segments of the engineering community. These methodologies occasionally formulate an optimization problem by defining an objective function based on dynamic parameters, with metaheuristics used to find the solution. In this study, damage localization and quantification is performed by an Adaptive Differential Evolution algorithm, which solves the associated optimization problem. Furthermore, this paper looks at the ...

  10. Interpretation of the evolution parameter of the Feynman parametrization of the Dirac equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio, J.P.; Garcia Alvarez, E.T.

    1995-01-01

    The Feynman parametrization of the Dirac equation is considered in order to obtain an indefinite mass formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics. It is shown that the parameter that labels the evolution is related to the proper time. The Stueckelberg interpretation of antiparticles naturally arises from the formalism. ((orig.))

  11. Study of the lattice parameter evolution of PWR irradiated MOX fuel by X-Ray diffraction; Etude de l'evolution du parametre cristallin des combustibles MOX irradies en rep par la methode de diffraction des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavier, B

    1995-07-01

    Fuel irradiation leads to a swelling resulting from the formation of gaseous (Kr, Xe) or solid fission products which are found either in solution or as solid inclusions in the matrix. This phenomena has to be evaluated to be taken into account in fuel cladding Interaction. Fuel swelling was studied as a function of burn up by measuring the corresponding cell constant evolution by X-Ray diffraction. This study was realized on Mixed Oxide Fuels (MOX) irradiated in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at different burn-up for 3 initial Pu contents. Lattice parameter evolutions were followed as a function of burn-up for the irradiated fuel with and without an annealing thermal treatment. These experimental evolutions are compared to the theoretical evolutions calculated from the hard sphere model, using the fission product concentrations determined by the APPOLO computer code. Contribution of varying parameters influencing the unit cell value is discussed. Thermal treatment effects were checked by metallography, X-Ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. After thermal treatment, no structural change was observed but a decrease of the lattice parameter was measured. This modification results essentially from self-irradiation defect annealing and not from stoichiometry variations. Microprobe analysis showed that about 15% of the formed Molybdenum is in solid solution In the oxide matrix. Micrographs showed the existence of Pu packs in the oxide matrix which induces a broadening of diffraction lines. The RIETVELD method used to analyze the X-Ray patterns did not allow to characterize independently the Pu packs and the oxide matrix lattice parameters. Nevertheless, with this method, the presence of micro-strains in the irradiated nuclear fuel could be confirmed. (author)

  12. Island universes structure and evolution of disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    DE JONG, R. S

    2007-01-01

    This book contains an up-to-date review of the structure and evolution of disk galaxies from both the observational and theoretical point of view. The book is the proceedings of the "Island Universes" conference held at the island of Terschelling, The Netherlands in July 2005, which attracted about 130 experts and students in the field. The conference was organized as a tribute to Dr. Piet C. van der Kruit for receiving the honorary Jacobus C. Kapteyn Professorship in Astronomy. The eight topical themes discussed at the meeting are reflected in these proceedings: 1) Properties of Stellar Disks, 2) Kinematics and Dynamics of Disk Galaxies, 3) Bars, Spiral Structure, and Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies, 4) The Outskirts and Environment of Disk Galaxies, 5) Interstellar Matter, 6) (Evolution of) Star Formation in Galactic Disks, 7) Disk Galaxies through Cosmic Time, and 8) Formation Models of Disk Galaxies. These proceedings are concluded with a conference summary reflecting on the most significant recent pro...

  13. 13C-NMR Study on Structure Evolution Characteristics of High-Organic-Sulfur Coals from Typical Chinese Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution characteristics of high-organic-sulfur (HOS coals with a wide range of ranks from typical Chinese areas were investigated using 13C-CP/MAS NMR. The results indicate that the structure parameters that are relevant to coal rank include CH3 carbon (fal*, quaternary carbon, CH/CH2 carbon + quaternary carbon (falH, aliphatic carbon (falC, protonated aromatic carbon (faH, protonated aromatic carbon + aromatic bridgehead carbon (faH+B, aromaticity (faCP, and aromatic carbon (farC. The coal structure changed dramatically in the first two coalification jumps, especially the first one. A large number of aromatic structures condensed, and aliphatic structures rapidly developed at the initial stage of bituminous coal accompanied by remarkable decarboxylation. Compared to ordinary coals, the structure evolution characteristics of HOS coals manifest in three ways: First, the aromatic CH3 carbon, alkylated aromatic carbon (faS, aromatic bridgehead carbon (faB, and phenolic ether (faP are barely relevant to rank, and abundant organic sulfur has an impact on the normal evolution process of coal. Second, the average aromatic cluster sizes of some super-high-organic-sulfur (SHOS coals are not large, and the extensive development of cross bonds and/or bridged bonds form closer connections among the aromatic fringes. Moreover, sulfur-containing functional groups are probably significant components in these linkages. Third, a considerable portion of “oxygen-containing functional groups” in SHOS coals determined by 13C-NMR are actually sulfur-containing groups, which results in the anomaly that the oxygen-containing structures increase with coal rank.

  14. A Model Parameter Extraction Method for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ozone Chamber using Differential Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, M.; Salam, Z.; Ishaque, K.

    2014-04-01

    In order to design an efficient resonant power supply for ozone gas generator, it is necessary to accurately determine the parameters of the ozone chamber. In the conventional method, the information from Lissajous plot is used to estimate the values of these parameters. However, the experimental setup for this purpose can only predict the parameters at one operating frequency and there is no guarantee that it results in the highest ozone gas yield. This paper proposes a new approach to determine the parameters using a search and optimization technique known as Differential Evolution (DE). The desired objective function of DE is set at the resonance condition and the chamber parameter values can be searched regardless of experimental constraints. The chamber parameters obtained from the DE technique are validated by experiment.

  15. Non-linear thermal evolution of the crystal structure and phase transitions of LaFeO3 investigated by high temperature X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selbach, Sverre M.; Tolchard, Julian R.; Fossdal, Anita; Grande, Tor

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure, anisotropic thermal expansion and structural phase transition of the perovskite LaFeO 3 has been studied by high-temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1533 K. The structural evolution of the orthorhombic phase with space group Pbnm and the rhombohedral phase with R3 ¯ c structure of LaFeO 3 is reported in terms of lattice parameters, thermal expansion coefficients, atomic positions, octahedral rotations and polyhedral volumes. Non-linear lattice expansion across the antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition of LaFeO 3 at T N =735 K was compared to the corresponding behavior of the ferroelectric antiferromagnet BiFeO 3 to gain insight to the magnetoelectric coupling in BiFeO 3 , which is also multiferroic. The first order phase transition of LaFeO 3 from Pbnm to R3 ¯ c was observed at 1228±9 K, and a subsequent transition to Pm3 ¯ m was extrapolated to occur at 2140±30 K. The stability of the Pbnm and R3 ¯ c polymorphs of LaFeO 3 is discussed in terms of the competing enthalpy and entropy of the two crystal polymorphs and the thermal evolution of the polyhedral volume ratio V A /V B . - Graphical abstract: Aniostropic thermal evolution of the lattice parameters and phase transition of LaFeO 3 . Highlights: ► The crystal structure of LaFeO 3 is studied by HTXRD from RT to 1533 K. ► A non-linear expansion across the Néel temperature is observed for LaFeO 3 . ► The ratio V A /V B is used to rationalize the thermal evolution of the structure.

  16. Topological bifurcations in the evolution of coherent structures in a convection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Magnus; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Blob filaments are coherent structures in a turbulent plasma flow. Understanding the evolution of these structures is important to improve magnetic plasma confinement. Three state variables describe blob filaments in a plasma convection model. A dynamical systems approach analyzes the evolution...

  17. Experimental study on evolution of bed structures of natural mountain rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-xiang Liu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bed structures in many mountain rivers provide additional resistance to the flow. A field experiment was conducted on debris flow deposits in the valley of the Jiangjiagou Ravine, a tributary of the Yangtze River in southwestern China, to study the evolution and distribution of bed structures and their relationship with environmental conditions. Water and sediment from the Jiangjiagou main stream were diverted into the experimental channel. Several hydrological schemes were adopted to scour the channel until equilibrium was reached. During this process the evolutions of bed structures and channel configuration were investigated. The results indicate that stronger bed structures mean greater stream power consumption, greater resistance, and greater slope in a certain section when rivers are in dynamic equilibrium. Thus, to some extent the longitudinal profiles of channels can be determined by the distribution of bed structures. In natural cases, the strength and evolution of bed structures are under the influence of environmental conditions such as discharge and bed-load transportation rate. That is, given the same conditions, the same bed structure distribution and longitudinal profile can be predicted.

  18. Influence of electron irradiation on internal friction and structure evolution of polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailova, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Important qualitative information on structural evolution and radiation alterations in polymer materials under the action of ionizing radiation can be obtained from the analysis of the temperature dependences of internal friction. Changing of internal friction parameters of relax maxima during irradiation is qualitative degree parameter of radiation scission-cross linking of the polymer molecules. In this work, the general phenomenological approach is realized by introduction of the effective 'observed' parameters into the simple kinetic equations. The applicability of such approach is justified by the fact that kinetics of both internal friction and scission-cross linking processes can be characterized by the same effective parameters. Temperature dependences of internal friction are experimentally studied in epoxy irradiated by 2.5 MeV pulse electron beam to different doses (D=3 MGy, 6 MGy and 9 MGy). Time dependences of internal friction characteristics associated with radiation-induced processes of polymer scission and cross-linking are analyzed and discussed. Experimental data on kinetics of structural transformations in epoxy are interpreted on the base of analytical solutions of differential equations for free radical accumulation during and after irradiation subject to the arbitrary effective order of radical recombination. It is shown that in the range of doses and dose rates under study radiation-induced scission predominates during polymer irradiation but in a certain period of time after irradiation scission changes to cross-linking. Characteristics of the kinetic curves obtained essentially depend on the dose

  19. Regge behaviour of structure functions and evolution of gluon structure function upto next-to-leading order at low-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, U.; Sarma, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of gluon structure function from Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) evolution equations upto next-to-leading order at low-x is presented assuming the Regge behaviour of structure functions. We compare our results of gluon structure function with GRV 98 global parameterization and show the compatibility of Regge behaviour of structure functions with PQCD. (author)

  20. Evolution of fuel plate parameters during deformation in rolling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durazzo, M., E-mail: mdurazzo@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute – IPEN/CNEN-SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Vieira, E.; Urano de Carvalho, E.F. [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute – IPEN/CNEN-SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Riella, H.G. [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute – IPEN/CNEN-SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Chemical Engineering Department, Santa Catarina Federal University, Florianópolis (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    The Nuclear and Energy Research Institute – IPEN/CNEN-SP routinely produces the nuclear fuel necessary for operating its research reactor, IEA-R1. This fuel consists of fuel plates containing U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al composites as the meat, which are fabricated by rolling. The rolling process currently deployed was developed based on information obtained from literature, which was used as a premise for defining the current manufacturing procedures, according to a methodology with an essentially empirical character. Despite the current rolling process being perfectly stable and highly reproducible, it is not well characterized and is therefore not fully known. The objective of this work is to characterize the rolling process for producing dispersion fuel plates. Results regarding the evolution of the main parameters of technological interest, after each rolling pass, are presented. Some defects that originated along the fuel plate deformation during the rolling process were characterized and discussed. The fabrication procedures for manufacturing the fuel plates are also presented. - Highlights: •Evolution of defects when manufacturing dispersion fuel plates. •Aspects of dispersion fuel plates fabrication. •What happen during the manufacturing of dispersion fuel plates? •Clarifying the deformation of fuel plates by rolling.

  1. Monogamy, strongly bonded groups, and the evolution of human social structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapais, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Human social evolution has most often been treated in a piecemeal fashion, with studies focusing on the evolution of specific components of human society such as pair-bonding, cooperative hunting, male provisioning, grandmothering, cooperative breeding, food sharing, male competition, male violence, sexual coercion, territoriality, and between-group conflicts. Evolutionary models about any one of those components are usually concerned with two categories of questions, one relating to the origins of the component and the other to its impact on the evolution of human cognition and social life. Remarkably few studies have been concerned with the evolution of the entity that integrates all components, the human social system itself. That social system has as its core feature human social structure, which I define here as the common denominator of all human societies in terms of group composition, mating system, residence patterns, and kinship structures. The paucity of information on the evolution of human social structure poses substantial problems because that information is useful, if not essential, to assess both the origins and impact of any particular aspect of human society. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dynamic response of structures with uncertain parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Z H; Liu, Y; Yang, Y

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an interval method for the dynamic response of structures with uncertain parameters is presented. In the presented method, the structural physical and geometric parameters and loads can be considered as interval variables. The structural stiffness matrix, mass matrix and loading vectors are described as the sum of two parts corresponding to the deterministic matrix and the uncertainty of the interval parameters. The interval problem is then transformed into approximate deterministic one. The Laplace transform is used to transform the equations of the dynamic system into linear algebra equations. The Maclaurin series expansion is applied on the modified dynamic equation in order to deal with the linear algebra equations. Numerical examples are studied by the presented interval method for the cases with and without damping. The upper bound and lower bound of the dynamic responses of the examples are compared, and it shows that the presented method is effective.

  3. (ajst) structural evolution of bode saadu area

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opiyo

    2, pp. 17-24. STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF BODE SAADU AREA,. SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA. C. T. Okonkwo. Department of Geology, University of Ilorin P.M.B. 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria. E-mail cokonkwo@unilorin.edu.ng. ABSTRACT: The Bode Saadu area comprises metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks which have.

  4. The structure and evolution of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Severino, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    This book equips the reader with a coherent understanding of the structure of the Sun and its evolution and provides all the knowledge required to construct a simplified model of the Sun. The early chapters cover key aspects of basic physics and describe the Sun’s size, mass, luminosity, and temperature. Using a semi-empirical approach, the structure of the present Sun is then modeled in detail, layer by layer, proceeding from the photosphere to the convection zone, radiation zone, and core. Finally, all stages of the Sun’s evolution, from its formation to the end of its life, are carefully explained. The book is primarily intended for university students taking the initial steps in moving from physics to astrophysics. It includes worked exercises and problems to illustrate the concepts discussed, as well as additional problems for independent study. With the aim of helping the reader as much as possible, most of the mathematics required to use the book are provided in the text.

  5. INVESTMENT STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION IN THE CONTEXT OF ECONOMIC CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CODAU CIPRIAN-CRACIUN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this article is the evolution analysis of net investment in Romania between economic growth and international economic crisis. The analysis captures both the evolution of net investment by structure elements (buildings, outfits, other investments and the structure and evolution of investments by sources of financing. Also there is an analysis of the foreign direct investment (FDI share in the total net investment and the impact of the economic crisis on this share. The article aims to identify the main factors for the evolution of investments in Romania before the financial crisis and determine how the financial crisis influenced the structure and volume of investments in the national economy. Most previous studies have focused either on a small part of the investments made in Romania (in most cases the FDI have been analyzed or on the period of economic expansion without capturing the evolution of investment during the economic crisis. Previous research has highlighted especially the FDI influence on macroeconomic indicators of high importance for the economy (unemployment rate, GDP growth rate, etc. with less focus on the factors influencing these investments and the close connection between the economic context (economy status and the volume of these investments. For the analysis of the investment evolution during the mentioned period statistical data was used that captured both the investment evolution trend and the changes occurred by the national economy stepping into recession amid the global financial crisis established. To get an overview of the situation it was considered a time internal that captured both the economic growth and the period after the onset of the economic crisis. Thereby information was obtained on the volume of net investment during 2000-2010, on foreign direct investment in the period 2003-2010 and their share in total net investment and also on the main sources of investment financing during the

  6. Effects of catalyst-bed’s structure parameters on decomposition and combustion characteristics of an ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yu-Song; Li, Guo-Xiu; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Jun; Wang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The decomposition and combustion process is investigated by numerical method. • Heat transfer in catalyst bed is modeled using non-isothermal and radiation model. • The wall heat transfer can impact on the distribution of temperature and species. • The value of catalyst bed length, diameter and wall thickness are optimized. - Abstract: The present investigation numerically studies the evolutions of decomposition and combustion within an ADN-based thruster, and the effects of the catalyst-bed’s three structure parameters (length, diameter, and wall thickness) on the general performance of ADN-based thruster have been systematically investigated. Based upon the calculated results, it can be known that the distribution of temperature gives a Gaussian manner at the exits of the catalyst-bed and the combustion chamber, and the temperature can be obviously effected by each the three structure parameters of the catalyst-bed. With the rise of each the three structure parameter, the temperature will first increases and decreases, and there exists an optimal design value making the temperature be the highest. Via the comparison on the maximal temperature at combustion chamber’s exit and the specific impulse, it can be obtained that the wall thickness plays an important role in the influences on the general performance of ADN-based thruster while the catalyst-bed’s length has the weak effects on the general performance among the three structure parameters.

  7. Spatiotemporal Diffusive Evolution and Fractal Structure of Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-01

    The spatiotemporal diffusive evolution and fractal structure of ground motion have been investigated at the in-ground tunnel of the KEK B-Factory (KEKB) injector linear accelerator (linac). The slow dynamic fluctuating displacements of the tunnel floor are measured in real time with a new remote-controllable sensing system based on a laser-based alignment system. Based on spatiotemporal analyses with linear-regression models, which were applied in both the time and frequency domains to time-series data recorded over a period of approximately 8 months, both coherent and stochastic components in the displacements of the tunnel floor were clearly observed along the entire length of the linac. In particular, it was clearly observed that the stochastic components exhibited characteristic spatiotemporal diffusive evolution with the fractal structure and fractional dimension. This report describes in detail the experimental techniques and analyses of the spatiotemporal diffusive evolution of ground motion observed at the in-ground tunnel of the injector linac using a real-time remote-controllable sensing system.

  8. Irradiation-induced void evolution in iron: A phase-field approach with atomistic derived parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuan-Yuan; Ding Jian-Hua; Huang Shao-Song; Zhao Ji-Jun; Liu Wen-Bo; Ke Xiao-Qin; Wang Yun-Zhi; Zhang Chi

    2017-01-01

    A series of material parameters are derived from atomistic simulations and implemented into a phase field (PF) model to simulate void evolution in body-centered cubic (bcc) iron subjected to different irradiation doses at different temperatures. The simulation results show good agreement with experimental observations — the porosity as a function of temperature varies in a bell-shaped manner and the void density monotonically decreases with increasing temperatures; both porosity and void density increase with increasing irradiation dose at the same temperature. Analysis reveals that the evolution of void number and size is determined by the interplay among the production, diffusion and recombination of vacancy and interstitial. (paper)

  9. Structuring evolution: biochemical networks and metabolic diversification in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Erin S; Badyaev, Alexander V

    2016-08-25

    Recurrence and predictability of evolution are thought to reflect the correspondence between genomic and phenotypic dimensions of organisms, and the connectivity in deterministic networks within these dimensions. Direct examination of the correspondence between opportunities for diversification imbedded in such networks and realized diversity is illuminating, but is empirically challenging because both the deterministic networks and phenotypic diversity are modified in the course of evolution. Here we overcome this problem by directly comparing the structure of a "global" carotenoid network - comprising of all known enzymatic reactions among naturally occurring carotenoids - with the patterns of evolutionary diversification in carotenoid-producing metabolic networks utilized by birds. We found that phenotypic diversification in carotenoid networks across 250 species was closely associated with enzymatic connectivity of the underlying biochemical network - compounds with greater connectivity occurred the most frequently across species and were the hotspots of metabolic pathway diversification. In contrast, we found no evidence for diversification along the metabolic pathways, corroborating findings that the utilization of the global carotenoid network was not strongly influenced by history in avian evolution. The finding that the diversification in species-specific carotenoid networks is qualitatively predictable from the connectivity of the underlying enzymatic network points to significant structural determinism in phenotypic evolution.

  10. {sup 3}He retention and structural evolution in erbium tritides: Phase and aging effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.S., E-mail: zlxs77@163.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Thin Film Centre, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Zhang, L.; Wang, W.D.; Liu, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Peng, S.M., E-mail: pengshuming@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ding, W.; Long, X.G.; Cheng, G.J.; Liang, J.H. [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Fu, Y.Q. [Thin Film Centre, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Effects of phase changes on {sup 3}He retention of Er tritide films were investigated. • The α phase in Er tritide films had no apparent effect on {sup 3}He release/retention. • Tritium content in the β phase showed significant effects on {sup 3}He retention. • Evolution of {sup 3}He in the β phase was apparently influenced by the γ phase. • Effects of phase changes on structure evolution of Er tritides were investigated. - Abstract: Effects of phase changes on {sup 3}He release/retention and crystal lattice evolution during aging of erbium (Er) tritide films were investigated using X-ray diffraction. The contents of α phase and γ phase in the Er tritide films showed significant different effects on {sup 3}He release/retention. The initial tritium stoichiometry or excess tritium atoms accommodated in the octahedral sites and the microstructure (i.e., the texture and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide inclusions) played an important role for the {sup 3}He release and the evolution of {sup 3}He bubbles in the β phase Er tritide films. In the β + γ region, evolution of {sup 3}He in the β phase was apparently influenced by the γ phase, which could result in a strongly anisotropic lattice dilation and an earlier inflection point of the expansion rate of (1 1 1) lattice parameter. A preferred occupation of {sup 3}He in basal plane of the hexagonal γ phase and the lattice expansion along the hexagonal direction were identified.

  11. Structural evolution of tunneling oxide passivating contact upon thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungjin; Min, Kwan Hong; Jeong, Myeong Sang; Lee, Jeong In; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-Eun; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Ka-Hyun

    2017-10-16

    We report on the structural evolution of tunneling oxide passivating contact (TOPCon) for high efficient solar cells upon thermal annealing. The evolution of doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) into polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) by thermal annealing was accompanied with significant structural changes. Annealing at 600 °C for one minute introduced an increase in the implied open circuit voltage (V oc ) due to the hydrogen motion, but the implied V oc decreased again at 600 °C for five minutes. At annealing temperature above 800 °C, a-Si:H crystallized and formed poly-Si and thickness of tunneling oxide slightly decreased. The thickness of the interface tunneling oxide gradually decreased and the pinholes are formed through the tunneling oxide at a higher annealing temperature up to 1000 °C, which introduced the deteriorated carrier selectivity of the TOPCon structure. Our results indicate a correlation between the structural evolution of the TOPCon passivating contact and its passivation property at different stages of structural transition from the a-Si:H to the poly-Si as well as changes in the thickness profile of the tunneling oxide upon thermal annealing. Our result suggests that there is an optimum thickness of the tunneling oxide for passivating electron contact, in a range between 1.2 to 1.5 nm.

  12. High-precision atmospheric parameter and abundance determination of massive stars, and consequences for stellar and Galactic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieva, Maria-Fernanda; Przybilla, Norbert; Irrgang, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The derivation of high precision/accuracy parameters and chemical abundances of massive stars is of utmost importance to the fields of stellar evolution and Galactic chemical evolution. We concentrate on the study of OB-type stars near the main sequence and their evolved progeny, the BA-type supergiants, covering masses of ∼6 to 25 solar masses and a range in effective temperature from ∼8000 to 35 000 K. The minimization of the main sources of systematic errors in the atmospheric model computation, the observed spectra and the quantitative spectral analysis play a critical role in the final results. Our self-consistent spectrum analysis technique employing a robust non-LTE line formation allows precise atmospheric parameters of massive stars to be derived, achieving 1σ-uncertainties as low as 1% in effective temperature and ∼0.05–0.10 dex in surface gravity. Consequences on the behaviour of the chemical elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are discussed here in the context of massive star evolution and Galactic chemical evolution, showing tight relations covered in previous work by too large statistical and systematic uncertainties. The spectral analysis of larger star samples, like from the upcoming Gaia-ESO survey, may benefit from these findings.

  13. Audit Structure at CERN: Present Situation and Possible Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This document describes the present situation and contains considerations regarding the possible evolution of the audit structure at CERN, following discussion in the Committee of Council in March 2002.

  14. Friction-induced nano-structural evolution of graphene as a lubrication additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Mao, Junyuan; Li, Yingru; He, Yongyong; Luo, Jianbin

    2018-03-01

    Graphene has attracted enormous attention in the field of lubrication based on its excellent physical and chemical properties. Although many studies have obtained thermally or chemically- exfoliated graphene and investigated their wide and important application, few studies have reported their physical nano-structural evolution under friction. In this study, we investigated the lubrication properties of graphene additives with different layer numbers and interlayer spacing by exfoliating. The additives with a higher degrees of exfoliation changed to ordering under friction, and had better lubrication properties, while that with a lower degrees exhibited obvious structural defects and high friction. Therefore, the original degrees of exfoliation plays a key role in the structural evolution of graphene and superior lubrication can be achieved through the physical nano-structure changing to ordering, even graphitization. Furthermore, the ordered tribofilm on the frictional interfaces was parallel to the sliding direction, meaning the highly exfoliated graphene indeed reaching slippage between its layers, which wasn't experimentally discovered in previous studies. This work provides a new understanding of the relationship between friction-induced nano-structural evolution and lubrication properties of graphene as a lubrication additive, and has great potential for the structural design of graphene as a lubrication additive.

  15. Ab-initio study of pressure evolution of structural, mechanical and magnetic properties of cementite (Fe3C) phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, S.; Ghosh, P. S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Arya, A.

    2018-04-01

    The pressure evolution of phase stability, structural and mechanical properties of Fe3C in ferro-magnetic (FM) and high pressure non magnetic (NM) phase is investigated from first principle calculations. The 2nd order FM to NM phase transition of Fe3C is identified around 60 GPa. Pressure (or density) variation of sound velocities from our ab-initio calculated single crystal elastic constants are determined to predict these parameters at Earth's outer core pressure.

  16. Evolution of single-particle structure of silicon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, O. V.; Fedorov, N. A.; Klimochkina, A. A.; Markova, M. L.; Spasskaya, T. I.; Tretyakova, T. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    New data on proton and neutron single-particle energies E_{nlj} of Si isotopes with neutron number N from 12 to 28 as well as occupation probabilities N_{nlj} of single-particle states of stable isotopes 28, 30Si near the Fermi energy were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data and excited state decay schemes of neighboring nuclei. The evaluated data indicate the following features of single-particle structure evolution: persistence of Z = 14 subshell closure with N increase, the new magicity of the number N = 16, and the conservation of the magic properties of the number N = 20 in Si isotopic chain. The features were described by the dispersive optical model. The calculation also predicts the weakening of N = 28 shell closure and demonstrates evolution of a bubble-like structure of the proton density distributions in neutron-rich Si isotopes.

  17. Determination of the numerical parameters of a continuous damage model for the structural analysis of clay brick masonry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Barbosa Mangueira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Models based on the continuous damage theory present good responses in representing the nonlinear behavior of reinforced concrete structures with loss of strength and stiffness of the material. However, damage theory is rarely employed in the analysis of masonry structures and numerical simulations are currently performed mostly by Finite Element Method formulations. A computational program was designed to determine the numerical parameters of a damage model of the physical properties of masonry components, solid clay brick and mortar. The model was formulated based on the composition of tensile and compressive surface strengths in the plane stress state. The numerical parameters, the corresponding curves of the activation surfaces and the evolution of the surfaces are presented. The results were fed into the computational program based on the Boundary Element Method (BEM for the simulation of masonry walls, and two types of masonry were simulated. The results confirm the good performance of the model and the program based on the BEM.

  18. Energy-driven surface evolution in beta-MnO2 structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Wentao; Yuan, Yifei; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Huang, Zhennan; Long, Fei; Friedrich, Craig; Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2018-01-01

    Exposed crystal facets directly affect the electrochemical/catalytic performance of MnO2 materials during their applications in supercapacitors, rechargeable batteries, and fuel cells. Currently, the facet-controlled synthesis of MnO2 is facing serious challenges due to the lack of an in-depth understanding of their surface evolution mechanisms. Here, combining aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and high-resolution TEM, we revealed a mutual energy-driven mechanism between beta-MnO2 nanowires and microstructures that dominated the evolution of the lateral facets in both structures. The evolution of the lateral surfaces followed the elimination of the {100} facets and increased the occupancy of {110} facets with the increase in hydrothermal retention time. Both self-growth and oriented attachment along their {100} facets were observed as two different ways to reduce the surface energies of the beta-MnO2 structures. High-density screw dislocations with the 1/2 < 100 > Burgers vector were generated consequently. The observed surface evolution phenomenon offers guidance for the facet-controlled growth of beta-MnO2 materials with high performances for its application in metal-air batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, etc.

  19. Accelerating parameter identification of proton exchange membrane fuel cell model with ranking-based differential evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Wenyin; Cai, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Parameter identification of PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell model is a very active area of research. Generally, it can be treated as a numerical optimization problem with complex nonlinear and multi-variable features. DE (differential evolution), which has been successfully used in various fields, is a simple yet efficient evolutionary algorithm for global numerical optimization. In this paper, with the objective of accelerating the process of parameter identification of PEM fuel cell models and reducing the necessary computational efforts, we firstly present a generic and simple ranking-based mutation operator for the DE algorithm. Then, the ranking-based mutation operator is incorporated into five highly-competitive DE variants to solve the PEM fuel cell model parameter identification problems. The main contributions of this work are the proposed ranking-based DE variants and their application to the parameter identification problems of PEM fuel cell models. Experiments have been conducted by using both the simulated voltage–current data and the data obtained from the literature to validate the performance of our approach. The results indicate that the ranking-based DE methods provide better results with respect to the solution quality, the convergence rate, and the success rate compared with their corresponding original DE methods. In addition, the voltage–current characteristics obtained by our approach are in good agreement with the original voltage–current curves in all cases. - Highlights: • A simple and generic ranking-based mutation operator is presented in this paper. • Several DE (differential evolution) variants are used to solve the parameter identification of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cells) model. • Results show that our method accelerates the process of parameter identification. • The V–I characteristics are in very good agreement with experimental data

  20. Taylor expansion of luminosity distance in Szekeres cosmological models: effects of local structures evolution on cosmographic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villani, Mattia, E-mail: villani@fi.infn.it [Sezione INFN di Firenze, Polo Scientifico Via Sansone 1, 50019, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    We consider the Goode-Wainwright representation of the Szekeres cosmological models and calculate the Taylor expansion of the luminosity distance in order to study the effects of the inhomogeneities on cosmographic parameters. Without making a particular choice for the arbitrary functions defining the metric, we Taylor expand up to the second order in redshift for Family I and up to the third order for Family II Szekeres metrics under the hypotesis, based on observation, that local structure formation is over. In a conservative fashion, we also allow for the existence of a non null cosmological constant.

  1. Automated Modal Parameter Estimation of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Palle; Brincker, Rune; Goursat, Maurice

    In this paper the problems of doing automatic modal parameter extraction of ambient excited civil engineering structures is considered. Two different approaches for obtaining the modal parameters automatically are presented: The Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) technique and a correlation...

  2. Effect of the processing parameters on the crystalline structure of lanthanide ortho tantalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Kisla P.F.; Dias, Anderson, E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2014-08-15

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the crystalline structures of ortho tantalate ceramics has been investigated. Powder materials were prepared by the solid-state reaction route. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements were employed to investigate the crystal structure of the produced materials. In this work, we analyzed three different examples in which the temperature and time were decisive on the final crystal structure of LnTaO{sub 4} compounds besides the lanthanide ionic size. Firstly, the thermal evolution for NdTaO{sub 4} samples showed that mixed crystal phases are formed up to 1100 °C, while well-crystallized M-NdTaO{sub 4} (I2/a) materials are obtained in temperatures higher than 1200 °C. Also, the influence of the synthesis time was investigated for the LaTaO{sub 4} ceramics: it was necessary 14 h to obtain samples in the P2{sub 1}/c structure. Finally, two polymorphs could be obtained for the DyTaO{sub 4} ceramics: P2/a and I2/a space groups were obtained at 1300 °C and 1500 °C, respectively. This study indicated that the temperature, time and lanthanide size are directly correlated with the crystalline arrangement of the ortho tantalate materials.(author)

  3. Prolongation Structure of Semi-discrete Nonlinear Evolution Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yongqiang; Wu Ke; Zhao Weizhong; Guo Hanying

    2007-01-01

    Based on noncommutative differential calculus, we present a theory of prolongation structure for semi-discrete nonlinear evolution equations. As an illustrative example, a semi-discrete model of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is discussed in terms of this theory and the corresponding Lax pairs are also given.

  4. Plant retroviruses: structure, evolution and future applications | Zaki ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Until recently, retroviruses were thought to be restricted to vertebrates. Plant sequencing projects revealed that plant genomes contain retroviral-like sequences. This review aims to address the structure and evolution of plant retroviruses. In addition, it proposes future applications for these important key components of plant ...

  5. The early-stage structural evolution of the Barmer Basin rift, Rajasthan, northwest India

    OpenAIRE

    Bladon, Andrew John

    2015-01-01

    The structural evolution of the Barmer Basin and the context of the rift within the northwest Indian region are poorly understood, despite being a prolific hydrocarbon province. In this work an integrated basin analysis is presented covering the outcrop-, seismic-, and lithosphere-scales. The early-stage structural evolution and the origin of poorly understood structural complications in the Barmer Basin subsurface are assessed. Subsequently, the findings are placed within the wider context o...

  6. Evolution of single-particle structure of silicon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bespalova, O.V.; Klimochkina, A.A.; Spasskaya, T.I.; Tretyakova, T.Yu. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fedorov, N.A.; Markova, M.L. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2018-01-15

    New data on proton and neutron single-particle energies E{sub nlj} of Si isotopes with neutron number N from 12 to 28 as well as occupation probabilities N{sub nlj} of single-particle states of stable isotopes {sup 28,30}Si near the Fermi energy were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data and excited state decay schemes of neighboring nuclei. The evaluated data indicate the following features of single-particle structure evolution: persistence of Z = 14 subshell closure with N increase, the new magicity of the number N = 16, and the conservation of the magic properties of the number N = 20 in Si isotopic chain. The features were described by the dispersive optical model. The calculation also predicts the weakening of N = 28 shell closure and demonstrates evolution of a bubble-like structure of the proton density distributions in neutron-rich Si isotopes. (orig.)

  7. A Bayesian Network Based Adaptability Design of Product Structures for Function Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Structure adaptability design is critical for function evolution in product families, in which many structural and functional design factors are intertwined together with manufacturing cost, customer satisfaction, and final market sales. How to achieve a delicate balance among all of these factors to maximize the market performance of the product is too complicated to address based on traditional domain experts’ knowledge or some ad hoc heuristics. Here, we propose a quantitative product evolution design model that is based on Bayesian networks to model the dynamic relationship between customer needs and product structure design. In our model, all of the structural or functional features along with customer satisfaction, manufacturing cost, sale price, market sales, and indirect factors are modeled as random variables denoted as nodes in the Bayesian networks. The structure of the Bayesian model is then determined based on the historical data, which captures the dynamic sophisticated relationship of customer demands of a product, structural design, and market performance. Application of our approach to an electric toothbrush product family evolution design problem shows that our model allows for designers to interrogate with the model and obtain theoretical and decision support for dynamic product feature design process.

  8. Structure and Evolution of the Foreign Exchange Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapień, J.; Gworek, S.; Drożdż, S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate topology and temporal evolution of the foreign currency exchange market viewed from a weighted network perspective. Based on exchange rates for a set of 46 currencies (including precious metals), we construct different representations of the FX network depending on a choice of the base currency. Our results show that the network structure is not stable in time, but there are main clusters of currencies, which persist for a long period of time despite the fact that their size and content are variable. We find a long-term trend in the network's evolution which affects the USD and EUR nodes. In all the network representations, the USD node gradually loses its centrality, while, on contrary, the EUR node has become slightly more central than it used to be in its early years. Despite this directional trend, the overall evolution of the network is noisy.

  9. Convergent evolution of modularity in metabolic networks through different community structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Wanding

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the modularity of metabolic networks of bacteria is closely related to the variability of their living habitats. However, given the dependency of the modularity score on the community structure, it remains unknown whether organisms achieve certain modularity via similar or different community structures. Results In this work, we studied the relationship between similarities in modularity scores and similarities in community structures of the metabolic networks of 1021 species. Both similarities are then compared against the genetic distances. We revisited the association between modularity and variability of the microbial living environments and extended the analysis to other aspects of their life style such as temperature and oxygen requirements. We also tested both topological and biological intuition of the community structures identified and investigated the extent of their conservation with respect to the taxomony. Conclusions We find that similar modularities are realized by different community structures. We find that such convergent evolution of modularity is closely associated with the number of (distinct enzymes in the organism’s metabolome, a consequence of different life styles of the species. We find that the order of modularity is the same as the order of the number of the enzymes under the classification based on the temperature preference but not on the oxygen requirement. Besides, inspection of modularity-based communities reveals that these communities are graph-theoretically meaningful yet not reflective of specific biological functions. From an evolutionary perspective, we find that the community structures are conserved only at the level of kingdoms. Our results call for more investigation into the interplay between evolution and modularity: how evolution shapes modularity, and how modularity affects evolution (mainly in terms of fitness and evolvability. Further, our results

  10. Convergent evolution of modularity in metabolic networks through different community structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wanding; Nakhleh, Luay

    2012-09-14

    It has been reported that the modularity of metabolic networks of bacteria is closely related to the variability of their living habitats. However, given the dependency of the modularity score on the community structure, it remains unknown whether organisms achieve certain modularity via similar or different community structures. In this work, we studied the relationship between similarities in modularity scores and similarities in community structures of the metabolic networks of 1021 species. Both similarities are then compared against the genetic distances. We revisited the association between modularity and variability of the microbial living environments and extended the analysis to other aspects of their life style such as temperature and oxygen requirements. We also tested both topological and biological intuition of the community structures identified and investigated the extent of their conservation with respect to the taxonomy. We find that similar modularities are realized by different community structures. We find that such convergent evolution of modularity is closely associated with the number of (distinct) enzymes in the organism's metabolome, a consequence of different life styles of the species. We find that the order of modularity is the same as the order of the number of the enzymes under the classification based on the temperature preference but not on the oxygen requirement. Besides, inspection of modularity-based communities reveals that these communities are graph-theoretically meaningful yet not reflective of specific biological functions. From an evolutionary perspective, we find that the community structures are conserved only at the level of kingdoms. Our results call for more investigation into the interplay between evolution and modularity: how evolution shapes modularity, and how modularity affects evolution (mainly in terms of fitness and evolvability). Further, our results call for exploring new measures of modularity and network

  11. PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Vasyunin, A.; Birnstiel, T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R ∼ 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO 2 , NH 2 CN, HNO, H 2 O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  12. Mathematical Modelling of Immune Parameters in the Evolution of Severe Dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Premaratne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Predicting the risk of severity at an early stage in an individual patient will be invaluable in preventing morbidity and mortality caused by dengue. We hypothesized that such predictions are possible by analyzing multiple parameters using mathematical modeling. Methodology. Data from 11 adult patients with dengue fever (DF and 25 patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF were analyzed. Multivariate statistical analysis was performed to study the characteristics and interactions of parameters using dengue NS1 antigen levels, dengue IgG antibody levels, platelet counts, and lymphocyte counts. Fuzzy logic fundamentals were used to map the risk of developing severe forms of dengue. The cumulative effects of the parameters were incorporated using the Hamacher and the OWA operators. Results. The operator classified the patients according to the severity level during the time period of 96 hours to 120 hours after the onset of fever. The accuracy ranged from 53% to 89%. Conclusion. The results show a robust mathematical model that explains the evolution from dengue to its serious forms in individual patients. The model allows prediction of severe cases of dengue which could be useful for optimal management of patients during a dengue outbreak. Further analysis of the model may also deepen our understanding of the pathways towards severe illness.

  13. Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolution, Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Krasiński, Andrzej; Hellaby, Charles; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle

    2009-10-01

    As the structures in our Universe are mapped out on ever larger scales, and with increasing detail, the use of inhomogeneous models is becoming an essential tool for analyzing and understanding them. This book reviews a number of important developments in the application of inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's field equations to cosmology. It shows how inhomogeneous models can be employed to study the evolution of structures such as galaxy clusters and galaxies with central black holes, and to account for cosmological observations like supernovae dimming, the cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations or the dependence of the Hubble parameter on redshift within classical general relativity. Whatever 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' turn out to be, inhomogeneities exist on many scales and need to be investigated with all appropriate methods. This book is of great value to all astrophysicists and researchers working in cosmology, from graduate students to academic researchers. - Presents inhomogeneous cosmological models, allowing readers to familiarise themselves with basic properties of these models - Shows how inhomogeneous models can be used to analyse cosmological observations such as supernovae, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillations - Reviews important developments in the application of inhomogeneous solutions of Einstein's field equations to cosmology

  14. Brain structure evolution in a basal vertebrate clade: evidence from phylogenetic comparative analysis of cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolm Niclas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate brain is composed of several interconnected, functionally distinct structures and much debate has surrounded the basic question of how these structures evolve. On the one hand, according to the 'mosaic evolution hypothesis', because of the elevated metabolic cost of brain tissue, selection is expected to target specific structures mediating the cognitive abilities which are being favored. On the other hand, the 'concerted evolution hypothesis' argues that developmental constraints limit such mosaic evolution and instead the size of the entire brain varies in response to selection on any of its constituent parts. To date, analyses of these hypotheses of brain evolution have been limited to mammals and birds; excluding Actinopterygii, the basal and most diverse class of vertebrates. Using a combination of recently developed phylogenetic multivariate allometry analyses and comparative methods that can identify distinct rates of evolution, even in highly correlated traits, we studied brain structure evolution in a highly variable clade of ray-finned fishes; the Tanganyikan cichlids. Results Total brain size explained 86% of the variance in brain structure volume in cichlids, a lower proportion than what has previously been reported for mammals. Brain structures showed variation in pair-wise allometry suggesting some degree of independence in evolutionary changes in size. This result is supported by variation among structures on the strength of their loadings on the principal size axis of the allometric analysis. The rate of evolution analyses generally supported the results of the multivariate allometry analyses, showing variation among several structures in their evolutionary patterns. The olfactory bulbs and hypothalamus were found to evolve faster than other structures while the dorsal medulla presented the slowest evolutionary rate. Conclusion Our results favor a mosaic model of brain evolution, as certain

  15. Structural parameter optimization design for Halbach permanent maglev rail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, F.; Tang, Y.; Ren, L.; Li, J.

    2010-01-01

    Maglev rail is an important part of the magnetic levitation launch system. Reducing the manufacturing cost of magnetic levitation rail is the key problem for the development of magnetic levitation launch system. The Halbach permanent array has an advantage that the fundamental spatial field is cancelled on one side of the array while the field on the other side is enhanced. So this array used in the design of high temperature superconducting permanent maglev rail could improve the surface magnetic field and the levitation force. In order to make the best use of Nd-Fe-B (NdFeB) material and reduce the cost of maglev rail, the effect of the rail's structural parameters on levitation force and the utilization rate of NdFeB material are analyzed. The optimal ranges of these structural parameters are obtained. The mutual impact of these parameters is also discussed. The optimization method of these structure parameters is proposed at the end of this paper.

  16. Structural parameter optimization design for Halbach permanent maglev rail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, F., E-mail: guofang19830119@163.co [R and D Center of Applied Superconductivity, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tang, Y.; Ren, L.; Li, J. [R and D Center of Applied Superconductivity, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2010-11-01

    Maglev rail is an important part of the magnetic levitation launch system. Reducing the manufacturing cost of magnetic levitation rail is the key problem for the development of magnetic levitation launch system. The Halbach permanent array has an advantage that the fundamental spatial field is cancelled on one side of the array while the field on the other side is enhanced. So this array used in the design of high temperature superconducting permanent maglev rail could improve the surface magnetic field and the levitation force. In order to make the best use of Nd-Fe-B (NdFeB) material and reduce the cost of maglev rail, the effect of the rail's structural parameters on levitation force and the utilization rate of NdFeB material are analyzed. The optimal ranges of these structural parameters are obtained. The mutual impact of these parameters is also discussed. The optimization method of these structure parameters is proposed at the end of this paper.

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance parameters and local structure for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HUA-MING ZHANG. 1. , GUANG-DUO LU. 1 ... the above ZFSs, the local structure information for the impurity Gd. 3+ is obtained, i.e., .... parameters, extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements and crystal-field spectrum ...

  18. Fermionic covariant prolongation structure theory for supernonlinear evolution equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jipeng; Wang Shikun; Wu Ke; Zhao Weizhong

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the superprincipal bundle and its associated superbundle. The super(nonlinear)connection on the superfiber bundle is constructed. Then by means of the connection theory, we establish the fermionic covariant prolongation structure theory of the supernonlinear evolution equation. In this geometry theory, the fermionic covariant fundamental equations determining the prolongation structure are presented. As an example, the supernonlinear Schroedinger equation is analyzed in the framework of this fermionic covariant prolongation structure theory. We obtain its Lax pairs and Baecklund transformation.

  19. Insight into Evolution, Processing and Performance of Multi-length-scale Structures in Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ching; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Cho, Yi-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Chen; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Hsiao, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Chang-Wen; Su, Chun-Jen; Jeng, U-Ser; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-09-04

    The structural characterization correlated to the processing control of hierarchical structure of planar heterojunction perovskite layer is still incomplete due to the limitations of conventional microscopy and X-ray diffraction. This present study performed the simultaneously grazing-incidence small-angle scattering and wide-angle scattering (GISAXS/GIWAXS) techniques to quantitatively probe the hierarchical structure of the planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. The result is complementary to the currently microscopic study. Correlation between the crystallization behavior, crystal orientation, nano- and meso-scale internal structure and surface morphology of perovskite film as functions of various processing control parameters is reported for the first time. The structural transition from the fractal pore network to the surface fractal can be tuned by the chloride percentage. The GISAXS/GIWAXS measurement provides the comprehensive understanding of concurrent evolution of the film morphology and crystallization correlated to the high performance. The result can provide the insight into formation mechanism and rational synthesis design.

  20. Insight into Evolution, Processing and Performance of Multi-length-scale Structures in Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ching; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Cho, Yi-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Chen; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Hsiao, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Chang-Wen; Su, Chun-Jen; Jeng, U.-Ser; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-09-01

    The structural characterization correlated to the processing control of hierarchical structure of planar heterojunction perovskite layer is still incomplete due to the limitations of conventional microscopy and X-ray diffraction. This present study performed the simultaneously grazing-incidence small-angle scattering and wide-angle scattering (GISAXS/GIWAXS) techniques to quantitatively probe the hierarchical structure of the planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. The result is complementary to the currently microscopic study. Correlation between the crystallization behavior, crystal orientation, nano- and meso-scale internal structure and surface morphology of perovskite film as functions of various processing control parameters is reported for the first time. The structural transition from the fractal pore network to the surface fractal can be tuned by the chloride percentage. The GISAXS/GIWAXS measurement provides the comprehensive understanding of concurrent evolution of the film morphology and crystallization correlated to the high performance. The result can provide the insight into formation mechanism and rational synthesis design.

  1. Evolution of structural, magnetic and transport behavior by Pr doping in SrRuO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Renu; Pramanik, A. K.

    2018-05-01

    Here we report the evolution of structural, magnetic and transport behavior in perovskite based ruthenates Sr1-xPrxRuO3 (x=0.0 and 0.1). The substitution of Pr on Sr site retains orthorhombic structure while we find the slight change in structural parameters. The SrRuO3 has itinerant ferromagnet (FM) type nature of ordering temperature ˜160 K and below the transition temperature showing large bifurcation between ZFC and FC magnetization. By Pr doping, the magnetic moment decreases with decreasing bifurcation of ZFC and FC. The ZFC data show three distinct peaks (three transition temperature; TM1,TM2 and TM3). The magnetization study of both the samples, at high temperature fitted with modified CWL showing the decreasing value of ordering temperature by Pr doping matches close to TM2. The low-temperature isothermal magnetization M (H) data show that the high field saturation moment has decreased by Pr doping. The Arrott plot gives spontaneous magnetization (Ms) which is also decreased by Pr substitution. Evolution of Rhodes-Wohlfarth ratio value increases, which suggests that FM in this system evolves toward the more itinerant type by Pr doping. The electrical resistivity ρ(T) of both the samples show metallic behavior, in the all temperature range and ρ(T) increases by Pr doping while around below 45 K, the resistivity decreases by Pr doping and this crossing temperature also matches with ZFC data.

  2. Kinematic morphology of large-scale structure: evolution from potential to rotational flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Eyink, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative way to describe the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of the characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, is very useful for understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with the cosmic web structure because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between the cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of the phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariant space.

  3. Kinematic morphology of large-scale structure: evolution from potential to rotational flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Eyink, Gregory L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    As an alternative way to describe the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of the characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, is very useful for understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with the cosmic web structure because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between the cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of the phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariant space.

  4. A comparative analysis of particle swarm optimization and differential evolution algorithms for parameter estimation in nonlinear dynamic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Amit; Abu-Mahfouz, Issam

    2014-01-01

    The use of evolutionary algorithms has been popular in recent years for solving the inverse problem of identifying system parameters given the chaotic response of a dynamical system. The inverse problem is reformulated as a minimization problem and population-based optimizers such as evolutionary algorithms have been shown to be efficient solvers of the minimization problem. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no published work that evaluates the efficacy of using the two most popular evolutionary techniques – particle swarm optimization and differential evolution algorithm, on a wide range of parameter estimation problems. In this paper, the two methods along with their variants (for a total of seven algorithms) are applied to fifteen different parameter estimation problems of varying degrees of complexity. Estimation results are analyzed using nonparametric statistical methods to identify if an algorithm is statistically superior to others over the class of problems analyzed. Results based on parameter estimation quality suggest that there are significant differences between the algorithms with the newer, more sophisticated algorithms performing better than their canonical versions. More importantly, significant differences were also found among variants of the particle swarm optimizer and the best performing differential evolution algorithm

  5. Solubility-Parameter-Guided Solvent Selection to Initiate Ostwald Ripening for Interior Space-Tunable Structures with Architecture-Dependent Electrochemical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Baoguang; Guo, Donglei; Qin, Jinwen; Meng, Tao; Wang, Xin; Cao, Minhua

    2018-01-08

    Despite significant advancement in preparing various hollow structures by Ostwald ripening, one common problem is the intractable uncontrollability of initiating Ostwald ripening due to the complexity of the reaction processes. Here, a new strategy on Hansen solubility parameter (HSP)-guided solvent selection to initiate Ostwald ripening is proposed. Based on this comprehensive principle for solvent optimization, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) was screened out, achieving accurate synthesis of interior space-tunable MoSe 2 spherical structures (solid, core-shell, yolk-shell and hollow spheres). The resultant MoSe 2 structures exhibit architecture-dependent electrochemical performances towards hydrogen evolution reaction and sodium-ion batteries. This pre-solvent selection strategy can effectively provide researchers great possibility in efficiently synthesizing various hollow structures. This work paves a new pathway for deeply understanding Ostwald ripening. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Structural evolution and reaction mechanism of lithium nickelate (LiNiO2 during the carbonation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela González-Varela

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lithium nickelate (LiNiO2 was synthesized using the lithium excess method, and then characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption. Finally, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses were performed in CO2 presence, at high temperatures. Results show that LiNiO2 is able to react with CO2 through a complex structural evolution process, where lithium atoms are released to produce Li2CO3, while some nickel atoms are rearranged on different Li1-xNi1+xO2 crystalline phases. LiNiO2-CO2 reaction kinetic parameters were determined assuming a first-order reaction, where kinetic constants tended to increase as a function of temperature. However, kinetic constant values did not follow a linear trend. This atypical behavior was attributed to LiNiO2 sintering and crystalline evolution performed as a function of temperature.

  7. Structural evolution of Fe-18Ni-16Cr-4Al steel during aging at 950 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Man; Jang, Jinsung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Zhangjian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, USTB, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steels are also among important structural materials for in-core components of nuclear reactors, and the performance, the oxidation resistance as well as the mechanical strength at high temperature are further expected after Fukushima accident. Alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steel was first developed by Y. Yamamoto et al. , which showed a good combination of oxidation resistance and creep resistance. The strengthening is achieved through nano-sized MX and Laves. Microstructural evolution of Fe-18Ni-16Cr-4Al during aging at 950 .deg. C was studied. This steel consists of two phases of austenite and ferrite. During aging, needle-shaped NiAl precipitates in austenite, while round shaped NiAl form in ferrite, which is supposed to be due to different crystal structural parameters.

  8. Connecting Global to Local Parameters in Barred Galaxy Models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Key words. Galaxies: barred—orbits—global and local parameters. .... series near the stable Lagrange point L1, which coincides with the origin. Doing so, .... Toomre, A. 1981, In: The Structure and Evolution of Normal Galaxies, (eds) S. M. Fall,.

  9. Structural Evolution of Human Recombinant alfaB-Crystallin under UV Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Fujii, Noriko; Morimoto, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    External stresses cause certain proteins to lose their regular structure and aggregate. In order to clarify this abnormal aggregation process, a structural evolution of human recombinant aB-crystallin under UV irradiation was observed with in situ small-angle neutron scattering. The abnormal...

  10. SAXS observation of structural evolution of heated olefin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Minhua; Mou Hongchen; Wang Yuxi; Li Demin; Wang Aiping; Ma Congxiao; Cheng Weidong; Wang Dan; Liu Jia

    2007-01-01

    Structural evolution of olefin during its heating process was observed with SAXS method at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The mean square fluctuation of electron density increased from 468.5 nm -2 at 22 degree C to 2416 nm -2 at 100 degree C, while the electronic gyration radius decreased from 11.61 nm at 22 degree C to 11.16 nm at 100 degree C. Therefore, the olefin softens as a result of the increased thermal motion of the molecules, rather than the shrinking size of fundamental structural units of olefin. (authors)

  11. PARAMETERS AFFECTING THE STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF A TUNNEL STRUCTURE EXPOSED TO FIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Pouran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Behaviour of cut-and-cover tunnels exposed to fire should be analysed by using a realistic structural model that takes account of mechanical and thermal effects on the structure. This has been performed with the aid of Finite Element (FE software package called SOFiSTiK in parallel, for two types of elements as a scope of research project financed by the German Bundesanstalt für Straßenwesen BAST. Since the stiffness of the structure at elevated temperatures is highly affected, a realistic model of structural behaviour of the tunnel could be only achieved by considering the nonlinear analysis of the structure. This has been performed for a 2–cell cut and cover tunnel by taking account of simultaneous reduction of stiffness and strength and the time-dependent increasing indirect effects due to axial constraints and temperature gradients induced by elevated temperatures. The thermal analyses have been performed and the effects were implemented into the structural model by the multi-layered strain model. The stress–strain model proposed by EN 1992-1-2 is implemented for the elevated temperature. Since there was sufficient amount of Polypropylene fibres in the concrete mixtures, modelling of spalling was excluded from the analysis. The critical corresponding stresses and material behaviour are compared and interpreted at different time stages. The main parameters affecting the accuracy and convergence of the results of structural analysis for the used model are identified: defining a realistic fire action, using concrete material model fulfilling the requirements of fire situation in tunnels, defining appropriate time intervals for load implementations. These parameters along with other parameters, which influence the results to a lesser degree, are identified and investigated in this paper.

  12. Structure and evolution of the Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaar, Edward Louis Christian

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on the structure and evolution of the bovine Y-chromosome and the use of paternal markers in molecular diagnostics. The Y-chromosome has emerged together with the X-chromosome early during the evolution of the mammals by differentiation of a pair of

  13. Symplectic and Hamiltonian structures of nonlinear evolution equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorfman, I.Y.

    1993-01-01

    A Hamiltonian structure on a finite-dimensional manifold can be introduced either by endowing it with a (pre)symplectic structure, or by describing the Poisson bracket with the help of a tensor with two upper indices named the Poisson structure. Under the assumption of nondegeneracy, the Poisson structure is nothing else than the inverse of the symplectic structure. Also in the degenerate case the distinction between the two approaches is almost insignificant, because both presymplectic and Poisson structures split into symplectic structures on leaves of appropriately chosen foliations. Hamiltonian structures that arise in the theory of evolution equations demonstrate something new in this respect: trying to operate in local terms, one is induced to develop both approaches independently. Hamiltonian operators, being the infinite-dimensional counterparts of Poisson structures, were the first to become the subject of investigations. A considerable period of time passed before the papers initiated research in the theory of symplectic operators, being the counterparts of presymplectic structures. In what follows, we focus on the main achievements in this field

  14. Effect of Ni on eutectic structural evolution in hypereutectic Al-Mg2Si cast alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chong; Wu Yaping; Li Hui; Wu Yuying; Liu Xiangfa

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → By the injection of rod-like NiAl 3 phase in Al-Mg 2 Si alloys, Al-Mg 2 Si binary eutectic structure gradually evolves into Al-Mg 2 Si-NiAl 3 ternary eutectic. → The ternary eutectic presents a unique double rod structure that rod-like NiAl 3 and Mg 2 Si uniformly distribute in Al matrix. → The mechanism of structural evolution was analyzed in terms of the detailed microstructural observations. → The high temperature (350 deg. C) tensile strength of the alloy increases by 23% due to the eutectic structural evolution. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to investigate the eutectic structural evolution of hypereutectic Al-20% Mg 2 Si with Ni addition under a gravity casting process. Three-dimensional morphologies of eutectic phases were observed in detail using field emission scanning electron microscopy, after Al matrix was removed by deep etching or extraction. The results show that Al-Mg 2 Si binary eutectic gradually evolves into Al-Mg 2 Si-NiAl 3 ternary eutectic with the increase of Ni content, and flake-like eutectic Mg 2 Si transforms into rods. The ternary eutectic presents a unique double rod structure that rod-like NiAl 3 and Mg 2 Si uniformly distribute in Al matrix. Further, the high temperature (350 deg. C) tensile strength of the alloy increases by 23% due to the eutectic structure evolution, and the mechanism of structural evolution was discussed and analyzed in terms of the detailed microstructural observations.

  15. Analysis of Porous Structure Parameters of Biomass Chars Versus Bituminous Coal and Lignite Carbonized at High Pressure and Temperature—A Chemometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Smoliński

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the porous structure of carbonized materials affect their physical properties, such as density or strength, their sorption capacity, and their reactivity in thermochemical processing, determining both their applicability as fuels or sorbents and their efficiency in various processes. The porous structure of chars is shaped by the combined effects of physical and chemical properties of a carbonaceous material and the operating parameters applied in the carbonization process. In the study presented, the experimental dataset covering parameters of various fuels, ranging from biomass through lignite to bituminous coal, and chars produced at 1273 K and under the pressure of 1, 2, 3, and 4 MPa was analyzed with the application of the advanced method of data exploration. The principal component analysis showed that the sample of the highest coal rank was characterized by lower values of parameters reflecting the development of the porous structure of chars. A negative correlation was also observed between the carbon content in a fuel and the evolution of the porous structure of chars at high pressure. The highest total pore volume of chars produced under 1 and 3 MPa and the highest micropore surface area under 3 MPa were reported for a carbonized fuel sample of the highest moisture content.

  16. Hamiltonian structures of some non-linear evolution equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, G.Z.

    1983-06-01

    The Hamiltonian structure of the O(2,1) non-linear sigma model, generalized AKNS equations, are discussed. By reducing the O(2,1) non-linear sigma model to its Hamiltonian form some new conservation laws are derived. A new hierarchy of non-linear evolution equations is proposed and shown to be generalized Hamiltonian equations with an infinite number of conservation laws. (author)

  17. Evaluating two-dimensional skeletal structure parameters using radiological bone morphometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asa, Kensuke; Sakurai, Takashi; Kashima, Isamu; Kumasaka, Satsuki

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study was to investigate the reliability of two-dimensional (2D) skeletal structure parameters obtained using radiological bone morphometric analysis. The 2D skeletal parameters in the regions of interest (ROIs) were measured on computed radiography (CR) images of first phalanges from racehorses, using radiological bone morphometric analysis. Cancellous bone blocks were made from the phalanges in the same position as the ROI determined on CR images. Three-dimensional (3D) trabecular parameters were measured using micro-computed tomography (μCT). The correlations between the 2D skeletal parameters and 3D trabecular parameters were evaluated in relation to the measured bone strength. The following 2D skeletal structure parameters were correlated with bone strength (r=0.61-0.69): skeletal perimeter (Sk.Pm), skeletal number (Sk.N), skeletal separation (Sk.Sp), skeletal spacing (Sk.Spac), fractal dimension (FD), and skeletal pattern factor (SkPf). The 3D trabecular structure parameters were closely correlated with bone strength (r=0.74-0.86). The 2D skeletal parameters Sk.N, Sk.Pm, FD, SkPf, and Sk.Spac were correlated with the 3D trabecular parameters (r=0.61-0.70). The 2D skeletal parameters obtained using radiological bone morphometric analysis may be useful indicators of trabecular strength. (author)

  18. Results of Evolution Supervised by Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz JÄNTSCHI

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a genetic algorithm is frequently assessed using a series of operators of evolution like crossover operators, mutation operators or other dynamic parameters. The present paper aimed to review the main results of evolution supervised by genetic algorithms used to identify solutions to agricultural and horticultural hard problems and to discuss the results of using a genetic algorithms on structure-activity relationships in terms of behavior of evolution supervised by genetic algorithms. A genetic algorithm had been developed and implemented in order to identify the optimal solution in term of estimation power of a multiple linear regression approach for structure-activity relationships. Three survival and three selection strategies (proportional, deterministic and tournament were investigated in order to identify the best survival-selection strategy able to lead to the model with higher estimation power. The Molecular Descriptors Family for structure characterization of a sample of 206 polychlorinated biphenyls with measured octanol-water partition coefficients was used as case study. Evolution using different selection and survival strategies proved to create populations of genotypes living in the evolution space with different diversity and variability. Under a series of criteria of comparisons these populations proved to be grouped and the groups were showed to be statistically different one to each other. The conclusions about genetic algorithm evolution according to a number of criteria were also highlighted.

  19. Cenozoic structures and the tectonic evolution of the eastern North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.; Egholm, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    Abundant seismic sections and well data from the Cenozoic succession in the eastern North Sea area generally reveal normal faulting, salt tectonics and localized tectonic inversion. However, inferences on the Cenozoic dynamic evolution of the region require thorough analysis of interactions between...... or cover tectonism took place. Our objectives are thus 1) to analyze the interaction between basement and cover structures, and if possible 2) to relate the structures to the regional tectonic evolution. The Zechstein evaporites pinch out onto the Ringkøbing-Fyn High, which in the eastern North Sea...... influencede.g. Miocene deposition and controlled the generation of second order faults. The latter detached along the top Chalk Group due to the topography generated during faulting, i.e. they are second order detachment surfaces. We conclude that the regional tectonic significance of the Cenozoic structures...

  20. Structural evolution of fluorinated graphene upon molten-alkali treatment probed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xianqing, E-mail: lxq@gxu.edu.cn [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Pan, Deyou; Lao, Ming; Liang, Shuiying [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Huang, Dan; Zhou, Wenzheng; Guo, Jin [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Structural evolution of FG during the molten-alkali treatment was studied. • XANES results reveal the transformation of surface functional groups of HFG. • The local and electronic structure of HFG can be tuned by varying the alkali-FG ratio. - Abstract: The structural evolution of fluorinated graphene (FG) nanosheets upon molten-alkali treatment has been systematically investigated utilizing X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. It is found that the hydroxyl groups can progressively displace fluorine atoms to form covalent bonds to the graphene sheets under designed molten-alkali condition. The XANES spectra also reveal the formation of epoxide groups through intramolecular dehydration of neighbouring hydroxyl groups after substitution reaction. At high alkali-FG weight ratio, the restoration of the π-conjugated structure in graphene sheets can be observed due to the gradual decomposition of epoxide groups. Our experimental results indicate that the surface chemistry and electronic structure of hydroxyl-functionalized FG (HFG) can be readily tuned by varying the ratio of reactants.

  1. Quantitative assessment of Aluminium cast Alloys` structural parameters to optimize ITS properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kuchariková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with evaluation of eutectic Si (its shape, size, and distribution, dendrite cell size and dendrite arm spacing in aluminium cast alloys which were cast into different moulds (sand and metallic. Structural parameters were evaluated using NIS-Elements image analyser software. This software is imaging analysis software for the evaluation, capture, archiving and automated measurement of structural parameters. The control of structural parameters by NIS Elements shows that optimum mechanical properties of aluminium cast alloys strongly depend on the distribution, morphology, size of eute ctic Si and matrix parameters.

  2. Study of the structural evolutions of crystalline tungsten oxide films prepared using hot-filament CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, P X; Wang, X P; Zhang, H X; Yang, B Q; Wang, Z B; Gonzalez-BerrIos, A; Morell, G; Weiner, B

    2007-01-01

    Structural evolutions of tungsten oxide(WO 3 ) samples on different substrates are studied using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The WO 3 samples are prepared using hot-filament CVD techniques. The focus of the study is on the evolutions of nano structures at different stages following deposition time. The experimental measurements reveal evolutions of the surface structures from uniform film to fractal-like structures, and eventually to nano particles, and crystalline structures from mono (0 1 0) crystalline thin film to polycrystalline thick film developments. The effect of high temperature on the nanostructured WO 3 is also investigated. Well-aligned nanoscale WO 3 rod arrays are obtained at a substrate temperature of up to 1400 deg. C. Further increasing the substrate temperature yields microscale crystalline WO 3 particles

  3. Structural evolution of amino acid crystals under stress from a non-empirical density functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatini, Riccardo; Küçükbenli, Emine; De Gironcoli, Stefano; Kolb, Brian; Thonhauser, T

    2012-01-01

    Use of the non-local correlation functional vdW-DF (from ‘van der Waals density functional’; Dion M et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 246401) has become a popular approach for including van der Waals interactions within density functional theory. In this work, we extend the vdW-DF theory and derive the corresponding stress tensor in a fashion similar to the LDA and GGA approach, which allows for a straightforward implementation in any electronic structure code. We then apply our methodology to investigate the structural evolution of amino acid crystals of glycine and l-alanine under pressure up to 10 GPa - with and without van der Waals interactions - and find that for an accurate description of intermolecular interactions and phase transitions in these systems, the inclusion of van der Waals interactions is crucial. For glycine, calculations including the vdW-DF (vdW-DF-c09x) functional are found to systematically overestimate (underestimate) the crystal lattice parameters, yet the stability ordering of the different polymorphs is determined accurately, at variance with the GGA case. In the case of l-alanine, our vdW-DF results agree with recent experiments that question the phase transition reported for this crystal at 2.3 GPa, as the a and c cell parameters happen to become equal but no phase transition is observed.

  4. Improvisation in evolution of genes and genomes: whose structure is it anyway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2008-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in a variety of seemingly unrelated fields such as sequencing, protein structure prediction, and high-throughput transcriptomics and metabolomics. At the same time, new microscopic models have been developed that made it possible to analyze the evolution of genes and genomes from first principles. The results from these efforts enable, for the first time, a comprehensive insight into the evolution of complex systems and organisms on all scales--from sequences to organisms and populations. Every newly sequenced genome uncovers new genes, families, and folds. Where do these new genes come from? How do gene duplication and subsequent divergence of sequence and structure affect the fitness of the organism? What role does regulation play in the evolution of proteins and folds? Emerging synergism between data and modeling provides first robust answers to these questions.

  5. Effect of synthesis parameters on polymethacrylic acid xerogel structures and equilibrium swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panić, V.; Jovanović, J.; Adnadjević, B.; Velicković, S.

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogels based on crosslinked polymethacrylic acid were synthesized via free-radical polymerization in aqueous solution, using N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide as a crosslinking agent and 2,2'-azobis-[2-(2-imidazolin-2-yl)propane] dihydrochloride as an initiator. The influence of the reaction parameters (the neutralization degree of methacrylic acid and the initial monomer concentration) on the equilibrium swelling degree, the swelling kinetic parameters and the basic structural properties of xerogels was investigated. The change of synthesis parameters leads to the change of the basic structural parameters of xerogel, as well as the equilibrium swelling degree and the initial swelling rate of the hydrogels. It is found that there are power form relationships between the equilibrium swelling degree, the initial swelling rate and the structural xerogel’s properties and the change of the neutralization degree of monomer, i.e. the monomer concentration. The examined correlations proved that the crosslinking density is the crucial parameter which determines all the other investigated structural and swelling parameters.

  6. Structural evolution of Ti/TiC multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahan, I.; Frage, N.; Dariel, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    Hard coatings based on metal/ceramic multilayers with periods in the nanometer range have been shown to possess some potential for improved tribological and mechanical properties. The present work is concerned with the structural evolution of (Ti/TiC) multilayers. Two kinds of multilayers consisting of 30 equithick (40 nm)TiC layers and 20 and 60 nm thick Ti layers, respectively, were sputter deposited on Mo substrates. The structural and the compositional evolution of these multilayers were examined by x-ray diffraction, transition electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, Auger electron microscopy spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis (DTA), in the as-deposited state and after various heat treatments up to 500 deg. C. Initially, the Ti layers had a crystalline columnar grain structure displaying a (002) texture. The TiC layers displayed weak crystallinity with a pronounced (111) texture. In the course of the heat treatments, carbon diffused from the carbide layer into the adjacent Ti layers transforming the latter into off-stoichiometric TiC x with x≅0.5 and simultaneously depleting the carbon content of the initial carbide layer. The formed TiC x layers maintained the textural relationship with the neighboring TiC layers, consistent with a transformation that involved only a ABAB to ABC stacking change of the Ti sublattice. Increased mobility of the Ti atoms in carbon-depleted original TiC layers led to their full or partial recrystallization. The thermal effects associated both with the transformation of Ti layers into TiC, due to the influx of carbon atoms, and with the recrystallization of the original TiC layers were clearly revealed by the DTA measurements

  7. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Burenin, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    function evolution to be used as a useful growth of a structure-based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 37 clusters with langzrang = 0.55 derived from 400 deg2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z ≈ 0.05 clusters...

  8. Evolution of bacterial life-history traits is sensitive to community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketola, Tarmo; Mikonranta, Lauri; Mappes, Johanna

    2016-06-01

    Very few studies have experimentally assessed the evolutionary effects of species interactions within the same trophic level. Here we show that when Serratia marcescens evolve in multispecies communities, their growth rate exceeds the growth rate of the bacteria that evolved alone, whereas the biomass yield gets lower. In addition to the community effects per se, we found that few species in the communities caused strong effects on S. marcescens evolution. The results indicate that evolutionary responses (of a focal species) are different in communities, compared to species evolving alone. Moreover, selection can lead to very different outcomes depending on the community structure. Such context dependencies cast doubt on our ability to predict the course of evolution in the wild, where species often inhabit very different kinds of communities. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. New Insights about Enzyme Evolution from Large Scale Studies of Sequence and Structure Relationships*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. PMID:25210038

  10. Morphological bubble evolution induced by air diffusion on submerged hydrophobic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Pengyu; Xiang, Yaolei; Xue, Yahui; Lin, Hao; Duan, Huiling

    2017-03-01

    Bubbles trapped in the cavities always play important roles in the underwater applications of structured hydrophobic surfaces. Air exchange between bubbles and surrounding water has a significant influence on the morphological bubble evolution, which in turn frequently affects the functionalities of the surfaces, such as superhydrophobicity and drag reduction. In this paper, air diffusion induced bubble evolution on submerged hydrophobic micropores under reduced pressures is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The morphological behaviors of collective and single bubbles are observed using confocal microscopy. Four representative evolution phases of bubbles are captured in situ. After depressurization, bubbles will not only grow and coalesce but also shrink and split although the applied pressure remains negative. A diffusion-based model is used to analyze the evolution behavior and the results are consistent with the experimental data. A criterion for bubble growth and shrinkage is also derived along with a phase diagram, revealing that the competition of effective gas partial pressures across the two sides of the diffusion layer dominates the bubble evolution process. Strategies for controlling the bubble evolution behavior are also proposed based on the phase diagram. The current work provides a further understanding of the general behavior of bubble evolution induced by air diffusion and can be employed to better designs of functional microstructured hydrophobic surfaces.

  11. Repetitive Identification of Structural Systems Using a Nonlinear Model Parameter Refinement Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Wen Lin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a statistical confidence interval based nonlinear model parameter refinement approach for the health monitoring of structural systems subjected to seismic excitations. The developed model refinement approach uses the 95% confidence interval of the estimated structural parameters to determine their statistical significance in a least-squares regression setting. When the parameters' confidence interval covers the zero value, it is statistically sustainable to truncate such parameters. The remaining parameters will repetitively undergo such parameter sifting process for model refinement until all the parameters' statistical significance cannot be further improved. This newly developed model refinement approach is implemented for the series models of multivariable polynomial expansions: the linear, the Taylor series, and the power series model, leading to a more accurate identification as well as a more controllable design for system vibration control. Because the statistical regression based model refinement approach is intrinsically used to process a “batch” of data and obtain an ensemble average estimation such as the structural stiffness, the Kalman filter and one of its extended versions is introduced to the refined power series model for structural health monitoring.

  12. Cultural Transmission and Evolution of Melodic Structures in Multi-generational Signaling Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaca, Massimo; Baggio, Giosuè

    2017-01-01

    It has been proposed that languages evolve by adapting to the perceptual and cognitive constraints of the human brain, developing, in the course of cultural transmission, structural regularities that maximize or optimize learnability and ease of processing. To what extent would perceptual and cognitive constraints similarly affect the evolution of musical systems? We conducted an experiment on the cultural evolution of artificial melodic systems, using multi-generational signaling games as a laboratory model of cultural transmission. Signaling systems, using five-tone sequences as signals, and basic and compound emotions as meanings, were transmitted from senders to receivers along diffusion chains in which the receiver in each game became the sender in the next game. During transmission, structural regularities accumulated in the signaling systems, following principles of proximity, symmetry, and good continuation. Although the compositionality of signaling systems did not increase significantly across generations, we did observe a significant increase in similarity among signals from the same set. We suggest that our experiment tapped into the cognitive and perceptual constraints operative in the cultural evolution of musical systems, which may differ from the mechanisms at play in language evolution and change.

  13. Structure and Evolution of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, I. L.

    2007-06-01

    Theoretical models and observational results are reviewed. The general picture of the structure and evolution of cataclysmic variables (CV) is presented, together with a brief discussion of additional mechanisms of intrinsic variability of the components and magnetic activity of secondaries. Special attention is paid to the accretion structures - flow, disk, column - which are affected by the magnetic field of the white dwarf. The mass and angular momentum transfer in asynchronous MCVs leads to a "propeller" stage of rapid synchronization, after which the "idlings" of the white dwarf are altered to "swingings" with a characteristic time of century(ies). The disk- magnetic field interaction leads to precession of the white dwarf, which causes quasi-periodic changes of the equilibrium rotational period. "Shot noise" in cataclysmic variables is discussed based on one-bandpass and multi-color observations.

  14. First stage of the structural evolution of austenite in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelosin, V.; Gerland, M.; Riviere, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two shape memory Cu-Al-Ni alloys, a polycrystal and a single crystal, exhibiting a martensitic transformation close to 130 C (in the as-quenched state) have been studied. Specimens have been quenched after heat treatment at 850 C. The structural evolutions of the high temperature phase (austenite) have been studied for thermal treatments performed below 200 C. Investigations have been carried out using electrical resistivity measurements, TEM (transmission electron microscopy) observations and X-ray diffraction analysis. The main structural modifications are observed in the polycrystalline alloy and concern first, the reordering process of the austenite structure (B2→L2 1 ), and second, the precipitation of the (Cu 9 Al 4 ) γ 2 phase. In the single crystal alloy, the evolutions are very slight and localized on the structural defects. Particular attention is paid to the role of the quenched-in vacancy elimination on the observed mechanisms. In addition, the incidence of the structural evolution on the transformation temperatures is also discussed. (orig.)

  15. Dislocation structure evolution in 304L stainless steel and weld joint during cyclic plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Jing, Hongyang; Zhao, Lei; Han, Yongdian; Lv, Xiaoqing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xu, Lianyong, E-mail: xulianyong@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-04-06

    Dislocation structures and their evolution of 304L stainless steel and weld metal made with ER308L stainless steel welding wire subjected to uniaxial symmetric strain-controlled loading and stress-controlled ratcheting loading were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The correlation between the cyclic response and the dislocation structure has been studied. The experiment results show that the cyclic behaviour of base metal and weld metal are different. The cyclic behaviour of the base metal consists of primary hardening, slight softening and secondary hardening, while the weld metal shows a short hardening within several cycles followed by the cyclic softening behaviour. The microscopic observations indicate that in base metal, the dislocation structures evolve from low density patterns to those with higher dislocation density during both strain cycling and ratcheting deformation. However, the dislocation structures of weld metal change oppositely form initial complicated structures to simple patterns and the dislocation density gradually decrease. The dislocation evolution presented during the strain cycling and ratcheting deformation is summarized, which can qualitatively explain the cyclic behaviour and the uniaxial ratcheting behaviour of two materials. Moreover, the dislocation evolution in the two types of tests is compared, which shows that the mean stress has an effect on the rate of dislocation evolution during the cyclic loading.

  16. Structure and Evolution of Kuiper Belt Objects and Dwarf Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Prialnik, D.; Stern, S. A.; Coradini, A.

    Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) accreted from a mélange of volatile ices, carbonaceous matter, and rock of mixed interstellar and solar nebular provenance. The transneptunian region, where this accretion took place, was likely more radially compact than today. This and the influence of gas drag during the solar nebula epoch argue for more rapid KBO accretion than usually considered. Early evolution of KBOs was largely the result of heating due to radioactive decay, the most important potential source being 26Al, whereas long-term evolution of large bodies is controlled by the decay of U, Th, and 40K. Several studies are reviewed dealing with the evolution of KBO models, calculated by means of one-dimensional numerical codes that solve the heat and mass balance equations. It is shown that, depending on parameters (principally rock content and porous conductivity), KBO interiors may have reached relatively high temperatures. The models suggest that KBOs likely lost ices of very volatile species during early evolution, whereas ices of less-volatile species should be retained in cold, less-altered subsurface layers. Initially amorphous ice may have crystallized in KBO interiors, releasing volatiles trapped in the amorphous ice, and some objects may have lost part of these volatiles as well. Generally, the outer layers are far less affected by internal evolution than the inner part, which in the absence of other effects (such as collisions) predicts a stratified composition and altered porosity distribution. Kuiper belt objects are thus unlikely to be "the most pristine objects in the solar system," but they do contain key information as to how the early solar system accreted and dynamically evolved. For large (dwarf planet) KBOs, long-term radiogenic heating alone may lead to differentiated structures -- rock cores, ice mantles, volatile-ice-rich "crusts," and even oceans. Persistence of oceans and (potential) volcanism to the present day depends strongly on body size and

  17. New insights about enzyme evolution from large scale studies of sequence and structure relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-10-31

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Identification of crystalline structures using Moessbauer parameters and artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, E.O.T.; Souza Junior, P.A. De; Garg, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is a useful technique for characterizing the valences, electronic and magnetic states, coordination symmetric and site occupancies of Fe cations. The Moessbauer parameters of Isomer Shift (I.S.) and Quadrupole Splitting (Q.S.) are useful to distinguish paramagnetic ferrous and ferric ions in several substances, while the internal magnetic field provides information on the crystallinity. A correlation is being sought between Moessbauer parameters and several structure properties of some iron-containing minerals using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). Distinct regions of crystalline structures are defined when any two parameters are plotted, but in several cases superposition of these regions leads to erroneous conclusions. We have tried to eliminate this difficulty by using convenient axes. These axes form n-dimensional vectors as input to our ANN. In recent years ANN has shown to be a powerful technique to solve problems as pattern recognition, optimization, preview ups and downs in stock market, automatic control and identification of a mineral from a Moessbauer spectrum of Moessbauer data bank. Using ANN we have been successful in identification of crystalline structures from plots of Moessbauer spectral parameters of I.S., Q.S., and structure using Moessbauer parameters of I.S., Q.S., and polyhedral volume of a coordination site are presented. (author) 28 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. SINEs, evolution and genome structure in the opossum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanjun; Ray, David A; Walker, Jerilyn A; Barnes, Erin W; Gentles, Andrew J; Samollow, Paul B; Jurka, Jerzy; Batzer, Mark A; Pollock, David D

    2007-07-01

    Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous retrotransposons, usually between 100 and 500 base pairs (bp) in length, which are ubiquitous components of eukaryotic genomes. Their activity, distribution, and evolution can be highly informative on genomic structure and evolutionary processes. To determine recent activity, we amplified more than one hundred SINE1 loci in a panel of 43 M. domestica individuals derived from five diverse geographic locations. The SINE1 family has expanded recently enough that many loci were polymorphic, and the SINE1 insertion-based genetic distances among populations reflected geographic distance. Genome-wide comparisons of SINE1 densities and GC content revealed that high SINE1 density is associated with high GC content in a few long and many short spans. Young SINE1s, whether fixed or polymorphic, showed an unbiased GC content preference for insertion, indicating that the GC preference accumulates over long time periods, possibly in periodic bursts. SINE1 evolution is thus broadly similar to human Alu evolution, although it has an independent origin. High GC content adjacent to SINE1s is strongly correlated with bias towards higher AT to GC substitutions and lower GC to AT substitutions. This is consistent with biased gene conversion, and also indicates that like chickens, but unlike eutherian mammals, GC content heterogeneity (isochore structure) is reinforced by substitution processes in the M. domestica genome. Nevertheless, both high and low GC content regions are apparently headed towards lower GC content equilibria, possibly due to a relative shift to lower recombination rates in the recent Monodelphis ancestral lineage. Like eutherians, metatherian (marsupial) mammals have evolved high CpG substitution rates, but this is apparently a convergence in process rather than a shared ancestral state.

  20. Role and convergent evolution of competing RNA secondary structures in mutually exclusive splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yuan; Hou, Shouqing; Wang, Xiu; Zhan, Leilei; Cao, Guozheng; Li, Guoli; Shi, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Hong, Weiling; Lin, Hao; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Feng; Yang, Yun; Jin, Yongfeng

    2017-10-03

    Exon or cassette duplication is an important means of expanding protein and functional diversity through mutually exclusive splicing. However, the mechanistic basis of this process in non-arthropod species remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that MRP1 genes underwent tandem exon duplication in Nematoda, Platyhelminthes, Annelida, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, and early-diverging Chordata but not in late-diverging vertebrates. Interestingly, these events were of independent origin in different phyla, suggesting convergent evolution of alternative splicing. Furthermore, we showed that multiple sets of clade-conserved RNA pairings evolved to guide species-specific mutually exclusive splicing in Arthropoda. Importantly, we also identified a similar structural code in MRP exon clusters of the annelid, Capitella teleta, and chordate, Branchiostoma belcheri, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved competing pairing-guided mechanism in bilaterians. Taken together, these data reveal the molecular determinants and RNA pairing-guided evolution of species-specific mutually exclusive splicing spanning more than 600 million years of bilaterian evolution. These findings have a significant impact on our understanding of the evolution of and mechanism underpinning isoform diversity and complex gene structure.

  1. Structural evolution of dilute magnetic (Sn,Mn)Se films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzyuba, Vasily; Dong, Sining; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Xiang; Rouvimov, Sergei; Okuno, Hanako; Mariette, Henri; Zhang, Xueqiang; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Tracy, Brian D.; Smith, David J.; Dobrowolska, Margaret; Furdyna, Jacek K.

    2017-02-01

    We describe the structural evolution of dilute magnetic (Sn,Mn)Se films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (111) substrates, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When the Mn concentration is increased, the lattice of the ternary (Sn,Mn)Se films evolves quasi-coherently from a SnSe2 two-dimensional (2D) crystal structure into a more complex quasi-2D lattice rearrangement, ultimately transforming into the magnetically concentrated antiferromagnetic MnSe 3D rock-salt structure as Mn approaches 50 at. % of this material. These structural transformations are expected to underlie the evolution of magnetic properties of this ternary system reported earlier in the literature.

  2. [Structure Parameters and Quality Outcomes of Ambulant Home-care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Ralf; Raeder, Kathrin; Kuntz, Simone; Strube-Lahmann, Sandra; Latendorf, Antje; Klingelhöfer-Noe, Jürgen; Lahmann, Nils

    2018-05-14

    So far, there are few data available on the changes of ambulant home-care in Germany over the last decades. Therefore, the aim of this research was to provide structure data on nursing personnel, funding, size, regional differences, and training needs of ambulant home-care services in Germany. In addition, a possible association between structure parameters and quality outcomes for pressure ulcer and malnutrition was investigated. In 2015, a multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted in home-care services in Germany. Structure data from 99 randomly selected home-care services as well as data on pressure ulcers and malnutrition of 903 care-dependent clients were analyzed. The median (home-care services. From a cut-off of 20,000 inhabitants, a region was considered urban. The average prevalence for decubitus and malnutrition (BMIhome-care service, and possible associations with structure parameters were analyzed using a multiple linear regression model. The proportion of registered nurses in non-private (private) home-care services was 60.6% (52.3%). The proportion of employees with a 200- h basic qualification in nursing was higher in private (12.5 vs. 4.7%), small home-care services (14.0 vs. 5.8%) and in urban regions (11.5 vs 5.7%). In average, registered nurses working in small home-care services spent significantly more time per client than the ones working in large services (3.8 vs. 2.9 h/week). The highest need for further training was shown on the subjects of pain, medication and cognitive impairment. No statistically significant correlation could be found between the average decubitus prevalence and structure parameters. Only the association between malnutrition prevalence and the proportion of registered nurses was statistically significant. The present representative study provides structure data on nursing personnel, funding, size, regional differences, and training needs of ambulant home-care services in Germany that could be used as a baseline

  3. The interface of protein structure, protein biophysics, and molecular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberles, David A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Bahar, Ivet; Bastolla, Ugo; Bloom, Jesse; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Colwell, Lucy J; de Koning, A P Jason; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Echave, Julian; Elofsson, Arne; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Goldstein, Richard A; Grahnen, Johan A; Holder, Mark T; Lakner, Clemens; Lartillot, Nicholas; Lovell, Simon C; Naylor, Gavin; Perica, Tina; Pollock, David D; Pupko, Tal; Regan, Lynne; Roger, Andrew; Rubinstein, Nimrod; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Sjölander, Kimmen; Sunyaev, Shamil; Teufel, Ashley I; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Thornton, Joseph W; Weinreich, Daniel M; Whelan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The interface of protein structural biology, protein biophysics, molecular evolution, and molecular population genetics forms the foundations for a mechanistic understanding of many aspects of protein biochemistry. Current efforts in interdisciplinary protein modeling are in their infancy and the state-of-the art of such models is described. Beyond the relationship between amino acid substitution and static protein structure, protein function, and corresponding organismal fitness, other considerations are also discussed. More complex mutational processes such as insertion and deletion and domain rearrangements and even circular permutations should be evaluated. The role of intrinsically disordered proteins is still controversial, but may be increasingly important to consider. Protein geometry and protein dynamics as a deviation from static considerations of protein structure are also important. Protein expression level is known to be a major determinant of evolutionary rate and several considerations including selection at the mRNA level and the role of interaction specificity are discussed. Lastly, the relationship between modeling and needed high-throughput experimental data as well as experimental examination of protein evolution using ancestral sequence resurrection and in vitro biochemistry are presented, towards an aim of ultimately generating better models for biological inference and prediction. PMID:22528593

  4. Contribution for the assessment and simplified calculation of structures taking into account hysteresis evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorka, U.E.

    1988-01-01

    By defining a scalar function of comparison in general and isolating one-dimensional cyclic hysteresis curves for field elements, the foundation is laid for a unified way of judging systems with chain-type structure taking into account hysteresis evolution. A general description of this evolution leads to certain evolutionary properties, with the 'linear' and 'uniform' evolution covering the usual methods for low-cycle fatigue (Miner's rule, Manson-Coffin, Rainflow, etc.). For the more realistic case of an 'exponential' and 'consistent' evolution, experimentally verifiable typ-functions are given which enable with fair accuracy an approximate time-domain computation of a system regarding hysteresis evolution. (orig.) [de

  5. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manojkumar, P.A., E-mail: manoj@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Chirayath, V.A.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Low energy nitrogen ion implantation in titanium was studied. • Chemical and defect states were analyzed using SIMS, XPS and PAS. • SIMS and depth resolved XPS data showed good agreement. • Depth resolved defect and chemical states information were revealed. • Formation of 3 layers of defect states proposed to fit PAS results. - Abstract: Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  6. How piecemeal is your caldera? Going beyond modelling to investigate the structural evolution of explosive caldera volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willcox, Chris; Branney, Mike [University of Leicester, UK, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Carrasco-Nunez, Gerardo [Centro de Geociencias Campus Juraquilla, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 1-742 Queretaro, Qro. 76001 (Mexico)], E-mail: cpw14@le.ac.uk

    2008-10-01

    Despite a profusion of analogue models relatively little is known about the internal structure and temporal evolution of explosive caldera volcanoes. So how can modellers test their predictions given that the internal structures of many young calderas are concealed? Mapping ancient exhumed calderas has proven advantageous, yet this requires a large investment of time and expertise to constrain the structural evolution in sufficient detail. We aim to investigate the interplay between the structural evolution and eruption style over time at a modern caldera. We have selected Los Humeros (Mexico) because it is thought to be an example of a caldera with some piecemeal development, and it also has a well-exposed pyroclastic succession and abundant borehole data.

  7. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo version of the genetic algorithm Differential Evolution: easy Bayesian computing for real parameter spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple genetic algorithm for numerical optimization in real parameter spaces. In a statistical context one would not just want the optimum but also its uncertainty. The uncertainty distribution can be obtained by a Bayesian analysis (after specifying prior and

  8. Neglect Of Parameter Estimation Uncertainty Can Significantly Overestimate Structural Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rózsás Árpád

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parameter estimation uncertainty is often neglected in reliability studies, i.e. point estimates of distribution parameters are used for representative fractiles, and in probabilistic models. A numerical example examines the effect of this uncertainty on structural reliability using Bayesian statistics. The study reveals that the neglect of parameter estimation uncertainty might lead to an order of magnitude underestimation of failure probability.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinases: structures, evolution, and diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massova, I; Kotra, L P; Fridman, R; Mobashery, S

    1998-09-01

    A comprehensive sequence alignment of 64 members of the family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) for the entire sequences, and subsequently the catalytic and the hemopexin-like domains, have been performed. The 64 MMPs were selected from plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. The analyses disclosed that as many as 23 distinct subfamilies of these proteins are known to exist. Information from the sequence alignments was correlated with structures, both crystallographic as well as computational, of the catalytic domains for the 23 representative members of the MMP family. A survey of the metal binding sites and two loops containing variable sequences of amino acids, which are important for substrate interactions, are discussed. The collective data support the proposal that the assembly of the domains into multidomain enzymes was likely to be an early evolutionary event. This was followed by diversification, perhaps in parallel among the MMPs, in a subsequent evolutionary time scale. Analysis indicates that a retrograde structure simplification may have accounted for the evolution of MMPs with simple domain constituents, such as matrilysin, from the larger and more elaborate enzymes.

  10. Table of periodic properties of fullerenes based on structural parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    The periodic table (PT) of the elements suggests that hydrogen could be the origin of everything else. The construction principle is an evolutionary process that is formally similar to those of Darwin and Oparin. The Kekulé structure count and permanence of the adjacency matrix of fullerenes are related to structural parameters involving the presence of contiguous pentagons p, q and r. Let p be the number of edges common to two pentagons, q the number of vertices common to three pentagons, and r the number of pairs of nonadjacent pentagon edges shared between two other pentagons. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the structural parameters and cluster analysis (CA) of the fullerenes permit classifying them and agree. A PT of the fullerenes is built based on the structural parameters, PCA and CA. The periodic law does not have the rank of the laws of physics. (1) The properties of the fullerenes are not repeated; only, and perhaps, their chemical character. (2) The order relationships are repeated, although with exceptions. The proposed statement is the following: The relationships that any fullerene p has with its neighbor p + 1 are approximately repeated for each period.

  11. Bias-Corrected Estimation of Noncentrality Parameters of Covariance Structure Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykov, Tenko

    2005-01-01

    A bias-corrected estimator of noncentrality parameters of covariance structure models is discussed. The approach represents an application of the bootstrap methodology for purposes of bias correction, and utilizes the relation between average of resample conventional noncentrality parameter estimates and their sample counterpart. The…

  12. A lithospheric perspective on structure and evolution of Precambrian cratons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide a summary of geophysical data on the structure of the stable continental lithosphere and its evolution since the Archean. Here, the term lithosphere is used to define the outer layer of the Earth which includes the crust and uppermost mantle, forms the ro...

  13. Evolution of self-organization in nano-structured PVD coatings under extreme tribological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox-Rabinovich, G., E-mail: gfox@mcmaster.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kovalev, A. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Aguirre, M.H. [Laboratory of Advanced Microscopy, Institute of Nanoscience of Aragón, University of Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Yamamoto, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel Ltd, 1-5-5 Takatsuda-dai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271, Hyogo (Japan); Veldhuis, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Gershman, I. [All-Russian Railway Research Institute, 10 Third Mytishchinskaya Street, Moscow 29851 (Russian Federation); Rashkovskiy, A. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Endrino, J.L. [Albengoa Research, Energia Solar 1, Palmas Altas, Seville 41014 (Spain); Beake, B. [Micro Materials Limited, Willow House, Yale Business Village, Ellice Way, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Dosbaeva, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Wainstein, D. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Yuan, Junifeng; Bunting, J.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • The evolution of self-organization under extreme frictional conditions has been studied. • Comprehensive characterization of the tribo-films was made using various surface analytical techniques. • During the running-in stage, mullite tribo-ceramics predominate on the surface of the nano-multilayer coating, establishing a functional hierarchy within the layer of tribo-films. • It is possible to control tribo-film evolution during self-organization by means of an increase in structural complexity and the non-equilibrium state of the surface engineered layer. - Abstract: The evolution of the self-organization process where dissipative structures are formed under the extreme frictional conditions associated with high performance dry machining of hardened steels has been studied in detail. The emphasis was on the progressive studies of surface transformations within multilayer and monolayer TiAlCrSiYN-based PVD coatings during the running-in stage of wear when self-organization process occurs. The coating layer was characterized by high resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). It is shown that the nano-multilayer coating possesses higher non-equilibrium structure in comparison to the monolayer. Comprehensive studies of the tribo-films (dissipative structures) formed on the friction surface were made using a number of advanced surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The data obtained for the tribo-films was combined with the detailed TEM studies of the structural and phase transformations within the underlying coating layer. This data was related to the micro-mechanical characteristics of the coating layer and its wear resistance. It was demonstrated that the evolution of the self-organization process is strongly controlled by the characteristics of the tribo-films formed at different stages of the wear process. Within running-in stage (after

  14. Coherent structures and turbulence evolution in magnetized non-neutral plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of turbulence of a magnetized pure electron plasma confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap is investigated by means of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell numerical code. The transverse plasma dynamics is studied both in the case of free evolution and under the influence of non-axisymmetric, multipolar radio-frequency drives applied on the circular conducting boundary. In the latter case the radio-frequency fields are chosen in the frequency range of the low-order azimuthal (diocotron) modes of the plasma in order to investigate their effect on the insurgence of azimuthal instabilities and the formation and evolution of coherent structures, possibly preventing the relaxation to a fully-developed turbulent state. Different initial density distributions (rings and spirals) are considered, so that evolutions characterized by different levels of turbulence and intermittency are obtained. The time evolution of integral and spectral quantities of interest are computed using a multiresolution analysis based on a wavelet decomposition of density maps. Qualitative features of turbulent relaxation are found to be similar in conditions of both free and forced evolution, but the analysis allows one to highlight fine details of the flow beyond the self-similarity turbulence properties, so that the influence of the initial conditions and the effect of the external forcing can be distinguished. In particular, the presence of small inhomogeneities in the initial density configuration turns out to lead to quite different final states, especially in the presence of competing unstable diocotron modes characterized by similar growth rates.

  15. Evolution of spin-dependent structure functions from DGLAP equations in leading order and next to leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baishya, R.; Jamil, U.; Sarma, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the spin-dependent singlet and nonsinglet structure functions have been obtained by solving Dokshitzer, Gribov, Lipatov, Altarelli, Parisi evolution equations in leading order and next to leading order in the small x limit. Here we have used Taylor series expansion and then the method of characteristics to solve the evolution equations. We have also calculated t and x evolutions of deuteron structure functions, and the results are compared with the SLAC E-143 Collaboration data.

  16. A Bayesian approach to the evolution of metabolic networks on a phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Mithani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The availability of genomes of many closely related bacteria with diverse metabolic capabilities offers the possibility of tracing metabolic evolution on a phylogeny relating the genomes to understand the evolutionary processes and constraints that affect the evolution of metabolic networks. Using simple (independent loss/gain of reactions or complex (incorporating dependencies among reactions stochastic models of metabolic evolution, it is possible to study how metabolic networks evolve over time. Here, we describe a model that takes the reaction neighborhood into account when modeling metabolic evolution. The model also allows estimation of the strength of the neighborhood effect during the course of evolution. We present Gibbs samplers for sampling networks at the internal node of a phylogeny and for estimating the parameters of evolution over a phylogeny without exploring the whole search space by iteratively sampling from the conditional distributions of the internal networks and parameters. The samplers are used to estimate the parameters of evolution of metabolic networks of bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas and to infer the metabolic networks of the ancestral pseudomonads. The results suggest that pathway maps that are conserved across the Pseudomonas phylogeny have a stronger neighborhood structure than those which have a variable distribution of reactions across the phylogeny, and that some Pseudomonas lineages are going through genome reduction resulting in the loss of a number of reactions from their metabolic networks.

  17. Reliability updating based on monitoring of structural response parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leira, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Short- and long-term aspects of measuring structural response parameters are addressed. Two specific examples of such measurements are considered for the purpose of illustration and in order to focus the discussion. These examples are taken from the petroleum industry (monitoring of riser response) and from the shipping industry (monitoring of ice-induced strains in a ship hull). Similarities and differences between the two cases are elaborated with respect to which are the most relevant mechanical limit states. Furthermore, main concerns related to reliability levels within a short-term versus long-term time horizon are highlighted. Quantifying the economic benefits of applying monitoring systems is also addressed. - Highlights: • Two examples of structural response monitoring are described. • Application of measurements is discussed in relation to updating of load and structural parameters. • Quantification of the value of response monitoring is made for both of the examples.

  18. The evolution of magnetic structures due to open-quote open-quote magnetosonic streaming close-quote close-quote

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutova, M.P.; Kaisig, M.; Tajima, T.

    1996-01-01

    The Faraday effect in gasdynamics called acoustic streaming and its accompanying nonlinear phenomena have analogies in plasma magnetohydrodynamics. A natural place where these effects may occur is the solar atmosphere with its strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields concentrated in random magnetic flux tubes. Unlike acoustic streaming in the usual gasdynamics, nonlinear phenomena consisting in the generation of plasma flows by an oscillating magnetic flux tube, open-quote open-quote magnetosonic streaming close-quote close-quote (Ryutova 1986), is accompanied by a current drive and results in a specific evolution of magnetic structures: depending on the physical parameters of the medium a single magnetic flux tube may be either split into thinner flux tubes or dissolved diffusively into the ambient plasma. The effect of the open-quote open-quote magnetosonic streaming,close-quote close-quote on one hand, is an obvious candidate for the generation of mass flows at magnetic flux tubes sites, and on the other hand, it plays an essential role in the evolution of magnetic structures and ultimately may determine their lifetime. The theory of magnetosonic streaming is general and can be applied to other astrophysical objects that maintain oscillatory motions and contain structured magnetic fields or magnetic domains. We review analytical results and describe the origin of the magnetosonic streaming in magnetic flux tubes due to their interaction with acoustic waves. We study numerically the regime of the open-quote open-quote magnetosonic streaming close-quote close-quote corresponding to splitting of a magnetic flux tube. Our computer simulation supports and extends the analytical result. copyright 1996 The American Astronomical Society

  19. SANS study of the structural evolution in NIPA/SA gel on dehydration

    CERN Document Server

    Sugiyama, M; Maeda, Y; Hara, K

    2002-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures of N-isopropylacryl-amide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gels with several water contents were investigated with a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) method in order to make clear their structural evolution on dehydration. The evolution of the SANS profile with a decrease in the water content in the gel could be classified into three stages. In the beginning, there was no peak in the SANS profile except for the central part, which steadily intensified. With the further water dissipation, a side peak appeared at around 0.02 A sup - sup 1 , the intensity of which increased up to a certain water content and then decreased. These results indicate that the water dissipation in the NIPA/SA gel occurs inhomogeneously. (orig.)

  20. Evolution of the accretion structure of the compact object in the symbiotic binary BF Cygni during outburst in 2009-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, N. A.; Tomova, M. T.; Bisikalo, D. V.

    2017-12-01

    The eclipsing symbiotic binary BF Cyg has had five orbital minima during its last optical outburst after 2006. The second minimum is much shallower than the first one and after that the minimum get deeper again. We determined the parameters of the accretion structure surrounding the compact object in two minima and traced its evolution until 2014. Moreover, we analysed the continuum of the system in the region of the UBVRCIC photometric bands to derive the parameters of its components at two times orbital maximum and calculated the mass-loss rate of the compact object. The results obtained allow us to conclude about the mechanism of fading of the optical light of the system until 2014. These results show that the optical flux of the outbursted compact object decreases because of "contraction" of its observed photosphere (pseudophotosphere) which, on its side, is due to increase of the velocity of its stellar wind, and the optical flux of the circumbinary nebula decreases mainly because of reduction of its mean density, which, on its side, is due to destruction of the accretion structure.

  1. Report on workshop"Structure and evolution of Eurasia (super- continent"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kanao

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A workshop on Structure and evolution of Eurasia (super- continent" was held on 23rd February 2004, at the National Institute of Polar Research with 29 participants. This provided an opportunity to review the history of amalgamation and breakup of past super-continents in the Earth's evolution, and speculate on the possibility of future super-continent formation. The largest continent on the present Earth, Eurasia, has been formed from an assembly of several sub-continental blocks including Asia, India and Europe, etc: it is also considered to be the nucleus of a future super-continent expected to form 250 m.y. after the present. In this workshop, several interesting topics were presented regarding the formation process, structure and dynamics of Eurasia, in particular in the deep crust and upper mantle. The first half of the workshop covered structural geology, shallow and deep seismic structure, and a simulation model of the Himalaya-Tibet region, known as a typical ongoing continent-continent collision zone. Inner crustal deformation of Eurasia was demonstrated by a newly developed Discrete Element method. In the latter half of the workshop, the possibility of formation of a future super-continent in the Western Pacific Triangular Zone was introduced with geological interpretation associated with an origin of the hot super-plumes. Seismic tomographic studies, particularly in China, which have revealed interesting features such as low velocity anomalies beneath the volcanic area, together with the presence of subducting Indian plates beneath the Tibet region were introduced. In the northwest Pacific region, remnant subducted slabs of the Kula plate have been found by local seismic tomography. Finally, a review of continental dynamics from gravity studies, and broadband seismic observations in the Baikal rift zones, were presented associated with the tectonics and evolution of central Eurasia. The formation mechanism of a hot super-plume in the

  2. Temporal evolution of the spectral lines emission and temperatures in laser induced plasmas through characteristic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredice, F.; Pacheco Martinez, P.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose an extended Boltzmann plot method to determine the usefulness of spectral lines for plasma parameter calculations. Based on the assumption that transient plasmas are under ideal conditions during an specific interval of time Δt, (i.e. thin, homogeneous and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)), the associated Boltzmann plots describe a surface in the space defined by the coordinates X = Energy, Y = Time and Z = ln (λ jl I j /g j A jl ), where I j is the integrated intensity of the spectral line, g j is the statistical weight of the level j, λ jl is the wavelength of the considered line and A jl is its transition rate. In order to express the Boltzmann plot surface in terms of a reduced set of constants B i , and δ i , we developed as a power series of time, the logarithm of I n (t)/I n (t 0 ), where I n (t) is the integrated intensity of any spectral line at time t, and I n (t 0 ) at initial time. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the intensity of any spectral line and consequently the temperature of the plasma can be also expressed with these constants. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the line intensity calculated using these constants with their experimental values, can be used as a criterion for selecting useful lines in plasma analysis. Furthermore, this method can also be applied to determine self-absorption or enhancement of the spectral lines, to evaluate a possible departure of LTE, and to check or estimate the upper level energy value of any spectral line. An advantage of this method is that the value of these constants does not depend on the spectral response of the detection system, the uncertainty of the transition rates belonging to the analyzed spectral lines or any other time-independent parameters. In order to prove our method, we determined the constants B i and δ i and therefore the Boltzmann plot surface from the temporal evolution of carbon lines obtained from a plasma generated by a Nd:YAG laser

  3. Structural evolution of biomass char and its effect on the gasification rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatehi, Hesameddin; Bai, Xue-Song

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A comprehensive model was developed to describe the evolution of biomass char structure. • An effectiveness factor was used to account for the intra-particle chemical and physical processes. • The effect of the structural evolution of the multi-pore structure on biomass char reactivity was analyzed. • The multi-pore model yields results in satisfactory agreement with experiments. - Abstract: The evolution of char porous structure can affect the conversion rate of the char by affecting the intra-particle transport, especially in the zone II conversion regime. A multi-pore model based on the capillary pore theory is developed to take into account different conversion rates for pores with different radii. The model is valid for biomass chars produced under relatively low heating rates, when the original beehive structure of the biomass is not destroyed during the pyrolysis stage. The contribution of different pores with different radius is taken into account using an effectiveness factor presented for each pore radius with respect to different reactions. As the char conversion proceeds, the pore enlargement increases the contribution of micro-pores; consequently the effective surface area will increase. The increase in the effective surface area leads to an increased reactivity of char during the entire conversion process. This model is used to analyze the steam gasification process of biomass char of centimeter sizes. The results from the present multi-pore model are in better agreement with experimental data than those from a corresponding single pore model. Since the multi-pore model accommodates the detailed intra-particle transport, it is a useful basis toward developing a more predictive model for biomass char gasification.

  4. Temperature evolution of subharmonic gap structures in MgB{sub 2}/Nb point-contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubileo, F. [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SUPERMAT e Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: giubileo@sa.infn.it; Bobba, F.; Scarfato, A.; Piano, S. [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SUPERMAT e Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Aprili, M. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie en Lumiere Polarisee, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); CSNSM-CNRS, Bat. 108 Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Cucolo, A.M. [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SUPERMAT e Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy)

    2007-09-01

    We have performed point-contact spectroscopy experiments on superconducting micro-constrictions between Nb tips and high quality MgB{sub 2} pellets. We measured the temperature evolution (between 4.2 K and 300 K) of the current-voltage (I-V) and of the dynamical conductance (dI/dV-V) characteristics. Above the Nb critical temperature T{sub C}{sup Nb}, the conductance of the constrictions behaves as predicted by the BTK model for S/N contacts being Nb in its normal state below T{sub C}{sup Nb}, the contacts show Josephson current and subharmonic gap structures, due to multiple Andreev reflections. These observations clearly indicate the coupling of the MgB{sub 2} 3D {pi}-band with the Nb superconducting order parameter. We found {delta}{sub {pi}} = 2.4 {+-} 0.2 meV for the three-dimensional gap of MgB{sub 2}.

  5. Precision and Accuracy Parameters in Structured Light 3-D Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiríksson, E. R.; Wilm, J.; Pedersen, D. B.; Aanæs, H.

    2016-04-01

    Structured light systems are popular in part because they can be constructed from off-the-shelf low cost components. In this paper we quantitatively show how common design parameters affect precision and accuracy in such systems, supplying a much needed guide for practitioners. Our quantitative measure is the established VDI/VDE 2634 (Part 2) guideline using precision made calibration artifacts. Experiments are performed on our own structured light setup, consisting of two cameras and a projector. We place our focus on the influence of calibration design parameters, the calibration procedure and encoding strategy and present our findings. Finally, we compare our setup to a state of the art metrology grade commercial scanner. Our results show that comparable, and in some cases better, results can be obtained using the parameter settings determined in this study.

  6. Evolution of Zinc Oxide Nanostructures Grown on Graphene by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis and Its Statistical Growth Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amgad Ahmed; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of zinc oxide nanostructures grown on graphene by alcohol-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis was investigated. The evolution of structures is strongly depended on pyrolysis parameters, i.e., precursor molarity, precursor flow rate, precursor injection/deposition time, and substrate temperature. Field-effect scanning electron microscope analysis, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the properties of the synthesized nanostructures and to provide evidence for the structural changes according to the changes in the pyrolysis parameters. The optimum parameters to achieve maximum density and well-defined hexagonally shaped nanorods were a precursor molarity of 0.2 M, an injection flow rate of 6 ml/min, an injection time of 10 min, and a substrate temperature of 250-355 °C. Based on the experimental results, the response surface methodology (RSM) was used to model and optimize the independent pyrolysis parameters using the Box-Behnken design. Here, the responses, i.e., the nanostructure density, size, and shape factor, are evaluated. All of the computations were performed using the Design-Expert software package. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate the results of the model and to determine the significant values for the independent pyrolysis parameters. The evolution of zinc oxide (ZnO) structures are well explained by the developed modelling which confirms that RSM is a reliable tool for the modelling and optimization of the pyrolysis parameters and prediction of nanostructure sizes and shapes.

  7. A Diagram of the Structure Evolution of Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3 O3-9%PbTiO3 Relaxor Ferroelectric Crystals with Excellent Piezoelectric Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric properties are of significant importance to medical ultrasound, actuators, sensors, and countless other device applications. The mechanism of piezoelectric properties can be deeply understood in light of structure evolutions. In this paper, we report a diagram of the structure evolutions of Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/30.91Ti0.09O3 (PZN-9PT crystals with excellent piezoelectric properties among orthorhombic, tetragonal, and cubic phases, with a temperature increasing from room temperature to 220 °C. Through fitting the temperature-dependent XRD curves with Gauss and Lorenz functions, we obtained the evolutions of the content ratio of three kinds of phases (orthorhombic, tetragonal and cubic and the lattice parameters of the PZN-9PT system with the changes of temperature. The XRD fitting results together with Raman and dielectric spectra show that the phase transitions of PZN-9PT are a typical continuous evolution process. Additionally, resonance and anti-resonance spectra show the excellent piezoelectric properties of these crystals, which probably originate from the nano twin domains, as demonstrated by TEM images. Of particular attention is that the thickness electromechanical coupling factor kt is up to 72%.

  8. Regge-like initial input and evolution of non-singlet structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Regge-like initial input and evolution of non-singlet structure functions from DGLAP equation up to next-next-to-leading order at low x and low Q. 2. NAYAN MANI NATH1,2,∗, MRINAL KUMAR DAS1 and JAYANTA KUMAR SARMA1. 1Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784 028, India. 2Department of Physics ...

  9. Numerical simulation of effective mechanical properties of stochastic composites with consideration for structural evolution under intensive dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakulov, Valerii V., E-mail: valery@ftf.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Smolin, Igor Yu., E-mail: smolin@ispms.ru, E-mail: skrp@ftf.tsu.ru; Skripnyak, Vladimir A., E-mail: smolin@ispms.ru, E-mail: skrp@ftf.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050, Russia and Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    Mechanical behavior of stochastic metal-ceramic composites with the aluminum matrix under high-rate deformation at shock-wave loading is numerically simulated with consideration for structural evolution. Effective values of mechanical parameters of metal-ceramic composites AlB{sub 4}C, AlSiC, and AlAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} are evaluated depending on different concentration of ceramic inclusions.

  10. Computer-Assisted Sperm Analysis (CASA) parameters and their evolution during preparation as predictors of pregnancy in intrauterine insemination with frozen-thawed donor semen cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréour, Thomas; Jean, Miguel; Mirallié, Sophie; Dubourdieu, Sophie; Barrière, Paul

    2010-04-01

    To study the potential of CASA parameters in frozen-thawed donor semen before and after preparation on silica gradient as predictors of pregnancy in IUI with donor semen cycles. CASA parameters were measured in thawed donor semen before and after preparation on a silica gradient in 132 couples undergoing 168 IUI cycles with donor semen. The evolution of these parameters throughout this process was calculated. The relationship with cycle outcome was then studied. Clinical pregnancy rate was 18.4% per cycle. CASA parameters on donor semen before or after preparation were not significantly different between pregnancy and failure groups. However, amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH) of spermatozoa improved in all cycles where pregnancy occurred, thus predicting pregnancy with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 20%. Even if CASA parameters do not seem to predict pregnancy in IUI with donor semen cycles, their evolution during the preparation process should be evaluated, especially for ALH. However, the link between ALH improvement during preparation process and pregnancy remains to be explored. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-Scale Modeling of Microstructural Evolution in Structural Metallic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei

    Metallic alloys are a widely used class of structural materials, and the mechanical properties of these alloys are strongly dependent on the microstructure. Therefore, the scientific design of metallic materials with superior mechanical properties requires the understanding of the microstructural evolution. Computational models and simulations offer a number of advantages over experimental techniques in the prediction of microstructural evolution, because they can allow studies of microstructural evolution in situ, i.e., while the material is mechanically loaded (meso-scale simulations), and bring atomic-level insights into the microstructure (atomistic simulations). In this thesis, we applied a multi-scale modeling approach to study the microstructural evolution in several metallic systems, including polycrystalline materials and metallic glasses (MGs). Specifically, for polycrystalline materials, we developed a coupled finite element model that combines phase field method and crystal plasticity theory to study the plasticity effect on grain boundary (GB) migration. Our model is not only coupled strongly (i.e., we include plastic driving force on GB migration directly) and concurrently (i.e., coupled equations are solved simultaneously), but also it qualitatively captures such phenomena as the dislocation absorption by mobile GBs. The developed model provides a tool to study the microstructural evolution in plastically deformed metals and alloys. For MGs, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the nucleation kinetics in the primary crystallization in Al-Sm system. We calculated the time-temperature-transformation curves for low Sm concentrations, from which the strong suppressing effect of Sm solute on Al nucleation and its influencing mechanism are revealed. Also, through the comparative analysis of both Al attachment and Al diffusion in MGs, it has been found that the nucleation kinetics is controlled by interfacial attachment of Al, and that

  12. Evaluation of design parameters in soil-structure systems through artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremonini, M.G.; Vardanega, C.; Parvis, E.

    1989-01-01

    This study refers to development of an artificial intelligence tool to evaluate design parameters for a soil-structure system as the foundations of Class 1 buildings of a nuclear power plant (NPP). This is based on an expert analysis of a large amount of information, collected during a comprehensive program of site investigations and laboratory tests and stored on a computer data-bank. The methodology comprises the following steps: organization of the available information on the site characteristics in a data-base; implementation and extensive use of a specific knowledge based expert system (KBES) devoted to both the analysis, interpretation and check of the information in the data-base, and to the evaluation of the design parameters; determination of effective access criteria to the data-base, for purposes of reordering the information and extracting design properties from a large number of experimental data; development of design profiles for both index properties and strength/strain parameters; and final evaluation of the design parameters. Results are obtained in the form of: local and general site stratigraphy; summarized soil index properties, detailing the site setting; static and dynamic stress-strain parameters, G/G max behavior and damping factors; condolidation parameters and OCR ratio; spatial distribution of parameters on site area; identification of specific local conditions; and cross correlation of parameters, thus covering the whole range of design parameters for NPP soil-structure systems

  13. Study of grain structure evolution during annealing of a twin-roll-cast Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, A.; Samajdar, I.; Nie, J.F.; Tewari, A.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure under static annealing was studied for mid-thickness section of a twin-roll-cast (TRC) magnesium alloy. Annealing was performed at 300 °C and 500 °C for different times. Microstructural evolution was quantitatively analyzed, from optical micrographs, using grain path envelope analysis. Additional information from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used for addressing the possible mechanism(s). It was found that the TRC structure had a bimodal grain size, which was preserved even after annealing at 300 °C. However, the annealing at 500 °C led to a unimodal grain size. This difference in the grain size distribution created a contrasting behavior in the normalized standard deviations. This was primarily attributed to a competition between recovery and recrystallization, and their respective dominance at 300° and 500 °C. A deformation induced recrystallization recovery (DIRR) model was proposed. The proposed model could successfully address the experimental microstructural evolution. - Highlights: • Annealing of twin roll cast (TRC) magnesium alloy was done at temperatures of 300 °C and 500 °C. • TRC had bimodal structure. Bimodality preserved for annealing at 300 °C. Annealing at 500 °C led to unimodal structure. • Grain evolution was described based on the competition between recovery and recrystallization. • Deformation induced recrystallization recovery (DIRR) mechanistic model was developed.

  14. Cultural Transmission and Evolution of Melodic Structures in Multi-generational Signaling Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumaca, Massimo; Baggio, G.

    2017-01-01

    , and basic and compound emotions as meanings, were transmitted from senders to receivers along diffusion chains in which the receiver in each game became the sender in the next game. During transmission, structural regularities accumulated in the signaling systems, following principles of proximity, symmetry...... and cognitive constraints similarly affect the evolution of musical systems? We conducted an experiment on the cultural evolution of artificial melodic systems, using multi-generational signaling games as a laboratory model of cultural transmission. Signaling systems, using five-tone sequences as signals...

  15. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal to Monitor Damage Evolution in Masonry Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A

    2011-01-01

    A crucial aspect in damage evaluation of masonry structures is the analysis of long-term behaviour and for this reason fatigue analysis has a great influence on safety assessment of this structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced and unreinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude and static loading has been carried out. During these tests, the AE signals were recorded. The AE signals were analysed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to examine the frequency distribution of the micro and macro cracking. It possible to evaluate the evolution of the wavelength of the AE signal through the two characteristic peak in the AE spectrum signals and the wave speed of the P or S waves. This wavelength evolution can be represent the microcrak and macrocrack evolution in masonry walls. This procedure permits to estimate the fracture dimension characteristic in several loading condition and for several masonry reinforced condition.

  16. Synthesis and textural evolution of alumina particles with mesoporous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun; Peng, Tianyou; Yao, Jinchun; Lv, Hongjin; Huang, Cheng

    2010-06-01

    Alumina particles with mesostructures were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method by using different inorganic aluminum salts followed by a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation and calcination process. The obtained mesoporous γ-alumina particles were systematically characterized by the X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. Effects of the aluminum salt counter anion, pH value and the azeotropic distillation process on the structural or textural evolution of alumina particles were investigated. It is found that Cl - in the reaction solution can restrain the textural evolution of the resultant precipitates into two-dimensional crystallized pseudoboehmite lamellae during the heterogeneous azeotropic distillation, and then transformed into γ-Al 2O 3 particles with mesostructures after further calcination at 1173 K, whereas coexisting SO 42- can promote above morphology evolution and then transformed into γ-Al 2O 3 nanofibers after calcination at 1173 K. Moreover nearly all materials retain relatively high specific surface areas larger than 100 m 2 g -1 even after calcinations at 1173 K.

  17. Learning structural bioinformatics and evolution with a snake puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo S. Nido

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose here a working unit for teaching basic concepts of structural bioinformatics and evolution through the example of a wooden snake puzzle, strikingly similar to toy models widely used in the literature of protein folding. In our experience, developed at a Master’s course at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain, the concreteness of this example helps to overcome difficulties caused by the interdisciplinary nature of this field and its high level of abstraction, in particular for students coming from traditional disciplines. The puzzle will allow us discussing a simple algorithm for finding folded solutions, through which we will introduce the concept of the configuration space and the contact matrix representation. This is a central tool for comparing protein structures, for studying simple models of protein energetics, and even for a qualitative discussion of folding kinetics, through the concept of the Contact Order. It also allows a simple representation of misfolded conformations and their free energy. These concepts will motivate evolutionary questions, which we will address by simulating a structurally constrained model of protein evolution, again modelled on the snake puzzle. In this way, we can discuss the analogy between evolutionary concepts and statistical mechanics that facilitates the understanding of both concepts. The proposed examples and literature are accessible, and we provide supplementary material (see ‘Data Availability’ to reproduce the numerical experiments. We also suggest possible directions to expand the unit. We hope that this work will further stimulate the adoption of games in teaching practice.

  18. Relations between the galactic evolution and the stellar evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouze, J.

    1984-01-01

    After a quick definition of the galactic evolution and a summary of the basic ingredients (namely the abundances of the chemical elements observed in different astrophysical sites), the parameters directly related to the stellar evolution which govern the galactic evolution are outlined. They are the rates of star formation, the initial mass functions and the various nucleosynthetic yields. The 'classical' models of chemical evolution of galaxies are then briefly recalled. Finally, attention is drawn to three recent contributions concerning both the galactic evolution and the stellar evolution. They are (i) some prediction of the rate of star formation for low mass stars made from the planetary nebula abundance distribution (ii) the chemical evolution of C, O and Fe and (iii) the chemical evolution of the galactic interstellar medium. (Auth.)

  19. Directed Evolution and Structural Characterization of a Simvastatin Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xue; Xie, Xinkai; Pashkov, Inna; Sawaya, Michael R.; Laidman, Janel; Zhang, Wenjun; Cacho, Ralph; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi; UCLA

    2010-02-02

    Enzymes from natural product biosynthetic pathways are attractive candidates for creating tailored biocatalysts to produce semisynthetic pharmaceutical compounds. LovD is an acyltransferase that converts the inactive monacolin J acid (MJA) into the cholesterol-lowering lovastatin. LovD can also synthesize the blockbuster drug simvastatin using MJA and a synthetic {alpha}-dimethylbutyryl thioester, albeit with suboptimal properties as a biocatalyst. Here we used directed evolution to improve the properties of LovD toward semisynthesis of simvastatin. Mutants with improved catalytic efficiency, solubility, and thermal stability were obtained, with the best mutant displaying an {approx}11-fold increase in an Escherichia coli-based biocatalytic platform. To understand the structural basis of LovD enzymology, seven X-ray crystal structures were determined, including the parent LovD, an improved mutant G5, and G5 cocrystallized with ligands. Comparisons between the structures reveal that beneficial mutations stabilize the structure of G5 in a more compact conformation that is favorable for catalysis.

  20. Temporal evolution of the spectral lines emission and temperatures in laser induced plasmas through characteristic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredice, F., E-mail: faustob@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas, P.O. Box 3 C. P.1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina); Pacheco Martinez, P. [Grupo de Espectroscopía Óptica de Emisión y Láser, Universidad del Atlántico, Barranquilla (Colombia); Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M. [Laboratorio de Fotofísica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-186, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose an extended Boltzmann plot method to determine the usefulness of spectral lines for plasma parameter calculations. Based on the assumption that transient plasmas are under ideal conditions during an specific interval of time Δt, (i.e. thin, homogeneous and in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)), the associated Boltzmann plots describe a surface in the space defined by the coordinates X = Energy, Y = Time and Z = ln (λ{sub jl}I{sub j}/g{sub j}A{sub jl}), where I{sub j} is the integrated intensity of the spectral line, g{sub j} is the statistical weight of the level j, λ{sub jl} is the wavelength of the considered line and A{sub jl} is its transition rate. In order to express the Boltzmann plot surface in terms of a reduced set of constants B{sub i}, and δ{sub i}, we developed as a power series of time, the logarithm of I{sub n}(t)/I{sub n}(t{sub 0}), where I{sub n}(t) is the integrated intensity of any spectral line at time t, and I{sub n}(t{sub 0}) at initial time. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the intensity of any spectral line and consequently the temperature of the plasma can be also expressed with these constants. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the line intensity calculated using these constants with their experimental values, can be used as a criterion for selecting useful lines in plasma analysis. Furthermore, this method can also be applied to determine self-absorption or enhancement of the spectral lines, to evaluate a possible departure of LTE, and to check or estimate the upper level energy value of any spectral line. An advantage of this method is that the value of these constants does not depend on the spectral response of the detection system, the uncertainty of the transition rates belonging to the analyzed spectral lines or any other time-independent parameters. In order to prove our method, we determined the constants B{sub i} and δ{sub i} and therefore the Boltzmann plot surface from the temporal

  1. The influence of common stimulus parameters on distortion product otoacoustic emission fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tiffany A; Baranowski, Lauren G

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether common approaches to setting stimulus parameters influence the depth of fine structure present in the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) response. Because the presence of fine structure has been suggested as a possible source of errors, if one of the common parametric approaches results in reduced fine-structure depth, it may be preferred over other approaches. DPOAE responses were recorded in a group of 21 subjects with normal hearing for 1/3-octave intervals surrounding 3 f2s (1, 2, and 4 kHz) at three L2s (30, 45, and 55 dB SPL). For each f2 and L2 combination, L1 and f2/f1 were set according to three commonly used parametric approaches. These included a simple approach, the approach recommended by Kummer et al., and the approach described by Johnson et al. These three approaches primarily differ in the recommended relationship between L1 and L2. For each parametric approach, DPOAE fine structure was evaluated by varying f2 in small steps. Differences in DPOAE level and DPOAE fine-structure depth across f2, L2, and the various stimulus parameters were evaluated using repeated-measures analysis of variance. As expected, significant variations in DPOAE level were observed across the three parametric approaches. For stimulus levels #45 dB SPL, the simple stimuli resulted in lower DPOAE levels than were observed for other approaches. An unexpected finding was that stimulus parameters developed by Johnson et al., which were believed to produce higher DPOAE levels than other approaches, produced the lowest DPOAE levels of the three approaches when f2 = 4 kHz. Significant differences in fine-structure depth were also observed. Greater fine-structure depth was observed with the simple parameters, although this effect was restricted to L2 # 45 dB SPL. When L2 = 55 dB SPL, all three parametric approaches resulted in equivalent fine-structure depth. A significant difference in fine-structure depth across the 3 f2s was also observed. The

  2. Relations between anisotropic defects, structural evolution, and van der Waals bonding in 2H-NbSe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavarri, J.R.; Mokrani, R.; Boulesteix, C.; Vacquier, G.

    1988-01-01

    Correlations between anisotropic defects and van der Waals interactions have been established for the layer compound 2H-NbSe 2 which is investigated by low temperature X-ray diffraction techniques. Thermal expansion coefficients and anisotropic Debye temperatures are determined. A diffraction profile analysis reveals the existence of lattice distortions independent of the temperature. They are due to layer defects. To interpret the structural evolution data, the thermal expansion functions, α a (T) and α c (T) are simulated in the low temperature range which yield the elastic constants and the Grueneisen parameters. Using bond energy models, the Van der Waals nature of interlayer Se-Se interactions is confirmed by a model of thermal expansion of bonds and connected with the C 13 component of the elastic tensor. Such interactions can explain the presence of some layer defects that can be 4H-NbSe 2 nuclei in the 2H host lattice. In addition, no strong change in the Grueneisen parameters is clearly shown to occur at the 35 K transition of 2H-NbSe 2 . (author)

  3. Influence of intensity parameters of earthquake on response of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Ciby Jacob; Madhavan Pillai, T. M.; Sajith, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    Earthquake is one of the most frightening and destructive phenomena of nature. The destructive capacity of an earthquake depends on various parameters. Without characterising earthquake time history data to the required intensity parameters, its effect on structures cannot be predicted. The influence of intensity parameter of earthquake on the destructive capacity of a structure is essential in the vibration control scenario also. In the present paper, three reinforced concrete (RC) framed structures with natural frequencies 4.688 Hz, 1.762 Hz, 1.661 Hz are used to investigate the influence between the intensity measures and the response. 20 ground motion time history data were selected with predominant frequency ranging from 1 Hz to 12.5 Hz. Some available intensity measures were used to characterise this data. 3D model of the structure was analysed in ETABSUL 13.1.3 software with diaphragm rigidity at floor level. Modal analysis was used to find the modes and corresponding time periods. Linear time history analysis was done for the three models for all the ground motion data. It is noted that four intensity parameters namely predominant frequency, Peak Ground Acceleration, Velocity Spectrum Intensity, Housner Intensity has an appreciable influence on the response.

  4. Effect of structural relaxation of metallic glasses on positron annihilation parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Decheng; Xiong Liangyue; Tang Zhongxun; Xu Yinhua

    1987-07-01

    The results of a comparative study of positron lifetime and a Doppler broadening line-shape parameter for two metallic glasses are presented. The change of lifetime τ-bar and the S-parameter for these two metallic glasses are shown to have a common feature, i.e. at the initial stage of structural relaxation, τ-bar presents a peak-form as a function of annealing time or temperature while the S-parameter decreases monotonically. A possible mechanism is proposed for explaining the peak-form of τ-bar which has been observed in many metallic glasses; the initial rise and the following decrease of τ-bar are attributed to the homogenization of defects taking place during the structural relaxation. The monotonic behaviour of the S-parameter seems to indicate that the annihilation of positrons in free state with the high momentum core electrons is negligible. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  5. An empirical formulation to describe the evolution of the high burnup structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia

    2015-01-15

    In the present work the behavior of fuel pellets for LWR power reactors in the high burnup range (average burnup higher than about 45 MWd/kgU) is analyzed. For extended irradiation periods, a considerable Pu concentration is reached in the pellet periphery (rim zone), that contributes to local burnup. Gradually, a new microstructure develops in that ring, characterized by small grains and large pores as compared with those of the original material. In this region Xe is absent from the solid lattice (although it continues to be dissolved in the rest of the pellet). The porous microstructure in the pellet edge causes local changes in the mechanical and thermal properties, thus affecting the overall fuel behavior. It is generally accepted that the evolution of porosity in the high burnup structure (HBS) is determinant of the retention capacity of the fission gases rejected from the fuel matrix. This is the reason why, during the latest years a considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the parameters that influence porosity. Although the mechanisms governing the microstructural transformation have not been completely elucidated yet, some empirical expressions can be given, and this is the intention of the present work, for representing the main physical parameters. Starting from several works published in the open literature, some mathematical expressions were developed to describe the behavior and progress of porosity at local burnup values ranging from 60 to 300 MWd/kgU. The analysis includes the interactions of different orders between pores, the growth of the pore radius by capturing vacancies, the evolution of porosity, pore number density and overpressure within the closed pores, the inventory of fission gas dissolved in the matrix and retained in the pores. The model is mathematically expressed by a system of non-linear differential equations. In the present work, results of this calculation scheme are compared with experimental data available in

  6. Young solar-type stars evolution: the lithium and seismology contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piau, Laurent Eric

    2001-01-01

    This PhD thesis is devoted to young low-mass stars. We modeled many of them since their formation until the solar age covering the range between 0.65 and 1.4 solar masses and metallicity values ranging from -0.1 to 0.1 dex. The theoretical computations are related to observations in nearby open-clusters: Hyades, Pleiades... This comparison demonstrates that the lithium evolution is still poorly understood in such stars. In stellar interiors, this nuclide is destroyed by nuclear processes at low temperatures. Its surface abundance evolution traduces mixing phenomena between surface and deeper layers and therefore allows a direct insight into stellar structure and evolution. Both of which depend on microscopic and macroscopic physical phenomena whose effects we systematically examine. As regards microphysics we mainly concentrate upon changes in metallicity, in distribution among metals and their consequences on stellar opacity. We also address atmospheric models while the star still lies close to its Hayashi track. Accretion and convective parameters are the macroscopic phenomena we address during pre-main sequence. The rotational effects are considered along the entire evolution including the much realistic rotation laws. The last part of this PhD thesis makes use of seismology. Today this Discipline allows direct probing of the solar internal structure and motions. Its future application in the realm of stars will substantially improve their understanding. We derive here some relevant seismic variables for the understanding of stellar evolution. Then we show how this powerful tool permits to determine fundamental stellar parameters such as the mass or the helium fraction. (author) [fr

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure evolutions of Cu-Zr metallic glasses under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Lin [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Tian, Zean; Xiao, Shifang [Department of Applied Physics, School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Deng, Huiqiu, E-mail: hqdeng@hnu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Ao, Bingyun [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, Mianyang 621907 (China); Chen, Piheng, E-mail: chenpiheng@caep.cn [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, Mianyang 621907 (China); Hu, Wangyu [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The structural evolution of Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} MG under irradiation was studied. • The structure clusters were analyzed using the LSCA method. • Most of these radiation damages have been self-recovered quickly. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the structural evolution of Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} metallic glasses under irradiation. The largest standard cluster analysis (LSCA) method was used to quantify the microstructure within the collision cascade regions. It is found that the majority of clusters within the collision cascade regions are full and defective icosahedrons. Not only the smaller structures (common neighbor subcluster) but also primary clusters greatly changed during the collision cascades; while most of these radiation damages self-recover quickly in the following quench states. These findings indicate the Cu-Zr metallic glasses have excellent irradiation-resistance properties.

  8. Crystal structure of vanadite: Refinement of anisotropic displacement parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laufek, F.; Skála, Roman; Haloda, J.; Císařová, I.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, 3-4 (2006), s. 271-275 ISSN 1210-8197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : anisotropic displacement parameter * crystal structure * single-crystal X-ray refinement * vanadinite Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  9. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-12-01

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO2.5 thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO3-δ). We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.

  10. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoungjeen Jeen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO2.5 thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO3-δ. We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.

  11. Accurate detection of hierarchical communities in complex networks based on nonlinear dynamical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Zhao; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2018-04-01

    One of the most challenging problems in network science is to accurately detect communities at distinct hierarchical scales. Most existing methods are based on structural analysis and manipulation, which are NP-hard. We articulate an alternative, dynamical evolution-based approach to the problem. The basic principle is to computationally implement a nonlinear dynamical process on all nodes in the network with a general coupling scheme, creating a networked dynamical system. Under a proper system setting and with an adjustable control parameter, the community structure of the network would "come out" or emerge naturally from the dynamical evolution of the system. As the control parameter is systematically varied, the community hierarchies at different scales can be revealed. As a concrete example of this general principle, we exploit clustered synchronization as a dynamical mechanism through which the hierarchical community structure can be uncovered. In particular, for quite arbitrary choices of the nonlinear nodal dynamics and coupling scheme, decreasing the coupling parameter from the global synchronization regime, in which the dynamical states of all nodes are perfectly synchronized, can lead to a weaker type of synchronization organized as clusters. We demonstrate the existence of optimal choices of the coupling parameter for which the synchronization clusters encode accurate information about the hierarchical community structure of the network. We test and validate our method using a standard class of benchmark modular networks with two distinct hierarchies of communities and a number of empirical networks arising from the real world. Our method is computationally extremely efficient, eliminating completely the NP-hard difficulty associated with previous methods. The basic principle of exploiting dynamical evolution to uncover hidden community organizations at different scales represents a "game-change" type of approach to addressing the problem of community

  12. Variability of Structural and Biomechanical Parameters of Pelophylax Esculentus (Amphibia, Anura Limb Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broshko Ye. O.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Variability of Structural and Biomechanical Prameters of Pelophylax esculentus (Amphibia, Anura Limb Bones. Broshko Ye. O. — Structural and biomechanical parameters of Edible Frog, Pelophylax esculentus (Linnaeus, 1758, limb bones, namely, mass, linear dimensions, parameters of the shaft’s cross-sectional shape (cross-sectional area, moments of inertia, radiuses of inertia were investigated. Some coefficients were also estimated: diameters ratio (df/ds, cross-sectional index (ik, principal moments of inertia ratio (Imax/Imin.. Coefficients of variation of linear dimensions (11.9-20.0 % anrelative bone mass (22-35 % were established. Moments of inertia of various bones are more variable (CV = 41.67-56.35 % in relation to radii of inertia (CV = 9.68-14.67 %. Shaft’s cross-sectional shape is invariable in all cases. However, there is high individual variability of structural and biomechanical parameters of P. esculentus limb bones. Variability of parameters was limited by the certain range. We suggest the presence of stable norm in bone structure. Stylopodium bones have the primary biomechanical function among the elements of limb skeleton, because their parameters most clearly responsive to changes in body mass.

  13. Interactive diversity promotes the evolution of cooperation in structured populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary games on networks traditionally assume that each individual adopts an identical strategy to interact with all its neighbors in each generation. Considering the prevalent diversity of individual interactions in the real society, here we propose the concept of interactive diversity, which allows individuals to adopt different strategies against different neighbors in each generation. We investigate the evolution of cooperation based on the edge dynamics rather than the traditional nodal dynamics in networked systems. The results show that, without invoking any other mechanisms, interactive diversity drives the frequency of cooperation to a high level for a wide range of parameters in both well-mixed and structured populations. Even in highly connected populations, cooperation still thrives. When interactive diversity and large topological heterogeneity are combined together, however, in the relaxed social dilemma, cooperation level is lower than that with just one of them, implying that the combination of many promotive factors may make a worse outcome. By an analytical approximation, we get the condition under which interactive diversity provides more advantages for cooperation than traditional evolutionary dynamics does. Numerical simulations validating the approximation are also presented. Our work provides a new line to explore the latent relation between the ubiquitous cooperation and individuals’ distinct responses in different interactions. The presented results suggest that interactive diversity should receive more attention in pursuing mechanisms fostering cooperation. (paper)

  14. Biophysical and structural considerations for protein sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahnen Johan A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein sequence evolution is constrained by the biophysics of folding and function, causing interdependence between interacting sites in the sequence. However, current site-independent models of sequence evolutions do not take this into account. Recent attempts to integrate the influence of structure and biophysics into phylogenetic models via statistical/informational approaches have not resulted in expected improvements in model performance. This suggests that further innovations are needed for progress in this field. Results Here we develop a coarse-grained physics-based model of protein folding and binding function, and compare it to a popular informational model. We find that both models violate the assumption of the native sequence being close to a thermodynamic optimum, causing directional selection away from the native state. Sampling and simulation show that the physics-based model is more specific for fold-defining interactions that vary less among residue type. The informational model diffuses further in sequence space with fewer barriers and tends to provide less support for an invariant sites model, although amino acid substitutions are generally conservative. Both approaches produce sequences with natural features like dN/dS Conclusions Simple coarse-grained models of protein folding can describe some natural features of evolving proteins but are currently not accurate enough to use in evolutionary inference. This is partly due to improper packing of the hydrophobic core. We suggest possible improvements on the representation of structure, folding energy, and binding function, as regards both native and non-native conformations, and describe a large number of possible applications for such a model.

  15. Evolution of the electrical properties of amorphous Ni24Zr76 and Ni35Ti65 as a result of structural relaxation and crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, J.M.; Fouquet, F.; Hillairet, J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are given for the resistivity and the thermopower of two metallic glasses, Ni 24 Zr 76 and Ni 35 Ti 65 , together with the temperature dependences of these physical parameters, between 4 K (or 78 K) and crystallization temperature. In the as-quenched state the observed profiles are in qualitative agreement with the Mooij empirical law, but they agree only in part with the Ziman theory. The modifications which occur in response to successive thermal treatments are analyzed in terms of structural relaxation and crystallization processes. As expected the respective evolutions of the two electrical properties studied are found to be very closely related. It is shown that they can adequately be used to monitor the evolution of the volume fraction of crystallinity during the aging of amorphous metallic alloys. (author)

  16. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF GRB AFTERGLOW PARAMETERS AS EVIDENCE OF COSMOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Beskin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of a study of 43 peaked R-band light curves of optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts with known redshifts are presented. The parameters of optical transients were calculated in the comoving frame, and then a search for pair correlations between them was conducted. A statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between the peak luminosity and the redshift both for pure afterglows and for events with residual gamma activity, which cannot be explained as an effect of observational selection.This suggests a cosmological evolution of the parameters of the local interstellar medium around the sources of the gamma-ray burst. In the models of forward and reverse shock waves, a relation between the density of the interstellar medium and the redshift was built for gamma-ray burst afterglows, leading to a power-law dependence of the star-formation rate at regions around GRBs on redshift with a slope of about 6.

  17. Understanding and Modeling the Evolution of Critical Points under Gaussian Blurring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, A.; Florack, L.M.J.; Heyden, A.; Sparr, G.; Nielsen, M.; Johansen, P.

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate the deep structure of Gaussian scale space images, one needs to understand the behaviour of critical points under the influence of parameter-driven blurring. During this evolution two different types of special points are encountered, the so-called scale space saddles and the

  18. Uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters for structured soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, B.; Mohanty, B. P.; McGuire, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Successful application of dual permeability models (DPM) to predict contaminant transport is contingent upon measured or inversely estimated soil hydraulic and solute transport parameters. The difficulty in unique identification of parameters for the additional macropore- and matrix-macropore interface regions, and knowledge about requisite experimental data for DPM has not been resolved to date. Therefore, this study quantifies uncertainty in dual permeability model parameters of experimental soil columns with different macropore distributions (single macropore, and low- and high-density multiple macropores). Uncertainty evaluation is conducted using adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo (AMCMC) and conventional Metropolis-Hastings (MH) algorithms while assuming 10 out of 17 parameters to be uncertain or random. Results indicate that AMCMC resolves parameter correlations and exhibits fast convergence for all DPM parameters while MH displays large posterior correlations for various parameters. This study demonstrates that the choice of parameter sampling algorithms is paramount in obtaining unique DPM parameters when information on covariance structure is lacking, or else additional information on parameter correlations must be supplied to resolve the problem of equifinality of DPM parameters. This study also highlights the placement and significance of matrix-macropore interface in flow experiments of soil columns with different macropore densities. Histograms for certain soil hydraulic parameters display tri-modal characteristics implying that macropores are drained first followed by the interface region and then by pores of the matrix domain in drainage experiments. Results indicate that hydraulic properties and behavior of the matrix-macropore interface is not only a function of saturated hydraulic conductivity of the macroporematrix interface (Ksa) and macropore tortuosity (lf) but also of other parameters of the matrix and macropore domains.

  19. A software for parameter optimization with Differential Evolution Entirely Parallel method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Kozlov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Differential Evolution Entirely Parallel (DEEP package is a software for finding unknown real and integer parameters in dynamical models of biological processes by minimizing one or even several objective functions that measure the deviation of model solution from data. Numerical solutions provided by the most efficient global optimization methods are often problem-specific and cannot be easily adapted to other tasks. In contrast, DEEP allows a user to describe both mathematical model and objective function in any programming language, such as R, Octave or Python and others. Being implemented in C, DEEP demonstrates as good performance as the top three methods from CEC-2014 (Competition on evolutionary computation benchmark and was successfully applied to several biological problems. Availability. DEEP method is an open source and free software distributed under the terms of GPL licence version 3. The sources are available at http://deepmethod.sourceforge.net/ and binary packages for Fedora GNU/Linux are provided for RPM package manager at https://build.opensuse.org/project/repositories/home:mackoel:compbio.

  20. Mechanical basis of morphogenesis and convergent evolution of spiny seashells

    KAUST Repository

    Chirat, R.; Moulton, D. E.; Goriely, A.

    2013-01-01

    Convergent evolution is a phenomenon whereby similar traits evolved independently in not closely related species, and is often interpreted in functional terms. Spines in mollusk seashells are classically interpreted as having repeatedly evolved as a defense in response to shell-crushing predators. Here we consider the morphogenetic process that shapes these structures and underlies their repeated emergence. We develop a mathematical model for spine morphogenesis based on the mechanical interaction between the secreting mantle edge and the calcified shell edge to which the mantle adheres during shell growth. It is demonstrated that a large diversity of spine structures can be accounted for through small variations in control parameters of this natural mechanical process. This physical mechanism suggests that convergent evolution of spines can be understood through a generic morphogenetic process, and provides unique perspectives in understanding the phenotypic evolution of this second largest phylum in the animal kingdom.

  1. Mechanical basis of morphogenesis and convergent evolution of spiny seashells

    KAUST Repository

    Chirat, R.

    2013-03-25

    Convergent evolution is a phenomenon whereby similar traits evolved independently in not closely related species, and is often interpreted in functional terms. Spines in mollusk seashells are classically interpreted as having repeatedly evolved as a defense in response to shell-crushing predators. Here we consider the morphogenetic process that shapes these structures and underlies their repeated emergence. We develop a mathematical model for spine morphogenesis based on the mechanical interaction between the secreting mantle edge and the calcified shell edge to which the mantle adheres during shell growth. It is demonstrated that a large diversity of spine structures can be accounted for through small variations in control parameters of this natural mechanical process. This physical mechanism suggests that convergent evolution of spines can be understood through a generic morphogenetic process, and provides unique perspectives in understanding the phenotypic evolution of this second largest phylum in the animal kingdom.

  2. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A

    2011-01-01

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a 'damage-gauge' for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  3. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A, E-mail: davide.masera@polito.it [Department of Structural and Geotechnical Engineering - Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2011-07-19

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a 'damage-gauge' for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  4. Nonlinear evolution of large-scale structure in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenk, C.S.; White, S.D.M.; Davis, M.

    1983-01-01

    Using N-body simulations we study the nonlinear development of primordial density perturbation in an Einstein--de Sitter universe. We compare the evolution of an initial distribution without small-scale density fluctuations to evolution from a random Poisson distribution. These initial conditions mimic the assumptions of the adiabatic and isothermal theories of galaxy formation. The large-scale structures which form in the two cases are markedly dissimilar. In particular, the correlation function xi(r) and the visual appearance of our adiabatic (or ''pancake'') models match better the observed distribution of galaxies. This distribution is characterized by large-scale filamentary structure. Because the pancake models do not evolve in a self-similar fashion, the slope of xi(r) steepens with time; as a result there is a unique epoch at which these models fit the galaxy observations. We find the ratio of cutoff length to correlation length at this time to be lambda/sub min//r 0 = 5.1; its expected value in a neutrino dominated universe is 4(Ωh) -1 (H 0 = 100h km s -1 Mpc -1 ). At early epochs these models predict a negligible amplitude for xi(r) and could explain the lack of measurable clustering in the Lyα absorption lines of high-redshift quasars. However, large-scale structure in our models collapses after z = 2. If this collapse precedes galaxy formation as in the usual pancake theory, galaxies formed uncomfortably recently. The extent of this problem may depend on the cosmological model used; the present series of experiments should be extended in the future to include models with Ω<1

  5. Kopernik, Einstein and evolution of a logic structure of relativity principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruczek, W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper shown that the development of physics as a logic structure was begun by Mikolaj Kopernik. It was consequently presented that the whole period of physic evolution, since Kopernik times through Einstein and also later, was determined by the relativity principle. That principle in this primary version was used for scienific justification of heliocentric system. As a consequence it caused the development of research on the motion, the time and the space (Gallileo, Newton and others). The article presents successive stages of the evolution of those motions, explaining the difference between Einstein's and Poincare's interpretation of them. The methodologic background of Einstein's measuring procedures was also explained. 10 refs., 7 figs. (author)

  6. ARPES study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 ( R=Y , La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, and Dy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zahid; Brouet, Veronique; Yang, Wanli; Zhou, Xingjiang; Hussain, Zahid; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D. H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Ru, N.; Fisher, R.

    2008-01-16

    We present a detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of the RTe3 family, which sets this system as an ideal"textbook" example for the formation of a nesting driven charge density wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDWinstabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi surface (up to 0.4 eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k space. An additional advantage of RTe3 is that theband structure can be very accurately described by a simple two dimensional tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure by comparing our ARPES measurements with the linear muffin-tinorbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R, and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDWinteraction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n (EF), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  7. Interplay between Peptide Bond Geometrical Parameters in Nonglobular Structural Contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Luciana; Balasco, Nicole; De Simone, Alfonso; Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Several investigations performed in the last two decades have unveiled that geometrical parameters of protein backbone show a remarkable variability. Although these studies have provided interesting insights into one of the basic aspects of protein structure, they have been conducted on globular and water-soluble proteins. We report here a detailed analysis of backbone geometrical parameters in nonglobular proteins/peptides. We considered membrane proteins and two distinct fibrous systems (am...

  8. Compatible topologies and parameters for NMR structure determination of carbohydrates by simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yingang

    2017-01-01

    The use of NMR methods to determine the three-dimensional structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins is still challenging, in part because of the lack of standard protocols. In order to increase the convenience of structure determination, the topology and parameter files for carbohydrates in the program Crystallography & NMR System (CNS) were investigated and new files were developed to be compatible with the standard simulated annealing protocols for proteins and nucleic acids. Recalculating the published structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes and glycosylated proteins demonstrates that the results are comparable to the published structures which employed more complex procedures for structure calculation. Integrating the new carbohydrate parameters into the standard structure calculation protocol will facilitate three-dimensional structural study of carbohydrates and glycosylated proteins by NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Zhiquan; Wu, Yekang; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Guorui; Li, Dalong; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Yu, Shengxue; Shen, Dejiu; Nash, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coated AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), potentio-dynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Detached coating samples were fabricated by an electrochemical method and more details of the internal micro-structure of coatings were clearly observed on the fractured cross-section morphologies of the samples compared to general polished cross-section morphologies. Evolution mechanisms of the coating corrosion behavior in relation to the evolution of micro-structural characteristics were discussed in detail.

  10. Structure evolution during the cooling and coalesced cooling processes of Cu-Co bimetallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guojian; Wang Qiang; Li Donggang; Lue Xiao; He Jicheng

    2008-01-01

    Constant-temperature molecular dynamics with general EAM was employed to study the structure evolutions during the cooling and coalesced cooling processes of Cu-Co bimetallic clusters. It shows that the desired particle morphologies and structures can be obtained by controlling the composition and distribution of hetero atoms during synthesis process

  11. Differential evolution-simulated annealing for multiple sequence alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addawe, R. C.; Addawe, J. M.; Sueño, M. R. K.; Magadia, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sequence alignments (MSA) are used in the analysis of molecular evolution and sequence structure relationships. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm, Differential Evolution - Simulated Annealing (DESA) is applied in optimizing multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) based on structural information, non-gaps percentage and totally conserved columns. DESA is a robust algorithm characterized by self-organization, mutation, crossover, and SA-like selection scheme of the strategy parameters. Here, the MSA problem is treated as a multi-objective optimization problem of the hybrid evolutionary algorithm, DESA. Thus, we name the algorithm as DESA-MSA. Simulated sequences and alignments were generated to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of DESA-MSA using different indel sizes, sequence lengths, deletion rates and insertion rates. The proposed hybrid algorithm obtained acceptable solutions particularly for the MSA problem evaluated based on the three objectives.

  12. Perspective on Structural Evolution and Relations with Thermophysical Properties of Metallic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Jian-Zhong

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between the structural evolution and properties of metallic liquids is a long-standing hot issue in condensed-matter physics and materials science. Here, recent progress is reviewed in several fundamental aspects of metallic liquids, including the methods to study their atomic structures, liquid-liquid transition, physical properties, fragility, and their correlations with local structures, together with potential applications of liquid metals at room temperature. Involved with more experimentally and theoretically advanced techniques, these studies provide more in-depth understanding of the structure-property relationship of metallic liquids and promote the design of new metallic materials with superior properties. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Toxin structures as evolutionary tools: Using conserved 3D folds to study the evolution of rapidly evolving peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undheim, Eivind A B; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structures have been used to explore the evolution of proteins for decades, yet they have rarely been utilized to study the molecular evolution of peptides. Here, we highlight areas in which 3D structures can be particularly useful for studying the molecular evolution of peptide toxins. Although we focus our discussion on animal toxins, including one of the most widespread disulfide-rich peptide folds known, the inhibitor cystine knot, our conclusions should be widely applicable to studies of the evolution of disulfide-constrained peptides. We show that conserved 3D folds can be used to identify evolutionary links and test hypotheses regarding the evolutionary origin of peptides with extremely low sequence identity; construct accurate multiple sequence alignments; and better understand the evolutionary forces that drive the molecular evolution of peptides. Also watch the video abstract. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Magnetic structure evolution in mechanically milled nanostructured ZnFe2O4 particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Wynn, P.; Mørup, Steen

    1999-01-01

    Nanostructured partially-inverted ZnFe2O4 particles have been prepared from bulk ZnFe2O4 by high-energy ball milling in an open container. The grain size reduction, cation site distributions, and the evolution of magnetic structures have been studied by x-ray diffraction with Rietveld structure...... refinements, transmission electron microscopy, and Mossbauer spectroscopy. It is found that a change of magnetic structure from an antiferromagnetic to a ferrimagnetic (or ferromagnetic) structure occurs in the milled samples. This change is correlated with the redistribution of the cations, Zn and Fe...

  15. Current-dependent electrode lattice fluctuations and anode phase evolution in a lithium-ion battery investigated by in situ neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Neeraj; Peterson, Vanessa K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Links between time-dependent structural parameters and battery performance. ► Current-dependent evolution of the anode. ► Direct correlation of LixCoO 2 and LiC 6 structure with battery capacity. -- Abstract: This work uses real-time in situ neutron powder diffraction to study the electrode lattice response and anode phase evolution in a commercial lithium-ion battery. We show that the time-resolved lattice response of the Li x CoO 2 cathode and Li x C 6 anode under non-equilibrium conditions varies proportionally with the applied current, where higher current results in faster structural change. Higher current also reduces the Li x CoO 2 cathode c lattice parameter and the LiC 6 quantity that forms at the charged state of the battery, both of which are related to lower battery capacity. At the anode, we find that the Li x C 6 phase evolution is current-dependent

  16. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung; Moreau, Liane M.; Bealing, Clive R.; Zhang, Haitao; Hennig, Richard G.; Robinson, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co 2P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS

  17. Standard Errors of Estimated Latent Variable Scores with Estimated Structural Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Takahiro; Shigemasu, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    The authors propose a concise formula to evaluate the standard error of the estimated latent variable score when the true values of the structural parameters are not known and must be estimated. The formula can be applied to factor scores in factor analysis or ability parameters in item response theory, without bootstrap or Markov chain Monte…

  18. Temporal evolution of electron energy distribution function and plasma parameters in the afterglow of drifting magnetron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Sang-Hun; In, Jung-Hwan; Chang, Hong-Young

    2005-01-01

    The temporal behaviour of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and the plasma parameters such as electron density, electron temperature and plasma and floating potentials in a mid-frequency pulsed dc magnetron plasma are investigated using time-resolved probe measurements. A negative-voltage dc pulse with an average power of 160 W during the pulse-on period, a repetition frequency of 20 kHz and a duty cycle of 50% is applied to the cathode of a planar unbalanced magnetron discharge with a grounded substrate. The measured electron energy distribution is found to exhibit a bi-Maxwellian distribution, which can be resolved with the low-energy electron group and the high-energy tail part during the pulse-on period, and a Maxwellian distribution only with low-energy electrons as a consequence of initially rapid decay of the high-energy tail part during the pulse-off period. This characteristic evolution of the EEDF is reflected in the decay characteristics of the electron density and temperature in the afterglow. These parameters exhibit twofold decay represented by two characteristic decay times of an initial fast decay time τ 1 , and a subsequent slower decay time τ 2 in the afterglow when approximated with a bi-exponential function. While the initial fast decay times are of the order of 1 μs (τ T1 ∼ 0.99 μs and τ N1 ∼ 1.5 μs), the slower decay times are of the order of a few tens of microseconds (τ T2 ∼ 7 μs and τ N2 ∼ 40 μs). The temporal evolution of the plasma parameters are qualitatively explained by considering the formation mechanism of the bi-Maxwellian electron distribution function and the electron transports of these electron groups in bulk plasma

  19. Structural Evolution in Photoactive Yellow Protein Studied by Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshizawa M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast structural evolution in photoactive yellow protein (PYP is studied by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. A comparison between wild-type PYP and E46Q mutant reveals that the hydrogen-bonding network surrounding the chromophore of PYP is immediately rearranged in the electronic excited state.

  20. Structural evolution of biomass char and its effect on the gasification rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatehi, Hesameddin; Bai, Xue Song

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of char porous structure can affect the conversion rate of the char by affecting the intra-particle transport, especially in the zone II conversion regime. A multi-pore model based on the capillary pore theory is developed to take into account different conversion rates for pores wi...

  1. Comparison of the population structure and life-history parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blacktail seabream Diplodus capensis were sampled from proximate (10 km apart) exploited and unexploited areas in southern Angola to compare their population structures and life-history parameters. Females dominated the larger size and older age classes in the unexploited area. In the exploited area the length and ...

  2. Structural evolution of Ge-rich Si1−xGex films deposited by jet-ICPCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous Ge-rich Si1−xGex films with local Ge-clustering were deposited by dual-source jet-type inductively coupled plasma chemical-vapor deposition (jet-ICPCVD. The structural evolution of the deposited films annealed at various temperatures (Ta is investigated. Experimental results indicate that the crystallization occurs to form Ge and Si clusters as Ta = 500 °C. With raising Ta up to 900 °C, Ge clusters percolate together and Si diffuses and redistributes to form a Ge/SiGe core/shell structure, and some Ge atoms partially diffuse to the surface as a result of segregation. The present work will be helpful in understanding the structural evolution process of a hybrid SiGe films and beneficial for further optimizing the microstructure and properties.

  3. Structural Evolution of the R-T Phase Boundary in KNN-Based Ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Lv, Xiang

    2017-10-04

    Although a rhombohedral-tetragonal (R-T) phase boundary is known to substantially enhance the piezoelectric properties of potassium-sodium niobate ceramics, the structural evolution of the R-T phase boundary itself is still unclear. In this work, the structural evolution of R-T phase boundary from -150 °C to 200 °C is investigated in (0.99-x)K0.5Na0.5Nb1-ySbyO3-0.01CaSnO3-xBi0.5K0.5HfO3 (where x=0~0.05 with y=0.035, and y=0~0.07 with x=0.03) ceramics. Through temperature-dependent powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Raman spectra, the structural evolution was determined to be Rhombohedral (R, <-125 °C) → Rhombohedral+Orthorhombic (R+O, -125 °C to 0 °C) → Rhombohedral+Tetragonal (R+T, 0 °C to 150 °C) → dominating Tetragonal (T, 200 °C to Curie temperature (TC)) → Cubic (C, >TC). In addition, the enhanced electrical properties (e.g., a direct piezoelectric coefficient (d33) of ~450±5 pC/N, a conversion piezoelectric coefficient (d33*) of ~580±5 pm/V, an electromechanical coupling factor (kp) of ~0.50±0.02, and TC~250 °C), fatigue-free behavior, and good thermal stability were exhibited by the ceramics possessing the R-T phase boundary. This work improves understanding of the physical mechanism behind the R-T phase boundary in KNN-based ceramics and is an important step towards their adoption in practical applications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrasi, F.; D''Onofrio, A.; Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G.; Gialanella, L.; Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Roca, V.; Romano, M.; Straniero, O.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely 7 Be(p,γ) 8 B and 12 C(α,γ) 16 O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  5. Techniques of Turnovers’ Evolution and Structure Analysis Using SQL Server 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Manole

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The turnovers’ evolution and structure analysis can provide many useful information for the construction of a viable set of policies for products, prices and retail network. When the analysis deals with large quantities of raw data, one of the solutions that guarantees the rigorous treatment of the data is the use of a software system based on a data warehouse.

  6. Evolution of Immiscibly Blended Functionalized Polymers with Respect to Cure Parameters and Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Nicholas Walter Medicus

    Powder coatings are becoming ubiquitous in the coating marketplace due to the absence of solvents in their formulation, but they have yet to see implementation in low-reflectance outdoor applications. This demand could be met by utilizing polymer blends formulated with low loadings of matting agents and pigments. The goal of this research is a thorough characterization of prototype low-reflectance coatings through several analytical techniques. Prototypical thermoset blends consist of functionalized polyurethanes rendered immiscible by differences in polar and hydrogen bonding characteristics, resulting in a surface roughened by droplet domains. Analysis of both pigmented and control clear films was performed. This research project had three primary aims: (1) determine the composition of the resin components of the polymer blend; (2) to monitor the evolution of domains before and during curing of clear polymer blends; (3) to monitor the evolution of these domains when pigments are added to these blends. The clear films enabled unhindered analysis by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy on the binder. However, these domains provided no spectroscopic signatures despite their observation by optical microscopy. This necessitated the development of a new procedure for cross-section preparation that leaves no contamination from polishing media, which enabled Raman mapping of the morphology via an introduced marker peak from styrene monomer. The clears were analyzed as a powder and as films that were quenched at various cure-times using FTIR, Raman, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermomechanical methods to construct a model of coating evolution based on cure parameters and polymer dynamics. Domains were observed in the powder, and underwent varying rates of coarsening as the cure progressed. TEM, scanning electron microscopy and thermomechanical methods were also used on pigmented systems at different states of the cure, including in

  7. Evolution of LiFePO4 thin films interphase with electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, N.; Cuisinier, M.; Zheng, Y.; Fernandez, V.; Hamon, J.; Hirayama, M.; Kanno, R.; Guyomard, D.

    2018-04-01

    Many parameters may control the growth and the characteristics of the interphase, such as surface structure and morphology, structural defects, grain boundaries, surface reactions, etc. However, polycrystalline surfaces contain these parameters simultaneously, resulting in a quite complicated system to study. Working with model electrode surfaces using crystallographically oriented crystalline thin films appears as a novel and unique approach to understand contributions of preferential orientation and rugosity of the surface. In order to rebuild the interphase architecture along electrochemical cycling, LiFePO4 epitaxial films offering ideal 2D (100) interfaces are here investigated through the use of non-destructive depth profiling by Angular Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The composition and structure of the interphase is then monitored upon cycling for samples stopped at the end of charge and discharge for various numbers of cycles, and discussed in the light of combined XPS and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements. Such an approach allows describing the interphase evolution on a specific model LiFePO4 crystallographic orientation and helps understanding the nature and evolution of the LiFePO4/electrolyte interphase forming on the surface of LiFePO4 poly-crystalline powder.

  8. Battery parameterisation based on differential evolution via a boundary evolution strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guangya

    2013-01-01

    the advances of evolutionary algorithms (EAs). Differential evolution (DE) is selected and modified to parameterise an equivalent circuit model of lithium-ion batteries. A boundary evolution strategy (BES) is developed and incorporated into the DE to update the parameter boundaries during the parameterisation......, as the equivalent circuit model is an abstract map of the battery electric characteristics, the determination of the possible ranges of parameters can be a challenging task. In this paper, an efficient yet easy to implement method is proposed to parameterise the equivalent circuit model of batteries utilising...

  9. A coherent structure approach for parameter estimation in Lagrangian Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, John; Santitissadeekorn, Naratip; Jones, Christopher K. R. T.

    2017-12-01

    We introduce a data assimilation method to estimate model parameters with observations of passive tracers by directly assimilating Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Our approach differs from the usual Lagrangian Data Assimilation approach, where parameters are estimated based on tracer trajectories. We employ the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) framework to avoid computing the likelihood function of the coherent structure, which is usually unavailable. We solve the ABC by a Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) method, and use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify the coherent patterns from tracer trajectory data. Our new method shows remarkably improved results compared to the bootstrap particle filter when the physical model exhibits chaotic advection.

  10. A model for evolution of overlapping community networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan, Rituraj; Biswal, Bibhu

    2017-05-01

    A model is proposed for the evolution of network topology in social networks with overlapping community structure. Starting from an initial community structure that is defined in terms of group affiliations, the model postulates that the subsequent growth and loss of connections is similar to the Hebbian learning and unlearning in the brain and is governed by two dominant factors: the strength and frequency of interaction between the members, and the degree of overlap between different communities. The temporal evolution from an initial community structure to the current network topology can be described based on these two parameters. It is possible to quantify the growth occurred so far and predict the final stationary state to which the network is likely to evolve. Applications in epidemiology or the spread of email virus in a computer network as well as finding specific target nodes to control it are envisaged. While facing the challenge of collecting and analyzing large-scale time-resolved data on social groups and communities one faces the most basic questions: how do communities evolve in time? This work aims to address this issue by developing a mathematical model for the evolution of community networks and studying it through computer simulation.

  11. Structural evolution of a granular medium during simultaneous penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Carreón, Yojana J. P.; Moctezuma, R. E.

    2018-01-01

    Typically, fluidized beds are granular systems composed of solid particles through which a fluid flows. They are relevant to a wide variety of disciplines such as physics, chemistry, engineering, among others. Generally, the fluidized beds are characterized by different flow regimes such as particulate, bubbling, slugging, turbulent, fast fluidization, and pneumatic conveying. Here, we report the experimental study of the structural evolution of a granular system due to simultaneous penetration of intruders in the presence of an upward airflow. We found that the granular medium evolves from the static state to the turbulent regime showing the coexistence of three regions in different flow regimes. Interestingly, the cooperative dynamic of intruders correlate with the formation of such regions. As a non-invasive method, we use lacunarity and fractal dimension to quantitatively describe the patterns arising within the system during the different stages of the penetration process. Finally, we found that our results would allow us to relate the evolution of the visual patterns appearing in the process with different physical properties of the system.

  12. Synthesis and textural evolution of alumina particles with mesoporous structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xun; Peng Tianyou; Yao Jinchun; Lv Hongjin; Huang Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Alumina particles with mesostructures were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method by using different inorganic aluminum salts followed by a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation and calcination process. The obtained mesoporous γ-alumina particles were systematically characterized by the X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. Effects of the aluminum salt counter anion, pH value and the azeotropic distillation process on the structural or textural evolution of alumina particles were investigated. It is found that Cl - in the reaction solution can restrain the textural evolution of the resultant precipitates into two-dimensional crystallized pseudoboehmite lamellae during the heterogeneous azeotropic distillation, and then transformed into γ-Al 2 O 3 particles with mesostructures after further calcination at 1173 K, whereas coexisting SO 4 2- can promote above morphology evolution and then transformed into γ-Al 2 O 3 nanofibers after calcination at 1173 K. Moreover nearly all materials retain relatively high specific surface areas larger than 100 m 2 g -1 even after calcinations at 1173 K. - Graphical abstract: Co-existing Cl - is beneficial for the formation of γ-alumina nanoparticles with mesostructures during the precipitation process. Interparticle and intraparticle mesopores can be derived from acidic solution and near neutral solution, respectively.

  13. Influence of Weaving Loom Setting Parameters on Changes of Woven Fabric Structure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aušra ADOMAITIENĖ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available During the manufacturing of fabric of different raw material there was noticed, that after removing the fabric from weaving loom and after stabilization of fabric structure, the changes of parameters of fabric structure are not regular. During this investigation it was analysed, how weaving loom technological parameters (heald cross moment and initial tension of warp should be chosen and how to predict the changes of fabric structure parameters and its mechanical properties. The dependencies of changes of half-wool fabric structure parameters (weft setting, fabric thickness and projections of fabric cross-section and mechanical properties (breaking force, elongation at break, static friction force and static friction coefficient on weaving loom setting parameters (heald cross moment and initial warp tension were analysed. The orthogonal Box plan of two factors was used, the 3-D dependencies were drawn, and empirical equations of these dependencies were established.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.780

  14. Game-Changing Innovations: How Culture Can Change the Parameters of Its Own Evolution and Induce Abrupt Cultural Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    One of the most puzzling features of the prehistoric record of hominid stone tools is its apparent punctuation: it consists of abrupt bursts of dramatic change that separate long periods of largely unchanging technology. Within each such period, small punctuated cultural modifications take place. Punctuation on multiple timescales and magnitudes is also found in cultural trajectories from historical times. To explain these sharp cultural bursts, researchers invoke such external factors as sudden environmental change, rapid cognitive or morphological change in the hominids that created the tools, or replacement of one species or population by another. Here we propose a dynamic model of cultural evolution that accommodates empirical observations: without invoking external factors, it gives rise to a pattern of rare, dramatic cultural bursts, interspersed by more frequent, smaller, punctuated cultural modifications. Our model includes interdependent innovation processes that occur at different rates. It also incorporates a realistic aspect of cultural evolution: cultural innovations, such as those that increase food availability or that affect cultural transmission, can change the parameters that affect cultural evolution, thereby altering the population’s cultural dynamics and steady state. This steady state can be regarded as a cultural carrying capacity. These parameter-changing cultural innovations occur very rarely, but whenever one occurs, it triggers a dramatic shift towards a new cultural steady state. The smaller and more frequent punctuated cultural changes, on the other hand, are brought about by innovations that spur the invention of further, related, technology, and which occur regardless of whether the population is near its cultural steady state. Our model suggests that common interpretations of cultural shifts as evidence of biological change, for example the appearance of behaviorally modern humans, may be unwarranted. PMID:28036346

  15. Design optimization of structural parameters in double gate MOSFETs for RF applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jiale; Xiao Han; Huang Ru; Wang Pengfei; Wang Yangyuan

    2008-01-01

    Double gate (DG) MOSFETs have recently attracted much attention for both logic and analog/RF applications. In this paper we focus on the design consideration of DG devices for RF applications. The different influences of key structural parameters on RF characteristics are comprehensively studied and optimized, including body thickness, spacer length and source/drain raised height. The impact of the fluctuation of geometrical parameters of DG devices on RF figures-of-merit are estimated. In addition, different dominance of structural parameters for RF applications is studied in DG devices with different channel lengths. The dependence of RF performance on the gate length downscaling of DG devices is also discussed. The obtained results give the design guidelines for DG devices for RF applications

  16. Fatigue damage evolution in quasi-unidirectional non-crimp fabric based composite materials for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    scales, the 3D x-ray computer tomography technique is used non-destructive to observe the fatigue damage evolution on the fiber and bundle scale. Those observations are then linked to the larger scales through mechanical testing of representative volumes of the non-crimp fabric bundle structure....... Numerically, those non-crimp fabric bundle structures extracted from the 3D x-ray scans can be used in a multi-scale based finite element models used for understanding the parameters controlling the fatigue damage evolutions. During tensiontension fatigue testing, the damage mechanism is shown...

  17. Structural evolution of a deformed Σ=9 (122) grain boundary in silicon. A high resolution electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study by high resolution electron microscopy of the evolution of a silicon bi-crystal under deformation at different temperatures. The author notably studied the structural evolution of the boundary as well as that of grains at the vicinity of the boundary. Two observation scales have been used: the evolution of sub-structures of dislocations induced by deformation in grains and in boundary, and the structure of all defects at an atomic scale. After a presentation of experimental tools (the necessary perfect quality of the electronic optics is outlined), the author recalls some descriptive aspects of grain boundaries (geometric network concepts to describe coinciding networks, concepts of delimiting boundaries and of structural unit to describe grain boundary atomic structure), recalls the characteristics of the studied bi-crystal, and the conditions under which it is deformed. He presents the structures of all perfectly coinciding boundaries, describes defects obtained by deformation at the vicinity of the boundary, describes the entry of dissociated dislocations into the boundaries, and discusses the characterization of boundary dislocations (the notion of Burgers vector is put into question again), and the atomic mechanism of displacement of dislocations in boundaries [fr

  18. Evolution of the structure and the phase composition of a bainitic structural steel during plastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E. N.; Glezer, A. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Aksenova, K. V.; Gromov, V. E.; Kazimirov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The evolution of the phase composition and the imperfect substructure of the 30Kh2N2MFA bainitic structural steel subjected to compressive deformation by 36% is quantitatively analyzed. It is shown that deformation is accompanied by an increase in the scalar dislocation density, a decrease in the longitudinal fragment sizes, an increase in the number of stress concentrators, the dissolution of cementite particles, and the transformation of retained austenite.

  19. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F; D` Onofrio, A [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); [INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L; Imbriani, G [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U; Rolfs, C; Strieder, F; Trautvetter, H P [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V; Romano, M [INFN, Napoli (Italy); [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  20. Nonlinear evolution of the mode structure of ELMs in realistic ASDEX Upgrade geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, Isabel; Hoelzl, Matthias; Lackner, Karl; Guenter, Sibylle [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    Edge-localized modes (ELMs) are edge instabilities in H-mode plasmas, which eject particles and energy. The suitability of the H-mode for future fusion reactors depends crucially on the exact ELM dynamics as they can damage plasma facing components if too large. We have simulated ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade geometry using the nonlinear MHD code JOREK. Emphasis was put on the mode structure evolution in the early ELM phase which is characterized by the exponential growth of the unstable toroidal Fourier harmonics followed by a phase of saturation. In the linear phase, toroidal harmonics grow independently, whereas at larger amplitudes, the nonlinear interaction between the toroidal harmonics influences their growth and structure. Prior to mode saturation, the evolution of the mode structure can be reproduced well by a simple quadratic mode-interaction model, which yields a possible explanation for the strong n=1 component of type-I ELMs observed in ASDEX Upgrade. In the linear phase of the simulations, intermediate toroidal mode numbers (n 6-14) are most unstable as predicted by the peeling-ballooning model. But non-linearly, the n=1 component becomes important due to an energy transfer from pairs of linearly dominant toroidal harmonics with neighboring mode numbers to the n=1. The latter thereby changes its spatial structure.

  1. Structural Measures to Track the Evolution of SNOMED CT Hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Duo; Gu, Huanying (Helen); Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Ochs, Christopher; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) is an extensive reference terminology with an attendant amount of complexity. It has been updated continuously and revisions have been released semi-annually to meet users’ needs and to reflect the results of quality assurance (QA) activities. Two measures based on structural features are proposed to track the effects of both natural terminology growth and QA activities based on aspects of the complexity of SNOMED CT. These two measures, called the structural density measure and accumulated structural measure, are derived based on two abstraction networks, the area taxonomy and the partial-area taxonomy. The measures derive from attribute relationship distributions and various concept groupings that are associated with the abstraction networks. They are used to track the trends in the complexity of structures as SNOMED CT changes over time. The measures were calculated for consecutive releases of five SNOMED CT hierarchies, including the Specimen hierarchy. The structural density measure shows that natural growth tends to move a hierarchy’s structure toward a more complex state, whereas the accumulated structural measure shows that QA processes tend to move a hierarchy’s structure toward a less complex state. It is also observed that both the structural density and accumulated structural measures are useful tools to track the evolution of an entire SNOMED CT hierarchy and reveal internal concept migration within it. PMID:26260003

  2. Structure and evolution of magnetic fields associated with solar eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the studies of solar photospheric magnetic field evolution in active regions and its relationship to solar flares. It is divided into two topics, the magnetic structure and evolution leading to solar eruptions and rapid changes in the photospheric magnetic field associated with eruptions. For the first topic, we describe the magnetic complexity, new flux emergence, flux cancelation, shear motions, sunspot rotation and magnetic helicity injection, which may all contribute to the storage and buildup of energy that trigger solar eruptions. For the second topic, we concentrate on the observations of rapid and irreversible changes of the photospheric magnetic field associated with flares, and the implication on the restructuring of the three-dimensional magnetic field. In particular, we emphasize the recent advances in observations of the photospheric magnetic field, as state-of-the-art observing facilities (such as Hinode and Solar Dynamics Observatory) have become available. The linkages between observations, theories and future prospectives in this research area are also discussed. (invited reviews)

  3. Evolution and mechanism of the periodical structures formed on Ti plate under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dong, E-mail: ld20501@126.com; Chen, Chuansong, E-mail: chencs@sdnu.edu.cn; Man, Baoyuan, E-mail: byman@sdnu.edu.cn; Meng, Xue; Sun, Yanna, E-mail: sunyuannaa@163.com; Li, Feifei

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Investigate the evolution and succession of three types of fs-laser induced periodic surface structures (FLIPSSs). • Achieve the laser processing window of each type of the FLIPSS. • Explain the formation and evolvement of the ripple structure in the respective of surface plasma wave (SPW). • Ascribe the interaction between the transmitted laser and the reflected laser at the two surfaces of the biconvex lens to the formation of ring structure. - Abstract: This work investigates the femtosencond laser (fs-laser) induced periodical surface structures (FLIPSS) on titanium plate including the concentric rings, microgrooves and subwavelength ripples. The evolution of the three types of the structures at different laser fluence and shot number is investigated experimentally in detail. The competition mechanisms exist among the different FLIPSS. A processing window for each resulting FLIPSS is obtained. In order to give an overall understanding of the FLIPSS, the formation mechanisms of each type of FLIPSS are discussed. The formation of the ripples is well explained by the propagating of the surface plasma wave (SPW) on the air/Ti interface. The evolutions of the ripple distribution are well understood according to this model as well. It is concluded that the interaction of the scattered wave of the laser light with the surface wave is concluded to give rise to the microgroove structure. According to our observation, the shape of the concentric rings does not change with the variation of the laser fluence and pulse number. The structure could be originated from the optical interference between the transmitted and reflected laser beams by the two surfaces of the biconvex lens. This investigation could not only make a further understanding of the formations of FLIPSS but also provide the possibility to control the surface morphologies in laser processing.

  4. Functional evolution and structural conservation in chimeric cytochromes p450: calibrating a structure-guided approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otey, Christopher R; Silberg, Jonathan J; Voigt, Christopher A; Endelman, Jeffrey B; Bandara, Geethani; Arnold, Frances H

    2004-03-01

    Recombination generates chimeric proteins whose ability to fold depends on minimizing structural perturbations that result when portions of the sequence are inherited from different parents. These chimeric sequences can display functional properties characteristic of the parents or acquire entirely new functions. Seventeen chimeras were generated from two CYP102 members of the functionally diverse cytochrome p450 family. Chimeras predicted to have limited structural disruption, as defined by the SCHEMA algorithm, displayed CO binding spectra characteristic of folded p450s. Even this small population exhibited significant functional diversity: chimeras displayed altered substrate specificities, a wide range in thermostabilities, up to a 40-fold increase in peroxidase activity, and ability to hydroxylate a substrate toward which neither parent heme domain shows detectable activity. These results suggest that SCHEMA-guided recombination can be used to generate diverse p450s for exploring function evolution within the p450 structural framework.

  5. Pressure-Induced Structural Evolution and Band Gap Shifts of Organometal Halide Perovskite-Based Methylammonium Lead Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingrui; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Guanjun; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zou, Bo

    2016-12-15

    Organometal halide perovskites are promising materials for optoelectronic devices. Further development of these devices requires a deep understanding of their fundamental structure-property relationships. The effect of pressure on the structural evolution and band gap shifts of methylammonium lead chloride (MAPbCl 3 ) was investigated systematically. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman experiments provided structural information on the shrinkage, tilting distortion, and amorphization of the primitive cubic unit cell. In situ high pressure optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra manifested that the band gap of MAPbCl 3 could be fine-tuned to the ultraviolet region by pressure. The optical changes are correlated with pressure-induced structural evolution of MAPbCl 3 , as evidenced by band gap shifts. Comparisons between Pb-hybrid perovskites and inorganic octahedra provided insights on the effects of halogens on pressure-induced transition sequences of these compounds. Our results improve the understanding of the structural and optical properties of organometal halide perovskites.

  6. New insights about enzyme evolution from large scale studies of sequence and structure relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Babbitt, Patricia; Brown, SD; Babbitt, PC

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfami

  7. Composition and structure variation for magnetron sputtered tantalum oxynitride thin films, as function of deposition parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristea, D.; Pătru, M.; Crisan, A.; Munteanu, D. [Department of Materials Science, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania); Crăciun, D. [Laser Department, National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Magurele (Romania); Barradas, N.P. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Apreutesei, M. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR 5270, CNRS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully F-69134 (France); MATEIS Laboratory-INSA de Lyon, Bât. B. Pascal, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Moura, C. [Center of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Cunha, L., E-mail: lcunha@fisica.uminho.pt [Center of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Structural evolution from β-Ta, to fcc-Ta(O,N), to amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} with increasing P(N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}). • The substrate bias influences the N content, but does not influence the O content of the films. • The structural features of the films appear at lower P(N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}) when produced with grounded substrate. - Abstract: Tantalum oxynitride thin films were produced by magnetron sputtering. The films were deposited using a pure Ta target and a working atmosphere with a constant N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ratio. The choice of this constant ratio limits the study concerning the influence of each reactive gas, but allows a deeper understanding of the aspects related to the affinity of Ta to the non-metallic elements and it is economically advantageous. This work begins by analysing the data obtained directly from the film deposition stage, followed by the analysis of the morphology, composition and structure. For a better understanding regarding the influence of the deposition parameters, the analyses are presented by using the following criterion: the films were divided into two sets, one of them produced with grounded substrate holder and the other with a polarization of −50 V. Each one of these sets was produced with different partial pressure of the reactive gases P(N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}). All the films exhibited a O/N ratio higher than the N/O ratio in the deposition chamber atmosphere. In the case of the films produced with grounded substrate holder, a strong increase of the O content is observed, associated to the strong decrease of the N content, when P(N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}) is higher than 0.13 Pa. The higher Ta affinity for O strongly influences the structural evolution of the films. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that the lower partial pressure films were crystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out that the density of the films depended on the deposition conditions: the higher the gas pressure, the

  8. Grain structure evolution in Inconel 718 during selective electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmer, H.; Bauereiß, A., E-mail: Andreas.Bauereiss@fau.de; Singer, R.F.; Körner, C.

    2016-06-21

    Selective electron beam melting (SEBM) is an additive manufacturing method where complex parts are built from metal powders in layers of typically 50 µm. An electron beam is used for heating (about 900 °C building temperature) and selective melting of the material. The grain structure evolution is a result of the complex thermal and hydrodynamic conditions in the melt pool. We show how different scanning strategies can be used to produce either a columnar grain structure with a high texture in building direction or an equiaxed fine grained structure. Numerical simulations of the selective melting process are applied to study the fundamental mechanisms responsible for differing grain structures. It is shown, that the direction of the thermal gradient during solidification can be altered by scanning strategies to acquire either epitaxial growth or stray grains. We show that it is possible to locally alter the grain structure of a part, thus allowing tailoring of the mechanical properties.

  9. Astronomical constraints on the cosmic evolution of the fine structure constant and possible quantum dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli, C L; Menten, K M; Stocke, J T; Perlman, E; Vermeulen, R; Briggs, F; de Bruyn , A G; Conway, J; Moore, C P

    2000-12-25

    We present measurements of absorption by the 21 cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen toward radio sources at substantial look-back times. These data are used in combination with observations of rotational transitions of common interstellar molecules to set limits on the evolution of the fine structure constant: alpha/ alphatheory, the limit on the secular evolution of the scale factor of the compact dimensions, R, is &Rdot/ Rbig bang, of DeltaR /R<10(-5).

  10. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  11. Properties and Semicrystalline Structure Evolution of Polypropylene/Montmorillonite Nanocomposites under Mechanical Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stribeck, Norbert; Zeinolebadi, Ahmad; Ganjaee Sari, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) monitors tensile and load-cycling tests of metallocene isotactic polypropylene (PP), a blend of PP and montmorillonite (MMT), and two block copolymer compatibilized PP/MMT nanocomposites. Mechanical properties of the materials are similar, but the semicrystalline......%. Other results concern the evolution of Strobl’s block structure and void formation during tensile loading....

  12. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    divide bulges into two types that correlate differently with their BHs. I review environmental secular evolution -- the transformation of gas-rich, star-forming spiral and irregular galaxies into gas-poor, `red and dead' S0 and spheroidal (`Sph') galaxies. I show that Sph galaxies such as NGC205 and Draco are not the low-luminosity end of the structural sequence (the `fundamental plane') of elliptical galaxies. Instead, Sph galaxies have structural parameters like those of low-luminosity S+Im galaxies. Spheroidals are continuous in their structural parameters~with~the disks of S0 galaxies. They are bulgeless S0s. S+Im -->S0+Sph transformation involves a variety of internal (supernova-driven baryon ejection) and environmental processes (e.g., ram-pressure gas stripping, harassment, and starvation). Finally, I summarise how hierarchical clustering and secular processes can be combined into a consistent and comprehensive picture of galaxy evolution.

  13. Regional evolution of geological structure in south China and U mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guoda; Kang Zili; Shen Jinrui; Jin Yushu

    1992-01-01

    This paper states the development laws of regional geological structure of South China and its controlling effect on uranium deposit evolution, and the characteristics of rich uranium formation in different periods of geo-history are analysed. It also discusses the relationship between the distribution of time and space and tectonic structure and environmental vicissitudes. The rock-magma activities-the strong formation of the Diwa Era is of great significance to the formation of uranium deposits within the region, especially to the formation of a series of multi-genesis polygene uranium deposits which are a potential direction in which to look for minerals within the region

  14. EREM: Parameter Estimation and Ancestral Reconstruction by Expectation-Maximization Algorithm for a Probabilistic Model of Genomic Binary Characters Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Liran; Wolf, Yuri I; Rogozin, Igor B; Koonin, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary binary characters are features of species or genes, indicating the absence (value zero) or presence (value one) of some property. Examples include eukaryotic gene architecture (the presence or absence of an intron in a particular locus), gene content, and morphological characters. In many studies, the acquisition of such binary characters is assumed to represent a rare evolutionary event, and consequently, their evolution is analyzed using various flavors of parsimony. However, when gain and loss of the character are not rare enough, a probabilistic analysis becomes essential. Here, we present a comprehensive probabilistic model to describe the evolution of binary characters on a bifurcating phylogenetic tree. A fast software tool, EREM, is provided, using maximum likelihood to estimate the parameters of the model and to reconstruct ancestral states (presence and absence in internal nodes) and events (gain and loss events along branches).

  15. Consensus conference on core radiological parameters to describe lumbar stenosis - an initiative for structured reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Winklhofer, Sebastian F.X. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Deyo, Richard A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Jarvik, Jeffrey G. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Porchet, Francois [Schulthess Klinik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Steurer, Johann [University Hospital Zurich, Horten Center for patient oriented research and knowledge transfer, Zurich (Switzerland); Collaboration: On behalf of the LSOS working group

    2014-12-15

    To define radiological criteria and parameters as a minimum standard in a structured radiological report for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to identify criteria and parameters for research purposes. All available radiological criteria and parameters for LSS were identified using systematic literature reviews and a Delphi survey. We invited to the consensus meeting, and provided data, to 15 internationally renowned experts from different countries. During the meeting, these experts reached consensus in a structured and systematic discussion about a core list of radiological criteria and parameters for standard reporting. We identified a total of 27 radiological criteria and parameters for LSS. During the meeting, the experts identified five of these as core items for a structured report. For central stenosis, these were ''compromise of the central zone'' and ''relation between fluid and cauda equina''. For lateral stenosis, the group agreed that ''nerve root compression in the lateral recess'' was a core item. For foraminal stenosis, we included ''nerve root impingement'' and ''compromise of the foraminal zone''. As a minimum standard, five radiological criteria should be used in a structured radiological report in LSS. Other parameters are well suited for research. (orig.)

  16. Orchestrated structure evolution: modeling growth-regulated nanomanufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Shaghayegh; Boehringer, Karl F [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2500 (United States); Kitayaporn, Sathana; Schwartz, Daniel T, E-mail: karlb@washington.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2500 (United States)

    2011-04-22

    Orchestrated structure evolution (OSE) is a scalable manufacturing method that combines the advantages of top-down (tool-directed) and bottom-up (self-propagating) approaches. The method consists of a seed patterning step that defines where material nucleates, followed by a growth step that merges seeded islands into the final patterned thin film. We develop a model to predict the completed pattern based on a computationally efficient approximate Green's function solution of the diffusion equation plus a Voronoi diagram based approach that defines the final grain boundary structure. Experimental results rely on electron beam lithography to pattern the seeds, followed by the mass transfer limited growth of copper via electrodeposition. The seed growth model is compared with experimental results to quantify nearest neighbor seed-to-seed interactions as well as how seeds interact with the pattern boundary to impact the local growth rate. Seed-to-seed and seed-to-pattern interactions are shown to result in overgrowth of seeds on edges and corners of the shape, where seeds have fewer neighbors. We explore how local changes to the seed location can be used to improve the patterning quality without increasing the manufacturing cost. OSE is shown to enable a unique set of trade-offs between the cost, time, and quality of thin film patterning.

  17. Precision and Accuracy Parameters in Structured Light 3-D Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Wilm, Jakob; Pedersen, David Bue

    2016-01-01

    measure is the established VDI/VDE 2634 (Part 2) guideline using precision made calibration artifacts. Experiments are performed on our own structured light setup, consisting of two cameras and a projector. We place our focus on the influence of calibration design parameters, the calibration procedure...

  18. Structural evolution under uniaxial drawing of Poly(D, L-lactide) Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoclet, Grégory; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc; Seguela, Roland

    2009-03-01

    Aliphatic polyesters are an important class of biodegradable polymers. They have drawn particular attention in the last few years as food packaging materials because they can be derived from renewable resources. Among this family, polylactide (PLA) is considered as one of the most promising ``green'' polymer for use as a substitute to petroleum-based polymers. In the present work, we investigate the mechanical behaviour of amorphous poly(D, L-lactide) films in relation to the structural evolution upon stretching at various draw temperatures (Td) above the glass transition temperature. Examination of the drawing behaviour shows that PLA initially behaves like a rubbery material until a true strain of the order of 1. Strain hardening occurs beyond this strain level, up to film fracture. Such strain hardening is generally ascribed to a strain induced crystallization phenomenon. In the present case, it is clearly more pronounced for Td = 90 C than for Td = 70 C. The corresponding structural evolutions are investigated by means of WAXS. The diffraction patterns reveal the marked influence of draw temperature. Indeed for Td = 70 C a mesophase is induced whereas strain-induced crystallisation takes place at Td = 90 C. Further work is in progress, in order to elucidate mesophase development and mechanical response.

  19. Structural evolution during fragile-to-strong transition in CuZr(Al) glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, C.; Hu, L.N.; Sun, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we show experimental evidence for the dynamic fragile-to-strong (F-S) transition in a series of CuZr(Al) glass-forming liquids (GFLs). A detailed analysis of the dynamics of 98 glass-forming liquids indicates that the F-S transition occurs around Tf-s ≈ 1.36 Tg. Using...... the hyperquenching-annealing-x-ray scattering approach, we have observed a three-stage evolution pattern of medium-range ordering (MRO) structures during the F-S transition, indicating a dramatic change of the MRO clusters around Tf-s upon cooling. The F-S transition in CuZr(Al) GFLs is attributed to the competition...... among the MRO clusters composed of different locally ordering configurations. A phenomenological scenario has been proposed to explain the structural evolution from the fragile to the strong phase in the CuZr(Al) GFLs....

  20. Structure and fluid evolution of Yili basin and their relation to sandstone type uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Juntang; Wang Chengwei; Feng Shirong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the summary of strata and structure distribution of Yili basin, the relation of structure and fluid evolution to sandstone type ur alum mineraliation are analyzed. It is found that uranium mineralization in Yili basin experienced ore hosting space forming, pre-alteration of hosting space, hosting space alteration and uranium formation stages. (authors)

  1. Quantitative interface models for simulating microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.Z.; Wang, T.; Zhou, S.H.; Liu, Z.K.; Chen, L.Q.

    2004-01-01

    To quantitatively simulate microstructural evolution in real systems, we investigated three different interface models: a sharp-interface model implemented by the software DICTRA and two diffuse-interface models which use either physical order parameters or artificial order parameters. A particular example is considered, the diffusion-controlled growth of a γ ' precipitate in a supersaturated γ matrix in Ni-Al binary alloys. All three models use the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from the same databases. The temporal evolution profiles of composition from different models are shown to agree with each other. The focus is on examining the advantages and disadvantages of each model as applied to microstructure evolution in alloys

  2. Coupling of order parameters, chirality, and interfacial structures in multiferroic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Sergio; Müller, Stefan; Poliakovsky, Arkady; Salje, Ekhard K H

    2011-04-13

    We study optimal interfacial structures in multiferroic materials with a biquadratic coupling between two order parameters. We discover a new duality relation between the strong coupling and the weak coupling regime for the case of isotropic gradient terms. We analyze the phase diagram depending on the coupling constant and anisotropy of the gradient term, and show that in a certain regime the secondary order parameter becomes activated only in the interfacial region.

  3. Parameter identification for structural dynamics based on interval analysis algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Lu, Zixing; Yang, Zhenyu; Liang, Ke

    2018-04-01

    A parameter identification method using interval analysis algorithm for structural dynamics is presented in this paper. The proposed uncertain identification method is investigated by using central difference method and ARMA system. With the help of the fixed memory least square method and matrix inverse lemma, a set-membership identification technology is applied to obtain the best estimation of the identified parameters in a tight and accurate region. To overcome the lack of insufficient statistical description of the uncertain parameters, this paper treats uncertainties as non-probabilistic intervals. As long as we know the bounds of uncertainties, this algorithm can obtain not only the center estimations of parameters, but also the bounds of errors. To improve the efficiency of the proposed method, a time-saving algorithm is presented by recursive formula. At last, to verify the accuracy of the proposed method, two numerical examples are applied and evaluated by three identification criteria respectively.

  4. Lithosphere structure and subsidence evolution of the conjugate S-African and Argentine margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, Ingo; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Cacace, Mauro; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Franke, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    The bathymetric evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margins is a matter of debate. Though it is commonly accepted that passive margins experience thermal subsidence as a result of lithospheric cooling as well as load induced subsidence in response to sediment deposition it is disputed if the South Atlantic passive margins were affected by additional processes affecting the subsidence history after continental breakup. We present a subsidence analysis along the SW African margin and offshore Argentina and restore paleobathymetries to assess the subsidence evolution of the margin. These results are discussed with respect to mechanisms behind margin evolution. Therefore, we use available information about the lithosphere-scale present-day structural configuration of these margins as a starting point for the subsidence analysis. A multi 1D backward modelling method is applied to separate individual subsidence components such as the thermal- as well as the load induced subsidence and to restore paleobathymetries for the conjugate margins. The comparison of the restored paleobathymetries shows that the conjugate margins evolve differently: Continuous subsidence is obtained offshore Argentina whereas the subsidence history of the SW African margin is interrupted by phases of uplift. This differing results for both margins correlate also with different structural configurations of the subcrustal mantle. In the light of these results we discuss possible implications for uplift mechanisms.

  5. Origin and evolution of the deep thermochemical structure beneath Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, N; Williams, S; Müller, R D; Gurnis, M; Bower, D J

    2017-01-18

    A unique structure in the Earth's lowermost mantle, the Perm Anomaly, was recently identified beneath Eurasia. It seismologically resembles the large low-shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) under Africa and the Pacific, but is much smaller. This challenges the current understanding of the evolution of the plate-mantle system in which plumes rise from the edges of the two LLSVPs, spatially fixed in time. New models of mantle flow over the last 230 million years reproduce the present-day structure of the lower mantle, and show a Perm-like anomaly. The anomaly formed in isolation within a closed subduction network ∼22,000 km in circumference prior to 150 million years ago before migrating ∼1,500 km westward at an average rate of 1 cm year -1 , indicating a greater mobility of deep mantle structures than previously recognized. We hypothesize that the mobile Perm Anomaly could be linked to the Emeishan volcanics, in contrast to the previously proposed Siberian Traps.

  6. Effects of structural error on the estimates of parameters of dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaegh, F. Y.; Bekey, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, the notion of 'near-equivalence in probability' is introduced for identifying a system in the presence of several error sources. Following some basic definitions, necessary and sufficient conditions for the identifiability of parameters are given. The effects of structural error on the parameter estimates for both the deterministic and stochastic cases are considered.

  7. Nonlinear evolution of single spike structure and vortex in Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Yuko O.; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Okamoto, Masayo; Nagatomo, Hideo; Matsuoka, Chihiro; Ishizaki, Ryuichi; Sakagami, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of single spike structure and vortex in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is investigated for two dimensional case, and axial symmetric and non axial symmetric cases with the use of a three-dimensional hydrodynamic code. It is shown that singularity appears in the vorticity left by transmitted and reflected shocks at a corrugated interface. This singularity results in opposite sign of vorticity along the interface that causes double spiral structure of the spike. Difference of nonlinear growth rate and double spiral structure among three cases is also discussed by visualization of simulation data. In a case that there is no slip-off of initial spike axis, vorticity ring is relatively stable, but phase rotation occurs. (author)

  8. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoO{sub x} films near topotactic phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeen, Hyoungjeen [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan, 609735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Nyung, E-mail: hnlee@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoO{sub x}) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO{sub 2.5} thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO{sub 3-δ}). We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.

  9. InGaN quantum well epilayers morphological evolution under a wide range of MOCVD growth parameter sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florescu, D.I.; Ting, S.M.; Merai, V.N.; Parekh, A.; Lee, D.S.; Armour, E.A.; Quinn, W.E. [Veeco TurboDisc Operations, 394 Elizabeth Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    This study exemplifies the use of TappingMode trademark atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface morphology imaging to investigate and optimise the metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) growth conditions and post-growth stability of thin (<40 Aa) InGaN layers with direct implications to the structural and optical properties of blue (460 nm) and green (520 nm) LEDs. InGaN epilayers less than 40 Aa thick of {proportional_to}20% solid phase indium were produced on thick (3-4 {mu}m) 2{sup ''} GaN templates grown on (0001) c-plane sapphire substrates. The morphological evolution of the InGaN material was studied utilising a DI3100 AFM tool. Surface morphology and its correlation with photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction results are discussed for every set of conditions employed. More specifically, the post-growth ambient exposure and thermal stability of the uncapped InGaN epilayers were investigated. In addition, the initial stage of subsequent GaN growth, which is an essential step towards the manufacture of LED active regions, was examined. Based on the above findings, a flexible MOCVD growth parameter space and improved LED constituent layer sequencing techniques have been established leading to more efficient and stable LED devices. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Recapitulating the Structural Evolution of Redox Regulation in Adenosine 5'-Phosphosulfate Kinase from Cyanobacteria to Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Nathin, David; Lee, Soon Goo; Sun, Tony; Jez, Joseph M

    2015-10-09

    In plants, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) kinase (APSK) is required for reproductive viability and the production of 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as a sulfur donor in specialized metabolism. Previous studies of the APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAPSK) identified a regulatory disulfide bond formed between the N-terminal domain (NTD) and a cysteine on the core scaffold. This thiol switch is unique to mosses, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. To understand the structural evolution of redox control of APSK, we investigated the redox-insensitive APSK from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SynAPSK). Crystallographic analysis of SynAPSK in complex with either APS and a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog or APS and sulfate revealed the overall structure of the enzyme, which lacks the NTD found in homologs from mosses and plants. A series of engineered SynAPSK variants reconstructed the structural evolution of the plant APSK. Biochemical analyses of SynAPSK, SynAPSK H23C mutant, SynAPSK fused to the AtAPSK NTD, and the fusion protein with the H23C mutation showed that the addition of the NTD and cysteines recapitulated thiol-based regulation. These results reveal the molecular basis for structural changes leading to the evolution of redox control of APSK in the green lineage from cyanobacteria to plants. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. A structural self-regulation of functioning macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristoforov, L.N.

    1998-01-01

    An approach to describing the functional structural changes of macromolecules processing the flows of low-mass agents is formulated. The latter appear as a source of a discrete noise whose defining parameters depend on structural variables. We derive a forward evolution equation and then, by adiabatic elimination, effective Fokker-Planck's equation for the structural modes. Within the dichotomous case, we discuss noise-induced nonequilibrium phase transitions reflecting the regulatory role of the structural subsystem

  12. Study on the Evolution Mechanism and Development Forecasting of China’s Power Supply Structure Clean Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The clean development of China’s power supply structure has become a crucial strategic problem for the low-carbon, green development of Chinese society. Considering the subsistent developments of optimized allocation of energy resources and efficient utilization, the urgent need to solve environmental pollution, and the continuously promoted power market-oriented reform, further study of China’s power structure clean development has certain theoretical value. Based on the data analysis, this paper analyzes the key factors that influence the evolution process of the structure with the help of system dynamics theory and carries out comprehensive assessments after the construction of the structure evaluation system. Additionally, a forecasting model of the power supply structure development based on the Vector Autoregressive Model (VAR has been put forward to forecast the future structure. Through the research of policy review and scenario analysis, the paths and directions of structure optimization are proposed. In this paper, the system dynamics, vector autoregressive model (VAR, policy mining, and scenario analysis methods are combined to systematically demonstrate the evolution of China’s power structure, and predict the future direction of development. This research may provide a methodological and practical reference for the analysis of China’s power supply structure optimization development and for theoretical studies.

  13. The evolution of plant secretory structures and emergence of terpenoid chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    Secretory structures in terrestrial plants appear to have first emerged as intracellular oil bodies in liverworts. In vascular plants, internal secretory structures, such as resin ducts and laticifers, are usually found in conjunction with vascular bundles, whereas subepidermal secretory cavities and epidermal glandular trichomes generally have more complex tissue distribution patterns. The primary function of plant secretory structures is related to defense responses, both constitutive and induced, against herbivores and pathogens. The ability to sequester secondary (or specialized) metabolites and defense proteins in secretory structures was a critical adaptation that shaped plant-herbivore and plant-pathogen interactions. Although this review places particular emphasis on describing the evolution of pathways leading to terpenoids, it also assesses the emergence of other metabolite classes to outline the metabolic capabilities of different plant lineages.

  14. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-28

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  15. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  16. Free flight in parameter space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle; Nilsson, Per Anders

    2008-01-01

    with continuous interpolation between population members. With a suitable sound engine, the system forms a surprisingly expressive performance instrument, used by the electronic free impro duo pantoMorf in concerts and recording sessions over the last year.......The well-known difficulty of controlling many synthesis parameters in performance, for exploration and expression, is addressed. Inspired by interactive evolution, random vectors in parameter space are assigned to an array of pressure sensitive pads. Vectors are scaled with pressure and added...... to define the current point in parameter space. Vectors can be scaled globally, allowing exploration of the whole space or minute timberal expression. The vector origin can be shifted at any time, allowing exploration of subspaces. In essence, this amounts to mutation-based interactive evolution...

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF MODAL PARAMETERS OF VIBRATING STRUCTURES WITH UNKNOWN ORSTOCHASTIC EXCITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Amaro Baldeón, Roberto; Gardel Kurka, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    The Vector Autoregressive Moving Average (VARMA) Model is used to identify dynamical characteristics of a structural system in the presence of noise. In order to estimate the parameters of the VARMA Model, the Spliid’s fast algorithm is used. To determine the modal parameters the companion matrix is built with the autoregressive part of the VARMA Model. The performance of this method here discussed is presented by means of simulations, using three degrees of freedom mass-dampingstiffness vibr...

  18. A new moving strategy for the sequential Monte Carlo approach in optimizing the hydrological model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gaofeng; Li, Xin; Ma, Jinzhu; Wang, Yunquan; Liu, Shaomin; Huang, Chunlin; Zhang, Kun; Hu, Xiaoli

    2018-04-01

    Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) samplers have become increasing popular for estimating the posterior parameter distribution with the non-linear dependency structures and multiple modes often present in hydrological models. However, the explorative capabilities and efficiency of the sampler depends strongly on the efficiency in the move step of SMC sampler. In this paper we presented a new SMC sampler entitled the Particle Evolution Metropolis Sequential Monte Carlo (PEM-SMC) algorithm, which is well suited to handle unknown static parameters of hydrologic model. The PEM-SMC sampler is inspired by the works of Liang and Wong (2001) and operates by incorporating the strengths of the genetic algorithm, differential evolution algorithm and Metropolis-Hasting algorithm into the framework of SMC. We also prove that the sampler admits the target distribution to be a stationary distribution. Two case studies including a multi-dimensional bimodal normal distribution and a conceptual rainfall-runoff hydrologic model by only considering parameter uncertainty and simultaneously considering parameter and input uncertainty show that PEM-SMC sampler is generally superior to other popular SMC algorithms in handling the high dimensional problems. The study also indicated that it may be important to account for model structural uncertainty by using multiplier different hydrological models in the SMC framework in future study.

  19. Contemporary evolution strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Bäck, Thomas; Krause, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Evolution strategies have more than 50 years of history in the field of evolutionary computation. Since the early 1990s, many algorithmic variations of evolution strategies have been developed, characterized by the fact that they use the so-called derandomization concept for strategy parameter adaptation. Most importantly, the covariance matrix adaptation strategy (CMA-ES) and its successors are the key representatives of this group of contemporary evolution strategies. This book provides an overview of the key algorithm developments between 1990 and 2012, including brief descriptions of the a

  20. Phylogeography, population structure and evolution of coral-eating butterflyfishes (Family Chaetodontidae, genus Chaetodon , subgenus Corallochaetodon )

    KAUST Repository

    Waldrop, Ellen; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Randall, John E.; DiBattista, Joseph; Rocha, Luiz A.; Kosaki, Randall K.; Berumen, Michael L.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the phylogeography, population structure and evolution of four butterflyfish species in the Chaetodon subgenus Corallochaetodon, with two widespread species (Indian Ocean – C. trifasciatus and Pacific Ocean – C. lunulatus

  1. Research on structure and electrical parameters of indium antimonide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhametniyazova, A.; Konyaeva, V.F.; Sukhanov, S.; Ashirov, A.; Aleksanyan, S.N.

    1980-01-01

    Results of investigations into the effect of conditions of formation of indium antimonide films prepared by thermal vacuum spraying on their structure, phase composition and electric parameters, are presented. The method of studying the synthesized semiconductor layers on the DRON-0.5 X-ray device with CoKsub(α)-radiation is tested. The dependence of structure, phase composition and electric properties of InSb layers 1+3 μm thick sprayed on ferrite substrates on condensation temperature, is established. Hexagonal InSb modification is found

  2. Research on structure and electrical parameters of indium antimonide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhametniyazova, A; Konyaeva, V F; Sukhanov, S; Ashirov, A; Aleksanyan, S N [AN Turkmenskoj SSR, Ashkhabad. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskii Inst.

    1980-01-01

    Results of investigations into the effect of conditions of formation of indium antimonide films prepared by thermal vacuum spraying on their structure, phase composition and electric parameters, are presented. The method of studying the synthesized semiconductor layers on the DRON-0.5 X-ray device with CoKsub(..cap alpha..)-radiation is tested. The dependence of structure, phase composition and electric properties of InSb layers 1+3 ..mu..m thick sprayed on ferrite substrates on condensation temperature, is established. Hexagonal InSb modification is found.

  3. Origin and Evolution of Protein Fold Designs Inferred from Phylogenomic Analysis of CATH Domain Structures in Proteomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Abbas; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The spatial arrangements of secondary structures in proteins, irrespective of their connectivity, depict the overall shape and organization of protein domains. These features have been used in the CATH and SCOP classifications to hierarchically partition fold space and define the architectural make up of proteins. Here we use phylogenomic methods and a census of CATH structures in hundreds of genomes to study the origin and diversification of protein architectures (A) and their associated topologies (T) and superfamilies (H). Phylogenies that describe the evolution of domain structures and proteomes were reconstructed from the structural census and used to generate timelines of domain discovery. Phylogenies of CATH domains at T and H levels of structural abstraction and associated chronologies revealed patterns of reductive evolution, the early rise of Archaea, three epochs in the evolution of the protein world, and patterns of structural sharing between superkingdoms. Phylogenies of proteomes confirmed the early appearance of Archaea. While these findings are in agreement with previous phylogenomic studies based on the SCOP classification, phylogenies unveiled sharing patterns between Archaea and Eukarya that are recent and can explain the canonical bacterial rooting typically recovered from sequence analysis. Phylogenies of CATH domains at A level uncovered general patterns of architectural origin and diversification. The tree of A structures showed that ancient structural designs such as the 3-layer (αβα) sandwich (3.40) or the orthogonal bundle (1.10) are comparatively simpler in their makeup and are involved in basic cellular functions. In contrast, modern structural designs such as prisms, propellers, 2-solenoid, super-roll, clam, trefoil and box are not widely distributed and were probably adopted to perform specialized functions. Our timelines therefore uncover a universal tendency towards protein structural complexity that is remarkable. PMID:23555236

  4. Transverse zones controlling the structural evolution of the Zipaquira Anticline (Eastern Cordillera, Colombia): Regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Helbert; Jiménez, Giovanny

    2016-08-01

    We report paleomagnetic, magnetic fabric and structural results from 21 sites collected in Cretaceous marine mudstones and Paleogene continental sandstones from the limbs, hinge and transverse zones of the Zipaquira Anticline (ZA). The ZA is an asymmetrical fold with one limb completely overturned by processes like gravity and salt tectonics, and marked by several axis curvatures. The ZA is controlled by at least two (2) transverse zones known as the Neusa and Zipaquira Transverse Zones (NTZ and ZTZ, respectively). Magnetic mineralogy methods were applied at different sites and the main carriers of the magnetic properties are paramagnetic components with some sites being controlled by hematite and magnetite. Magnetic fabric analysis shows rigid-body rotation for the back-limb in the ZA, while the forelimb is subjected to internal deformation. Structural and paleomagnetic data shows the influence of the NTZ and ZTZ in the evolution of the different structures like the ZA and the Zipaquira, Carupa, Rio Guandoque, Las Margaritas and Neusa faults, controlling several factors as vergence, extension, fold axis curvature and stratigraphic detatchment. Clockwise rotations unraveled a block segmentation following a discontinuos model caused by transverse zones and one site reported a counter clockwise rotation associated with a left-lateral strike slip component for transverse faults (e.g. the Neusa Fault). We propose that diverse transverse zones have been active since Paleogene times, playing an important role in the tectonic evolution of the Cundinamarca sub-basin and controlling the structural evolution of folds and faults with block segmentation and rotations.

  5. Rifting to India-Asia Reactivation: Multi-phase Structural Evolution of the Barmer Basin, Rajasthan, northwest India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. J.; Bladon, A.; Clarke, S.; Najman, Y.; Copley, A.; Kloppenburg, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Barmer Basin, situated within the West Indian Rift System, is an intra-cratonic rift basin produced during Gondwana break-up. Despite being a prominent oil and gas province, the structural evolution and context of the rift within northwest India remains poorly understood. Substantial subsurface datasets acquired during hydrocarbon exploration provide an unrivalled tool to investigate the tectonic evolution of the Barmer Basin rift and northwest India during India-Asia collision. Here we present a structural analysis using seismic datasets to investigate Barmer Basin evolution and place findings within the context of northwest India development. Present day rift structural architectures result from superposition of two non-coaxial extensional events; an early mid-Cretaceous rift-oblique event (NW-SE), followed by a main Paleocene rifting phase (NE-SW). Three phases of fault reactivation follow rifting: A transpressive, Late Paleocene inversion along localised E-W and NNE-SSW-trending faults; a widespread Late Paleocene-Early Eocene inversion and Late Miocene-Present Day transpressive strike-slip faulting along NW-SE-trending faults and isolated inversion structures. A major Late Eocene-Miocene unconformity in the basin is also identified, approximately coeval with those identified within the Himalayan foreland basin, suggesting a common cause related to India-Asia collision, and calling into question previous explanations that are not compatible with spatial extension of the unconformity beyond the foreland basin. Although, relatively poorly age constrained, extensional and compressional events within the Barmer Basin can be correlated with regional tectonic processes including the fragmentation of Gondwana, the rapid migration of the Greater Indian continent, to subsequent collision with Asia. New insights into the Barmer Basin development have important implications not only for ongoing hydrocarbon exploration but the temporal evolution of northwest India.

  6. EREM: Parameter Estimation and Ancestral Reconstruction by Expectation-Maximization Algorithm for a Probabilistic Model of Genomic Binary Characters Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Carmel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary binary characters are features of species or genes, indicating the absence (value zero or presence (value one of some property. Examples include eukaryotic gene architecture (the presence or absence of an intron in a particular locus, gene content, and morphological characters. In many studies, the acquisition of such binary characters is assumed to represent a rare evolutionary event, and consequently, their evolution is analyzed using various flavors of parsimony. However, when gain and loss of the character are not rare enough, a probabilistic analysis becomes essential. Here, we present a comprehensive probabilistic model to describe the evolution of binary characters on a bifurcating phylogenetic tree. A fast software tool, EREM, is provided, using maximum likelihood to estimate the parameters of the model and to reconstruct ancestral states (presence and absence in internal nodes and events (gain and loss events along branches.

  7. Intermolecular Force Field Parameters Optimization for Computer Simulations of CH4 in ZIF-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phannika Kanthima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential evolution (DE algorithm is applied for obtaining the optimized intermolecular interaction parameters between CH4 and 2-methylimidazolate ([C4N2H5]− using quantum binding energies of CH4-[C4N2H5]− complexes. The initial parameters and their upper/lower bounds are obtained from the general AMBER force field. The DE optimized and the AMBER parameters are then used in the molecular dynamics (MD simulations of CH4 molecules in the frameworks of ZIF-8. The results show that the DE parameters are better for representing the quantum interaction energies than the AMBER parameters. The dynamical and structural behaviors obtained from MD simulations with both sets of parameters are also of notable differences.

  8. Pivotal statistics for testing subsets of structural parameters in the IV Regression Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.R.

    2000-01-01

    We construct a novel statistic to test hypothezes on subsets of the structural parameters in anInstrumental Variables (IV) regression model. We derive the chi squared limiting distribution of thestatistic and show that it has a degrees of freedom parameter that is equal to the number ofstructural

  9. A quantitative analysis of secondary RNA structure using domination based parameters on trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yue

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become increasingly apparent that a comprehensive database of RNA motifs is essential in order to achieve new goals in genomic and proteomic research. Secondary RNA structures have frequently been represented by various modeling methods as graph-theoretic trees. Using graph theory as a modeling tool allows the vast resources of graphical invariants to be utilized to numerically identify secondary RNA motifs. The domination number of a graph is a graphical invariant that is sensitive to even a slight change in the structure of a tree. The invariants selected in this study are variations of the domination number of a graph. These graphical invariants are partitioned into two classes, and we define two parameters based on each of these classes. These parameters are calculated for all small order trees and a statistical analysis of the resulting data is conducted to determine if the values of these parameters can be utilized to identify which trees of orders seven and eight are RNA-like in structure. Results The statistical analysis shows that the domination based parameters correctly distinguish between the trees that represent native structures and those that are not likely candidates to represent RNA. Some of the trees previously identified as candidate structures are found to be "very" RNA like, while others are not, thereby refining the space of structures likely to be found as representing secondary RNA structure. Conclusion Search algorithms are available that mine nucleotide sequence databases. However, the number of motifs identified can be quite large, making a further search for similar motif computationally difficult. Much of the work in the bioinformatics arena is toward the development of better algorithms to address the computational problem. This work, on the other hand, uses mathematical descriptors to more clearly characterize the RNA motifs and thereby reduce the corresponding search space. These

  10. Structural Evolution of Q-Carbon and Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Siddharth; Bhaumik, Anagh; Sachan, Ritesh; Narayan, Jagdish

    2018-04-01

    This article provides insights pertaining to the first-order phase transformation involved in the growth of densely packed Q-carbon and nanodiamonds by nanosecond laser melting and quenching of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films. DLC films with different sp 3 content were melted rapidly in a controlled way in super-undercooled state and quenched, leading to formation of distinct nanostructures, i.e., nanodiamonds, Q-carbon, and Q-carbon nanocomposites. This analysis provides direct evidence of the dependence of the super-undercooling on the structural evolution of Q-carbon. Finite element heat flow calculations showed that the super-undercooling varies monotonically with the sp 3 content. The phenomenon of solid-liquid interfacial instability during directional solidification from the melt state is studied in detail. The resulting lateral segregation leads to formation of cellular filamentary Q-carbon nanostructures. The dependence of the cell size and wavelength at the onset of instability on the sp 3 content of DLC thin films was modeled based on perturbation theory.

  11. Algebraic models for the hierarchy structure of evolution equations at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rembiesa, P.; Stasto, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    We explore several models of QCD evolution equations simplified by considering only the rapidity dependence of dipole scattering amplitudes, while provisionally neglecting their dependence on transverse coordinates. Our main focus is on the equations that include the processes of pomeron splittings. We examine the algebraic structures of the governing equation hierarchies, as well as the asymptotic behavior of their solutions in the large-rapidity limit

  12. A discrete exterior approach to structure-preserving discretization of distributed-parameter port-Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seslija, Marko; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; van der Schaft, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of structure-preserving discretization of open distributed-parameter systems with Hamiltonian dynamics. Employing the formalism of discrete exterior calculus, we introduce simplicial Dirac structures as discrete analogues of the Stokes-Dirac structure and demonstrate

  13. Evolution of complex dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilds, Roy; Kauffman, Stuart A.; Glass, Leon

    2008-09-01

    We study the evolution of complex dynamics in a model of a genetic regulatory network. The fitness is associated with the topological entropy in a class of piecewise linear equations, and the mutations are associated with changes in the logical structure of the network. We compare hill climbing evolution, in which only mutations that increase the fitness are allowed, with neutral evolution, in which mutations that leave the fitness unchanged are allowed. The simple structure of the fitness landscape enables us to estimate analytically the rates of hill climbing and neutral evolution. In this model, allowing neutral mutations accelerates the rate of evolutionary advancement for low mutation frequencies. These results are applicable to evolution in natural and technological systems.

  14. Interplay between Peptide Bond Geometrical Parameters in Nonglobular Structural Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Esposito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several investigations performed in the last two decades have unveiled that geometrical parameters of protein backbone show a remarkable variability. Although these studies have provided interesting insights into one of the basic aspects of protein structure, they have been conducted on globular and water-soluble proteins. We report here a detailed analysis of backbone geometrical parameters in nonglobular proteins/peptides. We considered membrane proteins and two distinct fibrous systems (amyloid-forming and collagen-like peptides. Present data show that in these systems the local conformation plays a major role in dictating the amplitude of the bond angle N-Cα-C and the propensity of the peptide bond to adopt planar/nonplanar states. Since the trends detected here are in line with the concept of the mutual influence of local geometry and conformation previously established for globular and water-soluble proteins, our analysis demonstrates that the interplay of backbone geometrical parameters is an intrinsic and general property of protein/peptide structures that is preserved also in nonglobular contexts. For amyloid-forming peptides significant distortions of the N-Cα-C bond angle, indicative of sterical hidden strain, may occur in correspondence with side chain interdigitation. The correlation between the dihedral angles Δω/ψ in collagen-like models may have interesting implications for triple helix stability.

  15. Interplay between peptide bond geometrical parameters in nonglobular structural contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Luciana; Balasco, Nicole; De Simone, Alfonso; Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Several investigations performed in the last two decades have unveiled that geometrical parameters of protein backbone show a remarkable variability. Although these studies have provided interesting insights into one of the basic aspects of protein structure, they have been conducted on globular and water-soluble proteins. We report here a detailed analysis of backbone geometrical parameters in nonglobular proteins/peptides. We considered membrane proteins and two distinct fibrous systems (amyloid-forming and collagen-like peptides). Present data show that in these systems the local conformation plays a major role in dictating the amplitude of the bond angle N-C(α)-C and the propensity of the peptide bond to adopt planar/nonplanar states. Since the trends detected here are in line with the concept of the mutual influence of local geometry and conformation previously established for globular and water-soluble proteins, our analysis demonstrates that the interplay of backbone geometrical parameters is an intrinsic and general property of protein/peptide structures that is preserved also in nonglobular contexts. For amyloid-forming peptides significant distortions of the N-C(α)-C bond angle, indicative of sterical hidden strain, may occur in correspondence with side chain interdigitation. The correlation between the dihedral angles Δω/ψ in collagen-like models may have interesting implications for triple helix stability.

  16. The evolution and structural design of prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannah, I.W.

    1978-01-01

    The introduction of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel to contain the main gas coolant circuit of nuclear reactors has marked a major step forward. This chapter traces the evolution and development of the PCPV, and lists the principal parameters adopted. Current design and loading standards are discussed in relation to the two main limit states of serviceability and safety. Prestressed concrete pressure vessel analysis has called for very extensive adaptation and expansion of conventional finite element and finite difference methods in order to deal with the elevated temperature of operation, together with extensive concrete testing at temperature and under multi-directional stressing. These new methods and extra data are being adopted in prestressed applications in other fields and may well prove to be of much wider significance than is presently appreciated. (author)

  17. Structural Parameters of Star Clusters: Signal to Noise Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narbutis D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the impact of photometric signal to noise on the accuracy of derived structural parameters of unresolved star clusters using MCMC model fitting techniques. Star cluster images were simulated as a smooth surface brightness distribution following a King profile convolved with a point spread function. The simulation grid was constructed by varying the levels of sky background and adjusting the cluster’s flux to a specified signal to noise. Poisson noise was introduced to a set of cluster images with the same input parameters at each node of the grid. Model fitting was performed using “emcee” algorithm. The presented posterior distributions of the parameters illustrate their uncertainty and degeneracies as a function of signal to noise. By defining the photometric aperture containing 80% of the cluster’s flux, we find that in all realistic sky background level conditions a signal to noise ratio of ~50 is necessary to constrain the cluster’s half-light radius to an accuracy better than ~20%. The presented technique can be applied to synthetic images simulating various observations of extragalactic star clusters.

  18. DFTB Parameters for the Periodic Table: Part 1, Electronic Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Oliveira, Augusto F; Philipsen, Pier; Zhechkov, Lyuben; van Lenthe, Erik; Witek, Henryk A; Heine, Thomas

    2013-09-10

    A parametrization scheme for the electronic part of the density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) method that covers the periodic table is presented. A semiautomatic parametrization scheme has been developed that uses Kohn-Sham energies and band structure curvatures of real and fictitious homoatomic crystal structures as reference data. A confinement potential is used to tighten the Kohn-Sham orbitals, which includes two free parameters that are used to optimize the performance of the method. The method is tested on more than 100 systems and shows excellent overall performance.

  19. Model parameter estimations from residual gravity anomalies due to simple-shaped sources using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Yunus Levent; Balkaya, Çağlayan; Göktürkler, Gökhan; Turan, Seçil

    2016-06-01

    An efficient approach to estimate model parameters from residual gravity data based on differential evolution (DE), a stochastic vector-based metaheuristic algorithm, has been presented. We have showed the applicability and effectiveness of this algorithm on both synthetic and field anomalies. According to our knowledge, this is a first attempt of applying DE for the parameter estimations of residual gravity anomalies due to isolated causative sources embedded in the subsurface. The model parameters dealt with here are the amplitude coefficient (A), the depth and exact origin of causative source (zo and xo, respectively) and the shape factors (q and ƞ). The error energy maps generated for some parameter pairs have successfully revealed the nature of the parameter estimation problem under consideration. Noise-free and noisy synthetic single gravity anomalies have been evaluated with success via DE/best/1/bin, which is a widely used strategy in DE. Additionally some complicated gravity anomalies caused by multiple source bodies have been considered, and the results obtained have showed the efficiency of the algorithm. Then using the strategy applied in synthetic examples some field anomalies observed for various mineral explorations such as a chromite deposit (Camaguey district, Cuba), a manganese deposit (Nagpur, India) and a base metal sulphide deposit (Quebec, Canada) have been considered to estimate the model parameters of the ore bodies. Applications have exhibited that the obtained results such as the depths and shapes of the ore bodies are quite consistent with those published in the literature. Uncertainty in the solutions obtained from DE algorithm has been also investigated by Metropolis-Hastings (M-H) sampling algorithm based on simulated annealing without cooling schedule. Based on the resulting histogram reconstructions of both synthetic and field data examples the algorithm has provided reliable parameter estimations being within the sampling limits of

  20. A simplified method for random vibration analysis of structures with random parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghienne, Martin; Blanzé, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric patches with adapted electrical circuits or viscoelastic dissipative materials are two solutions particularly adapted to reduce vibration of light structures. To accurately design these solutions, it is necessary to describe precisely the dynamical behaviour of the structure. It may quickly become computationally intensive to describe robustly this behaviour for a structure with nonlinear phenomena, such as contact or friction for bolted structures, and uncertain variations of its parameters. The aim of this work is to propose a non-intrusive reduced stochastic method to characterize robustly the vibrational response of a structure with random parameters. Our goal is to characterize the eigenspace of linear systems with dynamic properties considered as random variables. This method is based on a separation of random aspects from deterministic aspects and allows us to estimate the first central moments of each random eigenfrequency with a single deterministic finite elements computation. The method is applied to a frame with several Young's moduli modeled as random variables. This example could be expanded to a bolted structure including piezoelectric devices. The method needs to be enhanced when random eigenvalues are closely spaced. An indicator with no additional computational cost is proposed to characterize the ’’proximity” of two random eigenvalues. (paper)

  1. Anisotropic Elastoplastic Damage Mechanics Method to Predict Fatigue Life of the Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualiang Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New damage mechanics method is proposed to predict the low-cycle fatigue life of metallic structures under multiaxial loading. The microstructure mechanical model is proposed to simulate anisotropic elastoplastic damage evolution. As the micromodel depends on few material parameters, the present method is very concise and suitable for engineering application. The material parameters in damage evolution equation are determined by fatigue experimental data of standard specimens. By employing further development on the ANSYS platform, the anisotropic elastoplastic damage mechanics-finite element method is developed. The fatigue crack propagation life of satellite structure is predicted using the present method and the computational results comply with the experimental data very well.

  2. Effects of temperature and electric field on order parameters in ferroelectric hexagonal manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. X.; Yang, K. L.; Jia, P.; Lin, H. L.; Li, C. F.; Lin, L.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2018-03-01

    In Landau-Devonshire phase transition theory, the order parameter represents a unique property for a disorder-order transition at the critical temperature. Nevertheless, for a phase transition with more than one order parameter, such behaviors can be quite different and system-dependent in many cases. In this work, we investigate the temperature (T) and electric field (E) dependence of the two order parameters in improper ferroelectric hexagonal manganites, addressing the phase transition from the high-symmetry P63/mmc structure to the polar P63cm structure. It is revealed that the trimerization as the primary order parameter with two components: the trimerization amplitude Q and phase Φ, and the spontaneous polarization P emerging as the secondary order parameter exhibit quite different stability behaviors against various T and E. The critical exponents for the two parameters Q and P are 1/2 and 3/2, respectively. As temperature increases, the window for the electric field E enduring the trimerization state will shrink. An electric field will break the Z2 part of the Z2×Z3 symmetry. The present work may shed light on the complexity of the vortex-antivortex domain structure evolution near the phase transition temperature.

  3. Discrete exterior geometry approach to structure-preserving discretization of distributed-parameter port-Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seslija, Marko; van der Schaft, Arjan; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.

    This paper addresses the issue of structure-preserving discretization of open distributed-parameter systems with Hamiltonian dynamics. Employing the formalism of discrete exterior calculus, we introduce a simplicial Dirac structure as a discrete analogue of the Stokes-Dirac structure and demonstrate

  4. Evolution of chemical-physical parameters and rheological characteristics of Sarda and Maltese goat dry hams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Mazzette

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In Sardinia, goat farming is a very important resource. Sarda and Maltese breed are reared mainly for milk production and for suckling kids meat, while meat from adult goats is undervalued. The use of adult goat meat to obtain ripened ham will contribute to safeguard the Sardinian goat supply chain. The aim of the present study was to characterize Sarda and Maltese goat dry ham in order to evaluate the quality of autochthonous goat breed meat. Chemical-physical characteristics were determined dur-ing the production stages, while the rheological and colour parameters and the composition of the goat ham were determined at the end of ripening. The pH evolution during processing were similar to other cured meat products, e.g. sheep hams, even though the values were high, especially in the products from Sarda breed. The aw value regularly decreased during processing. Colour parameters (L*, a*, b* in the hams from Maltese goat breed were significantly (P<0.05 higher than in those from Sarda. The Sarda goat ham showed a significantly lower percentage of moisture (42% vs 52%, an higher protein content (44.35% vs 34.19%, while no differences were pointed out in the total fat content. Among the ham rheological properties, hardness parameters showed higher levels (13850.22±7589.92 vs 11073.99±6481.31, respectively in Sarda and Maltese hams in comparison to similar products from pork and sheep, while adhesiveness value was lower. The results show that the quality parameters of goat ripened hams are affected mainly by the charac-teristics of the goat meat, in relation on the breed and the breeding system, and, less, by the traditional technology.

  5. The impact of structural error on parameter constraint in a climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeall, Doug; Williams, Jonny; Booth, Ben; Betts, Richard; Challenor, Peter; Wiltshire, Andy; Sexton, David

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty in the simulation of the carbon cycle contributes significantly to uncertainty in the projections of future climate change. We use observations of forest fraction to constrain carbon cycle and land surface input parameters of the global climate model FAMOUS, in the presence of an uncertain structural error. Using an ensemble of climate model runs to build a computationally cheap statistical proxy (emulator) of the climate model, we use history matching to rule out input parameter settings where the corresponding climate model output is judged sufficiently different from observations, even allowing for uncertainty. Regions of parameter space where FAMOUS best simulates the Amazon forest fraction are incompatible with the regions where FAMOUS best simulates other forests, indicating a structural error in the model. We use the emulator to simulate the forest fraction at the best set of parameters implied by matching the model to the Amazon, Central African, South East Asian, and North American forests in turn. We can find parameters that lead to a realistic forest fraction in the Amazon, but that using the Amazon alone to tune the simulator would result in a significant overestimate of forest fraction in the other forests. Conversely, using the other forests to tune the simulator leads to a larger underestimate of the Amazon forest fraction. We use sensitivity analysis to find the parameters which have the most impact on simulator output and perform a history-matching exercise using credible estimates for simulator discrepancy and observational uncertainty terms. We are unable to constrain the parameters individually, but we rule out just under half of joint parameter space as being incompatible with forest observations. We discuss the possible sources of the discrepancy in the simulated Amazon, including missing processes in the land surface component and a bias in the climatology of the Amazon.

  6. Effect of textiles structural parameters on surgical healing; a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwa, A. Ali

    2017-10-01

    Medical Textiles is one of the most rapidly expanding sectors in the technical textile market. The huge growth of medical textiles applications was over the last 12 years. “Biomedical Textiles” is a subcategory of medical textiles that narrows the field down to those applications that are intended for active tissue contact, tissue regeneration or surgical implantation. Since the mid-1960s, the current wave of usage is coming as a result of new fibers and new technologies for textile materials construction. “Biotextiles” term include structures composed of textile fibers designed for use in specific biological environments. Medical Textile field was utilizing different materials, textile techniques and structures to provide new medical products with high functionality in the markets. There are other processes that are associated with textiles in terms of the various treatments and finishing. The aim of this article is to draw attention to the medical field in each of Vitro and Vivo trend, and its relation with textile structural parameters, with regard to the fiber material, production techniques, and fabric structures. Also, it is focusing on some cases studies which were applied in our research which produced with different textile parameters. Finally; an overview is presented about modern and innovative applications of the medical textiles.

  7. Structural Evolution of central part of the Tuzgolu (Salt Lake) Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ada, M.; Cemen, I.; Çaptuğ, A.; Demirci, M.; Engin, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Tuzgolu Basin in Central Anatolia, Turkey, covers low-relief areas located between the Pontide Mountains to the North and Tauride Mountains to the South. The basin started to form as a rift basin during the Late Maastrichtian. The main Tuzgolu-Aksaray fault zone on the eastern margin of the basin and the northwest trending Yeniceoba and Cihanbeyli fault zones on the western margin of the basin were probably developed during that time. The basin has also experienced westward extension in response to westward escape of the Anatolian plate since Late Miocene. Several geologic studies have been conducted in the Tuz Gölü (Salt Lake) Basin and surrounding areas to determine structural and tectono-stratigraphic development of the basin. However, there are still many questions regarding the structural evolution of the basin. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the structural evolution of the central Tuzgolu Basin based on the structural interpretation of available 2-D seismic reflection profiles, well log analysis and construction of structural cross sections. The cross-sections will be based on depth converted seismic lines to determine structural geometry of the faults and folds. A preliminary Petrel project has been prepared using available seismic profiles. Our preliminary structural interpretations suggest that a well-developed rollover anticline was developed with respect to the westward extension in Central Anatolia. The rollover anticline is faulted in its crest area by both down-to-the west and down-to-the east normal faults. The geometry of the main boundary fault at depth still remains in question. We anticipate that this question will be resolved based on depth converted structural cross-sections and their restoration.

  8. Strategy evolution driven by switching probabilities in structured multi-agent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianlei; Chen, Zengqiang; Li, Zhiqi

    2017-10-01

    Evolutionary mechanism driving the commonly seen cooperation among unrelated individuals is puzzling. Related models for evolutionary games on graphs traditionally assume that players imitate their successful neighbours with higher benefits. Notably, an implicit assumption here is that players are always able to acquire the required pay-off information. To relax this restrictive assumption, a contact-based model has been proposed, where switching probabilities between strategies drive the strategy evolution. However, the explicit and quantified relation between a player's switching probability for her strategies and the number of her neighbours remains unknown. This is especially a key point in heterogeneously structured system, where players may differ in the numbers of their neighbours. Focusing on this, here we present an augmented model by introducing an attenuation coefficient and evaluate its influence on the evolution dynamics. Results show that the individual influence on others is negatively correlated with the contact numbers specified by the network topologies. Results further provide the conditions under which the coexisting strategies can be calculated analytically.

  9. Statistical evaluation of low cycle loading curves parameters for structural materials by mechanical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daunys, Mykolas; Sniuolis, Raimondas

    2006-01-01

    About 300 welded joint materials that are used in nuclear power energy were tested under monotonous tension and low cycle loading in Kaunas University of Technology together with St. Peterburg Central Research Institute of Structural Materials in 1970-2000. The main mechanical, low cycle loading and fracture characteristics of base metals, weld metals and some heat-affected zones of welded joints metals were determined during these experiments. Analytical dependences of low cycle fatigue parameters on mechanical characteristics of structural materials were proposed on the basis of a large number of experimental data, obtained by the same methods and testing equipment. When these dependences are used, expensive low cycle fatigue tests may be omitted and it is possible to compute low cycle loading curves parameters and lifetime for structural materials according to the main mechanical characteristics given in technical manuals. Dependences of low cycle loading curves parameters on mechanical characteristics for several groups of structural materials used in Russian nuclear power energy are obtained by statistical methods and proposed in this paper

  10. Force-chain evolution in a two-dimensional granular packing compacted by vertical tappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iikawa, Naoki; Bandi, M. M.; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2018-03-01

    We experimentally study the statistics of force-chain evolution in a vertically-tapped two-dimensional granular packing by using photoelastic disks. In this experiment, the tapped granular packing is gradually compacted. During the compaction, the isotropy of grain configurations is quantified by measuring the deviator anisotropy derived from fabric tensor, and then the evolution of force-chain structure is quantified by measuring the interparticle forces and force-chain orientational order parameter. As packing fraction increases, the interparticle force increases and finally saturates to an asymptotic value. Moreover, the grain configurations and force-chain structures become isotropically random as the tapping-induced compaction proceeds. In contrast, the total length of force chains remains unchanged. From the correlations of those parameters, we find two relations: (i) a positive correlation between the isotropy of grain configurations and the disordering of force-chain orientations, and (ii) a negative correlation between the increasing of interparticle forces and the disordering of force-chain orientations. These relations are universally held regardless of the mode of particle motions with or without convection.

  11. A quantitative analysis of the diurnal evolution of Ionospheric Alfvén resonator magnetic resonance features and calculation of changing IAR parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Hebden

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Resonance features of the Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator (IAR can be observed in pulsation magnetometer data from Sodankylä, Finland using dynamic spectra visualizations. IAR resonance features were identified on 13 of 30 days in October 1998, with resonance structures lasting for 3 or more hours over 10 intervals. The diurnal evolution of the harmonic features was quantified for these 10 intervals using a manual cursor-clicking technique. The resonance features displayed strong linear relationships between harmonic frequency and harmonic number for all of the time intervals studied, enabling a homogeneous cavity model for the IAR to be adopted to interpret the data. This enabled the diurnal variation of the effective size of the IAR to be obtained for each of the 10 time intervals. The average effective size was found to be 530 km, and to have an average variation of 32% over each time interval: small compared to the average variation in Alfvén velocity of 61%. Thus the diurnal variation of the harmonics is chiefly caused by the changing plasma density within the IAR due to changing insolation. This study confirms Odzimek (2004 that the dominating factor affecting the IAR eigenfrequencies is the variation in the Alfvén velocity at the F-layer ion-density peak, with the changing IAR size affecting the IAR eigenfrequencies to a smaller extent. Another IAR parameter was derived from the analysis of the IAR resonance features associated with the phase matching structure of the standing waves in the IAR. This parameter varied over the time intervals studied by 20% on average, possibly due to changing ionospheric conductivity. Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere;Wave propagation – Radio science (Electromagnetic noise and interference

  12. Topology Synthesis of Structures Using Parameter Relaxation and Geometric Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.

    2007-01-01

    Typically, structural topology optimization problems undergo relaxation of certain design parameters to allow the existence of intermediate variable optimum topologies. Relaxation permits the use of a variety of gradient-based search techniques and has been shown to guarantee the existence of optimal solutions and eliminate mesh dependencies. This Technical Publication (TP) will demonstrate the application of relaxation to a control point discretization of the design workspace for the structural topology optimization process. The control point parameterization with subdivision has been offered as an alternative to the traditional method of discretized finite element design domain. The principle of relaxation demonstrates the increased utility of the control point parameterization. One of the significant results of the relaxation process offered in this TP is that direct manufacturability of the optimized design will be maintained without the need for designer intervention or translation. In addition, it will be shown that relaxation of certain parameters may extend the range of problems that can be addressed; e.g., in permitting limited out-of-plane motion to be included in a path generation problem.

  13. Hyperfine electric parameters calculation in Si samples implanted with {sup 57}Mn→{sup 57}Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Y., E-mail: yabreu@ceaden.edu.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), Calle 30 No. 502 e/5ta y 7ma Ave., 11300 Miramar, Playa, La Habana (Cuba); Cruz, C.M.; Piñera, I.; Leyva, A.; Cabal, A.E. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), Calle 30 No. 502 e/5ta y 7ma Ave., 11300 Miramar, Playa, La Habana (Cuba); Van Espen, P. [Departement Chemie, Universiteit Antwerpen, Middelheimcampus, G.V.130, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Van Remortel, N. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Middelheimcampus, G.U.236, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Nowadays the electronic structure calculations allow the study of complex systems determining the hyperfine parameters measured at a probe atom, including the presence of crystalline defects. The hyperfine electric parameters have been measured by Mössbauer spectroscopy in silicon materials implanted with {sup 57}Mn→{sup 57}Fe ions, observing four main contributions to the spectra. Nevertheless, some ambiguities still remain in the {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra interpretation in this case, regarding the damage configurations and its evolution with annealing. In the present work several implantation environments are evaluated and the {sup 57}Fe hyperfine parameters are calculated. The observed correlation among the studied local environments and the experimental observations is presented, and a tentative microscopic description of the behavior and thermal evolution of the characteristic defects local environments of the probe atoms concerning the location of vacancies and interstitial Si in the neighborhood of {sup 57}Fe ions in substitutional and interstitial sites is proposed.

  14. Specification of indoor climate design parameters at the assessment of moisture protective properties of enclosing structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornienko Sergey Valer’evich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to wide implementation of enveloping structures with increased heat-insulation properties in modern construction here appeared a necessity to assess their moisture conditions. Assessment of moisture conditions of enveloping structures is carried out according to maximum allowable moisture state basing on determining the surface of maximum damping. In relation to it the necessity of additional vapour barrier is checked using moisture balance equation. Though the change of indoor climate parameters in premises is not taken into account in moisture balance equations defined for different seasons. The author improves the method of calculating moisture protective parameters of enclosing structures according to the maximum allowable damping state for a year and a period of moisture accumulation. It is shown in this article that accounting of temperature and relative humidity change of inside air allows specifying calculated parameters of indoor climate in residential and office rooms in assessment of moisture protective properties of enclosing structures for the case of an effective enclosing structure with a façade heat-insulation composite system. Coordinates of the maximum moistened surface of the envelope depends on indoor climate design parameters. It is concluded that the increase of requirements for moisture protection of enclosing structures when using design values of temperature and relative humidity of internal air according to the Russian regulation (SP 50.13330.2012 is not always reasonable. Accounting of changes of indoor climate parameters allows more precise assessment of moisture protective properties of enclosing structures during their design.

  15. Recapitulating the Structural Evolution of Redox Regulation in Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Kinase from Cyanobacteria to Plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Nathin, David; Lee, Soon Goo; Sun, Tony; Jez, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) kinase (APSK) is required for reproductive viability and the production of 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as a sulfur donor in specialized metabolism. Previous studies of the APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAPSK) identified a regulatory disulfide bond formed between the N-terminal domain (NTD) and a cysteine on the core scaffold. This thiol switch is unique to mosses, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. To understand the structural evolution of redox control of APSK, we investigated the redox-insensitive APSK from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SynAPSK). Crystallographic analysis of SynAPSK in complex with either APS and a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog or APS and sulfate revealed the overall structure of the enzyme, which lacks the NTD found in homologs from mosses and plants. A series of engineered SynAPSK variants reconstructed the structural evolution of the plant APSK. Biochemical analyses of SynAPSK, SynAPSK H23C mutant, SynAPSK fused to the AtAPSK NTD, and the fusion protein with the H23C mutation showed that the addition of the NTD and cysteines recapitulated thiol-based regulation. These results reveal the molecular basis for structural changes leading to the evolution of redox control of APSK in the green lineage from cyanobacteria to plants. PMID:26294763

  16. Analysis of Parameters Assessment on Laminated Rubber-Metal Spring for Structural Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, M.A.; Putra, A.; Mansor, M.R.; Musthafah, M.T.; Akop, M.Z.; Abdullah, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of parameter assessment on laminated rubber-metal spring (LR-MS) for vibrating structure. Three parameters were selected for the assessment which are mass, Young's modulus and radius. Natural rubber materials has been used to develop the LR-MS model. Three analyses were later conducted based on the selected parameters to the LR-MS performance which are natural frequency, location of the internal resonance frequency and transmissibility of internal resonance. Results of the analysis performed were plotted in frequency domain function graph. Transmissibility of laminated rubber-metal spring (LR-MS) is changed by changing the value of the parameter. This occurrence was referred to the theory from open literature then final conclusion has been make which are these parameters have a potential to give an effects and trends for LR-MS transmissibility. (paper)

  17. A Novel Coupled State/Input/Parameter Identification Method for Linear Structural Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Wan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In many engineering applications, unknown states, inputs, and parameters exist in the structures. However, most methods require one or two of these variables to be known in order to identify the other(s. Recently, the authors have proposed a method called EGDF for coupled state/input/parameter identification for nonlinear system in state space. However, the EGDF method based solely on acceleration measurements is found to be unstable, which can cause the drift of the identified inputs and displacements. Although some regularization methods can be adopted for solving the problem, they are not suitable for joint input-state identification in real time. In this paper, a strategy of data fusion of displacement and acceleration measurements is used to avoid the low-frequency drift in the identified inputs and structural displacements for linear structural systems. Two numerical examples about a plane truss and a single-stage isolation system are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed modified EGDF algorithm.

  18. Recent Advances on the Understanding of Structural and Composition Evolution of LMR Cathodes for Li-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pengfei [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Chong-Min, E-mail: chongmin.wang@pnnl.gov [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Ji-Guang, E-mail: chongmin.wang@pnnl.gov [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Lithium-and-manganese-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as very promising for lithium (Li)-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several barriers such as their limited electrochemical stability and rate capability. In this work, we present recent progress on the understanding of structural and compositional evolution of LMR cathode materials, with an emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and electrochemical properties. In particular, using Li[Li{sub 0.2}Ni{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 0.6}]O{sub 2} as a typical example, we clearly illustrate the structural characteristics of pristine materials and their dependence on the material-processing history, cycling-induced structural degradation/chemical partition, and their correlation with electrochemical performance degradation. The fundamental understanding that resulted from this work may also guide the design and preparation of new cathode materials based on the ternary system of transitional metal oxides.

  19. Line-feature-based calibration method of structured light plane parameters for robot hand-eye system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuhan; Jing, Fengshui; Tan, Min

    2013-03-01

    For monocular-structured light vision measurement, it is essential to calibrate the structured light plane parameters in addition to the camera intrinsic parameters. A line-feature-based calibration method of structured light plane parameters for a robot hand-eye system is proposed. Structured light stripes are selected as calibrating primitive elements, and the robot moves from one calibrating position to another with constraint in order that two misaligned stripe lines are generated. The images of stripe lines could then be captured by the camera fixed at the robot's end link. During calibration, the equations of two stripe lines in the camera coordinate system are calculated, and then the structured light plane could be determined. As the robot's motion may affect the effectiveness of calibration, so the robot's motion constraints are analyzed. A calibration experiment and two vision measurement experiments are implemented, and the results reveal that the calibration accuracy can meet the precision requirement of robot thick plate welding. Finally, analysis and discussion are provided to illustrate that the method has a high efficiency fit for industrial in-situ calibration.

  20. Optimal evolution models for quantum tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this article concerns the stroboscopic approach to quantum tomography, which is an area of science where quantum physics and linear algebra overlap. In this article we introduce the algebraic structure of the parametric-dependent quantum channels for 2-level and 3-level systems such that the generator of evolution corresponding with the Kraus operators has no degenerate eigenvalues. In such cases the index of cyclicity of the generator is equal to 1, which physically means that there exists one observable the measurement of which performed a sufficient number of times at distinct instants provides enough data to reconstruct the initial density matrix and, consequently, the trajectory of the state. The necessary conditions for the parameters and relations between them are introduced. The results presented in this paper seem to have considerable potential applications in experiments due to the fact that one can perform quantum tomography by conducting only one kind of measurement. Therefore, the analyzed evolution models can be considered optimal in the context of quantum tomography. Finally, we introduce some remarks concerning optimal evolution models in the case of n-dimensional Hilbert space. (paper)

  1. High performance EUV multilayer structures insensitive to capping layer optical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, Maria Guglielmina; Suman, Michele; Monaco, Gianni; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Windt, David L

    2008-09-15

    We have designed and tested a-periodic multilayer structures containing protective capping layers in order to obtain improved stability with respect to any possible changes of the capping layer optical properties (due to oxidation and contamination, for example)-while simultaneously maximizing the EUV reflection efficiency for specific applications, and in particular for EUV lithography. Such coatings may be particularly useful in EUV lithographic apparatus, because they provide both high integrated photon flux and higher stability to the harsh operating environment, which can affect seriously the performance of the multilayer-coated projector system optics. In this work, an evolutive algorithm has been developed in order to design these a-periodic structures, which have been proven to have also the property of stable performance with respect to random layer thickness errors that might occur during coating deposition. Prototypes have been fabricated, and tested with EUV and X-ray reflectometry, and secondary electron spectroscopy. The experimental results clearly show improved performance of our new a-periodic coatings design compared with standard periodic multilayer structures.

  2. MnFe(PGe) compounds: Preparation, structural evolution, and magnetocaloric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ming; Zhang Hong-Guo; Zhang Jiu-Xing; Liu Dan-Min

    2015-01-01

    The interdependences of preparation conditions, magnetic and crystal structures, and magnetocaloric effects (MCE) of the MnFePGe-based compounds are reviewed. Based upon those findings, a new method for the evaluation of the MCE in these compounds, based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), is proposed. The MnFePGe-based compounds are a group of magnetic refrigerants with giant magnetocaloric effect (GMCE), and as such, have drawn tremendous attention, especially due to their many advantages for practical applications. Structural evolution and phase transformation in the compounds as functions of temperature, pressure, and magnetic field are reported. Influences of preparation conditions upon the homogeneity of the compounds’ chemical composition and microstructure, both of which play a key role in the MCE and thermal hysteresis of the compounds, are introduced. Lastly, the origin of the “virgin effect” in the MnFePGe-based compounds is discussed. (paper)

  3. High-speed infrared thermography for the measurement of microscopic boiling parameters on micro- and nano-structured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Youngjae; Kim, Hyungdae; Kim, Hyungmo; Kim, Joonwon

    2014-01-01

    Micro- and nano-scale structures on boiling surfaces can enhance nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and critical heat flux (CHF). A few studies were conducted to explain the enhancements of HTC and CHF using the microscopic boiling parameters. Quantitative measurements of microscopic boiling parameters are needed to understand the physical mechanism of the boiling heat transfer augmentation on structured surfaces. However, there is no existing experimental techniques to conveniently measure the boiling parameters on the structured surfaces because of the small (structured surfaces. The visualization results are analyzed to obtain the microscopic boiling parameters. Finally, quantitative microscopic boiling parameters are used to interpret the enhancement of HTC and CHF. In this study, liquid-vapor phase distributions of each surface were clearly visualized by IR thermography during the nucleate boiling phenomena. From the visualization results, following microscopic boiling parameters were quantitatively measured by image processing. - Number density of dry patch, NDP IR thermography technique was demonstrated by nucleate pool boiling experiments with M- and N surfaces. The enhancement of HTC and CHF could be explained by microscopic boiling parameters

  4. Effect of varying geometrical parameters of trapezoidal corrugated-core sandwich structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid N.Z.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich structure is an attractive alternative that increasingly used in the transportation and aerospace industry. Corrugated-core with trapezoidal shape allows enhancing the damage resistance to the sandwich structure, but on the other hand, it changes the structural response of the sandwich structure. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of varying geometrical parameters of trapezoidal corrugated-core sandwich structure under compression loading. The corrugated-core specimen was fabricated using press technique, following the shape of trapezoidal shape. Two different materials were used in the study, glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP. The result shows that the mechanical properties of the core in compression loading are sensitive to the variation of a number of unit cells and the core thickness.

  5. Influence of choice of null network on small-world parameters of structural correlation networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Hadi Hosseini

    Full Text Available In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1 networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP, 2 networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS, and 3 networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR. The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures.

  6. Influence of Choice of Null Network on Small-World Parameters of Structural Correlation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. M. Hadi; Kesler, Shelli R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness) have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1) networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP), 2) networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS), and 3) networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR). The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures. PMID:23840672

  7. Microarchitecture Parameters Describe Bone Structure and Its Strength Better Than BMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Topoliński

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Hypothesis. Some papers have shown that bone mineral density (BMD may not be accurate in predicting fracture risk. Recently microarchitecture parameters have been reported to give information on bone characteristics. The aim of this study was to find out if the values of volume, fractal dimension, and bone mineral density are correlated with bone strength. Methods. Forty-two human bone samples harvested during total hip replacement surgery were cut to cylindrical samples. The geometrical mesh of layers of bone mass obtained from microCT investigation and the volumes of each layer and fractal dimension were calculated. The finite element method was applied to calculate the compression force F causing ε=0.8% strain. Results. There were stronger correlations for microarchitecture parameters with strength than those for bone mineral density. The values of determination coefficient R2 for mean volume and force were 0.88 and 0.90 for mean fractal dimension and force, while for BMD and force the value was 0.53. The samples with bigger mean bone volume of layers and bigger mean fractal dimension of layers (more complex structure presented higher strength. Conclusion. The volumetric and fractal dimension parameters better describe bone structure and strength than BMD.

  8. Safe structural food bolus in elderly: the relevant parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenberghe-Descamps, Mathilde; Septier, Chantal; Prot, Aurélie; Tournier, Carole; Hennequin, Martine; Vigneau, Evelyne; Feron, Gilles; Labouré, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Mastication is essential to prepare food into a bolus ready to be swallowed safely, with no choking risk. Based on food bolus properties, a masticatory normative indicator was developed by Woda et al. (2010) to identify impaired masticatory function within good oral health population. The aim of the present study was to identify relevant parameters of bolus' structure to differentiate safe to unsafe bolus among elderly contrasting by their dental status.93 elderly, 58% with at least 7 posteri...

  9. Simultaneous determination of aquifer parameters and zone structures with fuzzy c-means clustering and meta-heuristic harmony search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvaz, M. Tamer

    2007-11-01

    This study proposes an inverse solution algorithm through which both the aquifer parameters and the zone structure of these parameters can be determined based on a given set of observations on piezometric heads. In the zone structure identification problem fuzzy c-means ( FCM) clustering method is used. The association of the zone structure with the transmissivity distribution is accomplished through an optimization model. The meta-heuristic harmony search ( HS) algorithm, which is conceptualized using the musical process of searching for a perfect state of harmony, is used as an optimization technique. The optimum parameter zone structure is identified based on three criteria which are the residual error, parameter uncertainty, and structure discrimination. A numerical example given in the literature is solved to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm. Also, a sensitivity analysis is performed to test the performance of the HS algorithm for different sets of solution parameters. Results indicate that the proposed solution algorithm is an effective way in the simultaneous identification of aquifer parameters and their corresponding zone structures.

  10. Model structural uncertainty quantification and hydrologic parameter and prediction error analysis using airborne electromagnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minsley, B. J.; Christensen, Nikolaj Kruse; Christensen, Steen

    Model structure, or the spatial arrangement of subsurface lithological units, is fundamental to the hydrological behavior of Earth systems. Knowledge of geological model structure is critically important in order to make informed hydrological predictions and management decisions. Model structure...... is never perfectly known, however, and incorrect assumptions can be a significant source of error when making model predictions. We describe a systematic approach for quantifying model structural uncertainty that is based on the integration of sparse borehole observations and large-scale airborne...... electromagnetic (AEM) data. Our estimates of model structural uncertainty follow a Bayesian framework that accounts for both the uncertainties in geophysical parameter estimates given AEM data, and the uncertainties in the relationship between lithology and geophysical parameters. Using geostatistical sequential...

  11. Estimating material parameters of a structurally based constitutive relation for skin mechanics

    KAUST Repository

    Jor, Jessica W. Y.

    2010-11-25

    This paper presents a structurally based modeling framework to characterize the structure-function relation in skin tissues, based upon biaxial tensile experiments performed in vitro on porcine skin. Equi-axial deformations were imposed by stretching circular skin specimens uniformly along twelve directions, and the resultant loads at the membrane attachment points were measured. Displacement fields at each deformation step were tracked using an image 2D cross-correlation technique. A modeling framework was developed to simulate the experiments, whereby measured forces were applied to finite element models that were created to represent the geometry and structure of the tissue samples. Parameters of a structurally based constitutive relation were then identified using nonlinear optimization. Results showed that the ground matrix stiffness ranged from 5 to 32 kPa, fiber orientation mean from 2 to 13. from the torso midline, fiber undulation mean from 1.04 to 1.34 and collagen fiber stiffness from 48 to 366 MPa. It was concluded that the objective function was highly sensitive to the mean orientation and that a priori information about fiber orientation mean was important for the reliable identification of constitutive parameters. © Springer-Verlag 2010.

  12. Structural Parameters and Strengthening Mechanisms in Cold-Drawn Pearlitic Steel Wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Godfrey, Andy; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2012-01-01

    Pearlitic steel wires have a nanoscale structure and a strength which can reach 5 GPa. In order to investigate strengthening mechanisms, structural parameters including interlamellar spacing, dislocation density and cementite decomposition, have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy...... and high resolution electron microscopy in wires cold drawn up to a strain of 3.7. Three strengthening mechanisms, namely boundary strengthening, dislocation strengthening and solid solution hardening have been analyzed and good agreement has been found between the measured flow stress and the value...

  13. Critical zone evolution and the origins of organised complexity in watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, C.; Troch, P. A.; Pelletier, J.; Rasmussen, C.; Chorover, J.

    2012-04-01

    The capacity of the landscape to store and transmit water is the result of a historical trajectory of landscape, soil and vegetation development, much of which is driven by hydrology itself. Progress in geomorphology and pedology has produced models of surface and sub-surface evolution in soil-mantled uplands. These dissected, denuding modeled landscapes are emblematic of the kinds of dissipative self-organized flow structures whose hydrologic organization may also be understood by low-dimensional hydrologic models. They offer an exciting starting-point for examining the mapping between the long-term controls on landscape evolution and the high-frequency hydrologic dynamics. Here we build on recent theoretical developments in geomorphology and pedology to try to understand how the relative rates of erosion, sediment transport and soil development in a landscape determine catchment storage capacity and the relative dominance of runoff process, flow pathways and storage-discharge relationships. We do so by using a combination of landscape evolution models, hydrologic process models and data from a variety of sources, including the University of Arizona Critical Zone Observatory. A challenge to linking the landscape evolution and hydrologic model representations is the vast differences in the timescales implicit in the process representations. Furthermore the vast array of processes involved makes parameterization of such models an enormous challenge. The best data-constrained geomorphic transport and soil development laws only represent hydrologic processes implicitly, through the transport and weathering rate parameters. In this work we propose to avoid this problem by identifying the relationship between the landscape and soil evolution parameters and macroscopic climate and geological controls. These macroscopic controls (such as the aridity index) have two roles: 1) they express the water and energy constraints on the long-term evolution of the landscape system

  14. Animal evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes it possi......This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes...

  15. Evolution algebras generated by Gibbs measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozikov, Utkir A.; Tian, Jianjun Paul

    2009-03-01

    In this article we study algebraic structures of function spaces defined by graphs and state spaces equipped with Gibbs measures by associating evolution algebras. We give a constructive description of associating evolution algebras to the function spaces (cell spaces) defined by graphs and state spaces and Gibbs measure μ. For finite graphs we find some evolution subalgebras and other useful properties of the algebras. We obtain a structure theorem for evolution algebras when graphs are finite and connected. We prove that for a fixed finite graph, the function spaces have a unique algebraic structure since all evolution algebras are isomorphic to each other for whichever Gibbs measures are assigned. When graphs are infinite graphs then our construction allows a natural introduction of thermodynamics in studying of several systems of biology, physics and mathematics by theory of evolution algebras. (author)

  16. Airborne-Measured Spatially-Averaged Temperature and Moisture Turbulent Structure Parameters Over a Heterogeneous Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platis, Andreas; Martinez, Daniel; Bange, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent structure parameters of temperature and humidity can be derived from scintillometer measurements along horizontal paths of several 100 m to several 10 km. These parameters can be very useful to estimate the vertical turbulent heat fluxes at the surface (applying MOST). However, there are many assumptions required by this method which can be checked using in situ data, e.g. 1) Were CT2 and CQ2 correctly derived from the initial CN2 scintillometer data (structure parameter of density fluctuations or refraction index, respectively)? 2) What is the influence of the surround hetereogeneous surface regarding its footprint and the weighted averaging effect of the scintillometer method 3) Does MOST provide the correct turbulent fluxes from scintillometer data. To check these issues, in situ data from low-level flight measurements are well suited, since research aircraft cover horizontal distances in very short time (Taylor's hypothesis of a frozen turbulence structure can be applyed very likely). From airborne-measured time series the spatial series are calculated and then their structure functions that finally provide the structure parameters. The influence of the heterogeneous surface can be controlled by the definition of certain moving-average window sizes. A very useful instrument for this task are UAVs since they can fly very low and maintain altitude very precisely. However, the data base of such unmanned operations is still quite thin. So in this contribution we want to present turbulence data obtained with the Helipod, a turbulence probe hanging below a manned helicopter. The structure parameters of temperature and moisture, CT2 and CQ2, in the lower convective boundary layer were derived from data measured using the Helipod in 2003. The measurements were carried out during the LITFASS03 campaign over a heterogeneous land surface around the boundary-layer field site of the Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory-Richard-Aßmann-Observatory (MOL) of the

  17. Temperature dependent evolution of the local electronic structure of atmospheric plasma treated carbon nanotubes: Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S. S.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; Murphy, H.

    2006-01-01

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the temperature dependent evolution of the electronic structure of acid treated carbon nanotubes, which were further modified by dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing in an ammonia atmosphere. The NEXAFS studies were performed from room temperature up to 900 deg. C. The presence of oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups was observed in C K edge, N K edge, and O K edge NEXAFS spectra of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The N K edge spectra revealed three types of π* features, the source of which was decisively identified by their temperature dependent evolution. It was established that these features are attributed to pyridinelike, NO, and graphitelike structures, respectively. The O K edge indicated that both carbonyl (C=O), π*(CO), and ether C-O-C, σ*(CO), functionalities were present. Upon heating in a vacuum to 900 deg. C the π*(CO) resonances disappeared while the σ*(CO) resonances were still present confirming their higher thermal stability. Heating did not produce a significant change in the π* feature of the C K edge spectrum indicating that the tabular structure of the nanotubes is essentially preserved following the thermal decomposition of the functional groups on the nanotube surface

  18. Some applications of nonlinear diffusion to processing of dynamic evolution images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltsov, Alexey N.; Nikishov, Sergey A.

    1997-01-01

    Model nonlinear diffusion equation with the most simple Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional was applied to locate boundaries between meaningful regions of low-level images. The method is oriented to processing images of objects that are a result of dynamic evolution: images of different organs and tissues obtained by radiography and NMR methods, electron microscope images of morphogenesis fields, etc. In the methods developed by us, parameters of the nonlinear diffusion model are chosen on the basis of the preliminary treatment of the images. The parameters of the Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional are extracted from the structure factor of the images. Owing to such a choice of the model parameters, the image to be processed is located in the vicinity of the steady-state of the diffusion equation. The suggested method allows one to separate distinct structures having specific space characteristics from the whole image. The method was applied to processing X-ray images of the lung

  19. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability

  20. Cloud structure evolution of heavy rain events from the East-West Pacific Ocean: a combined global observation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekaranom, A. B.; Nurjani, E.; Pujiastuti, I.

    2018-04-01

    Heavy rain events are often associated with flood hazards as one of the most devastating events across the globe. It is therefore essential to identify the evolution of heavy rainfall cloud structures, primarily from global satellite observation, as a tool to provide better disaster early warning systems. To identify the mechanism of heavy rainfall systems and its relationship with cloud development, especially over The Pacific Ocean, we aim to study the westward evolution of the convective systems over this area. Several datasets from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), CloudSat GEOPROF product, and ECMWF-reanalysis (ERA) interim were utilized to characterize the evolution. Geolocation and orbital time-lag analysis of the three different datasets for more than 8 years (2006-2014) could provide information related to the evolution of cloud structures associated with heavy rain events. In the first step, a heavy rainfall database was generated from TRMM. The CloudSat coordinate and time position were then matched with TRMM coordinate and time position. All of the processes were programatically conducted in fortran programming language. The result shows a transition between East and West Pacific ocean for TMI data.

  1. Challenges in parameter identification of large structural dynamic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    In theory, it is possible to determine the parameters of a structural or mechanical system by subjecting it to some dynamic excitation and measuring the response. Considerable research has been carried out in this subject area known as the system identification over the past two decades. Nevertheless, the challenges associated with numerical convergence are still formidable when the system is large in terms of the number of degrees of freedom and number of unknowns. While many methods work for small systems, the convergence becomes difficult, if not impossible, for large systems. In this keynote lecture, both classical and non-classical system identification methods for dynamic testing and vibration-based inspection are discussed. For classical methods, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) approach is used. On this basis, a substructural identification method has been developed as a strategy to deal with large structural systems. This is achieved by reducing the problem size, thereby significantly improving the numerical convergence and efficiency. Two versions of this method are presented each with its own merits. A numerical example of frame structure with 20 unknown parameters is illustrated. For non-classical methods, the Genetic Algorithm (GA) is shown to be applicable with relative ease due to its 'forward analysis' nature. The computational time is, however, still enormous for large structural systems due to the combinatorial explosion problem. A model GA method has been developed to address this problem and tested with considerable success on a relatively large system of 50 degrees of freedom, accounting for input and output noise effects. An advantages of this GA-based identification method is that the objective function can be defined in response measured. Numerical studies show that the method is relatively robust, as it does in response measured. Numerical studies show that the method is relatively robust, as it dos not require good initial guess and the

  2. Cepheid evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.A.

    1984-05-01

    A review of the phases of stellar evolution relevant to Cepheid variables of both Types I and II is presented. Type I Cepheids arise as a result of normal post-main sequence evolutionary behavior of many stars in the intermediate to massive range of stellar masses. In contrast, Type II Cepheids generally originate from low-mass stars of low metalicity which are undergoing post core helium-burning evolution. Despite great progress in the past two decades, uncertainties still remain in such areas as how to best model convective overshoot, semiconvection, stellar atmospheres, rotation, and binary evolution as well as uncertainties in important physical parameters such as the nuclear reaction rates, opacity, and mass loss rates. The potential effect of these uncertainties on stellar evolution models is discussed. Finally, comparisons between theoretical predictions and observations of Cepheid variables are presented for a number of cases. The results of these comparisons show both areas of agreement and disagreement with the latter result providing incentive for further research

  3. Composition influence on positron annihilation parameters in ZnO-based nanocrystal semiconductor powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damonte, L.C.; Hernandez Fenollosa, M.A.; Donderis, V.; Mari, B. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Cami de Vera s/n, Valencia, 46071 (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O powders at various compositions were obtained by mechanical milling from the binary oxides. The progressive incorporation of Mg atoms into the ZnO lattice was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The evolution of annihilation parameters with milling time and composition were analyzed and related to the possible types of mechanical and substitutional induced defect present. It was concluded that the average lifetime constitute a useful parameter to sense the complete cation substitution in the wurtzite structure. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Composition influence on positron annihilation parameters in ZnO-based nanocrystal semiconductor powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damonte, L.C.; Hernandez Fenollosa, M.A.; Donderis, V.; Mari, B.

    2007-01-01

    Zn 1-x Mg x O powders at various compositions were obtained by mechanical milling from the binary oxides. The progressive incorporation of Mg atoms into the ZnO lattice was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The evolution of annihilation parameters with milling time and composition were analyzed and related to the possible types of mechanical and substitutional induced defect present. It was concluded that the average lifetime constitute a useful parameter to sense the complete cation substitution in the wurtzite structure. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Directed evolution of the periodic table: probing the electronic structure of late actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, M L; Albrecht-Schmitt, T E

    2017-07-25

    Recent investigations of the coordination chemistry and physical properties of berkelium (Z = 97) and californium (Z = 98) have revealed fundamental differences between post-curium elements and lighter members of the actinide series. This review highlights these developments and chronicles key findings and concepts from the last half-century that have helped usher in a new understanding of the evolution of electronic structure in the periodic table.

  6. Spin Glass Models of Syntax and Language Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Siva, Karthik; Tao, Jim; Marcolli, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Using the SSWL database of syntactic parameters of world languages, and the MIT Media Lab data on language interactions, we construct a spin glass model of language evolution. We treat binary syntactic parameters as spin states, with languages as vertices of a graph, and assigned interaction energies along the edges. We study a rough model of syntax evolution, under the assumption that a strong interaction energy tends to cause parameters to align, as in the case of ferromagnetic materials. W...

  7. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    OpenAIRE

    Hyoungjeen Jeen; Ho Nyung Lee

    2015-01-01

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model syste...

  8. Structural Evolution of the R-T Phase Boundary in KNN-Based Ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Lv, Xiang; Wu, Jiagang; Xiao, Dingquan; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhang, Xixiang

    2017-01-01

    , the structural evolution of R-T phase boundary from -150 °C to 200 °C is investigated in (0.99-x)K0.5Na0.5Nb1-ySbyO3-0.01CaSnO3-xBi0.5K0.5HfO3 (where x=0~0.05 with y=0.035, and y=0~0.07 with x=0.03) ceramics. Through temperature-dependent powder X-ray diffraction

  9. Recombination-Driven Genome Evolution and Stability of Bacterial Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Purushottam D; Pang, Tin Yau; Maslov, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    While bacteria divide clonally, horizontal gene transfer followed by homologous recombination is now recognized as an important contributor to their evolution. However, the details of how the competition between clonality and recombination shapes genome diversity remains poorly understood. Using a computational model, we find two principal regimes in bacterial evolution and identify two composite parameters that dictate the evolutionary fate of bacterial species. In the divergent regime, characterized by either a low recombination frequency or strict barriers to recombination, cohesion due to recombination is not sufficient to overcome the mutational drift. As a consequence, the divergence between pairs of genomes in the population steadily increases in the course of their evolution. The species lacks genetic coherence with sexually isolated clonal subpopulations continuously formed and dissolved. In contrast, in the metastable regime, characterized by a high recombination frequency combined with low barriers to recombination, genomes continuously recombine with the rest of the population. The population remains genetically cohesive and temporally stable. Notably, the transition between these two regimes can be affected by relatively small changes in evolutionary parameters. Using the Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) data, we classify a number of bacterial species to be either the divergent or the metastable type. Generalizations of our framework to include selection, ecologically structured populations, and horizontal gene transfer of nonhomologous regions are discussed as well. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. The evolution of cooperation on geographical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yixiao; Wang, Yi; Sheng, Jichuan

    2017-11-01

    We study evolutionary public goods game on geographical networks, i.e., complex networks which are located on a geographical plane. The geographical feature effects in two ways: In one way, the geographically-induced network structure influences the overall evolutionary dynamics, and, in the other way, the geographical length of an edge influences the cost when the two players at the two ends interact. For the latter effect, we design a new cost function of cooperators, which simply assumes that the longer the distance between two players, the higher cost the cooperator(s) of them have to pay. In this study, network substrates are generated by a previous spatial network model with a cost-benefit parameter controlling the network topology. Our simulations show that the greatest promotion of cooperation is achieved in the intermediate regime of the parameter, in which empirical estimates of various railway networks fall. Further, we investigate how the distribution of edges' geographical costs influences the evolutionary dynamics and consider three patterns of the distribution: an approximately-equal distribution, a diverse distribution, and a polarized distribution. For normal geographical networks which are generated using intermediate values of the cost-benefit parameter, a diverse distribution hinders the evolution of cooperation, whereas a polarized distribution lowers the threshold value of the amplification factor for cooperation in public goods game. These results are helpful for understanding the evolution of cooperation on real-world geographical networks.

  11. On Electron Hole Evolution in Inhomogeneous Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzichev, I.; Vasko, I.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.

    2017-12-01

    Electron holes (EHs) are the stationary localized non-linear structures in phase space existing due to an electron population trapped within EH electrostatic potential. EHs were found to be a common phenomenon in the Earth's magnetosphere. Such structures were observed in reconnecting current sheets, injection fronts in the outer radiation belt, and in many other situations. EHs usually propagate along magnetic field lines with velocities about electron thermal velocity, are localized on the scale of about 4-10 Debye lengths, and have the field amplitude up to hundreds of mV/m. Generation of these structures, evolution, and their role in relaxation of instabilities and energy dissipation, particle energization, supporting large-scale potential drops is under active investigation. In this report, we present the results of 1.5D gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell simulations of the EH evolution in plasmas with inhomogeneous magnetic field and inhomogeneous density. Our calculations show that the inhomogeneity has a critical effect on the EH dynamics. EHs propagating into stronger (weaker) magnetic field are decelerated (accelerated) with deceleration (acceleration) rate dependent on the magnetic field gradient. During the deceleration of EH, the potential drop (weak double layer) along EH is generated. Such a potential drop might be experimentally observable even for single EH in the reconnecting current sheets. The same holds for the propagation in the plasma with inhomogeneous density. For some parameters of the system, the deceleration results in the turning of the hole. The interesting feature of this process is that the turning point depends only on the EH parameters, being independent of the average inhomogeneity scale. Our calculations also demonstrate the significant difference between "quasi-particle" concept and real evolution of the hole. Indeed, the EH is accelerated (decelerated) faster than it follows from a quasi-particle energy conservation law. It indicates

  12. Mode analysis and structure parameter optimization of a novel SiGe-OI rib optical waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Song; Gao Yong; Yang Yuan [Department of Electronic Engineering, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710048 (China); Feng Yuchun, E-mail: vonfs@yahoo.com.c [Key Laboratories of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2009-08-15

    The mode of a novel SiGe-OI optical waveguide is analyzed, and its single-mode conditions are derived. The Ge content and structure parameters of SiGe-OI optical waveguides are respectively optimized. Under an operation wavelength of 1300 nm, the structures of SiGe-OI rib optical waveguides are built and analyzed with Optiwave software, and the optical field and transmission losses of the SiGe-OI rib optical waveguides are analyzed. The optimization results show that when the structure parameters H, h, W are respectively 500 nm, 250 nm, 500 nm and the Ge content is 5%, the total power loss of SiGe-OI rib waveguides is 0.3683 dB/cm considering the loss of radiation outside the waveguides and materials, which is less than the traditional value of 0.5 dB/cm. The analytical technique for SiGe-OI optical waveguides and structure parameters computed by this paper are proved to be accurate and computationally efficient compared with the beam propagation method (BPM) and the experimental results. (semiconductor devices)

  13. A compact cyclic plasticity model with parameter evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Tidemann, L.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a compact model for cyclic plasticity based on energy in terms of external and internal variables, and plastic yielding described by kinematic hardening and a flow potential with an additive term controlling the nonlinear cyclic hardening. The model is basically described by five...... parameters: external and internal stiffness, a yield stress and a limiting ultimate stress, and finally a parameter controlling the gradual development of plastic deformation. Calibration against numerous experimental results indicates that typically larger plastic strains develop than predicted...

  14. Evolution of weak perturbations in gas-solid suspension with chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharypov, O.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Thermophysics; Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Anufriev, I.S. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Dynamics of weak finite-amplitude perturbations in two-phase homogeneous medium (gas + solid particles) with non-equilibrium chemical reaction in gas is studied theoretically. Non-linear model of plane perturbation evolution is substantiated. The model takes into account wave-kinetic interaction and dissipation effects, including inter-phase heat and momentum transfer. Conditions for uniform state of the system are analyzed. Non-linear equation describing evolution of plane perturbation is derived under weak dispersion and dissipation effects. The obtained results demonstrate self-organization in the homogeneous system: steady-state periodic structure arises, its period, amplitude and velocity depends on the features of the medium. The dependencies of these parameters on dissipation and chemical kinetics are analyzed.

  15. Evolution of Microstructure and Texture during Annealing of Aluminum AA1050 Cold Rolled to High and Ultrahigh Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishin, Oleg; Juul Jensen, Dorte; Hansen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure and texture of commercial purity aluminum (AA1050) have been investigated after cold rolling to von Mises strains of 3.6 to 6.4 followed by recovery and recrystallization during annealing. The evolution of structural parameters of the deformed microstructure, such as boundary...

  16. Influence analysis of structural parameters on electromagnetic properties of HTS linear induction motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.; Zheng, T.Q.; Zhang, W.; Fang, J.; Liu, Y.M.

    2011-01-01

    A new type high temperature superconductor linear induction motor is designed and analyzed as a prototype to ensure applicability aimed at industrial motors. Made of Bi-2223/Ag, primary windings are distributed with the double-layer concentrated structure. The motor is analyzed by 2D electromagnetic Finite Element Method to get magnetic field distribution, thrust force, vertical force and so on. The critical current of motor and the electromagnetic force are mostly decided by the leakage flux density of primary slot and by the main magnetic flux and eddy current respectively. The structural parameters of motor have a great influence on the distribution of magnetic field. Under constant currents, the properties of motor are analyzed with different slot widths, slot heights and winding turns. The properties of motor, such as the maximum slot leakage flux density, motor thrust and motor vertical force, are analyzed with different structural parameters.

  17. Oh sister, where art thou? Spatial population structure and the evolution of an altruistic defence trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamminger, T; Foitzik, S; Metzler, D; Pennings, P S

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of parasite virulence and host defences is affected by population structure. This effect has been confirmed in studies focusing on large spatial scales, whereas the importance of local structure is not well understood. Slavemaking ants are social parasites that exploit workers of another species to rear their offspring. Enslaved workers of the host species Temnothorax longispinosus have been found to exhibit an effective post-enslavement defence behaviour: enslaved workers were observed killing a large proportion of the parasites' offspring. As enslaved workers do not reproduce, they gain no direct fitness benefit from this 'rebellion' behaviour. However, there may be an indirect benefit: neighbouring host nests that are related to 'rebel' nests can benefit from a reduced raiding pressure, as a result of the reduction in parasite nest size due to the enslaved workers' killing behaviour. We use a simple mathematical model to examine whether the small-scale population structure of the host species could explain the evolution of this potentially altruistic defence trait against slavemaking ants. We find that this is the case if enslaved host workers are related to nearby host nests. In a population genetic study, we confirm that enslaved workers are, indeed, more closely related to host nests within the raiding range of their resident slavemaker nest, than to host nests outside the raiding range. This small-scale population structure seems to be a result of polydomy (e.g. the occupation of several nests in close proximity by a single colony) and could have enabled the evolution of 'rebellion' by kin selection. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  18. Both Epistasis and Diversifying Selection Drive the Structural Evolution of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Mucin-Like Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeh, Neke; Nshogozabahizi, Jean Claude; Aris-Brosou, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Throughout the last 3 decades, Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreaks have been confined to isolated areas within Central Africa; however, the 2014 variant reached unprecedented transmission and mortality rates. While the outbreak was still under way, it was reported that the variant leading up to this outbreak evolved faster than previous EBOV variants, but evidence for diversifying selection was undetermined. Here, we test this selection hypothesis and show that while previous EBOV outbreaks were preceded by bursts of diversification, evidence for site-specific diversifying selection during the emergence of the 2014 EBOV clade is weak. However, we show strong evidence supporting an interplay between selection and correlated evolution (epistasis), particularly in the mucin-like domain (MLD) of the EBOV glycoprotein. By reconstructing ancestral structures of the MLD, we further propose a structural mechanism explaining how the substitutions that accumulated between 1918 and 1969 distorted the MLD, while more recent epistatic substitutions restored part of the structure, with the most recent substitution being adaptive. We suggest that it is this complex interplay between weak selection, epistasis, and structural constraints that has shaped the evolution of the 2014 EBOV variant. The role that selection plays in the emergence of viral epidemics remains debated, particularly in the context of the 2014 EBOV outbreak. Most critically, should such evidence exist, it is generally unclear how this relates to function and increased virulence. Here, we show that the viral lineage leading up to the 2014 outbreak underwent a complex interplay between selection and correlated evolution (epistasis) in a protein region that is critical for immune evasion. We then reconstructed the three-dimensional structure of this domain and showed that the initial mutations in this lineage deformed the structure, while subsequent mutations restored part of the structure. Along this mutational path, the

  19. In Situ Observation of the Dislocation Structure Evolution During a Strain Path Change in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejdemann, Christian; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Lienert, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of deformation structures in individual grains embedded in polycrystalline copper specimens during strain path changes is observed in situ by high-resolution reciprocal space mapping with high-energy synchrotron radiation. A large number of individual subgrains is resolved; their be......The evolution of deformation structures in individual grains embedded in polycrystalline copper specimens during strain path changes is observed in situ by high-resolution reciprocal space mapping with high-energy synchrotron radiation. A large number of individual subgrains is resolved...... and orientation of the resolved subgrains change only slightly, while their elastic stresses are significantly altered. This indicates the existence of a microplastic regime during which only the subgrains deform plastically and no yielding of the dislocation walls occurs. After reloading above 0.3% strain......, the elastic stresses of individual subgrains are about the same as in unidirectionally deformed reference specimens. They increase only slightly during further straining—accompanied by occasional emergence of new subgrains, abundant orientation changes, and disappearance of existing subgrains....

  20. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the ''selfhealing'' or radiation resistance in advanced

  1. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  2. Monitoring early hydration of reinforced concrete structures using structural parameters identified by piezo sensors via electromechanical impedance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talakokula, Visalakshi; Bhalla, Suresh; Gupta, Ashok

    2018-01-01

    Concrete is the most widely used material in civil engineering construction. Its life begins when the hydration process is activated after mixing the cement granulates with water. In this paper, a non-dimensional hydration parameter, obtained from piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) patches bonded to rebars embedded inside concrete, is employed to monitor the early age hydration of concrete. The non-dimensional hydration parameter is derived from the equivalent stiffness determined from the piezo-impedance transducers using the electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique. The focus of the study is to monitor the hydration process of cementitious materials commencing from the early hours and continue till 28 days using single non-dimensional parameter. The experimental results show that the proposed piezo-based non-dimensional hydration parameter is very effective in monitoring the early age hydration, as it has been derived from the refined structural impedance parameters, obtained by eliminating the PZT contribution, and using both the real and imaginary components of the admittance signature.

  3. The triple helix of collagens - an ancient protein structure that enabled animal multicellularity and tissue evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Aaron L; Boudko, Sergei P; Rokas, Antonis; Hudson, Billy G

    2018-04-09

    The cellular microenvironment, characterized by an extracellular matrix (ECM), played an essential role in the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity in animals (metazoans), and in the subsequent evolution of diverse animal tissues and organs. A major ECM component are members of the collagen superfamily -comprising 28 types in vertebrates - that exist in diverse supramolecular assemblies ranging from networks to fibrils. Each assembly is characterized by a hallmark feature, a protein structure called a triple helix. A current gap in knowledge is understanding the mechanisms of how the triple helix encodes and utilizes information in building scaffolds on the outside of cells. Type IV collagen, recently revealed as the evolutionarily most ancient member of the collagen superfamily, serves as an archetype for a fresh view of fundamental structural features of a triple helix that underlie the diversity of biological activities of collagens. In this Opinion, we argue that the triple helix is a protein structure of fundamental importance in building the extracellular matrix, which enabled animal multicellularity and tissue evolution. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF PROTOSTELLAR AND PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. OUTBURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhaohuan; Hartmann, Lee; Gammie, Charles F.; Book, Laura G.; Simon, Jacob B.; Engelhard, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As an initial investigation into the long-term evolution of protostellar disks, we explore the conditions required to explain the large outbursts of disk accretion seen in some young stellar objects. We use one-dimensional time-dependent disk models with a phenomenological treatment of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and gravitational torques to follow disk evolution over long timescales. Comparison with our previous two-dimensional disk model calculations indicates that the neglect of radial effects and two-dimensional disk structure in the one-dimensional case makes only modest differences in the results; this allows us to use the simpler models to explore parameter space efficiently. We find that the mass infall rates typically estimated for low-mass protostars generally result in AU-scale disk accretion outbursts, as predicted by our previous analysis. We also confirm quasi-steady accretion behavior for high mass infall rates if the values of α-parameter for the MRI are small, while at this high accretion rate convection from the thermal instability may lead to some variations. We further constrain the combinations of the α-parameter and the MRI critical temperature, which can reproduce observed outburst behavior. Our results suggest that dust sublimation may be connected with full activation of the MRI. This is consistent with the idea that small dust captures ions and electrons to suppress the MRI. In a companion paper, we will explore both long-term outburst and disk evolution with this model, allowing for infall from protostellar envelopes with differing angular momenta.

  5. Imprints of the large-scale structure on AGN formation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porqueres, Natàlia; Jasche, Jens; Enßlin, Torsten A.; Lavaux, Guilhem

    2018-04-01

    Black hole masses are found to correlate with several global properties of their host galaxies, suggesting that black holes and galaxies have an intertwined evolution and that active galactic nuclei (AGN) have a significant impact on galaxy evolution. Since the large-scale environment can also affect AGN, this work studies how their formation and properties depend on the environment. We have used a reconstructed three-dimensional high-resolution density field obtained from a Bayesian large-scale structure reconstruction method applied to the 2M++ galaxy sample. A web-type classification relying on the shear tensor is used to identify different structures on the cosmic web, defining voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters. We confirm that the environmental density affects the AGN formation and their properties. We found that the AGN abundance is equivalent to the galaxy abundance, indicating that active and inactive galaxies reside in similar dark matter halos. However, occurrence rates are different for each spectral type and accretion rate. These differences are consistent with the AGN evolutionary sequence suggested by previous authors, Seyferts and Transition objects transforming into low-ionization nuclear emission line regions (LINERs), the weaker counterpart of Seyferts. We conclude that AGN properties depend on the environmental density more than on the web-type. More powerful starbursts and younger stellar populations are found in high densities, where interactions and mergers are more likely. AGN hosts show smaller masses in clusters for Seyferts and Transition objects, which might be due to gas stripping. In voids, the AGN population is dominated by the most massive galaxy hosts.

  6. Structural Evolution and Mobile Shale Deformation in the Eastern Niger Delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiener, R. W.; Aikhionbare, D. O. L.

    2002-01-01

    Regional cross-sections and restorations of the eastern delta constructed from 2D and 3D seismic data show the structural evolution of paired extensional contractional belts and the kinematic and geometric evolution of mobile shale. The delta consists of an updip extensional belt and downdip zones of transitional and contractional deformation linked by a regional detachment. The extensional belt is characterized by zones of N-dipping (counterregional) and S-dipping (regional) normal faults.In the regional fault trend, sediment accommodation space is created largely by lateral movement of mobile substrate due to sediment loading and gravity. The transitional belt is characterized by low relief, shale-cored detachment folds and normal faults. The contractional belt consists of 2 parts, the high relief shale-cored detachment fold belt (mobile shale) and the fold/thrust belt: In the mobile shale belt, anticlines are generally symmetric and characterized by parallel-folded cover and highly variable thickness in the underlying ductile shale zone.Palinspastic restoration of the mobile shale by area balance shows a high degree of lateral and vertical mobility. Isostatic restoration of the depositional wedge that is the precursor to the mobile shale suggests lateral movement of 10s of kms from the extensional to the contractional domain. The fold and thrust belt is characterized by a train of asymmetric fault-related folds. The zone of ductile substrate is thin in this area, which may account for the change in structural style from high relief detachment folds in the mobile shale belt to a more classic fold/thrust belt style to the south

  7. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  8. Decoupling of the Leading Order DGLAP Evolution Equation with Spin Dependent Structure Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadbakht, F. Teimoury; Boroun, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    We propose an analytical solution for DGLAP evolution equations with polarized splitting functions at the Leading Order (LO) approximation based on the Laplace transform method. It is shown that the DGLAP evolution equations can be decoupled completely into two second order differential equations which then are solved analytically by using the initial conditions δ FS(x,Q2)=F[partial δ FS0(x), δ FS0(x)] and {δ G}(x,Q2)=G[partial δ G0(x), δ G0(x)]. We used this method to obtain the polarized structure function of the proton as well as the polarized gluon distribution function inside the proton and compared the numerical results with experimental data of COMPASS, HERMES, and AAC'08 Collaborations. It was found that there is a good agreement between our predictions and the experiments.

  9. Giant hub Src and Syk tyrosine kinase thermodynamic profiles recapitulate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Thermodynamic scaling theory, previously applied mainly to small proteins, here analyzes quantitative evolution of the titled functional network giant hub enzymes. The broad domain structure identified homologically is confirmed hydropathically using amino acid sequences only. The most surprising results concern the evolution of the tyrosine kinase globular surface roughness from avians to mammals, which is first order, compared to the evolution within mammals from rodents to humans, which is second order. The mystery of the unique amide terminal region of proto oncogene tyrosine protein kinase is resolved by the discovery there of a rare hydroneutral septad targeting cluster, which is paralleled by an equally rare octad catalytic cluster in tyrosine kinase in humans and a few other species (cat and dog). These results, which go far towards explaining why these proteins are among the largest giant hubs in protein interaction networks, use no adjustable parameters.

  10. Strain concentration at structural discontinuities and its quantification by elastic follow-up parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Naoto; Takasho, Hideki

    1998-12-01

    Elevated temperature structural design codes pay attention to strain concentration at structural discontinuities due to creep and plasticity, since it causes to enlarge creep-fatigue damage of material. One of the difficulties to predict strain concentration is its dependency on loading, constitutive equations, and relaxation time. This study investigated fundamental mechanism of strain concentration and its main factors. It was clarified that strain concentration was caused from strain redistribution between elastic and inelastic regions, which can be quantified by the elastic follow-up parameter. As a function of inelastic strain, the elastic follow-up parameter can describe variation of strain concentration during incremental loading and relaxation process, caused by transition of strain distribution from peak strain concentration to secondary stress redistribution. Structures have their own elastic follow-up characteristics as a function of inelastic strain, which is insensitive to constitutive equations. It means that application of inelastic analysis is not difficult to obtain elastic follow-up characteristics. (author)

  11. Explicitly integrating parameter, input, and structure uncertainties into Bayesian Neural Networks for probabilistic hydrologic forecasting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuesong

    2011-11-01

    Estimating uncertainty of hydrologic forecasting is valuable to water resources and other relevant decision making processes. Recently, Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) have been proved powerful tools for quantifying uncertainty of streamflow forecasting. In this study, we propose a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) framework (BNN-PIS) to incorporate the uncertainties associated with parameters, inputs, and structures into BNNs. This framework allows the structure of the neural networks to change by removing or adding connections between neurons and enables scaling of input data by using rainfall multipliers. The results show that the new BNNs outperform BNNs that only consider uncertainties associated with parameters and model structures. Critical evaluation of posterior distribution of neural network weights, number of effective connections, rainfall multipliers, and hyper-parameters shows that the assumptions held in our BNNs are not well supported. Further understanding of characteristics of and interactions among different uncertainty sources is expected to enhance the application of neural networks for uncertainty analysis of hydrologic forecasting. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Structural evolution on medium-range-order during the fragile-strong transition in Ge_1_5Te_8_5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shuai; Stolpe, Moritz; Gross, Oliver; Hembree, William; Hechler, Simon; Bednarcik, Jozef; Busch, Ralf; Lucas, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray scattering, we investigate liquid Ge_1_5Te_8_5 spanning a wide temperature range from near T_g to the melt, and demonstrate that the density anomaly and fragile-strong transition are not only related to short-range-order (SRO) structural change (e.g. Peierls-like distortion), but also accompanied by a remarkable development of medium-range-order (MRO). The latter manifests as an emerging pre-peak in total structure factor S(Q) and atomic pair correlations on the length scale of ∼8 Å in the real space G(r) function. The results highlight the role of medium-range structural ordering in the evolution of the configurational entropy which, according to the Adam-Gibbs theory, can be linked to the fragile-strong transition (FS-transition). Based on the relation between structure and liquid dynamics, the FS-transitions at high pressures are examined in terms of experimental data and the Ehrenfest relation. This work identifies the length scale for the atomic correlations in MRO structural evolutions and presents a structural approach to exploring liquid dynamics, which may be useful for investigating relevant phase-change alloys.

  13. The parameters controlling the strength of soil-steel structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhordari, M. A.; Abdel-Sayed, G.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper examines the ultimate load carrying capacity of soil-steel structures taking into consideration the sequence of the developments of plastic hinges, their location, and their sustained plastic moment. Non-linear analysis has been conducted using a micro-computer program in which a structural model is applied with the soil replaced by normal and tangential springs acting at the nodal points of a polygon representing the conduit wall. A comparative study has been conducted for the parameters which affect the load carrying capacity of soil-steel structure, leading to the following conclusions: (1) the load carrying capacity of the composite structure is significantly affected by the shear stiffness (or friction) of the surrounding soil; (2) the conduit span may be used when calculating the buckling load rather than the local radius of the conduit wall; (3) circular arches with sector angle of less than 180 d eg have higher load carrying capacity than equivalent re-entrant arches, i.e. arches with sector angle of more than 180 d eg; (4) the buckling load of the conduit is slightly affected by the rigidity of the lower zone of the conduit wall; (5) eccentric application of the load has practically little effect on its load carrying capacity

  14. Internal and environmental secular evolution of disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    2015-03-01

    classical bulges, (2) correspondingly large ratios of ordered to random velocities, (3) small velocity dispersions σ with respect to the Faber-Jackson correlation between σ and bulge luminosity, (4) spiral structure or nuclear bars in the `bulge' part of the light profile, (5) nearly exponential brightness profiles and (6) starbursts. None of the above classification criteria are 100% reliable. Published disagreements on (pseudo)bulge classifications usually result from the use of diffferent criteria. It is very important to use as many classification criteria as possible. When two or more criteria are used, the probability of misclassification becomes very small. I also review environmental secular evolution - the transformation of gas-rich, star-forming spiral and irregular galaxies into gas-poor, `red and dead' S0 and spheroidal (`Sph') galaxies. I show that Sph galaxies such as NGC 205 and Draco are not the low-luminosity end of the structural sequence (the `fundamental plane') of elliptical galaxies. Instead, Sph galaxies have structural parameters like those of low-luminosity S+Im galaxies. Spheroidals are continuous in their structural parameters with the disks of S0 galaxies. They are bulgeless S0s. S+Im -> S0+Sph transformation involves a variety of internal (supernova-driven baryon ejection) and environmental processes (e.g., ram-pressure gas stripping, harassment, and starvation). Improved evidence for galaxy transformation is presented in several papers at this meeting.

  15. Influence of pre-existing basement faults on the structural evolution of the Zagros Simply Folded belt: 3D numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    The Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros orogen is characterized by elongated fold trains symptomatically defining the geomorphology along this mountain range. The Zagros orogen results from the collision of the Arabian and the Eurasian plates. The Simply Folded Belt is located southwest of the Zagros suture zone. An up to 2 km thick salt horizon below the sedimentary sequence enables mechanical and structural detachment from the underlying Arabian basement. Nevertheless, deformation within the basement influences the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt. It has been shown that thrusts in form of reactivated normal faults can trigger out-of-sequence deformation within the sedimentary stratigraphy. Furthermore, deeply rooted strike-slip faults, such as the Kazerun faults between the Fars zone in the southeast and the Dezful embayment and the Izeh zone, are largely dispersing into the overlying stratigraphy, strongly influencing the tectonic evolution and mechanical behaviour. The aim of this study is to reveal the influence of basement thrusts and strike-slip faults on the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt depending on the occurrence of intercrustal weak horizons (Hormuz salt) and the rheology and thermal structure of the basement. Therefore, we present high-resolution 3D thermo-mechnical models with pre-existing, inversively reactivated normal faults or strike-slip faults within the basement. Numerical models are based on finite difference, marker-in-cell technique with (power-law) visco-plastic rheology accounting for brittle deformation. Preliminary results show that deep tectonic structures present in the basement may have crucial effects on the morphology and evolution of a fold-and-thrust belt above a major detachment horizon.

  16. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  17. An improved state-parameter analysis of ecosystem models using data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Liu, S.; Tieszen, L.L.; Hollinger, D.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Much of the effort spent in developing data assimilation methods for carbon dynamics analysis has focused on estimating optimal values for either model parameters or state variables. The main weakness of estimating parameter values alone (i.e., without considering state variables) is that all errors from input, output, and model structure are attributed to model parameter uncertainties. On the other hand, the accuracy of estimating state variables may be lowered if the temporal evolution of parameter values is not incorporated. This research develops a smoothed ensemble Kalman filter (SEnKF) by combining ensemble Kalman filter with kernel smoothing technique. SEnKF has following characteristics: (1) to estimate simultaneously the model states and parameters through concatenating unknown parameters and state variables into a joint state vector; (2) to mitigate dramatic, sudden changes of parameter values in parameter sampling and parameter evolution process, and control narrowing of parameter variance which results in filter divergence through adjusting smoothing factor in kernel smoothing algorithm; (3) to assimilate recursively data into the model and thus detect possible time variation of parameters; and (4) to address properly various sources of uncertainties stemming from input, output and parameter uncertainties. The SEnKF is tested by assimilating observed fluxes of carbon dioxide and environmental driving factor data from an AmeriFlux forest station located near Howland, Maine, USA, into a partition eddy flux model. Our analysis demonstrates that model parameters, such as light use efficiency, respiration coefficients, minimum and optimum temperatures for photosynthetic activity, and others, are highly constrained by eddy flux data at daily-to-seasonal time scales. The SEnKF stabilizes parameter values quickly regardless of the initial values of the parameters. Potential ecosystem light use efficiency demonstrates a strong seasonality. Results show that the

  18. On the evolution equations, solvable through the inverse scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdjikov, V.S.; Khristov, E.Kh.

    1979-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution equations (NLEE), related to the one-parameter family of Dirac operators are considered in a uniform manner. The class of NLEE solvable through the inverse scatterina method and their conservation laws are described. The description of the hierarchy of Hamiltonian structures and the proof of complete integrability of the NLEE is presented. The class of Baecklund transformations for these NLEE is derived. The general formulae are illustrated by two important examples: the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and the sine-Gordon equation

  19. Growth model and structure evolution of Ag layers deposited on Ge films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Arkadiusz; Skowronski, Lukasz; Górecka, Ewa; Kierdaszuk, Jakub; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the crystallinity and optical parameters of silver layers of 10-35 nm thickness as a function 2-10 nm thick Ge wetting films deposited on SiO 2 substrates. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements proved that segregation of germanium into the surface of the silver film is a result of the gradient growth of silver crystals. The free energy of Ge atoms is reduced by their migration from boundaries of larger grains at the Ag/SiO 2 interface to boundaries of smaller grains near the Ag surface. Annealing at different temperatures and various durations allowed for a controlled distribution of crystal dimensions, thus influencing the segregation rate. Furthermore, using ellipsometric and optical transmission measurements we determined the time-dependent evolution of the film structure. If stored under ambient conditions for the first week after deposition, the changes in the transmission spectra are smaller than the measurement accuracy. Over the course of the following three weeks, the segregation-induced effects result in considerably modified transmission spectra. Two months after deposition, the slope of the silver layer density profile derived from the XRR spectra was found to be inverted due to the completed segregation process, and the optical transmission spectra increased uniformly due to the roughened surfaces, corrosion of silver and ongoing recrystallization. The Raman spectra of the Ge wetted Ag films were measured immediately after deposition and ten days later and demonstrated that the Ge atoms at the Ag grain boundaries form clusters of a few atoms where the Ge-Ge bonds are still present.

  20. Spatial pattern of structural ageing in eastern Croatia: evolution and explanations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Jukic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to examine the ageing situation and social policy issues in the Osijek-Baranja County of eastern Croatia. Using historical evidence from census data, research suggests that the evolution of the ageing pattern has been mainly determined by such factors as development of the transport system, changes in political-territorial organisation, supply of jobs in the cities, deagrarianisation and a domestic war in the 1990s. The increased importance of urban centres, through planned industrialisation and administrative centralisation, has accelerated and intensified rural-tourban migration. Consequently, the spatial pattern of structural ageing has been substantially affected. A significant variation was found in urban and rural areas and also within sub-regional units. The findings suggest that the evolution of spatial disparities in the ageing pattern is because of unplanned migration; spatial differences in the level of socio-economic development; the influence of tradition, such as higher fertility rates historically in some areas; and suburbanisation, notably around the city of Osijek. The article concludes that ageing is affecting the country's economic growth and the formal and informal social support systems, including the provision of resources for older citizens in the endangered areas.

  1. Population Structure and Evolution after Speciation of the Hokkaido Salamander (Hynobius retardatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Matsunami

    Full Text Available The Hokkaido salamander (Hynobius retardatus is endemic to Hokkaido Island, Japan, and shows intriguing flexible phenotypic plasticity and regional morphological diversity. However, to date, allozymes and partial mitochondria DNA sequences have provided only an outline of its demographic histories and the pattern of its genetic diversification. To understand the finer details of the population structure of this species and its evolution since speciation, we genotyped five regional populations by using 12 recently developed microsatellite polymorphic markers. We found a clear population structure with low gene flow among the five populations, but a close genetic relationship between the Teshio and Kitami populations. Our demographic analysis suggested that Teshio and Erimo had the largest effective population sizes among the five populations. These findings regarding the population structure and demography of H. retardatus improve our understanding of the faunal phylogeography on Hokkaido Island and also provide fundamental genetic information that will be useful for future studies.

  2. Superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces in biology: evolution, structural principles and biomimetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, W; Mail, M; Neinhuis, C

    2016-08-06

    A comprehensive survey of the construction principles and occurrences of superhydrophobic surfaces in plants, animals and other organisms is provided and is based on our own scanning electron microscopic examinations of almost 20 000 different species and the existing literature. Properties such as self-cleaning (lotus effect), fluid drag reduction (Salvinia effect) and the introduction of new functions (air layers as sensory systems) are described and biomimetic applications are discussed: self-cleaning is established, drag reduction becomes increasingly important, and novel air-retaining grid technology is introduced. Surprisingly, no evidence for lasting superhydrophobicity in non-biological surfaces exists (except technical materials). Phylogenetic trees indicate that superhydrophobicity evolved as a consequence of the conquest of land about 450 million years ago and may be a key innovation in the evolution of terrestrial life. The approximate 10 million extant species exhibit a stunning diversity of materials and structures, many of which are formed by self-assembly, and are solely based on a limited number of molecules. A short historical survey shows that bionics (today often called biomimetics) dates back more than 100 years. Statistical data illustrate that the interest in biomimetic surfaces is much younger still. Superhydrophobicity caught the attention of scientists only after the extreme superhydrophobicity of lotus leaves was published in 1997. Regrettably, parabionic products play an increasing role in marketing.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces in biology: evolution, structural principles and biomimetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mail, M.; Neinhuis, C.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of the construction principles and occurrences of superhydrophobic surfaces in plants, animals and other organisms is provided and is based on our own scanning electron microscopic examinations of almost 20 000 different species and the existing literature. Properties such as self-cleaning (lotus effect), fluid drag reduction (Salvinia effect) and the introduction of new functions (air layers as sensory systems) are described and biomimetic applications are discussed: self-cleaning is established, drag reduction becomes increasingly important, and novel air-retaining grid technology is introduced. Surprisingly, no evidence for lasting superhydrophobicity in non-biological surfaces exists (except technical materials). Phylogenetic trees indicate that superhydrophobicity evolved as a consequence of the conquest of land about 450 million years ago and may be a key innovation in the evolution of terrestrial life. The approximate 10 million extant species exhibit a stunning diversity of materials and structures, many of which are formed by self-assembly, and are solely based on a limited number of molecules. A short historical survey shows that bionics (today often called biomimetics) dates back more than 100 years. Statistical data illustrate that the interest in biomimetic surfaces is much younger still. Superhydrophobicity caught the attention of scientists only after the extreme superhydrophobicity of lotus leaves was published in 1997. Regrettably, parabionic products play an increasing role in marketing. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science’. PMID:27354736

  4. Structural Evolution and Mechanisms of Fatigue in Polycrystalline Brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jesper Vejlø

    The plastic strain controlled fatigue behaviour of polycrystalline Cu-15%Zn and Cu-30%Zn has been investigated with the aim of studying the effect of slip mode modification by the addition of zinc to copper. It has been clearly demonstrated, that true cyclic saturation does not occur in the plastic...... type single slip. This behaviour has been described by the self-consistent Sachs-Eshelby model, which provides estimates of the CSS curve for brass polycrystals. Successive stages of primary hardening, softening and secondary hardening has been observed in the plastic strain controlled fatigue of brass....... It has been found that the primary hardening is attributed to an increase of intergranular stresses whereas the sec-ondary hardening apparently is attributed to an increase of friction stresses. Investigations of the structural evolution show that the softening behaviour can be explained by the presence...

  5. Structure directing agents induced morphology evolution and phase transition from indium-based rho- to sod-ZMOF

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yanshu; Cairns, Amy; Liu, Yunling; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cai, Xuechao; Pang, Maolin; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    In this report, indium-based rho-and sod-ZMOFs with different morphologies and sizes were prepared. Simultaneous morphology evolution and phase transformation from porous rho-to nonporous sod-ZMOFs were reported for the first time by simply varying the concentration of structure directing agents (SDAs).

  6. Oxygen Evolution at Hematite Surfaces: The Impact of Structure and Oxygen Vacancies on Lowering the Overpotential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Klaver, P.; van Santen, R.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Bieberle, A.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are essential for understanding the limitations of water splitting. Most research has focused so far on the OER at flat metal oxide surfaces. The structure sensitivity of the OER has, however, recently been highlighted as a promising research

  7. Structure directing agents induced morphology evolution and phase transition from indium-based rho- to sod-ZMOF

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yanshu

    2017-06-23

    In this report, indium-based rho-and sod-ZMOFs with different morphologies and sizes were prepared. Simultaneous morphology evolution and phase transformation from porous rho-to nonporous sod-ZMOFs were reported for the first time by simply varying the concentration of structure directing agents (SDAs).

  8. Physical experiments and analysis on the generation and evolution of tsunami-induced turbulent coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalligeris, Nikos; Lynett, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Numerous historical accounts describe the formation of ``whirpools'' inside ports and harbors during tsunami events, causing port operation disruptions. Videos from the Japan 2011 tsunami revealed complex nearshore flow patters, resulting from the interaction of tsunami-induced currents with the man-made coastline, and the generation of large eddies (or turbulent coherent structures) in numerous ports and harbors near the earthquake epicenter. The aim of this work is to study the generation and evolution of tsunami-induced turbulent coherent structures (TCS) in a well-controlled environment using realistic scaling. A physical configuration is created in the image of a port entrance at a scale of 1:27 and a small-amplitude, long period wave creates a transient flow through the asymmetric harbor channel. A separated region forms, which coupled with the transient flow, leads to the formation of a stable monopolar TCS. The surface flow is examined through mono- and stereo-PTV techniques to extract surface velocity vectors. Surface velocity maps and vortex flow profiles are used to study the experimental TCS generation and evolution, and characterize the TCS structure. Analytical tools are used to describe the TCS growth rate and kinetic energy decay. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation NEES Research program, with Award Number 1135026.

  9. If the cap fits, wear it: an overview of telomeric structures over evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nick; Derboven, Elisa; Valuchova, Sona; Riha, Karel

    2014-03-01

    Genome organization into linear chromosomes likely represents an important evolutionary innovation that has permitted the development of the sexual life cycle; this process has consequently advanced nuclear expansion and increased complexity of eukaryotic genomes. Chromosome linearity, however, poses a major challenge to the internal cellular machinery. The need to efficiently recognize and repair DNA double-strand breaks that occur as a consequence of DNA damage presents a constant threat to native chromosome ends known as telomeres. In this review, we present a comparative survey of various solutions to the end protection problem, maintaining an emphasis on DNA structure. This begins with telomeric structures derived from a subset of prokaryotes, mitochondria, and viruses, and will progress into the typical telomere structure exhibited by higher organisms containing TTAGG-like tandem sequences. We next examine non-canonical telomeres from Drosophila melanogaster, which comprise arrays of retrotransposons. Finally, we discuss telomeric structures in evolution and possible switches between canonical and non-canonical solutions to chromosome end protection.

  10. The evolution of the Russian oil governance structure: A neo-institutionalist interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossiaud, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    This PhD dissertation deals with the evolution of the institutional and organizational framework of the Russian oil industry during the period 1992-2012. Its main objective is to characterize and reinterpret the increasing involvement of the national oil companies (NOCs), Rosneft and Gazpromneft, in the upstream activities observed since the middle of the 2000's. Until then, their levels of production had remained very low after the privatization program implemented at the beginning of the transition process. For achieving this objective, we rely on the New Institutional Economics (NIE) theoretical framework. This allows us to lead a comparative analysis of the different oil governance structures, i.e. the alternative modes of organizing the upstream activities. More it enables us to understand the way these different modes interact with the institutional environment of the countries in which they are implemented. We argue that the increasing involvement of the Russian NOCs can be characterized as a change from a liberal oil governance structure to a hybrid oil governance structure. We show that this organizational evolution must be interpreted as the feasible reform that can be implemented by the federal authorities for dealing with the incoherence between the liberal governance structure defined at the beginning of the transition process and the Russian institutional environment. From the beginning of the 1990's until the middle of the 2000's, this institutional incoherence relates to the fact that the Russian institutional environment prevents the effectiveness of oil contracts (licenses, production sharing agreements, tax) governing the transaction between the Russian state and the private oil companies. From the point of view of the federal authorities, two problems appear crucial: their difficulties for capturing the oil rent and the exploration crisis. After the implementation of the hybrid oil governance structure, Rosneft plays a role of complement to the

  11. The unique structural parameters of the underlying host galaxies in blue compact dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of possible evolutionary pathways between various types of dwarf galaxies is still not fully understood. Blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) provide a unique window into dwarf galaxy formation and evolution and are often thought of as an evolutionary stage between different classes of dwarf galaxies. In this study we use deep optical and near-infrared observations of the underlying hosts of BCDs in order to study the structural differences between different types of dwarf galaxies. When compared with dwarf irregular galaxies of similar luminosities, we find that the underlying hosts of BCDs have significantly more concentrated light distributions, with smaller scale lengths and brighter central surface brightnesses. We demonstrate here that the underlying hosts of BCDs are distinct from the broad continuum of typical dwarf irregular galaxies, and that it is unlikely that most dwarf irregular galaxies can transform into a BCD or vice versa. Furthermore, we find that the starburst in a BCD only brightens it on average by ∼0.8 mag (factor of two), in agreement with other studies. It appears that a BCD is a long-lived and distinct type of dwarf galaxy that exhibits an exceptionally concentrated matter distribution. We suggest that it is this compact mass distribution that enables the strong star formation events that characterize this class of dwarf galaxy, that the compactness of the underlying host can be used as a distinguishing parameter between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies, and that it can also be used to identify BCDs which are not currently experiencing an intense starburst event.

  12. The Evolution of Enterprise Organization Designs

    OpenAIRE

    Jay R. Galbraith

    2012-01-01

    This article extends Alfred Chandler's seminal ideas about strategy and organizational structure, and it predicts the next stage of organizational evolution. Chandler described the evolution of vertical integration and diversification strategies for which the functional and multidivisional structures are appropriate. He also explained how the dominant structure at any point in time is a concatenation or accumulation of all previous strategies and structures. I extend Chandler's ideas by descr...

  13. Universal features of JIMWLK and BK evolution at small x

    CERN Document Server

    Rummukainen, K; Rummukainen, Kari; Weigert, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of numerical studies of the JIMWLK and BK equations with a particular emphasis on the universal scaling properties and phase space structure involved. The results are valid for near zero impact parameter in DIS. We demonstrate IR safety due to the occurrence of a rapidity dependent saturation scale Q_s(\\tau). Within the set of initial conditions chosen both JIMWLK and BK equations show remarkable agreement. We point out the crucial importance of running coupling corrections to obtain consistency in the UV. Despite the scale breaking induced by the running coupling we find that evolution drives correlators towards an asymptotic form with near scaling properties. We discuss asymptotic features of the evolution, such as the \\tau- and A-dependence of Q_s away from the initial condition.

  14. Synchronization of chaotic systems with parameter uncertainties via variable structure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemadi, Shahram; Alasty, Aria; Salarieh, Hassan

    2006-01-01

    The Letter introduces a robust control design method to synchronize a pair of different uncertain chaotic systems. The technique is based on sliding-mode and variable structure control theories. Comparison of proposed method with previous works is performed during simulations. It is shown that the proposed controller while appearing in a faster response, is able to overcome random uncertainties of all model parameters

  15. Synchronization of chaotic systems with parameter uncertainties via variable structure control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemadi, Shahram [Centre of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alasty, Aria [Centre of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: aalasti@sharif.edu; Salarieh, Hassan [Centre of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-08-28

    The Letter introduces a robust control design method to synchronize a pair of different uncertain chaotic systems. The technique is based on sliding-mode and variable structure control theories. Comparison of proposed method with previous works is performed during simulations. It is shown that the proposed controller while appearing in a faster response, is able to overcome random uncertainties of all model parameters.

  16. Time evolution of pore system in lime - Pozzolana composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleželová, Magdaléna; Čáchová, Monika; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Keppert, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The lime - pozzolana mortars and plasters are used in restoration works on building cultural heritage but these materials are also following the trend of energy - efficient solutions in civil engineering. Porosity and pore size distribution is one of crucial parameters influencing engineering properties of porous materials. The pore size distribution of lime based system is changing in time due to chemical processes occurring in the material. The present paper describes time evolution of pore system in lime - pozzolana composites; the obtained results are useful in prediction of performance of lime - pozzolana systems in building structures.

  17. MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER EVOLUTION. V. BINARY STELLAR EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Umbreit, Stefan; Rasio, Frederic A.; Fregeau, John M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of globular clusters containing primordial binaries, including full single and binary stellar evolution using our Monte Carlo cluster evolution code updated with an adaptation of the single and binary stellar evolution codes SSE and BSE from Hurley et al. We describe the modifications that we have made to the code. We present several test calculations and comparisons with existing studies to illustrate the validity of the code. We show that our code finds very good agreement with direct N-body simulations including primordial binaries and stellar evolution. We find significant differences in the evolution of the global properties of the simulated clusters using stellar evolution compared with simulations without any stellar evolution. In particular, we find that the mass loss from the stellar evolution acts as a significant energy production channel simply by reducing the total gravitational binding energy and can significantly prolong the initial core contraction phase before reaching the binary-burning quasi-steady state of the cluster evolution. We simulate a large grid of models varying the initial cluster mass, binary fraction, and concentration parameter, and we compare properties of the simulated clusters with those of the observed Galactic globular clusters (GGCs). We find that simply including stellar evolution in our simulations and assuming the typical initial cluster half-mass radius is approximately a few pc independent of mass, our simulated cluster properties agree well with the observed GGC properties such as the core radius and the ratio of the core radius to the half-mass radius. We explore in some detail qualitatively different clusters in different phases of their evolution and construct synthetic Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams for these clusters.

  18. Lifetime monogamy and the evolution of eusociality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2009-01-01

    and termites is thus analogous to the evolution of multicellularity. Focusing on lifetime monogamy as a universal precondition for the evolution of obligate eusociality simplifies the theory and may help to resolve controversies about levels of selection and targets of adaptation. The monogamy window...... underlines that cooperative breeding and eusociality are different domains of social evolution, characterized by different sectors of parameter space for Hamilton's rule....

  19. Consistent Parameter and Transfer Function Estimation using Context Free Grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Daniel; Herrnegger, Mathew; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    This contribution presents a method for the inference of transfer functions for rainfall-runoff models. Here, transfer functions are defined as parametrized (functional) relationships between a set of spatial predictors (e.g. elevation, slope or soil texture) and model parameters. They are ultimately used for estimation of consistent, spatially distributed model parameters from a limited amount of lumped global parameters. Additionally, they provide a straightforward method for parameter extrapolation from one set of basins to another and can even be used to derive parameterizations for multi-scale models [see: Samaniego et al., 2010]. Yet, currently an actual knowledge of the transfer functions is often implicitly assumed. As a matter of fact, for most cases these hypothesized transfer functions can rarely be measured and often remain unknown. Therefore, this contribution presents a general method for the concurrent estimation of the structure of transfer functions and their respective (global) parameters. Note, that by consequence an estimation of the distributed parameters of the rainfall-runoff model is also undertaken. The method combines two steps to achieve this. The first generates different possible transfer functions. The second then estimates the respective global transfer function parameters. The structural estimation of the transfer functions is based on the context free grammar concept. Chomsky first introduced context free grammars in linguistics [Chomsky, 1956]. Since then, they have been widely applied in computer science. But, to the knowledge of the authors, they have so far not been used in hydrology. Therefore, the contribution gives an introduction to context free grammars and shows how they can be constructed and used for the structural inference of transfer functions. This is enabled by new methods from evolutionary computation, such as grammatical evolution [O'Neill, 2001], which make it possible to exploit the constructed grammar as a

  20. Structural evolution in films of alloy Zn70Al27Cu3 (ZA27)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.H.; Lee, W.B.; Mei, Z.; To, S.; Sze, Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    Films of alloy ZA27 were produced using electron deposition technique. Structural evolution and phase decomposition of the films were studied. It was found that the alloy films were relatively stable because of a strong preferred crystal orientation of the nano-phases. The dependence of nano-phase stability on the Zn content and the preferred crystal orientation is discussed from point of view of Gibbs free energy

  1. The ionisation parameter of star-forming galaxies evolves with the specific star formation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasinen, Melanie; Kewley, Lisa; Bian, Fuyan; Groves, Brent; Kashino, Daichi; Silverman, John; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of the ionisation parameter of star-forming galaxies using a high-redshift (z ˜ 1.5) sample from the FMOS-COSMOS survey and matched low-redshift samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By constructing samples of low-redshift galaxies for which the stellar mass (M*), star formation rate (SFR) and specific star formation rate (sSFR) are matched to the high-redshift sample we remove the effects of an evolution in these properties. We also account for the effect of metallicity by jointly constraining the metallicity and ionisation parameter of each sample. We find an evolution in the ionisation parameter for main-sequence, star-forming galaxies and show that this evolution is driven by the evolution of sSFR. By analysing the matched samples as well as a larger sample of z physically consistent with the definition of the ionisation parameter, a measure of the hydrogen ionising photon flux relative to the number density of hydrogen atoms.

  2. Determination of structural and spectroscopic parameters of 4-hydroxyantipyrine, using DFT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catikkas, B.; Aktan, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, structural and vibrational parameters were calculated. First of all, conformational analysis of 4-hydroxyantipyrine was carried out in gas phase. Then, the geometric parameters (bond length, bond angle and tortion angle) of the most stable conformer were calculated and the Infrared and Raman frequencies of fundamental modes were determined. Calculations were made by using DFT B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) method implemented the Gaussian 03 program. Afterwards, vibrational assignments of the title molecule were calculated by using Scaled Quantum Mechanical (SQM) analysis. In conclusion, calculated values were compared with corresponding experimental results.

  3. Bringing molecules back into molecular evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus O Wilke

    Full Text Available Much molecular-evolution research is concerned with sequence analysis. Yet these sequences represent real, three-dimensional molecules with complex structure and function. Here I highlight a growing trend in the field to incorporate molecular structure and function into computational molecular-evolution work. I consider three focus areas: reconstruction and analysis of past evolutionary events, such as phylogenetic inference or methods to infer selection pressures; development of toy models and simulations to identify fundamental principles of molecular evolution; and atom-level, highly realistic computational modeling of molecular structure and function aimed at making predictions about possible future evolutionary events.

  4. Influence of electrospinning parameters on the structural morphology and diameter of electrospun nanofibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, V

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a simple method of producing nanofibers by introducing electric field into the polymer solutions. We report an experimental investigation on the influence of processing parameters and solution properties on the structural...

  5. Testing general relativity at cosmological scales: Implementation and parameter correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dossett, Jason N.; Ishak, Mustapha; Moldenhauer, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The testing of general relativity at cosmological scales has become a possible and timely endeavor that is not only motivated by the pressing question of cosmic acceleration but also by the proposals of some extensions to general relativity that would manifest themselves at large scales of distance. We analyze here correlations between modified gravity growth parameters and some core cosmological parameters using the latest cosmological data sets including the refined Cosmic Evolution Survey 3D weak lensing. We provide the parametrized modified growth equations and their evolution. We implement known functional and binning approaches, and propose a new hybrid approach to evolve the modified gravity parameters in redshift (time) and scale. The hybrid parametrization combines a binned redshift dependence and a smooth evolution in scale avoiding a jump in the matter power spectrum. The formalism developed to test the consistency of current and future data with general relativity is implemented in a package that we make publicly available and call ISiTGR (Integrated Software in Testing General Relativity), an integrated set of modified modules for the publicly available packages CosmoMC and CAMB, including a modified version of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe-galaxy cross correlation module of Ho et al. and a new weak-lensing likelihood module for the refined Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey weak gravitational lensing tomography data. We obtain parameter constraints and correlation coefficients finding that modified gravity parameters are significantly correlated with σ 8 and mildly correlated with Ω m , for all evolution methods. The degeneracies between σ 8 and modified gravity parameters are found to be substantial for the functional form and also for some specific bins in the hybrid and binned methods indicating that these degeneracies will need to be taken into consideration when using future high precision data.

  6. Comparison of segmentation techniques to determine the geometric parameters of structured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacAulay, Gavin D; Giusca, Claudiu L; Leach, Richard K; Senin, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Structured surfaces, defined as surfaces characterized by topography features whose shape is defined by design specifications, are increasingly being used in industry for a variety of applications, including improving the tribological properties of surfaces. However, characterization of such surfaces still remains an issue. Techniques have been recently proposed, based on identifying and extracting the relevant features from a structured surface so they can be verified individually, using methods derived from those commonly applied to standard-sized parts. Such emerging approaches show promise but are generally complex and characterized by multiple data processing steps making performance difficult to assess. This paper focuses on the segmentation step, i.e. partitioning the topography so that the relevant features can be separated from the background. Segmentation is key for defining the geometric boundaries of the individual feature, which in turn affects any computation of feature size, shape and localization. This paper investigates the effect of varying the segmentation algorithm and its controlling parameters by considering a test case: a structured surface for bearing applications, the relevant features being micro-dimples designed for friction reduction. In particular, the mechanisms through which segmentation leads to identification of the dimple boundary and influences dimensional properties, such as dimple diameter and depth, are illustrated. It is shown that, by using different methods and control parameters, a significant range of measurement results can be achieved, which may not necessarily agree. Indications on how to investigate the influence of each specific choice are given; in particular, stability of the algorithms with respect to control parameters is analyzed as a means to investigate ease of calibration and flexibility to adapt to specific, application-dependent characterization requirements. (paper)

  7. Evolution of the electronic and ionic structure of Mg clusters with increase in cluster size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2003-01-01

    The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral and singly charged magnesium clusters have been investigated using ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory and systematic post–Hartree-Fock many-body perturbation theory accounting for all electrons in the system....... We have investigated the appearance of the elements of the hcp structure and metallic evolution of the magnesium clusters, as well as the stability of linear chains and rings of magnesium atoms. The results obtained are compared with the available experimental data and the results of other...

  8. Analysis of deuterium relaxation-derived methyl axis order parameters and correlation with local structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittermaier, Anthony; Kay, Lewis E.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    1999-01-01

    Methyl axis (S2axis) and backbone NH (S2NH) order parameters derived from eight proteins have been analyzed. Similar distribution profiles for Ala S2axis and S2NH order parameters were observed. A good correlation between the two S2axis values of Val and Leu methyl groups is noted, although differences between order parameters can arise. The relation of S2axis or S2NH to solvent accessibility and packing density has also been investigated. Correlations are weak, likely reflecting the importance of collective, non-local motions in proteins. The lack of correlation between these simple structural parameters and dynamics emphasizes the importance of motional studies to fully characterize proteins

  9. Evaluation of liquid fragility and thermal stability of Al-based metallic glasses by equivalent structure parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuelian; Bian Xiufang; Hu Lina

    2010-01-01

    Based on extended Ideal-Atomic-Packing model, we propose an equivalent structure parameter '6x+11y' to evaluate fragility and thermal stability of Al-TM-RE metallic glasses, where x and y are composition concentrations of transition metal (TM) and rare earth (RE), respectively. Experimental results show that glass forming compositions with '6x+11y' near 100 have the smallest fragility parameter and best structure stability. In addition, '6x+11y' parameter has a positive relationship with onset-crystallization temperature, T x . Al-TM-RE glassy alloys with (6x+11y)≤100 undergo primary crystallization of fcc-Al nanocrystals, while alloys with (6x+11y)>100 exhibit nanoglassy or glassy crystallization behavior.

  10. An improved method for predicting the evolution of the characteristic parameters of an information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushkin, A. V.; Kasatkina, T. I.; Novoseltsev, V. I.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    The article proposes a forecasting method that allows, based on the given values of entropy and error level of the first and second kind, to determine the allowable time for forecasting the development of the characteristic parameters of a complex information system. The main feature of the method under consideration is the determination of changes in the characteristic parameters of the development of the information system in the form of the magnitude of the increment in the ratios of its entropy. When a predetermined value of the prediction error ratio is reached, that is, the entropy of the system, the characteristic parameters of the system and the depth of the prediction in time are estimated. The resulting values of the characteristics and will be optimal, since at that moment the system possessed the best ratio of entropy as a measure of the degree of organization and orderliness of the structure of the system. To construct a method for estimating the depth of prediction, it is expedient to use the maximum principle of the value of entropy.

  11. Assessment of structural model and parameter uncertainty with a multi-model system for soil water balance models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Thomas; Multsch, Sebastian; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    Water for agriculture is strongly limited in arid and semi-arid regions and often of low quality in terms of salinity. The application of saline waters for irrigation increases the salt load in the rooting zone and has to be managed by leaching to maintain a healthy soil, i.e. to wash out salts by additional irrigation. Dynamic simulation models are helpful tools to calculate the root zone water fluxes and soil salinity content in order to investigate best management practices. However, there is little information on structural and parameter uncertainty for simulations regarding the water and salt balance of saline irrigation. Hence, we established a multi-model system with four different models (AquaCrop, RZWQM, SWAP, Hydrus1D/UNSATCHEM) to analyze the structural and parameter uncertainty by using the Global Likelihood and Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) method. Hydrus1D/UNSATCHEM and SWAP were set up with multiple sets of different implemented functions (e.g. matric and osmotic stress for root water uptake) which results in a broad range of different model structures. The simulations were evaluated against soil water and salinity content observations. The posterior distribution of the GLUE analysis gives behavioral parameters sets and reveals uncertainty intervals for parameter uncertainty. Throughout all of the model sets, most parameters accounting for the soil water balance show a low uncertainty, only one or two out of five to six parameters in each model set displays a high uncertainty (e.g. pore-size distribution index in SWAP and Hydrus1D/UNSATCHEM). The differences between the models and model setups reveal the structural uncertainty. The highest structural uncertainty is observed for deep percolation fluxes between the model sets of Hydrus1D/UNSATCHEM (~200 mm) and RZWQM (~500 mm) that are more than twice as high for the latter. The model sets show a high variation in uncertainty intervals for deep percolation as well, with an interquartile range (IQR) of

  12. Theoretical aspects of the formation and evolution of charged particle tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Miterev, A M

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical ideas on the formation and evolution of charged particle tracks in a condensed medium are discussed. The historical development of the field is briefly reviewed. The distribution of charged particle energies on quantum states and the volume of the absorbing medium are considered. and conditions for the formation of various track structures are discussed. The structures of extended heavy-ion tracks are compared for some ion parameters and track characteristics take to be the same. Relaxation processes in the tracks of multicharged ions ate analyzed. Track effects ate considered and possible mechanisms for the formation of chemically active defects in a latent track are described

  13. Constraints on Composition, Structure and Evolution of the Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Gianluca; Bonadiman, Costanza; Aulbach, Sonja; Schutt, Derek

    2015-05-01

    The idea for this special issue was triggered at the Goldschmidt Conference held in Florence (August 25-30, 2013), where we convened a session titled "Integrated Geophysical-Geochemical Constraints on Composition and Structure of the Lithosphere". The invitation to contribute was extended not only to the session participants but also to a wider spectrum of colleagues working on related topics. Consequently, a diverse group of Earth scientists encompassing geophysicists, geodynamicists, geochemists and petrologists contributed to this Volume, providing a comprehensive overview on the nature and evolution of lithospheric mantle by combining studies that exploit different types of data and interpretative approaches. The integration of geochemical and geodynamic datasets and their interpretation represents the state of the art in our knowledge of the lithosphere and beyond, and could serve as a blueprint for future strategies in concept and methodology to advance our knowledge of this and other terrestrial reservoirs.

  14. Impact of Clinical Parameters in the Intrahost Evolution of HIV-1 Subtype B in Pediatric Patients: A Machine Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Sánchez, Patricia; Cobos, Alberto; Navaro, Marisa; Ramos, José Tomas; Pagán, Israel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Determining the factors modulating the genetic diversity of HIV-1 populations is essential to understand viral evolution. This study analyzes the relative importance of clinical factors in the intrahost HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) evolution and in the fixation of drug resistance mutations (DRM) during longitudinal pediatric HIV-1 infection. We recovered 162 partial HIV-1B pol sequences (from 3 to 24 per patient) from 24 perinatally infected patients from the Madrid Cohort of HIV-1 infected children and adolescents in a time interval ranging from 2.2 to 20.3 years. We applied machine learning classification methods to analyze the relative importance of 28 clinical/epidemiological/virological factors in the HIV-1B evolution to predict HIV-1B genetic diversity (d), nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations (dN, dS) and DRM presence. Most of the 24 HIV-1B infected pediatric patients were Spanish (91.7%), diagnosed before 2000 (83.3%), and all were antiretroviral therapy experienced. They had from 0.3 to 18.8 years of HIV-1 exposure at sampling time. Most sequences presented DRM. The best-predictor variables for HIV-1B evolutionary parameters were the age of HIV-1 diagnosis for d, the age at first antiretroviral treatment for dN and the year of HIV-1 diagnosis for ds. The year of infection (birth year) and year of sampling seemed to be relevant for fixation of both DRM at large and, considering drug families, to protease inhibitors (PI). This study identifies, for the first time using machine learning, the factors affecting more HIV-1B pol evolution and those affecting DRM fixation in HIV-1B infected pediatric patients. PMID:29044435

  15. Application of differential evolution algorithm on self-potential data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangtao; Yin, Minghao

    2012-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a population based evolutionary algorithm widely used for solving multidimensional global optimization problems over continuous spaces, and has been successfully used to solve several kinds of problems. In this paper, differential evolution is used for quantitative interpretation of self-potential data in geophysics. Six parameters are estimated including the electrical dipole moment, the depth of the source, the distance from the origin, the polarization angle and the regional coefficients. This study considers three kinds of data from Turkey: noise-free data, contaminated synthetic data, and Field example. The differential evolution and the corresponding model parameters are constructed as regards the number of the generations. Then, we show the vibration of the parameters at the vicinity of the low misfit area. Moreover, we show how the frequency distribution of each parameter is related to the number of the DE iteration. Experimental results show the DE can be used for solving the quantitative interpretation of self-potential data efficiently compared with previous methods.

  16. STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION AND COMPOSITION CHANGE IN THE SURFACE REGION OF POLYPROPYLENE/CLAY NANOCOMPOSITES ANNEALED AT HIGH TEMPERATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐涛

    2009-01-01

    A model experiment was done to clear the formation mechanism of protective layers during combustion of polypropylene(PP)/organically modified montmorillonite(OMMT) nanocomposites.The investigation was focused on the effects of annealing temperature on the structural changes and protective layer formation.The decomposition of OMMT and degradation of PP/OMMT nanocomposites were characterized by means of thermogravimetric analysis(TGA).The structural evolution and composition change in the surface region of...

  17. The evolution of Ω in inflationary universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.S.; Ellis, G.F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Phase-plane diagrams are presented showing the evolution of the cosmological density parameter Ω in terms of the Robertson-Walker scale factor S. These diagrams are given for both simple fluids and for mixtures of fluids; this enables construction of such diagrams for inflationary universes, whether the inflation is exponential or power-law inflation. The diagrams enable simple consideration of the evolution of the density parameter in inflationary universe models, and clearly demonstrate that there exist such models leading to any value whatever for Ω at the present day. (author)

  18. Determination of cosmological parameters: An introduction for non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Then I show how the age of the universe depends on them, followed by the evolution of the scale parameter of the universe for various values of the density parameters. Then I define strategies for measuring them, and show the results for the recent determination of these parameters from measurements on supernovas of ...

  19. Structural evolution of Eucalyptus tar pitch-based carbons during carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prauchner, Marcos J.; Pasa, Vanya M.D.; Molhallem, Nelcy D.S.; Otani, Choyu; Otani, Satika; Pardini, Luiz C.

    2005-01-01

    Wood tar pitches are generated as by-products by the charcoal manufacturing industry. They have a macromolecular structure constituted mainly by phenolic, guaiacylic, and siringylic units common to lignin. Due to their characteristics, biopitches are been investigated as precursors of carbon materials such as carbon fibers, bioelectrodes and activated carbons. In the present work the structural evolution of Eucalyptus tar pitches under carbonization is investigated, which is important for the improvement of planning and control of pitch processing and end-product properties during carbon material production. The studies involve X-ray diffraction and infrared analyses, besides helium density, BET surface area and BJH pore volume measurements. The results showed that the conversion of pitch into carbon basically involves three steps: (1) Up to around 600 deg C the material has an highly disordered structure, being the release of aliphatic side chains and volatiles the main events taking place. (2) Between 600 deg C and 800 deg C, condensation of aromatic rings occurs to form bi-dimensional hexagonal networks so that micro- and mesoporosity are developed. The 800 deg C-coke is constituted by two phases: one highly disordered and another more crystalline. (3) Over 800 deg C, both phases are gradually ordered. As defects are gradually removed, surface area and porosity decrease, approaching zero for the 2100 deg C-coke

  20. Discharge control and evolution in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Bell, M.; Boody, F.; Bush, C.; Cecchi, J.L.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Efthimion, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was designed to explore plasma confinement and heating at reactor-like parameters. Operation of both the toroidal field and plasma current at full design parameters has been achieved and the plasma parameters are summarized in this work. Control of the discharge evolution has played an important role in attaining these parameters. The control of impurities in a tokamak is largely a result of the choice of limiter and wall materials, conditioning techniques and gettering. The impurity control procedures adopted during the run period ending April 13, 1985 are discussed. The discussion of discharge evolution and control is broken down into discharge initiation, volt-second consumption, current and density ramp-up and ramp-down. Also discussed is control of the current ramp-up using a plasma growing technique and the control of density using gas puffing, pellet injection and neutral beam fueling, along with a discussion of the density range which is found to increase plasma current

  1. Compatible topologies and parameters for NMR structure determination of carbohydrates by simulated annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yingang

    2017-01-01

    The use of NMR methods to determine the three-dimensional structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins is still challenging, in part because of the lack of standard protocols. In order to increase the convenience of structure determination, the topology and parameter files for carbohydrates in the program Crystallography & NMR System (CNS) were investigated and new files were developed to be compatible with the standard simulated annealing protocols for proteins and nucleic acids. Recalculat...

  2. Evolution of structural and optical properties in the course of thermal evolution of sol-gel derived cobalt-doped gahnite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurajica, S.; Tkalcec, E.; Grzeta, B.; Ivekovic, D.; Mandic, V.; Popovic, J.; Kranzelic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Distribution of Co 2+ ions in zinc cobalt aluminate lattice seats depend on Co loading. The green color of samples at lower temperatures is a consequence of partial oxidation of Co 2+ ions and their accommodation in octahedral sites. Thermal treatment at higher temperatures promotes gradual change of color to blue, characteristic for tetrahedrally coordinated Co 2+ ions. The spectra evolution could be interpreted as a progressive reduction of Co 3+ to Co 2+ ions at higher temperatures. - Abstract: Thermal evolution of sol-gel derived gahnite (ZnAl 2 O 4 ) with 4, 8 and 12 at.% of Zn replaced with Co was studied by thermal analysis techniques (DTA/TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Zinc-cobalt spinel powders were produced by gel heat treatment at temperatures as low as 400 o C. Crystal structure was characterized using Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns for the samples annealed at 800 o C, simultaneously with the analysis of diffraction line broadening. It was found out that the distribution of Co 2+ ions in tetrahedral and octahedral sites of zinc cobalt aluminate crystal lattice, crystallite size and lattice strain depend on Co loading. The green color of samples thermally treated at T 2+ ions at lower temperatures and accommodation of Co 3+ ions in octahedral sites. Thermal treatment at higher temperatures promote gradual change of color from green to blue, characteristic for tetrahedrally coordinated Co 2+ ions. The spectra evolution could be interpreted as a progressive reduction of Co 3+ to Co 2+ ions at higher temperatures.

  3. Spectral-luminosity evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Darryl; Boldt, Elihu

    1992-01-01

    The origin of the cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds is explained via the mechanism of AGN spectral-luminosity evolution. The spectral evolution of precursor active galaxies into AGN, and Newton-Raphson input and output parameters are discussed.

  4. Structural observability analysis and EKF based parameter estimation of building heating models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.W.U. Perera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Research for enhanced energy-efficient buildings has been given much recognition in the recent years owing to their high energy consumptions. Increasing energy needs can be precisely controlled by practicing advanced controllers for building Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning (HVAC systems. Advanced controllers require a mathematical building heating model to operate, and these models need to be accurate and computationally efficient. One main concern associated with such models is the accurate estimation of the unknown model parameters. This paper presents the feasibility of implementing a simplified building heating model and the computation of physical parameters using an off-line approach. Structural observability analysis is conducted using graph-theoretic techniques to analyze the observability of the developed system model. Then Extended Kalman Filter (EKF algorithm is utilized for parameter estimates using the real measurements of a single-zone building. The simulation-based results confirm that even with a simple model, the EKF follows the state variables accurately. The predicted parameters vary depending on the inputs and disturbances.

  5. A parametric reconstruction of the deceleration parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Mamon, Abdulla [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal (India); Visva-Bharati, Department of Physics, Santiniketan (India); Das, Sudipta [Visva-Bharati, Department of Physics, Santiniketan (India)

    2017-07-15

    The present work is based on a parametric reconstruction of the deceleration parameter q(z) in a model for the spatially flat FRW universe filled with dark energy and non-relativistic matter. In cosmology, the parametric reconstruction technique deals with an attempt to build up a model by choosing some specific evolution scenario for a cosmological parameter and then estimate the values of the parameters with the help of different observational datasets. In this paper, we have proposed a logarithmic parametrization of q(z) to probe the evolution history of the universe. Using the type Ia supernova, baryon acoustic oscillation and the cosmic microwave background datasets, the constraints on the arbitrary model parameters q{sub 0} and q{sub 1} are obtained (within 1σ and 2σ confidence limits) by χ{sup 2}-minimization technique. We have then reconstructed the deceleration parameter, the total EoS parameter ω{sub tot}, the jerk parameter and have compared the reconstructed results of q(z) with other well-known parametrizations of q(z). We have also shown that two model selection criteria (namely, the Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion) provide a clear indication that our reconstructed model is well consistent with other popular models. (orig.)

  6. A Python Calculator for Supernova Remnant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, D. A.; Williams, J. E.

    2017-05-01

    A freely available Python code for modeling supernova remnant (SNR) evolution has been created. This software is intended for two purposes: to understand SNR evolution and to use in modeling observations of SNR for obtaining good estimates of SNR properties. It includes all phases for the standard path of evolution for spherically symmetric SNRs. In addition, alternate evolutionary models are available, including evolution in a cloudy ISM, the fractional energy-loss model, and evolution in a hot low-density ISM. The graphical interface takes in various parameters and produces outputs such as shock radius and velocity versus time, as well as SNR surface brightness profile and spectrum. Some interesting properties of SNR evolution are demonstrated using the program.

  7. A new unbiased stochastic derivative estimator for discontinuous sample performances with structural parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Yijie; Fu, Michael C.; Hu, Jian Qiang; Heidergott, Bernd

    In this paper, we propose a new unbiased stochastic derivative estimator in a framework that can handle discontinuous sample performances with structural parameters. This work extends the three most popular unbiased stochastic derivative estimators: (1) infinitesimal perturbation analysis (IPA), (2)

  8. The Taxonomy of Blue Amorphous Galaxies. II. Structure and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Amanda T.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    1999-09-01

    Dwarf galaxies play an important role in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution, and starbursts are believed to affect the structure and evolution of dwarf galaxies strongly. We have therefore embarked on a systematic study of 12 of the nearest dwarf galaxies thought to be undergoing bursts of star formation. These were selected primarily by their morphological type (blue ``amorphous'' galaxies). We show that these blue amorphous galaxies are not physically distinguishable from dwarfs selected as starbursting by other methods, such as blue compact dwarfs (BCDs) and H II galaxies. All these classes exhibit surface brightness profiles that are exponential in the outer regions (r>~1.5re) but often have a predominantly central blue excess, suggesting a young burst in an older, redder galaxy. Typically, the starbursting ``cores'' are young (~107-108 yr) events compared to the older (~109-1010 yr) underlying galaxy (the ``envelope''). The ratio of the core to envelope in blue light ranges from essentially zero to about 2. These starbursts are therefore modest events involving only a few percent of the stellar mass. The envelopes have surface brightnesses that are much higher than typical dwarf irregular (dI) galaxies, so it is unlikely that there is a straightforward evolutionary relation between typical dIs and dwarf starburst galaxies. Instead we suggest that amorphous galaxies may repeatedly cycle through starburst and quiescent phases, corresponding to the galaxies with strong and weak/absent cores, respectively. Once amorphous galaxies use up the available gas (either through star formation or galactic winds) so that star formation is shut off, the faded remnants would strongly resemble dwarf elliptical galaxies. However, in the current cosmological epoch, this is evidently a slow process that is the aftermath of a series of many weak, recurring bursts. Present-day dE's must have experienced more rapid and intense evolution than this in the distant past.

  9. Homogenization-based interval analysis for structural-acoustic problem involving periodical composites and multi-scale uncertain-but-bounded parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Yu, Dejie; Xia, Baizhan; Liu, Jian; Ma, Zhengdong

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a homogenization-based interval analysis method for the prediction of coupled structural-acoustic systems involving periodical composites and multi-scale uncertain-but-bounded parameters. In the structural-acoustic system, the macro plate structure is assumed to be composed of a periodically uniform microstructure. The equivalent macro material properties of the microstructure are computed using the homogenization method. By integrating the first-order Taylor expansion interval analysis method with the homogenization-based finite element method, a homogenization-based interval finite element method (HIFEM) is developed to solve a periodical composite structural-acoustic system with multi-scale uncertain-but-bounded parameters. The corresponding formulations of the HIFEM are deduced. A subinterval technique is also introduced into the HIFEM for higher accuracy. Numerical examples of a hexahedral box and an automobile passenger compartment are given to demonstrate the efficiency of the presented method for a periodical composite structural-acoustic system with multi-scale uncertain-but-bounded parameters.

  10. The molecular clock of neutral evolution can be accelerated or slowed by asymmetric spatial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Sample, Christine; Dementieva, Yulia; Medeiros, Ruben C; Paoletti, Christopher; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-02-01

    Over time, a population acquires neutral genetic substitutions as a consequence of random drift. A famous result in population genetics asserts that the rate, K, at which these substitutions accumulate in the population coincides with the mutation rate, u, at which they arise in individuals: K = u. This identity enables genetic sequence data to be used as a "molecular clock" to estimate the timing of evolutionary events. While the molecular clock is known to be perturbed by selection, it is thought that K = u holds very generally for neutral evolution. Here we show that asymmetric spatial population structure can alter the molecular clock rate for neutral mutations, leading to either Ku. Our results apply to a general class of haploid, asexually reproducing, spatially structured populations. Deviations from K = u occur because mutations arise unequally at different sites and have different probabilities of fixation depending on where they arise. If birth rates are uniform across sites, then K ≤ u. In general, K can take any value between 0 and Nu. Our model can be applied to a variety of population structures. In one example, we investigate the accumulation of genetic mutations in the small intestine. In another application, we analyze over 900 Twitter networks to study the effect of network topology on the fixation of neutral innovations in social evolution.

  11. The molecular clock of neutral evolution can be accelerated or slowed by asymmetric spatial structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Allen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Over time, a population acquires neutral genetic substitutions as a consequence of random drift. A famous result in population genetics asserts that the rate, K, at which these substitutions accumulate in the population coincides with the mutation rate, u, at which they arise in individuals: K = u. This identity enables genetic sequence data to be used as a "molecular clock" to estimate the timing of evolutionary events. While the molecular clock is known to be perturbed by selection, it is thought that K = u holds very generally for neutral evolution. Here we show that asymmetric spatial population structure can alter the molecular clock rate for neutral mutations, leading to either Ku. Our results apply to a general class of haploid, asexually reproducing, spatially structured populations. Deviations from K = u occur because mutations arise unequally at different sites and have different probabilities of fixation depending on where they arise. If birth rates are uniform across sites, then K ≤ u. In general, K can take any value between 0 and Nu. Our model can be applied to a variety of population structures. In one example, we investigate the accumulation of genetic mutations in the small intestine. In another application, we analyze over 900 Twitter networks to study the effect of network topology on the fixation of neutral innovations in social evolution.

  12. Diagnostic of corrosion–erosion evolution for [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, C.; Villarreal, M. [Thin Film Group, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: jcaicedoangulo1@gmail.com [Powder Metallurgy and Processing of Solid Recycled Research Group, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Aperador, W. [Ingeniería Mecatrónica, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Bogotá (Colombia); Caicedo, H.H. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prieto, P. [Thin Film Group, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Center of Excellence for Novel Materials, CENM, Cali (Colombia)

    2013-10-31

    HfN/VN multilayered systems were grown on 4140 steel substrates with the aim to improve their electrochemical behavior. The multilayered coatings were grown via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique by systematically varying the bilayer period (Λ) and the bilayer number (n) while maintaining constant the total coating thickness (∼ 1.2 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [HfN/VN]{sub n} multilayered coatings. The maximum corrosion resistance was obtained for coatings with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to bilayer n = 80. Polarization resistance and corrosion rate was around 112.19 kΩ cm{sup 2} and 0.094*10{sup −3} mmy respectively; moreover, these multilayered system showed a decrease of 80% on mass loss due to the corrosive–erosive process, in relation to multilayered systems with n = 1 and Λ = 1200. HfN/VN multilayers have been designed and deposited on Si (100) and AISI 4140 steel substrates with bilayer periods (Λ) in a broad range, from nanometers to hundreds of nanometers to study the microstructural evolution and electrochemical progress with decreasing bilayer thickness. - Highlights: • Enhancements on surface electrochemical properties and response to surface corrosion attack. • Superficial phenomenon that occurs in corrosion surface of [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n • Corrosion–erosion evolution for [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n structures.

  13. Diagnostic of corrosion–erosion evolution for [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, C.; Villarreal, M.; Caicedo, J.C.; Aperador, W.; Caicedo, H.H.; Prieto, P.

    2013-01-01

    HfN/VN multilayered systems were grown on 4140 steel substrates with the aim to improve their electrochemical behavior. The multilayered coatings were grown via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique by systematically varying the bilayer period (Λ) and the bilayer number (n) while maintaining constant the total coating thickness (∼ 1.2 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [HfN/VN] n multilayered coatings. The maximum corrosion resistance was obtained for coatings with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to bilayer n = 80. Polarization resistance and corrosion rate was around 112.19 kΩ cm 2 and 0.094*10 −3 mmy respectively; moreover, these multilayered system showed a decrease of 80% on mass loss due to the corrosive–erosive process, in relation to multilayered systems with n = 1 and Λ = 1200. HfN/VN multilayers have been designed and deposited on Si (100) and AISI 4140 steel substrates with bilayer periods (Λ) in a broad range, from nanometers to hundreds of nanometers to study the microstructural evolution and electrochemical progress with decreasing bilayer thickness. - Highlights: • Enhancements on surface electrochemical properties and response to surface corrosion attack. • Superficial phenomenon that occurs in corrosion surface of [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n • Corrosion–erosion evolution for [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n structures

  14. Structural and interaction parameters of thermosensitive native α-elastin biohybrid microgel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaceanu, Andreea; Singh, Smriti; Demco, Dan E.; Möller, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The structural and water interaction parameters for native, α-elastin biohybrid microgel crosslinked with hydrophilic and hydrophobic crosslinkers are obtained from the volume phase transition temperature behaviour, 1H high-resolution magic-angle sample spinning transverse magnetization relaxation NMR, and modified Flory-Rehner swelling theory. Firstly, considering a homogeneous morphology the number of subchains in the biohybrid microgel, the residual water in deswollen state as a function of crosslink density and the temperature dependence of the Flory biopolymer-water interaction parameters are reported for the biohybrid microgels prepared with hydrophilic (PEG-DGE) and hydrophobic (BS3) crosslinkers. The Flory-Rehner classical approach is subsequently modified taking into account the heterogeneities observed by NMR transverse relaxation measurements. Two differently mobile regions are determined, a hydrophobic domain and a crosslinking domain with relative reduced mobility. For the first time, the influence of chain mobility on the Flory interaction parameter is investigated through a modified Flory state equation. The contributions of amino-acids located in the hydrophobic and crosslinking domains in the polypeptide sequence are separated while analyzing the biopolymer-water interaction.

  15. Detection, characterization and evolution of internal repeats in Chitinases of known 3-D structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manigandan Sivaji

    Full Text Available Chitinase proteins have evolved and diversified almost in all organisms ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. During evolution, internal repeats may appear in amino acid sequences of proteins which alter the structural and functional features. Here we deciphered the internal repeats from Chitinase and characterized the structural similarities between them. Out of 24 diverse Chitinase sequences selected, six sequences (2CJL, 2DSK, 2XVP, 2Z37, 3EBV and 3HBE did not contain any internal repeats of amino acid sequences. Ten sequences contained repeats of length <50, and the remaining 8 sequences contained repeat length between 50 and 100 residues. Two Chitinase sequences, 1ITX and 3SIM, were found to be structurally similar when analyzed using secondary structure of Chitinase from secondary and 3-Dimensional structure database of Protein Data Bank. Internal repeats of 3N17 and 1O6I were also involved in the ligand-binding site of those Chitinase proteins, respectively. Our analyses enhance our understanding towards the identification of structural characteristics of internal repeats in Chitinase proteins.

  16. Δη − Δφ correlations and the ridge structure in STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva, L C

    2012-01-01

    Triggered di-hadron correlation studies using central Au+Au collisions at √S NN = 200 GeV in STAR revealed a novel ridge-like structure in two dimensions (Δη, Δφ) for high p T particles. A similar structure is also present in an inclusive un-triggered di-hadron correlation analysis. We study the (p T ) evolution of di-hadron correlations by increasing the lower p T acceptance of both charged particles. A smooth evolution of data is observed and our results reproduce the triggered analysis structure near (p T ) = 2.7 GeV/c. We quantify the correlation structure evolution by fitting a model function. The model function emphasizes possible initial state fluctuation contributions via the use of higher harmonic model components v n (n=1,2,3,4,5) and a remainder which is modeled via an asymmetric 2d Gaussian. The extracted parameters are compared to model predictions and p+p data at √S NN = 200 GeV and possible origins of the nearside structure are discussed.

  17. Micro-Structural Evolution and Size-Effects in Plastically Deformed Single Crystals: Strain Gradient Continuum Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah

    the macroscopic effects related to strain gradients, most predict smooth micro-structures. The evolution of dislocation micro-structures, during plastic straining of ductile crystalline materials, is highly complex and nonuniform. Published experimental measurements on deformed metal crystals show distinct......An extensive amount of research has been devoted to the development of micro-mechanics based gradient plasticity continuum theories, which are necessary for modeling micron-scale plasticity when large spatial gradients of plastic strain appear. While many models have proven successful in capturing...... strain. It is clear that many challenges are associated with modeling dislocation structures, within a framework based on continuum fields, however, since the strain gradient effects are attributed to the dislocation micro-structure, it is a natural step, in the further development of gradient theories...

  18. Dynamic analysis and reliability assessment of structures with uncertain-but-bounded parameters under stochastic process excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Duy Minh; Gao, Wei; Song, Chongmin; Tangaramvong, Sawekchai

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the non-deterministic dynamic analysis and reliability assessment of structures with uncertain-but-bounded parameters under stochastic process excitations. Random ground acceleration from earthquake motion is adopted to illustrate the stochastic process force. The exact change ranges of natural frequencies, random vibration displacement and stress responses of structures are investigated under the interval analysis framework. Formulations for structural reliability are developed considering the safe boundary and structural random vibration responses as interval parameters. An improved particle swarm optimization algorithm, namely randomised lower sequence initialized high-order nonlinear particle swarm optimization algorithm, is employed to capture the better bounds of structural dynamic characteristics, random vibration responses and reliability. Three numerical examples are used to demonstrate the presented method for interval random vibration analysis and reliability assessment of structures. The accuracy of the results obtained by the presented method is verified by the randomised Quasi-Monte Carlo simulation method (QMCSM) and direct Monte Carlo simulation method (MCSM). - Highlights: • Interval uncertainty is introduced into structural random vibration responses. • Interval dynamic reliability assessments of structures are implemented. • Boundaries of structural dynamic response and reliability are achieved

  19. Automatic Clustering Using FSDE-Forced Strategy Differential Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasid, A.

    2018-01-01

    Clustering analysis is important in datamining for unsupervised data, cause no adequate prior knowledge. One of the important tasks is defining the number of clusters without user involvement that is known as automatic clustering. This study intends on acquiring cluster number automatically utilizing forced strategy differential evolution (AC-FSDE). Two mutation parameters, namely: constant parameter and variable parameter are employed to boost differential evolution performance. Four well-known benchmark datasets were used to evaluate the algorithm. Moreover, the result is compared with other state of the art automatic clustering methods. The experiment results evidence that AC-FSDE is better or competitive with other existing automatic clustering algorithm.

  20. THE STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF FORMING AND EARLY STAGE STAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaehnig, Karl O.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the degree of angular substructure in the stellar position distribution of young members of Galactic star-forming regions, looking for correlations with distance from cluster center, surface number density of stars, and local dynamical age. To this end we adopt the catalog of members in 18 young (∼1-3 Myr) clusters from the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray Survey and the statistical analysis of the angular dispersion parameter, δ ADP, N . We find statistically significant correlation between δ ADP, N and physical projected distance from the center of the clusters, with the centers appearing smoother than the outskirts, consistent with more rapid dynamical processing on local dynamical, free-fall or orbital timescales. Similarly, smoother distributions are seen in regions of higher surface density, or older dynamical ages. These results indicate that dynamical processing that erases substructure is already well-advanced in young, sometimes still-forming, clusters. Such observations of the dissipation of substructure have the potential to constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of young and forming clusters

  1. Output-Only Modal Parameter Recursive Estimation of Time-Varying Structures via a Kernel Ridge Regression FS-TARMA Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Sai Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modal parameter estimation plays an important role in vibration-based damage detection and is worth more attention and investigation, as changes in modal parameters are usually being used as damage indicators. This paper focuses on the problem of output-only modal parameter recursive estimation of time-varying structures based upon parameterized representations of the time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TARMA. A kernel ridge regression functional series TARMA (FS-TARMA recursive identification scheme is proposed and subsequently employed for the modal parameter estimation of a numerical three-degree-of-freedom time-varying structural system and a laboratory time-varying structure consisting of a simply supported beam and a moving mass sliding on it. The proposed method is comparatively assessed against an existing recursive pseudolinear regression FS-TARMA approach via Monte Carlo experiments and shown to be capable of accurately tracking the time-varying dynamics in a recursive manner.

  2. Polyamorphic Transformations in Fe-Ni-C Liquids: Implications for Chemical Evolution of Terrestrial Planets: Fe-Ni-C liquid structural change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Xiaojing [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu HI USA; Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu HI USA; Chen, Bin [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu HI USA; Wang, Jianwei [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge LA USA; Kono, Yoshio [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne IL USA; Zhu, Feng [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI USA

    2017-12-01

    During the formation of the Earth's core, the segregation of metallic liquids from silicate mantle should have left behind evident geochemical imprints on both the mantle and the core. Some distinctive geochemical signatures of the mantle-derived rocks likely own their origin to the metal-silicate differentiation of the primitive Earth, setting our planet apart from undifferentiated meteorites as well as terrestrial planets or moons isotopically and compositionally. Understanding the chemical evolution of terrestrial planetary bodies requires knowledge on properties of both liquid iron alloys and silicates equilibrating under physicochemical conditions pertinent to the deep magma ocean. Here we report experimental and computational results on the pressure-induced structural evolution of iron-nickel liquids alloyed with carbon. Our X-ray diffraction experiments up to 7.3 gigapascals (GPa) demonstrate that Fe-Ni (Fe90Ni10) liquids alloyed with 3 and 5 wt % carbon undergo a polyamorphic liquid structure transition at approximately 5 GPa. Corroborating the experimental observations, our first-principles molecular dynamic calculations reveal that the structural transitions result from the marked prevalence of three-atom face-sharing polyhedral connections in the liquids at >5 GPa. The structure and polyamorphic transitions of liquid iron-nickel-carbon alloys govern their physical and chemical properties and may thus cast fresh light on the chemical evolution of terrestrial planets and moons.

  3. Gravothermal aspects in evolution of the stars and the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Daiichiro; Eriguchi, Yoshiharu; Hachisu, Izumi.

    1982-01-01

    In celestial bodies and the universe self-gravity plays an essential role in determining their nature and evolution. Global thermodynamics of such self-gravitating systems is discussed. They exhibit thermodynamically peculiar nature such as negative specific heat, and, depending on parameters involved, they have no state of stable thermal equilibrium within the framework of Newtonian gravity. The expansion of the universe produces a change in the thermodynamic boundary conditions for subsystems embedded in the universe. Such situations are related with the origin of their evolution (or, in other words, emergence of diversities, orders or spatial structures) and generation of information. Such phenomena are known in relation to stellar evolution, gravothermal catastrophe of self-gravitating systems (star itself or gravitational many body system), formation of black holes and evolution of the universe. Their inter-relations are clarified from the standpoint of thermodynamics of self-gravitating systems, black holes, dissipative open systems and irreversible processes, and of cosmology. It is shown that the expansion of the universe and the effect of self-gravity are essential in generation of information and as a ponderamotive force of evolution. The laws of physics including the second law of thermodynamics hold even in such processes. Thus, the generation of information is formulated rigorously, while the concept of evolution can be defined not in a simple and unique fashion but in relation with ''apparent'' concept of common sense in which some interaction is overlooked. (author)

  4. Objective characterization of bruise evolution using photothermal depth profiling and Monte Carlo modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows noninvasive determination of laser-induced temperature depth profiles in optically scattering layered structures. The obtained profiles provide information on spatial distribution of selected chromophores such as melanin and hemoglobin in human skin. We apply the described approach to study time evolution of incidental bruises (hematomas) in human subjects. By combining numerical simulations of laser energy deposition in bruised skin with objective fitting of the predicted and measured PPTR signals, we can quantitatively characterize the key processes involved in bruise evolution (i.e., hemoglobin mass diffusion and biochemical decomposition). Simultaneous analysis of PPTR signals obtained at various times post injury provides an insight into the variations of these parameters during the bruise healing process. The presented methodology and results advance our understanding of the bruise evolution and represent an important step toward development of an objective technique for age determination of traumatic bruises in forensic medicine.

  5. Helicity evolution at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    We construct small-x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g 1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of α s ln 2  (1/x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of α s ln (1/x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation effects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-N c and large-N c   N f limits. As a cross-check, in the ladder approximation, our equations map onto the same ladder limit of the infrared evolution equations for the g 1 structure function derived previously by Bartels, Ermolaev and Ryskin http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s002880050285.

  6. Surface ripple evolution by argon ion irradiation in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Meetika; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu

    2016-01-01

    In this report, an attempt has been made to investigate the morphological evolution of nanoscale surface ripples on aliphatic (polypropylene, PP) and aromatic (polyethylene terephthalate, PET) polymeric substrates irradiated with 50 keV Ar"+ ions. The specimens were sputtered at off normal incidence of 30° with 5 × 10"1"6 Ar"+ cm"−"2. The topographical features and structural behavior of the specimens were studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and UV-Visible spectroscopy techniques, respectively. The Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter simulations were performed to calculate sputtering yield of irradiated PP and PET polymers. Sputtering yield of carbon atoms has been found to be smaller for PP (0.40) as compared to PET (0.73), which is attributed to the different structures of two polymers. AFM analysis demonstrates the evolution of ripple like features with amplitude (2.50 nm) and wavelength (690 nm) on PET while that of lower amplitude (1.50 nm) and higher wavelength (980 nm) on PP specimen. The disorder parameter (Urbach energy) has been found to increase significantly from 0.30 eV to 1.67 eV in case of PP as compared to a lesser increase from 0.35 eV to 0.72 eV in case of PET as revealed by UV-Visible characterization. A mutual correlation between ion beam sputtering induced topographical variations with that of enhancement in the disorder parameter of the specimens has been discussed.

  7. Untangling Galaxy Components - The Angular Momentum Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Martha; Merrifield, Michael; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a new technique to decompose Integral Field spectral data cubes into separate bulge and disk components, allowing us to study the kinematic and stellar population properties of the individual components and how they vary with position. We present here the application of this method to a sample of fast rotator early type galaxies from the MaNGA integral field survey, and demonstrate how it can be used to explore key properties of the individual components. By extracting ages, metallicities and the angular momentum parameter lambda of the bulges and disks, we show how this method can give us new insights into the underlying structure of the galaxies and discuss what this can tell us about their evolution history.

  8. Chempy: A flexible chemical evolution model for abundance fitting. Do the Sun's abundances alone constrain chemical evolution models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybizki, Jan; Just, Andreas; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-09-01

    Elemental abundances of stars are the result of the complex enrichment history of their galaxy. Interpretation of observed abundances requires flexible modeling tools to explore and quantify the information about Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) stored in such data. Here we present Chempy, a newly developed code for GCE modeling, representing a parametrized open one-zone model within a Bayesian framework. A Chempy model is specified by a set of five to ten parameters that describe the effective galaxy evolution along with the stellar and star-formation physics: for example, the star-formation history (SFH), the feedback efficiency, the stellar initial mass function (IMF), and the incidence of supernova of type Ia (SN Ia). Unlike established approaches, Chempy can sample the posterior probability distribution in the full model parameter space and test data-model matches for different nucleosynthetic yield sets. It is essentially a chemical evolution fitting tool. We straightforwardly extend Chempy to a multi-zone scheme. As an illustrative application, we show that interesting parameter constraints result from only the ages and elemental abundances of the Sun, Arcturus, and the present-day interstellar medium (ISM). For the first time, we use such information to infer the IMF parameter via GCE modeling, where we properly marginalize over nuisance parameters and account for different yield sets. We find that 11.6+ 2.1-1.6% of the IMF explodes as core-collapse supernova (CC-SN), compatible with Salpeter (1955, ApJ, 121, 161). We also constrain the incidence of SN Ia per 103M⊙ to 0.5-1.4. At the same time, this Chempy application shows persistent discrepancies between predicted and observed abundances for some elements, irrespective of the chosen yield set. These cannot be remedied by any variations of Chempy's parameters and could be an indication of missing nucleosynthetic channels. Chempy could be a powerful tool to confront predictions from stellar

  9. Experimental Active Vibration Control in Truss Structures Considering Uncertainties in System Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Domingues Bueno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of algorithms for robust active vibration control in flexible structures considering uncertainties in system parameters. It became an area of enormous interest, mainly due to the countless demands of optimal performance in mechanical systems as aircraft, aerospace, and automotive structures. An important and difficult problem for designing active vibration control is to get a representative dynamic model. Generally, this model can be obtained using finite element method (FEM or an identification method using experimental data. Actuators and sensors may affect the dynamics properties of the structure, for instance, electromechanical coupling of piezoelectric material must be considered in FEM formulation for flexible and lightly damping structure. The nonlinearities and uncertainties involved in these structures make it a difficult task, mainly for complex structures as spatial truss structures. On the other hand, by using an identification method, it is possible to obtain the dynamic model represented through a state space realization considering this coupling. This paper proposes an experimental methodology for vibration control in a 3D truss structure using PZT wafer stacks and a robust control algorithm solved by linear matrix inequalities.

  10. Neuromuscular Structure, Evolution and Development in Meiofaunal Annelids with Special Focus on Dinophilus gyrociliatus (Dinophilidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerbl, Alexandra

    less complex sensory structures. Yet, very little is still known on how these small brains are organized to fulfil basic functions. This study addresses the structure, evolution and development of neuromuscular systems within two exclusively meiofaunal lineages Lobatocerebridae and Dinophilidae....... RESULTS: Both families were shown to be nested within annelids in phylogenomic analyses based on transcriptomic data, which also suggest the Spiralian ancestor to be meiofaunal (Manuscript 4). The annelid affinity of the enigmatic Lobatocerebridae was further tested by detailed morphological examinations...... warranting further studies to uncover how the genetic domains influence the configuration of the brain...

  11. Compositional Evolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Structures by Total X-Ray Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Soyer-Uzun, Sezen; Chae, Sejung Rosie; Benmore, Chris J.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to study the structural characteristics of a set of C-S-H samples with 0.6 ≤ C/S a;circ 1.75. It has been observed that Si is tetrahedrally coordinated to O for all samples irrespective of chemical composition and the Ca-O coordination number gradually decreases from ∼7 to ∼6 with increasing C/S ratio. This suggests that the C-S-H structure evolves from a tobermorite-like structure into a jennite-like structure as a function of increasing C/S ratio as the interlayer space decreases from ∼1.3 to ∼1 nm. Evolution of these short- and medium-range order structural characteristics in the C-S-H system is associated with the alteration of the Ca-O layers and silicate depolymerization with increasing C/S. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.

  12. Compositional Evolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Structures by Total X-Ray Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Soyer-Uzun, Sezen

    2011-12-09

    High-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to study the structural characteristics of a set of C-S-H samples with 0.6 ≤ C/S a;circ 1.75. It has been observed that Si is tetrahedrally coordinated to O for all samples irrespective of chemical composition and the Ca-O coordination number gradually decreases from ∼7 to ∼6 with increasing C/S ratio. This suggests that the C-S-H structure evolves from a tobermorite-like structure into a jennite-like structure as a function of increasing C/S ratio as the interlayer space decreases from ∼1.3 to ∼1 nm. Evolution of these short- and medium-range order structural characteristics in the C-S-H system is associated with the alteration of the Ca-O layers and silicate depolymerization with increasing C/S. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.

  13. Influence of processing parameters on pore structure of 3D porous chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte complex scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florczyk, Stephen J; Kim, Dae-Joon; Wood, David L; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-09-15

    Fabrication of porous polymeric scaffolds with controlled structure can be challenging. In this study, we investigated the influence of key experimental parameters on the structures and mechanical properties of resultant porous chitosan-alginate (CA) polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) scaffolds, and on proliferation of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells, targeted at bone tissue engineering. We demonstrated that the porous structure is largely affected by the solution viscosity, which can be regulated by the acetic acid and alginate concentrations. We found that the CA PEC solutions with viscosity below 300 Pa.s yielded scaffolds of uniform pore structure and that more neutral pH promoted more complete complexation of chitosan and alginate, yielding stiffer scaffolds. CA PEC scaffolds produced from solutions with viscosities below 300 Pa.s also showed enhanced cell proliferation compared with other samples. By controlling the key experimental parameters identified in this study, CA PEC scaffolds of different structures can be made to suit various tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Structural evolution of Ni-20Cr alloy during ball milling of elemental powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez B, I.; Trapaga M, L. G.; Martinez F, E.; Zoz, H.

    2011-01-01

    The ball milling (B M) of blended Ni and Cr elemental powders was carried out in a Simoloyer performing on high-energy scale mode at maximum production to obtain a nano structured Ni-20Cr alloy. The phase transformations and structural changes occurring during mechanical alloying were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (Om). A gradual solid solubility of Cr and the subsequent formation of crystalline metastable solid solutions described in terms of the Avrami-Ero fe ev kinetics model were calculated. The XRD analysis of the structure indicates that cumulative lattice strain contributes to the driving force for solid solution between Ni and Cr during B M. Microstructure evolution has shown, additionally to the lamellar length refinement commonly observed, the folding of lamellae in the final processing stage. Om observations revealed that the lamellar spacing of Ni rich zones reaches a steady value near 500 nm and almost disappears after 30 h of milling. (Author)

  15. Numerical simulations of crashworthiness performance of multi-cell structures considering damage evolution criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrada Quirino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper finite element software Abaqus was used to analyse the effect of cross-sectional shape on the crashworthiness performance of multi-cell profiles. An emphasis was placed on the modelling of the damage initiation criteria and its evolution during the crash event. The structures evaluated included square and circular multi-cell cross-sections fabricated with aluminium alloy EN AW-7108 T6. During the crash simulations, the structures were subjected to axial impact loads using a 500-kg rigid body striker with an initial velocity of 10 m/s. Accordingly to our results, profiles with circular cross-section base presented better crashworthiness performance than square profiles. An increase in crush force efficiency to 36.9% and specific energy to 35.4% was observed when a circular cross-section has been reinforced in the transversal and longitudinal directions. Finally, it was corroborated that the addition of the damage initiation criteria allowed for more reliable crash simulations of the structures.

  16. Structural evolution of Ni-20Cr alloy during ball milling of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez B, I.; Trapaga M, L. G. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico); Martinez F, E. [Centro de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Cerrada de Cecati s/n, Col. Santa Catarina Azcapotzalco, 02250 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Zoz, H., E-mail: israelbaez@gmail.co [Zoz GmbH, D-57482, Wenden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The ball milling (B M) of blended Ni and Cr elemental powders was carried out in a Simoloyer performing on high-energy scale mode at maximum production to obtain a nano structured Ni-20Cr alloy. The phase transformations and structural changes occurring during mechanical alloying were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (Om). A gradual solid solubility of Cr and the subsequent formation of crystalline metastable solid solutions described in terms of the Avrami-Ero fe ev kinetics model were calculated. The XRD analysis of the structure indicates that cumulative lattice strain contributes to the driving force for solid solution between Ni and Cr during B M. Microstructure evolution has shown, additionally to the lamellar length refinement commonly observed, the folding of lamellae in the final processing stage. Om observations revealed that the lamellar spacing of Ni rich zones reaches a steady value near 500 nm and almost disappears after 30 h of milling. (Author)

  17. Artificial selection for structural color on butterfly wings and comparison with natural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Bethany R; Liew, Seng Fatt; Lilien, David A; Dinwiddie, April J; Noh, Heeso; Cao, Hui; Monteiro, Antónia

    2014-08-19

    Brilliant animal colors often are produced from light interacting with intricate nano-morphologies present in biological materials such as butterfly wing scales. Surveys across widely divergent butterfly species have identified multiple mechanisms of structural color production; however, little is known about how these colors evolved. Here, we examine how closely related species and populations of Bicyclus butterflies have evolved violet structural color from brown-pigmented ancestors with UV structural color. We used artificial selection on a laboratory model butterfly, B. anynana, to evolve violet scales from UV brown scales and compared the mechanism of violet color production with that of two other Bicyclus species, Bicyclus sambulos and Bicyclus medontias, which have evolved violet/blue scales independently via natural selection. The UV reflectance peak of B. anynana brown scales shifted to violet over six generations of artificial selection (i.e., in less than 1 y) as the result of an increase in the thickness of the lower lamina in ground scales. Similar scale structures and the same mechanism for producing violet/blue structural colors were found in the other Bicyclus species. This work shows that populations harbor large amounts of standing genetic variation that can lead to rapid evolution of scales' structural color via slight modifications to the scales' physical dimensions.

  18. Monte-Carlo simulation of dispersion fuel meat structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2003-01-01

    Under the irradiation conditions in research reactors, the inter-diffusion occurs at the fuel particle and matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. Because of the inter-diffusion reaction, the U 3 Al 7 Si 2 layer is formed around each U 3 Si 2 particle. The layer thickness grows up with irradiation duration and fission density. The formation of resultant layer causes the consumption of U 3 Si 2 fuel and aluminum matrix. This process leads to the evolution of geometrical structure of fuel meat. According to the stochastic locations of particles in dispersion, the authors developed a simulation method for the evolution of the fuel meat structure by utilizing Monte-Carlo method. Every particle is characterized by its diameter and location. The parameters of meat structure include particle size distribution, as-fabricated fuel volume fraction, resultant layer thickness, layer volume fraction, U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, aluminum volume fraction, contiguity probability and inter-linkage fraction of particles. Particularly for the dispersion with as-fabricated fuel volume fraction of 43% and particle sizes in a well-defined normal distribution, more than 13000 sampling particles are simulated in the meat volume of 6 mm x 6 mm x 0.5 mm. The meat structure parameters are calculated as functions of layer thickness in the range from 0-16 μm. (authors)

  19. Thermodynamics and Structural Evolution during a Reversible Vesicle-Micelle Transition of a Vitamin-Derived Bolaamphiphile Induced by Sodium Cholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Nan; Ge, Bing-Qiang; Shen, Yun-Feng; He, Yu-Xuan; Chen, Zhong-Xiu

    2016-03-09

    Interaction of endogenous sodium cholate (SC) with dietary amphiphiles would induce structural evolution of the self-assembled aggregates, which inevitably affects the hydrolysis of fat in the gut. Current work mainly focused on the interaction of bile salts with classical double-layered phospholipid vesicles. In this paper, the thermodynamics and structural evolution during the interaction of SC with novel unilamellar vesicles formed from vitamin-derived zwitterionic bolaamphiphile (DDO) were characterized. It was revealed that an increased temperature and the presence of NaCl resulted in narrowed micelle-vesicle coexistence and enlarged the vesicle region. The coexistence of micelles and vesicles mainly came from the interaction of monomeric SC with DDO vesicles, whereas micellar SC contributed to the total solubilization of DDO vesicles. This research may enrich the thermodynamic mechanism behind the structure transition of the microaggregates formed by amphiphiles in the gut. It will also contribute to the design of food formulation and drug delivery system.

  20. THE EVOLUTION OF SOME BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN THE HONEYBEES’ HAEMOLYMPH (A. M. CARPATHICA COLLECTED IN THE INACTIVE SEASON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGRIPINA SAPCALIU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical analyses of the blood are largely used for the routine diagnosis and especially for the metabolic survey in farm animals. These facts conduct us to the idea that similar analyses, applied on honeybee hemolymph, could be used IN monitoring the healthy state of honeybee colonies. The present studies represent preliminary researches, which aimed to investigate the variability of the main biochemical parameters in the hemolymph of the healthy honeybees (Apis mellifera in inactive season. The researches were carried out on honeybee samples collected from 5 honeybee colonies belonging to a breeding apiary of the Institute for Beekeeping Research and Development from Bucharest. In order to perform the biochemical analyses, the honeybees samples, consisting in 50 individuals on sample (10 individuals/colony were randomly collected and their haemolimph collected, at different time intervals, in inactive season (fall-winter. Totally, there were collected 250 haemolyph samples in a 2 years interval and the following 21 biochemical parameters were analysed: GLU, HDL-c, ALP, T-cho, Tprot, Alb., BUN, LDH, CPK,, Mg, IP, GGT, GOT, GPT, Ca, Cre,, Amy, T–BIL, TG, UA.. The test was carried out after the collection and processing of the samples using the SPOTCHEM EZSP4430, equipment with dry kits, the slides technique, respectively .During the 2nd part of the inactive season, the values of most biochemical parameters increase in different proportions, their levels being maintained also in the first part of the active seasons (April, May, June.The values obtained for the main studied biochemical parameters in the haemolymph of the healthy honeybees collected from honeybee colonies kept in natural conditions show a highly variable evolution in the two consecutive years of experiments during the inactive season.

  1. Population Structures in Russia: Optimality and Dependence on Parameters of Global Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Yegorov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to analytical investigation of the division of geographical space into urban and rural areas with application to Russia. Yegorov (2005, 2006, 2009 has suggested the role of population density on economics. A city has an attractive potential based on scale economies. The optimal city size depends on the balance between its attractive potential and the cost of living that can be approximated by equilibrium land rent and commuting cost. For moderate scale effects optimal population of a city depends negatively on transport costs that are related positively with energy price index. The optimal agricultural density of population can also be constructed. The larger is a land slot per peasant, the higher will be the output from one unit of his labour force applied to this slot. But at the same time, larger farm size results in increase of energy costs, related to land development, collecting the crop and bringing it to the market. In the last 10 years we have observed substantial rise of both food and energy prices at the world stock markets. However, the income of farmers did not grow as fast as food price index. This can shift optimal rural population density to lower level, causing migration to cities (and we observe this tendency globally. Any change in those prices results in suboptimality of existing spatial structures. If changes are slow, the optimal infrastructure can be adjusted by simple migration. If the shocks are high, adaptation may be impossible and shock will persist. This took place in early 1990es in the former USSR, where after transition to world price for oil in domestic markets existing spatial infrastructure became suboptimal and resulted in persistent crisis, leading to deterioration of both industry and agriculture. Russia is the largest country but this is also its problem. Having large resource endowment per capita, it is problematic to build sufficient infrastructure. Russia has too low population

  2. Evolution of strike-slip fault systems and associated geomorphic structures. Model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, Keichi

    2003-01-01

    Sandbox experiments were performed to investigate evolution of fault systems and its associated geomorphic structures caused by strike-slip motion on basement faults. A 200 cm long, 40 cm wide, 25 cm high sandbox was used in a strike-slip fault model test. Computerized X-ray tomography applied to the sandbox experiments made it possible to analyze the kinematic evaluation, as well as the three-dimensional geometry, of the faults. The deformation of the sand pack surface was analyzed by use of a laser method 3D scanner, which is a three-dimensional noncontact surface profiling instrument. A comparison of the experimental results with natural cases of active faults reveals the following: In the left-lateral strike-slip fault experiments, the deformation of the sand pack with increasing basement displacement is observed as follows. 1) In three dimensions, the right-stepping shears that have a cirque'/'shell'/'shipbody' shape develop on both sides of the basement fault. The shears on one side of the basement fault join those on the other side, resulting in helicoidal shaped shear surfaces. Shears reach the surface of the sand near or above the basement fault and en echelon Riedel shears are observed at the surface of the sand. The region between two Riedels is always an up-squeezed block. 2) lower-angle shears generally branch off from the first Riedel shears. 3) Pressure ridges develop within the zone defined by the right-stepping helicoidal shaped lower-angle shears. 4) Grabens develop between the pressure ridges. 5) Y-shears offset the pressure ridges. 6) With displacement concentrated on the central throughgoing fault zone, a liner trough developed directly above the basement fault. R1 shear and P foliation are observed in the liner trough. Such evolution of the shears and its associated structures in the fault model tests agrees well with that of strike-slip fault systems and its associated geomorphic structures. (author)

  3. Oxygen Evolution at Manganite Perovskite Ruddlesden-Popper Type Particles: Trends of Activity on Structure, Valence and Covalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ebrahimizadeh Abrishami

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An improved understanding of the correlation between the electronic properties of Mn-O bonds, activity and stability of electro-catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER is of great importance for an improved catalyst design. Here, an in-depth study of the relation between lattice structure, electronic properties and catalyst performance of the perovskite Ca1−xPrxMnO3 and the first-order RP-system Ca2−xPrxMnO4 at doping levels of x = 0, 0.25 and 0.5 is presented. Lattice structure is determined by X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinement. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Mn-L and O-K edges gives access to Mn valence and covalency of the Mn-O bond. Oxygen evolution activity and stability is measured by rotating ring disc electrode studies. We demonstrate that the highest activity and stability coincidences for systems with a Mn-valence state of +3.7, though also requiring that the covalency of the Mn-O bond has a relative minimum. This observation points to an oxygen evolution mechanism with high redox activity of Mn. Covalency should be large enough for facile electron transfer from adsorbed oxygen species to the MnO6 network; however, it should not be hampered by oxidation of the lattice oxygen, which might cause a crossover to material degradation. Since valence and covalency changes are not entirely independent, the introduction of the energy position of the eg↑ pre-edge peak in the O-K spectra as a new descriptor for oxygen evolution is suggested, leading to a volcano-like representation of the OER activity.

  4. Olive mill wastewater sludge from evaporation ponds: evolution of physico-chemical parameters during storage and composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, N; Aloui, F; Dhouib, A; Sayadi, S

    2006-02-01

    The evolution of analytical parameters of olive mill waste water sludge stored in evaporation ponds was investigated after one year and two years of storage. It was observed that some of the phenolic monomer compounds resisted removal and the fraction of water soluble phenols was only slightly polymerised. Co-composting of the sludge was carried out with yard trimming as bulking agent ratio and poultry manure to balance the C/N. Three turned piles with three proportions of 35%, 65% and 80% of olive mill waste water sludge were prepared. Co-composting of the sludge was possible in all the cases. Best results were obtained, however, at a proportion of 35% which permitted a shorter composting time, a higher degree of nitrification and a higher rate of total phenols decreasing. A high polymerisation of the fraction of water soluble phenols was observed at the end of composting in all the piles.

  5. Neutron star evolution and the structure of matter at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyeur, Madeleine.

    1981-09-01

    The structure and properties of neutron stars are determined by the state of cold nuclear matter at high density. In order to investigate the behavior of matter inside neutron stars, observables sensitive to their internal structure have to be calculated and confronted to observations. The thermal radiation of neutron stars seems to be a good candidate to be such observable. It can be shown that the neutrino luminosity of neutron stars, responsible for their cooling in the early stages of their evolution is strongly dependent on possible phase transitions to superfluid nucleons, to pion condensation or to quark matter. The specific heat of matter is also not the same in the various phases expected at high density and is particularly sensitive to the nucleon superfluidity. At present, both the theoretical estimates and the observations of the thermal properties of neutron stars are still quite preliminary. In particular, large uncertainties due to possible reheating mechanisms and magnetic field effects make the theoretical interpretation of the steady radiation of pulsars quite difficult

  6. Evolution of open magnetic structures on the sun: the Skylab period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution harmonic analysis of the measured photospheric magnetic field of the Sun is used to construct models of open magnetic structures over a period of 11 solar rotations. The models successfully reproduce the surface location and topology of all coronal holes during the Skylab period. In addition, there is persistent evidence in the models that open field lines are associated with active regions in a systematic way. These associations are listed for the period studied; they suggest that open field lines are a basic feature of solar magnetism. Specific examples of the evolution of coronal holes and of calculated open structures are presented. Quantitative study of the measured field strength within and neighboring a hole confirms the fact that coronal hole regions are indistinguishable by local magnetic properties. However, the calculated field strengths at the footpoints of open field lines within coronal holes show distinct evolutionary patterns and may indicate that, at least in young coronal holes, a significant amount of magnetic flux is closed. Problems of studying magnetic field divergence by using these models are discussed

  7. Application of differential evolution algorithm on self-potential data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangtao Li

    Full Text Available Differential evolution (DE is a population based evolutionary algorithm widely used for solving multidimensional global optimization problems over continuous spaces, and has been successfully used to solve several kinds of problems. In this paper, differential evolution is used for quantitative interpretation of self-potential data in geophysics. Six parameters are estimated including the electrical dipole moment, the depth of the source, the distance from the origin, the polarization angle and the regional coefficients. This study considers three kinds of data from Turkey: noise-free data, contaminated synthetic data, and Field example. The differential evolution and the corresponding model parameters are constructed as regards the number of the generations. Then, we show the vibration of the parameters at the vicinity of the low misfit area. Moreover, we show how the frequency distribution of each parameter is related to the number of the DE iteration. Experimental results show the DE can be used for solving the quantitative interpretation of self-potential data efficiently compared with previous methods.

  8. Protein secondary structure appears to be robust under in silico evolution while protein disorder appears not to be.

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Christian

    2010-01-16

    MOTIVATION: The mutation of amino acids often impacts protein function and structure. Mutations without negative effect sustain evolutionary pressure. We study a particular aspect of structural robustness with respect to mutations: regular protein secondary structure and natively unstructured (intrinsically disordered) regions. Is the formation of regular secondary structure an intrinsic feature of amino acid sequences, or is it a feature that is lost upon mutation and is maintained by evolution against the odds? Similarly, is disorder an intrinsic sequence feature or is it difficult to maintain? To tackle these questions, we in silico mutated native protein sequences into random sequence-like ensembles and monitored the change in predicted secondary structure and disorder. RESULTS: We established that by our coarse-grained measures for change, predictions and observations were similar, suggesting that our results were not biased by prediction mistakes. Changes in secondary structure and disorder predictions were linearly proportional to the change in sequence. Surprisingly, neither the content nor the length distribution for the predicted secondary structure changed substantially. Regions with long disorder behaved differently in that significantly fewer such regions were predicted after a few mutation steps. Our findings suggest that the formation of regular secondary structure is an intrinsic feature of random amino acid sequences, while the formation of long-disordered regions is not an intrinsic feature of proteins with disordered regions. Put differently, helices and strands appear to be maintained easily by evolution, whereas maintaining disordered regions appears difficult. Neutral mutations with respect to disorder are therefore very unlikely.

  9. Protein secondary structure appears to be robust under in silico evolution while protein disorder appears not to be.

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Christian; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The mutation of amino acids often impacts protein function and structure. Mutations without negative effect sustain evolutionary pressure. We study a particular aspect of structural robustness with respect to mutations: regular protein secondary structure and natively unstructured (intrinsically disordered) regions. Is the formation of regular secondary structure an intrinsic feature of amino acid sequences, or is it a feature that is lost upon mutation and is maintained by evolution against the odds? Similarly, is disorder an intrinsic sequence feature or is it difficult to maintain? To tackle these questions, we in silico mutated native protein sequences into random sequence-like ensembles and monitored the change in predicted secondary structure and disorder. RESULTS: We established that by our coarse-grained measures for change, predictions and observations were similar, suggesting that our results were not biased by prediction mistakes. Changes in secondary structure and disorder predictions were linearly proportional to the change in sequence. Surprisingly, neither the content nor the length distribution for the predicted secondary structure changed substantially. Regions with long disorder behaved differently in that significantly fewer such regions were predicted after a few mutation steps. Our findings suggest that the formation of regular secondary structure is an intrinsic feature of random amino acid sequences, while the formation of long-disordered regions is not an intrinsic feature of proteins with disordered regions. Put differently, helices and strands appear to be maintained easily by evolution, whereas maintaining disordered regions appears difficult. Neutral mutations with respect to disorder are therefore very unlikely.

  10. The subclonal structure and genomic evolution of oral squamous cell carcinoma revealed by ultra-deep sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin J

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are very heterogeneous between patients; however the subclonal structure remains unexplored mainly due to studies using only a single biopsy per patient. To deconvolutethe clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution......, we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with ultra-deep targeted sequencing on oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). From each patient, a set of biopsies was sampled from distinct geographical sites in primary tumor and lymph node metastasis.We demonstrate that the included OSCCs show a high...

  11. Impact of long-term fertilization practice on soil structure evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-01-01

    higher macroporosity and biological (earthworm) activity in the well fertilized areas when compared to plots without or only a small amount of fertilizer applied. A combined evaluation of the soil water characteristic, gas transport and X-ray CT results suggested that pore size distributions widened......The study characterized soil structure development and evolution in six plots that were amended with varying amounts of animalmanure (AM) and NPK fertilizer over a period of 106 years in a long-termfertilization experiment in Bad Lauchstädt, Germany. Two intact soil cores (10-cm diameter and 8-cm...... tall) and bulk soil samples were extracted froma depth between 5 and 15-cmfromeach plot. Soil properties including texture, organic carbon, soil–water characteristic, air permeability and diffusivity were measured and analyzed along with X-ray computed tomography (CT) data. Long...

  12. Heavy particle track structure parameters for biophysical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Averaged values of physical track structure parameters are important in radiobiology and radiological protection for the expression of damage mechanisms and for quantifying radiation effects. To provide a ready reference, tables of relevant quantities have been compiled for heavy charged particles in liquid water. The full tables will be published elsewhere but here illustrative examples are given of the trends for the most important quantities. In the tables, data are given for 74 types of heavy charged particle ranging from protons to uranium ions at specific energies between 0.1 keV/u and 1 GeV/u. Aggregate effects in liquid water are taken into account implicitly in the calculations. Results are presented for instantaneous particle energies and for averages over the charged particle equilibrium spectrum. The latter are of special relevance to radiation dosimetry. Quality parameters calculated are: β 2 ; z 2 /β 2 ; linear primary ionisation and the mean free path between ionisations; LET; track and dose-restricted LET with 100 eV cut-off; relative variances; delta-ray energies and ranges; ion energies and ranges and kerma factors. Here, the procedures used in the calculations are indicated. Representative results are shown in graphical form. The role of the physical track properties is discussed with regard to optimisation of the design of experiments intended to elucidate biological damage mechanisms in mammalian cells and their relevance to radiological protection. ((orig.))

  13. UNCERTAINTIES IN GALACTIC CHEMICAL EVOLUTION MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Côté, Benoit; Ritter, Christian; Herwig, Falk; O’Shea, Brian W.; Pignatari, Marco; Jones, Samuel; Fryer, Chris L.

    2016-01-01

    We use a simple one-zone galactic chemical evolution model to quantify the uncertainties generated by the input parameters in numerical predictions for a galaxy with properties similar to those of the Milky Way. We compiled several studies from the literature to gather the current constraints for our simulations regarding the typical value and uncertainty of the following seven basic parameters: the lower and upper mass limits of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), the slope of the high-mass end of the stellar IMF, the slope of the delay-time distribution function of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the number of SNe Ia per M ⊙ formed, the total stellar mass formed, and the final mass of gas. We derived a probability distribution function to express the range of likely values for every parameter, which were then included in a Monte Carlo code to run several hundred simulations with randomly selected input parameters. This approach enables us to analyze the predicted chemical evolution of 16 elements in a statistical manner by identifying the most probable solutions, along with their 68% and 95% confidence levels. Our results show that the overall uncertainties are shaped by several input parameters that individually contribute at different metallicities, and thus at different galactic ages. The level of uncertainty then depends on the metallicity and is different from one element to another. Among the seven input parameters considered in this work, the slope of the IMF and the number of SNe Ia are currently the two main sources of uncertainty. The thicknesses of the uncertainty bands bounded by the 68% and 95% confidence levels are generally within 0.3 and 0.6 dex, respectively. When looking at the evolution of individual elements as a function of galactic age instead of metallicity, those same thicknesses range from 0.1 to 0.6 dex for the 68% confidence levels and from 0.3 to 1.0 dex for the 95% confidence levels. The uncertainty in our chemical evolution model

  14. Influence of coherent structures on the evolution of an axisymmetric turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Massimiliano; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2018-03-01

    The role of initial conditions in affecting the evolution toward self-similarity of an axisymmetric turbulent jet is examined. The jet's near-field coherence was manipulated by non-circular exit geometries of identical open area, De2, including a square and a fractal exit, for comparison with a classical round orifice jet. Hot-wire anemometry and 2D-planar particle image velocimetry experiments were performed between the exit and a location 26De downstream, where the Reynolds stress profiles are self-similar. This study shows that a fractal geometry significantly changes the near-field structure of the jet, breaking up the large-scale coherent structures, thereby affecting the entrainment rate of the background fluid into the jet stream. It is found that many of the jet's turbulent characteristics scale with the number of eddy turnover times rather than simply the streamwise coordinate, with the entrainment rate (amongst others) found to be comparable across the different jets after approximately 3-4 eddies have been overturned. The study is concluded by investigating the jet's evolution toward a self-similar state. No differences are found for the large-scale spreading rate of the jets in the weakly self-similar region, so defined as the region for which some, but not all of the terms of the mean turbulent kinetic energy equation are self-similar. However, the dissipation rate of the turbulent kinetic energy was found to vary more gradually in x than predicted according to the classical equilibrium theories of Kolmogorov. Instead, the dissipation was found to vary in a non-equilibrium fashion for all three jets tested.

  15. Neutron scattering studies of pretransitional phenomena in structural phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1979-03-01

    Materials exhibiting structural phase transformations are well known to possess pretransitional phenomena. Below the transition temperature, T/sub c/, an order parameter appears and the pretransitional effects are associated with the fluctuations of the order parameter. Neutron scattering techniques have proved invaluable in studying the temporal and spatial dependence of these fluctuations. SrTiO 3 is the prototypical example of a structural phase transformation exhibiting features observable in other transformations such as martensitic and order-disorder. The experimental evolution of the understanding of the phase transformation in SrTiO 3 will be reviewed and the features observed will be shown to typify other systems

  16. Evolution Dynamics of Relief and Sediment Structures During the Initial Phase of Ecosystem Evolution Within an Experimentally Constructed Catchment Landscape and Their Influence on the Shallow Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerkamp, K.; Voelkel, J.; Leopold, M.; Roeder, J.; Winkelbauer, J.

    2008-12-01

    The studies are integrated in a project of the Collaborative Research Center of the German Research Foundation (DFG SFB-TRR 38) 'Structures and processes of the initial ecosystem development phase in an artificial water catchment'. The experimental catchment 'Hühnerwasser' is built up by mechanically deposited sediments reconstructing an initially emerged landscape. In order to monitor its geomorphological as well as ecofunctional evolution with time it is essential to incorporate comprehensive geophysical applications dealing with geomorphology and sedimentology of both surface as well as shallow subsurface. Digital terrain modelling on meso- to microscale is employed to reflect and analyze superficial processes and evolution trends as well as their influence on the abiotic and biotic structures and processes of the succeeding ecosystem. Especially in the case of the portrayal and analysis of subsurface characteristics, strategy needs to adapt to the special requirements of the SFB-project as the catchment system should only underlie 'natural' conditions and therefore not be altered by any implementations in the course of field investigation. Consequently, intrusive methods such as drillings or profiles are to be omitted. Methods of geophysical prospection hence constitute an indispensable tool in investigation of subsurface composition. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electric resistivity tomography (ERT) are applied with adequate resolution to detect the primary deposition structures within the technogenically bedded sediment. By means of this evaluation subsurface structures can be interpreted with regards to their relevance in controlling soil water movement, slope hydrology, redox interactions, root distribution etc. Furthermore, alterations of these primary structures resulting from bio- and pedoturbation processes can be monitored.

  17. Microstructure evolution of electron beam welded Ti3Al-Nb joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Jicai; Wu Huiqiang; He Jingshan; Zhang Bingang

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure evolution characterization in high containing Nb, low Al titanium aluminide alloy of electron beam welded joints was investigated by means of OM, SEM, XRD, TEM and microhardness analysis. The results indicated that the microstructure of the weld metal made with electron beam under the welding conditions employed in this work was predominantly metastable, retaining ordered β phase (namely B2 phase), and was independent of the welding parameters but independent of the size and the orientation of the weld solidification structures. As the heat input is decreased, the cellular structure zone is significantly reduced, and then the crystallizing morphology of fusion zone presented dendritically columnar structure. There existed grain growth coarsening in heat affected zone (HAZ) for insufficient polygonization. Both fusion zone (FZ) and the HAZ had higher microhardness than the base metal

  18. Evolution of weighted complex bus transit networks with flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ailing; Xiong, Jie; Shen, Jinsheng; Guan, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Study on the intrinsic properties and evolutional mechanism of urban public transit networks (PTNs) has great significance for transit planning and control, particularly considering passengers’ dynamic behaviors. This paper presents an empirical analysis for exploring the complex properties of Beijing’s weighted bus transit network (BTN) based on passenger flow in L-space, and proposes a bi-level evolution model to simulate the development of transit routes from the view of complex network. The model is an iterative process that is driven by passengers’ travel demands and dual-controlled interest mechanism, which is composed of passengers’ spatio-temporal requirements and cost constraint of transit agencies. Also, the flow’s dynamic behaviors, including the evolutions of travel demand, sectional flow attracted by a new link and flow perturbation triggered in nearby routes, are taken into consideration in the evolutional process. We present the numerical experiment to validate the model, where the main parameters are estimated by using distribution functions that are deduced from real-world data. The results obtained have proven that our model can generate a BTN with complex properties, such as the scale-free behavior or small-world phenomenon, which shows an agreement with our empirical results. Our study’s results can be exploited to optimize the real BTN’s structure and improve the network’s robustness.

  19. On the determination of neutrino masses and dark energy evolution from the cross-correlation of CMB and LSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)