WorldWideScience

Sample records for structural carotenoid analogs

  1. Carotenoids Database: structures, chemical fingerprints and distribution among organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuzaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

    To promote understanding of how organisms are related via carotenoids, either evolutionarily or symbiotically, or in food chains through natural histories, we built the Carotenoids Database. This provides chemical information on 1117 natural carotenoids with 683 source organisms. For extracting organisms closely related through the biosynthesis of carotenoids, we offer a new similarity search system 'Search similar carotenoids' using our original chemical fingerprint 'Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints'. These Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints describe the chemical substructure and the modification details based upon International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) semi-systematic names of the carotenoids. The fingerprints also allow (i) easier prediction of six biological functions of carotenoids: provitamin A, membrane stabilizers, odorous substances, allelochemicals, antiproliferative activity and reverse MDR activity against cancer cells, (ii) easier classification of carotenoid structures, (iii) partial and exact structure searching and (iv) easier extraction of structural isomers and stereoisomers. We believe this to be the first attempt to establish fingerprints using the IUPAC semi-systematic names. For extracting close profiled organisms, we provide a new tool 'Search similar profiled organisms'. Our current statistics show some insights into natural history: carotenoids seem to have been spread largely by bacteria, as they produce C30, C40, C45 and C50 carotenoids, with the widest range of end groups, and they share a small portion of C40 carotenoids with eukaryotes. Archaea share an even smaller portion with eukaryotes. Eukaryotes then have evolved a considerable variety of C40 carotenoids. Considering carotenoids, eukaryotes seem more closely related to bacteria than to archaea aside from 16S rRNA lineage analysis. : http://carotenoiddb.jp.

  2. Structural and functional roles of carotenoids in chlorosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pšencík, Jakub; Arellano, Juan B; Collins, Aaron M; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Torkkeli, Mika; Löflund, Benita; Serimaa, Ritva E; Blankenship, Robert E; Tuma, Roman; Butcher, Sarah J

    2013-04-01

    Chlorosomes are large light-harvesting complexes found in three phyla of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are primarily composed of self-assembling pigment aggregates. In addition to the main pigment, bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e, chlorosomes also contain variable amounts of carotenoids. Here, we use X-ray scattering and electron cryomicroscopy, complemented with absorption spectroscopy and pigment analysis, to compare the morphologies, structures, and pigment compositions of chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus grown under two different light conditions and Chlorobaculum tepidum. High-purity chlorosomes from C. aurantiacus contain about 20% more carotenoid per bacteriochlorophyll c molecule when grown under low light than when grown under high light. This accentuates the light-harvesting function of carotenoids, in addition to their photoprotective role. The low-light chlorosomes are thicker due to the overall greater content of pigments and contain domains of lamellar aggregates. Experiments where carotenoids were selectively extracted from intact chlorosomes using hexane proved that they are located in the interlamellar space, as observed previously for species belonging to the phylum Chlorobi. A fraction of the carotenoids are localized in the baseplate, where they are bound differently and cannot be removed by hexane. In C. tepidum, carotenoids cannot be extracted by hexane even from the chlorosome interior. The chemical structure of the pigments in C. tepidum may lead to π-π interactions between carotenoids and bacteriochlorophylls, preventing carotenoid extraction. The results provide information about the nature of interactions between bacteriochlorophylls and carotenoids in the protein-free environment of the chlorosome interior.

  3. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Bun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored...... structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-atocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid...... 4,4'-diapotorulene on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results demonstrate that a series of structurally novel carotenoids possessing biologically beneficial properties can be synthesized in E. coli....

  4. Structure of the principal carotenoid pigment of Cellulomonas biazotea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, O B; Montes, A R; Andrewes, A G

    1980-01-01

    The yellow-pigmented Cellulomonas biazotea, ATCC 486, contains a mixture of carotenoids. The principal compound is a decapreno carotenoid (C50H72O2) tentatively characterized as 2,2'-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-butenyl)-gamma,gamma-carotene on the basis of electronic absorption, infrared, proton magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometries. The carotenoid is presumed to be identical to sarcinaxanthin from Sarcina lutea pro-synon. Micrococcus luteus and, therefore, is isomeric with decaprenoxanthin from Cellulomonas dehydrogenans. PMID:6245065

  5. Reconstructing Carotenoid-Based and Structural Coloration in Fossil Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria E; Orr, Patrick J; Kearns, Stuart L; Alcalá, Luis; Anadón, Pere; Peñalver, Enrique

    2016-04-25

    Evidence of original coloration in fossils provides insights into the visual communication strategies used by ancient animals and the functional evolution of coloration over time [1-7]. Hitherto, all reconstructions of the colors of reptile integument and the plumage of fossil birds and feathered dinosaurs have been of melanin-based coloration [1-6]. Extant animals also use other mechanisms for producing color [8], but these have not been identified in fossils. Here we report the first examples of carotenoid-based coloration in the fossil record, and of structural coloration in fossil integument. The fossil skin, from a 10 million-year-old colubrid snake from the Late Miocene Libros Lagerstätte (Teruel, Spain) [9, 10], preserves dermal pigment cells (chromatophores)-xanthophores, iridophores, and melanophores-in calcium phosphate. Comparison with chromatophore abundance and position in extant reptiles [11-15] indicates that the fossil snake was pale-colored in ventral regions; dorsal and lateral regions were green with brown-black and yellow-green transverse blotches. Such coloration most likely functioned in substrate matching and intraspecific signaling. Skin replicated in authigenic minerals is not uncommon in exceptionally preserved fossils [16, 17], and dermal pigment cells generate coloration in numerous reptile, amphibian, and fish taxa today [18]. Our discovery thus represents a new means by which to reconstruct the original coloration of exceptionally preserved fossil vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Compact Structural Test Generation for Analog Macros

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaal, V.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    1997-01-01

    A structural, fault-model based methodology for the generation of compact high-quality test sets for analog macros is presented. Results are shown for an IV-converter macro design. Parameters of so-called test configurations are optimized for detection of faults in a fault-list and an optimal

  7. Novel targeted approach to better understand how natural structural barriers govern carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility in vegetable-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Paola; Lemmens, Lien; Ribas-Agustí, Albert; Sosa, Carola; Met, Kristof; de Dieu Umutoni, Jean; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2013-12-01

    An experimental approach, allowing us to understand the effect of natural structural barriers (cell walls, chromoplast substructures) on carotenoid bioaccessibility, was developed. Different fractions with different levels of carotenoid bio-encapsulation (carotenoid-enriched oil, chromoplasts, small cell clusters, and large cell clusters) were isolated from different types of carrots and tomatoes. An in vitro method was used to determine carotenoid bioaccessibility. In the present work, a significant decrease in carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility could be observed with an increasing level of bio-encapsulation. Differences in cell wall material and chromoplast substructure between matrices influenced carotenoid release and inclusion in micelles. For carrots, cell walls and chromoplast substructure were important barriers for carotenoid bioaccessibility while, in tomatoes, the chromoplast substructure represented the most important barrier governing bioaccessibility. The highest increase in carotenoid bioaccessibility, for all matrices, was obtained after transferring carotenoids into the oil phase, a system lacking cell walls and chromoplast substructures that could hamper carotenoid release. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural Determinats Underlying Photoprotection in the Photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein of Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Adjele; Kinney, James N.; Zwart, Petrus H.; Punginelli, Claire; D' Haene, Sandrine; Perreau, Francois; Klein, Michael G.; Kirilovsky, Diana; Kerfeld, Cheryl

    2010-04-01

    The photoprotective processes of photosynthetic organisms involve the dissipation of excess absorbed light energy as heat. Photoprotection in cyanobacteria is mechanistically distinct from that in plants; it involves the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP), a water-soluble protein containing a single carotenoid. The OCP is a new member of the family of blue light photoactive proteins; blue-green light triggers the OCP-mediated photoprotective response. Here we report structural and functional characterization of the wildtype and two mutant forms of the OCP, from the model organism Synechocystis PCC6803. The structural analysis provides highresolution detail of the carotenoidprotein interactions that underlie the optical properties of the OCP, unique among carotenoid-proteins in binding a single pigment per polypeptide chain. Collectively, these data implicate several key amino acids in the function of the OCP and reveal that the photoconversion and photoprotective responses of the OCP to blue-green light can be decoupled.

  9. What makes an analogy difficult? The effects of order and causal structure on analogical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, M T

    1997-07-01

    In 4 experiments, the author tested 2 factors that affect the difficulty of analogies: order of presentation of information and causal structure. Experiments 1, 2, and 4 showed robust order effects for the positioning of sentences-sentence pairs in a variety of mapping problems. Experiments 2, 3, and 4 revealed the effects of causal structure in these analogies. Experiment 3 showed that the beneficial effects of causal structure are most marked in thematic, mapping problems presented in a casual question-answering context. Experiment 4 dealt with the interaction between order and causal structure and showed that order effects occur only in the presence of causal structure. Of all the analogy models in the literature, the incremental analogy machine is the best predictor of these results.

  10. Insights into the Structural Changes Occurring upon Photoconversion in the Orange Carotenoid Protein from Broadband Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Re, Eleonora; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Leverenz, Ryan L.; Huxter, Vanessa M.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Mathies, Richard A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2014-05-22

    Carotenoids play an essential role in photoprotection, interacting with other pigments to safely dissipate excess absorbed energy as heat. In cyanobacteria, the short time scale photoprotective mechanisms involve the photoactive orange carotenoid protein (OCP), which binds a single carbonyl carotenoid. Blue-green light induces the photoswitching of OCP from its ground state form (OCPO) to a metastable photoproduct (OCPR). OCPR can bind to the phycobilisome antenna and induce fluorescence quenching. The photoswitching is accompanied by structural and functional changes at the level of the protein and of the bound carotenoid. In this study, we use broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to look at the differences in excited state dynamics of the carotenoid in the two forms of OCP. Our results provide insight into the origin of the pronounced vibrational lineshape and oscillatory dynamics observed in linear absorption and 2D electronic spectroscopy of OCPO and the large inhomogeneous broadening in OCPR, with consequences for the chemical function of the two forms.

  11. Root graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Root graviresponsiveness in normal and carotenoid-deficient mutant seedlings of Zea mays was not significantly different. Columella cells in roots of mutant seedlings were characterized by fewer, smaller, and a reduced relative volume of plastids as compared to columella cells of normal seedlings. Plastids in columella cells of mutant seedlings possessed reduced amounts of starch. Although approximately 10 per cent of the columella cells in mutant seedlings lacked starch, their plastids were located at the bottom of the cell. These results suggest that (i) carotenoids are not necessary for root gravitropism, (ii) graviresponsiveness is not necessarily proportional to the size, number, or relative volume of plastids in columella cells, and (iii) sedimentation of plastids in columella cells may not result directly from their increased density due to starch content. Plastids in columella cells of normal and mutant seedlings were associated with bands of microtubule-like structures, suggesting that these structures may be involved in 'positioning' plastids in the cell.

  12. Mass spectrometry footprinting reveals the structural rearrangements of cyanobacterial orange carotenoid protein upon light activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haijun [Washington University; Zhang, Hao [Washington University; King, Jeremy D. [Washington University; Wolf, Nathan R. [Washington University; Prado, Mindy [Washington University; Gross, Michael L. [Washington University; Blankenship, Robert E. [Washington University

    2014-12-01

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP), a member of the family of blue light photoactive proteins, is required for efficient photoprotection in many cyanobacteria. Photoexcitation of the carotenoid in the OCP results in structural changes within the chromophore and the protein to give an active red form of OCP that is required for phycobilisome binding and consequent fluorescence quenching. We characterized the light-dependent structural changes by mass spectrometry-based carboxyl footprinting and found that an α helix in the N-terminal extension of OCP plays a key role in this photoactivation process. Although this helix is located on and associates with the outside of the β-sheet core in the C-terminal domain of OCP in the dark, photoinduced changes in the domain structure disrupt this interaction. We propose that this mechanism couples light-dependent carotenoid conformational changes to global protein conformational dynamics in favor of functional phycobilisome binding, and is an essential part of the OCP photocycle.

  13. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and ChargeTransfer Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development andimplementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probeapparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation ofinvestigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specificattention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highlysymmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes thedevelopment and construction of the experimental apparatus usedthroughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss theinvestigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resultingfrom a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of itsmethyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we areable to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provideevidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT)type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of thecarotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidencefor the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systemsand found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigationof the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsiblefor the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allowsfor a more detailed understanding of the importance of structuraldynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting.

  14. Structural (UV) and carotenoid-based plumage coloration - signals for parental investment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucass, Carsten; Iserbyt, Arne; Eens, Marcel; Müller, Wendt

    2016-05-01

    Parental care increases parental fitness through improved offspring condition and survival but comes at a cost for the caretaker(s). To increase life-time fitness, caring parents are, therefore, expected to adjust their reproductive investment to current environmental conditions and parental capacities. The latter is thought to be signaled via ornamental traits of the bearer. We here investigated whether pre- and/or posthatching investment of blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) parents was related to ornamental plumage traits (UV crown coloration and carotenoid-based plumage coloration) expressed by either the individual itself (i.e. "good parent hypothesis") or its partner (i.e. "differential allocation hypothesis"). Our results show that neither prehatching (that is clutch size and offspring begging intensity) nor posthatching parental investment (provisioning rate, offspring body condition at fledging) was related to an individual's UV crown coloration or to that of its partner. Similar observations were made for carotenoid-based plumage coloration, except for a consistent positive relationship between offspring begging intensity and maternal carotenoid-based plumage coloration. This sex-specific pattern likely reflects a maternal effect mediated via maternally derived egg substances, given that the relationship persisted when offspring were cross-fostered. This suggests that females adjust their offspring's phenotype toward own phenotype, which may facilitate in particular mother-offspring co-adaptation. Overall, our results contribute to the current state of evidence that structural or pigment-based plumage coloration of blue tits are inconsistently correlated with central life-history traits.

  15. Simultaneous HPLC-DAD-MS (ESI+) determination of structural and geometrical isomers of carotenoids in mature grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, Pasquale; Milella, Rosa Anna; Antonacci, Donato

    2010-09-01

    Carotenoids are uniquely functional polyene pigments ubiquitous in nature; aside from being responsible for the color of a wide variety of vegetables, interest is being focused on food carotenoids due to their likely health benefits. From analytical point of view, it is important to unequivocally identify individual carotenoid compounds in many food stuffs. Therefore, isolation of standards from natural sources must be encouraged for accurate identifications. Like many fruits, mature grape berries contain numerous carotenoid compounds, mostly found in the skin at levels two to three times higher than in the pulp. Carotenoid compounds in a typical wine grape variety (Negroamaro) grown in Apulian region were investigated by reversed-phase C(30) (RP-30) HPLC-DAD-MS (ESI(+)) analysis. As a consequence of an unusual ionization process of carotenoids, their mass spectra registered in the positive ion mode comprised both protonated molecules and molecular ion radicals with little fragmentation. Additionally, selective collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments, together with fine structures of the UV-vis spectra, were used to differentiate structural and geometrical isomers. This technique allowed the simultaneous determination of regio- and cis-isomers of lutein (zeaxanthin, 9Z and 9'Z-lutein) and a cis-isomer of β-carotene (9Z- β-carotene), 5,6-epoxy xanthophylls (violaxanthin, (9'Z)-neoxanthin, lutein-5,6-epoxide) and 5,8-epoxy xanthophylls diasteroisomers (neochrome, auroxanthin, luteoxanthin, flavoxanthin, chrysanthemaxanthin). 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Suppression of the phytoene synthase gene (EgcrtB) alters carotenoid content and intracellular structure of Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shota; Soshino, Mika; Takaichi, Shinichi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Nagata, Noriko; Asahina, Masashi; Shinomura, Tomoko

    2017-07-17

    of cells to light stress. Our results indicate that suppression of EgcrtB causes a significant decrease in carotenoid and chlorophyll content in E. gracilis accompanied by changes in intracellular structures, suggesting that Dtx (de-epoxidized form of diadinoxanthin cycle pigments) contributes to photoprotection of this alga during the long-term acclimation to light-induced stress.

  17. Seasonal changes in colour: a comparison of structural, melanin- and carotenoid-based plumage colours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar Delhey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plumage coloration is important for bird communication, most notably in sexual signalling. Colour is often considered a good quality indicator, and the expression of exaggerated colours may depend on individual condition during moult. After moult, plumage coloration has been deemed fixed due to the fact that feathers are dead structures. Still, many plumage colours change after moult, although whether this affects signalling has not been sufficiently assessed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied changes in coloration after moult in four passerine birds (robin, Erithacus rubecula; blackbird, Turdus merula; blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus; and great tit, Parus major displaying various coloration types (melanin-, carotenoid-based and structural. Birds were caught regularly during three years to measure plumage reflectance. We used models of avian colour vision to derive two variables, one describing chromatic and the other achromatic variation over the year that can be compared in magnitude among different colour types. All studied plumage patches but one (yellow breast of the blue tit showed significant chromatic changes over the year, although these were smaller than for a typical dynamic trait (bill colour. Overall, structural colours showed a reduction in relative reflectance at shorter wavelengths, carotenoid-based colours the opposite pattern, while no general pattern was found for melanin-based colours. Achromatic changes were also common, but there were no consistent patterns of change for the different types of colours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Changes of plumage coloration independent of moult are probably widespread; they should be perceivable by birds and have the potential to affect colour signalling.

  18. The relationship of analogical distance to analogical function and preinventive structure: the case of engineering design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bo T; Schunn, Christian D

    2007-01-01

    Analogy was studied in real-world engineering design, using the in vivo method. Analogizing was found to occur frequently, entailing a roughly equal amount of within- and between-domain analogies. In partial support for theories of unconscious plagiarism (Brown & Murphy, 1989; Marsh, Landau, & Hicks, 1996) and Ward's (1994) path-of-least-resistance model, it was found that the reference to exemplars (in the form of prototypes) significantly reduced the number of between-domain analogies between source and target, as compared with using sketches or no external representational systems. Analogy served three functions in relation to novel design concepts: identifying problems, solving problems, and explaining concepts. Problem identifying analogies were mainly within domain, explanatory analogies were mainly between domain, and problem-solving analogies were a mixture of within- and between-domain analogies.

  19. Carotenoids and Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Uragami, Chiasa; Cogdell, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous and essential pigments in photosynthesis. They absorb in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum and transfer the absorbed energy to (bacterio-)chlorophylls, and so expand the wavelength range of light that is able to drive photosynthesis. This is an example of singlet-singlet energy transfer, and so carotenoids serve to enhance the overall efficiency of photosynthetic light reactions. Carotenoids also act to protect photosynthetic organisms from the harmful effects of excess exposure to light. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophylls to carotenoids plays a key role in this photoprotective reaction. In the light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria and chlorophytes, carotenoids have an additional role of structural stabilization of those complexes. In this article we review what is currently known about how carotenoids discharge these functions. The molecular architecture of photosynthetic systems will be outlined first to provide a basis from which to describe carotenoid photochemistry, which underlies most of their important functions in photosynthesis.

  20. Structuring students’ analogical reasoning in solving algebra problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lailiyah, S.; Nusantara, T.; Sa’dijah, C.; Irawan, E. B.; Kusaeri; Asyhar, A. H.

    2018-01-01

    The average achievement of Indonesian students’ mathematics skills according to Benchmark International Trends in Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is ranked at the 38th out of 42 countries and according to the survey result in Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is ranked at the 64th out of 65 countries. The low mathematics skill of Indonesian student has become an important reason to research more deeply about reasoning and algebra in mathematics. Analogical reasoning is a very important component in mathematics because it is the key to creativity and it can make the learning process in the classroom become effective. The major part of the analogical reasoning is about structuring including the processes of inferencing and decision-making happens. Those processes involve base domain and target domain. Methodologically, the subjects of this research were 42 students from class XII. The sources of data were derived from the results of thinks aloud, the transcribed interviews, and the videos taken while the subject working on the instruments and interviews. The collected data were analyzed using qualitative techniques. The result of this study described the structuring characteristics of students’ analogical reasoning in solving algebra problems from all the research subjects.

  1. Scattering and structures essentials and analogies in quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Povh, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Quantum physics may appear complicated, especially if one forgets the "big picture" and gets lost in the details. However, it can become clearer and less tangled if one applies a few fundamental concepts so that simplified approaches can emerge and estimated orders of magnitude become clear. Povh and Rosina’s Scattering and Structures presents the properties of quantum systems (elementary particles, nucleons, atoms, molecules, quantum gases, quantum liquids, stars, and early universe) with the help of elementary concepts and analogies between these seemingly different systems. In this new edition, sections on quantum gases and an up to date overview of elementary particles have been added.

  2. Global Picosecond Structural Dynamics of Orange Carotenoid Protein in Photo/Chemical Activated Signaling States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanting; Xu, Mengyang; Liu, Hanjun; Blankenship, Robert; Markelz, Andrea

    Light availability to photosynthetic organisms changes throughout the day. High light can over-saturate photosynthetic capacity and produce reactive oxygen which damages the photosynthetic apparatus and leads to cell death. Photosynthetic organisms have evolved multiple photo-protective strategies to prevent oxidative damage from light stress. For cyanobacteria, a blue-light photo-sensor orange carotenoid protein (OCP) responds to exposure to intense light. Upon high light stress, OCP converts from the orange inactive form (OCPO) to the red active form (OCPR) , with a large conformational change. And OCPR interacts with the light harvesting antenna phycobilisome (PB), and mediates the energy quenching of PB. We argue that both the susceptibility of OCP to large conformational change and its interaction with PB are associated with changes in the long range picosecond structural flexibility. To investigate the protein flexibility with signaling state dependence, temperature dependent terahertz time domain spectroscopy is performed in the range of 80 - 290 K on OCP solutions, as a function of illumination and chaotrope (NaSCN) concentration, which produces a long lived red state in the absence of photoexcitation. We characterize the global flexibility by both the net THz absorbance and the dynamical transition temperature, which scales with structural stability, and observed the dynamical transition occurred in the 180-220 K range. R.E.B. acknowledges DOE award DE-FG02- 07ER15902 and A.G.M. acknowledges NSF awards DBI 1556359 and MCB 1616529, and DOE award DE-SC0016317 for support of the work.

  3. Structure-Dependent Immune Modulatory Activity of Protegrin-1 Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu M. Zughaier

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Protegrins are porcine antimicrobial peptides (AMPs that belong to the cathelicidin family of host defense peptides. Protegrin-1 (PG-1, the most investigated member of the protegrin family, is an arginine-rich peptide consisting of 18 amino acid residues, its main chain adopting a β-hairpin structure that is linked by two disulfide bridges. We report on the immune modulatory activity of PG-1 and its analogs in neutralizing bacterial endotoxin and capsular polysaccharides, consequently inhibiting inflammatory mediators’ release from macrophages. We demonstrate that the β-hairpin structure motif stabilized with at least one disulfide bridge is a prerequisite for the immune modulatory activity of this type of AMP.

  4. Plasmids of carotenoid-producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - structure, diversity and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i) plasmid replication, (ii) stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families) and (iii) mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families). A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes) containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase). The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria.

  5. Plasmids of carotenoid-producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria - structure, diversity and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maj

    Full Text Available Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria: P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i plasmid replication, (ii stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families and (iii mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families. A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase. The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria.

  6. Molecular Mechanism of Photoactivation and Structural Location of the Cyanobacterial Orange Carotenoid Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [Department; Liu, Haijun [Department; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M. [Department; Prado, Mindy [Department; Jiang, Jing [Department; Gross, Michael L. [Department; Blankenship, Robert E. [Department

    2013-12-17

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP) plays a photoprotective role in cyanobacterial photosynthesis similar to that of nonphotochemical quenching in higher plants. Under high-light conditions, the OCP binds to the phycobilisome (PBS) and reduces the extent of transfer of energy to the photosystems. The protective cycle starts from a light-induced activation of the OCP. Detailed information about the molecular mechanism of this process as well as the subsequent recruitment of the active OCP to the phycobilisome are not known. We report here our investigation on the OCP photoactivation from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by using a combination of native electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) and protein cross-linking. We demonstrate that native MS can capture the OCP with its intact pigment and further reveal that the OCP undergoes a dimer-to-monomer transition upon light illumination. The reversion of the activated form of the OCP to the inactive, dark form was also observed by using native MS. Furthermore, in vitro reconstitution of the OCP and PBS allowed us to perform protein chemical cross-linking experiments. Liquid chromatography–MS/MS analysis identified cross-linking species between the OCP and the PBS core components. Our result indicates that the N-terminal domain of the OCP is closely involved in the association with a site formed by two allophycocyanin trimers in the basal cylinders of the phycobilisome core. This report improves our understanding of the activation mechanism of the OCP and the structural binding site of the OCP during the cyanobacterial nonphotochemical quenching process.

  7. Structure and infrared spectra of hydrocarbon interstellar dust analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molpeceres, Germán; Timón, Vicente; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Escribano, Rafael; Maté, Belén; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J

    2017-01-04

    A theoretical study of the structure and mid infrared (IR) spectra of interstellar hydrocarbon dust analogs is presented, based on DFT calculations of amorphous solids. The basic molecular structures for these solids are taken from two competing literature models. The first model considers small aromatic units linked by aliphatic chains. The second one assumes a polyaromatic core with hydrogen and methyl substituents at the edges. The calculated spectra are in reasonably good agreement with those of aliphatic-rich and graphitic-rich samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) generated in our laboratory. The theoretical analysis allows the assignment of the main vibrations in the HAC spectra and shows that there is a large degree of mode mixing. The calculated spectra show a marked dependence on the density of the model solids, which evinces the strong influence of the environment on the strengths of the vibrational modes. The present results indicate that the current procedure of estimating the hydrogen and graphitic content of HAC samples through the decomposition of IR features into vibrational modes of individual functional groups is problematic owing to the mentioned mode mixing and to the difficulty of assigning reliable and unique band strengths to the various molecular vibrations. Current band strengths from the literature might overestimate polyaromatic structures. Comparison with astronomical observations suggests that the average structure of carbonaceous dust in the diffuse interstellar medium lies probably in between those of the two models considered, though closer to the more aliphatic structure.

  8. Plasmids of Carotenoid-Producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - Structure, Diversity and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. ...

  9. Characterization of chromoplasts and carotenoids of red- and yellow-fleshed papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiggert, Ralf M; Steingass, Christof B; Heller, Annerose; Esquivel, Patricia; Carle, Reinhold

    2011-11-01

    Chromoplast morphology and ultrastructure of red- and yellow-fleshed papaya (Carica papaya L.) were investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. Carotenoid analyses by LC-MS revealed striking similarity of nutritionally relevant carotenoid profiles in both the red and yellow varieties. However, while yellow fruits contained only trace amounts of lycopene, the latter was found to be predominant in red papaya (51% of total carotenoids). Comparison of the pigment-loaded chromoplast ultrastructures disclosed tubular plastids to be abundant in yellow papaya, whereas larger crystalloid substructures characterized most frequent red papaya chromoplasts. Exclusively existent in red papaya, such crystalloid structures were associated with lycopene accumulation. Non-globular carotenoid deposition was derived from simple solubility calculations based on carotenoid and lipid contents of the differently colored fruit pulps. Since the physical state of carotenoid deposition may be decisive regarding their bioavailability, chromoplasts from lycopene-rich tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) were also assessed and compared to red papaya. Besides interesting analogies, various distinctions were ascertained resulting in the prediction of enhanced lycopene bioavailability from red papaya. In addition, the developmental pathway of red papaya chromoplasts was investigated during fruit ripening and carotenogenesis. In the early maturation stage of white-fleshed papaya, undifferentiated proplastids and globular plastids were predominant, corresponding to incipient carotenoid biosynthesis. Since intermediate plastids, e.g., amyloplasts or chloroplasts, were absent, chromoplasts are likely to emerge directly from proplastids.

  10. Tren-based Analogs of Bacillibactin: Structure and Stability1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertz, Emily A.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic analogs were designed to highlight the effect of the glycine moiety of bacillibactin on the overall stability of the ferric complex as compared to synthetic analogs of enterobactin. Insertion of a variety of amino acids to catecholamide analogs based on a Tren (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) backbone increased the overall acidity of the ligands, causing an enhancement of the stability of the resulting ferric complex as compared to TRENCAM. Solution thermodynamic behavior of these siderophores and their synthetic analogs was investigated through potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations. X-ray crystallography, circular dichroism, and molecular modeling were used to determine the chirality and geometry of the ferric complexes of bacillibactin and its analogs. In contrast to the Tren scaffold, addition of a glycine to the catechol chelating arms causes an inversion of the trilactone backbone, resulting in opposite chiralities of the two siderophores and a destabilization of the ferric complex of bacillibactin compared to ferric enterobactin. PMID:16813410

  11. X-ray scattering and electron cryomicroscopy study on the effect of carotenoid biosynthesis to the structure of Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikonen, T P; Li, H; Psencík, J

    2007-01-01

    Chlorosomes, the main antenna complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria, were isolated from null mutants of Chlorobium tepidum, each of which lacked one enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids. The effects of the altered carotenoid composition on the structure of the chlorosomes were...... in the arrangement of lamellae and spacing between the lamellar planes of bacteriochlorophyll aggregates. In addition, comparisons among the various mutants enabled refinement of the assignments of the x-ray scattering peaks. While the main scattering peaks come from the lamellar structure of bacteriochlorophyll c...

  12. Structural priming as structure-mapping: children use analogies from previous utterances to guide sentence production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Micah B; Tomlinson, Marc T; Echols, Catharine H; Love, Bradley C

    2011-01-01

    What mechanisms underlie children's language production? Structural priming--the repetition of sentence structure across utterances--is an important measure of the developing production system. We propose its mechanism in children is the same as may underlie analogical reasoning: structure-mapping. Under this view, structural priming is the result of making an analogy between utterances, such that children map semantic and syntactic structure from previous to future utterances. Because the ability to map relationally complex structures develops with age, younger children are less successful than older children at mapping both semantic and syntactic relations. Consistent with this account, 4-year-old children showed priming only of semantic relations when surface similarity across utterances was limited, whereas 5-year-olds showed priming of both semantic and syntactic structure regardless of shared surface similarity. The priming of semantic structure without syntactic structure is uniquely predicted by the structure-mapping account because others have interpreted structural priming as a reflection of developing syntactic knowledge. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  13. Structural Perspectives of Insulin Receptor Isoform-Selective Insulin Analogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Jul 27 (2017), č. článku 167. ISSN 1664-2392 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : insulin receptor * insulin binding * analog * diabetes * glucose Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.675, year: 2016 http:// journal .frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fendo.2017.00167/full

  14. Evidences for Cooperative Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonds in Protein Secondary Structure Analogs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu Zhou; Geng Deng; Yan-zhen Zheng; Jing Xu; Hamad Ashraf; Zhi-wu Yu

    2016-01-01

    .... The structural origin of this cooperativity, however, is still under debate. Here we report a new investigation combining excess infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculation on peptide analogs, represented by N-methylformamide (NMF...

  15. Carotenoids are essential for the assembly of cyanobacterial photosynthetic complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tóth, T.N.; Chukhutsina, Volha; Domonkos, Ildikó; Knoppová, Jana; Komenda, Josef; Kis, Mihály; Lénárt, Zsófia; Garab, Gyozo; Kovács, László; Gombos, Zoltán; Amerongen, Van Herbert

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids (carotenes and xanthophylls) are important for light harvesting, photoprotection and structural stability of a variety of pigment-protein complexes. Here, we investigated the consequences of altered carotenoid composition for the functional organization of

  16. Semantics, analogy and alternation capacity of syntactic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojčić Živojin S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Departing from examples found in the language of Njegoš and later writers from a broader area, and on the theoretical premises of cognitive linguistics as well as on transformational grammar methodology, author is discussing the syntactic and semantic elements that enable the alternations of conjunctions gde, što, kako and da - mutually and with other dependent clauses conjunctions the semantic basis of which are the notions “cause”, “space”, “manner of an action” and “object of an action”. According to author, in the given process, with inner linguistic semantic and analogical factors, the idiolectal experience of speaker / writer (listener / reader and his/her knowledge of language units in the common language of the given society - have the most important role in the event of language perception.

  17. From Carotenoids to Strigolactones

    KAUST Repository

    Jia, Kunpeng

    2017-12-13

    Strigolactones (SLs) are phytohormones that regulate different plant developmental and adaptation processes. When released into soil, SLs act as chemical signals attracting symbiotic arbuscular fungi and inducing seed germination in root parasitic weeds. SLs are carotenoid-derivatives characterized by the presence of a butenolide ring that is connected by an enol ether bridge to a less conserved, second moiety. Carotenoids are isopenoid pigments that differ in structure, number of conjugated double bonds and stereo-configuration. Genetic analysis and enzymatic studies demonstrate that SLs originate from all-trans-β-carotene in a pathway that involves the all-trans-/9-cis-β-carotene isomerase DWARF27 (D27) and the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 7 and 8 (CCD7, 8). The CCD7-mediated, regio- and stereospecific double bond cleavage of 9-cis-β-carotene leads to a 9-cis-configured intermediate that is converted by CCD8 via a combination of reactions into the central metabolite carlactone. By catalyzing repeated oxygenation reactions that can be coupled to ring closure, CYP711 enzymes convert carlactone into tricyclic ring containing, canonical and non-canonical SLs. Mostly unknown, modifying enzymes further increase SLs diversity. In this review, we touch on carotenogenesis, provide an update on SL biosynthesis, with emphasis on the substrate specificity and reactions catalyzed by the different enzymes, and describe the regulation of the pathway.

  18. X-ray structure based evaluation of analogs of citalopram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topiol, Sid; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Sanchez, Connie

    2017-01-01

    The recent publication of X-ray structures of SERT includes structures with the potent antidepressant S-Citalopram (S-Cit). Earlier predictions of ligand binding at both a primary (S1) and an allosteric modulator site (S2), were confirmed. We provide herein examples of a series of Citalopram...... to explain this SAR and demonstrate the potential utility of the newly emerging X-ray structures within the neurotransmitter:sodium Symporter family for drug design....

  19. Analog analysis of π-mode structures: Results and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan O. Schriber

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The cavities of choice for high-energy synchrotrons and for medium-beta and high-beta accelerating superconducting structures around the world are π-mode structures. A coupled-circuit analysis, allowing for errors in cell frequencies and cell coupling constants, has been used to determine relative on-axis electric field amplitudes between cells, operating frequencies, end-cell tuning, relative on-axis field phase shifts, and field tilts when operated off resonance. Formulas are given for the above information as well as specific examples showing sensitivities and machining/assembly/control tolerances. A method to determine relative field amplitudes on the basis of the mode spectra was developed.

  20. Evidence for a Structure-Mapping Theory of Analogy and Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    which I will l Ilm" m mc1-aknv - _f- efl ^,ac f= i crma ctymartls-,.m- n -n ru!ez as analogy. (Example (3) above is such a metaphor). Thus, although... adolescence (Dent, 1984; Gardner, Kircher, Winner & Perkins, 1975; Reynolds & Ortony, 1980; Winner, 1980). According to the structure-mapping theory

  1. Analog/RF performance of two tunnel FETs with symmetric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shupeng; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Shulong; Li, Wei; Wang, Qianqiong

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the radio frequency and analog performance of two tunnel field-effect transistors with symmetric structures are analyzed. The symmetric U-shape gate tunnel field-effect transistor (SUTFET) and symmetric tunnel field-effect transistor (STFET) are investigated by Silvaco Atlas simulation. The basic electrical properties and the parameters related to frequency and analog characteristics are analyzed. Due to the lower off-state leakage current, the STFET has better power consumption performance. The SUTFET obtains larger operating current (242 μA/μm), transconductance (490 μS/μm), output conductance (494 μS/μm), gain bandwidth product (3.2 GHz) and cut-off frequency (27.7 GHz). The simulation result of these two devices can be used as a guideline for their analog/RF applications.

  2. Structure-Promiscuity Relationship Puzzles-Extensively Assayed Analogs with Large Differences in Target Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ye; Jasial, Swarit; Gilberg, Erik; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    Publicly available screening data were systematically searched for extensively assayed structural analogs with large differences in the number of targets they were active against. Screening compounds with potential chemical liabilities that may give rise to assay artifacts were identified and excluded from the analysis. "Promiscuity cliffs" were frequently identified, defined here as pairs of structural analogs with a difference of at least 20 target annotations across all assays they were tested in. New assay indices were introduced to prioritize cliffs formed by screening compounds that were extensively tested in comparably large numbers of assays including many shared assays. In these cases, large differences in promiscuity degrees were not attributable to differences in assay frequency and/or lack of assay overlap. Such analog pairs have high priority for further exploring molecular origins of multi-target activities. Therefore, these promiscuity cliffs and associated target annotations are made freely available. The corresponding analogs often represent equally puzzling and interesting examples of structure-promiscuity relationships.

  3. Comparison of PWM and PCM Based Digital-Analog Converter Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Koçyiğit, Gökhan; Çini, Uğur

    2016-01-01

    In this work performance limitations of various pulse-width modulationarchitectures are compared. First, classical pulse-width modulation basedanalog digital converter is analyzed. Then, pulse-count modulation baseddigital-analog converter is explored. The structures are implemented on AlteraTMStratix III FPGA. A sawtooth test signal is generated to analyze theperformance of the DAC structures. Maximum effective resolution is calculateddepending on the architecture selected. The paper is espe...

  4. Structurally optimized analogs of the retrograde trafficking inhibitor Retro-2cycl limit Leishmania infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Evan; Huyghues-Despointes, Charles-Eugene; Yu, Chun; Handy, Emma L; Sello, Jason K; Kima, Peter E

    2017-05-01

    In infected mammalian cells, Leishmania parasites reside within specialized compartments called parasitophorous vacuoles (LPVs). We have previously shown that Retro-2, a member of a novel class of small retrograde pathway inhibitors caused reduced LPV sizes and lower parasite numbers during experimental L. mexicana sp. infections. The purpose of this study was to determine if structural analogs of Retro-2cycl reported to have superior potency in the inhibition of retrograde pathway-dependent phenomena (i.e., polyomavirus cellular infection by polyomavrius and Shiga toxin trafficking in cells) are also more effective than the parent compound at controlling Leishmania infections. In addition to their effects on LPV development, we show that two optimized analogs of Retro-2cycl, DHQZ 36 and DHQZ 36.1 limit Leishmania amazonensis infection in macrophages at EC50 of 13.63+/-2.58μM and10.57+/-2.66μM, respectively, which is significantly lower than 40.15μM the EC50 of Retro-2cycl. In addition, these analogs caused a reversal in Leishmania induced suppression of IL-6 release by infected cells after LPS activation. Moreover, we show that in contrast to Retro-2cycl that is Leishmania static, the analogs can kill Leishmania parasites in axenic cultures, which is a desirable attribute for any drug to treat Leishmania infections. Together, these studies validate and extend the published structure-activity relationship analyses of Retro-2cycl.

  5. Hydrophilic Carotenoids: Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Agócs

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are substantially hydrophobic antioxidants. Hydrophobicity is this context is rather a disadvantage, because their utilization in medicine as antioxidants or in food chemistry as colorants would require some water dispersibility for their effective uptake or use in many other ways. In the past 15 years several attempts were made to synthetize partially hydrophilic carotenoids. This review compiles the recently synthetized hydrophilic carotenoid derivatives.

  6. Biomonitoring of human exposures to chlorinated derivatives and structural analogs of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andra, Syam S; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Arora, Manish; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Makris, Konstantinos C

    2015-12-01

    The high reactivity of bisphenol A (BPA) with disinfectant chlorine is evident in the instantaneous formation of chlorinated BPA derivatives (ClxBPA) in various environmental media that show increased estrogen-activity when compared with that of BPA. The documented health risks associated with BPA exposures have led to the gradual market entry of BPA structural analogs, such as bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol B (BPB), etc. A suite of exposure sources to ClxBPA and BPA analogs in the domestic environment is anticipated to drive the nature and range of halogenated BPA derivatives that can form when residual BPA comes in contact with disinfectant in tap water and/or consumer products. The primary objective of this review was to survey all available studies reporting biomonitoring protocols of ClxBPA and structural BPA analogs (BPS, BPF, BPB, etc.) in human matrices. Focus was paid on describing the analytical methodologies practiced for the analysis of ClxBPA and BPA analogs using hyphenated chromatography and mass spectrometry techniques, because current methodologies for human matrices are complex. During the last decade, an increasing number of ecotoxicological, cell-culture and animal-based and human studies dealing with ClxBPA exposure sources and routes of exposure, metabolism and toxicity have been published. Up to date findings indicated the association of ClxBPA with metabolic conditions, such as obesity, lipid accumulation, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, particularly in in-vitro and in-vivo studies. We critically discuss the limitations, research needs and future opportunities linked with the inclusion of ClxBPA and BPA analogs into exposure assessment protocols of relevant epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Carotenoid metabolism in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. Th...

  8. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  9. The effect of structural changes on charge transfer states in a light-harvesting carotenoid-diaryl-porphyrin-C{sub 60} molecular triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, Marco [Computational Science Program, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Baruah, Tunna, E-mail: tbaruah@utep.edu [Computational Science Program, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    We present a detailed study of charge transfer (CT) excited states for a large number of configurations in a light-harvesting Carotenoid-diaryl-Porphyrin-C{sub 60} (CPC{sub 60}) molecular triad. The chain-like molecular triad undergoes photoinduced charge transfer process exhibiting a large excited state dipole moment, making it suitable for application to molecular-scale opto-electronic devices. An important consideration is that the structural flexibility of the CPC{sub 60} triad impacts its dynamics in solvents. Since experimentally measured dipole moments for the triad of ∼110 D and ∼160 D strongly indicate a range in structural variability in the excited state, studying the effect of structural changes on the CT excited state energetics furthers the understanding of its charge transfer states. We have calculated the variation in the lowest CT excited state energies by performing a scan of possible variation in the structure of the triad. Some of these configurations were generated by incrementally scanning a 360° torsional (dihedral) twist at the C{sub 60}-porhyrin linkage and the porphyrin-carotenoid linkage. Additionally, five different CPC{sub 60} conformations were studied to determine the effect of pi-conjugation and particle-hole Coulombic attraction on the CT excitation energies. Our calculations show that configurational changes in the triad induces a variation of ∼0.6 eV in CT excited state energies in the gas-phase. The corresponding calculated excited state dipoles show a range of 47 D–188 D. The absorption spectra and density of states of these structures show little variation except for the structures where the porphyrin and aryl conjugation is changed.

  10. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloz, Miroslav [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pillai, Smitha [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Kodis, Gerdenis [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gust, Devens [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Thomas A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); van Grondelle, Rienk [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kennis, John T. M. [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-04-14

    . These synthetic systems are providing a deeper understanding of structural and environmental effects on the interactions between carotenoids and tetrapyrroles and thereby better defining their role in controlling natural photosynthetic systems.

  11. Nucleic Acid Base Analog FRET-Pair Facilitating Detailed Structural Measurements in Nucleic Acid Containing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börjesson, Karl; Preus, Søren; El-Sagheer, Afaf

    2009-01-01

    toward detailed studies of the inherent dynamics of nucleic acid structures. Moreover, the placement of FRET-pair chromophores inside the base stack will be a great advantage in studies where other (biomacro)molecules interact with the nucleic acid. Lastly, our study gives possibly the first truly solid...... distances covering up to more than one turn of the DNA duplex. Importantly, we show that the rigid stacking of the two base analogs, and consequently excellent control of their exact positions and orientations, results in a high control of the orientation factor and hence very distinct FRET changes...... as the number of bases separating tCO and tC(nitro) is varied. A set of DNA strands containing the FRET-pair at wisely chosen locations will, thus, make it possible to accurately distinguish distance- from orientation-changes using FRET. In combination with the good nucleobase analog properties, this points...

  12. Evaluation of Fluorescent Analogs of Deoxycytidine for Monitoring DNA Transitions from Duplex to Functional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogini P. Bhavsar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Topological variants of single-strand DNA (ssDNA structures, referred to as “functional DNA,” have been detected in regulatory regions of many genes and are thought to affect gene expression. Two fluorescent analogs of deoxycytidine, Pyrrolo-dC (PdC and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tC∘, can be incorporated into DNA. Here, we describe spectroscopic studies of both analogs to determine fluorescent properties that report on structural transitions from double-strand DNA (dsDNA to ssDNA, a common pathway in the transition to functional DNA structures. We obtained fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD spectra, steady-state fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes of the fluorophores in DNA. Our results show that PdC is advantageous in fluorescence lifetime studies because of a distinct ~2 ns change between paired and unpaired bases. However, tC∘ is a better probe for FDCD experiments that report on the helical structure of DNA surrounding the fluorophore. Both fluorophores provide complementary data to measure DNA structural transitions.

  13. Strain-dependent carotenoid productions in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Han Seung; Kim, Kong-Hwan; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2010-12-01

    Seven Escherichia coli strains, which were metabolically engineered with carotenoid biosynthetic pathways, were systematically compared in order to investigate the strain-specific formation of carotenoids of structural diversity. C30 acyclic carotenoids, diaponeurosporene and diapolycopene were well produced in all E. coli strains tested. However, the C30 monocyclic diapotorulene formation was strongly strain dependent. Reduced diapotorulene formation was observed in the E. coli strain Top10, MG1655, and MDS42 while better formation was observed in the E. coli strain JM109, SURE, DH5a, and XL1-Blue. Interestingly, C40 carotenoids, which have longer backbones than C30 carotenoids, also showed strain dependency as C30 diapotorulene did. Quantitative analysis showed that the SURE strain was the best producer for C40 acyclic lycopene, C40 dicyclic β-carotene, and C30 monocyclic diapotorulene. Of the seven strains examined, the highest volumetric productivity for most of the carotenoids structures was observed in the recombinant SURE strain. In conclusion, we showed that recombinant hosts and carotenoid structures influenced carotenoid productions significantly, and this information can serve as the basis for the subsequent development of microorganisms for carotenoids of interest.

  14. Marine Carotenoids and Cardiovascular Risk Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Speranza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine carotenoids are important bioactive compounds with physiological activities related to prevention of degenerative diseases.found principally in plants, with potential antioxidant biological properties deriving from their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. They are substances with very special and remarkable properties that no other groups of substances possess and that form the basis of their many, varied functions and actions in all kinds of living organisms. The potential beneficial effects of marine carotenoids have been studied particularly in astaxanthin and fucoxanthin as they are the major marine carotenoids. Both these two carotenoids show strong antioxidant activity attributed to quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. The potential role of these carotenoids as dietary anti-oxidants has been suggested to be one of the main mechanisms for their preventive effects against cancer and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this short review is to examine the published studies concerning the use of the two marine carotenoids, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Biopolymeric Mucin and Synthetic Polymer Analogs: Their Structure, Function and Role in Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar P. Authimoolam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucin networks are viscoelastic fibrillar aggregates formed through the complex self-association of biopolymeric glycoprotein chains. The networks form a lubricious, hydrated protective shield along epithelial regions within the human body. The critical role played by mucin networks in impacting the transport properties of biofunctional molecules (e.g., biogenic molecules, probes, nanoparticles, and its effect on bioavailability are well described in the literature. An alternate perspective is provided in this paper, presenting mucin’s complex network structure, and its interdependent functional characteristics in human physiology. We highlight the recent advances that were achieved through the use of mucin in diverse areas of bioengineering applications (e.g., drug delivery, biomedical devices and tissue engineering. Mucin network formation is a highly complex process, driven by wide variety of molecular interactions, and the network possess structural and chemical variations, posing a great challenge to understand mucin’s bulk behavior. Through this review, the prospective potential of polymer based analogs to serve as mucin mimic is suggested. These analog systems, apart from functioning as an artificial model, reducing the current dependency on animal models, can aid in furthering our fundamental understanding of such complex structures.

  16. Rchemcpp: a web service for structural analoging in ChEMBL, Drugbank and the Connectivity Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klambauer, Günter; Wischenbart, Martin; Mahr, Michael; Unterthiner, Thomas; Mayr, Andreas; Hochreiter, Sepp

    2015-10-15

    We have developed Rchempp, a web service that identifies structurally similar compounds (structural analogs) in large-scale molecule databases. The service allows compounds to be queried in the widely used ChEMBL, DrugBank and the Connectivity Map databases. Rchemcpp utilizes the best performing similarity functions, i.e. molecule kernels, as measures for structural similarity. Molecule kernels have proven superior performance over other similarity measures and are currently excelling at machine learning challenges. To considerably reduce computational time, and thereby make it feasible as a web service, a novel efficient prefiltering strategy has been developed, which maintains the sensitivity of the method. By exploiting information contained in public databases, the web service facilitates many applications crucial for the drug development process, such as prioritizing compounds after screening or reducing adverse side effects during late phases. Rchemcpp was used in the DeepTox pipeline that has won the Tox21 Data Challenge and is frequently used by researchers in pharmaceutical companies. The web service and the R package are freely available via http://shiny.bioinf.jku.at/Analoging/ and via Bioconductor. hochreit@bioinf.jku.at Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Laboratory characterization of the structural properties controlling dynamical gas transport in Mars-analog soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Hanna G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    2008-10-01

    Dynamical transport of gases within the martian regolith controls many climatic processes, and is particularly important in the deposition and/or mobilization of shallow ground ice, as well as exchange of other volatiles between the martian regolith and atmosphere. A variety of theoretical studies have addressed issues related to ground ice dynamics on Mars and in the terrestrial analog environment of the Antarctic Dry Valleys. These theoretical studies have drawn on a limited set of empirical measurements to constrain the structural parameters controlling gas diffusion and flow in soils. Here, we investigate five groups of Mars-analog soils: glass spheres, JSC Mars-1, aeolian dune sand, Antarctic Dry Valley soils, and arctic loess. We present laboratory measurements of the structural properties most relevant to gas transport in these soils: porosity, tortuosity, permeability, bulk and intrinsic densities, grain-size distribution, pore-size distribution and BET surface area. Our results bear directly both on the appropriateness of assumptions made in theoretical studies and on current outstanding issues in the study of shallow ground ice on Mars and in the Dry Valleys. Specifically, we find that (1) measured values of tortuosity are lower than values commonly assumed for Mars by a factor of two to three; (2) diffusive loss of ground ice on Mars can likely proceed up to four times faster than predicted by theoretical studies; (3) soil permeabilities are sufficiently high that flushing of the soil column by bulk flow of atmospheric gases may further speed loss or deposition of shallow ground ice; (4) the pore volume in some Mars-analog soils is sufficiently high to explain high volumetric ice abundances inferred from Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer data as simple pore ice; and (5) measured properties of soils collected in Beacon Valley, Antarctica agree well with assumptions made in theoretical studies and are consistent with rapid loss of ground ice in the

  18. The organization of bacteriochlorophyll c in chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and the structural role of carotenoids and protein. An absorption, linear dichroism, circular dichroism and Stark spectroscopy study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, R.N.; Oberheide, U.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.; Foidl, M.; Oelze, J.; van Amerongen, H.

    1997-01-01

    The organization of bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c) molecules was studied in normal and carotenoid-deficient chlorosomes isolated from the green phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Carotenoid-deficient chlorosomes were obtained from cells grown in the presence of 60 μg of

  19. The organization of bacteriochlorophyll c in chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and the structural role of carotenoids and protein. An absorption, linear dichroism, circular dichroism ans Stark spectroscopy study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, R.N.; Oberheide, U.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.; Foidl, M.; Oelze, J.; van Amerongen, H.

    1997-01-01

    The organization of bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c) molecules was studied in normal and carotenoid-deficient chlorosomes isolated from the green phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Carotenoid-deficient chlorosomes were obtained from cells grown in the presence of 60 μg of

  20. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  1. Toward smart aerospace structures: design of a piezoelectric sensor and its analog interface for flaw detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-31

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  2. Operational amplifier speed and accuracy improvement analog circuit design with structural methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Vadim V

    2004-01-01

    Operational Amplifier Speed and Accuracy Improvement proposes a new methodology for the design of analog integrated circuits. The usefulness of this methodology is demonstrated through the design of an operational amplifier. This methodology consists of the following iterative steps: description of the circuit functionality at a high level of abstraction using signal flow graphs; equivalent transformations and modifications of the graph to the form where all important parameters are controlled by dedicated feedback loops; and implementation of the structure using a library of elementary cells. Operational Amplifier Speed and Accuracy Improvement shows how to choose structures and design circuits which improve an operational amplifier's important parameters such as speed to power ratio, open loop gain, common-mode voltage rejection ratio, and power supply rejection ratio. The same approach is used to design clamps and limiting circuits which improve the performance of the amplifier outside of its linear operat...

  3. Male lures for mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata wied.): Structural analogs of α-copaene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flath, R A; Cunningham, R T; Mon, T R; John, J O

    1994-10-01

    Nine sesquiterpenes structurally related to the potent male Mediterranean fruit fly lure (+)-α-copaene were tested in a series of field bioassays to determine their male medfly attractiveness relative to one another and to (+)-α-copaene itself. This study was carried out to determine the relative importance of the various substructure components of the (+)-α-copaene molecule in eliciting an attractive response in the male fly. Tests indicated that any deviation from the three-dimensional structure of (+)-α-copaene leads to major losses in male fly attractancy. The tested analogs fell into two groups, based on their levels of attraction: (+)-α-ylangene, (+)-β-copaene, (+)-β-ylangene, and (-)-α-copaene were found to be somewhat attractive, although much less so than (+)-α-copaene, while (+)-cyclosativene, (+)-cyclocopacamphene, (+)-longicyclene, (+)-longipinene, and (-)-trans-α-bergamotene were not attractive.

  4. Carotenoids and Retinoids: Nomenclature, Chemistry, and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Earl H; Curley, Robert W

    Carotenoids are polyenes synthesized in plants and certain microorganisms and are pigments used by plants and animals in various physiological processes. Some of the over 600 known carotenoids are capable of metabolic conversion to the essential nutrient vitamin A (retinol) in higher animals. Vitamin A also gives rise to a number of other metabolites which, along with their analogs, are known as retinoids. To facilitate discussion about these important molecules, a nomenclature is required to identify specific substances. The generally accepted rules for naming these important molecules have been agreed to by various Commissions of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and International Union of Biochemistry. These naming conventions are explained along with comparisons to more systematic naming rules that apply for these organic chemicals. Identification of the carotenoids and retinoids has been advanced by their chemical syntheses, and here, both classical and modern methods for synthesis of these molecules, as well as their analogs, are described. Because of their importance in biological systems, sensitive methods for the detection and quantification of these compounds from various sources have been essential. Early analyses that relied on liquid adsorption and partition chromatography have given way to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with various detection methods. The development of HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry, particularly LC/MS-MS with Multiple Reaction Monitoring, has resulted in the greatest sensitivity and specificity in these analyses.

  5. Dietary factors that affect carotenoid bioavailability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van het K.H.

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids are thought to contribute to the beneficial effects of increased vegetable consumption. To better understand the potential benefits of carotenoids, we investigated the bioavailability of carotenoids from vegetables and dietary factors which might influence carotenoid

  6. Curcumin and Its Carbocyclic Analogs: Structure-Activity in Relation to Antioxidant and Selected Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Vasantha Rupasinghe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is the major phenolic compound present in turmeric (Curcuma longa L.. Curcumin and 15 novel analogs were investigated for their antioxidant and selected biological activities. Strong relationships between the structure and evaluated activity revealed that the compounds with specific functional groups and carbon skeleton had specific biological profiles. Among the compounds tested, the derivatives (E-2-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene-5-((E-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylacryloylcyclopentanone (3e, and (E-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene-5-((E-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylacryloyl-cyclopentanone (3d and the parent compound curcumin exhibited the strongest free radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity. Concerning the other biological activities studied the compound (E-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene-5-((E-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl-acryloylcyclopentanone (3d was the most potent angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor, while the derivatives (E-2-(4-hydroxybenzylidene-6-((E-3-(4-hydroxyphenylacryloylcyclohexanone (2b, (E-2-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene-6-((E-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylacryloylcyclohexanone (2e and (E-2-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene-5-((E-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylacryloylcyclopentanone (3e exhibited strong tyrosinase inhibition. Moreover, (E-2-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene-6-((E-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-acryloylcyclohexanone (2e was also found to be the strongest human HIV-1 protease inhibitor in vitro among the tested compounds. Cytotoxicity studies using normal human lung cells revealed that the novel curcumin as well as its carbocyclic analogs are not toxic.

  7. First report on the structural exploration and prediction of new BPTES analogs as glutaminase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sk. Abdul; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2017-09-01

    Glutaminase is one of the important key enzymes regulating cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation in cancer. Therefore, it is being explored as a crucial target regarding anticancer drug design and development. However, none of the potent and selective glutaminase inhibitors is available in the market though two prototype glutaminase inhibitors are reported namely DON as well as BPTES. Due to severe toxicity in clinical trials, the use of DON is restricted. However, BPTES is an allosteric glutaminase inhibitor with less toxic profile and, therefore, lead optimization of BPTES may be a good option to develop newer drug candidates. In this study, a multi-QSAR modeling is carried out on a series of BPTES analogs. A significant connection between different descriptors and the glutaminase inhibitory activities is noticed by employing multiple linear regression, artificial neural network and support vector machine techniques. The classification-based QSAR such as linear discriminant analysis and Bayesian classification modeling are also performed to search important molecular fingerprints or substructures that may help in classifying the probability of finding 'active' and 'inactive' BPTES analogs. Moreover, HQSAR and Topomer CoMFA analyses are also performed. In addition, the SAR observations are interpreted with all these validated computational models along with the structure-based contours. Finally, new twenty two compounds are designed and predicted for their probable glutaminase inhibitory activity.

  8. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Boukabache

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures’ reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure’s integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  9. Mechanistic aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Moïse, Alexander R.

    2014-01-08

    Carotenoid synthesis is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. Carotenoids are tetraterpenes derived through the condensation of the five-carbon (C5) universal isoprenoid precursors isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). A recently developed concept that could explain the role of the poly-cis pathway in carotenoid synthesis is that the intermediates of this pathway have additional physiological roles that extend beyond serving as precursors of lycopene. This concept is based on the analysis of the phenotype of several mutant strains of tomato lacking carotenoid synthetic genes. The feedback regulation of early carotenoid synthetic genes in response to a block in upstream metabolism represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the mechanism and regulation of carotenoid synthesis and of metabolic regulation in general. The molecular details of a signaling pathway that regulates carotenogenesis in response to the levels of carotenoid precursors are still unclear.

  10. Low-Actuation Voltage MEMS Digital-to-Analog Converter with Parylene Spring Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng-Wen; Lee, Fu-Wei; Liao, Hsin-Hung; Kuo, Wen-Cheng; Yang, Yao-Joe

    2015-08-28

    We propose an electrostatically-actuated microelectromechanical digital-to-analog converter (M-DAC) device with low actuation voltage. The spring structures of the silicon-based M-DAC device were monolithically fabricated using parylene-C. Because the Young's modulus of parylene-C is considerably lower than that of silicon, the electrostatic microactuators in the proposed device require much lower actuation voltages. The actuation voltage of the proposed M-DAC device is approximately 6 V, which is less than one half of the actuation voltages of a previously reported M-DAC equipped with electrostatic microactuators. The measured total displacement of the proposed three-bit M-DAC is nearly 504 nm, and the motion step is approximately 72 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the M-DAC can be employed as a mirror platform with discrete displacement output for a noncontact surface profiling system.

  11. Low-Actuation Voltage MEMS Digital-to-Analog Converter with Parylene Spring Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wen Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose an electrostatically-actuated microelectromechanical digital-to-analog converter (M-DAC device with low actuation voltage. The spring structures of the silicon-based M-DAC device were monolithically fabricated using parylene-C. Because the Young’s modulus of parylene-C is considerably lower than that of silicon, the electrostatic microactuators in the proposed device require much lower actuation voltages. The actuation voltage of the proposed M-DAC device is approximately 6 V, which is less than one half of the actuation voltages of a previously reported M-DAC equipped with electrostatic microactuators. The measured total displacement of the proposed three-bit M-DAC is nearly 504 nm, and the motion step is approximately 72 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the M-DAC can be employed as a mirror platform with discrete displacement output for a noncontact surface profiling system.

  12. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, L.; Jäger, C.; Simionovici, A.; Lemaire, J. L.; Sabri, T.; Foy, E.; Yagoubi, S.; Henning, T.; Salomon, D.; Martinez-Criado, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei contain X-ray-dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Aims: Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. Methods: We prepared enstatite (MgSiO3) nanograins, which are analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared in X-ray transparent substrates and were irradiated with hard X-rays nanobeams (29.4 keV) provided by beamline ID16B of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble). X-ray diffraction images were recorded in transmission mode, and the ensuing diffractograms were analyzed as a function of the total X-ray exposure time. Results: We detected the amorphization of polycrystalline silicates embedded in an organic matrix after an accumulated X-ray exposure of 6.4 × 1027 eV cm-2. Pure crystalline silicate grains (without resin) do not exhibit amorphization. None of the amorphous silicate samples (pure and embedded in resin) underwent crystallization. We analyze the evolution of the polycrystalline sample embedded in an organic matrix as a function of X-ray exposure. Conclusions: Loss of diffraction peak intensity, peak broadening, and the disappearance of discrete spots and arcs reveal the amorphization

  13. Analog earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, R.B. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository.

  14. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein, and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD.

  15. Carotenoid fluorescence in Dunaliella salina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinegris, D.M.M.; Es, van M.A.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Dunaliella salina is a halotolerant green alga that is well known for its carotenoid producing capacity. The produced carotenoids are mainly stored in lipid globules. For various research purposes, such as production and extraction kinetics, we would like to determine and/or localise the carotenoid

  16. Biologically active polymers from spontaneous carotenoid oxidation: a new frontier in carotenoid activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Johnston

    Full Text Available In animals carotenoids show biological activity unrelated to vitamin A that has been considered to arise directly from the behavior of the parent compound, particularly as an antioxidant. However, the very property that confers antioxidant activity on some carotenoids in plants also confers susceptibility to oxidative transformation. As an alternative, it has been suggested that carotenoid oxidative breakdown or metabolic products could be the actual agents of activity in animals. However, an important and neglected aspect of the behavior of the highly unsaturated carotenoids is their potential to undergo addition of oxygen to form copolymers. Recently we reported that spontaneous oxidation of ß-carotene transforms it into a product dominated by ß-carotene-oxygen copolymers. We now report that the polymeric product is biologically active. Results suggest an overall ability to prime innate immune function to more rapidly respond to subsequent microbial challenges. An underlying structural resemblance to sporopollenin, found in the outer shell of spores and pollen, may allow the polymer to modulate innate immune responses through interactions with the pattern recognition receptor system. Oxygen copolymer formation appears common to all carotenoids, is anticipated to be widespread, and the products may contribute to the health benefits of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables.

  17. Biologically active polymers from spontaneous carotenoid oxidation: a new frontier in carotenoid activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James B; Nickerson, James G; Daroszewski, Janusz; Mogg, Trevor J; Burton, Graham W

    2014-01-01

    In animals carotenoids show biological activity unrelated to vitamin A that has been considered to arise directly from the behavior of the parent compound, particularly as an antioxidant. However, the very property that confers antioxidant activity on some carotenoids in plants also confers susceptibility to oxidative transformation. As an alternative, it has been suggested that carotenoid oxidative breakdown or metabolic products could be the actual agents of activity in animals. However, an important and neglected aspect of the behavior of the highly unsaturated carotenoids is their potential to undergo addition of oxygen to form copolymers. Recently we reported that spontaneous oxidation of ß-carotene transforms it into a product dominated by ß-carotene-oxygen copolymers. We now report that the polymeric product is biologically active. Results suggest an overall ability to prime innate immune function to more rapidly respond to subsequent microbial challenges. An underlying structural resemblance to sporopollenin, found in the outer shell of spores and pollen, may allow the polymer to modulate innate immune responses through interactions with the pattern recognition receptor system. Oxygen copolymer formation appears common to all carotenoids, is anticipated to be widespread, and the products may contribute to the health benefits of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables.

  18. Curcumin and its carbocyclic analogs: structure-activity in relation to antioxidant and selected biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Khushwant S; Jha, Amitabh; Youssef, Dani; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2013-05-10

    Curcumin is the major phenolic compound present in turmeric (Curcuma longa L.). Curcumin and 15 novel analogs were investigated for their antioxidant and selected biological activities. Strong relationships between the structure and evaluated activity revealed that the compounds with specific functional groups and carbon skeleton had specific biological profiles. Among the compounds tested, the derivatives (E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)-5-((E)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)acryloyl)cyclopentanone (3e), and (E)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-5-((E)-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acryloyl)-cyclopentanone (3d) and the parent compound curcumin exhibited the strongest free radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity. Concerning the other biological activities studied the compound (E)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-5-((E)-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-acryloyl)cyclopentanone (3d) was the most potent angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, while the derivatives (E)-2-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-6-((E)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)acryloyl)cyclohexanone (2b), (E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)-6-((E)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)acryloyl)cyclohexanone (2e) and (E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)-5-((E)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)acryloyl)cyclopentanone (3e) exhibited strong tyrosinase inhibition. Moreover, (E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)-6-((E)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-acryloyl)cyclohexanone (2e) was also found to be the strongest human HIV-1 protease inhibitor in vitro among the tested compounds. Cytotoxicity studies using normal human lung cells revealed that the novel curcumin as well as its carbocyclic analogs are not toxic.

  19. Insights into structure-activity relationships of somatostatin analogs containing mesitylalanine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martín-Gago, Pablo; Aragón, Eric; Gomez-Caminals, Marc; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Ramón, Rosario; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Verdaguer, Xavier; López-Ruiz, Pilar; Colás, Begoña; Cortes, María Alicia; Ponsati, Berta; Macias, Maria J; Riera, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    .... Taking these properties into account, we have synthesized ten somatostatin analogs containing Msa residues in different key positions to modify the intrinsic conformational flexibility of the natural hormone...

  20. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ..omega../sup 70/ promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs.

  1. Enhanced biological activity of carotenoids stabilized by phenyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ji Suk; Jeon, Sunhwa; Byun, Youn Jung; Koo, Sangho; Choi, Shin Sik

    2015-06-15

    Carotenoids are lipid soluble food ingredients with multifunction including antioxidant and anticancer activities. However, carotenoids are destructively oxidized upon reaction with radicals resulting in toxic effects on biological systems. Two synthetic carotenoids (BAS and BTS) containing the aromatic phenyl groups with a para-substituent (OMe and Me, respectively) at C-13 and C-13' position were prepared in order to overcome a structural instability of carotenoid. Both BAS and BTS exerted stronger radical scavenging activity than β-carotene in DPPH and ABTS assays. In particular, BTS significantly reduced in vivo ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels and improved body growth and reproduction of Caenorhabditiselegans. BTS has a great potential for the advanced and modified carotenoid material with stability leading to enhanced bioavailability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural benefits of bisphenol S and its analogs resulting in their high sorption on carbon nanotubes and graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huiying; Li, Hao; Liang, Ni; Chen, Fangyuan; Liao, Shaohua; Zhang, Di; Wu, Min; Pan, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Bisphenol S (BPS), a new bisphenol analog, is considered to be a potential replacement for bisphenol A (BPA), which has gained concern because of its potentially adverse health impacts. Therefore, studies are needed to investigate the environmental fate and risks of this compound. In this study, the adsorption of BPS and four structural analogs on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphite (GP) were investigated. When solid-phase concentrations were normalized by the surface areas, oxygen-containing functional groups on the absorbents showed a positive impact on phenol sorption but inhibited the sorption of chemicals with two benzene rings. Among BPS analogs, diphenyl sulfone showed the lowest sorption when hydrophobic effects were ruled out. Chemicals with a butterfly structure, formed between the two benzene rings, showed consistently high sorption on MWCNTs, independent of the substituted electron-donating or accepting functional groups. This study emphasizes the importance of chemical conformation on organic, contaminant sorption on engineered, carbonaceous materials.

  3. Modular Hybrid Energy Concept Employing a Novel Control Structure Based on a Simple Analog System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETREUS, D.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel control topology which enables the setup of a low cost analog system leading to the implementation of a modular energy conversion system. The modular concept is based on hybrid renewable energy (solar and wind and uses high voltage inverters already available on the market. An important feature of the proposed topology is a permanently active current loop, which assures short circuit protection and simplifies the control loops compensation. The innovative analogue solution of the control structure is based on a dedicated integrated circuit (IC for power factor correction (PFC circuits, used in a new configuration, to assure an efficient inverter start-up. The energy conversion system (control structure and maximum power point tracking algorithm is simulated using a new macromodel-based concept, which reduces the usual computational burden of the simulator and achieves high processing speed. The proposed novel system is presented in this article from concept, through the design and implementation stages, is verified through simulation and is validated by experimental results.

  4. Substituent effect on the thermodynamic solubility of structural analogs: relative contribution of crystal packing and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Shirai, Osamu; Kano, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of the solubility of benzoylphenylurea (BPU) derivatives was conducted to investigate the relative importance of crystal packing and hydration for improving solubility with minor structural modification. The contribution of crystal packing to solubility was evaluated from the change in Gibbs energy on the transition from the crystalline to liquid state. Hydration Gibbs energy was estimated using a linear free-energy relationship between octanol-water partition coefficients and gas-water partition coefficients. The established solubility model satisfactorily explained the relative thermodynamic solubility of the model compounds and revealed that crystal packing and hydration equally controlled solubility of the structural analogs. All hydrophobic substituents were undesirable for solubility in terms of hydration, as expected. On the other hand, some of these hydrophobic substituents destabilized crystal packing and improved the solubility of the BPU derivatives when their impact on crystal packing exceeded their negative influence on hydration. The replacement of a single substituent could cause more than a 10-fold enhancement in thermodynamic solubility; this degree of improvement was comparable to that generally achieved by amorphous formulations. Detailed analysis of thermodynamic solubility will allow us to better understand the true substituent effect and design drug-like candidates efficiently. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. A Better Understanding of Protein Structure and Function by the Synthesis and Incorporation of Selenium- and Tellurium Containing Tryptophan Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmey, Sherif Samir [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division; Belmont Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Physics; Rice, Ambrose Eugene [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division; Belmont Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Physics; Hatch, Duane Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division; Belmont Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Physics; Silks, Louis A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Bioscience Division

    2016-08-17

    Unnatural heavy metal-containing amino acid analogs have shown to be very important in the analysis of protein structure, using methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy. Synthesis and incorporation of selenium-containing methionine analogs has already been shown in the literature however with some drawbacks due to toxicity to host organisms. Thus synthesis of heavy metal tryptophan analogs should prove to be more effective since the amino acid tryptophan is naturally less abundant in many proteins. For example, bioincorporation of β-seleno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl-L-alanine ([4,5]SeTrp) and β-selenolo[2,3-b]pyrrolyl-L-alanine ([6,7]SeTrp) has been shown in the following proteins without structural or catalytic perturbations: human annexin V, barstar, and dihydrofolate reductase. The reported synthesis of these Se-containing analogs is currently not efficient for commercial purposes. Thus a more efficient, concise, high-yield synthesis of selenotryptophan, as well as the corresponding, tellurotryptophan, will be necessary for wide spread use of these unnatural amino acid analogs. This research will highlight our progress towards a synthetic route of both [6,7]SeTrp and [6,7]TeTrp, which ultimately will be used to study the effect on the catalytic activity of Lignin Peroxidase (LiP).

  6. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosária

    2013-08-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to introduce analogies in their lessons. Both aspects have been discussed in the literature in the last few decades. However, almost nothing is known about how teachers draw their own analogies for instructional purposes or, in other words, about how they reason analogically when planning and conducting teaching. This is the focus of this paper. Six secondary teachers were individually interviewed; the aim was to characterize how they perform each of the analogical reasoning subprocesses, as well as to identify their views on analogies and their use in science teaching. The results were analyzed by considering elements of both theories about analogical reasoning: the structural mapping proposed by Gentner and the analogical mechanism described by Vosniadou. A comprehensive discussion of our results makes it evident that teachers' content knowledge on scientific topics and on analogies as well as their pedagogical content knowledge on the use of analogies influence all their analogical reasoning subprocesses. Our results also point to the need for improving teachers' knowledge about analogies and their ability to perform analogical reasoning.

  7. Glycosaminoglycans analogs from marine invertebrates: structure, biological effects, and potential as new therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavão, Mauro S. G.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, several glycosaminoglycan analogs obtained from different marine invertebrate are reported. The structure, biological activity and mechanism of action of these unique molecules are detailed reviewed and exemplified by experiments in vitro and in vivo. Among the glycans studied are low-sulfated heparin-like polymers from ascidians, containing significant anticoagulant activity and no bleeding effect; dermatan sulfates with significant neurite outgrowth promoting activity and anti-P-selectin from ascidians, and a unique fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from sea cucumbers, possessing anticoagulant activity after oral administration and high anti P- and L-selectin activities. The therapeutic value and safety of these invertebrate glycans have been extensively proved by several experimental animal models of diseases, including thrombosis, inflammation and metastasis. These invertebrate glycans can be obtained in high concentrations from marine organisms that have been used as a food source for decades, and usually obtained from marine farms in sufficient quantities to be used as starting material for new therapeutics. PMID:25309878

  8. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes having analogous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Abhijeet; Shrivastava, B. D.; Srivastava, Krishna; Prasad, J.

    2013-02-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been studied at the Cu K-edge in five mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, viz., [Cu(L-glu)(bipy)] 1, [Cu(L-glu)(phen) (H2O)].3H2O 2, [Cu(L-tyro)(bipy)(ClO4)].2H2O 3, [Cu(L-phen)(bipy)(H2O)] (ClO4) 4, and [Cu(L-tyro)(phen)(H2O)] (ClO4).1.5H2O 5 (where L-glu = L-glutamate dianion, L-tyro = L-tyrosinate anion, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and phen =1,10-phenanthroline), having essentially the same structure. The crystallographic data are available for all the complexes using which five theoretical models have been generated. Firstly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data of each complex has been analyzed using its own theoretical model and the results obtained are found to be comparable with the crystallographic results. Then, the EXAFS data of each complex has been analyzed using the theoretical models of the remaining four of these complexes. For each complex, the structural parameters obtained by fitting EXAFS data with theoretical models of the four remaining complexes have been found to be comparable with those obtained by fitting its own theoretical model. Thus, it has been found that if the crystal structure is not available for a complex, then the crystal structure of similar or analogous complex can be used satisfactorily for generating the theoretical model for the EXAFS data analysis of that complex, even if different ligands are attached to the central metal atom. On the basis of EXAFS data analysis, the coordination geometries around the central metal ions in these complexes have been depicted.

  9. Physalis alkekengi Carotenoidic Extract Inhibitor of Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Sanda Chedea

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the carotenoidic saponified extract of Physalis alkekengi sepals (PA towards the lipoxygenase (LOX oxidation of linoleic acid. Lipoxygenase activity in the presence of carotenoids, standard and from extract, was followed by its kinetic behaviour determining the changes in absorption at 234 nm. The standard carotenoids used were β-carotene (β-car, lutein (Lut, and zeaxanthin (Zea. The calculated enzymatic specific activity (ESA after 600 s of reaction proves that PA carotenoidic extract has inhibitory effect on LOX oxidation of linoleic acid. A longer polyenic chain of carotenoid structure gives a higher ESA during the first reaction seconds. This situation is not available after 600 s of reaction and may be due to a destruction of this structure by cooxidation of carotenoids, besides the classical LOX reaction. The PA carotenoidic extract inhibiting the LOX-1 reaction can be considered a source of lipoxygenase inhibitors.

  10. Carotenoid absorption in chicken intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, R; Alonso, A; Martín, M

    1978-09-01

    The powdered flowers of marigold (Tagetes erecta) are used as a cheap source of carotenoids in avicultura. Lutein (3,3'-dyhydroxi-alpha-carotene) constitutes up to 85 to 90% of marigold carotenoids. In the plant, lutein is found esterified to palmitic or estearic acid. In chicken, carotenoid is hydrolized in the first portion of the small intestine, and absorbed as free lutein. After the absorption, lutein is not re-esterified in the different chicken tissues.

  11. Analog circuit design structured mixed-mode design, multi-bit sigma-delta converters, short range RF circuits

    CERN Document Server

    van Roermund, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Preface. Part I: Structured Mixed-Mode Design. Introduction. Structured Oscillator Design; C. Verhoeven, A. van Staveren. Systematic Design of High-frequency gm-C Filters; E. Lauwers, G. Gielen. Structured LNA Design; E.H. Nordholt. High-Level Simulation and Modeling Tools for Mixed-Signal Front-ends of Wireless Systems; P. Wambacq, et al. Structured Simulation-Based Analog Design Synthesis; R.A. Rutenbar. Structured Analog layout Design; K. Lampaert. Part II: Multi-Bit Sigma Delta Converters. Introduction. Architecture Considerations for Multi-Bit SigmaDelta ADCs; T. Brooks. Multirate Sigma-Delta Modulators, an Alternative to Multibit; F. Colodro, A. Torralba. Circuit Design Aspects of Multi-Bit Delta-Sigma Converters; Y. Geerts, et al. High-speed Digital to Analog Converter Issues with Applications to Sigma Delta Modulators; K. Doris, et al. Correction-Free Multi-Bit Sigma-Delta Modulators for ADSL; R. del Rio, et al. Sigma Delta Converters in Wireline Communications; A. Wiesbauer, et al. Part III: Short Ra...

  12. Isolation and structural determination of the first 8-epi-type tetrodotoxin analogs from the newt, Cynops ensicauda popei, and comparison of tetrodotoxin analogs profiles of this newt and the puffer fish, Fugu poecilonotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yuta; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Konoki, Keiichi; Cho, Yuko; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2012-03-01

    Identification of new tetrodotoxin (TTX) analogs from TTX-possessing animals might provide insight into its biosynthesis and metabolism. In this study, four new analogs, 8-epi-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, 4,9-anhydro-8-epi-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, 1-hydroxy-8-epi-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, and 1-hydroxy-4,4a-anhydro-8-epi-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, were isolated from the newt, Cynops ensicauda popei, and their structures were determined using spectroscopic methods. These are the first 8-epi-type analogs of TTX that have been found in a natural source. Furthermore, we examined the composition of the TTX analogs in this newt and in the ovary of the puffer fish, Fugu poecilonotus, using LC/MS. The results indicate that TTX and 11-deoxyTTX were present in both sources. However, 6-epiTTX and 8-epi-type analogs were detected only in the newt, while 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX was a specific and major analog in the puffer fish. Such considerable differences among analog compositions might reflect differences in the biosynthesis or metabolism of TTX between these animals.

  13. Isolation and Structural Determination of the First 8-epi-type Tetrodotoxin Analogs from the Newt, Cynops ensicauda popei, and Comparison of Tetrodotoxin Analogs Profiles of This Newt and the Puffer Fish, Fugu poecilonotus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Yotsu-Yamashita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of new tetrodotoxin (TTX analogs from TTX-possessing animals might provide insight into its biosynthesis and metabolism. In this study, four new analogs, 8-epi-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, 4,9-anhydro-8-epi-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, 1-hydroxy-8-epi-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, and 1-hydroxy-4,4a-anhydro-8-epi-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, were isolated from the newt, Cynops ensicauda popei, and their structures were determined using spectroscopic methods. These are the first 8-epi-type analogs of TTX that have been found in a natural source. Furthermore, we examined the composition of the TTX analogs in this newt and in the ovary of the puffer fish, Fugu poecilonotus, using LC/MS. The results indicate that TTX and 11-deoxyTTX were present in both sources. However, 6-epiTTX and 8-epi-type analogs were detected only in the newt, while 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX was a specific and major analog in the puffer fish. Such considerable differences among analog compositions might reflect differences in the biosynthesis or metabolism of TTX between these animals.

  14. Packing schemes of cavities in selected clathrasils and zeolites and the analogous packings of atoms in crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hem, Caroline Piper; Makovicky, Emil; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2010-01-01

    Sizes of cavities and their packing schemes in selected zeolites and clathrasils were studied by means of least squares fitting of circumscribed spheres to them. Resulting packing of spheres of different diameters was analyzed by the coordinates of their centers, their volumes and sphericity......, and interpreted by comparison with analogous packings of atoms in inorganic compounds and alloys. The topology is described qualitatively as “negative” structures formed by the cavities. Melanophlogite and dodecasils 3C and 1H are all clathrasils with isolated cavities. They all have pentagonal dodecahedral [512......] cages, associated with other cavity types. The packing of cavities in melanophlogite is analogous to the packing of atoms in the structure of Cr3Si, where the Cr atoms form icosahedra around the Si sites. Dodecasil 3C has a cubic arrangement of [512] cavities, which is described as ABC stacking...

  15. Symbolic representation for analog realization of a family of fractional order controller structures via continued fraction expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhira, Anindya; Das, Saptarshi; Pan, Indranil; Das, Shantanu

    2015-07-01

    This paper uses the Continued Fraction Expansion (CFE) method for analog realization of fractional order differ-integrator and few special classes of fractional order (FO) controllers viz. Fractional Order Proportional-Integral-Derivative (FOPID) controller, FO[PD] controller and FO lead-lag compensator. Contemporary researchers have given several formulations for rational approximation of fractional order elements. However, approximation of the controllers studied in this paper, due to having fractional power of a rational transfer function, is not available in analog domain; although its digital realization already exists. This motivates us for applying CFE based analog realization technique for complicated FO controller structures to get equivalent rational transfer functions in terms of the controller tuning parameters. The symbolic expressions for rationalized transfer function in terms of the controller tuning parameters are especially important as ready references, without the need of running CFE algorithm every time and also helps in the synthesis of analog circuits for such FO controllers. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy of melamine and structural analogs in milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral Raman imaging has the potential for rapid screening of solid-phase samples for potential adulterants. We found that the Raman spectra of melamine analogs changed dramatically and uniquely as a function of elevated temperature. Raman spectra were acquired for urea, biuret, cyanuric acid...

  17. Combined structure- and ligand-based virtual screening to evaluate caulerpin analogs with potential inhibitory activity against monoamine oxidase B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Prates Lorenzo

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural marine products can help increase the quality of life in patients with neurological diseases. A large number of marine products act against Alzheimer's disease through varying pathways. According to structure- and ligand-based analyses, caulerpin, an alkaloid primarily isolated from the genus Caulerpa, possesses activity against monoamine oxidase B. To predict the activity of caulerpin, we employed Volsurf descriptors and the machine learning Random Forest algorithm in parallel with a structure-based methodology that included molecular docking. Using caulerpin as a lead compound, a database containing 108 analogs was evaluated, and nine were selected as active. The structures selected as active exhibited polar and non-polar substitutions on the caulerpin skeleton, which were relevant for their activity. Dragon consensus drug-like scoring was applied to identify the active analogs that might serve as good drug candidates, and the entire group presented satisfactory performance. These results indicate the possibility of using these analogs as potential leads against Alzheimer's disease.

  18. The Or gene enhances carotenoid accumulation and stability during post-harvest storage of potato tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yang, Yong; Xu, Qiang; Owsiany, Katherine; Welsch, Ralf; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Lu, Shan; Van Eck, Joyce; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Failla, Mark; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2012-03-01

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality. To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability, we investigated transgenic potato tubers that expressed the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene. We found that the Or transgene not only promoted retention of β-carotene level, but also continuously stimulated its accumulation during 5 months of cold storage. In contrast, no increased levels of carotenoids were observed in the tubers of vector-only controls or a yellow-flesh variety during the same period of storage. The increased carotenoid accumulation was found to be associated with the formation of lipoprotein-carotenoid sequestering structures, as well as with the enhanced abundance of phytoene synthase, a key enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, the provitamin A carotenoids stored were shown to be stable during simulated digestion and accessible for uptake by human intestinal absorptive cells. Proteomic analysis identified three major functional groups of proteins (i.e. heat shock proteins, glutathione-S-transferases, and carbohydrate metabolic proteins) that are potentially important in the Or-regulated carotenoid accumulation. Our results show that regulation of carotenoid sequestration capacity is an important mechanism by which carotenoid stability is regulated. Our findings suggest that induction of a proper sink structure formation in staple crops may provide the crops with a unique ability to promote and/or stabilize provitamin A accumulation during plant growth and post-harvest storage.

  19. Structural and functional analogies and differences between histidine decarboxylase and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase molecular networks: Biomedical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Rodríguez-López, Rocio; Morales, María; Urdiales, José Luis

    2016-12-01

    Human histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and dopa decarboxilase (DDC) are highly homologous enzymes responsible for the synthesis of biogenic amines (BA) like histamine, and serotonin and dopamine, respectively. The enzymes share many structural and functional analogies, while their product metabolisms also follow similar patterns that are confluent in some metabolic steps. They are involved in common physiological functions, such as neurotransmission, gastrointestinal track function, immunity, cell growth and cell differentiation. As a consequence, metabolic elements of both BA subfamilies are also co-participants in a long list of human diseases. This review summarizes the analogies and differences in their origin (HDC and DDC) as well as their common pathophysiological scenarios. The major gaps of information are also underlined, as they delay the possibility of holistic approaches that would help personalized medicine and pharmacological initiatives for prevalent and rare diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. LSD and structural analogs: pharmacological evaluation at D1 dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, V J; Lawler, C P; Fox, D R; Neve, K A; Nichols, D E; Mailman, R B

    1995-04-01

    The hallucinogenic effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) have been attributed primarily to actions at serotonin receptors. A number of studies conducted in the 1970s indicated that LSD also has activity at dopamine (DA) receptors. These latter studies are difficult to interpret, however, because they were completed before the recognition of two pharmacologically distinct DA receptor subtypes, D1 and D2. The availability of subtype-selective ligands (e.g., the D1 antagonist SCH23390) and clonal cell lines expressing a homogeneous receptor population now permits an assessment of the contributions of DA receptor subtypes to the DA-mediated effects of LSD. The present study investigated the binding and functional properties of LSD and several lysergamide and analogs at dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Several of these compounds have been reported previously to bind with high affinity to serotonin 5HT2 (i.e., 3H-ketanserin) sites in the rat frontal cortex (K0.5 5-30 nM). All tested compounds also competed for both D1-like (3H-SCH 23390) and D2-like (3H-spiperone plus unlabeled ketanserin) DA receptors in rat striatum, with profiles indicative of agonists (nH LSD and analogs for D2 like receptors was similar to their affinity for 5HT2 sites. The affinity for D1 like receptors was slightly lower (2- to 3-fold), although LSD and several analogs bound to D1 receptors with affinity similar to the prototypical D1 partial agonist SKF38393 (K0.5 ca. 25 nM). A second series of experiments tested the binding and functional properties of LSD and selected analogs in C-6 glioma cells expressing the rhesus macaque D1A receptor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Insights into Structure-Activity Relationships of Somatostatin Analogs Containing Mesitylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Martín-Gago

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The non-natural amino acid mesitylalanine (2,4,6-trimethyl-L-phenylalanine; Msa has an electron-richer and a more conformationally restricted side-chain than that of its natural phenylalanine counterpart. Taking these properties into account, we have synthesized ten somatostatin analogs containing Msa residues in different key positions to modify the intrinsic conformational flexibility of the natural hormone. We have measured the binding affinity of these analogs and correlated it with the main conformations they populate in solution. NMR and computational analysis revealed that analogs containing one Msa residue were conformationally more restricted than somatostatin under similar experimental conditions. Furthermore, we were able to characterize the presence of a hairpin at the pharmacophore region and a non-covalent interaction between aromatic residues 6 and 11. In all cases, the inclusion of a D-Trp in the eighth position further stabilized the main conformation. Some of these peptides bound selectively to one or two somatostatin receptors with similar or even higher affinity than the natural hormone. However, we also found that multiple incorporations of Msa residues increased the life span of the peptides in serum but with a loss of conformational rigidity and binding affinity.

  2. Food Predictors of Plasma Carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J. Hendrickson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Empirical prediction models that weight food frequency questionnaire (FFQ food items by their relation to nutrient biomarker concentrations may estimate nutrient exposure better than nutrient intakes derived from food composition databases. Carotenoids may especially benefit because contributing foods vary in bioavailability and assessment validity. Our objective was to develop empirical prediction models for the major plasma carotenoids and total carotenoids and evaluate their validity compared with dietary intakes calculated from standard food composition tables. 4180 nonsmoking women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS blood subcohort with previously measured plasma carotenoids were randomly divided into training (n = 2787 and testing (n = 1393 subsets. Empirical prediction models were developed in the training subset by stepwise selection from foods contributing ≥0.5% to intake of the relevant carotenoid. Spearman correlations between predicted and measured plasma concentrations were compared to Spearman correlations between dietary intake and measured plasma concentrations for each carotenoid. Three to 12 foods were selected for the α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids prediction models. In the testing subset, Spearman correlations with measured plasma concentrations for the calculated dietary intakes and predicted plasma concentrations, respectively, were 0.31 and 0.37 for α-carotene, 0.29 and 0.31 for β-carotene, 0.36 and 0.41 for β-cryptoxanthin, 0.28 and 0.31 for lutein/zeaxanthin, 0.22 and 0.23 for lycopene, and 0.22 and 0.27 for total carotenoids. Empirical prediction models may modestly improve assessment of some carotenoids, particularly α-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin.

  3. Structure-activity relationships of precursors and analogs of natural 3-enoyl-tetramic acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnickel, Bertram; Bayliffe, Frances; Diestel, Randi; Kempf, Karl; Laschat, Sabine; Pachali, Steffen; Sasse, Florenz; Schlenk, Andrea; Schobert, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Fragments and synthetic precursors prepared en route to the macrocyclic 3-acyltetramic acids (=3-acyl-1,5-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2H-pyrrol-2-ones) aburatubolactam and macrocidin A, as well as other analogs with variance in the ring heteroatom (N, O, S), and the residues at N(1), C(3), and C(5) were tested for cytotoxic and antimicrobial effects. Anticancer activity against various tumor cell lines in vitro did not necessarily require an intact pyrrolidin-2,4-dione ring. An acyclic β-hydroxy-octatr...

  4. Structure-activity relationships of precursors and analogs of natural 3-enoyl-tetramic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnickel, Bertram; Bayliffe, Frances; Diestel, Randi; Kempf, Karl; Laschat, Sabine; Pachali, Steffen; Sasse, Florenz; Schlenk, Andrea; Schobert, Rainer

    2010-12-01

    Fragments and synthetic precursors prepared en route to the macrocyclic 3-acyltetramic acids (=3-acyl-1,5-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2H-pyrrol-2-ones) aburatubolactam and macrocidin A, as well as other analogs with variance in the ring heteroatom (N, O, S), and the residues at N(1), C(3), and C(5) were tested for cytotoxic and antimicrobial effects. Anticancer activity against various tumor cell lines in vitro did not necessarily require an intact pyrrolidin-2,4-dione ring. An acyclic β-hydroxy-octatrienoyl amide precursor to aburatubolactam also exhibited distinct activity with an IC₅₀ (120 h) value of <2.5 μM. The length of 3-oligoenoyl residues had little influence on the anticancer activity, but 3-alka-oligoenoyl tetramic acids were far more efficacious than their 3-(4-methoxycinnamoyl) congeners. N-H-3-acyltetramic acids were generally more active than their N-Me or N-Boc analogs, unless further polar groups necessitated an increased lipophilicity for sufficient uptake. Tetronic and thiotetronic acids were far less antiproliferative in cancer cells when compared with identically substituted tetramic acids.

  5. Structural studies provide clues for analog design of specific inhibitors of Cryptosporidium hominis thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vidya P; Cisneros, Jose A; Frey, Kathleen M; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Wang, Yiqiang; Gangjee, Aleem; White, A Clinton; Jorgensen, William L; Anderson, Karen S

    2014-09-01

    Cryptosporidium is the causative agent of a gastrointestinal disease, cryptosporidiosis, which is often fatal in immunocompromised individuals and children. Thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) are essential enzymes in the folate biosynthesis pathway and are well established as drug targets in cancer, bacterial infections, and malaria. Cryptosporidium hominis has a bifunctional thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase enzyme, compared to separate enzymes in the host. We evaluated lead compound 1 from a novel series of antifolates, 2-amino-4-oxo-5-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines as an inhibitor of Cryptosporidium hominis thymidylate synthase with selectivity over the human enzyme. Complementing the enzyme inhibition compound 1 also has anti-cryptosporidial activity in cell culture. A crystal structure with compound 1 bound to the TS active site is discussed in terms of several van der Waals, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions with the protein residues and the substrate analog 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate (TS), cofactor NADPH and inhibitor methotrexate (DHFR). Another crystal structure in complex with compound 1 bound in both the TS and DHFR active sites is also reported here. The crystal structures provide clues for analog design and for the design of ChTS-DHFR specific inhibitors. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Marine Carotenoids: Biological Functions and Commercial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Vega

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological functions of carotenoids relevant for life on earth. Biological properties of carotenoids allow for a wide range of commercial applications. Indeed, recent interest in the carotenoids has been mainly for their nutraceutical properties. A large number of scientific studies have confirmed the benefits of carotenoids to health and their use for this purpose is growing rapidly. In addition, carotenoids have traditionally been used in food and animal feed for their color properties. Carotenoids are also known to improve consumer perception of quality; an example is the addition of carotenoids to fish feed to impart color to farmed salmon.

  7. Development of an analytical methodology using Fourier transform mass spectrometry to discover new structural analogs of wine natural sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Axel; Génin, Eric; Waffo-Téguo, Pierre; Bibès, Alice; Da Costa, Grégory; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Volatile and non-volatile molecules are directly responsible for the thrill and excitement provided by wine-tasting. Their elucidation requires powerful analytical techniques and innovative methodologies. In a recent work, two novel sweet compounds called quercotriterpenosides (QTT) were identified in oak wood used for wine-ageing. The aim of the present study is to discover structural analogs of such natural sweeteners in oak wood. For this purpose, an analytical approach was developed as an alternative to chemical synthesis. Orbitrap mass spectrometry proved to be a crucial technique both to demonstrate the presence of QTT analogs in oak wood by targeted screening and to guide the purification pathway of these molecules using complementary chromatographic tools. Four compounds were isolated and identified for the first time: two isomers, one glucosyl derivative and one galloyl derivative of QTT. Their tasting showed that only the two new isomers were sweet, thus demonstrating both the pertinence of the strategy and the influence of functional groups on gustatory properties. Finally, this paper presents some developments involving multistage Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) to provide solid structural information on these functional groups prior to any purification of compounds. Such analytical developments could be particularly useful for research on taste-active or bio-active products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phylogenetic and evolutionary patterns in microbial carotenoid biosynthesis are revealed by comparative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L Klassen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carotenoids are multifunctional, taxonomically widespread and biotechnologically important pigments. Their biosynthesis serves as a model system for understanding the evolution of secondary metabolism. Microbial carotenoid diversity and evolution has hitherto been analyzed primarily from structural and biosynthetic perspectives, with the few phylogenetic analyses of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic proteins using either used limited datasets or lacking methodological rigor. Given the recent accumulation of microbial genome sequences, a reappraisal of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic diversity and evolution from the perspective of comparative genomics is warranted to validate and complement models of microbial carotenoid diversity and evolution based upon structural and biosynthetic data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative genomics were used to identify and analyze in silico microbial carotenoid biosynthetic pathways. Four major phylogenetic lineages of carotenoid biosynthesis are suggested composed of: (i Proteobacteria; (ii Firmicutes; (iii Chlorobi, Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes; and (iv Archaea, Bacteroidetes and two separate sub-lineages of Actinobacteria. Using this phylogenetic framework, specific evolutionary mechanisms are proposed for carotenoid desaturase CrtI-family enzymes and carotenoid cyclases. Several phylogenetic lineage-specific evolutionary mechanisms are also suggested, including: (i horizontal gene transfer; (ii gene acquisition followed by differential gene loss; (iii co-evolution with other biochemical structures such as proteorhodopsins; and (iv positive selection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Comparative genomics analyses of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic proteins indicate a much greater taxonomic diversity then that identified based on structural and biosynthetic data, and divides microbial carotenoid biosynthesis into several, well-supported phylogenetic lineages not evident

  9. Phylogenetic and evolutionary patterns in microbial carotenoid biosynthesis are revealed by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Jonathan L

    2010-06-22

    Carotenoids are multifunctional, taxonomically widespread and biotechnologically important pigments. Their biosynthesis serves as a model system for understanding the evolution of secondary metabolism. Microbial carotenoid diversity and evolution has hitherto been analyzed primarily from structural and biosynthetic perspectives, with the few phylogenetic analyses of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic proteins using either used limited datasets or lacking methodological rigor. Given the recent accumulation of microbial genome sequences, a reappraisal of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic diversity and evolution from the perspective of comparative genomics is warranted to validate and complement models of microbial carotenoid diversity and evolution based upon structural and biosynthetic data. Comparative genomics were used to identify and analyze in silico microbial carotenoid biosynthetic pathways. Four major phylogenetic lineages of carotenoid biosynthesis are suggested composed of: (i) Proteobacteria; (ii) Firmicutes; (iii) Chlorobi, Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes; and (iv) Archaea, Bacteroidetes and two separate sub-lineages of Actinobacteria. Using this phylogenetic framework, specific evolutionary mechanisms are proposed for carotenoid desaturase CrtI-family enzymes and carotenoid cyclases. Several phylogenetic lineage-specific evolutionary mechanisms are also suggested, including: (i) horizontal gene transfer; (ii) gene acquisition followed by differential gene loss; (iii) co-evolution with other biochemical structures such as proteorhodopsins; and (iv) positive selection. Comparative genomics analyses of microbial carotenoid biosynthetic proteins indicate a much greater taxonomic diversity then that identified based on structural and biosynthetic data, and divides microbial carotenoid biosynthesis into several, well-supported phylogenetic lineages not evident previously. This phylogenetic framework is applicable to understanding the evolution of

  10. Analog Coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CODING, ANALOG SYSTEMS), INFORMATION THEORY, DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS , TRANSMITTER RECEIVERS, WHITE NOISE, PROBABILITY, ERRORS, PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTIONS, DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, SET THEORY, COMPUTER PROGRAMS

  11. Analog computing

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive introduction to analog computing. As most textbooks about this powerful computing paradigm date back to the 1960s and 1970s, it fills a void and forges a bridge from the early days of analog computing to future applications. The idea of analog computing is not new. In fact, this computing paradigm is nearly forgotten, although it offers a path to both high-speed and low-power computing, which are in even more demand now than they were back in the heyday of electronic analog computers.

  12. Carotenoid dynamics in Atlantic salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omholt Stig W

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids are pigment molecules produced mainly in plants and heavily exploited by a wide range of organisms higher up in the food-chain. The fundamental processes regulating how carotenoids are absorbed and metabolized in vertebrates are still not fully understood. We try to further this understanding here by presenting a dynamic ODE (ordinary differential equation model to describe and analyse the uptake, deposition, and utilization of a carotenoid at the whole-organism level. The model focuses on the pigment astaxanthin in Atlantic salmon because of the commercial importance of understanding carotenoid dynamics in this species, and because deposition of carotenoids in the flesh is likely to play an important life history role in anadromous salmonids. Results The model is capable of mimicking feed experiments analyzing astaxanthin uptake and retention over short and long time periods (hours, days and years under various conditions. A sensitivity analysis of the model provides information on where to look for possible genetic determinants underlying the observed phenotypic variation in muscle carotenoid retention. Finally, the model framework is used to predict that a specific regulatory system controlling the release of astaxanthin from the muscle is not likely to exist, and that the release of the pigment into the blood is instead caused by the androgen-initiated autolytic degradation of the muscle in the sexually mature salmon. Conclusion The results show that a dynamic model describing a complex trait can be instrumental in the early stages of a project trying to uncover underlying determinants. The model provides a heuristic basis for an experimental research programme, as well as defining a scaffold for modelling carotenoid dynamics in mammalian systems.

  13. Carotenoid dynamics in Atlantic salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasingh, Hannah; Øyehaug, Leiv; Våge, Dag Inge; Omholt, Stig W

    2006-04-18

    Carotenoids are pigment molecules produced mainly in plants and heavily exploited by a wide range of organisms higher up in the food-chain. The fundamental processes regulating how carotenoids are absorbed and metabolized in vertebrates are still not fully understood. We try to further this understanding here by presenting a dynamic ODE (ordinary differential equation) model to describe and analyse the uptake, deposition, and utilization of a carotenoid at the whole-organism level. The model focuses on the pigment astaxanthin in Atlantic salmon because of the commercial importance of understanding carotenoid dynamics in this species, and because deposition of carotenoids in the flesh is likely to play an important life history role in anadromous salmonids. The model is capable of mimicking feed experiments analyzing astaxanthin uptake and retention over short and long time periods (hours, days and years) under various conditions. A sensitivity analysis of the model provides information on where to look for possible genetic determinants underlying the observed phenotypic variation in muscle carotenoid retention. Finally, the model framework is used to predict that a specific regulatory system controlling the release of astaxanthin from the muscle is not likely to exist, and that the release of the pigment into the blood is instead caused by the androgen-initiated autolytic degradation of the muscle in the sexually mature salmon. The results show that a dynamic model describing a complex trait can be instrumental in the early stages of a project trying to uncover underlying determinants. The model provides a heuristic basis for an experimental research programme, as well as defining a scaffold for modelling carotenoid dynamics in mammalian systems.

  14. New Insight into the Cleavage Reaction of Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120 Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase in Natural and Nonnatural Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jinsol; Kim, Se Hyeuk

    2013-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at a specific double bond to generate apocarotenoids. In this study, we investigated the activity and substrate preferences of NSC3, a CCD of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, in vivo and in vitro using natural and nonnatural carotenoid structures. NSC3 cleaved β-apo-8′-carotenal at 3 positions, C-13C-14, C-15C-15′, and C-13′C-14′, revealing a unique cleavage pattern. NSC3 cleaves the natural structure of carotenoids 4,4′-diaponeurosporene, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-al, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-oic acid, 4,4′-diapotorulene, and 4,4′-diapotorulen-4′-al to generate novel cleavage products (apo-14′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-13′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-10′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-14′-diapotorulenal, and apo-10′-diapotorulenal, respectively). The study of carotenoids with natural or nonnatural structures produced by using synthetic modules could provide information valuable for understanding the cleavage reactions or substrate preferences of other CCDs in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23524669

  15. Synthesis, receptor binding studies, optical spectroscopic and in silico structural characterization of morphiceptin analogs with cis-4-amino-L-proline residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamska-Bartłomiejczyk, Anna; Borics, Attila; Tömböly, Csaba; Dvorácskó, Szabolcs; Lisowski, Marek; Kluczyk, Alicja; Wołczański, Grzegorz; Piekielna-Ciesielska, Justyna; Janecka, Anna

    2017-11-07

    Three novel morphiceptin analogs, in which Pro in position 2 and/or 4 was replaced by cis-4-aminoproline connected with the preceding amino acid through the primary amino group, were synthesized. The opioid receptor affinities, functional assay results, enzymatic degradation studies and experimental and in silico structural analysis of such analogs are presented. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Marine Carotenoids: Biological Functions and Commercial Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilchez, C.; Forján, E.; Cuaresma, M.; Bédmar, F.; Garbayo, I.; Vega, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological

  17. New and Rare Carotenoids Isolated from Marine Bacteria and Their Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Shindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria have not been examined as extensively as land bacteria. We screened carotenoids from orange or red pigments-producing marine bacteria belonging to rare or novel species. The new acyclic carotenoids with a C30 aglycone, diapolycopenedioc acid xylosylesters A–C and methyl 5-glucosyl-5,6-dihydro-apo-4,4′-lycopenoate, were isolated from the novel Gram-negative bacterium Rubritalea squalenifaciens, which belongs to phylum Verrucomicrobia, as well as the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Planococcus maritimus strain iso-3 belonging to the class Bacilli, phylum Firmicutes, respectively. The rare monocyclic C40 carotenoids, (3R-saproxanthin and (3R,2′S-myxol, were isolated from novel species of Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the family Flavobacteriaceae, phylum Bacteroidetes. In this review, we report the structures and antioxidant activities of these carotenoids, and consider relationships between bacterial phyla and carotenoid structures.

  18. Crystal Structures of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase Bound to Inhibitory Analogs Reveal New Insight into Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Skaff, D. Andrew; McWhorter, William J.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2011-10-28

    The polyisoprenoid compound undecaprenyl phosphate is required for biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycans in Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogenic Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus spp. In these organisms, the mevalonate pathway is used to produce the precursor isoprenoid, isopentenyl 5-diphosphate. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes formation of isopentenyl 5-diphosphate in an ATP-dependent irreversible reaction and is therefore an attractive target for inhibitor development that could lead to new antimicrobial agents. To facilitate exploration of this possibility, we report the crystal structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD (1.85 {angstrom} resolution) and, to the best of our knowledge, the first structures of liganded MDD. These structures include MDD bound to the mevalonate 5-diphosphate analogs diphosphoglycolyl proline (2.05 {angstrom} resolution) and 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP; 2.2 {angstrom} resolution). Comparison of these structures provides a physical basis for the significant differences in K{sub i} values observed for these inhibitors. Inspection of enzyme/inhibitor structures identified the side chain of invariant Ser{sup 192} as making potential contributions to catalysis. Significantly, Ser {yields} Ala substitution of this side chain decreases k{sub cat} by {approx}10{sup 3}-fold, even though binding interactions between FMVAPP and this mutant are similar to those observed with wild type MDD, as judged by the 2.1 {angstrom} cocrystal structure of S192A with FMVAPP. Comparison of microbial MDD structures with those of mammalian counterparts reveals potential targets at the active site periphery that may be exploited to selectively target the microbial enzymes. These studies provide a structural basis for previous observations regarding the MDD mechanism and inform future work toward rational inhibitor design.

  19. Toxicity modulation, resistance enzyme evasion, and A-site X-ray structure of broad-spectrum antibacterial neomycin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; Kanazawa, Hiroki; Dozzo, Paola; Matias, Rowena D; Feeney, Lee Ann; Armstrong, Eliana S; Hildebrandt, Darin J; Kane, Timothy R; Gliedt, Micah J; Goldblum, Adam A; Linsell, Martin S; Aggen, James B; Kondo, Jiro; Hanessian, Stephen

    2014-09-19

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are pseudosaccharides decorated with ammonium groups that are critical for their potent broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Despite over three decades of speculation whether or not modulation of pKa is a viable strategy to curtail aminoglycoside kidney toxicity, there is a lack of methods to systematically probe amine-RNA interactions and resultant cytotoxicity trends. This study reports the first series of potent aminoglycoside antibiotics harboring fluorinated N1-hydroxyaminobutyryl acyl (HABA) appendages for which fluorine-RNA contacts are revealed through an X-ray cocrystal structure within the RNA A-site. Cytotoxicity in kidney-derived cells was significantly reduced for the derivative featuring our novel β,β-difluoro-HABA group, which masks one net charge by lowering the pKa without compromising antibacterial potency. This novel side-chain assists in evasion of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and it can be easily transferred to impart these properties onto any number of novel analogs.

  20. Identification and expression analysis of candidate genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in chickpea seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Rezaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant carotenoids have a key role in preventing various diseases in human because of their antioxidant and provitamin A properties. Chickpea is a good source of carotenoid among legumes and its diverse germplasm and genome accessibility makes it a good model for carotenogenesis studies. The structure, location and copy numbers of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis were retrieved from the chickpea genome. The majority of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs within these genes across five diverse chickpea cultivars was synonymous mutation. We examined the expression of the carotenogenesis genes and their association with carotenoid concentration at different seed development stages of five chickpea cultivars. Total carotenoid concentration ranged from 22 μg g-1 in yellow cotyledon kabuli to 44 μg g-1 in green cotyledon desi at 32 days post anthesis (DPA. The majority of carotenoids in chickpea seeds consists of lutein and zeaxanthin. The expression of the selected 19 genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis pathway showed common pattern across five cultivars with higher expression at 8 and/or 16 DPA then dropped considerably at 24 and 32 DPA. Almost all genes were up-regulated in CDC Jade cultivar. Correlation analysis between gene expression and carotenoid concentration showed that the genes involved in the primary step of carotenoid biosynthesis pathway including carotenoid desaturase and isomerase positively correlated with various carotenoid components in chickpea seeds. A negative correlation was found between hydroxylation activity and provitamin A concentration in the seeds. The highest provitamin A concentration including β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin were found in green cotyledon chickpea cultivars.

  1. Structural imbalance promotes behavior analogous to aesthetic preference in domestic chicks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Elliott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual images may be judged 'aesthetic' when their positioning appears imbalanced. An apparent imbalance may signify an as yet incomplete action or event requiring more detailed processing. As such it may refer to phylogenetically ancient stimulus-response mechanisms such as those mediating attentional deployment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied preferences for structural balance or imbalance in week-old domestic chicks (Gallus gallus, using a conditioning procedure to reinforce pecking at either "aligned" (balanced or "misaligned" (imbalanced training stimuli. A testing phase with novel balanced and imbalanced stimuli established whether chicks would retain their conditioned behavior or revert to chance responding. Whereas those trained on aligned stimuli were equally likely to choose aligned or misaligned stimuli, chicks trained on misaligned stimuli maintained the trained preference. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with the idea that the coding of structural imbalance is primary and even overrides classical conditioning. Generalized to the humans, these results suggest aesthetic judgments based upon structural imbalance may be based on evolutionarily ancient mechanisms, which are shared by different vertebrate species.

  2. Analogy of strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm and structural topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, In Gwun; Kim, Il Yong; Kwak, Byung Ban

    2009-01-01

    In bone-remodeling studies, it is believed that the morphology of bone is affected by its internal mechanical loads. From the 1970s, high computing power enabled quantitative studies in the simulation of bone remodeling or bone adaptation. Among them, Huiskes et al. (1987, "Adaptive Bone Remodeling Theory Applied to Prosthetic Design Analysis," J. Biomech. Eng., 20, pp. 1135-1150) proposed a strain energy density based approach to bone remodeling and used the apparent density for the characterization of internal bone morphology. The fundamental idea was that bone density would increase when strain (or strain energy density) is higher than a certain value and bone resorption would occur when the strain (or strain energy density) quantities are lower than the threshold. Several advanced algorithms were developed based on these studies in an attempt to more accurately simulate physiological bone-remodeling processes. As another approach, topology optimization originally devised in structural optimization has been also used in the computational simulation of the bone-remodeling process. The topology optimization method systematically and iteratively distributes material in a design domain, determining an optimal structure that minimizes an objective function. In this paper, we compared two seemingly different approaches in different fields-the strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm (biomechanical approach) and the compliance based structural topology optimization method (mechanical approach)-in terms of mathematical formulations, numerical difficulties, and behavior of their numerical solutions. Two numerical case studies were conducted to demonstrate their similarity and difference, and then the solution convergences were discussed quantitatively.

  3. Artonin E and Structural Analogs from Artocarpus Species Abrogates Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imaobong Etti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing rate of mortality ensued from breast cancer has encouraged research into safer and efficient therapy. The human Estrogen receptor α has been implicated in the majority of reported breast cancer cases. Molecular docking employing Glide, Schrodinger suite 2015, was used to study the binding affinities of small molecules from the Artocarpus species after their drug-like properties were ascertained. The structure of the ligand-binding domain of human Estrogen receptor α was retrieved from Protein Data Bank while the structures of compounds were collected from PubChem database. The binding interactions of the studied compounds were reported as well as their glide scores. The best glide scored ligand, was Artonin E with a score of −12.72 Kcal when compared to other studied phytomolecules and it evoked growth inhibition of an estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells in submicromolar concentration (3.8–6.9 µM in comparison to a reference standard Tamoxifen (18.9–24.1 µM within the tested time point (24–72 h. The studied ligands, which had good interactions with the target receptor, were also drug-like when compared with 95% of orally available drugs with the exception of Artoelastin, whose predicted physicochemical properties rendered it less drug-like. The in silico physicochemical properties, docking interactions and growth inhibition of the best glide scorer are indications of the anti-breast cancer relevance of the studied molecules.

  4. Analysis of carotenoid composition in petals of calendula (Calendula officinalis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Sanae; Maoka, Takashi; Sumitomo, Katsuhiko; Ohmiya, Akemi

    2005-11-01

    Nineteen carotenoids were identified in extracts of petals of orange- and yellow-flowered cultivars of calendula (Calendula officinalis L.). Ten carotenoids were unique to orange-flowered cultivars. The UV-vis absorption maxima of these ten carotenoids were at longer wavelengths than that of flavoxanthin, the main carotenoid of calendula petals, and it is clear that these carotenoids are responsible for the orange color of the petals. Six carotenoids had a cis structure at C-5 (C-5'), and it is conceivable that these (5Z)-carotenoids are enzymatically isomerized at C-5 in a pathway that diverges from the main carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Among them, (5Z,9Z)-lycopene (1), (5Z,9Z,5'Z,9'Z)-lycopene (3), (5'Z)-gamma-carotene (4), and (5'Z,9'Z)-rubixanthin (5) has never before been identified. Additionally, (5Z,9Z,5'Z)-lycopene (2) has been reported only as a synthesized compound.

  5. Interactions between Carotenoids from Marine Bacteria and Other Micronutrients: Impact on Stability and Antioxidant Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria Bacillus indicus HU36 are sources of oxygenated carotenoids with original structures (about fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments with acylated d-glucosyl groups). In this study, we evaluated the stability (sensitivity to iron-induced autoxidation) and antioxidant activity (inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation) of combinations of bacterial HU36 carotenoids with the bacterial vitamin menaquinone MQ-7 and with phenolic antioxidants (vitamin E, chlorogenic acid, rutin). Unexpectedly, MQ-7 strongly improves the ability of HU36 carotenoids to inhibit FeII-induced lipid peroxidation, although MQ-7 was not consumed in the medium. We propose that their interaction modifies the carotenoid antioxidant mechanism(s), possibly by allowing carotenoids to scavenge the initiating radicals. For comparison, β-carotene and lycopene in combination were shown to exhibit a slightly higher stability toward iron-induced autoxidation, as well as an additive antioxidant activity as compared to the carotenoids, individually. HU36 carotenoids and phenolic antioxidants displayed synergistic activities in the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation induced by heme iron, but not by free iron. Synergism could arise from antioxidants interacting via electron transfer through the porphyrin nucleus of heme iron. Overall, combining antioxidants acting via complementary mechanisms could be the key for optimizing the activity of this bacterial carotenoid cocktail. PMID:26610529

  6. Identification of PAH Isomeric Structure in Cosmic Dust Analogs: The AROMA Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Hassan; Bonnamy, Anthony; Papanastasiou, Dimitris; Cernicharo, Jose; Martín-Gago, Jose-Angel; Joblin, Christine

    2017-07-01

    We developed a new analytical experimental setup called AROMA (Astrochemistry Research of Organics with Molecular Analyzer) that combines laser desorption/ionization techniques with ion trap mass spectrometry. We report here on the ability of the apparatus to detect aromatic species in complex materials of astrophysical interest and characterize their structures. A limit of detection of 100 femto-grams has been achieved using pure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) samples, which corresponds to 2 × 108 molecules in the case of coronene (C24H12). We detected the PAH distribution in the Murchison meteorite, which is made of a complex mixture of extraterrestrial organic compounds. In addition, collision induced dissociation experiments were performed on selected species detected in Murchison, which led to the first firm identification of pyrene and its methylated derivatives in this sample.

  7. Identification of PAH Isomeric Structure in Cosmic Dust Analogs: The AROMA Setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbah, Hassan; Bonnamy, Anthony; Joblin, Christine [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Papanastasiou, Dimitris [Fasmatech Science + Technology, Athens, GR (Greece); Cernicharo, Jose; Martín-Gago, Jose-Angel, E-mail: christine.joblin@irap.omp.eu [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    We developed a new analytical experimental setup called AROMA (Astrochemistry Research of Organics with Molecular Analyzer) that combines laser desorption/ionization techniques with ion trap mass spectrometry. We report here on the ability of the apparatus to detect aromatic species in complex materials of astrophysical interest and characterize their structures. A limit of detection of 100 femto-grams has been achieved using pure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) samples, which corresponds to 2 × 10{sup 8} molecules in the case of coronene (C{sub 24}H{sub 12}). We detected the PAH distribution in the Murchison meteorite, which is made of a complex mixture of extraterrestrial organic compounds. In addition, collision induced dissociation experiments were performed on selected species detected in Murchison, which led to the first firm identification of pyrene and its methylated derivatives in this sample.

  8. Hybrid 2D/3D-quantitative structure-activity relationship and modeling studies perspectives of pepstatin A analogs as cathepsin D inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arodola, Olayide A; Soliman, Mahmoud Es

    2018-01-01

    Cathepsin D, one of the attractive targets in the treatment of breast cancer, has been implicated in HIV neuropathogenesis with potential proteolytic effects on chemokines. Methodology/result: Diverse modeling tools were used to reveal the key structural features affecting the inhibitory activities of 78 pepstatin A analogs. Analyses were performed to investigate the stability, rationality and fluctuation of the analogs. Results showed a clear correlation between the experimental and predicted activities of the analogs as well as the variation in their activities relative to structural modifications. The insight gained from this study offers theoretical references for understanding the mechanism of action of cathepsin D and will aid in the design of more potent and clinically-relevant drugs. Graphical abstract [Formula: see text].

  9. Control of electrochemical signals from quantum dots conjugated to organic materials by using DNA structure in an analog logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Yoo, Si-Youl; Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Ji-Young; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2016-10-01

    Various bio-logic gates have been studied intensively to overcome the rigidity of single-function silicon-based logic devices arising from combinations of various gates. Here, a simple control tool using electrochemical signals from quantum dots (QDs) was constructed using DNA and organic materials for multiple logic functions. The electrochemical redox current generated from QDs was controlled by the DNA structure. DNA structure, in turn, was dependent on the components (organic materials) and the input signal (pH). Independent electrochemical signals from two different logic units containing QDs were merged into a single analog-type logic gate, which was controlled by two inputs. We applied this electrochemical biodevice to a simple logic system and achieved various logic functions from the controlled pH input sets. This could be further improved by choosing QDs, ionic conditions, or DNA sequences. This research provides a feasible method for fabricating an artificial intelligence system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The genomic structure of the human Charcot-Leyden crystal protein gene is analogous to those of the galectin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, K.D. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Handen, J.S.; Rosenberg, H.F. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein, or eosinophil lysophospholipase, is a characteristic protein of human eosinophils and basophils; recent work has demonstrated that the CLC protein is both structurally and functionally related to the galectin family of {beta}-galactoside binding proteins. The galectins as a group share a number of features in common, including a linear ligand binding site encoded on a single exon. In this work, we demonstrate that the intron-exon structure of the gene encoding CLC is analogous to those encoding the galectins. The coding sequence of the CLC gene is divided into four exons, with the entire {beta}-galactoside binding site encoded by exon III. We have isolated CLC {beta}-galactoside binding sites from both orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and murine (Mus musculus) genomic DNAs, both encoded on single exons, and noted conservation of the amino acids shown to interact directly with the {beta}-galactoside ligand. The most likely interpretation of these results suggests the occurrence of one or more exon duplication and insertion events, resulting in the distribution of this lectin domain to CLC as well as to the multiple galectin genes. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship study of conformationally constrained analogs of indole-3-carboxamides as novel CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyoi, Takao; York, Mark; Francis, Stuart; Edwards, Darren; Walker, Glenn; Houghton, Andrea K; Cottney, Jean E; Baker, James; Adam, Julia M

    2010-08-15

    Novel tricyclic indole-3-carboxamides were synthesized as structurally restricted analogs of bicyclic indoles, and found to be potent CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonists. The CB1 agonist activity depended on the absolute configuration of the chiral center of the tricyclic ring. The preferred enantiomer was more potent than the structurally unconstrained lead compound. Structure-activity relationships in the amide side chain of the indole C-3 position were also investigated. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of trihexyphenydil, the structural analog of phencyclidine, on neocortical and hippocampal electrical activity in sleep-waking cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachkebia, N; Mchedlidze, O; Chkhartishvili, E; Dzadzamia, Sh; Oniani, T

    2009-04-01

    Finding about structural and functional relation between NMDA receptors specific binding and phencyclidine sites was very important for a possible modulation of NMDA receptors' function. We have therefore got interested what would happen with EEG and vegetative patterns of PS in the case when NMDA receptors function is modulated by blocking of phencyclidines' site. Consequently, we studied the effects of Trihexyphenydil, the structural analog of phencyclidine, on neocortical and hippocampal electrical activity in SWC. On cats (n=5) metallic electrodes were implanted under Nembutal anesthesia. EEG registration lasting 12 hr daily started after animals' recovery. Trihexyphenydil was administered intraperitoneally (0.5 mg/kg - 1 mg/kg). Statistical processing was made by Students' t-test. Trihexyphenydil resulted in dissociated triggering of PS. Rapid eye movements and PGO waves appeared on the face of active waking state. Therefore on the background of behavioral active waking according to electrical activity of the visual cortex and rapid eye movements, electrographic patterns of paradoxical sleep were recorded. Thus in our experiments it was shown firstly that the mechanism of hallucinogenic action of Trihexyphenydil is closely related to the disturbance of paradoxical sleep integrity. Blocking of NMDA receptors phencyclidines site and therefore functional modulation of these receptors produce the splitting of PS patterns and their intrusion in waking state. Such an effect never takes place in normal conditions since the waking system has the powerful inhibitory influence on the PS triggering system. Suggestion is make that NMDA glutamate receptors must be involved in mechanisms providing structural and functional integrity of PS and that fulfillment of such function is possible in the case when the NMDA receptors phencyclidine site isn't in blocked state. Normal functioning of NMDA receptors phencyclidine site represents the mechanism which inhibits and/or hampers

  13. Crystal structures at 2.5 Angstrom resolution of seryl-tRNA synthetase complexed with two analogs of seryl adenylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belrhali, H.; Yaremchuk, A.; Tukalo, M.

    1994-01-01

    Crystal structures of seryl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus complexed with two different analogs of seryl adenylate have been determined at 2.5 Angstrom resolution. The first complex is between the enzyme and seryl-hydroxamate-AMP (adenosine monophosphate), produced enzymatically...

  14. Isolation of peridininol, an anti-spasmodic carotenoid pigment, from Zoanthus sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parameswaran, P.S.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    A C37 carotenoid pigment, peridininol, isolated from a marine Zoanthus sp. exhibited promising anti-spasmodic activity against nicotine and serotonin in in vitro studies using guinea pig ileum. Its purification and structure are presented along...

  15. Design and Stereochemical Research (DFT, ECD and Crystal Structure of Novel Bedaquiline Analogs as Potent Antituberculosis Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiding Geng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of bedaquiline analogs containing H-bond donors were designed as anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis drugs. A pair of diastereoisomers (R/S- and S/S-isomers was selected from these designed compounds for synthetic and stereochemical research. The title compounds were synthesized from chiral precursors for the first time and the absolute configurations (ACs were determined by electronic circular dichroism (ECD with quantum chemical calculations. Moreover, a single crystal of the S/S compound was obtained for X-ray diffraction analysis, and the crystal structure showed high consistency with the geometry, confirming the reliability of ACs obtained by ECD analyses and theoretical simulation. Furthermore, the effect of stereochemistry on the anti-tuberculosis activity was investigated. The MICs of the R/S- and S/S-isomers against Mycobacterium phlei 1180 are 9.6 and 32.1 μg·mL−1, respectively. Finally, molecular docking was carried out to evaluate the inhibitory nature and binding mode differences between diastereoisomers.

  16. Olefin metathesis in carotenoid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Takayuki; Iguchi, Naoko; Katsumura, Shigeo

    2009-11-21

    Olefin metathesis is a powerful and widely applicable synthetic method for carbon-carbon double bond formation. However, its application to the synthesis of conjugating polyene chains has been very limited because of possible undesired side reactions. We attempted to apply this method to the synthesis of symmetrical carotenoids. In this paper, the syntheses of violaxanthin and mimulaxanthin are described using the olefin metathesis protocol.

  17. The structure of turbulence near a tall forest edge: the backward-facing step flow analogy revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detto, Matteo; Katul, Gabriel G; Siqueira, Mario; Juang, Jehn-Yih; Stoy, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Flow disturbances near tall forest edges are receiving significant attention in diverse disciplines including ecology, forest management, meteorology, and fluid mechanics. Current theories suggest that near a forest edge, when the flow originates from a forest into a large clearing, the flow retains its forest canopy turbulence structure at the exit point. Here, we propose that this framework is not sufficiently general for dense forested edges and suggest that the flow shares several attributes with backward-facing step (BFS) flow. Similar analogies, such as rotor-like circulations, have been proposed by a number of investigators, though the consequences of such circulations on the primary terms in the mean momentum balance at the forest clearing edge have rarely been studied in the field. Using an array of three triaxial sonic anemometers positioned to measure horizontal and vertical gradients of the velocity statistics near a forest edge, we show that the flow structure is more consistent with an intermittent recirculation pattern, rather than a continuous rotor, whose genesis resembles the BFS flow. We also show that the lateral velocity variance, v'2, is the moment that adjusts most slowly with downwind distance as the flow exits from the forest into the clearing. Surprisingly, the longitudinal and vertical velocity variances (u'2 and w'2) at the forest edge were comparable in magnitude to their respective values at the center of a large grass-covered forest clearing, suggesting rapid adjustment at the edge. Discussions on how the forest edge modifies the spectra and co-spectra of momentum fluxes, effective mixing length, and static pressure are also presented.

  18. Structure-activity relationships of novel salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH analogs: iron chelation, anti-oxidant and cytotoxic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliška Potůčková

    Full Text Available Salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH is a lipophilic, tridentate iron chelator with marked anti-oxidant and modest cytotoxic activity against neoplastic cells. However, it has poor stability in an aqueous environment due to the rapid hydrolysis of its hydrazone bond. In this study, we synthesized a series of new SIH analogs (based on previously described aromatic ketones with improved hydrolytic stability. Their structure-activity relationships were assessed with respect to their stability in plasma, iron chelation efficacy, redox effects and cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, studies assessed the cytotoxicity of these chelators and their ability to afford protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative injury in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. The ligands with a reduced hydrazone bond, or the presence of bulky alkyl substituents near the hydrazone bond, showed severely limited biological activity. The introduction of a bromine substituent increased ligand-induced cytotoxicity to both cancer cells and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. A similar effect was observed when the phenolic ring was exchanged with pyridine (i.e., changing the ligating site from O, N, O to N, N, O, which led to pro-oxidative effects. In contrast, compounds with long, flexible alkyl chains adjacent to the hydrazone bond exhibited specific cytotoxic effects against MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells and low toxicity against H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Hence, this study highlights important structure-activity relationships and provides insight into the further development of aroylhydrazone iron chelators with more potent and selective anti-neoplastic effects.

  19. Generality of the 18-n Rule: Intermetallic Structural Chemistry Explained through Isolobal Analogies to Transition Metal Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannello, Vincent J; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2015-12-07

    Intermetallic phases exhibit a vast structural diversity in which electron count is known to be one controlling factor. However, chemical bonding theory has yet to establish how electron counts and structure are interrelated for the majority of these compounds. Recently, a simple bonding picture for transition metal (T)-main group (E) intermetallics has begun to take shape based on isolobal analogies to molecular T complexes. This bonding picture is summarized in the 18-n rule: each T atom in a T-E intermetallic phase will need 18-n electrons to achieve a closed-shell 18-electron configuration, where n is the number of electron pairs it shares with other T atoms in multicenter interactions isolobal to T-T bonds. In this Article, we illustrate the generality of this rule with a survey over a wide range of T-E phases. First, we illustrate how three structural progressions with changing electron counts can be accounted for, both geometrically and electronically, with the 18-n rule: (1) the transition between the fluorite and complex β-FeSi2 types for TSi2 phases; (2) the sequence from the marcasite type to the arsenopyrite type and back to the marcasite type for TSb2 compounds; and (3) the evolution from the AuCu3 type to the ZrAl3 and TiAl3 types for TAl3 phases. We then turn to a broader survey of the applicability of the 18-n rule through a study of the following 34 binary structure types: PtHg4, CaF2 (fluorite), Fe3C, CoGa3, Co2Al5, Ru2B3, β-FeSi2, NiAs, Ni2Al3, Rh4Si5, CrSi2, Ir3Ga5, Mo3Al8, MnP, TiSi2, Ru2Sn3, TiAl3, MoSi2, CoSn, ZrAl3, CsCl, FeSi, AuCu3, ZrSi2, Mn2Hg5, FeS2 (oP6, marcasite), CoAs3 (skutterudite), PdSn2, CoSb2, Ir3Ge7, CuAl2, Re3Ge7, CrP2, and Mg2Ni. Through these analyses, the 18-n rule is established as a framework for interpreting the stability of 341 intermetallic phases and anticipating their properties.

  20. Comparing the photophysics of the two forms of the Orange Carotenoid Protein using 2D electronic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathies R.A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is applied to investigate the photophysics of the photoactive orange carotenoid protein, which is involved in nonphotochemical quenching in cyanobacteria. Differences in dynamics between the light and dark forms arise from the different structure of the carotenoid in the protein pocket, with consequences for the biological role of the two forms.

  1. In-silico Comparative Study and Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship Analysis of Some Structural and Physiochemical Descriptors of Elvitegravir Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, R; Ghosh, S

    2011-07-01

    Elvitegravir is a new-generation drug which acts as an integrase inhibitor of the HIV virus. The potential inhibition has been tested from the clinical trial data. Here the work basically deals with the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis by considering some of the physiochemical descriptors like molecular weight, logP, molar volume, and structural descriptors like Winers index, and molecular topological index of the drug analogs. The descriptors were calculated from the E-Dragon server and the multiple linear regression equation models were built by using Minitab tools. The different combinations of structural and physiochemical descriptors were considered for model derivation. The best three models were chosen by observing high R-Sq value, high F-value and low residual errors. The P values (regression) for the three models indicates the significance of the considered descriptors.The overall results obtained with these model suggest that for this perticular drug the activity is dependent on physiochemical descriptors.

  2. Verification of Three-Phase Dependency Analysis Bayesian Network Learning Method for Maize Carotenoid Gene Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianxiao; Tian, Zonglin

    2017-01-01

    Mining the genes related to maize carotenoid components is important to improve the carotenoid content and the quality of maize. On the basis of using the entropy estimation method with Gaussian kernel probability density estimator, we use the three-phase dependency analysis (TPDA) Bayesian network structure learning method to construct the network of maize gene and carotenoid components traits. In the case of using two discretization methods and setting different discretization values, we compare the learning effect and efficiency of 10 kinds of Bayesian network structure learning methods. The method is verified and analyzed on the maize dataset of global germplasm collection with 527 elite inbred lines. The result confirmed the effectiveness of the TPDA method, which outperforms significantly another 9 kinds of Bayesian network learning methods. It is an efficient method of mining genes for maize carotenoid components traits. The parameters obtained by experiments will help carry out practical gene mining effectively in the future.

  3. Quantification of the "SLAMENGHI" factors for carotenoid bioavailability and bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C E; Castenmiller, J J

    1998-01-01

    The bioavailability of carotenoids is the fraction of ingested carotenoids utilized for normal physiological functions or storage, while bioconversion is the proportion of bioavailable carotenoid converted to retinol (vitamin A). Factors influencing carotenoid bioavailability and bioconversion have been incorporated in the mnemonic "SLAMENGHI": species of carotenoid; molecular linkage; amount of carotenoids consumed in a meal; matrix in which the carotenoid is incorporated; effectors of absorption and bioconversion; nutrient status of the host; genetic factors; host-related factors; and mathematical interactions. In this paper, an attempt is made to quantify the impact of the various SLAMENGHI factors on carotenoid bioavailability and bioconversion although many of the data available are not strictly comparable.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, Lowell D [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Focsan, A Ligia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Konovalova, Tatyana A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence, Jesse [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowman, Michael K [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Molnar, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deli, Jozsef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond

  5. The Role of Carotenoids in Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theognosia Vergou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The human skin, as the boundary organ between the human body and the environment, is under the constant influence of free radicals (FR, both from the outside in and from the inside out. Carotenoids are known to be powerful antioxidant substances playing an essential role in the reactions of neutralization of FR (mainly reactive oxygen species ROS. Carotenoid molecules present in the tissue are capable of neutralizing several attacks of FR, especially ROS, and are then destroyed. Human skin contains carotenoids, such as α-, γ-, β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and their isomers, which serve the living cells as a protection against oxidation. Recent studies have reported the possibility to investigate carotenoids in human skin quickly and non-invasively by spectroscopic means. Results obtained from in-vivo studies on human skin have shown that carotenoids are vital components of the antioxidative protective system of the human skin and could serve as marker substances for the overall antioxidative status. Reflecting the nutritional and stress situation of volunteers, carotenoids must be administered by means of antioxidant-rich products, e.g., in the form of fruit and vegetables. Carotenoids are degraded by stress factors of any type, inter alia, sun radiation, contact with environmental hazards, illness, etc. The kinetics of the accumulation and degradation of carotenoids in the skin have been investigated.

  6. Carotenoids from Phaffia rhodozyma : Antioxidant activity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main goal of this work was to establish the stability and antioxidant activity of the extracts obtained through different techniques for recovering carotenoids from Phaffia rhodozyma NRRL-Y 17268. The best conditions for extracting carotenoids through cell rupture with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) were found to be a ...

  7. Ultrafast carotenoid band shifts: Experiment and theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herek, J.L.; Wendling, M.; He, Z.; Polivka, T.; Garcia-Asua, G.; Cogdell, R.J.; Hunter, C.N.; van Grondelle, R.; Sundstrom, V.; Pullerits, T.

    2004-01-01

    The ultrafast carotenoid band shift upon excitation of nearby bacteriochlorophyll molecules was studied in three different light harvesting complexes from purple bacteria. The results were analyzed in terms of changes in local electric field of the carotenoids. Time dependent density functional

  8. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloz, M.; Pillai, S.; Kodis, G.; Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L.; van Grondelle, R.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2011-01-01

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8- backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-robe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted

  9. Structurally Analogous Degradable Version of Fluorene-Bipyridine Copolymer with Exceptional Selectivity for Large-Diameter Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanimozhi, Catherine; Brady, Gerald J; Shea, Matthew J; Huang, Peishen; Joo, Yongho; Arnold, Michael S; Gopalan, Padma

    2017-11-22

    Separation of electronically pure, narrowly dispersed, pristine, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from a heterogeneous as-synthesized mixture is essential for various semiconducting technologies and biomedical applications. Although conjugated polymer wrappers are often utilized to facilitate electronic-type sorting, it is highly desirable to remove organic residues from the resulting devices. We report here the design and synthesis of a mild acid-degradable π-conjugated polyimine polymer, poly[(9,9-di-n-octyl-2,7-fluoren-dinitrilomethine)-alt-co-(6,6'-{2,2'-bipyridyl-dimethine})] (PFO-N-BPy), that is structurally analogous to the commonly used and commercially available poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(6,6'-(2,2'-bipyridine))] (PFO-BPy). An acid cleavable imine link (-HC═N-) was introduced in the PFO-N-BPy backbone to impart degradability, which is absent in PFO-BPy. PFO-N-BPy was synthesized via a metal catalyst-free aza-Wittig reaction in high yields. PFO-N-BPy with a degree of polymerization of just ∼10 showed excellent (>99% electronic purity) selectivity for both large-diameter (1.3-1.7 nm) arc-discharge semiconducting CNTs (S-CNTs) and smaller diameter (0.8-1.2 nm) high-pressure carbon monoxide disproportionation reaction S-CNTs. Overall, the selectivity for the semiconducting species is similar to that of PFO-BPy but with an advantage of complete depolymerization under mild acidic conditions into recyclable monomers. We further show by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy that the PFO-N-BPy-wrapped S-CNTs can be aligned into a monolayer array on gate dielectrics using a floating evaporative self-assembly process from which the polymer can be completely removed. Short channel field effect transistors were fabricated from the polymer-stripped aligned S-CNT arrays, which further confirmed the semiconducting purity on the order of 99.9% or higher.

  10. Kinetics of the transformation of n-propyl gallate and structural analogs in the perfused rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Santos, Israel Souza; Giaretta de Moraes, Amarilis; Mito, Márcio Shigueaki; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar, E-mail: adebracht@uol.com.br

    2013-11-15

    n-Propyl gallate and its analogs are used in foods and other products to prevent oxidation. In the liver the compound exerts several harmful effects, especially gluconeogenesis inhibition. The mode of transport and distribution of n-propyl gallate and its kinetics of biotransformation have not yet been investigated. To fill this gap the transformation, transport and distribution of n-propyl gallate and two analogs were investigated in the rat liver. Isolated perfused rat liver was used. n-Propyl gallate, methyl gallate, n-octyl gallate and transformation products were quantified by high pressure-liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence detection. The interactions of n-propyl gallate and analogs with the liver presented three main characteristics: (1) the hydrolytic release of gallic acid from n-propyl gallate and methyl gallate was very fast compared with the subsequent transformations of the gallic acid moiety; (2) transport of the esters was very fast and flow-limited in contrast to the slow and barrier-limited transport of gallic acid; (3) the apparent distribution volume of n-propyl gallate, but probably also of methyl gallate and n-octyl gallate, greatly exceeded the water space in the liver, contrary to the gallic acid space which is smaller than the water space. It can be concluded that at low portal concentrations (< 50 μM) the gallic acid esters are 100% extracted during a single passage through the liver, releasing mainly gallic acid into the systemic circulation. For the latter a considerable time is required until complete biotransformation. The exposure of the liver to the esters, however, is quite prolonged due to extensive intracellular binding. - Highlights: • The liver binds very strongly n-propyl gallate and releases basically gallic acid. • n-propyl gallate and analogs undergo concentrative flow-limited distribution. • Gallic acid undergoes barrier-limited distribution and is slowly transformed. • The long residence time of n

  11. UV-induced changes in antioxidant capacities of selected carotenoids toward lecithin in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, Dragan [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia); Markovic, Dejan [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia)], E-mail: markovic57@info-net.co.yu

    2008-01-15

    Antioxidant action of four selected carotenoids (two carotenes, {beta}-carotene and lycopene, and two xanthophylls, lutein and neoxanthin) on UV-induced lecithin lipid peroxidation in aqueous solution has been studied by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. TBA test is based on absorbance measurements of complex formed between malondialdehyde, secondary product of lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid, at 532 nm. The antioxidant capacities of investigated carotenoids appeared to be strongly affected by UV-action. High energy input of the involved UV-photons plays major governing role, though a certain impact of the carotenoid structures cannot be neglected. The results suggest a minor remained contribution of selected carotenoids to prevention of lecithin peroxidation in the studied system as a result of UV-irradiation.

  12. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Breeman, R.B. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Redesign, reconstruction, and directed extension of the Brevibacterium linens C40 carotenoid pathway in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Park, Yun Hee; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways of Brevibacterium linens DSMZ 20426 were reconstructed, redesigned, and extended with additional carotenoid-modifying enzymes of other sources in a heterologous host Escherichia coli. The modular lycopene pathway synthesized an unexpected carotenoid structure, 3,4-didehydrolycopene, as well as lycopene. Extension of the novel 3,4-didehydrolycopene pathway with the mutant Pantoea lycopene cyclase CrtY(2) and the Rhodobacter spheroidene monooxygenase CrtA generated monocyclic torulene and acyclic oxocarotenoids, respectively. The reconstructed beta-carotene pathway synthesized an unexpected 7,8-dihydro-beta-carotene in addition to beta-carotene. Extension of the beta-carotene pathway with the B. linens beta-ring desaturase CrtU and Pantoea beta-carotene hydroxylase CrtZ generated asymmetric carotenoid agelaxanthin A, which had one aromatic ring at the one end of carotene backbone and one hydroxyl group at the other end, as well as aromatic carotenoid isorenieratene and dihydroxy carotenoid zeaxanthin. These results demonstrate that reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathways and extension with promiscuous enzymes in a heterologous host holds promise as a rational strategy for generating structurally diverse compounds that are hardly accessible in nature.

  14. Structural and electronic similarity but functional difference in methylmalonyl-CoA mutase between coenzyme B12 and the analog 2',5'-dideoxyadenosylcobalamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calafat, A M; Taoka, S; Puckett, J M; Semerad, C; Yan, H; Luo, L; Chen, H; Banerjee, R; Marzilli, L G

    1995-10-31

    The cofactor analog 2',5'-dideoxyadenosylcobalamin (ddAdoCbl) differs from the natural cofactor coenzyme B12 [5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin (dAdoCbl)] by lacking only one oxygen atom. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of ddAdoCbl have been assigned unambiguously by homonuclear and heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques. The 1H, 13C, and 31P chemical shift values for ddAdoCbl were compared with those of another organocobalamin, namely dAdoCbl. This assessment shows that the analog is very similar both electronically and structurally to the natural cofactor. The effectiveness of ddAdoCbl as a cofactor for both the human and Propionibacterium shermanii methylmalonyl-CoA mutases was compared with that of the natural cofactor. ddAdoCbl was found to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to dAdoCbl. Similar binding affinities to both enzymes were found for both the ddAdoCbl analog and the natural cofactor. However, in the presence of ddAdoCbl, the rate of conversion of methylmalonyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA was only 1-2% of that seen with the natural cofactor. There were no changes with time in the visible absorption spectrum of the bound cofactor analog in the presence of substrate, suggesting that the Co-C bond was not cleaved. The CD (circular dichroism) spectra of dAdoCbl and ddAdoCbl are very similar, consistent with the NMR results. The CD spectral changes upon binding to P. shermanii methylmalonyl-CoA mutase are large compared to those reported on the binding of dAdoCbl to ethanolamine ammonia lyase. Furthermore, the CD spectra of both enzyme-bound cobalamins are very similar, suggesting that similar changes in the conformation or structure in these cobalamins occur on binding to the enzyme.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Colorful World of Microbes: Carotenoids and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushwaha Kirti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cells accumulate pigments under certain culture conditions, which have very important industrial applications. Microorganisms can serve as sources of carotenoids, the most widespread group of naturally occurring pigments. More than 750 structurally different yellow, orange, and red colored molecules are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes with an estimated market of $ 919 million by 2015. Carotenoids protect cells against photooxidative damage and hence found important applications in environment, food and nutrition, disease control, and as potent antimicrobial agents. In addition to many research advances, this paper reviews concerns with recent evaluations, applications of microbial pigments, and recommendations for future researches with an understanding of evolution and biosynthetic pathways along with other relevant aspects.

  16. Implementation of structure-mapping inference by event-file binding and action planning: a model of tool-improvisation analogies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Structure-mapping inferences are generally regarded as dependent upon relational concepts that are understood and expressible in language by subjects capable of analogical reasoning. However, tool-improvisation inferences are executed by members of a variety of non-human primate and other species. Tool improvisation requires correctly inferring the motion and force-transfer affordances of an object; hence tool improvisation requires structure mapping driven by relational properties. Observational and experimental evidence can be interpreted to indicate that structure-mapping analogies in tool improvisation are implemented by multi-step manipulation of event files by binding and action-planning mechanisms that act in a language-independent manner. A functional model of language-independent event-file manipulations that implement structure mapping in the tool-improvisation domain is developed. This model provides a mechanism by which motion and force representations commonly employed in tool-improvisation structure mappings may be sufficiently reinforced to be available to inwardly directed attention and hence conceptualization. Predictions and potential experimental tests of this model are outlined.

  17. Differential effects of environment on potato phenylpropanoid and carotenoid expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payyavula Raja S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant secondary metabolites, including phenylpropanoids and carotenoids, are stress inducible, have important roles in potato physiology and influence the nutritional value of potatoes. The type and magnitude of environmental effects on tuber phytonutrients is unclear, especially under modern agricultural management that minimizes stress. Understanding factors that influence tuber secondary metabolism could facilitate production of more nutritious crops. Metabolite pools of over forty tuber phenylpropanoids and carotenoids, along with the expression of twenty structural genes, were measured in high-phenylpropanoid purple potatoes grown in environmentally diverse locations in North America (Alaska, Texas and Florida. Results Phenylpropanoids, including chlorogenic acid (CGA, were higher in samples from the northern latitudes, as was the expression of phenylpropanoid genes including phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, which had over a ten-fold difference in relative abundance. Phenylpropanoid gene expression appeared coordinately regulated and was well correlated with metabolite pools, except for hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinatehydroxcinnamoyl transferase (HQT; r = -0.24. In silico promoter analysis identified two cis-acting elements in the HQT promoter not found in the other phenylpropanoid genes. Anthocyanins were more abundant in Alaskan samples and correlated with flavonoid genes including DFR (r = 0.91, UFGT (r = 0.94 and F3H (r = 0.77. The most abundant anthocyanin was petunidin-3-coum-rutinoside-5-glu, which ranged from 4.7 mg g-1 in Alaska to 2.3 mg g-1 in Texas. Positive correlations between tuber sucrose and anthocyanins (r = 0.85, suggested a stimulatory effect of sucrose. Smaller variation was observed in total carotenoids, but marked differences occurred in individual carotenoids, which had over a ten-fold range. Violaxanthin, lutein or zeaxanthin were the predominant carotenoids in tubers from Alaska, Texas and Florida

  18. Biologically Active Polymers from Spontaneous Carotenoid Oxidation: A New Frontier in Carotenoid Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, James B; Nickerson, James G.; Janusz Daroszewski; Trevor J Mogg; Burton, Graham W.

    2014-01-01

    In animals carotenoids show biological activity unrelated to vitamin A that has been considered to arise directly from the behavior of the parent compound, particularly as an antioxidant. However, the very property that confers antioxidant activity on some carotenoids in plants also confers susceptibility to oxidative transformation. As an alternative, it has been suggested that carotenoid oxidative breakdown or metabolic products could be the actual agents of activity in animals. However, an...

  19. Carotenoid, chlorophyll, and chlorophyll-derived compounds in grapes and port wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Pinto, Maria Manuela; Silva Ferreira, António César; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2005-12-28

    Carotenoids and chlorophyll-derived compounds in grapes and Port wines were investigated by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-DAD-MS (ESP+) analysis. A total of 13 carotenoid and chlorophyll-derived compounds are formally reported in grapes, 3 are identified for the first time, pheophytins a and b and (13Z)-beta-carotene, and 3 others remain unknown. In Port wines 19 compounds with carotenoid or chlorophyll-like structures are present, 8 still unidentified. The young wines showed higher total carotenoid content and chlorophyll-like compounds compared to aged Ports, with lutein and beta-carotene as major carotenoids. Among samples analyzed of monovarietal Vitis vinifera L. cultivar wines produced with the five most important Douro varieties, Tinta Roriz contained the highest levels of carotenoids and Touriga Franca the lowest. The forced-aging study indicated that lutein was more sensitive to temperature than beta-carotene. Additionally, aged wines showed higher ratios of beta-carotene/lutein concentrations compared to new Ports. Rates of degradation of chlorophyll derivative compounds were higher than those for carotene and lutein.

  20. A nitromethane-based HPLC system alternative to acetonitrile for carotenoid analysis of fruit and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Acetonitrile-based HPLC systems are the most commonly used for carotenoid analysis from different plant tissues. Because of the acetonitrile shortage, an HPLC system for the separation of carotenoids on C(18) reversed-phase columns was developed in which an acetonitrile-alcohol-based mobile phase was replaced by nitromethane. This solvent comes closest to acetonitrile with respect to its elutrophic property. Our criterion was to obtain similar separation and retention times for a range of differently structured carotenoids. This was achieved by further increase in the lipophilicity with ethylacetate. For all the carotenoids which we tested, we found co-elution only of β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene. By addition of 1% of water, separation of this pair of carotenoids was also achieved. The final recommended mobile phase consisted of nitromethane : 2-propanol : ethyl acetate : water (79 : 10 : 10 : 1, by volume). On Nucleosil C(18) columns and related ones like Hypersil C(18), we obtained separation of carotenes, hydroxyl, epoxy and keto derivatives, which resembles the excellent separation properties of acetonitrile-based mobile phases on C(18) reversed phase columns. We successfully applied the newly developed HPLC system to the separation of carotenoids from different vegetables and fruit. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Carotenoid maintenance handicap and the physiology of carotenoid-based signalisation of health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Despite a reasonable scientific interest in sexual selection, the general principles of health signalisation via ornamental traits remain still unresolved in many aspects. This is also true for the mechanism preserving honesty of carotenoid-based signals. Although it is widely accepted that this type of ornamentation reflects an allocation trade-off between the physiological utilisation of carotenoids (mainly in antioxidative processes) and their deposition in ornaments, some recent evidence suggests more complex interactions. Here, we further develop the models currently proposed to explain the honesty of carotenoid-based signalisation of heath status by adding the handicap principle concept regulated by testosterone. We propose that under certain circumstances carotenoids may be dangerous for the organism because they easily transform into toxic cleavage products. When reserves of other protective antioxidants are insufficient, physiological trade-offs may exist between maintenance of carotenoids for ornament expression and their removal from the body. Furthermore, we suggest that testosterone which enhances ornamentation by increasing carotenoid bioavailability may also promote oxidative stress and hence lower antioxidant reserves. The presence of high levels of carotenoids required for high-quality ornament expression may therefore represent a handicap and only individuals in prime health could afford to produce elaborate colourful ornaments. Although further testing is needed, this ‘carotenoid maintenance handicap’ hypothesis may offer a new insight into the physiological aspects of the relationship between carotenoid function, immunity and ornamentation.

  2. Carotenoid bioaccessibility in pulp and fresh juice from carotenoid-rich sweet oranges and mandarins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, María Jesús; Cilla, Antonio; Barberá, Reyes; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Citrus fruits are a good source of carotenoids for the human diet; however, comparative studies of carotenoids in different citrus food matrices are scarce. In this work the concentration and bioaccessibility of carotenoids in sweet oranges and mandarins with marked differences in carotenoid composition were evaluated in pulp and compared to those in fresh juice. The pulp and juice of the red-fleshed Cara Cara sweet orange variety was highly rich in carotenes (mainly lycopene and phytoene) compared to standard Navel orange, while β-cryptoxanthin and phytoene predominated in mandarins. Total carotenoid content in the pulp of the ordinary Navel orange and in the red-fleshed Cara Cara orange, as well as in the Clementine mandarin were higher than in the corresponding juices, although individual carotenoids were differentially affected by juice preparation. Bioaccessibility of the bioactive carotenoids (the ones described to be absorbed by humans) was greater in both pulp and juice of the carotenoid-rich Cara Cara orange compared to the Navel orange while increasing levels of β-cryptoxanthin were detected in the bioaccessible fractions of pulp and juice of mandarins postharvest stored at 12 °C compared to freshly-harvested fruits. Overall, results indicated that higher soluble bioactive carotenoids from citrus fruits and, consequently, potential nutritional and health benefits are obtained by the consumption of pulp with respect to fresh juice.

  3. Effect of the back bias on the analog performance of standard FD and UTBB transistors-based self-cascode structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Rodrigo T.; Flandre, Denis; Trevisoli, Renan; de Souza, Michelly; Pavanello, Marcelo A.

    2017-09-01

    This work demonstrates that active back biasing can improve significantly the analog performance of two-transistors self-cascode structures. The study was performed by applying both standard and UTBB fully depleted (FD) SOI MOSFETs to the structures and has shown that a voltage gain improvement of about 7 dB is obtained when a forward back bias is applied to the drain-sided transistor of standard FD devices-based structure. In the case of UTBB transistors, an improvement larger than 5 dB of the output voltage gain is shown depending on the back bias applied to both n- or p-type devices. Finally, it is shown that the mirroring precision of current mirrors composed by SC structures can be more than 20% better than the one composed by single devices and the improvement is better when adequate back bias is applied.

  4. IMPORTANCE OF CAROTENOIDS FOR HUMAN HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih ÖTLEŞ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are brightly yellow to red pigments occuring in plants and are introduced into humans through dietary intake of vegetables and fruits. They do not dissolve in water, they can give maximum absorption in UV region at 400-450 nm., and they are stable in alkali. Some carotenoids have provitamin A activity and they are important because of the synthesis of Vitamin A needed to be taken into the body. In addition to this function, carotenoids play very important roles in preventing diseases caused by Vitamin A deficiency, coronary heart diseases, and cancer. They are effective in preventing or at least slowering cancer as a result of their antioxidative properties. Studies are shown that cancer risk (especially the lung cancer decreases with the intake of carotenoids. As a conclusion vegetables and fruits-rich diet is always important and valuable for healty populations.

  5. Discovery and Characterization of Carotenoid-Oxygen Copolymers in Fruits and Vegetables with Potential Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Graham W; Daroszewski, Janusz; Mogg, Trevor J; Nikiforov, Grigory B; Nickerson, James G

    2016-05-18

    We reported previously that the spontaneous oxidation of β-carotene and other carotenoids proceeds predominantly by formation of carotenoid-oxygen copolymers and that β-carotene copolymers exhibit immunological activity, including priming innate immune function and limiting inflammatory processes. Oxidative loss of carotenoids in fruits and vegetables occurs during processing. Here we report evidence for the occurrence of associated analogous copolymer compounds. Geronic acid, an indirect, low molecular weight marker of β-carotene oxidation at ∼2% of β-carotene copolymers, is found to occur in common fresh or dried foods, including carrots, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, paprika, rosehips, seaweeds, and alfalfa, at levels encompassing an approximately thousand-fold range, from low ng/g in fresh foods to μg/g in dried foods. Copolymers isolated from several dried foods reach mg/g levels: comparable to initial carotenoid levels. In vivo biological activity of supplemental β-carotene copolymers has been previously documented at μg/g levels, suggesting that some foods could have related activity.

  6. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line: The lowest energy states in 9He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in 9Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Uberseder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound 9He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy 9He states exist with spins Jπ=1/2+ and Jπ=1/2− and widths on the order of 100–200 keV. These findings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. The present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the 8He+n system, performed via a search for the T=5/2 isobaric analog states in 9Li populated through 8He+p elastic scattering. The present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad Jπ=1/2+ state in 9He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.

  7. Ultra-fast analog-to-digital converter based on a nonlinear triplexer and an optical coder with a photonic crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Farhad; Soroosh, Mohammad; Alipour-Banaei, Hamed; Farshidi, Ebrahim

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose what we believe is a novel all-optical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) based on photonic crystals. The proposed structure is composed of a nonlinear triplexer and an optical coder. The nonlinear triplexer is for creating discrete levels in the continuous optical input signal, and the optical coder is for generating a 2-bit standard binary code out of the discrete levels coming from the nonlinear triplexer. Controlling the resonant mode of the resonant rings through optical intensity is the main objective and working mechanism of the proposed structure. The maximum delay time obtained for the proposed structure was about 5 ps and the total footprint is about 1520  μm2.

  8. Structure-activity relationship of piperine and its synthetic amide analogs for therapeutic potential to prevent experimentally induced ER stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ayat S; Ravindran, Sreenithya; Khalil, Ashraf; Munusamy, Shankar

    2017-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the key organelle involved in protein folding and maturation. Emerging studies implicate the role of ER stress in the development of chronic kidney disease. Thus, there is an urgent need for compounds that could ameliorate ER stress and prevent CKD. Piperine and its analogs have been reported to exhibit multiple pharmacological activities; however, their efficacy against ER stress in kidney cells has not been studied yet. Hence, the goal of this study was to synthesize amide-substituted piperine analogs and screen them for pharmacological activity to relieve ER stress using an in vitro model of tunicamycin-induced ER stress using normal rat kidney (NRK-52E) cells. Five amide-substituted piperine analogs were synthesized and their chemical structures were elucidated by pertinent spectroscopic techniques. An in vitro model of ER stress was developed using tunicamycin, and the compounds of interest were screened for their effect on cell viability, and the expression of ER chaperone GRP78, the pro-apoptotic ER stress marker CHOP, and apoptotic caspases 3 and 12 (via western blotting). Our findings indicate that exposure to tunicamycin (0.5 μg/mL) for 2 h induces the expression of GRP78 and CHOP, and apoptotic markers (caspase-3 and caspase-12) and causes a significant reduction in renal cell viability. Pre-treatment of cells with piperine and its cyclohexylamino analog decreased the tunicamycin-induced upregulation of GRP78 and CHOP and cell death. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that piperine and its analogs differentially regulate ER stress, and thus represent potential therapeutic agents to treat ER stress-related renal disorders. Graphical Abstract Piperine (PIP) reduces the expression of ER stress markers (GRP78 and CHOP) induced by pathologic stimuli and consequently decreases the activation of apoptotic caspase-12 and caspase-3; all of which contributes to its chemical chaperone and cytoprotective properties to protect

  9. Molecular modeling of fentanyl analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJILJANA DOSEN-MICOVIC

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Fentanyl is a highly potent and clinically widely used narcotic analgesic. A large number of its analogs have been synthesized, some of which (sufentanil and alfentanyl are also in clinical use. Theoretical studies, in recent years, afforded a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships of this class of opiates and allowed insight into the molecular mechanism of the interactions of fentanyl analogs with their receptors. An overview of the current computational techniques for modeling fentanyl analogs, their receptors and ligand-receptor interactions is presented in this paper.

  10. Carotenoid-dependent signals and the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels in birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J. P.; Maia, Rafael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Sexual selection has resulted in a wide array of ornaments used in mate choice, and such indicator traits signal quality honestly when they bear costs, precluding cheating. Carotenoid-dependent coloration has attracted considerable attention in this context, because investing carotenoids in

  11. Mechanism of carotenoid coloration in the brightly colored plumages of broadbills (Eurylaimidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O; LaFountain, Amy M; Berg, Christopher J; Tauber, Michael J; Frank, Harry A

    2014-07-01

    The plumage carotenoids of six species from five genera of broadbills (Eurylaimidae) have been examined. These plumages are crimson, violet, purple-maroon, or yellow. Two genera also have brilliant green plumages that are produced by a combination of structural coloration and unknown carotenoids. Six different carotenoids from nine different plumage patches were identified, including two previously unknown molecules, using high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and MS/MS fragment analysis. The yellow pigment in Eurylaimus javanicus and Eurylaimus ochromalus is identified as the novel carotenoid, 7,8-dihydro-3'-dehydro-lutein. The yellow and green plumages of Psarisomus dalhousiae contain the unmodified dietary carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin. The brilliant green feathers of Calyptomena viridis contain a mixture of lutein and two other xanthophylls that have previously been found only in woodpeckers (Picinae). The crimson and violet colors of Cymbirhynchus, Sarcophanops, and Eurylaimus are produced by a novel pigment, which is identified as 2,3-didehydro-papilioerythrinone. The molecular structure of this carotenoid was confirmed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance, correlated two-dimensional spectroscopy, and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy. Resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy carried out at room and low temperatures was used to probe the configuration and conformation of 2,3-didehydro-papilioerythrinone in situ within crimson C. macrorhynchos and purple-red E. javanicus feathers. The rR spectra reveal that the pigment is in an all-trans configuration and appears to be relatively planar in the feathers. The likely metabolic pathways for the production of broadbill carotenoids from dietary precursors are discussed.

  12. Carotenoid-enriched transgenic corn delivers bioavailable carotenoids to poultry and protects them against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogareda, Carmina; Moreno, Jose A; Angulo, Eduardo; Sandmann, Gerhard; Portero, Manuel; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are health-promoting organic molecules that act as antioxidants and essential nutrients. We show that chickens raised on a diet enriched with an engineered corn variety containing very high levels of four key carotenoids (β-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin and lutein) are healthy and accumulate more bioavailable carotenoids in peripheral tissues, muscle, skin and fat, and more retinol in the liver, than birds fed on standard corn diets (including commercial corn supplemented with colour additives). Birds were challenged with the protozoan parasite Eimeria tenella and those on the high-carotenoid diet grew normally, suffered only mild disease symptoms (diarrhoea, footpad dermatitis and digital ulcers) and had lower faecal oocyst counts than birds on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that carotenoid-rich corn maintains poultry health and increases the nutritional value of poultry products without the use of feed additives. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Analogical Inference and Analogical Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-04

    serious problems as wells since ’structural identities’ (a bit of a misnomer here) are defined as foal -relevant Identities, the interpretation...DepartmentDepartment of Neurology P.O. Box 2158DrLeSumn 22 South Greenet Street New Haven, CT 06520 Stanford Sulniest B alt m ore M D 12011040 C athcart W

  14. Structure-Activity Relationships of the MEPicides: N-Acyl and O-Linked Analogs of FR900098 as Inhibitors of Dxr from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose, Géraldine; Jackson, Emily R; Haymond, Amanda; Johny, Chinchu; Edwards, Rachel L; Wang, Xu; Brothers, R Carl; Edelstein, Emma K; Odom, Audrey R; Boshoff, Helena I; Couch, Robin D; Dowd, Cynthia S

    2016-12-09

    Despite continued research efforts, the threat of drug resistance from a variety of bacteria continues to plague clinical communities. Discovery and validation of novel biochemical targets will facilitate development of new drugs to combat these organisms. The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway to make isoprene units is a biosynthetic pathway essential to many bacteria. We and others have explored inhibitors of the MEP pathway as novel antibacterial agents. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, and Yersinia pestis, resulting in the plague or "black death", both rely on the MEP pathway for isoprene production. 1-Deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (Dxr) catalyzes the first committed step in the MEP pathway. We examined two series of Dxr inhibitors based on the parent structure of the retrohydroxamate natural product FR900098. The compounds contain either an extended N-acyl or O-linked alkyl/aryl group and are designed to act as bisubstrate inhibitors of the enzyme. While nearly all of the compounds inhibited both Mtb and Yp Dxr to some extent, compounds generally displayed more potent inhibition against the Yp homologue, with the best analogs displaying nanomolar IC50 values. In bacterial growth inhibition assays, the phosphonic acids generally resulted in poor antibacterial activity, likely a reflection of inadequate permeability. Accordingly, diethyl and dipivaloyloxymethyl (POM) prodrug esters of these compounds were made. While the added lipophilicity did not enhance Yersinia activity, the compounds showed significantly improved antitubercular activities. The most potent compounds have Mtb MIC values of 3-12 μg/mL. Taken together, we have uncovered two series of analogs that potently inhibit Dxr homologues from Mtb and Yp. These inhibitors of the MEP pathway, termed MEPicides, serve as leads for future analog development.

  15. Papaya carotenoids increased in Oxisols soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonwan Sangsoy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The papaya fruit is healthy for humans as it contains high levels of antioxidants and provitamin A due to high lycopene and β-carotenes contents, respectively. The carotenoids were determined from papayas grown in three different locations—Kamphaeng Saen (KS, Sisaket (SK, and Tha Mai (TM—and also the study investigated whether the Oxisols soil was capable of increasing the carotenoids content in the papaya fruit. The lycopene, β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin contents were determined from four different ripening stages (mature green to fully ripe. Concomitantly, the transcript levels of five genes involved in carotenoids biosynthesis—phytoene desaturase (PDS, carotene desaturase (ZDS, lycopene-β-cyclase (LCY-B1 and LCY-B2, and β-carotene hydroxylase (B-CHX—were investigated. Papayas grown at TM had the highest lycopene, which was supported by the high expression levels of PDS, ZDS and B-CHX and the lower expression levels of the two LCY-B genes; however the locations did not affect the fruit quality. The ‘Plak Mai Lai’ papaya was further investigated by being grown in one location but on two different soil types (Oxisols and Ultisols, to compare their carotenoids contents. Higher carotenoid contents were detected in the papaya grown in the Oxisols.

  16. Structure-activity relationships of novel salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH) analogs: iron chelation, anti-oxidant and cytotoxic properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Potůčková, Eliška; Hrušková, Kateřina; Bureš, Jan; Kovaříková, Petra; Špirková, Iva A; Pravdíková, Kateřina; Kolbabová, Lucie; Hergeselová, Tereza; Hašková, Pavlína; Jansová, Hana; Macháček, Miloslav; Jirkovská, Anna; Richardson, Vera; Lane, Darius J R; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R; Vávrová, Kateřina; Šimůnek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    ...). Their structure-activity relationships were assessed with respect to their stability in plasma, iron chelation efficacy, redox effects and cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells...

  17. Analog current mode analog/digital converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Khayrollah (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An improved subranging or comparator circuit is provided for an analog-to-digital converter. As a subranging circuit, the circuit produces a residual signal representing the difference between an analog input signal and an analog of a digital representation. This is achieved by subdividing the digital representation into two or more parts and subtracting from the analog input signal analogs of each of the individual digital portions. In another aspect of the present invention, the subranging circuit comprises two sets of differential input pairs in which the transconductance of one differential input pair is scaled relative to the transconductance of the other differential input pair. As a consequence, the same resistor string may be used for two different digital-to-analog converters of the subranging circuit.

  18. Cyclic pentapeptide analogs based on endomorphin-2 structure: cyclization studies using liquid chromatography combined with on-line mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekielna, Justyna; Kluczyk, Alicja; Perlikowska, Renata; Janecka, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The cyclization of linear analogs based on endomorphin-2 structure, Tyr/Dmt-d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp-NH2 and Tyr/Dmt-d-Cys-Phe-Phe-Cys-NH2 (where Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), resulting in obtaining lactam or disulfide derivatives, was studied using liquid chromatography combined with on-line mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In case of cyclization via an amide bond, the formation of the cyclic monomers, cyclic but not linear dimers and even traces of cyclic trimers was observed. Disulfide bridge containing peptides was obtained by the solid-phase synthesis of the linear sequences, followed by either in-solution or on-resin cyclization. In case of the in-solution cyclization, the expected cyclic monomers were the only products. When oxidation of the cysteine residues was performed when the peptides were still on the resin, cyclic monomer and two cyclodimers, parallel and antiparallel, were found. Digestion of the isolated cyclodimers with α-chymotrypsin allowed for their unambiguous identification. The comparison of the cyclic monomer/dimer ratios for analogs with Tyr versus Dmt in position 1 revealed that the presence of the exocyclic Dmt favored formation of the cyclic monomer, most likely due to the increased steric bulk of this amino acid side-chain as compared with Tyr. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Carotenoid diagenesis in a marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, C. D.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The major carotenoids at three levels (3, 40, and 175 m below the sediment-water interface) in a core from a marine sediment (Cariaco Trench, off Venezuela) have been examined. Mass and electronic spectral data have provided evidence for the onset of a progressive reduction of carotenoids in the geological column. The time scale of the process appears to depend on the particular carotenoid. Reduction of up to two double bonds is observed for the diol, zeaxanthin, in the oldest sediment (about 340,000 years old) but no reduction is observed in the younger samples (about 5000 and 56,000 years old). The diketone, canthaxanthin, shows evidence of reduction of up to two double bonds in the 56,000-yr sample and up to five double bonds in the oldest sample. No reduction of beta-carotene was observed in any of the samples.

  20. The intake of carotenoids in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Jakobsen, Jette; Andersen, N. L.

    2000-01-01

    To estimate the intake of carotenoids in the Danish population Danish fruits and vegetables were screened with an HPLC method consisting of extraction with ethanol:tetrahydrofuran, separation by reversed phase HPLC with the mobile phase acetonitril:methanol:dichlormethan, triethylamin, BHT...... and detection at 450 nm. Food intakes were estimated by the national dietary surveys (1995) from 7 days' food registration (n = 1837 adults), which allows the whole diet to be described by the mean intake and intake distribution of 207 raw or semiprepared foods. By multiplication with the mean content...... in the foods the mean intake and intake distribution of the carotenoids were calculated. Carrots and tomatoes have both high contents of carotenoids (8,450 mu g/100 g alpha- + beta-carotene and 4,790 mu g/100 g lycopene, respectively) and high intakes (19 and 15 g/day, respectively) and were responsible for 47...

  1. Ferrocenylaniline based amide analogs of methoxybenzoic acids: Synthesis, structural characterization and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, Ataf Ali; Kausar, Samia; Hamayun, Muhammad; Lal, Bhajan; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Badshah, Amin

    2017-10-01

    Three new ferrocene based amides were synthesized with slight structural difference. The general formula of the amides is C5H5FeC5H4C6H4NHCOC6H4(OCH3). The synthesized compounds were characterized by instrumental techniques like elemental analysis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Structure of the two compounds was also studied by single crystal X-rays diffraction analysis. Structural studies provide the evidence that pMeO (one of the synthesized compounds) is an example of amides having no intermolecular hydrogen bonding in solid structure. In the BChE inhibition assay, compound (oMeO) having strong intermolecular force in the solid structure is less active than the compound (pMeO) with weak intermolecular forces in the solid structure. The docking studies proved that hydrogen bonding between inhibitor and BChE enzyme is of more importance for the activity, rather than intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the solid structure of inhibitor.

  2. Interference with Clp protease impairs carotenoid accumulation during tomato fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Lucio; Simon-Moya, Miguel; Llorente, Briardo; Llamas, Ernesto; Marro, Mónica; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Li, Li; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel; Vicente, Ariel

    2018-01-29

    Profound metabolic and structural changes are required for fleshy green fruits to ripen and become colorful and tasty. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), fruit ripening involves the differentiation of chromoplasts, specialized plastids that accumulate carotenoid pigments such as β-carotene (pro-vitamin A) and lycopene. Here, we explored the role of the plastidial Clp protease in chromoplast development and carotenoid accumulation. Ripening-specific silencing of one of the subunits of the Clp proteolytic complex resulted in β-carotene-enriched fruits that appeared orange instead of red when ripe. Clp-defective fruit displayed aberrant chromoplasts and up-regulated expression of nuclear genes encoding the tomato homologs of Orange (OR) and ClpB3 chaperones, most probably to deal with misfolded and aggregated proteins that could not be degraded by the Clp protease. ClpB3 and OR chaperones protect the carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase and phytoene synthase, respectively, from degradation, whereas OR chaperones additionally promote chromoplast differentiation by preventing the degradation of carotenoids such as β-carotene. We conclude that the Clp protease contributes to the differentiation of chloroplasts into chromoplasts during tomato fruit ripening, acting in co-ordination with specific chaperones that alleviate protein folding stress, promote enzyme stability and accumulation, and prevent carotenoid degradation. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. Effects of carotenoids on damage of biological lipids induced by gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2014-05-01

    Carotenoids are considered to be involved in the radioresistant mechanisms of radioresistant bacteria. In these bacterial cells, carotenoids are present in biological lipids, and therefore may be related to the radiation-induced damage of lipids. However, only limited data are available for the role of carotenoids in such damage. In this study, we irradiated an α-linolenic acid-benzene solution with gamma rays and analyzed the resulting oxidative degradation and peroxidation damage in the presence or absence of two typical carotenoids: β-carotene and astaxanthin. The analyses revealed that oxidative degradation and peroxidation of α-linolenic acid, as evaluated by the amount of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene formed, respectively, increased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, 8.5×10-3 M β-carotene inhibited gamma radiation-induced oxidative degradation of α-linolenic acid, whereas 5.0×10-5 and 5.0×10-6 M β-carotene, and 5.0×10-7 and 5.0×10-8 M astaxanthin promoted degradation. In contrast, neither β-carotene nor astaxanthin affected peroxidation of α-linolenic acid. These results suggest that an optimum concentration of carotenoids in radioresistant bacteria protects biological lipid structures from radiation-induced damage.

  4. Accumulation of Carotenoids and Metabolic Profiling in Different Cultivars of Tagetes Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ji Park

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Species of Tagetes, which belong to the family Asteraceae show different characteristics including, bloom size, shape, and color; plant size; and leaf shape. In this study, we determined the differences in primary metabolites and carotenoid yields among six cultivars from two Tagetes species, T. erecta and T. patula. In total, we detected seven carotenoids in the examined cultivars: violaxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, α-carotene, β-carotene, 9-cis-β-carotene, and 13-cis-β-carotene. In all the cultivars, lutein was the most abundant carotenoid. Furthermore, the contents of each carotenoid in flowers varied depending on the cultivar. Principal component analysis (PCA facilitated metabolic discrimination between Tagetes cultivars, with the exception of Inca Yellow and Discovery Orange. Moreover, PCA and orthogonal projection to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA results provided a clear discrimination between T. erecta and T. patula. Primary metabolites, including xylose, citric acid, valine, glycine, and galactose were the main components facilitating separation of the species. Positive relationships were apparent between carbon-rich metabolites, including those of the TCA cycle and sugar metabolism, and carotenoids.

  5. Accumulation of Carotenoids and Metabolic Profiling in Different Cultivars of Tagetes Flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun Ji; Park, Soo-Yun; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Ahn, Hyung-Geun; Kim, Jae Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2017-02-18

    Species of Tagetes, which belong to the family Asteraceae show different characteristics including, bloom size, shape, and color; plant size; and leaf shape. In this study, we determined the differences in primary metabolites and carotenoid yields among six cultivars from two Tagetes species, T. erecta and T. patula. In total, we detected seven carotenoids in the examined cultivars: violaxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, α-carotene, β-carotene, 9-cis-β-carotene, and 13-cis-β-carotene. In all the cultivars, lutein was the most abundant carotenoid. Furthermore, the contents of each carotenoid in flowers varied depending on the cultivar. Principal component analysis (PCA) facilitated metabolic discrimination between Tagetes cultivars, with the exception of Inca Yellow and Discovery Orange. Moreover, PCA and orthogonal projection to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) results provided a clear discrimination between T. erecta and T. patula. Primary metabolites, including xylose, citric acid, valine, glycine, and galactose were the main components facilitating separation of the species. Positive relationships were apparent between carbon-rich metabolites, including those of the TCA cycle and sugar metabolism, and carotenoids.

  6. Dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, I.; Cadier, E.; Beulens, J. W J; van der A, D. L.; Spijkerman, A. M W; van der Schouw, Y. T.

    Background and aims: Carotenoids may reduce diabetes risk, due to their antioxidant properties. However, the association between dietary carotenoids intake and type 2 diabetes risk is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether higher dietary carotenoid intakes

  7. Effect of harvesting periods and processing methods on carotenoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other carotenoids detected were viola-xanthin, lycopene, astaxanthin and antheraxanthin. Total carotenoids content (129.69 μg/100 g) of parboiled flour sample harvested at 7 months was higher than other samples. Harvesting of trifoliate yam tubers at 11 months provided yam with high concentration of carotenoids ...

  8. Dietary factors that affect the bioavailability of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van het K.H.; West, C.E.; Weststrate, J.A.; Hautvast, J.G.A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Carotenoids are thought to contribute to the beneficial effects of increased vegetable consumption. Various dietary factors have an effect on the bioavailability of carotenoids. The type of food matrix in which carotenoids are located is a major factor. The bioavailability of ß-carotene from

  9. The fate of carotenoids in sediments: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koopmans, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Despite carotenoids being abundant natural products, there are only scattered literature reports of carotenoid derivatives (mainly in the form of their 'perhydro' derivatives) in ancient sediments and petroleum. This was thought to be due to the sensitivity of carotenoids toward oxygen and their

  10. Carotenoid levels in human lymphocytes, measured by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanauskaite, R.; Ramanauskaite, Regina B.; Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, Kees J.; Sijtsema, N.M.; van der Maas, Louis; Greve, Jan; Otto, Cornelis; Figdor, Carl

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoid levels in lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy people have been investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. We observed that carotenoids are concentrated in so-called “Gall bodies”. The level of carotenoids in living human lymphocytes was found to be age-dependent and to

  11. Carotenoids and retinoids: molecular aspects and health issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Packer, Lester

    2005-01-01

    ... are byproducts of metabolism in humans. Indeed, the presence of carotenoids in the diet and their role in human health has become a subject of unprecedented interest. Some carotenoids are called provitamin A compounds because they are precursors of retinol and retinoic acid. The type of carotenoids found in human plasma depends on the...

  12. Carotenoid levels in human lymphocytes, measured by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanauskaite, R B; SegersNolten, IGMJ; DeGrauw, K J; Sijtsema, N M; VanderMaas, L; Greve, J; Otto, C; Figdor, C G

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoid levels in lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy people have been investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. We observed that carotenoids are concentrated in so-called ''Gall bodies''. The level of carotenoids in living human lymphocytes was found to be age-dependent and to

  13. 3-Amino 1,8-naphthalimide, a structural analog of the anti-cholera drug virstatin inhibits chemically-biased swimming and swarming motility in vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxia; Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2017-06-01

    A screen for inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae motility identified the compound 3-amino 1,8-naphthalimide (3-A18NI), a structural analog of the cholera drug virstatin. Similar to virstatin, 3-A18NI diminished cholera toxin production. In contrast, 3-A18NI impeded swimming and/or swarming motility of V. cholerae and V. parahemolyticus suggesting that it could target the chemotaxis pathway shared by the polar and lateral flagellar system of vibrios. 3-A18NI did not inhibit the expression of V. cholerae major flagellin FlaA or the assembly of its polar flagellum. Finally, 3-A18NI enhanced V. cholerae colonization mimicking the phenotype of chemotaxis mutants that exhibit counterclockwise-biased flagellum rotation. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Excited-State Dynamics of Carotenoids Studied by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ingu; Pang, Yoonsoo [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sebok [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Carotenoids, natural antenna pigments in photosynthesis share a symmetric backbone of conjugated polyenes. Contrary to the symmetric and almost planar geometries of carotenoids, excited state structure and dynamics of carotenoids are exceedingly complex. In this paper, recent infrared and visible transient absorption measurements and excitation dependent dynamics of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al and 7',7'-dicyano-7'-apo-β-carotene will be reviewed. The recent visible transient absorption measurements of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al in polar and nonpolar solvents will also be introduced to emphasize the complex excited-state dynamics and unsolved problems in the S{sub 2} and S{sub 1} excited states.

  15. Insight into the Strong Antioxidant Activity of Deinoxanthin, a Unique Carotenoid in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Fang Ji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Deinoxanthin (DX is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations. It was found that DX possesses lower lowest triplet excitation energy for its unique structure than other carotenoids, such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin, which endows DX strong potential in the energy transfer-based ROS‑scavenging process. Moreover, the H-atom donating potential of DX is similar to zeaxanthin according to the theoretical homolytic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy. Thus, the large number of conjugated double bonds should be crucial for its strong antioxidant activity.

  16. Facile synthesis of analogous graphene quantum dots with sp2 hybridized carbon atom dominant structures and their photovoltaic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengcheng; Shen, Yongtao; Li, Yu; Zheng, Wenjun; Xue, Yunjia; Qin, Chengqun; Zhang, Bo; Hao, Jingxiang; Feng, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Graphene quantum dot (GQD) is an emerging class of zero-dimensional nanocarbon material with many novel applications. It is of scientific importance to prepare GQDs with more perfect structures, that is, GQDs containing negligible oxygenous defects, for both optimizing their optical properties and helping in their photovoltaic applications. Herein, a new strategy for the facile preparation of ``pristine'' GQDs is reported. The method we presented is a combination of a bottom-up synthetic and a solvent-induced interface separation process, during which the target products with highly crystalline structure were selected by the organic solvent. The obtained organic soluble GQDs (O-GQDs) showed a significant difference in structure and composition compared with ordinary aqueous soluble GQDs, thus leading to a series of novel properties. Furthermore, O-GQDs were applied as electron-acceptors in a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)-based organic photovoltaic device. The performance highlights that O-GQD has potential to be a novel electron-acceptor material due to the sp2 hybridized carbon atom dominant structure and good solubility in organic solvents.Graphene quantum dot (GQD) is an emerging class of zero-dimensional nanocarbon material with many novel applications. It is of scientific importance to prepare GQDs with more perfect structures, that is, GQDs containing negligible oxygenous defects, for both optimizing their optical properties and helping in their photovoltaic applications. Herein, a new strategy for the facile preparation of ``pristine'' GQDs is reported. The method we presented is a combination of a bottom-up synthetic and a solvent-induced interface separation process, during which the target products with highly crystalline structure were selected by the organic solvent. The obtained organic soluble GQDs (O-GQDs) showed a significant difference in structure and composition compared with ordinary aqueous soluble GQDs, thus leading to a series of novel

  17. Intuitive analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Intuitive Analog Circuit Design outlines ways of thinking about analog circuits and systems that let you develop a feel for what a good, working analog circuit design should be. This book reflects author Marc Thompson's 30 years of experience designing analog and power electronics circuits and teaching graduate-level analog circuit design, and is the ideal reference for anyone who needs a straightforward introduction to the subject. In this book, Dr. Thompson describes intuitive and ""back-of-the-envelope"" techniques for designing and analyzing analog circuits, including transistor amplifi

  18. Facile synthesis of analogous graphene quantum dots with sp(2) hybridized carbon atom dominant structures and their photovoltaic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengcheng; Shen, Yongtao; Li, Yu; Zheng, Wenjun; Xue, Yunjia; Qin, Chengqun; Zhang, Bo; Hao, Jingxiang; Feng, Wei

    2014-11-07

    Graphene quantum dot (GQD) is an emerging class of zero-dimensional nanocarbon material with many novel applications. It is of scientific importance to prepare GQDs with more perfect structures, that is, GQDs containing negligible oxygenous defects, for both optimizing their optical properties and helping in their photovoltaic applications. Herein, a new strategy for the facile preparation of "pristine" GQDs is reported. The method we presented is a combination of a bottom-up synthetic and a solvent-induced interface separation process, during which the target products with highly crystalline structure were selected by the organic solvent. The obtained organic soluble GQDs (O-GQDs) showed a significant difference in structure and composition compared with ordinary aqueous soluble GQDs, thus leading to a series of novel properties. Furthermore, O-GQDs were applied as electron-acceptors in a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)-based organic photovoltaic device. The performance highlights that O-GQD has potential to be a novel electron-acceptor material due to the sp(2) hybridized carbon atom dominant structure and good solubility in organic solvents.

  19. Long-lived coherence in carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J A; Cannon, E; Van Dao, L; Hannaford, P [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Quiney, H M; Nugent, K A, E-mail: jdavis@swin.edu.a [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    We use two-colour vibronic coherence spectroscopy to observe long-lived vibrational coherences in the ground electronic state of carotenoid molecules, with decoherence times in excess of 1 ps. Lycopene and spheroidene were studied isolated in solution, and within the LH2 light-harvesting complex extracted from purple bacteria. The vibrational coherence time is shown to increase significantly for the carotenoid in the complex, providing further support to previous assertions that long-lived electronic coherences in light-harvesting complexes are facilitated by in-phase motion of the chromophores and surrounding proteins. Using this technique, we are also able to follow the evolution of excited state coherences and find that for carotenoids in the light-harvesting complex the (S{sub 2}|S{sub 0}) superposition remains coherent for more than 70 fs. In addition to the implications of this long electronic decoherence time, the extended coherence allows us to observe the evolution of the excited state wavepacket. These experiments reveal an enhancement of the vibronic coupling to the first vibrational level of the C-C stretching mode and/or methyl-rocking mode in the ground electronic state 70 fs after the initial excitation. These observations open the door to future experiments and modelling that may be able to resolve the relaxation dynamics of carotenoids in solution and in natural light-harvesting systems.

  20. Carotenoid content, sensory properties and microbiological quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The carotenoid content, sensory properties and microbiological assessment of stored cassava fufu from two cultivars of yellow cassava (TMS 01/1368 and TMS 01/1412) being multiplied for distribution in South-East and South-South Nigeria were investigated using standard techniques. There is scanty information on ...

  1. Carotenoids and protection against solar UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Wilhelm; Sies, Helmut

    2002-01-01

    Upon exposure to UV light photooxidative reactions are initiated which are damaging to biomolecules and affect the integrity of cells and tissues. Photooxidative damage plays a role in pathological processes and is involved in the development of disorders affecting the skin. When skin is exposed to UV light, erythema is observed as an initial reaction. Carotenoids like beta-carotene or lycopene are efficient antioxidants scavenging singlet molecular oxygen and peroxyl radicals generated in during photooxidation. When beta-carotene was applied as such or in combination with alpha-tocopherol for 12 weeks, erythema formation induced with a solar light simulator was diminished from week 8 on. Similar effects were also achieved with a diet rich in lycopene. Ingestion of tomato paste corresponding to a dose of 16 mg lycopene/ day over 10 weeks led to increases in serum levels of lycopene and total carotenoids in skin. At week 10, erythema formation was significantly lower in the group that ingested the tomato paste as compared to the control group. No significant difference was found at week 4 of treatment. Thus, protection against UV light-induced erythema can be achieved by ingestion of a commonly consumed dietary source of lycopene. Such protective effects of carotenoids were also demonstrated in cell culture. The in-vitro data indicate that there is an optimal level of protection for each carotenoid. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Electronic Band Structure of BaCo_{2}As_{2}: A Fully Doped Ferropnictide Analog with Reduced Electronic Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an investigation with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of the Fermi surface and electronic band structure of BaCo_{2}As_{2}. Although its quasinesting-free Fermi surface differs drastically from that of its Fe-pnictide cousins, we show that the BaCo_{2}As_{2} system can be used as an approximation to the bare unoccupied band structure of the related BaFe_{2-x}Co_{x}As_{2} and Ba_{1-x}K_{x}Fe_{2}As_{2} compounds. However, our experimental results, in agreement with dynamical-mean-field-theory calculations, indicate that electronic correlations are much less important in BaCo_{2}As_{2} than in the ferropnictides. Our findings suggest that this effect is due to the increased filling of the electronic 3d shell in the presence of significant Hund’s exchange coupling.

  3. S-layer proteins as a source of carotenoids: Isolation of the carotenoid cofactor deinoxanthin from its S-layer protein DR_2577.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farci, Domenica; Esposito, Francesca; El Alaoui, Sabah; Piano, Dario

    2017-09-01

    S-layers are regular paracrystalline arrays of proteins or glycoproteins that characterize the outer envelope of several bacteria and archaea. The auto-assembling properties of these proteins make them suitable for application in nanotechnologies. However, the bacterial cell wall and its S-layer are also an important binding sites for carotenoids and they may represent a potential source of these precious molecules for industrial purposes. The S-layer structure and its components were extensively studied in the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which for long time represented one of the model organisms in this respect. The protein DR_2577 has been shown to be one of the naturally over-expressed S-layer components in this bacterium. The present report describes a high scale purification procedure of this protein in solution. The purity of the samples, assayed by native and denaturing electrophoresis, showed how this method leads to a selective and high efficient recovery of the pure DR_2577. Recently, we have found that the deinoxanthin, a carotenoid typical of D. radiodurans, is a cofactor non covalently bound to the protein DR_2577. The pure DR_2577 samples may be precipitated or lyophilized and used as a source of the carotenoid cofactor deinoxanthin by an efficient extraction using organic solvents. The procedure described in this work may represent a general approach for the isolation of S-layer proteins and their carotenoids with potentials for industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Carotenoids from Haloarchaea and Their Potential in Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Baños, Montserrat; Garbayo, Inés; Vílchez, Carlos; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2015-08-25

    The production of pigments by halophilic archaea has been analysed during the last half a century. The main reasons that sustains this research are: (i) many haloarchaeal species possess high carotenoids production availability; (ii) downstream processes related to carotenoid isolation from haloarchaea is relatively quick, easy and cheap; (iii) carotenoids production by haloarchaea can be improved by genetic modification or even by modifying several cultivation aspects such as nutrition, growth pH, temperature, etc.; (iv) carotenoids are needed to support plant and animal life and human well-being; and (v) carotenoids are compounds highly demanded by pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food markets. Several studies about carotenoid production by haloarchaea have been reported so far, most of them focused on pigments isolation or carotenoids production under different culture conditions. However, the understanding of carotenoid metabolism, regulation, and roles of carotenoid derivatives in this group of extreme microorganisms remains mostly unrevealed. The uses of those haloarchaeal pigments have also been poorly explored. This work summarises what has been described so far about carotenoids production by haloarchaea and their potential uses in biotechnology and biomedicine. In particular, new scientific evidence of improved carotenoid production by one of the better known haloarchaeon (Haloferax mediterranei) is also discussed.

  5. Carotenoids from Haloarchaea and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Baños, Montserrat; Garbayo, Inés; Vílchez, Carlos; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    The production of pigments by halophilic archaea has been analysed during the last half a century. The main reasons that sustains this research are: (i) many haloarchaeal species possess high carotenoids production availability; (ii) downstream processes related to carotenoid isolation from haloarchaea is relatively quick, easy and cheap; (iii) carotenoids production by haloarchaea can be improved by genetic modification or even by modifying several cultivation aspects such as nutrition, growth pH, temperature, etc.; (iv) carotenoids are needed to support plant and animal life and human well-being; and (v) carotenoids are compounds highly demanded by pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food markets. Several studies about carotenoid production by haloarchaea have been reported so far, most of them focused on pigments isolation or carotenoids production under different culture conditions. However, the understanding of carotenoid metabolism, regulation, and roles of carotenoid derivatives in this group of extreme microorganisms remains mostly unrevealed. The uses of those haloarchaeal pigments have also been poorly explored. This work summarises what has been described so far about carotenoids production by haloarchaea and their potential uses in biotechnology and biomedicine. In particular, new scientific evidence of improved carotenoid production by one of the better known haloarchaeon (Haloferax mediterranei) is also discussed. PMID:26308012

  6. Patterns of serum carotenoid accumulation and skin colour variation in kestrel nestlings in relation to breeding conditions and different terms of carotenoid supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, Stefania; Costantini, David; Fanfani, Alberto; Tagliavini, James; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    Carotenoids are pigments synthesised by autotrophic organisms. For nestlings of raptorial species, which obtain carotenoids from the consumption of other heterotrophic species, the access to these pigments can be crucial. Carotenoids, indeed, have fundamental health maintenance functions, especially

  7. Structure activity relationship of pyridoxazinone substituted RHS analogs of oxabicyclooctane-linked 1,5-naphthyridinyl novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents (Part-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Meinke, Peter T; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Wei, Changqing; Liao, Yonggang; Peng, Xuanjia; Wang, Xiu; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Yajima, Masanobu; Shibue, Taku; Shibata, Takeshi; Ohata, Kohei; Nishimura, Akinori; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-09-01

    Oxabicyclooctane linked 1,5-naphthyridinyl-pyridoxazinones are novel broad-spectrum bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) targeting bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV at a site different than quinolones. Due to lack of cross-resistance to known antibiotics they present excellent opportunity to combat drug-resistant bacteria. A structure activity relationship of the pyridoxazinone moiety is described in this Letter. Chemical synthesis and activities of NBTIs with substitutions at C-3, C-4 and C-7 of the pyridoxazinone moiety with halogens, alkyl groups and methoxy group has been described. In addition, substitutions of the linker NH proton and its transformation into amide analogs of AM-8085 and AM-8191 have been reported. Fluoro, chloro, and methyl groups at C-3 of the pyridoxazinone moiety retained the potency and spectrum. In addition, a C-3 fluoro analog showed 4-fold better oral efficacy (ED50 3.9 mg/kg) as compared to the parent AM-8085 in a murine bacteremia model of infection of Staphylococcus aureus. Even modest polarity (e.g., methoxy) is not tolerated at C-3 of the pyridoxazinone unit. The basicity and NH group of the linker is important for the activity when CH2 is at the linker position-8. However, amides (with linker position-8 ketone) with a position-7 NH or N-methyl group retained potency and spectrum suggesting that neither basicity nor hydrogen-donor properties of the linker amide NH is essential for the activity. This would suggest likely an altered binding mode of the linker position-7,8 amide containing compounds. The amides showed highly improved hERG (functional IC50 >30 μM) profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Deconvolution Protocol for ChIP-Seq Reveals Analogous Enhancer Structures on the Mouse and Human Ribosomal RNA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Clement Mars

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and Massively Parallel Sequencing, or ChIP-Seq, has greatly advanced our genome-wide understanding of chromatin and enhancer structures. However, its resolution at any given genetic locus is limited by several factors. In applying ChIP-Seq to the study of the ribosomal RNA genes, we found that a major limitation to resolution was imposed by the underlying variability in sequence coverage that very often dominates the protein–DNA interaction profiles. Here, we describe a simple numerical deconvolution approach that, in large part, corrects for this variability, and significantly improves both the resolution and quantitation of protein–DNA interaction maps deduced from ChIP-Seq data. This approach has allowed us to determine the in vivo organization of the RNA polymerase I preinitiation complexes that form at the promoters and enhancers of the mouse (Mus musculus and human (Homo sapiens ribosomal RNA genes, and to reveal a phased binding of the HMG-box factor UBF across the rDNA. The data identify and map a “Spacer Promoter” and associated stalled polymerase in the intergenic spacer of the human ribosomal RNA genes, and reveal a very similar enhancer structure to that found in rodents and lower vertebrates.

  9. A Deconvolution Protocol for ChIP-Seq Reveals Analogous Enhancer Structures on the Mouse and Human Ribosomal RNA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Jean-Clement; Sabourin-Felix, Marianne; Tremblay, Michel G; Moss, Tom

    2018-01-04

    The combination of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and Massively Parallel Sequencing, or ChIP-Seq, has greatly advanced our genome-wide understanding of chromatin and enhancer structures. However, its resolution at any given genetic locus is limited by several factors. In applying ChIP-Seq to the study of the ribosomal RNA genes, we found that a major limitation to resolution was imposed by the underlying variability in sequence coverage that very often dominates the protein-DNA interaction profiles. Here, we describe a simple numerical deconvolution approach that, in large part, corrects for this variability, and significantly improves both the resolution and quantitation of protein-DNA interaction maps deduced from ChIP-Seq data. This approach has allowed us to determine the in vivo organization of the RNA polymerase I preinitiation complexes that form at the promoters and enhancers of the mouse ( Mus musculus ) and human ( Homo sapiens ) ribosomal RNA genes, and to reveal a phased binding of the HMG-box factor UBF across the rDNA. The data identify and map a "Spacer Promoter" and associated stalled polymerase in the intergenic spacer of the human ribosomal RNA genes, and reveal a very similar enhancer structure to that found in rodents and lower vertebrates. Copyright © 2018 Mars et al.

  10. Structural and Functional Analysis of G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibition by Paroxetine and a Rationally Designed Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Wu, Emily; Wilson, Michael W.; Singh, Puja; Larsen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we identified the serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine as an inhibitor of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) that improves cardiac performance in live animals. Paroxetine exhibits up to 50-fold selectivity for GRK2 versus other GRKs. A better understanding of the molecular basis of this selectivity is important for the development of even more selective and potent small molecule therapeutics and chemical genetic probes. We first sought to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying paroxetine selectivity among GRKs. We directly measured the KD for paroxetine and assessed its mechanism of inhibition for each of the GRK subfamilies and then determined the atomic structure of its complex with GRK1, the most weakly inhibited GRK tested. Our results suggest that the selectivity of paroxetine for GRK2 largely reflects its lower affinity for adenine nucleotides. Thus, stabilization of off-pathway conformational states unique to GRK2 will likely be key for the development of even more selective inhibitors. Next, we designed a benzolactam derivative of paroxetine that has optimized interactions with the hinge of the GRK2 kinase domain. The crystal structure of this compound in complex with GRK2 confirmed the predicted interactions. Although the benzolactam derivative did not significantly alter potency of inhibition among GRKs, it exhibited 20-fold lower inhibition of serotonin reuptake. However, there was an associated increase in the potency for inhibition of other AGC kinases, suggesting that the unconventional hydrogen bond formed by the benzodioxole ring of paroxetine is better accommodated by GRKs. PMID:24220010

  11. Structural and functional analysis of g protein-coupled receptor kinase inhibition by paroxetine and a rationally designed analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Kristoff T; Wu, Emily; Wilson, Michael W; Singh, Puja; Larsen, Scott D; Tesmer, John J G

    2014-02-01

    Recently we identified the serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine as an inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) that improves cardiac performance in live animals. Paroxetine exhibits up to 50-fold selectivity for GRK2 versus other GRKs. A better understanding of the molecular basis of this selectivity is important for the development of even more selective and potent small molecule therapeutics and chemical genetic probes. We first sought to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying paroxetine selectivity among GRKs. We directly measured the K(D) for paroxetine and assessed its mechanism of inhibition for each of the GRK subfamilies and then determined the atomic structure of its complex with GRK1, the most weakly inhibited GRK tested. Our results suggest that the selectivity of paroxetine for GRK2 largely reflects its lower affinity for adenine nucleotides. Thus, stabilization of off-pathway conformational states unique to GRK2 will likely be key for the development of even more selective inhibitors. Next, we designed a benzolactam derivative of paroxetine that has optimized interactions with the hinge of the GRK2 kinase domain. The crystal structure of this compound in complex with GRK2 confirmed the predicted interactions. Although the benzolactam derivative did not significantly alter potency of inhibition among GRKs, it exhibited 20-fold lower inhibition of serotonin reuptake. However, there was an associated increase in the potency for inhibition of other AGC kinases, suggesting that the unconventional hydrogen bond formed by the benzodioxole ring of paroxetine is better accommodated by GRKs.

  12. Agonistic and antagonistic activities of bacterially derived Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A: comparison with activities of synthetic material of the proposed structure and analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J R; Christ, W J; Bristol, J R; Kawata, T; Rossignol, D P

    1995-03-01

    Lipid A from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLA) has been previously shown to antagonize many of the effects of endotoxins from more pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. We have reported on the synthesis of the proposed structure of RSLA and determined that bacterially derived RSLA is not identical to its proposed structure (W.J. Christ, P. D. McGuinness, O. Asano, Y. Wang, M. A. Mullarkey, M. Perez, L. D. Hawkins, T. A. Blythe, G. R. Dubuc, and A. L. Robidoux, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116:3637-3638, 1994). Here we report results of analyzing the antagonistic and agonistic activities of bacterially derived RSLA in comparison with the activities of chemically synthesized material of the proposed structure of RSLA and analogs. Results indicated that all compounds were approximately equally potent at inhibiting endotoxin-induced release of tumor necrosis factor alpha from human monocytes and human whole blood as well as endotoxin-induced generation of nitric oxide in murine macrophages. In addition, all compounds were of equivalent potencies at inhibiting the binding of 125I-labelled lipopolysaccharide derivatized with 2-(p-azido-salicylamido) ethyl-1-3'-dithiopropionate to murine macrophages. Higher concentrations of bacterially derived RSLA (10 to 100 microM) were agonistic in human and murine assays. In gamma interferon-treated murine macrophages, agonism was exhibited at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In contrast, all synthetic materials were either dramatically less agonistic or devoid of agonistic activity when tested at concentrations as high as 100 microM. It is possible either that bacterially derived RSLA contains a small amount of a highly agonistic impurity or that the agonistic activity of RSLA is intrinsic to its molecular structure. In either case, these biological results support our previous report concluding that biologically derived RSLA is not identical to synthetic material of its proposed structure.

  13. What are carotenoids signaling? Immunostimulatory effects of dietary vitamin E, but not of carotenoids, in Iberian green lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopena, Renata; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    In spite that carotenoid-based sexual ornaments are one of the most popular research topics in sexual selection of animals, the antioxidant and immunostimulatory role of carotenoids, presumably signaled by these colorful ornaments, is still controversial. It has been suggested that the function of carotenoids might not be as an antioxidant per se, but that colorful carotenoids may indirectly reflect the levels of nonpigmentary antioxidants, such as melatonin or vitamin E. We experimentally fed male Iberian green lizards ( Lacerta schreiberi) additional carotenoids or vitamin E alone, or a combination of carotenoids and vitamin E dissolved in soybean oil, whereas a control group only received soybean oil. We examined the effects of the dietary supplementations on phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced skin-swelling immune response and body condition. Lizards that were supplemented with vitamin E alone or a combination of vitamin E and carotenoids had greater immune responses than control lizards, but animals supplemented with carotenoids alone had lower immune responses than lizards supplemented with vitamin E and did not differ from control lizards. These results support the hypothesis that carotenoids in green lizards are not effective as immunostimulants, but that they may be visually signaling the immunostimulatory effects of non-pigmentary vitamin E. In contrast, lizards supplemented with carotenoids alone have higher body condition gains than lizards in the other experimental groups, suggesting that carotenoids may be still important to improve condition.

  14. Differential bioavailability, clearance, and tissue distribution of the acyclic tomato carotenoids lycopene and phytoene in mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy Engelmann; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2013-12-01

    Lycopene (LYC) is the major tomato carotenoid and is the focus of substantial research. Phytoene (PE), a minor tomato carotenoid, is found in human blood and tissues in similar concentrations to LYC. To determine which metabolic differences underlie this phenomenon, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus, n = 56) were fed control or tomato powder (TP)-containing diets (to establish steady-state serum and tissue carotenoid concentrations similar to tomato-fed humans) for 26 d. The TP-fed gerbils were then provided either a single, oral, cottonseed oil (CO) vehicle dose and tissues were collected at 6 h or they were provided unlabeled PE or LYC in CO and tissues were evaluated at 6, 12, or 24 h. In vehicle-dosed, TP-fed gerbils, LYC was the major carotenoid (≥ 55% carotenoids) in liver, spleen, testes, and the prostate-seminal vesicle complex, whereas PE was the major serum and adipose carotenoid (≥ 37% total carotenoid) and phytofluene was the major carotenoid (≥ 38%) in adrenals and lungs. PE dosing increased hepatic, splenic, and serum PE concentrations compared with vehicle dosing (P < 0.05) from 6 to 24 h, whereas LYC dosing increased only serum LYC at 6 and 12 h (P < 0.05) compared with vehicle dosing. This suggested PE was more bioavailable and cleared more slowly than LYC. To precisely track absorptive and distributive differences, (14)C-PE or (14)C-LYC (n = 2/group) was provided to TP-fed gerbils. Bioavailability assessed by carcass (14)C-content was 23% for PE and 8% for LYC. Nearly every extra-hepatic tissue accumulated greater dose radioactivity after (14)C-PE than (14)C-LYC dosing. Thus, LYC and PE, which structurally differ only by saturation, pharmacokinetically differ in bioavailability, tissue deposition, and clearance.

  15. Components of Geometric Analogy Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Timothy M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Adults' geometric analogy solution was investigated as a function of systematic variations in the information structure of items. Latency data from verification of true and false items were recorded. A model incorporating assumptions about the form of item representation, working memory factors, and processing components and strategies was…

  16. Critical structural and functional roles for the N-terminal insertion sequence in surfactant protein B analogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J Walther

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein B (SP-B; 79 residues belongs to the saposin protein superfamily, and plays functional roles in lung surfactant. The disulfide cross-linked, N- and C-terminal domains of SP-B have been theoretically predicted to fold as charged, amphipathic helices, suggesting their participation in surfactant activities. Earlier structural studies with Mini-B, a disulfide-linked construct based on the N- and C-terminal regions of SP-B (i.e., approximately residues 8-25 and 63-78, confirmed that these neighboring domains are helical; moreover, Mini-B retains critical in vitro and in vivo surfactant functions of the native protein. Here, we perform similar analyses on a Super Mini-B construct that has native SP-B residues (1-7 attached to the N-terminus of Mini-B, to test whether the N-terminal sequence is also involved in surfactant activity.FTIR spectra of Mini-B and Super Mini-B in either lipids or lipid-mimics indicated that these peptides share similar conformations, with primary alpha-helix and secondary beta-sheet and loop-turns. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated that Super Mini-B was dimeric in SDS detergent-polyacrylamide, while Mini-B was monomeric. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR, predictive aggregation algorithms, and molecular dynamics (MD and docking simulations further suggested a preliminary model for dimeric Super Mini-B, in which monomers self-associate to form a dimer peptide with a "saposin-like" fold. Similar to native SP-B, both Mini-B and Super Mini-B exhibit in vitro activity with spread films showing near-zero minimum surface tension during cycling using captive bubble surfactometry. In vivo, Super Mini-B demonstrates oxygenation and dynamic compliance that are greater than Mini-B and compare favorably to full-length SP-B.Super Mini-B shows enhanced surfactant activity, probably due to the self-assembly of monomer peptide into dimer Super Mini-B that mimics the functions and putative structure of native SP-B.

  17. Analog and hybrid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Hyndman, D E

    2013-01-01

    Analog and Hybrid Computing focuses on the operations of analog and hybrid computers. The book first outlines the history of computing devices that influenced the creation of analog and digital computers. The types of problems to be solved on computers, computing systems, and digital computers are discussed. The text looks at the theory and operation of electronic analog computers, including linear and non-linear computing units and use of analog computers as operational amplifiers. The monograph examines the preparation of problems to be deciphered on computers. Flow diagrams, methods of ampl

  18. Mate choice for a male carotenoid-based ornament is linked to female dietary carotenoid intake and accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toomey Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coevolution of male traits and female mate preferences has led to the elaboration and diversification of sexually selected traits; however the mechanisms that mediate trait-preference coevolution are largely unknown. Carotenoid acquisition and accumulation are key determinants of the expression of male sexually selected carotenoid-based coloration and a primary mechanism maintaining the honest information content of these signals. Carotenoids also influence female health and reproduction in ways that may alter the costs and benefits of mate choice behaviours and thus provide a potential biochemical link between the expression of male traits and female preferences. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated the dietary carotenoid levels of captive female house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus and assessed their mate choice behavior in response to color-manipulated male finches. Results Females preferred to associate with red males, but carotenoid supplementation did not influence the direction or strength of this preference. Females receiving a low-carotenoid diet were less responsive to males in general, and discrimination among the colorful males was positively linked to female plasma carotenoid levels at the beginning of the study when the diet of all birds was carotenoid-limited. Conclusions Although female preference for red males was not influenced by carotenoid intake, changes in mating responsiveness and discrimination linked to female carotenoid status may alter how this preference is translated into choice. The reddest males, with the most carotenoid rich plumage, tend to pair early in the breeding season. If carotenoid-related variations in female choice behaviour shift the timing of pairing, then they have the potential to promote assortative mating by carotenoid status and drive the evolution of carotenoid-based male plumage coloration.

  19. Regulation of carotenoid accumulation and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in citrus juice sacs in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Kato, Masaya; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Takagi, Toshihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Nesumi, Hirohisa

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms regulating carotenoid accumulation in citrus, a culture system was set up in vitro with juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.), Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck), and Lisbon lemon (Citrus limon Burm.f.). The juice sacs of all the three varieties enlarged gradually with carotenoid accumulation. The changing patterns of carotenoid content and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in juice sacs in vitro were similar to those ripening on trees in the three varieties. Using this system, the changes in the carotenoid content and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in response to environmental stimuli were investigated. The results showed that carotenoid accumulation was induced by blue light treatment, but was not affected by red light treatment in the three varieties. Different regulation of CitPSY expression, which was up-regulated by blue light while unaffected by red light, led to different changes in carotenoid content in response to these two treatments in Satsuma mandarin and Valencia orange. In all three varieties, increases in carotenoid content were observed with sucrose and mannitol treatments. However, the accumulation of carotenoid in the two treatments was regulated by distinct mechanisms at the transcriptional level. With abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, the expression of the genes investigated in this study was up-regulated in Satsuma mandarin and Lisbon lemon, indicating that ABA induced its own biosynthesis at the transcriptional level. This feedback regulation of ABA led to decreases in carotenoid content. With gibberellin (GA) treatment, carotenoid content was significantly decreased in the three varieties. Changes in the expression of genes related to carotenoid metabolism varied among the three varieties in response to GA treatment. These results provided insights into improving carotenoid content and composition in citrus during fruit

  20. Mate choice for a male carotenoid-based ornament is linked to female dietary carotenoid intake and accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The coevolution of male traits and female mate preferences has led to the elaboration and diversification of sexually selected traits; however the mechanisms that mediate trait-preference coevolution are largely unknown. Carotenoid acquisition and accumulation are key determinants of the expression of male sexually selected carotenoid-based coloration and a primary mechanism maintaining the honest information content of these signals. Carotenoids also influence female health and reproduction in ways that may alter the costs and benefits of mate choice behaviours and thus provide a potential biochemical link between the expression of male traits and female preferences. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated the dietary carotenoid levels of captive female house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) and assessed their mate choice behavior in response to color-manipulated male finches. Results Females preferred to associate with red males, but carotenoid supplementation did not influence the direction or strength of this preference. Females receiving a low-carotenoid diet were less responsive to males in general, and discrimination among the colorful males was positively linked to female plasma carotenoid levels at the beginning of the study when the diet of all birds was carotenoid-limited. Conclusions Although female preference for red males was not influenced by carotenoid intake, changes in mating responsiveness and discrimination linked to female carotenoid status may alter how this preference is translated into choice. The reddest males, with the most carotenoid rich plumage, tend to pair early in the breeding season. If carotenoid-related variations in female choice behaviour shift the timing of pairing, then they have the potential to promote assortative mating by carotenoid status and drive the evolution of carotenoid-based male plumage coloration. PMID:22233462

  1. Carotenoids intake and asthma prevalence in Thai children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguansak Rerksuppaphol

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several antioxidant nutrients have been described to inversely correlate with asthma. In order to quantify the intake of these substances, it is possible to measure skin levels by Raman spectroscopy, a novel non-invasive technique that can also be used in children. This cross-sectional school-based study involved 423 children from a rural area of Thailand. Asthmatic children were diagnosed according to a Health Interview for Asthma Control questionnaire. Skin carotenoid levels were measured with Raman spectroscopy. Demographic data were obtained by directly interviewing children and their parents, whereas anthropometric parameters were measured by trained staff. Intake of carotenoids, vitamin A and C were evaluated by a food frequency questionnaire. Overall incidence of asthma in Thai schoolchildren (aged 3.5-17.8 years was 17.3%. There was no significant difference in dietary intake of carotenoids and vitamin A and C, and skin carotenoid level between asthmatic and nonasthmatic children. Skin carotenoid level significantly correlated with all carotenoids and vitamin A intake (P<0.05. Carotenoids and vitamin A and C intakes, and skin carotenoid levels were not associated with the risk of asthma in Thai children. Skin carotenoids correlated with all carotenoids and vitamin A intake in mild to moderate degrees. Raman spectroscopy was confirmed to be a useful tool to determine antioxidant skin levels.

  2. Structure and kinematics of segment-scale crustal accretion processes in Iceland and implications for analogous mid-ocean ridge systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Drew Lorenz

    2011-12-01

    s of km 'rift jumps' as is conventional models suggest. The structure relationships we define in the Icelandic crust are similar to that of other magmatic rift systems including Mid-Ocean Ridges, continental rifts and ancient volcanic rift margins. As such, we suggest that many of the crustal accretion processes we have inferred from Icelandic data may be important in these analogous environments as well.

  3. Physical barriers to carotenoid bioaccessibility. Ultrastructure survey of chromoplast and cell wall morphology in nine carotenoid-containing fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Jennifer; Holzenburg, Andreas; King, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    The ultrastructural characterisation of cellular components is a key element in revealing the bases for differences in nutrient bioaccessibility among fruits and vegetables and their derived products. Together, cell walls and chromoplasts constitute the two major physical barriers to carotenoid release from the food matrix (structure) during digestion. In general, larger cells with thinner cell walls are most likely to fail under mechanical pressure. In relation to chromoplasts, the substructures plastoglobuli, crystals and membranes give decreasing rates of carotenoid solubilisation when exposed to digestive forces. This paper describes cell wall and chromoplast structures in nine carotenoid-storing raw fruits and vegetables. Watermelon and melon cells were shown to have the largest cells concomitant with thin, non-fibrous cell walls, while carrot, hypodermal grapefruit and sweet potato cells were smallest with fibrous or dense cell walls. Mango fruit showed the highest proportion of globules to other substructures. Carrot, papaya and tomato contained many crystalline structures. Finally, watermelon, mango and butternut squash developed a high proportion of membranous structures. A more precise description of the physical characteristics of foods that stand as barriers to bioaccessibility can help in understanding which are more or less inhibitory for particular foods. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Importance of the tryptophans of gramicidin for its lipid structure modulating activity in lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine model membranes. A comparative study employing gramicidin analogs and a synthetic α-helical hydrophobic polypeptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aranda, F.J.; Killian, J.A.; Kruijff, B. de

    1987-01-01

    The importance of the tryptophan residues of gramicidin for the lipid structure modulating activity of this pentadecapeptide was investigated by studying the interaction of gramicidin analogs A, B, C (which have a tryptophan, phenylalanine and tyrosine in position 11, respectively) and

  5. Potent antidiuretic agonists, deamino-vasopressin and desmopressin, and their inverso analogs: NMR structure and interactions with micellar and liposomic models of cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubecka, Emilia A; Sikorska, Emilia; Sobolewski, Dariusz; Prahl, Adam; Slaninová, Jiřina; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2016-05-01

    Deamination of vasopressin (AVP) enhances its antidiuretic activity. Moreover, introduction of D-Arg8 instead of its L enantiomer in deamino-vasopressin (dAVP) results in an extremely potent and selective antidiuretic agonist - desmopressin (dDAVP). In this study we describe the synthesis, pharmacological properties and structures of these two potent antidiuretic agonists, and their inverso analogs. The structures of the peptides are studied in micellar and liposomic models of cell membrane using CD spectroscopy. Additionally, three-dimensional structures in mixed anionic-zwitterionic micelles are obtained using NMR spectroscopy supported by molecular dynamics simulations. Our conformational studies have shown that desmopressin in a membrane mimicking environment adopts one of the characteristic for vasopressin-like peptides β-turn - in position 3,4. Furthermore, dDAVP shows the tendency to create a β-turn in the Cys6-Gly9 C-tail, considered to be important for the antidiuretic activity, and also some tendency to adopt a 5,6 β-turn. In desmopressin, in contrast to the native vasopressin, deamino-vasopressin and [D-Arg8]-vasopressin (DAVP), the Arg8 side chain, crucial for the pressor and antidiuretic activities, is very well exposed for interaction with the receptor, whereas Gly9, crucial for the pressor and uterotonic activities, is situated together with the C-terminal amide group very close to the tocin ring. The arrangements of the Gln4 and Asn5 side chains, being crucial for OT activity, also differ in desmopressin as compared to those of AVP, dAVP and DAVP. These differences in arrangement of the important for activities side chains are likely to explain extremely potent and selective antidiuretic activities of desmopressin. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 245-259, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Modification of carotenoid levels by abscission agents and expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in 'valencia' sweet orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferez, Fernando; Pozo, Luis V; Rouseff, Russell R; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2013-03-27

    The effect of 5-chloro-3-methyl-4-nitro-1H-pyrazole (CMNP) and ethephon on peel color, flavedo carotenoid gene expression, and carotenoid accumulation was investigated in mature 'Valencia' orange ( Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) fruit flavedo at three maturation stages. Abscission agent application altered peel color. CMNP was more effective than ethephon in promoting green-to-red (a) and blue-to-yellow (b) color at the middle and late maturation stages and total carotenoid changes at all maturation stages. Altered flow of carotenoid precursors during maturation due to abscission agents was suggested by changes in phytoene desaturase (Pds) and ζ-carotene desaturase (Zds) gene expression. However, each abscission agent affected downstream expression differentially. Ethephon application increased β-carotene hydroxilase (β-Chx) transcript accumulation 12-fold as maturation advanced from the early to middle and late stages. CMNP markedly increased β- and ε-lycopene cyclase (Lcy) transcript accumulation 45- and 15-fold, respectively, at midmaturation. Patterns of carotenoid accumulation in flavedo were supported in part by gene expression changes. CMNP caused greater accumulation of total flavedo carotenoids at all maturation stages when compared with ethephon or controls. In general, CMNP treatment increased total red carotenoids more than ethephon or the control but decreased total yellow carotenoids at each maturation stage. In control fruit flavedo, total red carotenoids increased and yellow carotenoids decreased as maturation progressed. Trends in total red carotenoids during maturation were consistent with measured a values. Changes in carotenoid accumulation and expression patterns in flavedo suggest that regulation of carotenoid accumulation is under transcriptional, translational, and post-translational control.

  7. Carotenoid extraction methods: A review of recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Ramesh Kumar; Keum, Young-Soo

    2018-02-01

    The versatile use of carotenoids in feed, food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries has emphasized the optimization of extraction methods to obtain the highest recovery. The choice of method for carotenoid extraction from food matrices is crucial, owing to the presence of diverse carotenoids with varied levels of polarity, and the presence of various physical and chemical barriers in the food matrices. This review highlights the theoretical aspects and recent developments of various conventional and nonconventional methods used for the extraction of carotenoids, including ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE), pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Recent applications of non-toxic and environmentally safe solvents (green solvents) and ionic liquids (IL) for carotenoid extraction are also described. Additionally, future research challenges in the context of carotenoids extractions are also identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of the inherited lithospheric structure on the interaction between the Kenyan and Ethiopian rifts across the Turkana depression: analog and numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Giacomo; Brune, Sascha; Ranalli, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Rifting processes result from the application of extensional stresses to a pre-deformed, and thus already structured, anisotropic lithosphere; consequently, the pre-rift lithospheric rheological structure and its along-axis variations play a major role in controlling the evolution and architecture of continental rifts. The East African Rift is a classic example of this process. The rift system developed within a region that has experienced several deformation events, which have given rise to significant variations in the rheological structure of the lithosphere. These variations -in turn- have played a major role on rift evolution, as clearly testified by the localisation and propagation of major rift segments within weak Proterozoic mobile belts surrounding cratonic areas. Linkage and mechanical interaction between adjacent rift segments typically occurred in correspondence to transverse pre-existing fabrics, where structurally complex areas (transfer zones) allowed significant along-axis variations in subsidence of grabens and elevation of uplifted flanks. One of these complex areas is the Turkana depression where the Ethiopian and Kenyan rifts interact. The region is characterised by anomalous morphology and distribution of deformation with respect to the rift valleys in Kenya and Ethiopia. In this work we investigate whether these anomalies result from the presence of a pre-existing Mesozoic graben, transverse to the trend of the rift valleys and characterized by thin crust and lithosphere. To this aim, we integrate crustal-scale, isothermal analog experiments with lithospheric-scale, thermo-mechanical numerical models. The two different methodologies generate very similar results, reproducing the along-axis transition from narrow rift valleys in Ethiopia/Kenya to a distributed deformation within the Turkana depression. Modeling results indicate that this variation results from the inherited distribution of lithospheric strength and -in particular- from the

  9. Dietary carotenoids in normal and pathological tissues of corpus uteri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Wołczyński

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids and retinyl esters are the source of vitamin A in the human body and its natural derivatives takes part in the regulation of cell replication and differentiation in the human endometrium, may induce the leiomyoma growth and has a role in differentiation of endometrial adenocarcinoma. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the presence of carotenoids in tissues from the normal uterus and from various tumors of the uterine corpus, as well as to compare the total content, major carotenoids and % of carotenoids belonging to the provitamin A group between the tissues examined. Using three independent methods of chromatography (CC, TLC, HPLC we analysed 140 human samples. We identified 13 carotenoids belonging to the eg. provitamin A group and epoxy carotenoids. In all the samples beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, neoxanthin, violaxanthin and mutatoxanthin were isolated. In normal tissues, the mean carotenoid content was the highest in the follicular phase endometrium (9.9 microg/g, while the highest percentage of carotenoids belonging to provitamin A group was found in the luteal phase (18.2%. In the pathological group, the highest mean values were demonstrated for epithelial lesions (8.0 microg/g, and within this group - in endometrioid adenocarcinoma (10.8 microg/g. In both groups, violaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein epoxide and mutatoxanthin were the predominant carotenoids. We have demonstrated that all uterine tissues show a concentration of beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin, being the source of vitamin A. The highest total values of carotenoids obtained in the group of endometrioid adenocarcinoma seem to confirm certain enzymatic defects in carotenoid metabolism in the course of the neoplastic process or some metabolic modifications. The finding of astaxanthin - the major antioxidant among carotenoids - in 63% of tissues examined is also significant.

  10. Analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Dobkin, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Analog circuit and system design today is more essential than ever before. With the growth of digital systems, wireless communications, complex industrial and automotive systems, designers are being challenged to develop sophisticated analog solutions. This comprehensive source book of circuit design solutions aids engineers with elegant and practical design techniques that focus on common analog challenges. The book's in-depth application examples provide insight into circuit design and application solutions that you can apply in today's demanding designs. <

  11. A Carotenoid Health Index Based on Plasma Carotenoids and Health Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Donaldson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available While there have been many studies on health outcomes that have included measurements of plasma carotenoids, this data has not been reviewed and assembled into a useful form. In this review sixty-two studies of plasma carotenoids and health outcomes, mostly prospective cohort studies or population-based case-control studies, are analyzed together to establish a carotenoid health index. Five cutoff points are established across the percentiles of carotenoid concentrations in populations, from the tenth to ninetieth percentile. The cutoff points (mean ± standard error of the mean are 1.11 ± 0.08, 1.47 ± 0.08, 1.89 ± 0.08, 2.52 ± 0.13, and 3.07 ± 0.20 µM. For all cause mortality there seems to be a low threshold effect with protection above every cutoff point but the lowest. But for metabolic syndrome and cancer outcomes there tends to be significant positive health outcomes only above the higher cutoff points, perhaps as a triage effect. Based on this data a carotenoid health index is proposed with risk categories as follows: very high risk: < 1 µM, high risk: 1–1.5 µM, moderate risk: 1.5–2.5 µM, low risk: 2.5–4 µM, and very low risk: > 4 µM. Over 95 percent of the USA population falls into the moderate or high risk category of the carotenoid health index.

  12. Effects of carotenoids from lucerne, marigold and tomato on egg yolk pigmentation and carotenoid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadas, F; Grammenidis, E; Surai, P F; Acamovic, T; Sparks, N H C

    2006-10-01

    1. The effects of various sources of natural carotenoids (Px alfalfa concentrate, tomato powder and marigold extract) as feed additives in quail diets on egg yolk pigmentation and carotenoid composition were investigated. 2. Adult Japanese quail were fed one of 5 different diets for 23 d: three diets each contained Px alfalfa concentrate (PX) or tomato powder (TP) or marigold extract (MG), one diet contained marigold extract and tomato powder (MG + TP) and a control diet (wheat/barley based) was low in carotenoid. All products were added at a rate of 2%, apart from marigold extract which was added at a rate of 0.2%. 3. Visual assessment of yolk colour (Roche colour fan) showed a stabilised yolk colour of 1.6, 7.7, 8.5, 8.8 and 10.6 for the control, PX, TP, MG and MG + TP treatments, respectively. 4. The total carotenoid concentration of the egg yolks were 2.2, 22.4, 4.1, 39.0 and 37.7 microg/g for the experimental groups fed the following diets: control, PX, TP, MG and MG + TP, respectively. Deposition of retinol, alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol in the egg yolk was unaffected by treatments. 5. Lutein was shown to be the major carotenoid in the egg yolk, comprising 1.65, 17.97, 2.03, 31.14 and 28.57 microg/g in control, PX, TP, MG and MG + TP, respectively. Inclusion of TP in the quail diet resulted in lycopene transfer to the egg. 6. It was concluded that, in comparison with the control group, there was an increase in the yolk concentrations of lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene in eggs produced by female quail fed diets supplemented with natural carotenoids.

  13. Subcellular Localization of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Zhang

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis pathway of carotenoids in cyanobacteria is partly described. However, the subcellular localization of individual steps is so far unknown. Carotenoid analysis of different membrane subfractions in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 shows that "light" plasma membranes have a high carotenoid/protein ratio, when compared to "heavier" plasma membranes or thylakoids. The localization of CrtQ and CrtO, two well-defined carotenoid synthesis pathway enzymes in Synechocystis, was studied by epitope tagging and western blots. Both enzymes are locally more abundant in plasma membranes than in thylakoids, implying that the plasma membrane has higher synthesis rates of β-carotene precursor molecules and echinenone.

  14. Incorporation of carotenoids from paprika oleoresin into human chylomicrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Martin, Hans D; Sies, Helmut; Stahl, Wilhelm

    2003-06-01

    The intake of a carotenoid-rich diet is epidemiologically related to a lower risk for different chronic disorders like cardiovascular disease, some types of cancer or age-related macular degeneration. Red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and its dietary products contain a variety of carotenoids, which may contribute to the carotenoid pattern of human blood and tissues. The objective of the present study was to assess the availability of carotenoids from paprika oleoresin, including zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, beta-carotene and the paprika-specific oxocarotenoids capsanthin and capsorubin. After overnight fasting, the volunteers (n 9) ingested a single dose of the paprika oleoresin containing 6.4 mg zeaxanthin, 4.2 mg beta-cryptoxanthin, 6.2 mg beta-carotene, 35.0 mg capsanthin and 2.0 mg capsorubin. At different time points the carotenoid pattern in the chylomicron fraction was analysed to evaluate carotenoid absorption. From the major carotenoids present in the paprika oleoresin only zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin and beta-carotene were detectable in considerable amounts. Although the xanthophylls in paprika oleoresin were mainly present as mono- or di-esters, only free zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin were found in human samples. The bioavailability of the pepper-specific carotenoids capsanthin and capsorubin from paprika oleoresin is very low. However, oleoresin is a suitable source for the provitamin A carotenoids beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin and the macular pigment zeaxanthin.

  15. Reversed-phase HPLC retention data in correlation studies with in lipophilicity molecular descriptors of carotenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Podunavac-Kuzmanović Sanja O.; Jevrić Lidija R.; Tepić Aleksandra N.; Šumić Zdravko

    2013-01-01

    Influence of chemical structure on the lipophilicity of isolated free carotenoids from paprika oleoresin has been studied by QSRR approach (Quantitative structure-retention relationship). The chromatographic behavior of these compounds was investigated by using reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (RP HPLC). Retention mechanism has been determined using the following mobile phase: acetone -water, on reversed - phase column (SB-C18). A variety ...

  16. Combinatorial Biosynthesis of Novel Multi-Hydroxy Carotenoids in the Red Yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Pollmann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The red yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is an established platform for the synthesis of carotenoids. It was used for the generation of novel multi oxygenated carotenoid structures. This was achieved by a combinatorial approach starting with the selection of a β-carotene accumulating mutant, stepwise pathway engineering by integration of three microbial genes into the genome and finally the chemical reduction of the resulting 4,4’-diketo-nostoxanthin (2,3,2’,3’-tetrahydroxy-4,4’-diketo-β-carotene and 4-keto-nostoxanthin (2,3,2’,3’-tetrahydroxy-4-monoketo-β-carotene. Both keto carotenoids and the resulting 4,4’-dihydroxy-nostoxanthin (2,3,4,2’,3’,4’-hexahydroxy-β-carotene and 4-hydroxy-nostoxanthin (2,3,4,2’3’-pentahydroxy-β-carotene were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Their molecular masses and fragmentation patterns allowed the unequivocal identification of all four carotenoids.

  17. Effects of experimental brood size manipulation and gender on carotenoid levels of Eurasian Kestrels Falco tinnunculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laaksonen, T.; Negro, J.J.; Lyytinen, S.; Valkama, J.; Ots, I.; Korpimäki, E.

    2008-01-01

    Animals use carotenoid-pigments for coloration, as antioxidants and as enhancers of the immune system. Carotenoid-dependent colours can thus signal individual quality and carotenoids have also been suggested to mediate life-history trade-offs.

  18. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis and structure-activity studies on novel analogs of human growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) with enhanced inhibitory activities on tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarandi, Marta; Cai, Renzhi; Kovacs, Magdolna; Popovics, Petra; Szalontay, Luca; Cui, Tengjiao; Sha, Wei; Jaszberenyi, Miklos; Varga, Jozsef; Zhang, XianYang; Block, Norman L; Rick, Ferenc G; Halmos, Gabor; Schally, Andrew V

    2017-03-01

    The syntheses and biological evaluations of new GHRH analogs of Miami (MIA) series with greatly increased anticancer activity are described. In the design and synthesis of these analogs, the following previous substitutions were conserved: D-Arg2, Har9, Abu15, and Nle27. Most new analogs had Ala at position 8. Since replacements of both Lys12 and Lys21 with Orn increased resistance against enzymatic degradation, these modifications were kept. The substitutions of Arg at both positions 11 and 20 by His were also conserved. We kept D-Arg28, Har29 -NH2 at the C-terminus or inserted Agm or 12-amino dodecanoic acid amide at position 30. We incorporated pentafluoro-Phe (Fpa5), instead of Cpa, at position 6 and Tyr(Me) at position 10 and ω-amino acids at N-terminus of some analogs. These GHRH analogs were prepared by solid-phase methodology and purified by HPLC. The evaluation of the activity of the analogs on GH release was carried out in vitro on rat pituitaries and in vivo in male rats. Receptor binding affinities were measured in vitro by the competitive binding analysis. The inhibitory activity of the analogs on tumor proliferation in vitro was tested in several human cancer cell lines such as HEC-1A endometrial adenocarcinoma, HCT-15 colorectal adenocarcinoma, and LNCaP prostatic carcinoma. For in vivo tests, various cell lines including PC-3 prostate cancer, HEC-1A endometrial adenocarcinoma, HT diffuse mixed β cell lymphoma, and ACHN renal cell carcinoma cell lines were xenografted into nude mice and treated subcutaneously with GHRH antagonists at doses of 1-5μg/day. Analogs MIA-602, MIA-604, MIA-610, and MIA-640 showed the highest binding affinities, 30, 58, 48, and 73 times higher respectively, than GHRH (1-29) NH2. Treatment of LNCaP and HCT-15 cells with 5μM MIA-602 or MIA-690 decreased proliferation by 40%-80%. In accord with previous tests in various human cancer lines, analog MIA-602 showed high inhibitory activity in vivo on growth of PC-3 prostate

  20. Structure of a Dihydroxycoumarin Active-Site Inhibitor in Complex with the RNase H Domain of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Structure-Activity Analysis of Inhibitor Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Myshakina, Nataliya S.; Ilina, Tatiana; Van Ry, Alexander; Ho, William C.; Parniak, Michael A.; Arnold, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    HIV encodes four essential enzymes: protease, integrase, reverse transcriptase (RT) associated DNA polymerase, and RT-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H). Current clinically approved anti-AIDS drugs target all HIV enzymatic activities except RNase H, which has proven to be a very difficult target for HIV drug discovery. Our high-throughput screening activities identified the dihydroxycoumarin compound F3284-8495 as a specific inhibitor of RT RNase H, with low micromolar potency in vitro. Optimization of inhibitory potency can be facilitated by structural information about inhibitor-target binding. Here, we report the crystal structure of F3284-8495 bound to the active site of an isolated RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT at a resolution limit of 1.71 Å. From predictions based on this structure, compounds were obtained that showed improved inhibitory activity. Computational analysis suggested structural alterations that could provide additional interactions with RT and thus improve inhibitory potency. These studies established proof-of-concept that F3284-8495 could be used as a favorable chemical scaffold for development of HIV RNase H inhibitors. PMID:24840303

  1. Analogies in biology textbooks in zoology teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Cézar Seiffert Santos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The biologic structures of living creatures are of difficult understanding for students, because they are usually unknown by those, in needs of strategic didactics in order to facilitate the student understanding. There are several strategies and methods for teaching, such as, analogies, metaphors, descriptions, among others. In this article we aim to identify, assess and classify the analogies used in the Higher School Biology textbooks, commonly used in Public State Schools of Manaus – AM, related to the zoology theme. The methodological procedure includes: a analysis of the whole zoological content of the most used textbooks in the public state network of Amazonas throughout the year; b three didactic textbooks have been specifically analyzed in order to specify the class taxon of “Fish” for the comparison of possible variations of types and quantities of analogies. The adopted classification of analogies was of Curtis & Reigeluth (1984 and the model of enriching analysis was according to the TWA Glynn model (Harrison & Treagust, 1993. It has been concluded that the use of analogies is greater in the content of invertebrates than that of vertebrates. Most Analogies are presented in a simple and direct manner, comparing structures, concrete to concrete, and of verbal mediation, almost nothing is presented in a diverse and heuristic manner of Zoology content on the LD. The development of limits of comparison and reflexion about the analogies was rare, only the presentation of the analogue and the target of analogy occurred.

  2. The New Carotenoid Pigment Moraxanthin Is Associated with Toxic Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Mangoni

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The new pigment “moraxanthin” was found in natural samples from a fish mortality site in the Inland Bays of Delaware, USA. Pure cultures of the species, tentatively named Chattonella cf. verruculosa, and natural samples contained this pigment as a dominant carotenoid. The pigment, obtained from a 10 L culture of C. cf. verruculosa, was isolated and harvested by HPLC and its structure determined from MS and 1D- and 2D-NMR. The data identified this pigment as a new acylated form of vaucheriaxanthin called moraxanthin after the berry like algal cell. Its presence in pure cultures and in natural bloom samples indicates that moraxanthin is specific to C. cf. verruculosa and can be used as a marker of its presence when HPLC is used to analyze natural blooms samples.

  3. Digital to Analog Converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Jan R.; Annema, Anne J.; van den Boom, Jeroen M.; Dijkmans, Eise C.

    2001-01-01

    A digital to analog converter (DAC) for converting a digital signal (DS) having a maximum voltage range which corresponds to a first supply voltage (UL) into an analog signal (UOUT) having a maximum voltage range which corresponds to a second supply voltage (UH). The first supply voltage (UL) is

  4. Digital to Analog Converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Jan R.; Annema, Anne J.; van den Boom, Jeroen M.; Dijkmans, Eise C.

    2006-01-01

    A digital to analog converter (DAC) for converting a digital signal (DS) having a maximum voltage range which corresponds to a first supply voltage (UL) into an analog signal (UOUT) having a maximum voltage range which corresponds to a second supply voltage (UH). The first supply voltage (UL) is

  5. Structure-Activity Relationship of Capsaicin Analogs and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-Mediated Human Lung Epithelial Cell ToxicityS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Karen C.; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Shahrokh, Kiumars; Sun, Hao; Lee, Jeewoo; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Yost, Garold S.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of intracellular transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) in human lung cells causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, increased expression of proapoptotic GADD153 (growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible transcript 3), and cytotoxicity. However, in cells with low TRPV1 expression, cell death is not inhibited by TRPV1 antagonists, despite preventing GADD153 induction. In this study, chemical variants of the capsaicin analog nonivamide were synthesized and used to probe the relationship between TRPV1 receptor binding, ER calcium release, GADD153 expression, and cell death in TRPV1-overexpressing BEAS-2B, normal BEAS-2B, and primary normal human bronchial epithelial lung cells. Modification of the 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzylamide vanilloid ring pharmacophore of nonivamide reduced the potency of the analogs and rendered several analogs mildly inhibitory. Correlation analysis of analog-induced calcium flux, GADD153 induction, and cytotoxicity revealed a direct relationship for all three endpoints in all three lung cell types for nonivamide and N-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)nonanamide. However, the N-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)nonanamide analog also produced cytotoxicity through redox cycling/reactive oxygen species formation, shown by inhibition of cell death by N-acetylcysteine. Molecular modeling of binding interactions between the analogs and TRPV1 agreed with data for reduced potency of the analogs, and only nonivamide was predicted to form a “productive” ligand-receptor complex. This study provides vital information on the molecular interactions of capsaicinoids with TRPV1 and substantiates TRPV1-mediated ER stress as a conserved mechanism of lung cell death by prototypical TRPV1 agonists. PMID:21343315

  6. Health Effects of Carotenoids during Pregnancy and Lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Monika A; Wesołowska, Aleksandra; Pawlus, Beata; Hamułka, Jadwiga

    2017-08-04

    Adequate nutrition is particularly important during pregnancy since it is needed not only for maintaining the health of the mother, but also determines the course of pregnancy and its outcome, fetus development as well as the child's health after birth and during the later period of life. Data coming from epidemiological and interventions studies support the observation that carotenoids intake provide positive health effects in adults and the elderly population. These health effects are the result of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies have also demonstrated the significant role of carotenoids during pregnancy and infancy. Some studies indicate a correlation between carotenoid status and lower risk of pregnancy pathologies induced by intensified oxidative stress, but results of these investigations are equivocal. Carotenoids have been well studied in relation to their beneficial role in the prevention of preeclampsia. It is currently hypothesized that carotenoids can play an important role in the prevention of preterm birth and intrauterine growth restriction. Carotenoid status in the newborn depends on the nutritional status of the mother, but little is known about the transfer of carotenoids from the mother to the fetus. Carotenoids are among the few nutrients found in breast milk, in which the levels are determined by the mother's diet. Nutritional status of the newborn directly depends on its diet. Both mix feeding and artificial feeding may cause depletion of carotenoids since infant formulas contain only trace amounts of these compounds. Carotenoids, particularly lutein and zeaxanthin play a significant role in the development of vision and nervous system (among others, they are important for the development of retina as well as energy metabolism and brain electrical activity). Furthermore, more scientific evidence is emerging on the role of carotenoids in the prevention of disorders affecting preterm infants, who are

  7. Health Effects of Carotenoids during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika A. Zielińska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Adequate nutrition is particularly important during pregnancy since it is needed not only for maintaining the health of the mother, but also determines the course of pregnancy and its outcome, fetus development as well as the child’s health after birth and during the later period of life. Data coming from epidemiological and interventions studies support the observation that carotenoids intake provide positive health effects in adults and the elderly population. These health effects are the result of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies have also demonstrated the significant role of carotenoids during pregnancy and infancy. Some studies indicate a correlation between carotenoid status and lower risk of pregnancy pathologies induced by intensified oxidative stress, but results of these investigations are equivocal. Carotenoids have been well studied in relation to their beneficial role in the prevention of preeclampsia. It is currently hypothesized that carotenoids can play an important role in the prevention of preterm birth and intrauterine growth restriction. Carotenoid status in the newborn depends on the nutritional status of the mother, but little is known about the transfer of carotenoids from the mother to the fetus. Carotenoids are among the few nutrients found in breast milk, in which the levels are determined by the mother’s diet. Nutritional status of the newborn directly depends on its diet. Both mix feeding and artificial feeding may cause depletion of carotenoids since infant formulas contain only trace amounts of these compounds. Carotenoids, particularly lutein and zeaxanthin play a significant role in the development of vision and nervous system (among others, they are important for the development of retina as well as energy metabolism and brain electrical activity. Furthermore, more scientific evidence is emerging on the role of carotenoids in the prevention of disorders affecting preterm

  8. Carotenoids in staple cereals: Metabolism, regulation, and genetic manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shengnan zhai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids play a critical role in animal and human health. Animals and humans are unable to synthesize carotenoids de novo, and therefore rely upon diet as sources of these compounds. However, major staple cereals often contain only small amounts of carotenoids in their grain. Consequently, there is considerable interest in genetic manipulation of carotenoid content in cereal grain. In this review, we focus on carotenoid metabolism and regulation in non-green plant tissues, as well as genetic manipulation in staple cereals such as rice, maize, and wheat. Significant progress has been made in three aspects: (1 seven carotenogenes play vital roles in carotenoid regulation in non-green plant tissues, including DXS (1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase influencing isoprenoid precursor supply, PSY (phytoene synthase, LCYB (β-cyclase and LCYE (ε-cyclase controlling biosynthesis, HYDB (1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase and CCDs (carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases responsible for degradation, and OR (orange conditioning sequestration sink; (2 pro-vitamin A-biofortified crops, such as rice and maize, were developed by either metabolic engineering or marker-assisted breeding; (3 QTLs for carotenoid content on chromosomes 3B, 7A, and 7B were consistently identified, eight carotenogenes including 23 loci were detected, and ten gene-specific markers for carotenoid accumulation were developed and applied in wheat improvement. A comprehensive and deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid metabolism in crops will be benefitical in improving our precision in improving carotenoid contents. Genomic selection and gene editing are emerging as transformative technologies for vitamin A biofortification.

  9. Hydraulic Capacitor Analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Mustafa

    2007-03-01

    Students have difficulties in physics because of the abstract nature of concepts and principles. One of the effective methods for overcoming students' difficulties is the use of analogies to visualize abstract concepts to promote conceptual understanding.2,3 According to Iding,4 analogies are consistent with the tenets of constructivist learning theories, which claim that learners should be actively involved and new concepts should be based on learners' previous experiences. When analogies are used during the teaching-learning process, they may promote students' understanding of abstract science concepts.5 This paper suggests a capacitor analogy that aims to foster students' conceptual understanding of capacitors in a slightly different way than Greenslade's analogy.6

  10. Expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes and changes in carotenoids during ripening in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namitha, Kanakapura Krishnamurthy; Archana, Surya Narayana; Negi, Pradeep Singh

    2011-04-01

    To study the expression pattern of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes, changes in their expression at different stages of maturity in tomato fruit (cv. Arka Ahuti) were investigated. The genes regulating carotenoid production were quantified by a dot blot method using a DIG (dioxigenin) labelling and detection kit. The results revealed that there was an increase in the levels of upstream genes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway such as 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), 4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (Lyt B), phytoene synthase (PSY), phytoene desaturase (PDS) and ζ-carotene desaturase (ZDS) by 2-4 fold at the breaker stage as compared to leaf. The lycopene and β-carotene content was analyzed by HPLC at different stages of maturity. The lycopene (15.33 ± 0.24 mg per 100 g) and β-carotene (10.37 ± 0.46 mg per 100 g) content were found to be highest at 5 days post-breaker and 10 days post-breaker stage, respectively. The lycopene accumulation pattern also coincided with the color values at different stages of maturity. These studies may provide insight into devising gene-based strategies for enhancing carotenoid accumulation in tomato fruits.

  11. The effects of space travel to Deinococcus radiodurans and the carotenoid Deinoxanthin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Petra; De Vera, Jean-Pierre; Bohmeier, Maria; Leuko, Stefan; Boettger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska

    Carotenoids are common, vital components of many organisms. They (1) protect chlorophyll from oxidative damage; (2) create harmless products from toxic singlet oxygen; (3) assist light absorption in chloroplasts as they collect energy in the spectrum where chlorophyll cannot; (4) transport harvested light energy to retinal based proton pumps; and (5) provide structure via the polyene chain to plastid membranes (Winters et al. 2013). More than 600 carotenoids have been isolated from natural sources and there is a rising interest in the use of carotenoids as possible biomarkers for life on other planets. It is therefore of great interest to investigate if the harboring organisms and the associated carotenoids are able to cope with simulated and real space conditions. These questions are addressed by the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) experiment Biology and Mars experiment (BIOMEX). BIOMEX is an interdisciplinary and international space research project and the prime objective is to measure to what extent biomarkers are resistant to and able to maintain their stability under space and Mars-like conditions. Part of the research focusses on the extreme radiation resistant Deinococcus radiodurans and the effect and influence of Deinoxanthin to fitness and survival following exposure to space conditions. Furthermore, the resistance of crude extracted Deinoxanthin to space conditions is of great interest and was tested. As part of environmental verification tests (EVT’s), D. radiodurans and D. radiodurans ΔcrtB (a mutant not able to produce Deinoxanthin) were exposed to several space relevant environmental factors. Interestingly, both strains showed similar survival abilities. To investigate if the carotenoid within the cell took damage, samples were investigated by RAMAN spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a non-destructive technique, the feasibility of this method which is able to detect carotenoids is well known and has been proposed to be onboard the ExoMars mission

  12. Genome-wide association analysis of the anthocyanin and carotenoid contents of rose petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Frank Schulz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Petal colour is one of the key characteristics determining the attractiveness and therefore the commercial value of an ornamental crop. Here, we present the first genome-wide association study for the important ornamental crop rose, focusing on the anthocyanin and carotenoid contents in petals of 96 diverse tetraploid garden rose genotypes. Cultivated roses display a vast phenotypic and genetic diversity and are therefore ideal targets for association genetics.For marker analysis, we used a recently designed Axiom SNP chip comprising 68,000 SNPs with additionally 281 SSRs, 400 AFLPs and 246 markers from candidate genes. An analysis of the structure of the rose population revealed three subpopulations with most of the genetic variation between individual genotypes rather than between clusters and with a high average proportion of heterozygous loci.The mapping of markers significantly associated with anthocyanin and carotenoid content to the related Fragaria and Prunus genomes revealed clusters of associated markers indicating five genomic regions associated with the total anthocyanin content and two large clusters associated with the carotenoid content. Among the marker clusters associated with the phenotypes, we found several candidate genes with known functions in either the anthocyanin or the carotenoid biosynthesis pathways. Among others, we identified a glutathione-S-transferase, 4CL, an auxin response factor and F3´H as candidate genes affecting anthocyanin concentration, and CCD4 and Zeaxanthine epoxidase as candidates affecting the concentration of carotenoids. These markers are starting points for future validation experiments in independent populations as well as for functional genomic studies to identify the causal factors for the observed colour phenotypes. Furthermore, validated markers may be interesting tools for marker-assisted selection in commercial breeding programmes in that they provide the tools to identify superior

  13. Seasonal patterns of reflectance indices, carotenoid pigments and photosynthesis of evergreen chaparral species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylinski, C; Gamon, J; Oechel, W

    2002-05-01

    This study examined the ability of the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) to track seasonal variations in carotenoid pigments and photosynthetic activity of mature evergreen chaparral shrubs. Our results confirm that PRI scales with photosystem two (PSII) photochemical efficiency across species and seasons, as demonstrated by PRI's strong correlation with de-epoxidized (photoprotective) xanthophyll cycle pigment levels (normalized to chlorophyll) and with the chlorophyll fluorescence index, ΔF/Fm'. PRI and carotenoid pigment levels (de-epoxidized xanthophyll cycle pigments normalized to chlorophyll or total carotenoid pigments normalized to chlorophyll) were correlated with seasonal fluctuations in midday net CO2 uptake of top-canopy leaves. By contrast, chlorophyll levels (as measured by the Chlorophyll Index) were not as strongly linked to photosynthetic activity, particularly when all species were considered together. Likewise, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, an index of canopy greenness) did not correlate with net CO2 uptake. Canopy NDVI also did not correlate with canopy PRI, demonstrating that these indices were largely independent over the temporal and spatial scales of this study. Together, these patterns provide evidence for coordinated regulation of carotenoid pigments, PSII electron transport, and carboxylation across seasons and indicate that physiological adjustments are more important than structural ones in modifying CO2-fixation capacity during periods of photosynthetic down-regulation for these evergreen species. The strong correlation between PRI of whole canopies and PRI of top-canopy leaves suggests that the canopy can be treated as a "big leaf" in terms of this reflectance index and that PRI can be used in "scalable" models. This along with the links between carotenoid pigments, PSII photochemical efficiency and carboxylation across species and seasons supports the use of optical assays of pigment levels and PSII activity

  14. Importancia nutricional de los pigmentos carotenoides

    OpenAIRE

    Meléndez Martínez, Antonio Jesús; Vicario Romero, Isabel; Heredia Mira, Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Los pigmentos carotenoides son compuestos responsables de la coloración de gran número de alimentos vegetales y animales, como zanahorias, zumo de naranja, tomates, salmón y yema del huevo. Desde hace muchos años, se sabe que algunos de estos compuestos, como a y b-caroteno, así como la b-criptoxantina, son provitaminas A. No obstante, estudios recientes han puesto de manifiesto las propiedades antioxidantes de estos pigmentos, así como su eficacia en la prevención de ciertas enfermedades del...

  15. Computational approaches to analogical reasoning current trends

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is known as a powerful mode for drawing plausible conclusions and solving problems. It has been the topic of a huge number of works by philosophers, anthropologists, linguists, psychologists, and computer scientists. As such, it has been early studied in artificial intelligence, with a particular renewal of interest in the last decade. The present volume provides a structured view of current research trends on computational approaches to analogical reasoning. It starts with an overview of the field, with an extensive bibliography. The 14 collected contributions cover a large scope of issues. First, the use of analogical proportions and analogies is explained and discussed in various natural language processing problems, as well as in automated deduction. Then, different formal frameworks for handling analogies are presented, dealing with case-based reasoning, heuristic-driven theory projection, commonsense reasoning about incomplete rule bases, logical proportions induced by similarity an...

  16. The effects of dietary carotenoid supplementation and retinal carotenoid accumulation on vision-mediated foraging in the house finch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Toomey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For many bird species, vision is the primary sensory modality used to locate and assess food items. The health and spectral sensitivities of the avian visual system are influenced by diet-derived carotenoid pigments that accumulate in the retina. Among wild House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus, we have found that retinal carotenoid accumulation varies significantly among individuals and is related to dietary carotenoid intake. If diet-induced changes in retinal carotenoid accumulation alter spectral sensitivity, then they have the potential to affect visually mediated foraging performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In two experiments, we measured foraging performance of house finches with dietarily manipulated retinal carotenoid levels. We tested each bird's ability to extract visually contrasting food items from a matrix of inedible distracters under high-contrast (full and dimmer low-contrast (red-filtered lighting conditions. In experiment one, zeaxanthin-supplemented birds had significantly increased retinal carotenoid levels, but declined in foraging performance in the high-contrast condition relative to astaxanthin-supplemented birds that showed no change in retinal carotenoid accumulation. In experiments one and two combined, we found that retinal carotenoid concentrations predicted relative foraging performance in the low- vs. high-contrast light conditions in a curvilinear pattern. Performance was positively correlated with retinal carotenoid accumulation among birds with low to medium levels of accumulation (∼0.5-1.5 µg/retina, but declined among birds with very high levels (>2.0 µg/retina. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that carotenoid-mediated spectral filtering enhances color discrimination, but that this improvement is traded off against a reduction in sensitivity that can compromise visual discrimination. Thus, retinal carotenoid levels may be optimized to meet the visual demands of specific

  17. Comparative effect of carotenoid complex from golden neo-life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These significant increases(P<0.05) show that both carotenoids have immunomodulatory effects; and that the GNLD Carotenoid complex which consists of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, Zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene and alpha-tocopherol is more potent in its immunomodulatory effect compared to the ...

  18. Metabolism of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during ripening of raspberry fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, M.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Simic, A.; Uitdewilligen, J.; Arkel, van J.; Vos, de C.H.; Jonker, H.H.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Sibbesen, O.; Qvist, I.; Mikkelsen, J.D.; Hall, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are important lipophilic antioxidants in fruits. Apocarotenoids such as ¿-ionone and ß-ionone, which are breakdown products of carotenoids, are important for the flavor characteristics of raspberry fruit, and have also been suggested to have beneficial effects on human health. Raspberry

  19. Comparative effect of carotenoid complex from golden neo-life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: The immunomodulatory effect of Carotenoid complex from Golden Neo-Life Dynamite (GNLD) and carrot extracted Carotenoid was assessed using 24 albino Wistar rats. The rats were assigned to 4 groups of 6 rats each consisting of group 1(control group treated with distilled water), group 2 (treated with olive oil) ...

  20. (gnld) and carrot extracted carotenoids on immune param

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be related to the chemical composition of both Carotenoid complexes; as the significantly higher value in the GNLD Carotenoid complex may be due to the presence of ! -carotene, ß- carotene, lutein, Zeaxanthin, ß-crptoxanthin, lycopene and ! -tocopherol compared to the carrot extract group that contained ! -carotene.

  1. Manipulation of Carotenoid Content in Plants to Improve Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Enriqueta; Rodrigo, Maria Jesús; Zacarias, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are essential components for human nutrition and health, mainly due to their antioxidant and pro-vitamin A activity. Foods with enhanced carotenoid content and composition are essential to ensure carotenoid feasibility in malnourished population of many countries around the world, which is critical to alleviate vitamin A deficiency and other health-related disorders. The pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis is currently well understood, key steps of the pathways in different plant species have been characterized and the corresponding genes identified, as well as other regulatory elements. This enables the manipulation and improvement of carotenoid content and composition in order to control the nutritional value of a number of agronomical important staple crops. Biotechnological and genetic engineering-based strategies to manipulate carotenoid metabolism have been successfully implemented in many crops, with Golden rice as the most relevant example of β-carotene improvement in one of the more widely consumed foods. Conventional breeding strategies have been also adopted in the bio-fortification of carotenoid in staple foods that are highly consumed in developing countries, including maize, cassava and sweet potatoes, to alleviate nutrition-related problems. The objective of the chapter is to summarize major breakthroughs and advances in the enhancement of carotenoid content and composition in agronomical and nutritional important crops, with special emphasis to their potential impact and benefits in human nutrition and health.

  2. Study of oxidation states of the transition metals in a series of Prussian blue analogs using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adak, S. [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, 88003 (United States); Hartl, M., E-mail: monika.hartl@esss.se [European Spallation Source ESS AB, 22100, Lund (Sweden); Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE-LC), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Daemen, L. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37830 (United States); Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE-LC), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Fohtung, E.; Nakotte, H. [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, 88003 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Systematic XANES measurements on Prussian blue analogs shows oxidation state of transition metals. • Cobal-iron bimetallic hexacyanometallates show unexpected oxidation states. • Iron(II) ions in hexacyanometallates(III) show varying spin state depending on their bond to the “N” end or “C” end of the cyanide ligand. • Thermal expansion coefficients have been linked to the XANES results. - Abstract: There have been renewed interests in metal-organic framework classes of materials such as Prussian blue analogues (PBAs) due to their potential usage in energy storage applications. In particular, due to their high surface areas, controllable structures and excellent electrochemical properties, PBAs such as hexacyanometalates M{sup II}{sub 3}[A{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2*}nH{sub 2}O (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; A = Co, Fe, Cr; n = no. of water molecules present), M{sup II}{sub 2}[Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2*}nH{sub 2}O (M = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) and mixed hexacyanometalates(III) (Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 3}[B{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2}·nH{sub 2}O (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75; B = Co, Fe) could have possible usage as a new class of cathode and even anode materials for rechargeable batteries. Detailed knowledge of the oxidation states of the transition metals in PBAs is required to improve efficiency and durability of such devices. Furthermore, a link between the thermal expansion observed in these materials and the oxidation state of the transition metal is of interest to synthesize materials with a desired thermal expansion behavior, Here we demonstrate the use of Synchrotron based X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra to identify transition metal oxidation states. Our analysis reveals the presence of divalent, trivalent and/or mixed valence transition metals in the materials as well as high-spin and low-spin complexes.

  3. Meat analog: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malav, O P; Talukder, S; Gokulakrishnan, P; Chand, S

    2015-01-01

    The health-conscious consumers are in search of nutritious and convenient food item which can be best suited in their busy life. The vegetarianism is the key for the search of such food which resembles the meat in respect of nutrition and sensory characters, but not of animal origin and contains vegetable or its modified form, this is the point when meat analog evolved out and gets shape. The consumers gets full satisfaction by consumption of meat analog due to its typical meaty texture, appearance and the flavor which are being imparted during the skilled production of meat analog. The supplement of protein in vegetarian diet through meat alike food can be fulfilled by incorporating protein-rich vegetative food grade materials in meat analog and by adopting proper technological process which can promote the proper fabrication of meat analog with acceptable meat like texture, appearance, flavor, etc. The easily available vegetables, cereals, and pulses in India have great advantages and prospects to be used in food products and it can improve the nutritional and functional characters of the food items. The various form and functional characters of food items are available world over and attracts the meat technologists and the food processors to bring some innovativeness in meat analog and its presentation and marketability so that the acceptability of meat analog can be overgrown by the consumers.

  4. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship study of bicyclic piperazine analogs of indole-3-carboxamides as novel cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Elizabeth M; Yoshiizumi, Kazuya; Cairns, Jim; Cowley, Phillip; Ferguson, Morag; Jeremiah, Fiona; Kiyoi, Takao; Morphy, Richard; Tierney, Jason; Wishart, Grant; York, Mark; Baker, James; Cottney, Jean E; Houghton, Andrea K; McPhail, Petula; Osprey, Andrew; Walker, Glenn; Adam, Julia M

    2010-12-15

    Bicyclic piperazine derivatives were synthesized as conformationally constrained analogs of N-alkyl piperazines and were found to be potent CB1 receptor agonists. The CB1 receptor agonist activity was dependent upon the absolute configuration of the chiral center of the bicyclic ring system. Although the conformational constraint did not protect the compounds from metabolism by N-dealkylation, several bicyclic analogs were found to be more potent than the unconstrained lead compound. Compound 8b demonstrated potent antinociceptive activity in vivo. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Arabidopsis ORANGE (AtOR) gene promotes carotenoid accumulation in transgenic corn hybrids derived from parental lines with limited carotenoid pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Judit; Zorrilla-López, Uxue; Medina, Vicente; Farré, Gemma; Sandmann, Gerhard; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2017-06-01

    The AtOR gene enhances carotenoid levels in corn by promoting the formation of plastoglobuli when the carotenoid pool is limited, but has no further effect when carotenoids are already abundant. The cauliflower orange (or) gene mutation influences carotenoid accumulation in plants by promoting the transition of proplastids into chromoplasts, thus creating intracellular storage compartments that act as metabolic sink. We overexpressed the Arabidopsis OR gene under the control of the endosperm-specific wheat LMW glutenin promoter in a white corn variety that normally accumulates only trace amounts of carotenoids. The total endosperm carotenoid content in the best-performing AtOR transgenic corn line was 32-fold higher than wild-type controls (~25 µg/g DW at 30 days after pollination) but the principal carotenoids remained the same, suggesting that AtOR increases the abundance of existing carotenoids without changing the metabolic composition. We analyzed the expression of endogenous genes representing the carotenoid biosynthesis and MEP pathways, as well as the plastid fusion/translocation factor required for chromoplast formation, but only the DXS1 gene was upregulated in the transgenic corn plants. The line expressing AtOR at the highest level was crossed with four transgenic corn lines expressing different carotenogenic genes and accumulating different carotenoids. The introgression of AtOR increased the carotenoid content of the hybrids when there was a limited carotenoid pool in the parental line, but had no effect when carotenoids were already abundant in the parent. The AtOR gene therefore appears to enhance carotenoid levels by promoting the formation of carotenoid-sequestering plastoglobuli when the carotenoid pool is limited, but has no further effect when carotenoids are already abundant because high levels of carotenoids can induce the formation of carotenoid-sequestering plastoglobuli even in the absence of AtOR.

  6. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Applied QSAR with Quantum Chemical Descriptors for Predicting Radical Scavenging Activities of Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhin, Changho; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2015-01-01

    One of the physiological characteristics of carotenoids is their radical scavenging activity. In this study, the relationship between radical scavenging activities and quantum chemical descriptors of carotenoids was determined. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) applied quantitative structure-activity relationship models (QSAR) were also developed for predicting and comparing radical scavenging activities of carotenoids. Semi-empirical PM6 and PM7 quantum chemical calculations were done by MOPAC. Ionisation energies of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids and the product of chemical potentials of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids were significantly correlated with the radical scavenging activities, and consequently these descriptors were used as independent variables for the QSAR study. The ANFIS applied QSAR models were developed with two triangular-shaped input membership functions made for each of the independent variables and optimised by a backpropagation method. High prediction efficiencies were achieved by the ANFIS applied QSAR. The R-square values of the developed QSAR models with the variables calculated by PM6 and PM7 methods were 0.921 and 0.902, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated reliabilities of the selected quantum chemical descriptors and the significance of QSAR models.

  7. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Applied QSAR with Quantum Chemical Descriptors for Predicting Radical Scavenging Activities of Carotenoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Jhin

    Full Text Available One of the physiological characteristics of carotenoids is their radical scavenging activity. In this study, the relationship between radical scavenging activities and quantum chemical descriptors of carotenoids was determined. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS applied quantitative structure-activity relationship models (QSAR were also developed for predicting and comparing radical scavenging activities of carotenoids. Semi-empirical PM6 and PM7 quantum chemical calculations were done by MOPAC. Ionisation energies of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids and the product of chemical potentials of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids were significantly correlated with the radical scavenging activities, and consequently these descriptors were used as independent variables for the QSAR study. The ANFIS applied QSAR models were developed with two triangular-shaped input membership functions made for each of the independent variables and optimised by a backpropagation method. High prediction efficiencies were achieved by the ANFIS applied QSAR. The R-square values of the developed QSAR models with the variables calculated by PM6 and PM7 methods were 0.921 and 0.902, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated reliabilities of the selected quantum chemical descriptors and the significance of QSAR models.

  8. Encapsulation of carotenoids extracted from halophilic Archaea in oil-in-water (O/W) micro- and nano-emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Marwa; Theochari, Ioanna; Papadimitriou, Vassiliki; Xenakis, Aristotelis; Ammar, Emna

    2017-10-16

    Carotenoids extracted from halophilc Archaea have potential health benefits. Their poor water-solubility and low bioavailability is a challenge to their incorporation into foods. The aim of this work was the carotenoids encapsulation into two oil-in-water (O/W) dispersions, to increase their use as functional food applications. A nanoemulsion produced by high pressure homogenization and a spontaneously formed microemulsion were conceived. The limonene was the dispersed oil phase, and mixtures of Triton X-100/Tween-80 (3:1) as emulsifiers and of water/glycerol (2:1) as the continuous aqueous phase. The microemulsion monophasic area was determined through the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Dynamic Light Scattering was used for the structural characterization of the nano- and micro-emulsions in the presence of the carotenoids. Moreover, the radical scavenging activity of the encapsulated carotenoids was examined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The results confirmed the delivery systems design effectiveness to encapsulate and stabilize the carotenoids for food applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carotenoids in Marine Invertebrates Living along the Kuroshio Current Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Sakagami

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids of the corals Acropora japonica, A. secale, and A. hyacinthus, the tridacnid clam Tridacna squamosa, the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci, and the small sea snail Drupella fragum were investigated. The corals and the tridacnid clam are filter feeders and are associated with symbiotic zooxanthellae. Peridinin and pyrrhoxanthin, which originated from symbiotic zooxanthellae, were found to be major carotenoids in corals and the tridacnid clam. The crown-of-thorns starfish and the sea snail D. fragum are carnivorous and mainly feed on corals. Peridinin-3-acyl esters were major carotenoids in the sea snail D. fragum. On the other hand, ketocarotenoids such as 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin and astaxanthin were major carotenoids in the crown-of-thorns starfish. Carotenoids found in these marine animals closely reflected not only their metabolism but also their food chains.

  10. Carotenoids and Their Isomers: Color Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueming Jiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as ‘functional food ingredients’. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables depends on their growth maturity, concentration of carotenoid isomers, and food processing methods. This article focuses more on several carotenoids and their isomers present in different fruits and vegetables along with their concentrations. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidation and cellular damages.

  11. Variation in Content of Carotenoids and Vitamin C in Carrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana MATĚJKOVÁ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carrots are the most popular and wide-spread of all root vegetables, and are the principal source of carotenoids in human diet. The purpose of this study was to examine differences between cultivars and the effect of storage regarding the carotenoid and vitamin C content in carrots. Six carrot cultivars were used in this study, ranging from early to late ones. Observed carotenoid content ranged from 60 mg kg-1 to 134 mg kg-1. Significantly higher levels of carotenoids were found in late and moderately late cultivars in comparison to early ones. Vitamin C content in these cultivars ranged from 54 mg kg-1 to 132 mg kg-1. Significantly higher contents of vitamin C were also found in the late cultivars. 30-day storage resulted in a significant reduction in vitamin C content, on average of 47%. There was also a reduction in the carotenoids content, but to a lesser extent, on average of 11%.

  12. Troubleshooting analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pease, Robert A

    1991-01-01

    Troubleshooting Analog Circuits is a guidebook for solving product or process related problems in analog circuits. The book also provides advice in selecting equipment, preventing problems, and general tips. The coverage of the book includes the philosophy of troubleshooting; the modes of failure of various components; and preventive measures. The text also deals with the active components of analog circuits, including diodes and rectifiers, optically coupled devices, solar cells, and batteries. The book will be of great use to both students and practitioners of electronics engineering. Other

  13. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavitavya Nijampatnam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 μM to 88 μM. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity.

  14. Synthesis of tritium-labeled vitamin A and its analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, S.W.; Bubb, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    Metabolic and pharmacologic studies of Vitamin A and its analogs related to the prevention of lung cancer and other epithelial cancers required tritium-labeled Vitamin A analogs and ..beta..-carotene at high specific activity. Syntheses of some of the isomers were therefore developed in the laboratory, as described in the paper. The advantages of the scheme shown are that : 1. Tritiums are introduced into the molecule by catalytic hydrogenation, thus affording high specific activity. 2. It uses an allylic rearrangement of tritiated vinyl-..beta..-ionol to C/sub 15/-phosphonium salt, which is condensed with C/sub 5/-nitrile to give C/sub 20/-skeleton of retinonitrile. 3. It permits the development of milder methods to convert tritium-labeled retinaldehyde, as a common intermediate, to the other retinoids (i.e., retinoic acid, retinol, and retinyl acetate). Furthermore, tritium-labeled all-trans-..beta..-carotene, an important carotenoid, has been obtained from the retinaldehyde.

  15. A European carotenoid database to assess carotenoid intakes and its use in a five-country comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Neill, M.E.; Carroll, Y.; Corridan, B.; Olmedilla, B.; Granado, F.; Blanco, I.; Berg, H. van den; Hininger, I.; Rousell, A.-M.; Chopra, M.; Southon, S.; Thurnham, D.I.

    2001-01-01

    A food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and carotenoid database with information on α- and β-carotene, lutein, lycopene and β-cryptoxanthin was prepared and used to compare the carotenoid intakes in five European countries: UK, Republic of Ireland, Spain, France and The Netherlands. Eighty, age- (25-45

  16. Testosterone treatment can increase circulating carotenoids but does not affect yellow carotenoid-based plumage colour in blue tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, A.; Roberts, M.L.; Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Delhey, K.

    2012-01-01

    A number of mechanisms are responsible for producing the variation in natural colours, and these need not act in isolation. A recent hypothesis states that carotenoid-based coloration, in addition to carotenoid availability, is also enhanced by elevated levels of circulating testosterone (T). This

  17. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Perlík, Václav; Cranston, Laura J; Cogdell, Richard J; Lincoln, Craig N; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The initial energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs between the light-harvesting pigments and on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that F\\"orster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which leads to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited state as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid el...

  18. Amarginal contribution of selected carotenoids to the supression of UV-irradiation-induced lecithin peroxidation in hexane solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGAN CVETKOVIC

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the anticipated antioxidant role of four selected carotenoids in mixtures with lecithin lipoidal compounds in hexane solution, under continuous UV-irradiation in three different ranges (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C. Two carotenes (b-carotene and licopene and two xantophylls (lutein and neoxanthin were employed to control the lipid peroxidation process generated by UV-irradiation, by scavenging the involved free radicals. The results show that while carotenoids undergo a substantial, structural dependent destruction (bleaching, which is highly dependent on energy of the UV-photons, their contribution to the expected suppression of lecithin peroxidation is of marginal importance, not exceeding a maximum of 20%. The marginal antioxidant behaviour has been attributed to a highly unordered hexane solution, where the scavenging action of the carotenoids becomes less competitive.

  19. TV Analog Station Transmitters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This file is an extract from the Consolidated Database System (CDBS) licensed by the Media Bureau. It consists of Analog Television Stations (see Rule Part47 CFR...

  20. Challenges in Analogical Reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features. One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same physics principle is involved but that is more difficult to handle. Here, we examine introductory physics students' ability to use analogies in solving problems involving Newton's second law. Students enrolled in an algebra-based introductory physics course were given a solved problem involving tension in a rope and were then asked to solve another problem for which the physics is very similar but involved a frictional force. They were asked to point out the similarities between the two problems and then use the analogy to solve the friction problem.

  1. Analog circuits cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Analog Circuits Cookbook presents articles about advanced circuit techniques, components and concepts, useful IC for analog signal processing in the audio range, direct digital synthesis, and ingenious video op-amp. The book also includes articles about amplitude measurements on RF signals, linear optical imager, power supplies and devices, and RF circuits and techniques. Professionals and students of electrical engineering will find the book informative and useful.

  2. FGF growth factor analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  3. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, M.; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develope a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  4. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-07-03

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were orthologs of the 47 carotenoid genes in A. thaliana. A high level of synteny was observed for carotenoid biosynthetic genes between A. thaliana and B. rapa. Out of 47 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in A. thaliana, 46 were successfully mapped to the 10 B. rapa chromosomes, and most of the genes retained more than one copy in B. rapa. The gene expansion was caused by the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event experienced by Brassica species. An expression analysis of the carotenoid biosynthetic genes suggested that their expression levels differed in root, stem, leaf, flower, callus, and silique tissues. Additionally, the paralogs of each carotenoid biosynthetic gene, which were generated from the WGT in B. rapa, showed significantly different expression levels among tissues, suggesting differentiated functions for these multi-copy genes in the carotenoid pathway. This first systematic study of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa provides insights into the carotenoid metabolic mechanisms of Brassica crops. In addition, a better understanding of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa will contribute to the development of conventional and transgenic B. rapa cultivars with enriched carotenoid levels in the future.

  5. Biotechnological production of carotenoids by yeasts: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, carotenoids are valuable molecules in different industries such as chemical, pharmaceutical, poultry, food and cosmetics. These pigments not only can act as vitamin A precursors, but also they have coloring and antioxidant properties, which have attracted the attention of the industries and researchers. The carotenoid production through chemical synthesis or extraction from plants is limited by low yields that results in high production costs. This leads to research of microbial production of carotenoids, as an alternative that has shown better yields than other aforementioned. In addition, the microbial production of carotenoids could be a better option about costs, looking for alternatives like the use of low-cost substrates as agro-industrials wastes. Yeasts have demonstrated to be carotenoid producer showing an important growing capacity in several agro-industrial wastes producing high levels of carotenoids. Agro-industrial wastes provide carbon and nitrogen source necessary, and others elements to carry out the microbial metabolism diminishing the production costs and avoiding pollution from these agro-industrial wastes to the environmental. Herein, we discuss the general and applied concepts regarding yeasts carotenoid production and the factors influencing carotenogenesis using agro-industrial wastes as low-cost substrates. PMID:24443802

  6. Raman measurement of carotenoid composition in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    The carotenoids lycopene and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants in skin and are thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and singlet oxygen. The role of carotenoid species in skin health is of strong current interest. We demonstrate the possibility to use Resonance Raman spectroscopy for fast, non-invasive, highly specific, and quantitative detection of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue and green laser excitation, we were able to characterize quantitatively the relative concentrations of each carotenoid species in-vivo. In the selective detection, we take advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profiles for beta-carotene and lycopene molecules, and obtain a quantitative assessment of individual long-chain carotenoid species in the skin rather than their cumulative levels. Preliminary dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects. The technique holds promise for rapid screening of carotenoid compositions in human skin in large populations and may be suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  7. Carotenoids from Marine Organisms: Biological Functions and Industrial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Galasso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As is the case for terrestrial organisms, carotenoids represent the most common group of pigments in marine environments. They are generally biosynthesized by all autotrophic marine organisms, such as bacteria and archaea, algae and fungi. Some heterotrophic organisms also contain carotenoids probably accumulated from food or partly modified through metabolic reactions. These natural pigments are divided into two chemical classes: carotenes (such as lycopene and α- and β-carotene that are composed of hydrogen and carbon; xanthophylls (such as astaxanthin, fucoxanthin and lutein, which are constituted by hydrogen, carbon and oxygen. Carotenoids, as antioxidant compounds, assume a key role in the protection of cells. In fact, quenching of singlet oxygen, light capture and photosynthesis protection are the most relevant biological functions of carotenoids. The present review aims at describing (i the biological functions of carotenoids and their benefits for human health, (ii the most common carotenoids from marine organisms and (iii carotenoids having large success in pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmeceutical industries, highlighting the scientific progress in marine species cultivation for natural pigments production.

  8. The effect of pulsed electric fields on carotenoids bioaccessibility: The role of tomato matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Francesca; Verkerk, Ruud; Mastwijk, Hennie; Anese, Monica; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Capuano, Edoardo

    2018-02-01

    Tomato fractions were subjected to pulsed electric fields treatment combined or not with heating. Results showed that pulsed electric fields and heating applied in combination or individually induced permeabilization of cell membranes in the tomato fractions. However, no changes in β-carotene and lycopene bioaccessibility were found upon combined and individual pulsed electric fields and heating, except in the following cases: (i) in tissue, a significant decrease in lycopene bioaccessibility upon combined pulsed electric fields and heating and heating only was observed; (ii) in chromoplasts, both β-carotene and lycopene bioaccessibility significantly decreased upon combined pulsed electric fields and heating and pulsed electric fields only. The reduction in carotenoids bioaccessibility was attributed to modification in chromoplasts membrane and carotenoids-protein complexes. Differences in the effects of pulsed electric fields on bioaccessibility among different tomato fractions were related to tomato structure complexity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrastructural deposition forms and bioaccessibility of carotenoids and carotenoid esters from goji berries (Lycium barbarum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Judith; Schädle, Christopher N; Sprenger, Jasmin; Heller, Annerose; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2017-03-01

    Goji berries (Lycium barbarum L.) have been known to contain strikingly high levels of zeaxanthin, while the physical deposition form and bioaccessibility of the latter was yet unknown. In the present study, we associated ripening-induced modifications in the profile of carotenoids with fundamental changes of the deposition state of carotenoids in goji berries. Unripe fruit contained common chloroplast-specific carotenoids being protein-bound within chloroplastidal thylakoids. The subsequent ripening-induced transformation of chloroplasts to tubular chromoplasts was accompanied by an accumulation of up to 36mg/100g FW zeaxanthin dipalmitate and further minor xanthophyll esters, prevailing in a presumably liquid-crystalline state within the nano-scaled chromoplast tubules. The in vitro digestion unraveled the enhanced liberation and bioaccessibility of zeaxanthin from these tubular aggregates in goji berries as compared to protein-complexed lutein from spinach. Goji berries therefore might represent a more potent source of macular pigments than green leafy vegetables like spinach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Selection and taxonomic identification of carotenoid-producing marine actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Francisco; Fernández-Chimeno, Rosa Isabel; de la Fuente, Juan Luis; Barredo, José-Luis

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids are important pigments produced by plants and many microorganisms, including fungi, microalgae, cyanobacteria, and bacteria. Marine actinomycetes are a group of bacteria that produce a variety of metabolites with economic potential. Here, we describe a general method of selecting marine actinomycetes as carotenoids' producers. The screening is carried out at two levels: the first one involves a quick selection of strains by visual color inspection, and the second consists in the analysis of the extracts by HPLC. The taxonomic analysis of the producing strains gives us an overview of the groups of actinomycetes in which carotenoids can be found.

  11. Metabolism of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during ripening of raspberry fruit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekwilder, J; van der Meer, IM; Simicb, A

    2008-01-01

    is one of the few fruits where fruit ripening is accompanied by the massive production of apocarotenoids. In this paper, changes in levels of carotenoids and apocarotenoids during raspberry fruit ripening are described. In addition, the isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a carotenoid...... cleavage dioxygenase (CCD), which putatively mediates the degradation of carotenoids to apocarotenoids during raspberry fruit ripening, is reported. Such information helps us to better understand how these compounds are produced in plants and may also enable us to develop novel strategies for improved...

  12. Carotenoids present in halotolerant Bacillus spore formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Le H; Fraser, Paul D; Tam, Nguyen K M; Cutting, Simon M

    2006-02-01

    Six isolates of pigmented spore-forming bacteria were recovered from human faeces from subjects in Vietnam. 16S rRNA analysis demonstrated close association with known pigmented Bacillus species. All isolates were able to tolerate growth on 8% NaCl and were resistant to arsenate, characteristics that make them most related to Bacillus indicus. Two visible pigments were apparent, a yellow pigment found in vegetative cells and an orange pigment found only in spores. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to characterize and quantify these pigments and found them to be carotenoids. The biosynthetic pathway that generates them branches with one that could lead to the spore-associated orange pigmentation. Although these bacteria were found in faeces, the seafood-rich diet of Vietnam and the recovery of other pigmented Bacillus species from seafood and marine environments makes it highly probable that the true origin of these bacteria is from ingested seafood.

  13. THE ISOLATION, ANALISIS AND TESTING OF SEA BUCKTHORN CAROTENOIDS ON MURINE MACROPHAGE CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICLEA ILEANA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to characterize a sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides fruitcarotenoidic extract and evaluate its influence on macrophage phagocytic responsegiven that carotenoids function as antioxidants. Carotenoids were isolated,saponified and analysed using HPLC before and after saponification. Murineperitoneal macrophages were cultured in medium containing carotenoidic extract.Carotenoid influence on phagocytosis was assessed by calculating the phagocyticindex (PI % and mean phagocytosis (MP. The positive significant differences(p<0,05 picture carotenoid ability to enhance cell phagocytic activity.

  14. THE ISOLATION, ANALISIS AND TESTING OF SEA BUCKTHORN CAROTENOIDS ON MURINE MACROPHAGE CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILEANA MICLEA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to characterize a sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides fruitcarotenoidic extract and evaluate its influence on macrophage phagocytic responsegiven that carotenoids function as antioxidants. Carotenoids were isolated,saponified and analysed using HPLC before and after saponification. Murineperitoneal macrophages were cultured in medium containing carotenoidic extract.Carotenoid influence on phagocytosis was assessed by calculating the phagocyticindex (PI % and mean phagocytosis (MP. The positive significant differences(p<0,05 picture carotenoid ability to enhance cell phagocytic activity.

  15. Analog Frame Store Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-15

    enhancement when coupled with the video acquisition performed by the Frame Store Memory in mode 2. 3 -11 It cr (A 3 coJ 0( kLL P.- FAIRCHILO IMAGING ...AD-AOSI 979 FAIRCHILD IMAGING SYSTEMS SYOSSET N Y F/0 17/2 ANALOG FRAME STORE MEMORY . CU) JAN 80 OAAK77-C-0165 UNCLASSIFIED ED-CX-141-5 M 1 .0 H " 1...DESCRIPTION 1-2 1.1.1 Analog Frame Store Memory 1-2 1.1.2 Analog Field Storage Device 1-4 1.1.3 Image Analyzer Digital Display (IADD) 1-4 1.2 PROGRAM’S

  16. CMOS analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Phillip E

    1987-01-01

    This text presents the principles and techniques for designing analog circuits to be implemented in a CMOS technology. The level is appropriate for seniors and graduate students familiar with basic electronics, including biasing, modeling, circuit analysis, and some familiarity with frequency response. Students learn the methodology of analog integrated circuit design through a hierarchically-oriented approach to the subject that provides thorough background and practical guidance for designing CMOS analog circuits, including modeling, simulation, and testing. The authors' vast industrial experience and knowledge is reflected in the circuits, techniques, and principles presented. They even identify the many common pitfalls that lie in the path of the beginning designer--expert advice from veteran designers. The text mixes the academic and practical viewpoints in a treatment that is neither superficial nor overly detailed, providing the perfect balance.

  17. Effect of long-term storage on the free and esterified carotenoids in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum conv. durum) and tritordeum (×Tritordeum Ascherson et Graebner) grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado-Ortega, Elena; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso

    2017-09-01

    The effect of long-term storage on the carotenoid composition in durum wheat and tritordeum grains was studied. Total carotenoid (mainly lutein) content decreased according to a temperature dependent first-order degradative kinetic model. The carotenoid retention was similar in both genotypes at the lower temperatures (71-73% at -32°C, 70% at 6°C and 55-56% at 20°C), whereas at the higher temperatures the pigment retention was higher in tritordeum (42% at 37°C; 10% at 50°C) than durum wheat (23% at 37°C; 1% at 50°C), probably due to the greater proportion of esterified xanthophylls. A clear difference between free and esterified pigments was observed, with smaller losses and slower degradation (higher stability) observed for the latter. The xanthophyll esterification process was highly specific and had a significant effect on the carotenoid stability according to the fatty acids involved in the esterification and their position on the lutein molecule. The results were consistent with a degradation process in which the carotenoid behavior is influenced by the chemical structure. Xanthophyll esterification can be promoted by environmental conditions, regardless of the cereal genotype, and is a powerful tool to modulate the carotenoid profile in cereals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  19. Carotenoid-based breast plumage colour, body condition and clutch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dependent ornamental trait. In some species of birds, red, orange and yellow feather colouration reflects male quality and advertises the carotenoid concentration of feathers. Such colouration is an important aspect of mate selection by females.

  20. Regulation of orange carotenoid protein activity in cyanobacterial photoprotection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurotte, A.; Lopez Igual, R.; Wilson, A.; Comolet, L.; Bourcier de Carbon, C.; Xiao, F.; Kirilovsky, D.

    2015-01-01

    Plants, algae, and cyanobacteria have developed mechanisms to decrease the energy arriving at reaction centers to protect themselves from high irradiance. In cyanobacteria, the photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) and the Fluorescence Recovery Protein are essential elements in this mechanism.

  1. Maternally invested carotenoids compensate costly ectoparasitism in the hihi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, John G; Thorogood, Rose; Brekke, Patricia; Cassey, Phillip; Karadas, Filiz; Armstrong, Doug P

    2009-08-04

    Dietary ingested carotenoid biomolecules have been linked to both improved health and immunity in nestling birds. Here, we test whether maternally invested egg carotenoids can offset the cost of parasitism in developing nestling hihi (Notiomystis cincta) from the bloodsucking mite (Ornithonyssus bursa). Our results reveal clear negative effects of parasitism on nestlings, and that maternally derived carotenoids compensate this cost, resulting in growth parameters and ultimate mass achieved being similar to nonparasitized young. Our results offer an unique example of a direct positive relationship between enhanced maternal investment of carotenoids and an ability to cope with a specific and costly parasite in young birds. As O. bursa infestations reduce population viability in hihi, our findings also highlight the importance of key nutritional resources for endangered bird populations to better cope with common parasite infestations.

  2. Supply of precursors for carotenoid biosynthesis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoids of industrial and nutritional interest produced by all photosynthetic organisms, including plants. Too often, the metabolic engineering of plant carotenogenesis has been obstructed by our limited knowledge on how the endogenous pathway interacts with other related metabolic pathways, particularly with those involved in the production of isoprenoid precursors. However, recent discoveries are providing new insights into this field. All isoprenoids derive from prenyl diphosphate precursors. In the case of carotenoids, these precursors are produced predominantly by the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants. This review focuses on the progress in our understanding of how manipulation of the MEP pathway impacts carotenoid biosynthesis and on the discoveries underlining the central importance of coordinating the supply of MEP-derived precursors with the biosynthesis of carotenoids and other derived isoprenoids. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Administration of Biosimilar Insulin Analogs: Role of Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fritz, Ingo; Khatami, Hootan; Edelman, Steven V

    2017-02-01

    With the expiration of patent protection for several originator insulin analog molecules, the availability of insulin analog copies is set to increase. Many regulatory authorities have developed, and continue to refine, guidelines for the approval of biosimilar insulin analogs. Aspects such as the structure, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of biosimilar insulin analogs are extensively addressed in these guidelines, but how the biosimilar insulin analog is administered to people with diabetes is not usually a topic. The aim of this article is to highlight that the delivery device-drug combination is of particular importance. Regulatory, legal, and practical aspects of the delivery device, be it a syringe, pen, or pump, have to be considered in the context of biosimilar insulin analogs. Although the safety and efficacy of biosimilar insulin analogs per se are of primary importance for physicians and people with diabetes, functions and features of the devices used for administration also require attention from a practical point of view. Unfortunately, although there are several clinical studies investigating the technical aspects of and patient preference for the originator insulin analog pens, there are currently very little published data for nonoriginator or biosimilar insulin analog pens. In addition, it is not known if it is safe to assume that a biosimilar insulin analog cartridge is compatible with an existing originator insulin analog pen. We believe that there is a need for more discussion on the role of devices for administration of biosimilar insulin analogs.

  4. Analog signal isolation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  5. Analog signal isolation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  6. Quantum Analog Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  7. How Analogy Drives Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstadter, Doug (Indiana University)

    2004-05-05

    Many new ideas in theoretical physics come from analogies to older ideas in physics. For instance, the abstract notion of 'isospin' (or isotopic spin) originated in the prior concept of 'spin' (quantized angular momentum); likewise, the concept of 'phonon' (quantum of sound, or quantized collective excitation of a crystal) was based on the prior concept of 'photon' (quantum of light, or quantized element of the electromagnetic field). But these two examples, far from being exceptions, in fact represent the bread and butter of inventive thinking in physics. In a nutshell, intraphysics analogy-making -- borrowing by analogy with something already known in another area of physics -- is central to the progress of physics. The aim of this talk is to reveal the pervasiveness -- indeed, the indispensability -- of this kind of semi-irrational, wholly intuitive type of thinking (as opposed to more deductive mathematical inference) in the mental activity known as 'doing physics'. Speculations as to why wild analogical leaps are so crucial to the act of discovery in physics (as opposed to other disciplines) will be offered.

  8. Synthesis, reactions and structure-activity relationships of 1-hydroxyspiro[2.5]cyclooct-4-en-3-ones: illudin analogs with in vitro cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Gopal; Bracht, Karin; Bednarski, Patrick J; Lalk, Michael; Langer, Peter

    2006-07-15

    1-Hydroxyspiro[2.5]cyclooct-4-en-3-ones-analogs of natural illudines--were prepared in good yields by cyclization of 1,3-dicarbonyl dianions or 1,3-bis-silyl enol ethers ('masked dianions') with 1,1-diacylcyclopropanes. Several spirocyclopropanes showed a significant antiproliferative activity against human leukemia HL60 cells in vitro. 1-Hydroxyspiro[2.5]cyclooct-4-en-3-ones represent highly reactive precursors of unstable spiro[5.2]cycloocta-4,7-dien-6-ones and reactions with a number of nucleophiles were studied.

  9. Enhanced C30 carotenoid production in Bacillus subtilis by systematic overexpression of MEP pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dan; Abdallah, Ingy I; de Haan, Ilse E M; Sibbald, Mark J J B; Quax, Wim J

    2015-07-01

    Creating novel biosynthetic pathways and modulating the synthesis of important compounds are one of the hallmarks of synthetic biology. Understanding the key parameters controlling the flux of chemicals throughout a metabolic pathway is one of the challenges ahead. Isoprenoids are the most functionally and structurally diverse group of natural products from which numerous medicines and relevant fine chemicals are derived. The well-characterized and broadly used production organism Bacillus subtilis forms an ideal background for creating and studying novel synthetic routes. In comparison to other bacteria, B. subtilis emits the volatile compound isoprene, the smallest representative of isoprenoids, in high concentrations and thus represents an interesting starting point for an isoprenoid cell factory. In this study, the effect of systematic overexpression of the genes involved in the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway on isoprenoid production in B. subtilis was investigated. B. subtilis strains harboring a plasmid containing C30 carotenoid synthetic genes, crtM and crtN, were combined with pHCMC04G plasmids carrying various synthetic operons of the MEP pathway genes. The levels of produced carotenoids, diaponeurosporene and diapolycopene, were used as indication of the role of the various enzymes on the flux of the MEP pathway. It was shown that the production of carotenoids can be increased significantly by overexpressing the MEP pathway enzymes. More broadly, the strains developed in this study can be used as a starting point for various isoprenoid cell factories.

  10. Influence of olive oil on carotenoid absorption from tomato juice and effects on postprandial lipemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Sara; Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Vallverdu-Queralt, Anna; Valderas-Martinez, Palmira; Illán, Montse; Sacanella, Emilio; Escribano, Elvira; Estruch, Ramon; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa Ma

    2015-02-01

    The potential benefits of tomato-rich diets for the cardiovascular system have been related to plasma concentrations of carotenoids. In addition, the bioavailability of carotenoids from foods depends on their chemical structure, processing and the food matrix. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of adding oil to tomato juice (not treated with heat) on the bioavailability of plasma carotenoids and postprandial lipid response. In a randomized, controlled, crossover feeding trial, eleven healthy volunteers were assigned to receive a single ingestion of 750g of tomato juice (TJ) containing 10% of refined olive oil/70kg body weight (BW) and 750g of TJ without oil/70kg BW on two different days. All lycopene isomers increased significantly in subjects consuming TJ with oil, reaching the maximum concentration at 24h. LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol decreased significantly 6h after the consumption of TJ with oil, which significantly correlated with an increase of trans-lycopene and 5-cis-lycopene, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolutionary origins and functions of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in marine diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha Coesel

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are produced by all photosynthetic organisms, where they play essential roles in light harvesting and photoprotection. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway of diatoms is largely unstudied, but is of particular interest because these organisms have a very different evolutionary history with respect to the Plantae and are thought to be derived from an ancient secondary endosymbiosis between heterotrophic and autotrophic eukaryotes. Furthermore, diatoms have an additional xanthophyll-based cycle for dissipating excess light energy with respect to green algae and higher plants. To explore the origins and functions of the carotenoid pathway in diatoms we searched for genes encoding pathway components in the recently completed genome sequences of two marine diatoms. Consistent with the supplemental xanthophyll cycle in diatoms, we found more copies of the genes encoding violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE and zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP enzymes compared with other photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, the similarity of these enzymes with those of higher plants indicates that they had very probably diversified before the secondary endosymbiosis had occurred, implying that VDE and ZEP represent early eukaryotic innovations in the Plantae. Consequently, the diatom chromist lineage likely obtained all paralogues of ZEP and VDE genes during the process of secondary endosymbiosis by gene transfer from the nucleus of the algal endosymbiont to the host nucleus. Furthermore, the presence of a ZEP gene in Tetrahymena thermophila provides the first evidence for a secondary plastid gene encoded in a heterotrophic ciliate, providing support for the chromalveolate hypothesis. Protein domain structures and expression analyses in the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum indicate diverse roles for the different ZEP and VDE isoforms and demonstrate that they are differentially regulated by light. These studies therefore reveal the ancient origins of several

  12. Carotenoids microencapsulation by spray drying method and supercritical micronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewska-Turak, Emilia

    2017-09-01

    Carotenoids are used as natural food colourants in the food industry. As unstable natural pigments they need protection. This protection can involve the microencapsulation process. There are numerous techniques that can be used for carotenoid protection, but two of them -spray drying and supercritical micronization - are currently the most commonly used. The objective of this paper is to describe these two techniques for carotenoid microencapsulation. In this review information from articles from the last five years was taken into consideration. Pigments described in the review are all carotenoids. Short summary of carotenoids sources was presented. For the spray drying technique, a review of carrier material and process conditions was made. Moreover, a short description of some of the most suitable processes involving supercritical fluids for carotenoids (astaxanthin, β-carotene, lutein and lycopene) encapsulation was given. These include the Supercritical Antisolvent process (SAS), Particles from Gas-Saturated Solutions (PGSS), Supercritical Fluid Extraction From an Emulsion (SFEE) and Solution Enhanced Dispersion by Supercritical fluids (SEDS). In most cases the studies, independently of the described method, were conducted on the laboratory scale. In some a scale-up was also tested. In the review a critical assessment of the used methods was made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel B; Nascimbene, Paul C; Dove, Carla J; Grimaldi, David A; James, Helen F

    2014-06-09

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  14. Differences in plasma and nipple aspirate carotenoid by lactation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantais-Smith, L M; Covington, C Y; Nordstrom-Klee, B A; Grubbs, C J; Eto, I; Lawson, D M; Pieper, B A; Northouse, L L

    2001-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants, such as provitamin A carotenoid, have a protective effect against breast cancer. The transport of carotenoid from the blood into the breast microenvironment may be enhanced by lactation. To examine the association between plasma and nipple aspirate carotenoid levels by lactation and post-wean status. The sample consisted of 43 women, ages 18-45, who were at least 12 months postpartum. Women who had breastfed their last infant were at least 3 months post-wean. Women collected breast fluid every other day for 17 days and had a venipuncture for total nipple aspirate and plasma carotenoid, and completed a written health assessment. The association between plasma and nipple aspirate carotenoid levels was significant for breastfeeding women (r =.39, p=.03), but not for non-breastfeeding women (r =.31, p =.27). However, while the association between plasma and nipple aspirate carotenoid levels was significant for women at or less than 9 months post-wean (r =.65, p = .01), the effect for women after 9 months post-wean (r = .21, p =.45) was not significant. Lactation may be protective by enhancing the delivery of chemopreventive substances available in the blood to the cell level of the breast, even after breast involution has occurred post lactation.

  15. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-06-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Retinal is formed from apo-carotenoids in Nostoc sp. PCC7120: in vitro characterization of an apo-carotenoid oxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzinger, Daniel; Ruch, Sandra; Kloer, Daniel P.; Wilde, Annegret; Al-Babili, Salim

    2006-01-01

    The sensory rhodopsin from Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. PCC7120 is the first cyanobacterial retinylidene protein identified. Here, we report on NosACO (Nostoc apo-carotenoid oxygenase), encoded by the ORF (open reading frame) all4284, as the candidate responsible for the formation of the required chromophore, retinal. In contrast with the enzymes from animals, NosACO converts β-apo-carotenals instead of β-carotene into retinal in vitro. The identity of the enzymatic products was proven by HPLC and gas chromatography–MS. NosACO exhibits a wide substrate specificity with respect to chain lengths and functional end-groups, converting β-apo-carotenals, (3R)-3-hydroxy-β-apo-carotenals and the corresponding alcohols into retinal and (3R)-3-hydroxyretinal respectively. However, kinetic analyses revealed very divergent Km and Vmax values. On the basis of the crystal structure of SynACO (Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 apo-carotenoid oxygenase), a related enzyme showing similar enzymatic activity, we designed a homology model of the native NosACO. The deduced structure explains the absence of β-carotene-cleavage activity and indicates that NosACO is a monotopic membrane protein. Accordingly, NosACO could be readily reconstituted into liposomes. To localize SynACO in vivo, a Synechocystis knock-out strain was generated expressing SynACO as the sole carotenoid oxygenase. Western-blot analyses showed that the main portion of SynACO occurred in a membrane-bound form. PMID:16759173

  17. Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

  18. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering for marine carotenoids: new opportunities and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chonglong; Kim, Jung-Hun; Kim, Seon-Won

    2014-09-17

    Carotenoids are a class of diverse pigments with important biological roles such as light capture and antioxidative activities. Many novel carotenoids have been isolated from marine organisms to date and have shown various utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. In this review, we summarize the pathways and enzymes of carotenoid synthesis and discuss various modifications of marine carotenoids. The advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for carotenoid production are also reviewed, in hopes that this review will promote the exploration of marine carotenoid for their utilizations.

  19. Antarctic analogs for Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A. E.; Andersen, D. T.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is a new world for Astrobiology. The Cassini discovery of the icy plume emanating from the South Polar region indicates an active world, where detection of water, organics, sodium, and nano-particle silica in the plume strongly suggests that the source is a subsurface salty ocean reservoir. Recent gravity data from Cassini confirms the presence of a regional sea extending north to 50°S. An ocean habitat under a thick ice cover is perhaps a recurring theme in the Outer Solar System, but what makes Enceladus unique is that the plume jetting out into space is carrying samples of this ocean. Therefore, through the study of Enceladus' plumes we can gain new insights not only of a possible habitable world in the Solar Systems, but also about the formation and evolution of other icy-satellites. Cassini has been able to fly through this plume - effectively sampling the ocean. It is time to plan for future missions that do more detailed analyses, possibly return samples back to Earth and search for evidence of life. To help prepare for such missions, the need for earth-based analog environments is essential for logistical, methodological (life detection) and theoretical development. We have undertaken studies of two terrestrial environments that are close analogs to Enceladus' ocean: Lake Vida and Lake Untersee - two ice-sealed Antarctic lakes that represent physical, chemical and possibly biological analogs for Enceladus. By studying the diverse biology and physical and chemical constraints to life in these two unique lakes we will begin to understand the potential habitability of Enceladus and other icy moons, including possible sources of nutrients and energy, which together with liquid water are the key ingredients for life. Analog research such as this will also enable us to develop and test new strategies to search for evidence of life on Enceladus.

  20. Improving carotenoid extraction from tomato waste by pulsed electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eLuengo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the influence of the application of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF of different intensities (3-7 kV/cm and 0-300 μs on the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel and pulp in a mixture of hexane:acetone:ethanol was studied with the aim of increasing extraction yield or reducing the percentage of the less green solvents in the extraction medium. According to the cellular disintegration index, the optimum treatment time for the permeabilization of tomato peel and pulp at different electric field strengths was 90 µs. The PEF permeabilization of tomato pulp did not significantly increase the carotenoid extraction. However, a PEF-treatment at 5 kV/cm improved the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel by 39 % as compared with the control in a mixture of hexane:ethanol:acetone (50:25:25. Further increments of electric field from 5 to 7 kV/cm did not increase significantly the extraction of carotenoids. . The presence of acetone in the solvent mixture did not positively affect the carotenoid extraction when the tomato peels were PEF-treated. Response surface methodology was used to determine the potential of PEF for reducing the percentage of hexane in a hexane:ethanol mixture. The application of a PEF-treatment allowed reducing the hexane percentage from 45 to 30 % without affecting the carotenoid extraction yield. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts obtained from tomato peel was correlated with the carotenoid concentration and it was not affected by the PEF-treatment.

  1. Carotenoids of Microalgae Used in Food Industry and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateau, Hélène; Solymosi, Katalin; Marchand, Justine; Schoefs, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    Since the industrial revolution, the consumption of processed food increased dramatically. During processing, food material loses many of its natural properties. The simple restoration of the original properties of the processed food as well as fortification require food supplementation with compounds prepared chemically or of natural origin. The observations that natural food additives are safer and better accepted by consumers than synthetic ones have strongly increased the demand for natural compounds. Because some of them have only a low abundance or are even rare, their market price can be very high. This is the case for most carotenoids of natural origin to which this review is dedicated. The increasing demand for food additives of natural origin contributes to an accelerated depletion of traditional natural resources already threatened by intensive agriculture and pollution. To overcome these difficulties and satisfy the demand, alternative sources for natural carotenoids have to be found. In this context, photosynthetic microalgae present a very high potential because they contain carotenoids and are able to produce particular carotenoids under stress. Their potential also resides in the fact that only ten thousands of microalgal strains have been described while hundred thousands of species are predicted to exist. Carotenoids have been known for ages for their antioxidant and coloring properties, and a large body of evidence has been accumulated about their health potential. This review summarizes both the medicinal and food industry applications of microalgae with emphasis on the former. In addition, traditional and alternative microalgal sources used for industrial carotenoid extraction, the chemical and physical properties, the biosynthesis and the localization of carotenoids in algae are also briefly discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian colour vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Matthew B; Collins, Aaron M; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Corbo, Joseph C

    2015-10-06

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Thus, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. A Systematic Evaluation of Analogs and Automated Read ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read-across is a data gap filling technique widely used within category and analog approaches to predict a biological property for a data-poor (target) chemical using known information from similar (source analog) chemical(s). Potential source analogs are typically identified based on structural similarity. Although much guidance has been published for read-across, practical principles for the identification and evaluation of the scientific validity of source analogs remains lacking. This case study explores how well 3 structure descriptor sets (Pubchem, Chemotyper and MoSS) are able to identify analogs for read-across and predict Estrogen Receptor (ER) binding activity for a specific class of chemicals: hindered phenols. For each target chemical, analogs were selected using each descriptor set with two cut-offs: (1) Minimum Tanimoto similarity (range 0.1 - 0.9), and (2) Closest N analogs (range 1 - 10). Each target-analog pair was then evaluated for its agreement with measured ER binding and agonism. The analogs were subsequently filtered using: (1) physchem properties (LogKow & Molecular Volume), and (2) number of literature sources as a marker for the quality of the experimental data. A majority vote prediction was made for each target phenol by reading-across from the closest N analogs. The data set comprised 462 hindered phenols and 257 non-hindered phenols. The results demonstrate that: (1) The concordance in ER activity rises with increasing similarity,

  4. A Systematic Evaluation of Analogs for the Read-across ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read-across is a data gap filling technique widely used within category and analog approaches to predict a biological property for a target data-poor chemical using known information from similar (source analog) chemical(s). Potential source analogs are typically identified based on structural similarity. Although much guidance has been published for read-across, practical guiding principles for the identification and evaluation of the scientific validity of source analogs, which is a critical step in deriving a robust read-across prediction, remains largely lacking.This case study explores the extent to which 3 structure descriptor sets (Pubchem, Chemotyper and MoSS) and their combinations are able to identify valid analogs for reading across Estrogen Receptor (ER) activity for a specific class of chemicals: hindered phenols. For each target chemical, two sets of analogs (hindered and non-hindered phenols) were selected using each descriptor set with two cut-offs: (1). Minimum Tanimoto similarity (range 0.1 - 0.9), and (2). Closest N analogs (range 1 - 10). Each target-analog pair was then evaluated for its agreement with measured ER binding and agonism. Subsequently, the analogs were filtered using physchem properties (LogKow & Molecular Volume) and the resultant agreement between each target-analog pair was evaluated. The data set comprised 462 hindered phenols and 296 non-hindered phenols. The results demonstrate that: (1). The concordance in ER activity r

  5. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of {beta}-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar ({approx}1 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for {beta}-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower ({approx}0.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for {beta}-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number

  6. Determination of carotenoids in Dunaliella salina cultivated in Taiwan and antioxidant capacity of the algal carotenoid extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chao-Chin; Lin, Jau-Tien; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chou, Fen-Pi; Yang, Deng-Jye

    2008-07-15

    A simple HPLC method with good separation efficiency was developed to determine all-trans and cis forms of carotenoids in Dunaliella salina cultivated in Taiwan. The analysis used a C30 column (250×4.6mm, 5μm) and an isocratic solvent system (flow rate=1mL/min) mixing methanol-acetonitrile-water (84/14/2, v/v/v) and methylene chloride, (75/25, v/v). Carotenoids were detected at 450nm. Moreover, the antioxidant capacities of the algal carotenoid extract were also evaluated with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay, reducing power and 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. Results showed that 7 carotenoids in the algal extract could be separated simultaneously within 30min and the total amount of them was 290.77mg/g algae. The contents of all-trans-β-carotene and 9- or 9'-cis-β-carotene, the major carotenoids in the algae, were 138.25 and 124.65mg/g algae, respectively. The contents of all-trans-lutein, all-trans-zeaxanthin, 13- or 13'-cis-β-carotene, all-trans-α-carotene and 9- or 9'-cis-α-carotene were 6.55, 11.27, 4.95, 2.69, and 2.41mg/g algae, respectively. The algal carotenoid extract had significantly higher antioxidant activity than all-trans forms of α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin in all antioxidant assays. The cis forms of carotenoids, especially 9- or 9'-cis-β-carotene, might play crucial roles for the antioxidant capacities of the algal extract. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Process optimisation for recovery of carotenoids from tomato waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Irini F; Oreopoulou, Vassiliki

    2011-12-01

    Carotenoids constitute an important component of waste originating from tomato processing plants. Studies were carried out to assess the extraction yield of tomato waste carotenoids in different solvents and solvent mixtures and to optimise the extraction conditions for maximum recovery. A mixture of ethyl acetate and hexane gave the highest carotenoid extraction yield among the others examined. Extraction conditions, such as percentage of hexane in the solvent mixture of ethyl acetate and hexane, ratio of solvent to waste and particle size were optimised using a statistically designed experiment. A regression equation for predicting the carotenoid yield as a function of three extraction variables was derived by statistical analysis and a model with predictive ability of 0.97 was obtained. The optimised conditions for maximum carotenoid yield (37.5mgkg(-1)drywaste) were 45% hexane in solvent mixture, solvent mixture to waste ratio of 9.1:1 (v/w) and particle size 0.56mm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhancement of Rhodobacter sphaeroides growth and carotenoid production through biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuli; Zhang, Guangming; Li, Xiangkun; Wu, Pan; Zhang, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis/cereus L2 was added as a biostimulant to enhance the biomass accumulation and carotenoid yield of Rhodobacter sphaeroides using wastewater as the culturing medium. Results showed that biostimulation could significantly enhance the R. sphaeroides biomass production and carotenoid yield. The optimal biostimulant proportion was 40 μL (about 6.4×10(5) CFU). Through the use of biostimulation, chemical oxygen demand removal, R. sphaeroides biomass production, carotenoid concentration, and carotenoid yield were improved by 178%, 67%, 214%, and 70%, respectively. Theoretical analysis revealed that there were two possible reasons for such increases. One was that biostimulation enhanced the R. sphaeroides wastewater treatment efficiency. The other was that biostimulation significantly decreased the peroxidase activity in R. sphaeroides. The results showed that the highest peroxidase activity dropped by 87% and the induction ratio of the RSP_3419 gene was 3.1 with the addition of biostimulant. The enhanced carotenoid yield in R. sphaeroides could thus be explained by a decrease in peroxidase activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Passive smoke exposure and circulating carotenoids in the CARDIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widome, Rachel; Jacobs, David R; Hozawa, Atsushi; Sijtsma, Femke; Gross, Myron; Schreiner, Pamela J; Iribarren, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to assess associations between passive smoke exposure in various venues and serum carotenoid concentrations. CARDIA is an ongoing longitudinal study of the risk factors for subclinical and clinical cardiovascular disease. At baseline in 1985/1986, serum carotenoids were assayed and passive smoke exposure inside and outside of the home and diet were assessed by self-report. Our analytic sample consisted of 2,633 black and white non-smoking adults aged 18-30 years. Greater total passive smoke exposure was associated with lower levels of the sum of the three provitamin A carotenoids, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin (-0.048 nmol/l per hour of passive smoke exposure, p = 0.001), unassociated with lutein/zeaxanthin, and associated with higher levels of lycopene (0.027 nmol/l per hour of passive smoke exposure, p = 0.010) after adjustment for demographics, diet, lipid profile, and supplement use. Exposure in both home and non-home spaces was also associated with lower levels of the provitamin A carotenoid index. Cross-sectionally, in 1985/86, passive smoke exposure in various venues was associated with reduced levels of provitamin A serum carotenoids. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Biosynthesis and regulation of carotenoids in Dunaliella: progresses and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhi-Wei; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Wu, Guang-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Natural carotenoids are high in demand in global market owing to their widespread applications in nutrition, medicine, food coloring agent and cosmetic, as well as to the natural and healthy preference of consumers today. Some strains of Dunaliella are well known for their talent of massive beta-carotene accumulation. Content of the high bioavailability stereoisomer of beta-carotene, the 9-cis stereoisomer, is highest in Dunaliella among all the natural carotenoids sources. These valuable algae have been exploited commercially for beta-carotene-rich Dunaliella powder and natural beta-carotene in many countries since 1980s. However, drawbacks of traditional production methods have hampered the worldwide promotion of carotenoids production with Dunaliella. To shake off the dilemma, complete understanding of carotenogenic mechanism is urgent. Carotenogenic mechanism in Dunaliella is described in present paper, including carotenogenic pathway and its regulation. Generally, it seems that carotenogenic pathway in Dunaliella is close to the one of higher plants. It is known that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in signal transduction for gene activation. Induction of ROS is in parallel with the enhanced beta-carotene accumulation in Dunaliella. It is suggested that ROS trigger massive carotenoids accumulation in Dunaliella. It also revealed that relation may exist between enhanced beta-carotene accumulation and lipid metabolism. For the talent of beta-carotene synthesis, it is possible that Dunaliella massively accumulates beta-carotene and other high-value carotenoids by genetic technologies.

  11. Circulating carotenoids and subsequent risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Cui, Jing; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Malspeis, Susan; Costenbader, Karen H; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Lu, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the associations between circulating carotenoids and future risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conducted a nested case-control study consisting of 227 incident RA cases and 671 matched controls with prospectively measured plasma carotenoids (α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene and lutein/zeaxanthin) levels in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II). Each incident RA case was matched with 3 healthy controls. Serologic phenotype of RA was determined by rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) obtained by chart review. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confident intervals (95% CI) for RA risk associated with each circulating carotenoid after adjusting for matching factors and other covariates. The median time from blood draw until RA diagnosis was 8.6 years. In the multivariable models, no significant associations were found between any plasma carotenoids and risk of RA. We further examined the associations for two subtypes of RA, and found associations of circulating α-carotene and β-carotene with reduced risk of seronegative RA. After correction for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method, the findings did not reach statistical significance. Circulating carotenoids levels are not associated with reduced risk of RA. Further investigations using large prospective cohorts are needed to confirm our findings.

  12. Placental and serum levels of carotenoids in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, P R; Mikhail, M S; Romney, S L

    2001-09-01

    We compared placental tissue, maternal serum, and umbilical cord venous blood levels of four dietary carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, and canthaxanthin) in normal pregnant women and those with preeclampsia. Levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, and canthaxanthin were measured in placental tissue, maternal serum, and umbilical cord venous blood from 22 normal pregnant women and 19 women with preeclampsia. The criteria for recruitment included gestational age of 30-42 weeks, singleton pregnancy, intact membranes, absence of labor contractions, and absence of any other medical complication concurrent with preeclampsia. Carotenoids were measured using high-pressure liquid chromatography. All four carotenoids were detectable in human placental tissue, maternal serum, and umbilical cord venous blood samples. The levels of beta-carotene, lycopene, and canthaxanthin in placentas from preeclamptic women were significantly lower (P =.032, .009, and .013, respectively, by Mann-Whitney test) than those from normal pregnant women. Maternal serum levels of beta-carotene and lycopene were significantly lower (P =.004 and .008, respectively, by Mann-Whitney test) in women with preeclampsia. However, umbilical cord venous blood levels of these carotenoids were not significantly different between the two groups. Lower placental tissue and maternal serum carotenoid levels in women with preeclampsia suggest that oxidative stress or a dietary antioxidant influence might have an effect on the pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  13. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases.

  14. Analog design centering and sizing

    CERN Document Server

    Graeb, Helmut E

    2007-01-01

    Here is a compendium of fundamental problem formulations of analog design centering and sizing. It provides a differentiated knowledge about the many tasks of analog design centering and sizing. In particular, coverage formulates the worst-case problem. The book stands at the interface between process technology and design technology, detailing how the two are required to reach a solution. It presents a mathematically founded description based on numerical optimization and statistics. This volume will enable analog and mixed-signal designers to assess CAD solution methods that are presented to them as well as help developers of analog CAD tools to formulate and develop solution approaches for analog design centering and sizing.

  15. ESD analog circuits and design

    CERN Document Server

    Voldman, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive and in-depth review of analog circuit layout, schematic architecture, device, power network and ESD design This book will provide a balanced overview of analog circuit design layout, analog circuit schematic development, architecture of chips, and ESD design.  It will start at an introductory level and will bring the reader right up to the state-of-the-art. Two critical design aspects for analog and power integrated circuits are combined. The first design aspect covers analog circuit design techniques to achieve the desired circuit performance. The second and main aspect pres

  16. Amount and qualities of carotenoids in fillets of fish species fed with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15 carotenoids, including 6 ketocarotenoids (4'- hydroxyechinenone, canthaxanthin, phoenicopterone, phoenicoxanthin, astaxanthin, 7,8- didehydroastaxanthin) were found, with a predominance of 3,4- dihydro- α- carotene, zeaxanthin, phoenicopterone, canthaxanthin, phoenicoxanthin and astaxanthin. Total carotenoid ...

  17. Stability of carotenoids recovered from shrimp waste and their use as colorant in fish sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachindra, N M; Mahendrakar, N S

    2010-01-01

    The stability of carotenoids recovered from shrimp waste using organic solvents and vegetable oils as affected by antioxidants and pigment carriers was evaluated during storage under different conditions. Solvent extracted carotenoid incorporated into alginate and starch as carriers was stored in metallised polyester and polypropylene pouches. Oil extracted carotenoids were stored in transparent and amber bottles. Also the use of recovered pigments as colorants in fish sausage was evaluated. Antioxidants, packaging material and storage period had a significant effect (p≤0.001) on the reduction of carotenoid content, while type of carrier had marginal effect (p≥0.05) on solvent extracted carotenoids during storage. Carotenoid content in pigmented oil was significantly affected by antioxidants (p≤0.001), packaging material (p≤0.05) and storage period (p≤0.001). Addition of carotenoid to the sausage enhanced the sensory colour, flavour and overall quality score of sausage and the added carotenoid was stable during processing.

  18. Direct quantification of carotenoids in low fat babyfoods via laser photoacoustics and colorimetric index a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doka, O.; Ajtony, Z.; Bicanic, D.D.; Valinger, D.; Vegvari, G.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are important antioxidants found in various foods including those for nutrition of infants. In this investigation, the total carotenoid content (TCC) of nine different commercially available baby foods was quantified using colorimetric index a * obtained via reflectance colorimetry (RC)

  19. Lomustine Analogous Drug Structures for Intervention of Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors: The Benefit of In Silico Substructure Search and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Bartzatt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lomustine is a nitrosourea anticancer agent shown to be effective for treatment of childhood medulloblastoma. In silico substructure searches produced 17 novel nitrosourea agents analogous to lumustine and retaining activity for DNA alkylation and cytotoxic activity. The mean values for Log P, polar surface area, formula weight, number of oxygens & nitrogens, and rotatable bonds were 2.524, 62.89 Anstroms2, 232.8, 5, and 2, respectively. All 17 agents have formula weight less than 450 and Log P less than 5, two criteria preferred for blood-brain barrier penetration. These agents have a polar surface area less than 90 Angstroms2. Each show zero violations of the Rule of five indicating favorable drug likeness and oral drug activity. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that 16 of the novel agents were highly similar to lomustine, save for agent 12 which bears a hydroxylated branched carbon substituent. A total of 17 novel anticancer agents were elucidated having molecular properties very effective for penetrating through the BBB and into the central nervous system. This study shows the effectiveness of in silico search and recognition of anticancer agents that are suitable for the clinical treatment of brain tumors.

  20. Effect of Carotenoid Supplemented Formula on Carotenoid Bioaccumulation in Tissues of Infant Rhesus Macaques: A Pilot Study Focused on Lutein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sookyoung; Neuringer, Martha; Johnson, Emily E; Kuchan, Matthew J; Pereira, Suzette L; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Erdman, John W

    2017-01-10

    Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the developing primate brain and retina, and may have important functional roles. However, its bioaccumulation pattern during early development is not understood. In this pilot study, we investigated whether carotenoid supplementation of infant formula enhanced lutein tissue deposition in infant rhesus macaques. Monkeys were initially breastfed; from 1 to 3 months of age they were fed either a formula supplemented with lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and lycopene, or a control formula with low levels of these carotenoids, for 4 months ( n = 2/group). All samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Final serum lutein in the supplemented group was 5 times higher than in the unsupplemented group. All brain regions examined showed a selective increase in lutein deposition in the supplemented infants. Lutein differentially accumulated across brain regions, with highest amounts in occipital cortex in both groups. β-carotene accumulated, but zeaxanthin and lycopene were undetectable in any brain region. Supplemented infants had higher lutein concentrations in peripheral retina but not in macular retina. Among adipose sites, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited the highest lutein level and was 3-fold higher in the supplemented infants. The supplemented formula enhanced carotenoid deposition in several other tissues. In rhesus infants, increased intake of carotenoids from formula enhanced their deposition in serum and numerous tissues and selectively increased lutein in multiple brain regions.

  1. Effect of Carotenoid Supplemented Formula on Carotenoid Bioaccumulation in Tissues of Infant Rhesus Macaques: A Pilot Study Focused on Lutein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sookyoung Jeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the developing primate brain and retina, and may have important functional roles. However, its bioaccumulation pattern during early development is not understood. In this pilot study, we investigated whether carotenoid supplementation of infant formula enhanced lutein tissue deposition in infant rhesus macaques. Monkeys were initially breastfed; from 1 to 3 months of age they were fed either a formula supplemented with lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and lycopene, or a control formula with low levels of these carotenoids, for 4 months (n = 2/group. All samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Final serum lutein in the supplemented group was 5 times higher than in the unsupplemented group. All brain regions examined showed a selective increase in lutein deposition in the supplemented infants. Lutein differentially accumulated across brain regions, with highest amounts in occipital cortex in both groups. β-carotene accumulated, but zeaxanthin and lycopene were undetectable in any brain region. Supplemented infants had higher lutein concentrations in peripheral retina but not in macular retina. Among adipose sites, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited the highest lutein level and was 3-fold higher in the supplemented infants. The supplemented formula enhanced carotenoid deposition in several other tissues. In rhesus infants, increased intake of carotenoids from formula enhanced their deposition in serum and numerous tissues and selectively increased lutein in multiple brain regions.

  2. Carotenoid and color changes in traditionally flaked and extruded products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto, Mario; Farroni, Abel; Schoenlechner, Regine; Schleining, Gerhard; Buera, Pilar

    2017-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of process and formulation on individual carotenoid loss in traditionally prepared cornflakes and those prepared by extrusion. The first step in the traditional process (maize grits cooking) promoted a 60% lutein content reduction and 40% in zeaxanthin loss, showing lutein more susceptibility to isomerization and decomposition. After toasting, the last step, the total loss averaged 80% for both compounds. The extruded maize in a plain formulation showed a 35% lutein and zeaxanthin reduction. However, in samples containing quinoa the decrease reached 60%, and the major loss (80%) was found in chia-containing formulations. Correlations between the color coordinate b(∗), total and individual carotenoid content, were obtained. It is of a major importance that the efforts to increase carotenoid content in raw materials are complemented with attempts to reduce the losses during processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microscale extraction method for HPLC carotenoid analysis in vegetable matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Pacheco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to generate simple, efficient analytical methods that are also fast, clean, and economical, and are capable of producing reliable results for a large number of samples, a micro scale extraction method for analysis of carotenoids in vegetable matrices was developed. The efficiency of this adapted method was checked by comparing the results obtained from vegetable matrices, based on extraction equivalence, time required and reagents. Six matrices were used: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., carrot (Daucus carota L., sweet potato with orange pulp (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam., pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch., watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. flour. Quantification of the total carotenoids was made by spectrophotometry. Quantification and determination of carotenoid profiles were formulated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with photodiode array detection. Microscale extraction was faster, cheaper and cleaner than the commonly used one, and advantageous for analytical laboratories.

  4. Horizontally transferred fungal carotenoid genes in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae

    OpenAIRE

    Altincicek, Boran; Kovacs, Jennifer L; Gerardo, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are organic pigments commonly synthesized by plants, algae and some micro-organisms. Through absorption of light energy, carotenoids facilitate photosynthesis and provide protection against photo-oxidation. While it was presumed that all carotenoids in animals were sequestered from their diets, aphids were recently shown to harbour genomic copies of functional carotenoid biosynthesis genes that were acquired via horizontal gene transfer from fungi. Our search of available animal t...

  5. Formal analogies in physics teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avelar Sotomaior Karam, Ricardo; Ricardo, Elio

    2012-01-01

    Reasoning by similarities, especially the ones associated with formal aspects, is one of the most valuable sources for the development of physical theories. The essential role of formal analogies in science can be highlighted by the fact that several equations for different physical situations have...... the exact same appearance. Coulomb’s law’s similarity with Newton’s, Maxwell’s application of fluid theory to electromagnetism and Hamilton’s optical mechanical analogy are some among many other examples. These cases illustrate the power of mathematics in providing unifying structures for physics. Despite...... the relevance of the subject, formal analogies are rarely systematically approached in physics education. In order to discuss this issue with pre-service physics teachers, we planned a lecture and designed a questionnaire with the goal of encouraging them to think about some “coincidences” in well known...

  6. Detection of carotenoids in psychrotrophic bacteria by spectroscopic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Kushwaha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Raman and Infrared spectroscopic signatures were used to find the different vibrational modes of individual carotenoid as their spectral fingerprint. Both have been previously demonstrated to be highly useful methodology for the identification and/or typing of microorganisms. In this study, we set out to evaluate whether these technologies could be applied to detect the presence of carotenoids in psychrotrophic bacterial isolates. FTIR and Raman spectra of four psychrotrophic bacteria viz. Kocuria rosea, K. turfanensis, Sanguibacter suarezii and Planococcus maritimus were examined during the investigation. FTIR spectra bands at 1653-1661cm-1 in different samples were assigned as part of chlorophyll, 1424-1426 cm-1 as -C-H- (CH2 bending vibration from methylene of carotenoids or lycopene, 1366-1367 cm-1 band as the -ionone ring of β-carotene due to the C-H, (–CH3 symmetrical bending. Interestingly, Raman spectra revealed intense Raman bands in the range of 1511-1530, 1153-1159 and 1003-1010 cm-1 representing bacterial carotenoids. We hypothesize the biosynthesis of carotenoid as adaptive strategy to cope up inhospitable cold environments of Leh and Ladakh. The strong, scattering bands by different isolates attributable to ν(C=C phase stretching, ν(C-C and δ(C-CH3 methyl components systems, which could be probably membrane-associated C50 carotenoids. Their high intensities are due to resonance enhancement. It can be concluded that Raman spectroscopy is a sensitive and convenient detection tool for typing of the bacterial biomarkers with less time consumption.

  7. Metabolic regulation of carotenoid-enriched Golden rice line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Gayen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A deficiency (VAD is the leading cause of blindness among children and is associated with high risk of maternal mortality. In order to enhance the bioavailability of vitamin A, high carotenoid transgenic golden rice has been developed by manipulating enzymes, such as phytoene synthase (psy and phytoene desaturase (crtI. In this study, proteome and metabolite analyses were carried out to comprehend metabolic regulation and adaptation of transgenic golden rice after the manipulation of endosperm specific carotenoid pathways. The main alteration was observed in carbohydrate metabolism pathways of the transgenic seeds. The 2D based proteomic studies demonstrated that carbohydrate metabolism-related enzymes, such as pullulanase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glucose-1-phosphate adenylyl transferase, were primarily up-regulated in transgenic rice seeds. In addition, the enzyme PPDK was also elevated in transgenic seeds thus enhancing pyruvate biosynthesis, which is the precursor in the carotenoids biosynthetic pathway. GC-MS based metabolite profiling demonstrated an increase in the levels of glyceric acid, fructo-furanose, and galactose, while decrease in galactonic acid and gentiobiose in the transgenic rice compared to WT. It is noteworthy to mention that the carotenoid content, especially β-carotene level in transgenic rice (4.3 µg/g was significantly enhanced. The present study highlights the metabolic adaptation process of a transgenic golden rice line (homozygous T4 progeny of SKBR-244 after enhancing carotenoid biosynthesis. The presented information would be helpful in the development of crops enriched in carotenoids by expressing metabolic flux of pyruvate biosynthesis.

  8. Metabolic Regulation of Carotenoid-Enriched Golden Rice Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Dipak; Ghosh, Subhrajyoti; Paul, Soumitra; Sarkar, Sailendra N; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is the leading cause of blindness among children and is associated with high risk of maternal mortality. In order to enhance the bioavailability of vitamin A, high carotenoid transgenic golden rice has been developed by manipulating enzymes, such as phytoene synthase (psy) and phytoene desaturase (crtI). In this study, proteome and metabolite analyses were carried out to comprehend metabolic regulation and adaptation of transgenic golden rice after the manipulation of endosperm specific carotenoid pathways. The main alteration was observed in carbohydrate metabolism pathways of the transgenic seeds. The 2D based proteomic studies demonstrated that carbohydrate metabolism-related enzymes, such as pullulanase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, were primarily up-regulated in transgenic rice seeds. In addition, the enzyme PPDK was also elevated in transgenic seeds thus enhancing pyruvate biosynthesis, which is the precursor in the carotenoids biosynthetic pathway. GC-MS based metabolite profiling demonstrated an increase in the levels of glyceric acid, fructo-furanose, and galactose, while decrease in galactonic acid and gentiobiose in the transgenic rice compared to WT. It is noteworthy to mention that the carotenoid content, especially β-carotene level in transgenic rice (4.3 μg/g) was significantly enhanced. The present study highlights the metabolic adaptation process of a transgenic golden rice line (homozygous T4 progeny of SKBR-244) after enhancing carotenoid biosynthesis. The presented information would be helpful in the development of crops enriched in carotenoids by expressing metabolic flux of pyruvate biosynthesis.

  9. Albert Einstein, Analogizer Extraordinaire

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Where does deep insight in physics come from? It is tempting to think that it comes from the purest and most precise of reasoning, following ironclad laws of thought that compel the clear mind completely rigidly. And yet the truth is quite otherwise. One finds, when one looks closely at any major discovery, that the greatest of physicists are, in some sense, the most crazily daring and irrational of all physicists. Albert Einstein exemplifies this thesis in spades. In this talk I will describe the key role, throughout Albert Einstein's fabulously creative life, played by wild guesses made by analogy lacking any basis whatsoever in pure reasoning. In particular, in this year of 2007, the centenary of 1907, I will describe how over the course of two years (1905 through 1907) of pondering, Einstein slowly came, via analogy, to understand the full, radical consequences of the equation that he had first discovered and published in 1905, arguably the most famous equation of all time: E = mc2.

  10. Neurotoxic Alkaloids: Saxitoxin and Its Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troco K. Mihali

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Saxitoxin (STX and its 57 analogs are a broad group of natural neurotoxic alkaloids, commonly known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs. PSTs are the causative agents of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP and are mostly associated with marine dinoflagellates (eukaryotes and freshwater cyanobacteria (prokaryotes, which form extensive blooms around the world. PST producing dinoflagellates belong to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium and Pyrodinium whilst production has been identified in several cyanobacterial genera including Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, Aphanizomenon Planktothrix and Lyngbya. STX and its analogs can be structurally classified into several classes such as non-sulfated, mono-sulfated, di-sulfated, decarbamoylated and the recently discovered hydrophobic analogs—each with varying levels of toxicity. Biotransformation of the PSTs into other PST analogs has been identified within marine invertebrates, humans and bacteria. An improved understanding of PST transformation into less toxic analogs and degradation, both chemically or enzymatically, will be important for the development of methods for the detoxification of contaminated water supplies and of shellfish destined for consumption. Some PSTs also have demonstrated pharmaceutical potential as a long-term anesthetic in the treatment of anal fissures and for chronic tension-type headache. The recent elucidation of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in cyanobacteria and the identification of new PST analogs will present opportunities to further explore the pharmaceutical potential of these intriguing alkaloids.

  11. Analytical Issues on the Determination of Carotenoids in Microalgae by Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detector; Aspectos Analiticos sobre la Determinacion de Compuestos Carotenoides en Microalgas mediante Cromatografia de Liquidos con Detector de Diodos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.; Perez, R. M.

    2012-04-11

    A preliminary study of literature review on the determination of carotenoids in microalgae samples by HPLC with diode array detector is presented. Main objective has been focused to compile data from literature and based on the main aspects of the analytical methodology used in the determination of these compounds. The work is structured as follows and affecting major analytical difficulties: Procurement and commercial availability of standard solutions. Stage of sample treatment. Chromatographic analysis. (Author) 19 refs.

  12. Engineering a carotenoid-binding site in Dokdonia sp. PRO95 Na(+)-translocating rhodopsin by a single amino acid substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anashkin, Viktor A; Bertsova, Yulia V; Mamedov, Adalyat M; Mamedov, Mahir D; Arutyunyan, Alexander M; Baykov, Alexander A; Bogachev, Alexander V

    2017-10-05

    Light-driven H(+), Cl(-) and Na(+) rhodopsin pumps all use a covalently bound retinal molecule to capture light energy. Some H(+)-pumping rhodopsins (xanthorhodopsins; XRs) additionally contain a carotenoid antenna for light absorption. Comparison of the available primary and tertiary structures of rhodopsins pinpointed a single Thr residue (Thr216) that presumably prevents carotenoid binding to Na(+)-pumping rhodopsins (NaRs). We replaced this residue in Dokdonia sp. PRO95 NaR with Gly, which is found in the corresponding position in XRs, and produced a variant rhodopsin in a ketocarotenoid-synthesising Escherichia coli strain. Unlike wild-type NaR, the isolated variant protein contained the tightly bound carotenoids canthaxanthin and echinenone. These carotenoids were visible in the absorption, circular dichroism and fluorescence excitation spectra of the Thr216Gly-substituted NaR, which indicates their function as a light-harvesting antenna. The amino acid substitution and the bound carotenoids did not affect the NaR photocycle. Our findings suggest that the antenna function was recently lost during NaR evolution but can be easily restored by site-directed mutagenesis.

  13. Potential physicochemical basis of Mediterranean diet effect: Ability of emulsified olive oil to increase carotenoid bioaccessibility in raw and cooked tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Ti; Liu, Chengmei; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Ruojie; Zhang, Zipei; Dai, Taotao; McClements, David Julian

    2016-11-01

    Excipient emulsions have compositions and structures specifically designed to increase the bioavailability of nutraceuticals in foods that they are co-ingested with. In this study, olive oil excipient emulsions were shown to significantly increase the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from tomatoes using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model (praw tomato-buffer mixture, and cooked tomato-buffer mixture; While being 32.3±2.60%, 55.7±3.28% and 42.6±3.75% for raw tomato-emulsion mixture, cooked tomato-emulsion mixture (boiled together) and cooked tomato- emulsion mixture (tomato boiled alone). These effects were attributed to: (i) the ability of digested olive oil droplets to form mixed micelles in the small intestine that solubilized the carotenoids; and, (ii) the ability of natural antioxidants (phenolics) in the olive oil to protect the carotenoids from oxidation. Thermal treatment (boiling) significantly increased carotenoid bioaccessibility from the tomatoes digested with emulsion, which was attributed to plant tissue disruption at elevated temperatures facilitating carotenoid release (pdiet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estabilidad de los pigmentos carotenoides en los alimentos

    OpenAIRE

    Meléndez Martínez, Antonio Jesús; Vicario Romero, Isabel; Heredia Mira, Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Los pigmentos carotenoides son compuestos responsables de la coloración de gran número de alimentos vegetales y animales. Numerosos estudios publicados recientemente han demostrado el efecto beneficioso de estos compuestos en la salud humana, por lo que, desde un punto de vista nutricional, resulta de gran importancia conocer qué factores intervienen en la degradación de los carotenoides, ya que su pérdida, además de producir cambios de color en el alimento, conlleva una disminución de su val...

  15. Los carotenoides dietéticos en el organismo animal

    OpenAIRE

    Brenes-Soto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Los compuestos carotenoides se encuentran en plantas, algas y bacterias, principalmente, y son ingeridos por los animales en sus dietas. Estos compuestos lipofílicos se dividen en carotenos y xantofilas, dependiendo de su estructura y composición molecular.  Además de su función como precursores de la vitamina A y como antioxidantes, los carotenoides también se pueden depositar en varios tejidos y órganos como el ojo, hígado, músculo, piel, picos y plumas de aves, en los cuales también cumple...

  16. Specific oxidative cleavage of carotenoids by VP14 of maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, S.H.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Gage, D.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Tan, Bao Cai [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-20

    The plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) is formed by the oxidative cleavage of an epoxy-carotenoid. The synthesis of other apocarotenoids, such as vitamin A in animals, may occur by a similar mechanism. In ABA biosynthesis, oxidative cleavage is the first committed reaction and is believed to be the key regulatory step. A new ABA-deficient mutant of maize has been identified and the corresponding gene, Vp14, has been cloned. The recombinant VP14 protein catalyzes the cleavage of 9-cis-epoxy-carotenoids to form C{sub 25} apo-aldehydes and xanthoxin, a precursor of ABA in higher plants.

  17. Evaluation of Extraction Methods for the Analysis of Carotenoids for Different Vegetable Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stancuta Scrob

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, different solvents were used to achieve the maximum extractibility of total carotenoids. The extracted total carotenoids were estimated using UV- visible spectrophotometer. Carotenoids from vegetable matrix can be used as a food colorant, food additive, cosmetics, antioxidants and nutraceuticals.

  18. Evaluation of Extraction Methods for the Analysis of Carotenoids for Different Vegetable Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Stancuta Scrob; Sevastita Muste; Crina Muresan; Anca Farcas; Sonia Socaci; Romina Vlaic

    2013-01-01

    In this study, different solvents were used to achieve the maximum extractibility of total carotenoids. The extracted total carotenoids were estimated using UV- visible spectrophotometer. Carotenoids from vegetable matrix can be used as a food colorant, food additive, cosmetics, antioxidants and nutraceuticals.

  19. The contribution of various foods to intake of vitamin A and carotenoids in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Hulshof, K.F.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    This study presents data on dietary intake of specific carotenoids in the Netherlands, based on a recently developed food composition database for carotenoids. Regularly eaten vegetables, the main dietary source of carotenoids, were sampled comprehensively and analysed with modern analytic methods.

  20. Absorption of beta-carotene and other carotenoids in humans and animal models : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, T. van

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To review available information on absorption and further metabolism of different carotenoids in man and to discuss animal models and approaches in the study of carotenoid absorption and metabolism in man. Conclusions: Humans appear to absorb various carotenoids in a relatively

  1. Carotenoids: Actual knowledge on food sources, intakes, stability and bioavailability and their protective role in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiani, Giuseppe; Castón, María Jesús Periago; Catasta, Giovina

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are one of the major food micronutrients in human diets and the overall objective of this review is to re-examine the role of carotenoids in human nutrition. We have emphasized the attention on the following carotenoids present in food and human tissues: -carotene, -cryptoxanthin, -ca...

  2. Effects of carotenoids, immune activation and immune suppression on the intensity of chronic coccidiosis in greenfinches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepp, Tuul; Karu, Ulvi; Sild, Elin; Männiste, Marju; Hõrak, Peeter

    2011-03-01

    Allocation trade-offs of carotenoids between their use in the immune system and production of integumentary colouration have been suggested as a proximate mechanism maintaining honesty of signal traits. We tested how dietary carotenoid supplementation, immune activation and immune suppression affect intensity of coccidian infection in captive greenfinches Carduelis chloris, a passerine with carotenoid-based plumage. Immune activation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) decreased body mass among birds not supplemented with lutein, while among the carotenoid-fed birds, PHA had no effect on mass dynamics. Immune suppression with dexamethasone (DEX) induced loss of body mass and reduced the swelling response to PHA. DEX and PHA increased the concentration of circulating heterophils. Lutein supplementation increased plasma carotenoid levels but had no effect on the swelling response induced by PHA. PHA and DEX treatments did not affect plasma carotenoids. Immune stimulation by PHA suppressed the infection, but only among carotenoid-supplemented birds. Priming of the immune system can thus aid in suppressing chronic infection but only when sufficient amount of carotenoids is available. Our experiment shows the importance of carotenoids in immune response, but also the complicated nature of this impact, which could be the reason for inconsistent results in studies investigating the immunomodulatory effects of carotenoids. The findings about involvement of carotenoids in modulation of an immune response against coccidiosis suggest that carotenoid-based ornaments may honestly signal individuals' ability to manage chronic infections. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  4. Visual relations children find easy and difficult to process in figural analogies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, C.E.; Alberto, R.A.; van den Boom, M.A.; de Boeck, P.A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Analogical reasoning, the ability to learn about novel phenomena by relating it to structurally similar knowledge, develops with great variability in children. Furthermore, the development of analogical reasoning coincides with greater working memory efficiency and increasing knowledge of the

  5. Binding mode prediction of aplysiatoxin, a potent agonist of protein kinase C, through molecular simulation and structure-activity study on simplified analogs of the receptor-recognition domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Yoshiki; Yanagita, Ryo C; Takahashi, Chise; Kawanami, Yasuhiro; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-15

    Aplysiatoxin (ATX) is a naturally occurring tumor promoter isolated from a sea hare and cyanobacteria. ATX binds to, and activates, protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes and shows anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cell lines. Recently, ATX has attracted attention as a lead compound for the development of novel anticancer drugs. In order to predict the binding mode between ATX and protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) C1B domain, we carried out molecular docking simulation, atomistic molecular dynamics simulation in phospholipid membrane environment, and structure-activity study on a simple acyclic analog of ATX. These studies provided the binding model where the carbonyl group at position 27, the hydroxyl group at position 30, and the phenolic hydroxyl group at position 20 of ATX were involved in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the PKCδ C1B domain, which would be useful for the rational design of ATX derivatives as anticancer lead compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Solution structure of the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus p9 protein: a rationalization of its different ALIX binding requirements compared to the analogous HIV-p6 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henklein Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The equine infection anemia virus (EIAV p9 Gag protein contains the late (L- domain required for efficient virus release of nascent virions from the cell membrane of infected cell. Results In the present study the p9 protein and N- and C-terminal fragments (residues 1-21 and 22-51, respectively were chemically synthesized and used for structural analyses. Circular dichroism and 1H-NMR spectroscopy provide the first molecular insight into the secondary structure and folding of this 51-amino acid protein under different solution conditions. Qualitative 1H-chemical shift and NOE data indicate that in a pure aqueous environment p9 favors an unstructured state. In its most structured state under hydrophobic conditions, p9 adopts a stable helical structure within the C-terminus. Quantitative NOE data further revealed that this α-helix extends from Ser-27 to Ser-48, while the N-terminal residues remain unstructured. The structural elements identified for p9 differ substantially from that of the functional homologous HIV-1 p6 protein. Conclusions These structural differences are discussed in the context of the different types of L-domains regulating distinct cellular pathways in virus budding. EIAV p9 mediates virus release by recruiting the ALG2-interacting protein X (ALIX via the YPDL-motif to the site of virus budding, the counterpart of the YPXnL-motif found in p6. However, p6 contains an additional PTAP L-domain that promotes HIV-1 release by binding to the tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. The notion that structures found in p9 differ form that of p6 further support the idea that different mechanisms regulate binding of ALIX to primary versus secondary L-domains types.

  7. Beginning analog electronics through projects

    CERN Document Server

    Singmin, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Analog electronics is the simplest way to start a fun, informative, learning program. Beginning Analog Electronics Through Projects, Second Edition was written with the needs of beginning hobbyists and students in mind. This revision of Andrew Singmin's popular Beginning Electronics Through Projects provides practical exercises, building techniques, and ideas for useful electronics projects. Additionally, it features new material on analog and digital electronics, and new projects for troubleshooting test equipment.Published in the tradition of Beginning Electronics Through Projects an

  8. Application of a new red carotenoid pigment-producing bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 7

    production. Based on this background information, we have screened for red pigment-producing non-sulfur bacteria producing proteinases in chicken feces. ..... with corn. Na et al. (2004) reported that a high concentra- tion of carotenoid supplements to feed lowered absorp- tion efficiency (Na et al., 2004). Yolks of a more ...

  9. Retention of phenolics, carotenoids, and antioxidant activity in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of three drying methods on phenolic and carotenoid content and antioxidant activity (AOA) of Tainong 66 cultivar sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) were investigated. Roots of 12 batches of freshly harvested tuberous root were washed in tap water, allowed to dry, peeled and cut into small pieces of 0.5 to 1 ...

  10. Differential expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-04-08

    Apr 8, 2016 ... 1Division of Biotechnology, 2Division of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry and 3Division of Vegetable Crops,. ICAR–Indian Institute of .... For immature green stage, mature green stage and breaker stage fruits hexane extract was further subjected to saponification using 15%. KOH. The carotenoids in the ...

  11. Expression profile of genes coding for carotenoid biosynthetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Expression profile of genes coding for carotenoid biosynthetic pathway during ripening and their association with accumulation of lycopene in tomato fruits. Shuchi Smita, Ravi Rajwanshi, Sangram Keshari Lenka, Amit Katiyar, Viswanathan Chinnusamy and. Kailash Chander Bansal. J. Genet. 92, 363–368. Table 1.

  12. Vitamins, carotenoids, dietary fiber, and the risk of gastric carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botterweck, A.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Numerous components of fruit and vegetables are considered to decrease the risk of gastric carcinoma. In the current prospective study, the authors examined the association between the intake of vitamins, carotenoids, and dietary fiber and vitamin supplement use and the incidence rate of

  13. Colour and carotenoid changes of pasteurised orange juice during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Scheling; Vervoort, Liesbeth; Tomic, Jovana; Santiago, Jihan Santanina; Lemmens, Lien; Panozzo, Agnese; Grauwet, Tara; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2015-03-15

    The correlation of carotenoid changes with colour degradation of pasteurised single strength orange juice was investigated at 20, 28, 35 and 42°C for a total of 32 weeks of storage. Changes in colour were assessed using the CIELAB system and were kinetically described by a zero-order model. L(∗), a(∗), b(∗), ΔE(∗), Cab(∗) and hab were significantly changed during storage (pcolour parameters were 64-73 kJ mol(-1). Several carotenoids showed important changes and appeared to have different susceptibilities to storage. A decrease of β-cryptoxanthin was observed at higher temperatures, whereas antheraxanthin started to decrease at lower temperatures. Depending on the time and temperature, changes in carotenoids could be due to isomerisation reactions, which may lead to a perceptible colour change. Although the contribution of carotenoids was recognised to some extent, other reactions seem of major importance for colour degradation of orange juice during storage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Phenols, essential oils and carotenoids of Rosa canina from Tunisia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antioxidant activity of leaf extracts of Rosa canina from diverse localities of Tunisia were evaluated by ABTS and DPPH methods, whereas in those of essential oils and carotenoids extracts such activity was determined only by the ABTS method. Total phenols determined by the Folin method revealed that at Aindraham, ...

  15. Changes in membrane lipids and carotenoids during light ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Myxoxanthophyll rose within a time interval of 8 h to 24 h after the onset of exposure to HL. -carotene content started to decrease after 4 h of the onset of exposure to HL. Zeaxanthin content rose with exposure to HL, but it was only significant after 24 h of exposure. Carotenoid changes are in agreement with a coordinated ...

  16. Genetic basis of carotenoid overproduction in Fusarium oxysporum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez-Ortiz, R.; Michielse, C.; Rep, M.; Limón, M.C.; Avalos, J.

    2012-01-01

    The phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum is a model organism in the study of plant-fungus interactions. As other Fusarium species, illuminated cultures of F. oxysporum exhibit an orange pigmentation because of the synthesis of carotenoids, and its genome contains orthologous light-regulated car

  17. Vibronic coupling in the excited-states of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miki, Takeshi [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Buckup, Tiago [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Krause, Marie S. [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Southall, June [College of Medical; Veterinary, and Life Science; University of Glasgow; G12 8QQ Glasgow, UK; Cogdell, Richard J. [College of Medical; Veterinary, and Life Science; University of Glasgow; G12 8QQ Glasgow, UK; Motzkus, Marcus [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast femtochemistry of carotenoids is governed by the interaction between electronic excited states, which has been explained by the relaxation dynamics within a few hundred femtoseconds from the lowest optically allowed excited state S2to the optically dark state S1.

  18. Liver retinol and carotenoid concentration of rats experimentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the liver retinol and carotenoid concentration of rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei. Results of the liver retinol determination showed that T. brucei infection led to a progressively significant (P < 0.01) depletion of liver retinol concentration (body vitamin A status) of infected rats from ...

  19. Innovative Alternative Technologies to Extract Carotenoids from Microalgae and Seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojary, Mahesha M.; Barba, Francisco J.; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Donsì, Francesco; Pataro, Gianpiero; Dias, Daniel A.; Juliano, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Marine microalgae and seaweeds (microalgae) represent a sustainable source of various bioactive natural carotenoids, including β-carotene, lutein, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, violaxanthin and fucoxanthin. Recently, the large-scale production of carotenoids from algal sources has gained significant interest with respect to commercial and industrial applications for health, nutrition, and cosmetic applications. Although conventional processing technologies, based on solvent extraction, offer a simple approach to isolating carotenoids, they suffer several, inherent limitations, including low efficiency (extraction yield), selectivity (purity), high solvent consumption, and long treatment times, which have led to advancements in the search for innovative extraction technologies. This comprehensive review summarizes the recent trends in the extraction of carotenoids from microalgae and seaweeds through the assistance of different innovative techniques, such as pulsed electric fields, liquid pressurization, supercritical fluids, subcritical fluids, microwaves, ultrasounds, and high-pressure homogenization. In particular, the review critically analyzes technologies, characteristics, advantages, and shortcomings of the different innovative processes, highlighting the differences in terms of yield, selectivity, and economic and environmental sustainability. PMID:27879659

  20. Expression profile of genes coding for carotenoid biosynthetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fruit ripening process is associated with change in carotenoid profile and accumulation of lycopene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). In this study, we quantified the -carotene and lycopene content at green, breaker and red-ripe stages of fruit ripening in eight tomato genotypes by using high-performance liquid ...

  1. Stability of bacterial carotenoids in the presence of iron in a model of the gastric compartment - comparison with dietary reference carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-04-15

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria, Bacillus indicus HU36 and Bacillus firmus GB1 are sources of carotenoids (∼fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments and ∼thirteen distinct pink pigments, respectively). They are glycosides of oxygenated lycopene derivatives (apo-lycopenoids) and are assumed to be more heat- and gastric-stable than common carotenoids. In this study, the oxidation by O2 of the bacterial carotenoids was initiated by free iron (Fe(II) and Fe(III)) or by heme iron (metmyoglobin) in a mildly acidic aqueous solution mimicking the gastro-intestinal compartment and compared to the oxidation of the common dietary carotenoids β-carotene, lycopene and astaxanthin. Under these conditions, all bacterial carotenoids appear more stable in the presence of heme iron vs. free iron. Carotenoid autoxidation initiated by Fe(II) is relatively fast and likely involves reactive oxygen-iron species derived from Fe(II) and O2. By contrast, the corresponding reaction with Fe(III) is kinetically blocked by the slow preliminary reduction of Fe(III) into Fe(II) by the carotenoids. The stability of carotenoids toward autoxidation increases as follows: β-caroteneoxidative species. Kinetic analyses of the iron-induced autoxidation of astaxanthin and HU36 carotenoids has been performed and gives insights in the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Analogies and analogy research in technical biology and bionics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtigall, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The procedural approaches of Technical Biology and Bionics are characterized, and analogy research is identified as their common basis. The actual creative aspect in bionical research lies in recognizing and exploiting technically oriented analogies underlying a specific biological prototype to indicate a specific technical application.

  3. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on carotenoids production by native strain of Aurantiochytrium Ch25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiye Esmizade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microorganisms produce carotenoids as a part of their response to environmental stresses. Carotenoids have many applications in human health, such as antioxidant, anti-cancer, light protection activity and as a precursor for hormones. Materials and methods: In this study, the effect of different carbon and nitrogen sources was evaluated on carotenoids production by native Aurantiochytrium strain. The effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources were studied on biomass and carotenoid production. Then, carotenoids were extracted and analyzed by TLC, spectrophotometry and HPLC methods. Results: Results showed that glycerol is the best carbon source for production of high carotenoids content. Selected medium contained: glycerol (1.5% v/v, peptone (1g/l, yeast extract (1g/l and 50% of sea water. Total carotenoids content was 134.8 µg/g CDW in this medium. TLC analysis showed that the extracted carotenoid is included: beta-carotene, astaxanthin monoester, astaxanthin diester and free astaxanthin. The results of HPLC analysis showed presence of astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, echinenone and β-carotene in the carotenoid extract. Discussion and conclusion: In this research, production of carotenoids was investigated in native strain of Aurantiochytrium and carotenoids profile was included astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, β-carotene and echinenone.

  4. Carotenoids of Sea Angels Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis from the Perspective of the Food Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maoka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea angels, Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis, are small, floating sea slugs belonging to Gastropoda, and their gonads are a bright orange-red color. Sea angels feed exclusively on a small herbivorous sea snail, Limacina helicina. Carotenoids in C. limacina, P. doliiformis, and L. helicina were investigated for comparative biochemical points of view. β-Carotene, zeaxanthin, and diatoxanthin were found to be major carotenoids in L. helicina. L. helicina accumulated dietary algal carotenoids without modification. On the other hand, keto-carotenoids, such as pectenolone, 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin, and adonixanthin were identified as major carotenoids in the sea angels C. limacina and P. doliiformis. Sea angels oxidatively metabolize dietary carotenoids and accumulate them in their gonads. Carotenoids in the gonads of sea angels might protect against oxidative stress and enhance reproduction.

  5. Carotenoids of sea angels Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis from the perspective of the food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoka, Takashi; Kuwahara, Takashi; Narita, Masanao

    2014-03-13

    Sea angels, Clione limacina and Paedoclione doliiformis, are small, floating sea slugs belonging to Gastropoda, and their gonads are a bright orange-red color. Sea angels feed exclusively on a small herbivorous sea snail, Limacina helicina. Carotenoids in C. limacina, P. doliiformis, and L. helicina were investigated for comparative biochemical points of view. β-Carotene, zeaxanthin, and diatoxanthin were found to be major carotenoids in L. helicina. L. helicina accumulated dietary algal carotenoids without modification. On the other hand, keto-carotenoids, such as pectenolone, 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin, and adonixanthin were identified as major carotenoids in the sea angels C. limacina and P. doliiformis. Sea angels oxidatively metabolize dietary carotenoids and accumulate them in their gonads. Carotenoids in the gonads of sea angels might protect against oxidative stress and enhance reproduction.

  6. Evaluation of carotenoid contents in irradiated buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jaqueline M. da; Coelho, Maysa J.; Lima, Keila S.C.; Lima, Antonio L.S. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: maysa@ime.eb.br; Godoy, Ronoel L.O.; Pacheco, Sidney [EMBRAPA Agroindustria de Alimentos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ronoel@ctaa.embrapa.br; Ferreira, Rubemar S. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste CRCN-CO/CNEN, Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil); E-mail: rferreira@cnen.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L.), a typical Brazilian fruit, can be found at north, northeast and center-west regions in Brazil. It has a high nutritional value and is considered an excellent source of vitamin A precursors, called carotenoids, showing a majority of {beta}-carotene. It can be used in many regional dishes. In this study, Buriti in natura was treated with gamma irradiation, deriving from a cavity type research irradiator which has a Cs-137 radiation source, with the doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy. The objective is to evaluate the irradiation effects on nutritional quality maintenance and conservation of Buriti, focusing in optimizer the processing conditions and increase consumption as a way to fight vitamin A deficiency. Clinical, biological and dietetic studies have indicated that the lack of vitamin A is the main cause of night blindness and xerophthalmia. The use of food irradiation is growing and represents an economic benefit to the agriculture through the reduction of post harvesting losses. The irradiated fruits and the control group were evaluated through the total carotenoids analysis, by spectrophotometry, and the carotenoids (a and b-carotene and luteine) determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). ANOVA was used to treat the results. The results show that buriti is an excellent source of total carotenoids, with a concentration of 44500 {mu}g/100 g in the pulp (70% of {beta}-carotene). The reduction of carotenoids contents due to the irradiation process does not compromise its nutritional quality that is still very above of recommendations, being the dose of 0.5 kGy more appropriate. (author)

  7. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of the retro-carotenoid rhodoxanthin in avian plumage, solid-state films, and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher J; LaFountain, Amy M; Prum, Richard O; Frank, Harry A; Tauber, Michael J

    2013-11-15

    Rhodoxanthin is one of few retro-carotenoids in nature. These chromophores are defined by a pattern of single and double bond alternation that is reversed relative to most carotenoids. Rhodoxanthin is found in the plumage of several families of birds, including fruit doves (Ptilinopus, Columbidae) and the red cotingas (Phoenicircus, Cotingidae). The coloration associated with the rhodoxanthin-containing plumage of these fruit dove and cotinga species ranges from brilliant red to magenta or purple. In the present study, rhodoxanthin is characterized in situ by UV-Vis reflectance and resonance Raman spectroscopy to gain insights into the mechanisms of color-tuning. The spectra are compared with those of the isolated pigment in solution and in thin solid films. Key vibrational signatures are identified for three isomers of rhodoxanthin, primarily in the fingerprint region. Electronic structure (DFT) calculations are employed to describe the normal modes of vibration, and determine characteristic modes of retro-carotenoids. These results are discussed in the context of various mechanisms that change the electronic absorption, including structural distortion of the chromophore or enhanced delocalization of π-electrons in the ground-state. From the spectroscopic evidence, we suggest that the shift in absorption is likely a consequence of perturbations that primarily affect the excited state of the chromophore. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An update on carotenoid biosynthesis in algae: phylogenetic evidence for the existence of two classes of phytoene synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duc; Haven, James; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Polle, Juergen E W

    2009-02-01

    Carotenoids play crucial roles in structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus of bacteria, algae, and higher plants. The entry-step reaction to carotenoid biosynthesis is catalyzed by the phytoene synthase (PSY), which is structurally and functionally related in all organisms. A comparative genomic analysis regarding the PSY revealed that the green algae Ostreococcus and Micromonas possess two orthologous copies of the PSY genes, indicating an ancient gene duplication event that produced two classes of PSY in algae. However, some other green algae (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris, and Volvox carteri), red algae (Cyanidioschyzon merolae), diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum), and higher plants retained only one class of the PSY gene whereas the other gene copy was lost in these species. Further, similar to the situation in higher plants recent gene duplications of PSY have occurred for example in the green alga Dunaliella salina/bardawil. As members of the PSY gene families in some higher plants are differentially regulated during development or stress, the discovery of two classes of PSY gene families in some algae suggests that carotenoid biosynthesis in these algae is differentially regulated in response to development and environmental stress as well.

  9. Development of Venus Balloon Seismology Missions Through Earth Analog Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Komjathy, A.; Cutts, J. A.; Pauken, M. T.; Garcia, R. F.; Mimoun, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Kedar, S.; Smrekar, S. E.; Hall, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    The study of a planet’s seismic activity is central to the understanding of its internal structure. We discuss advances made through Earth analog testing for performing remote seismology on Venus using balloons floated in the mid-atmosphere.

  10. Physical Analog Modeling of Martian Dike-Induced Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, D. Y.; Watson-Morris, M. J.; Morris, A. P.

    2012-03-01

    Analog models of dike injection were performed to determine style and magnitude of structural deformation associated with the dike. Primary deformation style is contraction rather than extension, indicating that martian dikes may not create grabens.

  11. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, J.W. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the licensing perspective of the term {open_quotes}natural analog studies{close_quotes} as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization.

  12. Novel fused pyrrole heterocyclic ring systems as structure analogs of LE 300: Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation as serotonin 5-HT(2A), dopamine and histamine H(1) receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostom, Sherif A F

    2010-02-01

    LE 300 represents a structurally novel type of antagonists acting preferentially at the dopamine D(1)/D(5 )receptors and the serotonin 5-HT(2A )receptor. This compound consists of a ten-membered central azecine ring fused to an indole ring on one side and a benzene moiety on the other side. To estimate the importance of the indole and / or phenyl moieties in this highly active benz-indolo-azecine, both rings were removed and replaced with a 1H-pyrrole counterpart. Accordingly, some new analogs of LE 300 namely, pyrrolo[2,3-g]indolizine, pyrrolo[3,2-a]quinolizine rings and their corresponding dimethylpyrrolo[2,3-d]azonine, and dimethylpyrrolo[2,3-d]azecine were synthesized to be evaluated for their activity at the 5-HT(2A) and dopamine D(1), D(2L), D(4), D(5) receptors in relation to LE 300. In addition, their activity at the H(1)-histamine receptors was also determined. The results suggested that the rigid pyrrolo[2,3-g]indolizine 7 and pyrrolo[3,2-a]quinolizine 8 analogs lacked biological activity in the adopted three bioassays. However, their corresponding flexible pyrrolo[2,3-d]azonine 11 and pyrrolo[2,3-d]azecine 12 derivatives revealed weak partial agonistic activity and weak antagonistic potency at the serotonin 5-HT(2A )and histamine H(1 )receptors, respectively. Meanwhile, they showed no affinity to any of the four utilized dopamine receptors. Variation in ring size did not contribute to a significant influence on the three tested bioactivities. Removal of the hydrophobic moiety (phenyl ring) and replacement of the indole moiety with a 1H-pyrrole counterpart led to a dramatic alteration in the profile of activity of such azecine-type compounds.

  13. Structure activity relationship of C-2 ether substituted 1,5-naphthyridine analogs of oxabicyclooctane-linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents (Part-5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Meinke, Peter T; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Takano, Hisashi; Ohata, Kohei; Kurasaki, Haruaki; Nishimura, Akinori; Shibata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-09-01

    Oxabicyclooctane linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) are new class of recently reported broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. They target bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and bind to a site different than quinolones. They show no cross-resistance to known antibiotics and provide opportunity to combat drug-resistant bacteria. A structure activity relationship of the C-2 substituted ether analogs of 1,5-naphthyridine oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs are described. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of a total of 63 analogs have been summarized representing alkyl, cyclo alkyl, fluoro alkyl, hydroxy alkyl, amino alkyl, and carboxyl alkyl ethers. All compounds were tested against three key strains each of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as for hERG binding activities. Many key compounds were also tested for the functional hERG activity. Six compounds were evaluated for efficacy in a murine bacteremia model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Significant tolerance for the ether substitution (including polar groups such as amino and carboxyl) at C-2 was observed for S. aureus activity however the same was not true for Enterococcus faecium and Gram-negative strains. Reduced clogD generally showed reduced hERG activity and improved in vivo efficacy but was generally associated with decreased overall potency. One of the best compounds was hydroxy propyl ether (16), which mainly retained the potency, spectrum and in vivo efficacy of AM8085 associated with the decreased hERG activity and improved physical property. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Graphene-on-semiconductor substrates for analog electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Cavallo, Francesca; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2016-04-26

    Electrically conductive material structures, analog electronic devices incorporating the structures and methods for making the structures are provided. The structures include a layer of graphene on a semiconductor substrate. The graphene layer and the substrate are separated by an interfacial region that promotes transfer of charge carriers from the surface of the substrate to the graphene.

  15. Structure/Reactivity Relationships in the Benzo[c]phenanthrene Skeleton: Stable Ion and Electrophilic Substitution (Nitration, Bromination) Study of Substituted Analogs; Novel Carbocations and Substituted Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulé, Cédric; Laali, Kenneth K.; Okazaki, Takao; Lakshman, Mahesh K.

    2008-01-01

    A series of novel carbocations were generated by low temperature protonation of substituted benzo[c]phenanthrenes B[c]Phs and their charge delocalization pathways were elucidated by NMR based on the magnitude of Δδ13C values. It has been shown that the protonation regioselectivity is strongly controlled by methoxy and hydroxyl substituents, whose directive effects override methyl substitution effects. Regiocontrol by –OMe and –OH substituents, and its stronger influence relative to methyl groups, was also observed in the nitration and bromination reactions. Charge distribution modes in the regioisomeric protonated carbocations via parent B[c]Ph as well as in the benzylic carbocation formed via fjord-region epoxide ring opening were deduced by GIAO-DFT, and from the NPA-derived changes in charges over CHs. These patterns were compared with those derived from NMR experiments in the substituted derivatives. NMR-based charge delocalization mapping provided insight into structure/activity relationships in the methylated and fluorinated B[c]Phs. Regioselectivities observed in the nitration and bromination reactions in representative cases are the same as those via protonations. Among a group of novel nitro and bromo derivatives synthesized in this study are examples where nitro group is introduced into the fjord-region, for which X-ray structure could be obtained in one case. PMID:17394355

  16. N-acylated alanine methyl esters (NAMEs) from Roseovarius tolerans, structural analogs of quorum-sensing autoinducers, N-acylhomoserine lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Hilke; Thiel, Verena; Voget, Sonja; Patzelt, Diana; Daniel, Rolf; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Schulz, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    The Roseobacter clade is one of the most important bacteria group living in the ocean. Liquid cultures of Roseovarius tolerans EL 164 were investigated for the production of autoinducers such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) and other secondary metabolites. The XAD extracts were analyzed by GC/MS. Two AHLs, Z7-C14 : 1-homoserine lactone (HSL) and C15 : 1-HSL, were identified. Additionally, the extract contained five compounds with molecular-ion peaks at m/z 104, 145, and 158, thus exhibiting mass spectra similar to those of AHLs with corresponding peaks at m/z 102, 143, and 156. Isolation of the main compound by column chromatography, NMR analysis, dimethyl disulfide derivatization for the determination of the location of the CC bond and finally synthesis of the compound with the proposed structure confirmed the compound to be (Z)-N-(hexadec-9-enoyl)alanine methyl ester. Four additional minor compounds were identified as C14 : 0-, C15 : 0-, C16 : 0-, and C17 : 1-N-acylated alanine methyl esters (NAMEs). All NAMEs have not been described from natural sources before. A BLASTp search showed the presence of AHL-producing luxI genes, but no homologous genes potentially responsible for the structurally closely related NAMEs were found. The involvement of the NAMEs in chemical communication processes of the bacteria is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  17. X-ray structures of the proprotein convertase furin bound with substrate analog inhibitors reveal substrate specificity determinants beyond the S4 pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Sven O; Hardes, Kornelia; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Than, Manuel E

    2018-01-09

    The proprotein convertase (PC) furin is a highly specific serine protease modifying and thereby activating proteins in the secretory pathway by proteolytic cleavage. Its substrates are involved in many diseases including cancer and infections caused by bacteria and viruses. Understanding furin's substrate specificity is of crucial importance for the development of pharmacologically applicable inhibitors. Using protein X-ray crystallography we investigated the extended substrate binding site of furin in complex with three peptide derived inhibitors at up to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of the protease bound with a hexapeptide inhibitor revealed molecular details of its S6 pocket, which remained completely unknown so far. The arginine residue at P6 induced an unexpected turn-like conformation of the inhibitor backbone, which is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular H-bonds. In addition, we confirmed the binding of arginine to the previously proposed S5 pocket (S51). An alternative S5 site (S52) could be utilized by shorter sidechains as demonstrated for a 4-aminomethyl-phenylacetyl residue, which shows steric properties similar to a lysine side chain. Interestingly, we also observed binding of a peptide with citrulline at P4 substituting the highly conserved arginine. The structural data might indicate an unusual protonation state of Asp264 maintaining the interaction with uncharged citrulline. The herein identified molecular interaction sites at P5 and P6 can be utilized to improve next generation furin inhibitors. Our data will also help to predict furin substrates more precisely based on the additional specificity determinants observed for P5 and P6.

  18. Carotenoids and amphibians: effects on life history and susceptibility to the infectious pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, Rickey D; Gervasi, Stephanie S; Murray, Cindy; French, Beverly J; Bradley, Paul W; Urbina, Jenny; Blaustein, Andrew R; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are considered beneficial nutrients because they provide increased immune capacity. Although carotenoid research has been conducted in many vertebrates, little research has been done in amphibians, a group that is experiencing global population declines from numerous causes, including disease. We raised two amphibian species through metamorphosis on three carotenoid diets to quantify the effects on life-history traits and post-metamorphic susceptibility to a fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis; Bd). Increased carotenoids had no effect on survival to metamorphosis in gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) but caused lower survival to metamorphosis in wood frogs [Lithobates sylvaticus (Rana sylvatica)]. Increased carotenoids caused both species to experience slower development and growth. When exposed to Bd after metamorphosis, wood frogs experienced high mortality, and the carotenoid diets had no mitigating effects. Gray treefrogs were less susceptible to Bd, which prevented an assessment of whether carotenoids could mitigate the effects of Bd. Moreover, carotenoids had no effect on pathogen load. As one of only a few studies examining the effects of carotenoids on amphibians and the first to examine potential interactions with Bd, our results suggest that carotenoids do not always serve amphibians in the many positive ways that have become the paradigm in other vertebrates.

  19. Disruption of a horizontally transferred phytoene desaturase abolishes carotenoid accumulation and diapause in Tetranychus urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryon, Astrid; Kurlovs, Andre H; Dermauw, Wannes; Greenhalgh, Robert; Riga, Maria; Grbić, Miodrag; Tirry, Luc; Osakabe, Masahiro; Vontas, John; Clark, Richard M; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2017-07-18

    Carotenoids underlie many of the vibrant yellow, orange, and red colors in animals, and are involved in processes ranging from vision to protection from stresses. Most animals acquire carotenoids from their diets because de novo synthesis of carotenoids is primarily limited to plants and some bacteria and fungi. Recently, sequencing projects in aphids and adelgids, spider mites, and gall midges identified genes with homology to fungal sequences encoding de novo carotenoid biosynthetic proteins like phytoene desaturase. The finding of horizontal gene transfers of carotenoid biosynthetic genes to three arthropod lineages was unprecedented; however, the relevance of the transfers for the arthropods that acquired them has remained largely speculative, which is especially true for spider mites that feed on plant cell contents, a known source of carotenoids. Pigmentation in spider mites results solely from carotenoids. Using a combination of genetic approaches, we show that mutations in a single horizontally transferred phytoene desaturase result in complete albinism in the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, as well as in the citrus red mite, Panonychus citri Further, we show that phytoene desaturase activity is essential for photoperiodic induction of diapause in an overwintering strain of T. urticae, consistent with a role for this enzyme in provisioning provitamin A carotenoids required for light perception. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes of fungal origin have therefore enabled some mites to forgo dietary carotenoids, with endogenous synthesis underlying their intense pigmentation and ability to enter diapause, a key to the global distribution of major spider mite pests of agriculture.

  20. Accumulation of carotenoids and expression of carotenogenic genes in peach fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shifeng; Liang, Minhua; Shi, Liyu; Shao, Jiarong; Song, Chunbo; Bian, Kun; Chen, Wei; Yang, Zhenfeng

    2017-01-01

    To understand better the regulatory mechanism of the carotenoid accumulation, the expression profile of relevant carotenoid genes and metabolites were compared between two peach cultivars with different colors during fruit development. Meanwhile, the change pattern of carotenoid content and expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in peaches after harvest in response to blue light were also investigated. As compared to the yellow fleshed-cultivar 'Jinli', lower carotenoid levels were observed in skin and pulp in white peach cultivar 'Hujing', which might be explained by differentially expression of PpCCD4 gene. With respect to 'Jinli', the carotenoid accumulation during fruit development in fruit skin was partially linked with the transcriptional regulation of PpFPPS, PpGGPS, PpLCYB and PpCHYB. However, in the pulp, the accumulation might be also associated with the increased transcriptions of PpPDS, along with the above four genes. Blue light treatment induced carotenoid accumulation in 'Jinli' peaches during storage. In addition, the treated-fruit displayed higher expression of all the eight genes analysed with a lesser extent on PpCCD4, which suggested that the much more increased carotenoid synthesis rate could result in the higher carotenoid content in blue light-treated fruit. The results presented herein contribute to further elucidating the regulatory mechanism of carotenoid accumulation in peach fruit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ancient origins and multiple appearances of carotenoid-pigmented feathers in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; McGraw, Kevin J.; Butler, Michael W.; Carrano, Matthew T.; Madden, Odile; James, Helen F.

    2014-01-01

    The broad palette of feather colours displayed by birds serves diverse biological functions, including communication and camouflage. Fossil feathers provide evidence that some avian colours, like black and brown melanins, have existed for at least 160 million years (Myr), but no traces of bright carotenoid pigments in ancient feathers have been reported. Insight into the evolutionary history of plumage carotenoids may instead be gained from living species. We visually surveyed modern birds for carotenoid-consistent plumage colours (present in 2956 of 9993 species). We then used high-performance liquid chromatography and Raman spectroscopy to chemically assess the family-level distribution of plumage carotenoids, confirming their presence in 95 of 236 extant bird families (only 36 family-level occurrences had been confirmed previously). Using our data for all modern birds, we modelled the evolutionary history of carotenoid-consistent plumage colours on recent supertrees. Results support multiple independent origins of carotenoid plumage pigmentation in 13 orders, including six orders without previous reports of plumage carotenoids. Based on time calibrations from the supertree, the number of avian families displaying plumage carotenoids increased throughout the Cenozoic, and most plumage carotenoid originations occurred after the Miocene Epoch (23 Myr). The earliest origination of plumage carotenoids was reconstructed within Passeriformes, during the Palaeocene Epoch (66–56 Myr), and not at the base of crown-lineage birds. PMID:24966316

  2. Effects of experimental brood size manipulation and gender on carotenoid levels of Eurasian kestrels Falco tinnunculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Laaksonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals use carotenoid-pigments for coloration, as antioxidants and as enhancers of the immune system. Carotenoid-dependent colours can thus signal individual quality and carotenoids have also been suggested to mediate life-history trade-offs. METHODOLOGY: To examine trade-offs in carotenoid allocation between parents and the young, or between skin coloration and plasma of the parents at different levels of brood demand, we manipulated brood sizes of Eurasian kestrels (Falco tinnunculus. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Brood size manipulation had no overall effect on plasma carotenoid levels or skin hue of parents, but female parents had twice the plasma carotenoid levels of males. Males work physically harder than females and they might thus also use more carotenoids against oxidative stress than females. Alternatively, females could be gaining back the carotenoid stores they depleted during egg-laying by eating primarily carotenoid-rich food items during the early nestling stage. Fledglings in enlarged broods had higher plasma carotenoid concentrations than those in reduced broods. This difference was not explained by diet. In light of recent evidence from other species, we suggest it might instead be due to fledglings in enlarged broods having higher testosterone levels, which in turn increased plasma carotenoid levels. The partial cross-foster design of our experiment revealed evidence for origin effects (genetic or maternal on carotenoid levels of fledglings, but no origin-environment interaction. SIGNIFICANCE: These results from wild birds differ from studies in captivity, and thus offer new insights into carotenoid physiology in relation to division of parental care and demands of the brood.

  3. Characterization of carotenoid-protein complexes and gene expression analysis associated with carotenoid sequestration in pigmented cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoid-protein complex separation by size exclusion chromatography, protein fractionation by SDS-PAGE, and shotgun PROTEOMICS technology were used to identify and characterize carotenoid associated proteins (CAPs) of chromoplast-enriched suspensions from cassava intense yellow storage root. A no...

  4. Fluorescent probes for detecting cholesterol-rich ordered membrane microdomains: entangled relationships between structural analogies in the membrane and functional homologies in the cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald Gaibelet

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the question of fluorescent detection of ordered membrane (micro domains in living (cultured cells, with a “practical” point of view since the situation is much more complicated than for studying model membranes. We first briefly recall the bases of model membrane structural organization involving liquid-ordered and -disordered phases, and the main features of their counterparts in cell membranes that are the various microdomains. We then emphasize the utility of the fluorescent probes derived from cholesterol, and delineate the respective advantages, limitations and drawbacks of the existing ones. In particular, besides their intra-membrane behavior, their relevant characteristics should integrate their different cellular fates for membrane turn-over, trafficking and metabolism, in order to evaluate and improve their efficiency for in-situ probing membrane microdomains in the cell physiology context. Finally, at the present stage, it appears that Bdp-Chol and Pyr-met-Chol display well complementary properties, allowing to use them in combination to improve the reliability of the current experimental approaches. But the field is still open, and there remains much work to perform in this research area.

  5. Analog-to-digital conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Pelgrom, Marcel J M

    2010-01-01

    The design of an analog-to-digital converter or digital-to-analog converter is one of the most fascinating tasks in micro-electronics. In a converter the analog world with all its intricacies meets the realm of the formal digital abstraction. Both disciplines must be understood for an optimum conversion solution. In a converter also system challenges meet technology opportunities. Modern systems rely on analog-to-digital converters as an essential part of the complex chain to access the physical world. And processors need the ultimate performance of digital-to-analog converters to present the results of their complex algorithms. The same progress in CMOS technology that enables these VLSI digital systems creates new challenges for analog-to-digital converters: lower signal swings, less power and variability issues. Last but not least, the analog-to-digital converter must follow the cost reduction trend. These changing boundary conditions require micro-electronics engineers to consider their design choices for...

  6. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Lincoln, Craig N.; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  7. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague 121 16 (Czech Republic); Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J. [Institute of Molecular Cell and System Biology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Lincoln, Craig N.; Hauer, Jürgen, E-mail: juergen.hauer@tuwien.ac.at [Photonics Institute, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 27, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Savolainen, Janne [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system’s Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  8. Analog Systems for Gravity Duals

    OpenAIRE

    Hossenfelder, S.

    2014-01-01

    We show that analog gravity systems exist for charged, planar black holes in asymptotic Anti-de Sitter space. These black holes have been employed to describe, via the gauge-gravity duality, strongly coupled condensed matter systems on the boundary of AdS-space. The analog gravity system is a different condensed matter system that, in a suitable limit, describes the same bulk physics as the theory on the AdS boundary. This combination of the gauge-gravity duality and analog gravity therefore ...

  9. Molecular interactions between (--epigallocatechin gallate analogs and pancreatic lipase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihui Wang

    Full Text Available The molecular interactions between pancreatic lipase (PL and four tea polyphenols (EGCG analogs, like (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, (--gallocatechin gallate (GCG, (--epicatechin gallate (ECG, and (--epigallocatechin (EC, were studied from PL activity, conformation, kinetics and thermodynamics. It was observed that EGCG analogs inhibited PL activity, and their inhibitory rates decreased by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. PL activity at first decreased rapidly and then slowly with the increase of EGCG analogs concentrations. α-Helix content of PL secondary structure decreased dependent on EGCG analogs concentration by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. EGCG, ECG, and EC could quench PL fluorescence both dynamically and statically, while GCG only quenched statically. EGCG analogs would induce PL self-assembly into complexes and the hydrodynamic radii of the complexes possessed a close relationship with the inhibitory rates. Kinetics analysis showed that EGCG analogs non-competitively inhibited PL activity and did not bind to PL catalytic site. DSC measurement revealed that EGCG analogs decreased the transition midpoint temperature of PL enzyme, suggesting that these compounds reduced PL enzyme thermostability. In vitro renaturation through urea solution indicated that interactions between PL and EGCG analogs were weak and non-covalent.

  10. Assessment of leaf carotenoids content with a new carotenoid index: Development and validation on experimental and model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianfeng; Huang, Wenjiang; Kong, Weiping; Ye, Huichun; Dong, Yingying; Casa, Raffaele

    2017-05-01

    Leaf carotenoids content (LCar) is an important indicator of plant physiological status. Accurate estimation of LCar provides valuable insight into early detection of stress in vegetation. With spectroscopy techniques, a semi-empirical approach based on spectral indices was extensively used for carotenoids content estimation. However, established spectral indices for carotenoids that generally rely on limited measured data, might lack predictive accuracy for carotenoids estimation in various species and at different growth stages. In this study, we propose a new carotenoid index (CARI) for LCar assessment based on a large synthetic dataset simulated from the leaf radiative transfer model PROSPECT-5, and evaluate its capability with both simulated data from PROSPECT-5 and 4SAIL and extensive experimental datasets: the ANGERS dataset and experimental data acquired in field experiments in China in 2004. Results show that CARI was the index most linearly correlated with carotenoids content at the leaf level using a synthetic dataset (R2 = 0.943, RMSE = 1.196 μg/cm2), compared with published spectral indices. Cross-validation results with CARI using ANGERS data achieved quite an accurate estimation (R2 = 0.545, RMSE = 3.413 μg/cm2), though the RBRI performed as the best index (R2 = 0.727, RMSE = 2.640 μg/cm2). CARI also showed good accuracy (R2 = 0.639, RMSE = 1.520 μg/cm2) for LCar assessment with leaf level field survey data, though PRI performed better (R2 = 0.710, RMSE = 1.369 μg/cm2). Whereas RBRI, PRI and other assessed spectral indices showed a good performance for a given dataset, overall their estimation accuracy was not consistent across all datasets used in this study. Conversely CARI was more robust showing good results in all datasets. Further assessment of LCar with simulated and measured canopy reflectance data indicated that CARI might not be very sensitive to LCar changes at low leaf area index (LAI) value, and in these conditions soil moisture

  11. Resonance Raman measurements of carotenoids using light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D; Eyring, N J; Fralick, J F; Stevenson, D N; Ferguson, S B

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact commercial instrument for measuring carotenoids in skin tissue. The instrument uses two light emitting diodes (LEDs) for dual-wavelength excitation and four photomultiplier tubes for multichannel detection. Bandpass filters are used to select the excitation and detection wavelengths. The f/1.3 optical system has high optical throughput and single photon sensitivity, both of which are crucial in LED-based Raman measurements. We employ a signal processing technique that compensates for detector drift and error. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the LED Raman instrument compares favorably to laser-based Raman spectrometers. This compact, portable instrument is used for non-invasive measurement of carotenoid molecules in human skin with a repeatability better than 10%.

  12. Carotenoid extraction from plants using a novel, environmentally friendly solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Betty K; Chapman, Mary H

    2009-02-11

    Few environmentally friendly solvents are available to extract carotenoids for use in foods. The most effective known solvents are products of the petroleum industry and toxic for human consumption. Yet carotenoid extracts are desirable for use in dietary supplements and as additives to enhance the health benefits of processed foods. Ethyl lactate is an excellent solvent to extract both trans- and cis-lycopene isomers from dried tomato powder, the extraction efficiency of which is enhanced by the addition of the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol and alpha-lipoic acid, both of which are known to benefit human health. It is also useful to extract lutein and beta-carotene from dried powders prepared from white corn and carrots. Because of its low flammability and its origin as a byproduct of the corn and soybean industries, it is more advantageous than ethyl acetate, which is a petroleum product.

  13. A large column analog experiment of stable isotope variations during reactive transport: II. Carbon mass balance, microbial community structure and predation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, Jennifer L.; Bill, Markus; Lim, HsiaoChien; Wu, Cindy; Conrad, Mark E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Brodie, Eoin L.

    2014-01-01

    microbial biomass pool. Overall, our approach provides high temporal and spatial sampling resolution at field relevant flow rates, while minimizing effects of mixing and transverse dispersion. The result is a quantitative carbon budget accounting for a diversity of processes that should be considered for inclusion in reactive transport models that aim to predict carbon turnover, nutrient flux, and redox reactions in natural and stimulated subsurface systems. the mobilization of previously stabilized, sediment-bound carbon; a carbon mass balance for a through-flowing sediment column over the course of a 43-day amendment using 13C-labeled acetate; a phylogenetic microbial community structure at associated carbon mass balance in a through-flowing system at field relevant flow rates provides novel, quantitative insights into the interface between biogeochemical cycling and bulk carbon fluxes in the near-surface environment.

  14. Carotenoid-cleavage activities of crude enzymes from Pandanous amryllifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningrum, Andriati; Schreiner, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Carotenoid degradation products, known as norisoprenoids, are aroma-impact compounds in several plants. Pandan wangi is a common name of the shrub Pandanus amaryllifolius. The genus name 'Pandanus' is derived from the Indonesian name of the tree, pandan. In Indonesia, the leaves from the plant are used for several purposes, e.g., as natural colorants and flavor, and as traditional treatments. The aim of this study was to determine the cleavage of β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal by carotenoid-cleavage enzymes isolated from pandan leaves, to investigate dependencies of the enzymatic activities on temperature and pH, to determine the enzymatic reaction products by using Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrophotometry (HS-SPME GC/MS), and to investigate the influence of heat treatment and addition of crude enzyme on formation of norisoprenoids. Crude enzymes from pandan leaves showed higher activity against β-carotene than β-apo-8'-carotenal. The optimum temperature of crude enzymes was 70°, while the optimum pH value was 6. We identified β-ionone as the major volatile reaction product from the incubations of two different carotenoid substrates, β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal. Several treatments, e.g., heat treatment and addition of crude enzymes in pandan leaves contributed to the norisoprenoid content. Our findings revealed that the crude enzymes from pandan leaves with carotenoid-cleavage activity might provide a potential application, especially for biocatalysis, in natural-flavor industry. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  15. Influence of Heat Treatments on Carotenoid Content of Cherry Tomatoes

    OpenAIRE

    D?Evoli, Laura; Lombardi-Boccia, Ginevra; Lucarini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Tomatoes and tomato products are rich sources of carotenoids—principally lycopene, followed by β-carotene and lutein. The aim of this work was to study the effect of heat treatment on carotenoid content in cherry tomatoes. Raw and canned products were sampled and analysed; furthermore whole, skin and pulp fractions of cherry tomatoes were analysed when raw and home-processed, in order to better understand heat treatment effects. Lycopene content in canned tomatoes was two-fold higher than in ...

  16. Identification and Quantification of Major Carotenoids in Some Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar M. EL-Qudah

    2009-01-01

    An HPLC study of 6 raw vegetables (Okra, green beans, eggplant zucchini, carrot and tomato) most frequently consumed worldwide was carried out to determine their carotenoid composition. The samples were purchased from supermarket in the city of Boston, USA. Neoxanthin, violaxanthin and lutein were contained in all samples except tomato for neoxanthin, carrot and tomato for violaxanthin and carrot for lutein. β-carotene was contained in all samples while α-carotene was contained only...

  17. Metabolic Regulation of Carotenoid-Enriched Golden Rice Line

    OpenAIRE

    Gayen, Dipak; Ghosh, Subhrajyoti; Paul, Soumitra; Sarkar, Sailendra N.; Swapan K Datta; Datta, Karabi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is the leading cause of blindness among children and is associated with high risk of maternal mortality. In order to enhance the bioavailability of vitamin A, high carotenoid transgenic golden rice has been developed by manipulating enzymes, such as phytoene synthase (psy) and phytoene desaturase (crtI). In this study, proteome and metabolite analyses were carried out to comprehend metabolic regulation and adaptation of transgenic golden rice after the manipulation ...

  18. Determination of carotenoids in tomato juice by liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C H; Chen, B H

    2003-09-12

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed to determine the various carotenoids in tomato juice. A C30 column and a mobile phase of acetonitrile-1-butanol (7:3, v/v) (A) and methylene chloride (B) with the following gradient elution were used: 99% A and 1% B intitally, increased to 4% B in 20 min, 10% B in 50 min and returned to 1% B in 55 min. Sixteen carotenoids, including all-trans-lutein, all-trans-beta-carotene, all-trans-lycopene and their 13 cis isomers were identified and resolved within 52 min with flow-rate at 2.0 ml/min and detection at 476 nm. Of the various extraction solvent systems, the best extraction efficiency of carotenoids in tomato juice was achieved by employing ethanol-hexane (4:3, v/v). Lycopene was found to be present in largest amount in tomato juice, followed by beta-carotene and lutein.

  19. Changes in carotenoids during processing and storage of pumpkin puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provesi, João Gustavo; Dias, Carolinne Odebrecht; Amante, Edna Regina

    2011-09-01

    Changes in the contents of carotenoids and their true retentions (% TR) during the production of puree of Cucurbita moschata 'Menina Brasileira' and of Cucurbita maxima 'Exposição' pumpkins and the stability of such compounds during 180days of storage were monitored by liquid chromatography coupled with a photodiode array detector. Cooking caused higher losses than commercial sterilisation. High losses of xanthophylls such as lutein and violaxanthin were noted during processing and storage of pumpkin puree. Such losses show the low stability of these compounds. The major carotenoids, pro-vitamin A carotenes, namely, α-carotene and all-trans-β-carotene for C. moschata 'Menina Brasileira' and all-trans-β-carotene for C. maxima 'Exposição' obtained high retentions (>75%) after processing. A slight degree of isomerisation of β-carotene was noted in the puree samples, but with low concentrations of cis-isomers. Storage for 180days did not significantly affect (P⩽0.05) the concentrations of these carotenoids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analog filters in nanometer CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Uhrmann, Heimo; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the basics of analog filters and the poor transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS 10 high-performance analog filters developed by the authors in 120 nm and 65 nm CMOS are described extensively. Among them are gm-C filters, current-mode filters, and active filters for system-on-chip realization for Bluetooth, WCDMA, UWB, DVB-H, and LTE applications. For the active filters several operational amplifier designs are described. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on low-voltage low-power analog filters. To cover the topic of the book comprehensively, linearization issues and measurement methods for the characterization of advanced analog filters are introduced in addition. Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension. This book will be of value to engineers and researchers in industry as well as scientists and Ph.D students at universities. The book is also recommendable to graduate students specializing on nanoelectronics, microelectronics ...

  1. Analog-to-digital converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewyn, L. L. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    An analog to digital converter circuit arrangement is reported that is suitable for use in ultra fast pulse height analysis. The circuit uses series connected tunnel diodes to quantize a voltage signal into discrete levels.

  2. Kukoamine A analogs with lipoxygenase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Garnelis, Thomas; Athanassopoulos, Constantinos M; Papaioannou, Dionissios

    2009-10-01

    Kukoamine A (KukA) is a spermine (SPM) conjugate with dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA), with interesting biological activities. The four possible regioisomers of KukA, as well as a series of KukA analogs incorporating changes in either the SPM or the DHCA structural units, were evaluated for their antioxidant activity and their inhibitory activity on soybean lipoxygenase (LOX) and lipid peroxidation. The reducing properties of the compounds were evaluated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and found to be in the range 5-97.5%. KukA significantly inhibits LOX with IC(50) 9.5 microM. All tested analogs inhibited lipid peroxidation in the range of 11-100%. The most potent compounds KukA and its analog 3, in which the DHCA units had been replaced by O,O9-dimethylcaffeic acid units, were studied for their anti-inflammatory activity in vivo on rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and found to be of comparable activity to indomethacin. The results of the biological tests are discussed in terms of structural characteristics.

  3. Astaxanthin analogs, adonixanthin and lycopene, activate Nrf2 to prevent light-induced photoreceptor degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuki; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Nagano, Ryota; Kuse, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Kei; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Masahiro; Ishibashi, Takashi; Maoka, Takashi; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-07-01

    Carotenoids, in particular astaxanthin, possess potent antioxidant capabilities. Astaxanthin also induces NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which plays a major regulatory role in the antioxidative response. However, little is known whether the carotenoid, by-products of astaxanthin, activate Nrf2. Toward this end, we screened eight astaxanthin analogs for Nrf2 activation in murine photoreceptor cell line, 661 W, by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In addition, we monitored cell death in 661 W cells pretreated with astaxanthin analogs or only pretreated for 6 h with astaxanthin analogs and then exposed to light. Furthermore, we quantified the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Cell death was quantified after light exposure by nuclear staining. Nrf2-controlled genes Ho-1, Nqo-1, and Gclm by qRT-PCR and Nrf2 in the nucleus were upregulated in 661 W cells exposed astaxanthin, adonixanthin, echinenone, and lycopene. Moreover, astaxanthin, adonixanthin, echinenone, β-carotene, adonirubin, and lycopene, but not canthaxanthin, suppressed ROS production and protected cells against light-induced damage. Moreover, pretreatment with adonixanthin or lycopene only before light exposure protected against light-induced cell damage and Nrf2 silencing canceled these effects. These findings indicate that the more potent astaxanthin analogs, adonixanthin and lycopene, protect against light-induced cell damage through not only an anti-oxidative response but also through Nrf2 activation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo Raman spectroscopy detects increased epidermal antioxidative potential with topically applied carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Caspers, P. J.; van der Pol, A.; Richter, H.; Patzelt, A.; Zastrow, L.; Darvin, M.; Sterry, W.; Fluhr, J. W.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the distribution of the carotenoids as a marker for the complete antioxidative potential in human skin was investigated before and after the topical application of carotenoids by in vivo Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The carotenoid profile was assessed after a short term topical application in 4 healthy volunteers. In the untreated skin, the highest concentration of natural carotenoids was detected in different layers of the stratum corneum (SC) close to the skin surface. After topical application of carotenoids, an increase in the antioxidative potential in the skin could be observed. Topically applied carotenoids penetrate deep into the epidermis down to approximately 24 μm. This study supports the hypothesis that antioxidative substances are secreted via eccrine sweat glands and/or sebaceous glands to the skin surface. Subsequently they penetrate into the different layers of the SC.

  5. Concurrent production of carotenoids and lipid by a filamentous microalga Trentepohlia arborum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Lanlan; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-08-01

    During the study of Trentepohlia arborum it became clear that its cells are rich in lipids and carotenoids. Thus, lipid content, composition and fatty acids profiles in individual lipid classes, as well as pigment profiles, responding to different culture conditions, were further investigated. The results showed that the predominant carotenoids and lipid fraction in total lipid in this study was β-carotene and TAG, respectively. The lipid content increased significantly under high light while nitrogen-replete conditions induced the highest carotenoids content. However, only with a double stress of high light and nitrogen-deficiency it was possible to maximize the productivities of both carotenoids and lipids. Carotenoids (mainly β-carotene) accounted for ca. 5% of the microalgal lipid under the double stress. Data herein show the potential of T. arborum for the production of both lipids and carotenoids, and hence provide an appropriate way to produce different products from T. arborum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biosynthesis and engineering of carotenoids and apocarotenoids in plants: state of the art and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Carlo; Diretto, Gianfranco; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids and their apocarotenoid derivatives are isoprenoid molecules important for the primary and secondary metabolisms of plants and other living organisms, displaying also key health-related roles in humans and animals. Progress in the knowledge of the carotenoid pathway at the genetic, biochemical and molecular level, supported by successful genetic engineering examples for an increasing number of important plant crops have paved the way for precise molecular breeding of carotenoids. In this review, following a description of the general carotenoid pathway, select examples of plant species able to produce specialty carotenoids and apocarotenoids are illustrated. An update on plant carotenoid engineering is also provided for non-solanaceous crops and members of the Solanaceae family, by means of different strategies and making use of plant and bacterial genes.

  7. Triplet state spectra and dynamics of peridinin analogs having different extents of pi-electron conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligotla, Shanti; Doyle, Sara; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Hasegawa, Shinji; Kajikawa, Takayuki; Katsumura, Shigeo; Frank, Harry A

    2010-03-01

    The Peridinin-Chlorophyll a-Protein (PCP) complex has both an exceptionally efficient light-harvesting ability and a highly effective protective capacity against photodynamic reactions involving singlet oxygen. These functions can be attributed to presence of a substantial amount of the highly-substituted and complex carotenoid, peridinin, in the protein and the facts that the low-lying singlet states of peridinin are higher in energy than those of chlorophyll (Chl) a, but the lowest-lying triplet state of peridinin is below that of Chl a. Thus, singlet energy can be transferred from peridinin to Chl a, but the Chl a triplet state is quenched before it can sensitize the formation of singlet oxygen. The present investigation takes advantage of Chl a as an effective triplet state donor to peridinin and explores the triplet state spectra and dynamics of a systematic series of peridinin analogs having different numbers of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. The carotenoids investigated are peridinin, which has a C(37) carbon skeleton and eight conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, and three synthetic analogs: C(33)-peridinin, having two less double bonds than peridinin, C(35)-peridinin which has one less double bond than peridinin, and C(39)-peridinin which has one more double bond than peridinin. In this study, the behavior of the triplet state spectra and kinetics exhibited by these molecules has been investigated in polar and nonpolar solvents and reveals a substantial effect of both pi-electron conjugated chain length and solvent environment on the spectral lineshapes. However, only a small dependence of these factors is observed on the kinetics of triplet energy transfer from Chl a and on carotenoid triplet state deactivation to the ground state.

  8. Optimal neural computations require analog processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.

    1998-12-31

    This paper discusses some of the limitations of hardware implementations of neural networks. The authors start by presenting neural structures and their biological inspirations, while mentioning the simplifications leading to artificial neural networks. Further, the focus will be on hardware imposed constraints. They will present recent results for three different alternatives of parallel implementations of neural networks: digital circuits, threshold gate circuits, and analog circuits. The area and the delay will be related to the neurons` fan-in and to the precision of their synaptic weights. The main conclusion is that hardware-efficient solutions require analog computations, and suggests the following two alternatives: (i) cope with the limitations imposed by silicon, by speeding up the computation of the elementary silicon neurons; (2) investigate solutions which would allow the use of the third dimension (e.g. using optical interconnections).

  9. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  10. Investigations of carotenoids in fungi. III. Fructifications of some species from the genus Suillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazyli Czeczuga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Using column and thin-layer chromatography the occurrence of carotenoids and their content was determined in fructifications of 5 species from the genus Suillus. 21 carotenoids were found, among them 3 which had not hitherto been detected in fungi (auroxanthin, 3,4-dihydroxy-α-carotene and myxoxantophyll. Moreover quantitative and qualitative differences were found in the content of carotenoids in fructifications of Boletus luteus which may be of importance in their taxonomy.

  11. Plasma carotenoid levels in passerines are related to infection by (some parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi eFiguerola

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plumage coloration plays an important role in intra and inter-sexual competition in birds. Many of the yellow, orange or red colours present in birds are carotenoid dependent. Carotenoids can not be synthetized de novo by birds and consequently should be obtained through their diet, and access to carotenoids may differ between individuals and species. In addition to ornamentation, carotenoids are important for bird physiology and it has been proposed that a trade-off in their allocation to these two functions occurs. Under this scenario parasites may play a central role in maintaining the honesty of plumage as a signaling system by increasing the demands for carotenoids for infection or damage control and/or by reducing carotenoid absorption in the intestines. We analyzed the relationship between (1 carotenoid concentrations in plasma and (2 blood and intestinal parasite richness and abundance in 22 species of passerines sampled in spring. Loads of different groups of parasites were unrelated so conclusions drawn from examining a particular group of parasites cannot be extrapolated to the whole community of pathogens and parasites inhabiting a host. At intraspecific level plasma carotenoid concentration was negatively related to the richness of intestinal parasites and the abundance of some groups of intestinal parasites, at interspecific level plasma carotenoid concentration was negatively related with the abundance of intestinal parasites. No relationship at intra- nor interpecific level was found between carotenoids and blood parasites. The results suggest that intestinal parasites play an important role in the evolution and maintenance of carotenoid-derived sexually selected ornamentations probably through a negative impact on the uptake of carotenoids at the gut.

  12. Comparative genomics reveals candidate carotenoid pathway regulators of ripening watermelon fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Stefania; Piro, Gabriella; Lee, Je Min; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; Giovannoni, James J; Lenucci, Marcello S

    2013-11-12

    Many fruits, including watermelon, are proficient in carotenoid accumulation during ripening. While most genes encoding steps in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been cloned, few transcriptional regulators of these genes have been defined to date. Here we describe the identification of a set of putative carotenoid-related transcription factors resulting from fresh watermelon carotenoid and transcriptome analysis during fruit development and ripening. Our goal is to both clarify the expression profiles of carotenoid pathway genes and to identify candidate regulators and molecular targets for crop improvement. Total carotenoids progressively increased during fruit ripening up to ~55 μg g(-1) fw in red-ripe fruits. Trans-lycopene was the carotenoid that contributed most to this increase. Many of the genes related to carotenoid metabolism displayed changing expression levels during fruit ripening generating a metabolic flux toward carotenoid synthesis. Constitutive low expression of lycopene cyclase genes resulted in lycopene accumulation. RNA-seq expression profiling of watermelon fruit development yielded a set of transcription factors whose expression was correlated with ripening and carotenoid accumulation. Nineteen putative transcription factor genes from watermelon and homologous to tomato carotenoid-associated genes were identified. Among these, six were differentially expressed in the flesh of both species during fruit development and ripening. Taken together the data suggest that, while the regulation of a common set of metabolic genes likely influences carotenoid synthesis and accumulation in watermelon and tomato fruits during development and ripening, specific and limiting regulators may differ between climacteric and non-climacteric fruits, possibly related to their differential susceptibility to and use of ethylene during ripening.

  13. Specific carotenoid pigments in the diet and a bit of oxidative stress in the recipe for producing red carotenoid-based signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de Blas, Esther; Mateo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Colorful ornaments have been the focus of sexual selection studies since the work of Darwin. Yellow to red coloration is often produced by carotenoid pigments. Different hypotheses have been formulated to explain the evolution of these traits as signals of individual quality. Many of these hypotheses involve the existence of a signal production cost. The carotenoids necessary for signaling can only be obtained from food. In this line, carotenoid-based signals could reveal an individual’s capacity to find sufficient dietary pigments. However, the ingested carotenoids are often yellow and became transformed by the organism to produce pigments of more intense color (red ketocarotenoids). Biotransformation should involve oxidation reactions, although the exact mechanism is poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that carotenoid biotransformation could be costly because a certain level of oxidative stress is required to correctly perform the conversion. The carotenoid-based signals could thus reveal the efficiency of the owner in successfully managing this challenge. In a bird with ketocarotenoid-based ornaments (the red-legged partridge; Alectoris rufa), the availability of different carotenoids in the diet (i.e. astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein) and oxidative stress were manipulated. The carotenoid composition was analyzed and quantified in the ornaments, blood, liver and fat. A number of oxidative stress biomarkers were also measured in the same tissues. First, we found that color and pigment levels in the ornaments depended on food levels of those carotenoids used as substrates in biotransformation. Second, we found that birds exposed to mild levels of a free radical generator (diquat) developed redder bills and deposited higher amounts of ketocarotenoids (astaxanthin) in ornaments. Moreover, the same diquat-exposed birds also showed a weaker resistance to hemolysis when their erythrocytes were exposed to free radicals, with females also enduring higher oxidative

  14. Leibniz y el concepto de analogía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Miguel Esquisabel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an analysis of the leibnizian applications of conceptof analogy as well as the analogical reasoning is approached. Thus, the analysis tries to show that the leibnizian concept of analogy is based on the idea of structural similarity. As a consequence of such consideration,two basic ways in which Leibniz applies analogical reasoning are examined. The first way has a conjectural character and is rather heuristic, whereas the second constitutes, at least in intention, a kind of demonstrative analogicalreasoning, since it tries to prove its conclusions for a determined theoreticaldomain by applying a transfer principle, which is itself founded on the identity of structural properties.This procedure is exemplified by outlining the leibnizian view on contingent truths. In this way, the paper concludesby pointing out the theoretical relevance of the concept of similarity in theleibnizian thought.

  15. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rocío Gómez-García

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits’ yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  16. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of carotenoids from pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.): a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Durante, Miriana; Lenucci, Marcello Salvatore; Mita, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are well known for their nutritional properties and health promoting effects representing attractive ingredients to develop innovative functional foods, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical preparations. Pumpkin (Cucurbita spp...

  17. Geographical location has greater impact on carotenoid content and bioaccessibility from tomatoes than variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, S A; Jiwan, M A; Daly, T; O'Brien, N M

    2009-12-01

    The suggested health benefits of consuming tomatoes and tomato-based products have been attributed, in part, to the carotenoids present in these foods. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to (i) analyse carotenoid content and bioaccessibility from different tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) types namely cherry, plum, round, and certain tomatoes-on-the-vine; and (ii) determine if geographical location (Ireland vs Spain) influenced the content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids in tomatoes of the same variety. Carotenoid bioaccessibility is defined as the amount of ingested carotenoids that, after digestion, are available for absorption by intestinal cells. Differences were seen in carotenoid content and bioaccessibility between the different tomato types tested. For instance, Irish round high-lycopene tomatoes contained the greatest amounts of lycopene and lutein but lowest levels of beta-carotene compared with the other Irish tomatoes. Furthermore, the content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids that were sourced from Ireland and Spain also varied greatly. Spanish tomatoes were generally superior in the content, bioaccessibility, and micelle content of carotenoids. To conclude, our findings suggest that geographical location, rather than the type of tomato, seems to have a more pronounced effect on carotenoid bioaccessibility from tomatoes.

  18. Resonant Raman detectors for noninvasive assessment of carotenoid antioxidants in human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia R.; Ermakov, Igor V.; Bernstein, P. S.

    2003-07-01

    Carotenoid antioxidants form an important part of the human body's anti-oxidant system and are thought to play an important role in disease prevention. Studies have shown an inverse correlation between high dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of certain cancers, heart disease and degenerative diseases. For example, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which are present in high concentrations in the human retina, are thought to prevent age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the Western world. We have developed various clinical prototype instruments, based on resonance Raman spectroscopy, that are able to measure carotenoid levels directly in the tissue of interest. At present we use the Raman technology to quantify carotenoid levels in the human retina, in skin, and in the oral cavity. We use resonant excitation of the π-conjugated molecules in the visible wavelength range and detect the molecules' carbon-carbon stretch frequencies. The spectral properties of the various carotenoids can be explored to selectively measure in some cases individual carotenoid species linked ot the prevention of cancer, in human skin. The instrumentation involves home-built, compact, high-throughput Raman systems capable of measuring physiological carotenoid concentrations in human subjects rapidly and quantitatively. The instruments have been demonstrated for field use and screening of tissue carotenoid status in large populations. In Epidemiology, the technology holds promise as a novel, noninvasive and objective biomarker of fruit and vegetable uptake.

  19. CD36 homolog divergence is responsible for the selectivity of carotenoid species migration to the silk gland of the silkworm Bombyx mori[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudoh, Takashi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Iizuka, Tetsuya; Narukawa, Junko; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Banno, Yutaka; Tsuchida, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    Dietary carotenoids are absorbed in the intestine and delivered to various tissues by circulating lipoproteins; however, the mechanism underlying selective delivery of different carotenoid species to individual tissues remains elusive. The products of the Yellow cocoon (C) gene and the Flesh (F) gene of the silkworm Bombyx mori determine the selectivity for transport of lutein and β-carotene, respectively, to the silk gland. We previously showed that the C gene encodes Cameo2, a CD36 family member, which is thought to function as a transmembrane lipoprotein receptor. Here, we elucidated the molecular identity of the F gene product by positional cloning, as SCRB15, a paralog of Cameo2 with 26% amino acid identity. In the F mutant, SCRB15 mRNA structure was severely disrupted, due to a 1.4 kb genomic insertion in a coding exon. Transgenic expression of SCRB15 in the middle silk gland using the binary GAL4-UAS expression system enhanced selective β-carotene uptake by the middle silk gland, while transgenic expression of Cameo2 enhanced selective lutein uptake under the same GAL4 driver. Our findings indicate that divergence of genes in the CD36 family determines the selectivity of carotenoid species uptake by silk gland tissue and that CD36-homologous proteins can discriminate among carotenoid species. PMID:23160179

  20. A Comprehensive Overview on the Micro- and Nano-technological Encapsulation Advances for Enhancing the Chemical Stability and Bioavailability of Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukoulis, Christos; Bohn, Torsten

    2015-06-11

    Carotenoids are lipophilic secondary plant compounds, and their consumption within fruits and vegetables has been positively correlated with a decreased risk of developing several chronic diseases. However, their bioavailability is often compromised due to incomplete release from the food matrix, poor solubility and potential degradation during digestion. In addition, carotenoids in food products are prone to oxidative degradation, not only lowering the nutritional value of the product but also triggering other quality deteriorative changes such as formation of lipid pro-oxidants (free radicals), development of discolorations or off-flavor defects. Encapsulation refers to a physicochemical process aiming to entrap an active substance in structurally engineered micro- or nano-systems in order to develop an effective thermodynamical and physical barrier against deteriorative environmental conditions, such as water vapor, oxygen, light, enzymes or pH. In this context, encapsulation of carotenoids has shown to be a very effective strategy to improve their chemical stability under common processing conditions including storage. In addition, encapsulation may also enhance bioavailability (via influencing bioaccessibility and absorption) of lipophilic bioactives, via modulating their release kinetics from the carrier system, solubility and interfacial properties. In the present paper, it is aimed to present the state of the art of carotenoid microencapsulation in order to enhance storability and bioavailability alike.

  1. Novel carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase catalyzes the first dedicated step in saffron crocin biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frusciante, Sarah; Diretto, Gianfranco; Bruno, Mark; Ferrante, Paola; Pietrella, Marco; Prado-Cabrero, Alfonso; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Beyer, Peter; Gomez-Gomez, Lourdes; Al-Babili, Salim; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Crocus sativus stigmas are the source of the saffron spice and accumulate the apocarotenoids crocetin, crocins, picrocrocin, and safranal, responsible for its color, taste, and aroma. Through deep transcriptome sequencing, we identified a novel dioxygenase, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2 (CCD2), expressed early during stigma development and closely related to, but distinct from, the CCD1 dioxygenase family. CCD2 is the only identified member of a novel CCD clade, presents the structural features of a bona fide CCD, and is able to cleave zeaxanthin, the presumed precursor of saffron apocarotenoids, both in Escherichia coli and in maize endosperm. The cleavage products, identified through high-resolution mass spectrometry and comigration with authentic standards, are crocetin dialdehyde and crocetin, respectively. In vitro assays show that CCD2 cleaves sequentially the 7,8 and 7′,8′ double bonds adjacent to a 3-OH-β-ionone ring and that the conversion of zeaxanthin to crocetin dialdehyde proceeds via the C30 intermediate 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal. In contrast, zeaxanthin cleavage dioxygenase (ZCD), an enzyme previously claimed to mediate crocetin formation, did not cleave zeaxanthin or 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal in the test systems used. Sequence comparison and structure prediction suggest that ZCD is an N-truncated CCD4 form, lacking one blade of the β-propeller structure conserved in all CCDs. These results constitute strong evidence that CCD2 catalyzes the first dedicated step in crocin biosynthesis. Similar to CCD1, CCD2 has a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that it may cleave carotenoids localized in the chromoplast outer envelope. PMID:25097262

  2. Novel carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase catalyzes the first dedicated step in saffron crocin biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Frusciante, Sarah

    2014-08-05

    Crocus sativus stigmas are the source of the saffron spice and accumulate the apocarotenoids crocetin, crocins, picrocrocin, and safranal, responsible for its color, taste, and aroma. Through deep transcriptome sequencing, we identified a novel dioxygenase, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2 (CCD2), expressed early during stigma development and closely related to, but distinct from, the CCD1 dioxygenase family. CCD2 is the only identified member of a novel CCD clade, presents the structural features of a bona fide CCD, and is able to cleave zeaxanthin, the presumed precursor of saffron apocarotenoids, both in Escherichia coli and in maize endosperm. The cleavage products, identified through high-resolution mass spectrometry and comigration with authentic standards, are crocetin dialdehyde and crocetin, respectively. In vitro assays show that CCD2 cleaves sequentially the 7,8 and 7′,8′ double bonds adjacent to a 3-OH-β-ionone ring and that the conversion of zeaxanthin to crocetin dialdehyde proceeds via the C30 intermediate 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal. In contrast, zeaxanthin cleavage dioxygenase (ZCD), an enzyme previously claimed to mediate crocetin formation, did not cleave zeaxanthin or 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal in the test systems used. Sequence comparison and structure prediction suggest that ZCD is an N-truncated CCD4 form, lacking one blade of the β-propeller structure conserved in all CCDs. These results constitute strong evidence that CCD2 catalyzes the first dedicated step in crocin biosynthesis. Similar to CCD1, CCD2 has a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that it may cleave carotenoids localized in the chromoplast outer envelope.

  3. The Structure of Analogical Models in Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    Dreyfus Department of Psychology Department of Philosophy Carnegie-Mellon University University of California Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Berkely, CA 94720 Dr...Astronautics Co. Dr. William Chase P.O.Box 516 Department of Psychology St. Louis , MO 63166 Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 1 Dr. Ed...Oregon Astronautics Co.-St. Louis Eugene OR 97403 P.O. Box 30204 Lowry AFB, CO 80230 Dr. Barbara Hayes-Roth The Rand Corporation 1 Dr. Steven W. Keele

  4. Provitamin A carotenoids from an engineered high-carotenoid maize are bioavailable and zeaxanthin does not compromise β-carotene absorption in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gómez, Joana; Moreno, Jose A; Angulo, Eduardo; Sandmann, Gerhard; Zhu, Changfu; Capell, Teresa; Nogareda, Carmina

    2017-06-23

    High-carotenoid (HC) maize, a biofortified staple crop which accumulates β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin, was used as a feed component in a chicken feeding trial to assess the bioavailability of provitamin A (PVA) carotenoids in the kernel matrix compared to the synthetic and natural color additives routinely used in the poultry industry. We found that the PVA carotenoids in HC maize were not metabolized in the same manner: β-carotene was preferentially converted into retinol in the intestine whereas β-cryptoxanthin accumulated in the liver. We also considered the effect of zeaxanthin on the absorption of PVA carotenoids because zeaxanthin is the major carotenoid component of HC maize. We found that chickens fed on diets with low levels of zeaxanthin accumulated higher levels of retinol in the liver, suggesting that zeaxanthin might interfere with the absorption of β-carotene, although this observation was not statistically significant. Our results show that HC maize provides bioavailable carotenoids, including PVA carotenoids, and is suitable for use as a feed component.

  5. Kinetics of carotenoid distribution in human skin in vivo after exogenous stress: disinfectant and wIRA-induced carotenoid depletion recovers from outside to inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluhr, Joachim W.; Caspers, Peter; van der Pol, J. Andre; Richter, Heike; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2011-03-01

    The human organism has developed a protection system against the destructive effect of free radicals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent of exogenous stress factors such as disinfectant and IR-A radiation on the skin, and their influence on the kinetics of carotenoids distribution during the recovery process. Ten healthy volunteers were assessed with resonance spectroscopy using an Argon-laser at 488 nm to excite the carotenoids in vivo. Additionally, Raman-confocal-micro-spectroscopy measurements were performed using a model 3510 Skin Composition Analyzer with spatially resolved measurements down to 30 μm. The measurements were performed at a baseline of 20, 40, 60, and 120 min after an external stressor consisting either of water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) with 150 mW/cm2 or 1 ml/cm2 of an alcoholic disinfectant. Both Raman methods were capable to detect the infrared-induced depletion of carotenoids. Only Raman-microspectroscopy could reveal the carotenoids decrease after topical disinfectant application. The carotenoid-depletion started at the surface. After 60 min, recovery starts at the surface while deeper parts were still depleted. The disinfectant- and wIRA-induced carotenoid depletion in the epidermis recovers from outside to inside and probably delivered by sweat and sebaceous glands. We could show that the Raman microscopic spectroscopy is suited to analyze the carotenoid kinetic of stress effects and recovery.

  6. In vivo antioxidant activity of carotenoid powder from tomato byproduct and its use as a source of carotenoids for egg-laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng; Li, Chen; Pan, Siyi

    2013-04-25

    Ultrasound treatment was used to extract carotenoids from tomato waste. Gelatin and gum arabic were applied as coating materials for the encapsulation of carotenoids. The first-order reaction was used to determine the degradation of carotenoids in the microcapsules. The result of controlled release studies showed that microcapsules would protect most of the carotenoids from being released in the stomach. We investigated the modifications induced by an oral administration of carotenoid powder on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes and ion status in liver of rat. The 28 day treatment increased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and manganese superoxide dismutase and reduced malondialdehyde concentration in rat liver. The activity of catalase was not affected by treatment and greater iron concentration was found in liver from treatment groups. However, there was no dose-dependent change of antioxidant enzyme activity or malondialdehyde concentration with increasing carotenoid consumption. Furthermore, carotenoid powder was able to be used as forage material for egg-laying hens. The 28 day treatment did not affect the egg performance, but significantly increased yolk colour parameters and lycopene content.

  7. Analog regulation of metabolic demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muskhelishvili Georgi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3D structure of the chromosome of the model organism Escherichia coli is one key component of its gene regulatory machinery. This type of regulation mediated by topological transitions of the chromosomal DNA can be thought of as an analog control, complementing the digital control, i.e. the network of regulation mediated by dedicated transcription factors. It is known that alterations in the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA lead to a rich pattern of differential expressed genes. Using a network approach, we analyze these expression changes for wild type E. coli and mutants lacking nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs from a metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network perspective. Results We find a significantly higher correspondence between gene expression and metabolism for the wild type expression changes compared to mutants in NAPs, indicating that supercoiling induces meaningful metabolic adjustments. As soon as the underlying regulatory machinery is impeded (as for the NAP mutants, this coherence between expression changes and the metabolic network is substantially reduced. This effect is even more pronounced, when we compute a wild type metabolic flux distribution using flux balance analysis and restrict our analysis to active reactions. Furthermore, we are able to show that the regulatory control exhibited by DNA supercoiling is not mediated by the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN, as the consistency of the expression changes with the TRN logic of activation and suppression is strongly reduced in the wild type in comparison to the mutants. Conclusions So far, the rich patterns of gene expression changes induced by alterations of the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA have been difficult to interpret. Here we characterize the effective networks formed by supercoiling-induced gene expression changes mapped onto reconstructions of E. coli's metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network. Our

  8. Novel Gemini vitamin D3 analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okamoto, Ryoko; Gery, Sigal; Kuwayama, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    We have synthesized 39 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] analogs having two side chains attached to carbon-20 (Gemini) with various modifications and compared their anticancer activities. Five structure-function rules emerged to identify analogs with enhanced anticancer activity. One...... of these active analogs, BXL-01-0126, was more potent than 1,25(OH)2D3 in mediating 50% clonal inhibition of cancer cell growth. Murine studies found that BXL-01-0126 and 1,25(OH)2D3 had nearly the same potency to raise serum calcium levels. Taken together, BXL-01-0126 when compared to 1,25(OH)2D3 has greater...... anticancer potency, but similar toxicity causing hypercalcemia. We focused on the effect of these compounds on the stimulation of expression of human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) whose gene has a vitamin D response element in its promoter. Expression of CAMP mRNA and protein increased in a dose...

  9. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  10. Composição de carotenoides em canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth Baehni Carotenoids composition of canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth Baehni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia da Silveira Agostini Costa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O canistel (P. campechiana é uma fruta nativa da América Central e México, ainda pouco conhecida no Brasil. Apresenta uma polpa amarelo-alaranjada, rica em carotenoides, que tem despertado interesse como potencial de vitamina A. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o teor de carotenoides e o valor provitamina A na polpa de canistel, assim como os teores de umidade e lipídeos na polpa e na semente. Os carotenoides foram separados por cromatografia em coluna aberta. O conteúdo de carotenoides totais foi de 226 ± 4 μg/g. Violaxantina e neoxantina foram os carotenóides predominantes, somando 196 ± 5 μg/g. seguidos por zetacaroteno, betacaroteno 5,6-epóxido, betacaroteno e fitoflueno. A semente foi a parte do fruto que apresentou maior teor de lipídeos totais, com 4,6 ± 0,2 %, e a polpa, 0,61 ± 0,03 %. Os resultados indicam que o canistel apresenta teores de carotenóides totais muito elevados e pode ser considerado uma boa fonte de provitamina A (59 ± 6 RAE/100g, se comparado com outras frutas normalmente consumidas. No entanto, os principais carotenoides encontrados em sua polpa são destituídos de atividade provitamina A.Canistel (Pouteria campechiana is a native fruit from Central America and Mexico. This fruit still not known in Brazil, presents an orange-yellow pulp rich in carotenoids, which has attracted interest as a potential source of vitamin A. The purpose of this study was to determine the carotenoids content and pro-vitamin A values in the pulp of canistel, as well as the percentage of moisture and lipids in the pulp and seeds. Carotenoids were separated by open column chromatography. The content of total carotenoids was 226 ± 4 μg/g. Violaxantin and neoxantin were the predominant carotenoids with 196 ± 5 μg/g followed by zeta-carotene, beta-carotene 5,6-epoxide, beta-carotene and phytofluene. The seeds presented higher levels of total lipids with 4.6 ± 0.2 %, while pulp had 0.61 ± 0.03 % of total lipid. These

  11. Carotenoids production: microorganisms as source of natural dyes Produção de carotenoides: microrganismos como fonte de pigmentos naturais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Valduga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are natural dyes synthesized by plants, algae and microorganisms. Application in many sectors can be found, as food dyeing and supplementation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and animal feed. Recent investigations have shown their ability to reduce the risks for many degenerative diseases like cancer, heart diseases, cataract and macular degeneration. An advantage of microbial carotenoids is the fact that the cultivation in controlled conditions is not dependent of climate, season or soil composition. In this review the advances in bio-production of carotenoids are presented, discussing the main factors that influence the microbial production of these dyes in different systems.

  12. Age-Related Relationships between Innate Immunity and Plasma Carotenoids in an Obligate Avian Scavenger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel López-Rull

    Full Text Available Variation in immunity is influenced by allocation trade-offs that are expected to change between age-classes as a result of the different environmental and physiological conditions that individuals encounter over their lifetime. One such trade-off occurs with carotenoids, which must be acquired with food and are involved in a variety of physiological functions. Nonetheless, relationships between immunity and carotenoids in species where these micronutrients are scarce due to diet are poorly studied. Among birds, vultures show the lowest concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a diet based on carrion. Here, we investigated variations in the relationships between innate immunity (hemagglutination by natural antibodies and hemolysis by complement proteins, pathogen infection and plasma carotenoids in nestling and adult griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus in the wild. Nestlings showed lower hemolysis, higher total carotenoid concentration and higher pathogen infection than adults. Hemolysis was negatively related to carotenoid concentration only in nestlings. A differential carotenoid allocation to immunity due to the incomplete development of the immune system of nestlings compared with adults is suggested linked to, or regardless of, potential differences in parasite infection, which requires experimental testing. We also found that individuals with more severe pathogen infections showed lower hemagglutination than those with a lower intensity infection irrespective of their age and carotenoid level. These results are consistent with the idea that intraspecific relationships between innate immunity and carotenoids may change across ontogeny, even in species lacking carotenoid-based coloration. Thus, even low concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a scavenger diet can be essential to the development and activation of the immune system in growing birds.

  13. Dietary compared with blood concentrations of carotenoids and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aune, Dagfinn; Chan, Doris S M; Vieira, Ana Rita; Navarro Rosenblatt, Deborah A; Vieira, Rui; Greenwood, Darren C; Norat, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    .... Carotenoid concentrations in blood are biomarkers of fruit and vegetable intake; however, no systematic assessment has compared dietary intake with blood concentrations of carotenoids and breast cancer risk...

  14. The Effect of the Crocus Sativus L. Carotenoid, Crocin, on the Polymerization of Microtubules, in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zarei Jaliani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Crocin, as the main carotenoid of saffron, has shown anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. Crocin might interact with cellular proteins and modulate their functions, but the exact target of this carotenoid and the other compounds of the saffron have not been discovered yet. Microtubular proteins, as one of the most important proteins inside the cells, have several functions in nearly all kinds of cellular processes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether crocin affects microtubule polymerization and tubulin structure. Materials and Methods: Microtubules were extracted from sheep brains after two cycles of temperature-dependant assembly-disassembly in the polymerization buffer (PMG. Then phosphocellulose P11 column was used to prepare MAP-free tubulin. Turbidimetric assay of microtubules was performed by incubation of tubulins at 37 ºC in PIPES buffer. To investigate the intrinsic fluorescence spectra of tubulins, the emission spectra of tryptophans was monitored. To test the interaction of crocin with tubulin in more details, ANS has been used. Results: Crocin extremely affected the tubulin polymerization and structure. Ultraviolet spectroscopy indicated that crocin increased polymerization of microtubules by nearly a factor of two. Fluorescence spectroscopic data also pointed to significant conformational changes of tubulin. Conclusion: We showed that crocin increased tubulin polymerization and microtubule nucleation rate and this effect was concentration dependant. After entering cell, crocin can modulate cellular proteins and their functions. Concerning the results of this study, crocin would be able to affect several cell processes through interaction with tubulin proteins or microtubules.

  15. Analog electronics for radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Analog Electronics for Radiation Detection showcases the latest advances in readout electronics for particle, or radiation, detectors. Featuring chapters written by international experts in their respective fields, this authoritative text: Defines the main design parameters of front-end circuitry developed in microelectronics technologies Explains the basis for the use of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors for the detection of charged particles and other non-consumer applications Delivers an in-depth review of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), evaluating the pros and cons of ADCs integrated at the pixel, column, and per-chip levels Describes incremental sigma delta ADCs, time-to-digital converter (TDC) architectures, and digital pulse-processing techniques complementary to analog processing Examines the fundamental parameters and front-end types associated with silicon photomultipliers used for single visible-light photon detection Discusses pixel sensors ...

  16. Analogies in Science and Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Simon; Salter, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Analogies are often used in science, but students may not appreciate their significance, and so the analogies can be misunderstood or discounted. For this reason, educationalists often express concern about the use of analogies in teaching. Given the important place of analogies in the discourse of science, it is necessary that students are…

  17. Relationship between Carotenoids, Retinol, and Estradiol Levels in Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Maggio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In vitro evidence suggests anti-estrogenic properties for retinol and carotenoids, supporting a chemo-preventive role of these phytochemicals in estrogen-dependent cancers. During aging there are significant reductions in retinol and carotenoid concentrations, whereas estradiol levels decline during menopause and progressively increase from the age of 65. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis of a potential relationship between circulating levels of retinol, carotenoids, and estradiol (E2 in a cohort of late post-menopausal women. Methods. We examined 512 women ≥ 65 years from the InCHIANTI study. Retinol, α-caroten, β-caroten, β-criptoxantin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene levels were assayed at enrollment (1998–2000 by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Estradiol and testosterone (T levels were assessed by Radioimmunometry (RIA and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio (T/E2, as a proxy of aromatase activity, was also calculated. General linear models adjusted for age (Model 1 and further adjusted for other confounders including Body Mass Index (BMI BMI, smoking, intake of energy, lipids, and vitamin A; C-Reactive Protein, insulin, total cholesterol, liver function, and testosterone (Model 2 were used to investigate the relationship between retinol, carotenoids, and E2 levels. To address the independent relationship between carotenoids and E2 levels, factors significantly associated with E2 in Model 2 were also included in a fully adjusted Model 3. Results. After adjustment for age, α-carotene (β ± SE = −0.01 ± 0.004, p = 0.02 and β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.0007 were significantly and inversely associated with E2 levels. α-Carotene was also significantly and positively associated with T/E2 ratio (β ± SE = 0.07 ± 0.03, p = 0.01. After adjustment for other confounders (Model 2, the inverse relationship between α-carotene (β ± SE = −1.59 ± 0.61, p = 0.01, β-carotene (β ± SE = −0.29

  18. LC-PDA/APCIitMS identification of algal carotenoid and oxysterol precursors to fatty acid esters in hydrolyzed extracts of the freshwater mussel Dreissena bugensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridoux, Maxime C; Sobiechowska, Monika; Pérez-Fuentetaja, Alicia; Alben, Katherine T

    2017-11-01

    Carotenyl fatty acid esters (carotenyl-FAEs) were extracted in acetone from freeze-dried Dreissena bugensis (Lakes Erie and Ontario) and hydrolyzed to identify the carotenoid precursors. Analysis by liquid chromatography (LC) with photodiode array (PDA) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (APCIitMS) revealed the major hydrolysis products: fucoxanthinol (FOH) from fucoxanthin (FX, diatoms); mactraxanthin (MX) from violaxanthin (VX, chlorophytes); 4-fold higher levels of an unknown, tentatively identified as an adduct of two closely eluting C27H46O3 and C27H48O3 steryl triols. Enzymatic hydrolysis (Candida rugosa) of dreissenid extracts yielded FOH and MX, but residual carotenyl-FAEs remained. Alkaline hydrolysis yielded isoFOH, MX, and steryl triols, without residual carotenyl-FAEs: isoFOH decreased, but two FOH hemiketal by-products increased, when the dose of potassium hydroxide in methanol was too high. The PDA detector profiled carotenyl-FAEs and products of enzymatic and alkaline hydrolysis, without interference. The APCIitMS detector revealed carotenoid and oxysterol products of alkaline hydrolysis but was adversely affected by background from bile salts used for enzymatic hydrolysis. LC retention times and elution order were correlated to solubility parameters, calculated from the analyte structure, to cross-check MS interpretations. A multiple linear regression of LC retention times on solubility parameters for 12 carotenoid standards included FOH, isoFOH, and MX (r 2 0.97). The model revealed the close similarity of polar carotenoid metabolites to C27-steryl triols tentatively identified by APCIitMS, suggesting that further LC-MS analyses would be beneficial, to explicitly link oxysterols and the polar carotenoids, as metabolites of algal precursors in the dreissenid diet. Graphical abstract Methods of analysis and major neutral products of hydrolysis from fatty acid esters in D. bugensis.

  19. Carotenoid-based bill and eye ring coloration as honest signals of condition: an experimental test in the red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Viñuela, Javier

    2008-09-01

    Carotenoid pigments cannot be synthesized by vertebrates but must be ingested through the diet. As they seem to be a limited resource, carotenoid-based ornaments are particularly interesting as possible honest signals of individual quality, in particular of foraging efficiency and nutritional status. Some studies have demonstrated the condition dependence of carotenoid-based plumage in birds. However, many other carotenoid-pigmented bare parts (i.e. skin, caruncles, bills, cere, and tarsi) are present in birds but, in comparison with plumage, little is known about these traits as indicators of individual quality. Here, we show that the eye ring pigmentation and bill redness of the red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) are positively associated to body condition and recent changes in body mass. Also, we found a negative relationship between these two traits and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, an indicator of physiological stress (the relationship with bill redness being significant only for males). In an experiment, we found that after a period of reduction in food intake (with the consequent loss of body mass), food-restricted birds showed lower eye ring pigmentation than ad-libitum-fed birds. Therefore, different ornaments seem to reflect changes in body condition but at different speeds or intensities (eye ring, a fleshy ornament, appears to respond more rapidly to changes in the nutritional status than a keratinized structure as the bill). These results indicate that carotenoid-based ornaments are condition-dependent traits in the red-legged partridge, being therefore susceptible to be employed as honest signals of quality in sexual selection.

  20. KAROTENOID DARI MAKROALGAE DAN MIKROALGAE: POTENSI KESEHATAN APLIKASI DAN BIOTEKNOLOGI [Carotenoids from Macroalgae and Microalgae: Health Potential, Application and Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leenawaty Limantara3

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Algae, both micro and macroalgae, is one of the largest producers of carotenoids. The major composition of carotenoid on algae are β-carotene, astaxanthin, luthein, zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, and fucoxanthin which have important roles for human health. Carotenoids were produced by several microalgae species such as Dunaliella sallina, Haemotococcus pluvialis, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Spirulina platensis, Nannnochloropsis oculata, and also from some macroalgae species such as Kappaphycus alvarezii, Sargassum sp, and Caulerpa sp. Carotenoids from algae has been proven as a powerful antioxidant and may prevent some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular, and cancer. Carotenoid also has been applied as a natural dye and dietary supplements. Biotechnology has been developed to increase the production of carotenoids from micro- and macroalgae. The large-scale cultivation of microalgae, either in open or closed system are shown to increase carotenoid production. During cultivation, some stress conditions can be specifically manipulated to optimize carotenoid production from microalgae.

  1. Carotenoid absorption from salad and salsa by humans is enhanced by the addition of avocado or avocado oil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Unlu, Nuray Z; Bohn, Torsten; Clinton, Steven K; Schwartz, Steven J

    2005-01-01

    .... However, most carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables are low in lipids. The objective of this study was to assess whether the addition of avocado fruit as a lipid source enhances carotenoid absorption in humans. Healthy subjects (n = 11/study...

  2. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments in solar saltern microbial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Joan; Grimalt, Joan O.; de Wit, Rutger; Keely, Brendan J.; Maxwell, James R.

    1994-11-01

    The distributions of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and their degradation products have been studied in two microbial mat systems developed in the calcite and calcite/gypsum evaporite domains of a solar saltern system. Phormidium valderianum and Microcoleus chthonoplastes are the dominant cyanobacterial species, respectively, and large amounts of Chloroflexus-like bacteria occur in the carbonate/gypsum mat. In both systems, the major pigments are chlorophyll a, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and myxoxanthophyll, which originate from these mat-building cyanobacteria. This common feature contrasts with differences in other pigments that are specific for each mat community. Thus, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin, reflecting diatom inputs, are only found in the calcite mat, whereas the calcite/gypsum mat contains high concentrations of bacteriochlorophylls c produced by the multicellular green filamentous bacteria. In both cases, the depth concentration profiles (0-30 and 0-40 mm) show a relatively good preservation of the cyanobacterial carotenoids, zeaxanthin, β-carotene, myxoxanthophyll, and echinenone. This contrasts with the extensive biodegradation of cyanobacterial remains observed microscopically. Fucoxanthin in the calcite mat is also transformed at a faster rate than the cyanobacterial carotenoids. Chlorophyll a, the major pigment in both mats, exhibits different transformation pathways. In the calcite/gypsum mat, it is transformed via C-13 2 carbomethoxy defunctionalization prior to loss of the phytyl chain, leading to the formation of pyrophaeophytin a and, subsequently, pyrophaeophorbide a. On the other hand, the occurrence of the enzyme chlorophyllase, attributed to diatoms in the calcite mat, gives rise to extensive phytyl hydrolysis, with the formation of chlorophyllide a, pyrophaeophorbide a and, in minor proportion, phaeophorbide a. Studies of the sources of the photosynthetic pigments and of their transformation pathways in such simplified ecosystems provide a

  3. Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the electronic structures of the MnFe Prussian blue analogs (RbxBay) Mn[3 -(x +2 y )]/2[Fe (CN) 6] H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsook; Seong, Seungho; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, D. H.; Thakur, Nidhi; Yusuf, S. M.; Kim, Bongjae; Min, B. I.; Kim, Younghak; Kim, J.-Y.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Kang, J.-S.

    2017-11-01

    The electronic structures of Prussian blue analog (RbxBay) Mn[3 -(x +2 y )]/2[Fe (CN) 6] cyanides have been investigated by employing soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) at the Fe and Mn L (2 p ) edges. The measured XAS spectra have been analyzed with the configuration-interaction (CI) cluster model calculations. The valence states of the Fe and Mn ions are found to be Fe2 +-Fe3 + mixed valent, with an average valency of v (Fe )˜2.8 and nearly divalent (Mn2 +), respectively. Our Mn/Fe 2 p XMCD study supports that Mn2 + ions are in the high-spin states while Fe2 +-Fe3 + ions are in the low-spin states. The Fe and Mn 2 p XAS spectra are found to be essentially the same for 80 ≤T ≤ 300 K, suggesting that a simple charge transfer upon cooling from Fe3 +-CN -Mn2 + to Fe2 +-CN -Mn3 + does not occur in (RbxBay) Mn[3 -(x +2 y )]/2[Fe (CN) 6] . According to the CI cluster model analysis, it is necessary to take into account both the ligand-to-metal charge transfer and the metal-to-ligand charge transfer in describing Fe 2 p XAS, while the effect of charge transfer is negligible in describing Mn 2 p XAS. The CI cluster model analysis also shows that the trivalent Fe3 + ions have a strong covalent bonding with the C ≡N ligands and are under a large crystal-field energy of 10 D q ˜3 eV, in contrast to the weak covalency effect and a small 10 D q ˜0.6 eV for the divalent Mn2 + ions.

  4. Carotenoid pigments in the fungus of Coltsfoot (Coleosporium tussilaginis)

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrila NEAMTU; Gh. ILLYES; Maria OTOIU

    1983-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on the carotenoid pigments in the fruiting bodies of the parasitic fungus Coleosporium tussilaginis (Pers.) Kleb., harvested in autumn from the lower mide of the leaves of coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara L.). The fructification of this fungus held only g-carotene and m-carotene. There were found no ranthophylls, epoxides; neither carboxyl nor carboxyl groups. The content of g-carotene was of 22 mg/100 g D.M. and that of b-carotene of 15 mg/100 g D.M. The content o...

  5. Post-harvest degradation of carotenoid glucose esters in saffron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, S; Umezaki, Y; Shoyama, Y; Saito, H; Nishi, K; Irino, N

    1994-10-01

    It has been found that an indoor cultivation system of Crocus sativus L. is more favorable with regard to the quality of saffron, as compared to the usual cultivation in an open field. Carotenoid glucose esters increase from the period before blooming and reach the maximum in the full blooming period, and are sensitive for the presence of oxygen, light irradiation, and beta-glucosidase. Moreover, it is evident that storage of saffron at -20 degrees C promotes the constant supply of saffron with a homogeneous pharmacological activity.

  6. Predictors of adipose tissue carotenoid and retinol levels in nine countries: The EURAMIC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Virtanen, S.M.; Veer, P. van 't; Kok, F.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Aro, A.

    1996-01-01

    The adipose tissue carotenoid (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene) and retinol levels and their predictors were determined in 686 male and 339 female middle-aged and elderly subjects from eight European countries and Israel during the years 1991 to 1992. Adipose tissue carotenoid levels in

  7. Carotenoid profiling of leaves of selected eggplant accessions subjected to drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study focused on the quantification of carotenoids of the leaves of African eggplants commonly consumed as leafy and fruit vegetables. The results gave comparative profiles of carotenoids at different growth and developmental stages and under drought stress. Stress was achieved by limiting irri...

  8. Critical assessment of three high performance liquid chromatography analytical methods for food carotenoid quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, M.G.; Oliveira, L.; Camoes, M.F.G.F.C.; Nunes, B.; Versloot, P.; Hulshof, P.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Three sets of extraction/saponification/HPLC conditions for food carotenoid quantification were technically and economically compared. Samples were analysed for carotenoids a-carotene, ß-carotene, ß-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene, and zeaxanthin. All methods demonstrated good performance in the

  9. A new energy transfer channel from carotenoids to chlorophylls in purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jin; Tseng, Chi-Wei; Chen, Tingwei; Leng, Xia; Yin, Huabing; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Rohlfing, Michael; Ma, Yuchen

    2017-07-10

    It is unclear whether there is an intermediate dark state between the S 2 and S 1 states of carotenoids. Previous two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements support its existence and its involvement in the energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophylls, but there is still considerable debate on the origin of this dark state and how it regulates the energy transfer process. Here we use ab initio calculations on excited-state dynamics and simulated two-dimensional electronic spectrum of carotenoids from purple bacteria to provide evidence supporting that the dark state may be assigned to a new A g + state. Our calculations also indicate that groups on the conjugation backbone of carotenoids may substantially affect the excited-state levels and the energy transfer process. These results contribute to a better understanding of carotenoid excited states.Carotenoids harvest energy from light and transfer it to chlorophylls during photosynthesis. Here, Feng et al. perform ab initio calculations on excited-state dynamics and simulated 2D electronic spectrum of carotenoids, supporting the existence of a new excited state in carotenoids.

  10. Dietary carotenoids and risk of colorectal cancer in a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Männistö, S.; Yaun, S.S.; Hunter, D.J.; Spiegelman, D.; Adami, H.O.; Albanes, D.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Buring, J.E.; Cerhan, J.R.; Colditz, G.A.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Fuchs, C.S.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Harnack, L.; Leitzmann, M.; McCullough, M.L.; Miller, A.B.; Rohan, T.E.; Schatzkin, A.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Zhang, S.M.; Smith-Warner, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Dietary carotenoids have been hypothesized to protect against epithelial cancers. The authors analyzed the associations between intakes of specific carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein + zeaxanthin, and lycopene) and risk of colorectal cancer using the primary data

  11. Dietary Carotenoids and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Pooled Analysis of Seven Cohort Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Männistö, S.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Spiegelman, D.; Albanes, D.; Anderson, K.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Cerhan, J.R.; Colditz, G.; Feskanich, D.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Miller, A.B.; Rohan, T.E.; Virtamo, J.; Willett, W.C.; Hunter, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Intervention trials with supplemental β-carotene have observed either no effect or a harmful effect on lung cancer risk. Because food composition databases for specific carotenoids have only become available recently, epidemiological evidence relating usual dietary levels of these carotenoids with

  12. Analysis of Carotenoid Production by Halorubrum sp. TBZ126; an Extremely Halophilic Archeon from Urmia Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Naziri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Carotenoids are of great interest in many scientific disciplines because of their wide distribution, diverse functions and interesting properties. The present report describes a new natural source for carotenoid production. Methods: Halorubrum sp., TBZ126, an extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from Urmia Lack following culture of water sample on marine agar medium and incubation at 30 °C. Then single colonies were cultivated in broth media. After that the cells were collected and carotenoids were extracted with acetone-methanol (7:3 v/v. The identification of carotenoids was performed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC in the presence of antimony pentachloride (SbCl5. The production profile was analyzed using liquid-chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS techniques. Phenotypic characteristics of the isolate were carried out and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: LC-MS analytical results revealed that produced carotenoids are bacterioruberin, lycopene and β-carotene. Bacterioruberin was found to be the predominant produced carotenoid. 16S rRNA analysis showed that TBZ126 has 100% similarity with Halorubrum chaoviator Halo-G*T (AM048786. Conclusion: Halorubrum sp. TBZ126, isolated from Urmia Lake has high capacity in the production of carotenoids. This extremely halophilic archaeon could be considered as a prokaryotic candidate for carotenoid production source for future studies.

  13. Carotenoid composition of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus), determined by HPLC-PDA-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, A F; de Rosso, V V; Mercadante, A Z

    2009-06-01

    Carotenoids are pigments responsible for the yellow-reddish color of many foods and are related to important functions and physiological actions, preventing several chronic-degenerative diseases. The objective of this study was to confirm the carotenoid composition of jackfruit by high-performance liquid chromatography connected to photodiode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-PDA-MS/MS). The main carotenoids were all-trans-lutein (24-44%), all-trans-beta-carotene (24-30%), all-trans-neoxanthin (4-19%), 9-cis-neoxanthin (4-9%) and 9-cis-violaxanthin (4-10%). Either qualitative or quantitative differences, mainly related to the lutein proportion, were found among three batches of jackfruit. Since the fruits from batch A showed significantly lower contents for almost all carotenoids, it also had the lowest total carotenoid content (34.1 microg/100 g) and provitamin A value, whereas the total carotenoid ranged from 129.0 to 150.3 microg/100 g in the other batches. The provitamin A values from batches B and C were 3.3 and 4.3 microg RAE/100 g, respectively. The carotenoid composition of jackfruit was successfully determined, where 14 of the 18 identified carotenoids were reported for first time. Differences among batches may be due to genetic and/or agricultural factors.

  14. Macular pigment carotenoids in the retina and occipital cortex are related in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Lutein and zeaxanthin are dietary carotenoids that preferentially accumulate in the macular region of the retina. Together with mesozeaxanthin, a conversion product of lutein in the macula, they form the macular pigment. Lutein is also the predominant carotenoid in human brain tissue and...

  15. CAROTENOID RETENTION IN MINIMALLY PROCESSED BIOFORTIFIED GREEN CORN STORED UNDER RETAIL MARKETING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Alves Barbosa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Storing processed food products can cause alterations in their chemical compositions. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate carotenoid retention in the kernels of minimally processed normal and vitamin A precursor (proVA-biofortified green corn ears that were packaged in polystyrene trays covered with commercial film or in multilayered polynylon packaging material and were stored. Throughout the storage period, the carotenoids were extracted from the corn kernels using organic solvents and were quantified using HPLC. A completely factorial design including three factors (cultivar, packaging and storage period was applied for analysis. The green kernels of maize cultivars BRS1030 and BRS4104 exhibited similar carotenoid profiles, with zeaxanthin being the main carotenoid. Higher concentrations of the carotenoids lutein, β-cryptoxanthin, and β-carotene, the total carotenoids and the total vitamin A precursor carotenoids were detected in the green kernels of the biofortified BRS4104 maize. The packaging method did not affect carotenoid retention in the kernels of minimally processed green corn ears during the storage period.

  16. Context-dependent effects of carotenoid supplementation on reproduction in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J. P.; Briga, Michael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid-dependent sexual coloration is one of the best-studied sexual signals, but how the honesty of such signals is maintained remains uncertain. The main hypotheses focus on acquisition limits and physiological use of carotenoids in immune function and regulating oxidative stress. A hypothesis

  17. Carotenoids located in human lymphocyte subpopulations and Natural Killer cells by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppels, G.J.; Puppels, G.J.; Garritsen, H.S.P.; Garritsen, H.S.P.; Kummer, J.A.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The presence and subcellular location of carotenoids in human lymphocyte sub-populations (CD4+, CD8+, T-cell receptor-γδ+, and CD19+ ) and natural killer cells (CD16+ ) were studied by means of Raman microspectroscopy. In CD4+ lymphocytes a high concentration (10-3M) of carotenoids was found in the

  18. Regulatory control of high levels of carotenoid accumulation in potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.; McQuinn, R.; Fei, Z.; Wolters, A.M.A.; Eck, van J.; Brown, C.; Giovannoni, J.J.; Li, L.

    2011-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers contain a wide range of carotenoid contents. To decipher the key factors controlling carotenoid levels in tubers, four potato lines (Atlantic, Désirée, 91E22 and POR03) were examined by a combination of biochemical, molecular and genomics approaches. These lines

  19. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, J.C.; Sandmann, G.; Visser, H.; Diaz, M.; Mossel, van M.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both

  20. Host-related factors explaining interindividual variability of carotenoid bioavailability and tissue concentrations in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohn, Torsten; Desmarchelier, Charles; Dragsted, Lars O.; Nielsen, Charlotte S.; Stahl, Wilhelm; Rühl, Ralph; Keijer, Jaap; Borel, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Carotenoid dietary intake and their endogenous levels have been associated with a decreased risk of several chronic diseases. There are indications that carotenoid bioavailability depends, in addition to the food matrix, on host factors. These include diseases (e.g. colitis), life-style habits (e.g.

  1. Carotenoid pigments and the selectivity of psittacofulvin-based coloration systems in parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, K J; Nogare, M C

    2004-07-01

    Carotenoid pigments are commonly used as colorants of feathers and bare parts by birds. However, parrots (Aves: Psittaciformes) use a novel class of plumage pigments (called psittacofulvins) that, like carotenoids, are lipid-soluble and red, orange, or yellow in color. To begin to understand how and why parrots use these pigments and not carotenoids in their feathers, we must first describe the distribution of these two types of pigments in the diet, tissues, and fluids of these birds. Here, we studied the carotenoid content of blood in five species of parrots with red in their plumage to see if they show the physiological ability to accumulate carotenoids in the body. Although Scarlet (Ara macao) and Greenwing Macaws (Ara chloroptera) and Eclectus (Eclectus roratus), African Gray (Psittacus erithacus) and Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) Parrots all use psittacofulvins to color their feathers red, we found that they also circulated high concentrations of both dietary (lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin) and metabolically derived (anhydrolutein, dehydrolutein) carotenoids through blood at the time of feather growth, at levels comparable to those found in many other carotenoid-colored birds. These results suggest that parrots have the potential to use carotenoids for plumage pigmentation, but preferentially avoid depositing them in feathers, which is likely under the control of the maturing feather follicle. As there is no evidence of psittacofulvins in parrot blood at the tune of feather growth, we presume that these pigments are locally synthesized by growing feathers within the follicular tissue.

  2. Plasma carotenoid concentrations in relation to acute respiratory infections in elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, J.M.; Kok, F.J.; Schouten, E.G.

    2004-01-01

    A high plasma carotenoid concentration could improve the immune response and result in decreased risk of infectious diseases. However, data on the relationship of plasma carotenoid concentration with acute respiratory infections, which occur frequently in elderly people, are scarce. We investigated,

  3. Separation of the Carotenoid Bixin from Annatto Seeds Using Thin-Layer and Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James V.; Ramos, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment the carotenoid bixin is isolated from annatto ("Bixa orellana") seeds using column chromatography. The experiment has several key advantages over previous pigment separation experiments. First, unlike other experiments significant quantities of the carotenoid (typically 20 to 25 mg) can be isolated from small quantities of plant…

  4. Enzymatic formation of apo-carotenoids from the xanthophyll carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin and b-cryptoxanthin by ferret carotene-9, 10-monooxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthophyll carotenoids, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and b-cryptoxanthin, may provide potential health benefits against chronic and degenerative diseases. Investigating pathways of xanthophyll metabolism are important to understanding their biological functions. Carotene-15,150-monooxygenase (CMO1) h...

  5. Effects of organic and conventional growth systems on the content of carotenoids in carrot roots, and on intake and plasma status of carotenoids in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søltoft, Malene; Bysted, Anette; Madsen, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    after consumption of the organic and conventional diets, but no systematic differences between the agricultural production systems were observed. CONCLUSION: The expected higher content of presumed health-promoting carotenoids in organic food products was not documented in this study. © 2011 Society...... health effects of organic foods. The aim was to study the impact of organic and conventional agricultural systems on the content of carotenoids in carrots and human diets. In addition, a human cross-over study was performed, measuring the plasma status of carotenoids in humans consuming diets made from......BACKGROUND: The demand for organic food products has increased during the last decades due to their probable health effects, among others. A higher content of secondary metabolites such as carotenoids in organic food products has been claimed, though not documented, to contribute to increased...

  6. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  7. A digital to analog converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Jan R.; Annema, Anne J.

    2000-01-01

    A digital to analog converter for a multibit digital input signal has a set of conversion elements for the positive signal excursions and a set of conversion elements for the negative signal excursions. In each set the conversion elements are selected according to a dynamic element matching

  8. A digital to analog converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Jan R.; Annema, Anne J.

    2006-01-01

    A digital to analog converter for a multibit digital input signal has a set of conversion elements for the positive signal excursions and a set of conversion elements for the negative signal excursions. In each set the conversion elements are selected according to a dynamic element matching

  9. Drawing Analogies to Deepen Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    This article offers examples of how drawing can facilitate thinking skills that promote analogical reasoning to enable deeper learning. The instructional design applies cognitive principles, briefly described here. The workshops were developed iteratively, through feedback from student and teacher participants. Elements of the UK National…

  10. Designing analog circuits in CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Anne J.; Nauta, Bram; van Langevelde, Ronald; Tuinhout, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The evolution in CMOS technology dictated by Moore's Law is clearly beneficial for designers of digital circuits, but it presents difficult challenges, such as lowered nominal supply voltages, for their peers in the analog world who want to keep pace with this rapid progression. This article

  11. Paper Analogies Enhance Biology Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to use paper analogies as models to illustrate various concepts in biology, human anatomy, and physiology classes. Models include biochemical paper models, protein papergrams, a paper model of early brain development, and a 3-D paper model of a eukaryotic cell. (AIM)

  12. [Carotenoids and fatty acids in red yeasts Sporobolomyces roseus and Rhodotorula glutinis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoli, P; Mierau, V; Weber, R W

    2004-01-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis and Sporobolomyces roseus, grown under different aeration regimes, showed differential responses in their carotenoid content. At higher aeration, the concentration of total carotenoids increased relative to biomass and total fatty acids in R. glutinis, but the composition of carotenoids (torulene > beta-carotene > gamma-carotene > torularhodin) remained unaltered. In contrast, S. roseus responded to enhanced aeration by a shift from the predominant beta-carotene to torulene and torularhodin, indicating a biosynthetic switch at the gamma-carotene branch point of carotenoid biosynthesis. The overall levels of total carotenoids in highly aerated flasks were 0.55 mol-percent and 0.50 mol-percent relative to total fatty acids in R. glutinis and S. roseus (respectively), and 206 and 412 microg g(-1) dry weight (respectively).

  13. Antioxidant, Antinociceptive, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Carotenoids Extracted from Dried Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Hernández-Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406±4 μg/g, pasilla 2933±1 μg/g, and ancho 1437±6 μg/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity and had the best scavenging capacity for the DPPH+ cation (24.2%. They also exhibited significant peripheral analgesic activity at 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg and induced central analgesia at 80 mg/kg. The results suggest that the carotenoids in dried guajillo peppers have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory benefits and could be useful for pain and inflammation relief.

  14. Antioxidant, Antinociceptive, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Carotenoids Extracted from Dried Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortega, Marcela; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Hernández-Navarro, María Dolores; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Dorantes-Alvarez, Lidia; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406 ± 4 μg/g, pasilla 2933 ± 1 μg/g, and ancho 1437 ± 6 μg/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity and had the best scavenging capacity for the DPPH+ cation (24.2%). They also exhibited significant peripheral analgesic activity at 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg and induced central analgesia at 80 mg/kg. The results suggest that the carotenoids in dried guajillo peppers have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory benefits and could be useful for pain and inflammation relief. PMID:23091348

  15. Intracellular Carotenoid Levels Measured by Raman Microspectroscopy: Comparison of Lymphocytes from Lung Cancer Patients and Healthy Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker schut, T.C.; Bakker Schut, Tom C.; Puppels, Gerwin J.; Puppels, G.J.; Kraan, Yvonne M.; Greve, Jan; van der Maas, Louis L.J.; Figdor, Carl

    1997-01-01

    Most studies concerning a possible protective role of carotenoids against cancer focus on serum carotenoid levels. We have used Raman microspectroscopy to study the intracellular amounts of carotenoids in lymphocytes of lung cancer patients and of healthy individuals. Our results indicate a

  16. Identification of catalytically important residues of the carotenoid 1,2-hydratases from Rubrivivax gelatinosus and Thiocapsa roseopersicina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiseni, A.; Otten, L.G.; Arends, I.W.C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoid 1,2-hydratases (CrtC) catalyze the selective addition of water to an isolated carbon–carbon double bond. Although their involvement in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is well understood, little is known about the mechanism by which these hydratases transform carotenoids such as

  17. Using Cortically-Inspired Algorithms for Analogical Learning and Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Related work on representing structure as features There has been some work on representing structures as vectors. For example, Holographic Reduced ...analogy to problems of surface similarity. Some of these problems and their reduced versions are shown in Fig. 10. Our representation also offers a new...used to process relational structures. We present a system that represents relational structures as fea- ture bags. Using this representation , our

  18. Effects of organic and conventional growth systems on the content of carotenoids in carrot roots, and on intake and plasma status of carotenoids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søltoft, Malene; Bysted, Anette; Madsen, Katja H; Mark, Alicja Budek; Bügel, Susanne G; Nielsen, John; Knuthsen, Pia

    2011-03-15

    The demand for organic food products has increased during the last decades due to their probable health effects, among others. A higher content of secondary metabolites such as carotenoids in organic food products has been claimed, though not documented, to contribute to increased health effects of organic foods. The aim was to study the impact of organic and conventional agricultural systems on the content of carotenoids in carrots and human diets. In addition, a human cross-over study was performed, measuring the plasma status of carotenoids in humans consuming diets made from crops from these agricultural systems. The content of carotenoids in carrot roots and human diets was not significantly affected by the agricultural production system or year, despite differences in fertilisation strategy and levels. The plasma status of carotenoids increased significantly after consumption of the organic and conventional diets, but no systematic differences between the agricultural production systems were observed. The expected higher content of presumed health-promoting carotenoids in organic food products was not documented in this study. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carotenoid supplementation positively affects the expression of a non-visual sexual signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain J-M Van Hout

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are a class of pigments which are widely used by animals for the expression of yellow-to-red colour signals, such as bill or plumage colour. Since they also have been shown to promote immunocompetence and to function as antioxidants, many studies have investigated a potential allocation trade-off with respect to carotenoid-based signals within the context of sexual selection. Although an effect of carotenoids on non-visual (e.g. acoustic signals involved in sexual selection has been hypothesized, this has to date not been investigated. First, we examined a potential effect of dietary carotenoid supplementation on overall song rate during the non-breeding season in captive male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris. After only 3-7 days, we found a significant (body-mass independent positive effect of carotenoid availability on overall song rate. Secondly, as a number of studies suggest that carotenoids could affect the modulation of sexual signals by plasma levels of the steroid hormone testosterone (T, we used the same birds to subsequently investigate whether carotenoid availability affects the increase in (nestbox-oriented song rate induced by experimentally elevated plasma T levels. Our results suggest that carotenoids may enhance the positive effect of elevated plasma T levels on nestbox-oriented song rate. Moreover, while non-supplemented starlings responded to T-implantation with an increase in both overall song rate and nestbox-oriented song, carotenoid-supplemented starlings instead shifted song production towards (reproductively relevant nestbox-oriented song, without increasing overall song rate. Given that song rate is an acoustic signal rather than a visual signal, our findings therefore indicate that the role of carotenoids in (sexual signalling need not be dependent on their function as pigments.