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Sample records for strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection

  1. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Nozaki, F.; Tanaka, K.; Ebihara, H.; Shimayama, T.; Katsuki, T.

    1981-07-15

    Sequential changes of gastrointestinal radiology are described in a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection. Duodenal dilatation, reflux of barium into the biliary and pancreatic duct, and mucosal thickening of the small intestine were the striking features before treatment. Although treatment with thiabendazole led to rapid and complete clearance of rhabditiform larvae, some abnormal radiologic changes in the small intestine persisted for approximately 4 months before the mucosal pattern reverted to normal.

  2. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complicating Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection

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    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is endemic in tropic and subtropic areas, but is currently seldom encountered in developed area like Taiwan. We present an elder man with acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection. There was no significant clue initially for diagnosing this patient as having S. stercoralis hyperinfection. Neither peripheral eosinophilia nor significant hemoptysis was noted. Bronchoscopy played a critical role to define the unexpected cause of his progressive pulmonary infiltrates. The correct diagnosis was soon made by recognition of the worm in bronchioloalveolar lavage cytology, and specific treatment was initiated promptly. For a septic patient with progressive pulmonary infiltrates, bronchoscopic studies including cytology may be necessary for defining the cause. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis should be considered as a cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompromised patient, especially with the presence of chronic gastrointestinal symptoms.

  3. Methylprednisolone acetate induces, and Δ7-dafachronic acid suppresses, Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in NSG mice.

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    Patton, John B; Bonne-Année, Sandra; Deckman, Jessica; Hess, Jessica A; Torigian, April; Nolan, Thomas J; Wang, Zhu; Kliewer, Steven A; Durham, Amy C; Lee, James J; Eberhard, Mark L; Mangelsdorf, David J; Lok, James B; Abraham, David

    2018-01-02

    Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection causes high mortality rates in humans, and, while hyperinfection can be induced by immunosuppressive glucocorticoids, the pathogenesis remains unknown. Since immunocompetent mice are resistant to infection with S. stercoralis , we hypothesized that NSG mice, which have a reduced innate immune response and lack adaptive immunity, would be susceptible to the infection and develop hyperinfection. Interestingly, despite the presence of large numbers of adult and first-stage larvae in S. stercoralis -infected NSG mice, no hyperinfection was observed even when the mice were treated with a monoclonal antibody to eliminate residual granulocyte activity. NSG mice were then infected with third-stage larvae and treated for 6 wk with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA), a synthetic glucocorticoid. MPA treatment of infected mice resulted in 50% mortality and caused a significant >10-fold increase in the number of parasitic female worms compared with infected untreated mice. In addition, autoinfective third-stage larvae, which initiate hyperinfection, were found in high numbers in MPA-treated, but not untreated, mice. Remarkably, treatment with Δ7-dafachronic acid, an agonist of the parasite nuclear receptor Ss -DAF-12, significantly reduced the worm burden in MPA-treated mice undergoing hyperinfection with S. stercoralis Overall, this study provides a useful mouse model for S. stercoralis autoinfection and suggests a therapeutic strategy for treating lethal hyperinfection.

  4. Corticosteroid-induced asthma: a manifestation of limited hyperinfection syndrome due to Strongyloides stercoralis.

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    Sen, P; Gil, C; Estrellas, B; Middleton, J R

    1995-09-01

    Inadequate therapeutic response to parenteral corticosteroids in patients with acute bronchial asthma is infrequent. We report four patients whose bronchial asthma symptoms worsened after treatment with parenteral corticosteroids. All had larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis in the stool. The new attack or the exacerbation of asthma appeared to be precipitated by systemic corticosteroid administration. The paradoxic therapeutic response of asthma to glucocorticoides was the major pulmonary manifestation of Strongyloides superinfection; there was no evidence of other organ involvement. Individuals with new onset of bronchial asthma or worsening of asthmatic episodes concurrent with the use of systemic corticosteroids should have thorough investigation for possible superinfection due to Strongyloides stercoralis. This is particularly important for patients who have resided in areas where intestinal helminthic infections are endemic. Discontinuance of steroid therapy or reduction in dosage of parenteral steroids appears necessary. Treatment with thiabendazole appears to be effective in patients with limited hyperinfection syndrome.

  5. Survival in a case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage due to Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection.

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    Steinhaus, Daniel A; Gainor, Justin F; Vernovsky, Inna; Winsett, Julie; Beer, Dennis J

    2012-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode endemic to tropical and sub-tropical regions. Although infection is typically asymptomatic or self-limited, immunocompromised individuals can develop a severe form of disease marked by hyperinfection. Pulmonary involvement accompanies hyperinfection in a majority of cases, though manifestations range from asymptomatic infiltrates to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and respiratory failure. When complicated by DAH, the hyperinfection syndrome is usually fatal. We report a case of a 65-year-old Guatemalan woman with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) treated with chronic steroids who presented with Escherichia coli urosepsis. She was initially treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids. She subsequently developed DAH due to disseminated strongyloidiasis. She was treated with oral and subcutaneous ivermectin and had complete recovery.

  6. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection in an HIV-Infected Patient Successfully Treated with Subcutaneous Ivermectin

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    Paolo Antonio Grossi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old Ethiopian HIV-positive man with peripheral T-cell lymphoma developed Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection. The patient was initially treated with oral ivermectin for three weeks without response, most likely due to malabsorption because of concomitant paralytic ileus. Given the persistence of larvae in the body fluids, the worsening respiratory status and clinical malabsorption, veterinary parenteral formulation of ivermectin was administered. The very high plasma concentration of ivermectin achieved in the patient after parenteral administration led to a rapid improvement in his clinical condition and rapid disappearance of the parasite from biological samples, without any adverse reaction.

  7. Endoscopic and histopathological study on the duodenum of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection

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    Kazuto Kishimoto; Akira Hokama; Tetsuo Hirata; Yasushi Ihama; Manabu Nakamoto; Nagisa Kinjo; Fukunori Kinjo; Jiro Fujita

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate endoscopic and histopathological findings in the duodenum of patients with Strongyloides stercoralis (5. stercoralis) hyperinfection.METHODS: Over a period of 23 years (1984-2006), we investigated 25 patients with 5. stercoralis hyperinfection who had had an esophagogastroduodenoscopy before undergoing treatment for strongyloidiasis. The clinical and endoscopic findings were analyzed retrospectively.RESULTS: Twenty-four (96%) of the patients investigated were under immunocompromised condition which was mainly due to a human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. The abnormal endoscopic findings, mainly edematous mucosa, white villi and erythematous mucosa, were observed in 23 (92%) patients. The degree of duodenitis including villous atrophy/destruction and inflammatory cell infiltration corresponded to the severity of the endoscopic findings. The histopathologic yield for identifying larvae was 71.4% by duodenal biopsy. The endoscopic findings of duodenitis were more severe in patients whose biopsies were positive for larvae than those whose biopsies were negative (Endoscopic severity score: 4.86 ± 2.47 vs 2.71 ± 1.38, P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Our study clearly demonstrates that, in addition to stool analysis, endoscopic observation and biopsies are very important. We also emphasize that 5. stercoralis and HTLV-1 infections should be ruled out before immunosuppressive therapy is administered in endemic regions.

  8. Donor-derived Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome after simultaneous kidney/pancreas transplantation

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    A. Galiano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most cases of strongyloidiasis associated with solid organ transplantation have been due to the reactivation of a latent infection in the recipient as a result of the immunosuppressive therapy; however, donor-derived infections are becoming increasingly frequent. The case of a patient who nearly died of a Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection after receiving simultaneous kidney/pancreas transplants is described herein. No specific parasitological tests were performed pre-transplantation, despite the fact that both the recipient and the donor originated from endemic areas. Serological analysis of the donor's serum performed retrospectively revealed the origin of the infection, which if it had been done beforehand would have prevented the serious complications. Current practice guidelines need to be updated to incorporate immunological and molecular techniques for the rapid screening of Strongyloides prior to transplantation, and empirical treatment with ivermectin should be applied systematically when there is the slightest risk of infection in the donor or recipient.

  9. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome Presenting as Severe, Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Leading to a Diagnosis of Cushing Disease

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    Yee, Brittany; Chi, Nai-Wen; Hansen, Lawrence A.; Lee, Roland R.; U, Hoi-Sang; Savides, Thomas J.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male immigrant from Ethiopia presented for consultation after 3 years of hematochezia/melena requiring > 25 units of blood transfusions. Physical examination revealed severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness, central obesity, proptosis, and abdominal striae, accompanied by eosinophilia, elevated hemoglobin A1c, elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol, lack of suppression of 8 am cortisol levels by 1 mg dexamethasone, and inappropriately elevated random adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. Histopathological examination of gastrointestinal biopsies showed large numbers of Strongyloides stercoralis, indicating Strongyloides hyperinfection. Treatment with 2 days of ivermectin led to resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. This syndrome was due to chronic immunosuppression from a pituitary ACTH (corticotroph) microadenoma, of which resection led to gradual normalization of urine cortisol, improved glycemic control, resolution of eosinophilia, and no recurrence of infection. PMID:26195463

  10. Strongyloides Hyperinfection Syndrome Combined with Cytomegalovirus Infection

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    Fatehi Elnour Elzein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mortality in Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome (SHS is alarmingly high. This is particularly common in bone marrow, renal, and other solid organ transplant (SOT patients, where figures may reach up to 50–85%. Immunosuppressives, principally corticosteroids, are the primary triggering factor. In general, the clinical features of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection are nonspecific; therefore, a high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy. Although recurrent Gram-negative sepsis and meningitis have been previously reported, the combination of both cytomegalovirus (CMV and strongyloidiasis had rarely been associated. We here describe a patient who survived SHS with recurrent Escherichia coli (E. coli urosepsis and CMV infection.

  11. Staphylococcus warneri meningitis in a patient with Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection and lymphoma: first report of a case Staphylococcus warneri meningite em paciente com hiperinfecção com Strongyloides stercoralis e linfoma: primeiro relato de caso

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    Renzo Nino Incani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of meningitis due to Staphylococcus warneri in a patient with a hyperinfection with Strongyloides stercoralis possibly associated with rituximab treatment for mantel cell lymphoma is reported for the first time in the literature. The patient was a 59-year-old woman, with a 3-year history of an apparently well controlled lymphoma after treatment with chemotherapy-immunotherapy and then immunotherapy alone, and diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. Meningitis was diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid culture and tested with an automated plate system. The patient was successfully treated with vancomycin; although fever and productive cough persisted. Severe gastrointestinal symptoms and pneumonia developed three weeks later. Hyperinfection syndrome by S. stercoralis was diagnosed, with abundant larvae in feces and expectoration.Caso de meningite por Staphylococcus warneri em paciente com hiperinfecção com Strongyloides stercoralis, possivelmente associada com tratamento de rituximab para linfoma de células do manto é relatada pela primeira vez na literatura. A paciente, mulher de 59 anos com história de três anos de linfoma aparentemente bem controlado com tratamento com quimioterapia-imunoterapia e, em seguida, somente imunoterapia e diagnóstico de estrongiloidíase. Meningite foi diagnosticada por cultura do líquido cefalorraquidiano e testada com sistema automatizado de placa. A paciente foi tratada com sucesso com vancomicina, embora a febre e a tosse produtiva não tenham desaparecido. Após graves sintomas gastrointestinais a paciente desenvolveu pneumonia três semanas mais tarde. Síndrome de hiperinfecção por S. stercoralis foi diagnosticada, com larvas abundantes nas fezes e expectoração.

  12. Strongyloides stercoralis Infection in Alcoholic Patients

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    Marcia C. A. Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The course of Strongyloides stercoralis infection is usually asymptomatic with a low discharge of rhabditoid larva in feces. However, the deleterious effects of alcohol consumption seem to enhance the susceptibility to infection, as shown by a fivefold higher strongyloidiasis frequency in alcoholics than in nonalcoholics. Moreover, the association between S. stercoralis infection and alcoholism presents a risk for hyperinfection and severe strongyloidiasis. There are several possible mechanisms for the disruption of the host-parasite equilibrium in ethanol-addicted patients with chronic strongyloidiasis. One explanation is that chronic ethanol intake stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis to produce excessive levels of endogenous cortisol, which in turn can lead to a deficiency in type 2 T helper cells (Th2 protective response, and also to mimic the parasite hormone ecdysone, which promotes the transformation of rhabditiform larvae to filariform larvae, leading to autoinfection. Therefore, when untreated, alcoholic patients are continuously infected by this autoinfection mechanism. Thus, the early diagnosis of strongyloidiasis and treatment can prevent serious forms of hyperinfection in ethanol abusers.

  13. incidence of strongyloides stercoralis infectionn in ungogo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Gillard, 1999). Strongyloides stercoralis is a common intestinal parasite of man. Most of the ..... Host factors such as malnutrition and undernutrition with their resultant effects on cellular immune response or the ability of the immune system.

  14. Real-time PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis-associated meningitis.

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    Nadir, Eyal; Grossman, Tamar; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Attali, Malka; Barkan, Daniel; Bardenstein, Rita; Zimhony, Oren

    2016-03-01

    Four immunocompromised patients, immigrants from Ethiopia, presented with diverse clinical manifestations of meningitis associated with Strongyloides stercoralis dissemination as determined by identification of intestinal larvae. The cerebrospinal fluid of 3 patients was tested by a validated (for stool) real-time PCR for S. stercoralis and was found positive, establishing this association. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Strongyloides stercoralis infestation in HIV seropositive patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A contemporary surge in diarrhoeal illnesses due to parasitic infestations is believed to be a synergy between endemicity and HIV seropositivity. Aim: To determine the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infestation among HIV seropositive patients at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital.

  16. Disseminated infection with Strongyloides stercoralis in a diabetic patient

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    Murali A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old male diabetic who was operated for carcinoma larynx 4 years back was admitted with exertional dyspnoea and bilateral leg swelling for the past 2 years. Over the last 2 months, there was a progressive worsening of symptoms. Echocardiography done 2 years back showed pericardial effusion. Echo done during the current admission also showed pericardial effusion with preserved left ventricular function; cytological examination of the pericardial fluid showed larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. He was treated with antinematodal drugs. A follow-up echo done at discharge showed no pericardial effusion and the patient was completely asymptomatic. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Strongyloides pericardial effusion in a diabetic patient.

  17. Regulatory T cell expansion in HTLV-1 and strongyloidiasis co-infection is associated with reduced IL-5 responses to Strongyloides stercoralis antigen.

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    Martin Montes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Human strongyloidiasis varies from a chronic but limited infection in normal hosts to hyperinfection in patients treated with corticosteroids or with HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells dampen immune responses to infections. How human strongyloidiasis is controlled and how HTLV-1 infection affects this control are not clear. We hypothesize that HTLV-1 leads to dissemination of Strongyloides stercoralis infection by augmenting regulatory T cell numbers, which in turn down regulate the immune response to the parasite.To measure peripheral blood T regulatory cells and Strongyloides stercoralis larval antigen-specific cytokine responses in strongyloidiasis patients with or without HTLV-1 co-infection.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from newly diagnosed strongyloidiasis patients with or without HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells were characterized by flow cytometry using intracellular staining for CD4, CD25 and FoxP3. PBMCs were also cultured with and without Strongyloides larval antigens. Supernatants were analyzed for IL-5 production.Patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides co-infection had higher parasite burdens. Eosinophil counts were decreased in the HTLV-1 and Strongyloides co-infected subjects compared to strongyloidiasis-only patients (70.0 vs. 502.5 cells/mm(3, p = 0.09, Mann-Whitney test. The proportion of regulatory T cells was increased in HTLV-1 positive subjects co-infected with strongyloidiasis compared to patients with only strongyloidiasis or asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (median = 17.9% vs. 4.3% vs. 5.9 p<0.05, One-way ANOVA. Strongyloides antigen-specific IL-5 responses were reduced in strongyloidiasis/HTLV-1 co-infected patients (5.0 vs. 187.5 pg/ml, p = 0.03, Mann-Whitney test. Reduced IL-5 responses and eosinophil counts were inversely correlated to the number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells.Regulatory T cell counts are increased in patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis co-infection and

  18. Ivermectin versus albendazole or thiabendazole for Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

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    Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Echevarria, Juan; White, A Clinton; Terashima, Angelica; Samalvides, Frine; Pérez-Molina, José A; Plana, Maria N

    2016-01-18

    Strongyloidiasis is a gut infection with Strongyloides stercoralis which is common world wide. Chronic infection usually causes a skin rash, vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation, and respiratory problems, and it can be fatal in people with immune deficiency. It may be treated with ivermectin or albendazole or thiabendazole. To assess the effects of ivermectin versus benzimidazoles (albendazole and thiabendazole) for treating chronic strongyloides infection. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (24 August 2015); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (January 1966 to August 2015); EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2015); LILACS (August 2015); and reference lists of articles. We also searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) using 'strongyloid*' as a search term, reference lists, and conference abstracts. Randomized controlled trials of ivermectin versus albendazole or thiabendazole for treating chronic strongyloides infection. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias in the included trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and fixed- or random-effects models. We pooled adverse event data if the trials were sufficiently similar in their adverse event definitions. We included seven trials, enrolling 1147 participants, conducted between 1994 and 2011 in different locations (Africa, Southeast Asia, America and Europe).In trials comparing ivermectin with albendazole, parasitological cure was higher with ivermectin (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.55 to 2.08; 478 participants, four trials, moderate quality evidence). There were no statistically significant differences in adverse events (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.09; 518 participants, four trials, low quality evidence).In trials comparing ivermectin with thiabendazole, there was little or no difference in parasitological cure (RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.20; 467

  19. Severe gastroduodenitis in a young man secondary to a hyperinfection for strongyloides stercolaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbelaez, Victor; Angarita, Oscar; Gomez, Martin; Sprockel John; Mejia, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    Patient that arrived to the emergency room with intense upper abdominal pain associated to abdominal distension, nausea and emesis of alimentary content, symptoms that begun five months before The patient referred some episodes of liquid diarrhea (neither mucous nor bloody), hyporexia, asthenia and adynamia that became progressive until limitation of his physical activity, taking him to prostration in bed and caquexia. The day before the consult he presents with melanemesis and vomit with total intolerance to the oral intake, associated to diarrheic dark stools which took him to the emergency room. During the diagnostic evaluation a severe gastroduodenitis due to a Strongyloides infection is evidenced, which is documented by gastric and duodenal biopsies. The patient also has an associated infection of HTLV-1 virus. With the diagnosis of a strongyloides hyperinfection, a treatment with ivermectine is started, with complete resolution of the symptoms. After showing the case in detail, we make a review of the literature about the treatment of this parasitic infection and its association with HTLV-1

  20. Cloning and expression of isocitrate lyase from human round worm Strongyloides stercoralis

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    Siddiqui A.A.

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A full length cDNA (1463 bp encoding isocitrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.1 of Strongyloides stercoralis is described. The nucleotide sequence of this insert identified a cDNA coding for the isocitrate lyase. The conceptually translated amino acid sequence of the open reading frame for S. stercoralis isocitrate lyase encodes a 450 amino acid residue protein with an apparent molecular weight of 50 kDa and a predicted pl of 6.39. The sequence is 69 % A/T, reflecting a characteristic A/T codon bias of S. stercoralis. The amino acid sequence of S. stercoralis isocitrate lyase is compared with bifunctional glyoxylate cycle protein of Caenorhabditis elegans and isocitrate lyases from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Myxococcus xanthus. The full length cDNA of S. stercoralis was expressed in pRSET vector and bacteriophage T7 promoter based expression system. S. stercoralis lyase recombinant protein, purified via immobilized metal affinity chromatography, showed a molecular mass of 50 kDa on polyacrylamide gels. The role of isocitrate lyase in the glyoxylate cycle and energy metabolism of S. stercoralis is also discussed.

  1. Strongyloides stercoralis is associated with significant morbidity in rural Cambodia, including stunting in children.

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    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Hattendorf, Jan; Marti, Hanspeter; Neumayr, Andreas; Char, Meng Chuor; Hatz, Christoph; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted nematode that can replicate within its host, leading to long-lasting and potentially fatal infections. It is ubiquitous and highly prevalent in Cambodia. The extent of morbidity associated with S. stercoralis infection is difficult to assess due to the broad spectrum of symptoms and, thus, remains uncertain. Clinical signs were compared among S. stercoralis infected vs. non-infected participants in a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2012 in eight villages of Northern Cambodia, and before and after treatment with a single oral dose of ivermectin (200μg/kg BW) among participants harboring S. stercoralis. Growth retardation among schoolchildren and adolescents was assessed using height-for-age and thinness using body mass index-for-age. S. stercoralis prevalence was 31.1% among 2,744 participants. Urticaria (55% vs. 47%, OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6) and itching (52% vs. 48%, OR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.4) were more frequently reported by infected participants. Gastrointestinal, dermatological, and respiratory symptoms were less prevalent in 103 mono-infected participants after treatment. Urticaria (66% vs. 11%, OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01-0.1) and abdominal pain (81 vs. 27%, OR: 0.07, 95% CI: 0.02-0.2) mostly resolved by treatment. S. stercoralis infection was associated with stunting, with 2.5-fold higher odds in case of heavy infection. The morbidity associated with S. stercoralis confirmed the importance of gastrointestinal and dermatological symptoms unrelated to parasite load, and long-term chronic effects when associated with malnutrition. The combination of high prevalence and morbidity calls for the integration of S. stercoralis into ongoing STH control measures in Cambodia.

  2. Strongyloides stercoralis y VIH: un caso de infección diseminada en una zona no endémica

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    F. D. Rivero

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis affects people who live in the tropics, but it also extends to temperate regions where its low incidence rate may lead to misdiagnose it. Inside the host this nematode may remain silent for many years, nevertheless, in patients infected with HIV its reactivation leads to a disseminated infection in ectopic sites. This report presents the case of a 34 years-old man infected with HIV who lived in a highland area in the province of Córdoba, Argentina. He was admitted to the hospital because of a complicated Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and prednisone treatment. A few days after admission his conditions deteriorated badly, a sputum examination revealed filariform larvae of S. stercoralis, he was then given oral ivermectin medication (200 µg/kg/d. Malabsorption and ileus were installed and he died from multiorganic failure. The evolution of HIV infection to AIDS, a steroids treatment and therapy failure despite oral ivermectin triggered larvae proliferation and lead to disseminated hyperinfection until he died. This report presents not only the first case of disseminated strongyloidiasis detected in our Hospital but also an indigenous infection acquired in a non-endemic area. An awareness of an increased predisposition to this infection, especially in immunocompromised patients with malabsorption and ileus is of paramount importance, since failure to initiate appropriate therapy can lead to catastrophic outcomes, as illustrated in this case report.Strongyloides stercoralis es un geohelminto que afecta a los pobladores que residen tanto en regiones tropicales como templadas. Dentro de sus huéspedes inmunocompetentes puede permanecer inadvertido durante años; no obstante, en pacientes infectados por el VIH su reactivación puede conducir a una diseminación de larvas hacia sitios ectópicos. Este informe muestra el caso de un paciente masculino VIH positivo oriundo de una zona

  3. Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm co-infection: spatial distribution and determinants in Preah Vihear Province, Cambodia.

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    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Vounatsou, Penelope; Chammartin, Frédérique; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2018-01-12

    Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm are two soil-transmitted helminths (STH) that are highly prevalent in Cambodia. Strongyloides stercoralis causes long-lasting infections and significant morbidity but is largely neglected, while hookworm causes the highest public health burden among STH. The two parasites have the same infection route, i.e. skin penetration. The extent of co-distribution, which could result in potential high co-morbidities, is unknown in highly endemic settings like Cambodia. The aim of this study was to predict the spatial distribution of S. stercoralis-hookworm co-infection risk and to investigate determinants of co-infection in Preah Vihear Province, North Cambodia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2010 in 60 villages of Preah Vihear Province. Diagnosis was performed on two stool samples, using combined Baermann technique and Koga agar culture plate for S. stercoralis and Kato-Katz technique for hookworm. Bayesian multinomial geostatistical models were used to assess demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioural determinants of S. stercoralis-hookworm co-infection and to predict co-infection risk at non-surveyed locations. Of the 2576 participants included in the study, 48.6% and 49.0% were infected with S. stercoralis and hookworm, respectively; 43.8% of the cases were co-infections. Females, preschool aged children, adults aged 19-49 years, and participants who reported regularly defecating in toilets, systematically boiling drinking water and having been treated with anthelmintic drugs had lower odds of co-infection. While S. stercoralis infection risk did not appear to be spatially structured, hookworm mono-infection and co-infection exhibited spatial correlation at about 20 km. Co-infection risk was positively associated with longer walking distances to a health centre and exhibited a small clustering tendency. The association was only partly explained by climatic variables, suggesting a role for underlying factors, such as

  4. E. coli Meningitis Presenting in a Patient with Disseminated Strongyloides stercoralis.

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    Gomez, Juliana B; Maque, Yvan; Moquillaza, Manuel A; Anicama, William E

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous Escherichia coli meningitis is an infrequent condition in adults and is associated with some predisposing factors, including severe Strongyloides stercoralis (SS) infections. Case Presentation. A 43-year-old Hispanic man, with history of travelling to the jungle regions of Peru and Brazil two decades ago, and who received prednisone due to Bell's palsy for three weeks before admission, presented to the Emergency Department with diarrhea, fever, and hematochezia. A week after admission he developed drowsiness, meningeal signs, abdominal distension, and constipation. A cerebrospinal fluid culture showed extended spectrum β -lactamase producing E. coli. A colonoscopy was performed and showed pancolitis. Three days after the procedure the patient became unstable and developed peritoneal signs. He underwent a laparotomy, which ended up in a total colectomy and partial proctectomy due to toxic megacolon. Three days later the patient died in the intensive care unit due to septic shock. Autopsy was performed and microscopic examination revealed the presence of multiple Strongyloides larvae throughout the body. Conclusion. Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be excluded in adults with spontaneous E. coli meningitis, especially, if gastrointestinal symptoms and history of travelling to an endemic area are present. Even with a proper diagnosis and management, disseminated strongyloidiasis has a poor prognosis.

  5. E. coli Meningitis Presenting in a Patient with Disseminated Strongyloides stercoralis

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    Juliana B. Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spontaneous Escherichia coli meningitis is an infrequent condition in adults and is associated with some predisposing factors, including severe Strongyloides stercoralis (SS infections. Case Presentation. A 43-year-old Hispanic man, with history of travelling to the jungle regions of Peru and Brazil two decades ago, and who received prednisone due to Bell’s palsy for three weeks before admission, presented to the Emergency Department with diarrhea, fever, and hematochezia. A week after admission he developed drowsiness, meningeal signs, abdominal distension, and constipation. A cerebrospinal fluid culture showed extended spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli. A colonoscopy was performed and showed pancolitis. Three days after the procedure the patient became unstable and developed peritoneal signs. He underwent a laparotomy, which ended up in a total colectomy and partial proctectomy due to toxic megacolon. Three days later the patient died in the intensive care unit due to septic shock. Autopsy was performed and microscopic examination revealed the presence of multiple Strongyloides larvae throughout the body. Conclusion. Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be excluded in adults with spontaneous E. coli meningitis, especially, if gastrointestinal symptoms and history of travelling to an endemic area are present. Even with a proper diagnosis and management, disseminated strongyloidiasis has a poor prognosis.

  6. Microarray-based analysis of differential gene expression between infective and noninfective larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis.

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    Roshan Ramanathan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Differences between noninfective first-stage (L1 and infective third-stage (L3i larvae of parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis at the molecular level are relatively uncharacterized. DNA microarrays were developed and utilized for this purpose.Oligonucleotide hybridization probes for the array were designed to bind 3,571 putative mRNA transcripts predicted by analysis of 11,335 expressed sequence tags (ESTs obtained as part of the Nematode EST project. RNA obtained from S. stercoralis L3i and L1 was co-hybridized to each array after labeling the individual samples with different fluorescent tags. Bioinformatic predictions of gene function were developed using a novel cDNA Annotation System software. We identified 935 differentially expressed genes (469 L3i-biased; 466 L1-biased having two-fold expression differences or greater and microarray signals with a p value<0.01. Based on a functional analysis, L1 larvae have a larger number of genes putatively involved in transcription (p = 0.004, and L3i larvae have biased expression of putative heat shock proteins (such as hsp-90. Genes with products known to be immunoreactive in S. stercoralis-infected humans (such as SsIR and NIE had L3i biased expression. Abundantly expressed L3i contigs of interest included S. stercoralis orthologs of cytochrome oxidase ucr 2.1 and hsp-90, which may be potential chemotherapeutic targets. The S. stercoralis ortholog of fatty acid and retinol binding protein-1, successfully used in a vaccine against Ancylostoma ceylanicum, was identified among the 25 most highly expressed L3i genes. The sperm-containing glycoprotein domain, utilized in a vaccine against the nematode Cooperia punctata, was exclusively found in L3i biased genes and may be a valuable S. stercoralis target of interest.A new DNA microarray tool for the examination of S. stercoralis biology has been developed and provides new and valuable insights regarding differences between infective and

  7. RNAseq analysis of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis reveals divergent regulation of canonical dauer pathways.

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    Jonathan D Stoltzfus

    Full Text Available The infectious form of many parasitic nematodes, which afflict over one billion people globally, is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i. The parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis differs from other nematode species that infect humans, in that its life cycle includes both parasitic and free-living forms, which can be leveraged to investigate the mechanisms of L3i arrest and activation. The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a similar developmentally arrested larval form, the dauer, whose formation is controlled by four pathways: cyclic GMP (cGMP signaling, insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ signaling, and biosynthesis of dafachronic acid (DA ligands that regulate a nuclear hormone receptor. We hypothesized that homologous pathways are present in S. stercoralis, have similar developmental regulation, and are involved in L3i arrest and activation. To test this, we undertook a deep-sequencing study of the polyadenylated transcriptome, generating over 2.3 billion paired-end reads from seven developmental stages. We constructed developmental expression profiles for S. stercoralis homologs of C. elegans dauer genes identified by BLAST searches of the S. stercoralis genome as well as de novo assembled transcripts. Intriguingly, genes encoding cGMP pathway components were coordinately up-regulated in L3i. In comparison to C. elegans, S. stercoralis has a paucity of genes encoding IIS ligands, several of which have abundance profiles suggesting involvement in L3i development. We also identified seven S. stercoralis genes encoding homologs of the single C. elegans dauer regulatory TGFβ ligand, three of which are only expressed in L3i. Putative DA biosynthetic genes did not appear to be coordinately regulated in L3i development. Our data suggest that while dauer pathway genes are present in S. stercoralis and may play a role in L3i development, there are significant differences between

  8. Morphogenesis of Strongyloides stercoralis infective larvae requires the DAF-16 ortholog FKTF-1.

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    Michelle L Castelletto

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on metabolic and morphological similarities between infective third-stage larvae of parasitic nematodes and dauer larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans, it is hypothesized that similar genetic mechanisms control the development of these forms. In the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, FKTF-1 is an ortholog of DAF-16, a forkhead transcription factor that regulates dauer larval development in C. elegans. Using transgenesis, we investigated the role of FKTF-1 in S. stercoralis' infective larval development. In first-stage larvae, GFP-tagged recombinant FKTF-1b localizes to the pharynx and hypodermis, tissues remodeled in infective larvae. Activating and inactivating mutations at predicted AKT phosphorylation sites on FKTF-1b give constitutive cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the protein, respectively, indicating that its post-translational regulation is similar to other FOXO-class transcription factors. Mutant constructs designed to interfere with endogenous FKTF-1b function altered the intestinal and pharyngeal development of the larvae and resulted in some transgenic larvae failing to arrest in the infective stage. Our findings indicate that FKTF-1b is required for proper morphogenesis of S. stercoralis infective larvae and support the overall hypothesis of similar regulation of dauer development in C. elegans and the formation of infective larvae in parasitic nematodes.

  9. HIGH PREVALENCE OF Strongyloides stercoralis INFECTION AMONG THE ELDERLY IN BRAZIL

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    Maria Margarida Naves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Little is known about the frequency of intestinal parasites in the elderly due to a lack of attention given to the occurrence of these infections among older adults. This study compares the frequency of Strongyloides stercoralis and other enteroparasites between elderly living in nursing homes (n = 100 and those noninstitutionalized (n = 100 from Uberlândia, state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, associated with data of epidemiological and socio-demographic conditions. Through coproparasitological examination of both groups, enteroparasites were detected in 15 of 200 individuals examined (7.5%; CI: 5.1- 9.9. S. stercoralis was the most frequent parasite 10/200 (5%; CI: 4.2-5.8, being significantly higher in males and in individuals with autonomy for daily living activities. There were no statistical differences in the prevalence of parasites between the two groups compared. In conclusion, S. stercoralis infection was highly prevalent in elderly patients and it does not depend on whether the individual was institutionalized or not.

  10. Fatalt forløbende Strongyloides stercoralis-infektion hos patient uden forudgående kendt immunsuppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M; Andersen, O; Friis-Møller, A

    2000-01-01

    -cell lymphoma were found in a jejunal specimen, and the patient was found to be infected with HTLV-1. Gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to infection with Strongyloides stercoralis is discussed as well as possible relations between the severity of infection, lymphoma and HTLV-1....

  11. Use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and dipstick assay for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, H. Rogier; Koelewijn, Rob; Hofwegen, Henk; Gilis, Henk; Wetsteyn, Jose C. F. M.; Wismans, Pieter J.; Sarfati, Claudine; Vervoort, Tony; van Gool, Tom

    2007-01-01

    A homemade enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Academic Medical Center ELISA [AMC-ELISA]) and a dipstick assay for the detection of anti-Strongyloides stercoralis antibodies in serum were developed and evaluated together with two commercially available ELISAs (IVD-ELISA [IVD Research, Inc.

  12. Spatial distribution of soil-transmitted helminths, including Strongyloides stercoralis, among children in Zanzibar

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    Stefanie Knopp

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A programme periodically distributing anthelminthic drugs to school-aged children for the control of soiltransmitted helminthiasis was launched in Zanzibar in the early 1990s. We investigated the spatial distribution of soiltransmitted helminth infections, including Strongyloides stercoralis, in 336 children from six districts in Unguja, Zanzibar, in 2007. One stool sample per child was examined with the Kato-Katz, Koga agar plate and Baermann methods. The point prevalence of the different helminth infections was compared to the geological characteristics of the study sites. The observed prevalences for Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and S. stercoralis were 35.5%, 12.2%, 11.9% and 2.2%, respectively, with considerable spatial heterogeneity. Whilst T. trichiura and hookworm infections were found in all six districts, no A. lumbricoides infections were recorded in the urban setting and only a low prevalence (2.2% was observed in the South district. S. stercoralis infections were found in four districts with the highest prevalence (4.0% in the West district. The prevalence of infection with any soil-transmitted helminth was highest in the North A district (69.6% and lowest in the urban setting (22.4%. A. lumbricoides, hookworm and, with the exception of the North B district, S. stercoralis infections were observed to be more prevalent in the settings north of Zanzibar Town, which are characterized by alluvial clayey soils, moist forest regions and a higher precipitation. After a decade of large-scale administration of anthelminthic drugs, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections across Unguja is still considerable. Hence, additional measures, such as improving access to adequate sanitation and clean water and continued health education, are warranted to successfully control soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Zanzibar.

  13. Different but overlapping populations of Strongyloides stercoralis in dogs and humans-Dogs as a possible source for zoonotic strongyloidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleta, Tegegn G; Zhou, Siyu; Bemm, Felix M; Schär, Fabian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter; Lok, James B; Streit, Adrian

    2017-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a much-neglected soil born helminthiasis caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Human derived S. stercoralis can be maintained in dogs in the laboratory and this parasite has been reported to also occur in dogs in the wild. Some authors have considered strongyloidiasis a zoonotic disease while others have argued that the two hosts carry host specialized populations of S. stercoralis and that dogs play a minor role, if any, as a reservoir for zoonotic S. stercoralis infections of humans. We isolated S. stercoralis from humans and their dogs in rural villages in northern Cambodia, a region with a high incidence of strongyloidiasis, and compared the worms derived from these two host species using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphisms. We found that in dogs there exist two populations of S. stercoralis, which are clearly separated from each other genetically based on the nuclear 18S rDNA, the mitochondrial cox1 locus and whole genome sequence. One population, to which the majority of the worms belong, appears to be restricted to dogs. The other population is indistinguishable from the population of S. stercoralis isolated from humans. Consistent with earlier studies, we found multiple sequence variants of the hypervariable region I of the 18 S rDNA in S. stercoralis from humans. However, comparison of mitochondrial sequences and whole genome analysis suggest that these different 18S variants do not represent multiple genetically isolated subpopulations among the worms isolated from humans. We also investigated the mode of reproduction of the free-living generations of laboratory and wild isolates of S. stercoralis. Contrary to earlier literature on S. stercoralis but similar to other species of Strongyloides, we found clear evidence of sexual reproduction. Overall, our results show that dogs carry two populations, possibly different species of Strongyloides. One population appears to be dog specific but the other one is

  14. [Duodenal Linphoma asociated to Strongyloides stercoralis infection. Two types of HTLV-1 infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Miranda, Julissa; Guzmán Rojas, Patricia; Espinoza-Ríos, Jorge; Mejía Cordero, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Infection by the Human T- Lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-1) causes Adult T cell Leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL), being the duodenal involvement rare. Commonly, patients co-infected with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis are seen due to the lack of TH2 response found on these patients. We describe a 48-year- old woman, from the jungle of Peru, with a family history of HTLV-1 infection, who presented with a History of chronic diarrhea and weight loss. HTLV-1 infection with ATLL and strongyloidiasis were diagnosed. Ivermectin treatment and chemotherapy were initiated, being stabilized, and discharged. We report this case because of the unusual coexistence in the duodenum of ATLL and strongyloidiasis.

  15. Strongyloides stercoralis daf-2 encodes a divergent ortholog of Caenorhabditis elegans DAF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Holman C; Ranjit, Najju; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D; Lok, James B

    2013-06-01

    We hypothesise that developmental arrest in infectious larvae of parasitic nematodes is regulated by signalling pathways homologous to Caenorhabditis elegans DAF (dauer formation) pathways. Alignment of Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) DAF-2 with DAF-2 of C. elegans and homologs of other species shows that most structural motifs in these insulin-like receptors are conserved. However, the catalytic domain of Ss-DAF-2 contains two substitutions (Q1242 and Q1256), that would result in constitutive dauer formation in C. elegans or diabetes in vertebrate animals. Ss-daf-2 also shows two alternately spliced isoforms, the constitutively expressed Ss-daf-2a, and Ss-daf-2b, which is only expressed in stages leading to parasitism. Copyright © 2013 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Strongyloides stercoralis age-1: a potential regulator of infective larval development in a parasitic nematode.

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    Jonathan D Stoltzfus

    Full Text Available Infective third-stage larvae (L3i of the human parasite Strongyloides stercoralis share many morphological, developmental, and behavioral attributes with Caenorhabditis elegans dauer larvae. The 'dauer hypothesis' predicts that the same molecular genetic mechanisms control both dauer larval development in C. elegans and L3i morphogenesis in S. stercoralis. In C. elegans, the phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI3 kinase catalytic subunit AGE-1 functions in the insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS pathway to regulate formation of dauer larvae. Here we identify and characterize Ss-age-1, the S. stercoralis homolog of the gene encoding C. elegans AGE-1. Our analysis of the Ss-age-1 genomic region revealed three exons encoding a predicted protein of 1,209 amino acids, which clustered with C. elegans AGE-1 in phylogenetic analysis. We examined temporal patterns of expression in the S. stercoralis life cycle by reverse transcription quantitative PCR and observed low levels of Ss-age-1 transcripts in all stages. To compare anatomical patterns of expression between the two species, we used Ss-age-1 or Ce-age-1 promoter::enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter constructs expressed in transgenic animals for each species. We observed conservation of expression in amphidial neurons, which play a critical role in developmental regulation of both dauer larvae and L3i. Application of the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 suppressed L3i in vitro activation in a dose-dependent fashion, with 100 µM resulting in a 90% decrease (odds ratio: 0.10, 95% confidence interval: 0.08-0.13 in the odds of resumption of feeding for treated L3i in comparison to the control. Together, these data support the hypothesis that Ss-age-1 regulates the development of S. stercoralis L3i via an IIS pathway in a manner similar to that observed in C. elegans dauer larvae. Understanding the mechanisms by which infective larvae are formed and activated may lead to novel control measures and treatments for

  17. Hiperinfestação por Strongyloides Stercoralis - doi:10.5020/18061230.2006.p118

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    Tânia Maria Cavalcante Maia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A estrongiloidíase é uma helmintíase predominantemente intestinal causada pelo Strongyloides stercoralis, sendo o homem seu hospedeiro definitivo, além da principal fonte de infecção. Este trabalho objetivou relatar um caso de identificação laboratorial de larva de Strongyloides stercolaris no líquido ascítico de um paciente do sexo masculino, 49 anos, agricultor, etilista há mais de 30 anos, encaminhado ao Hospital Universitário Walter Cantídio, por estar evoluindo com episódios de icterícia associada a aumento do volume abdominal diagnosticado como ascite, vômito, diarréia pastosa e diminuição do volume urinário. No internamento, foi iniciada medicação profilática para Peritonite Bacteriana Espontânea (PBE, bem como reposição de vitaminas, hidratação venosa e diuréticos, sem sucesso terapêutico. A partir de achados no líquido ascítico de presença de larvas de Strongyloides stercolaris em atividade, o quadro foi interpretado como estrongiloidíase disseminada em paciente imunocomprometido por hepatopatia avançada e alcoólica. O paciente evoluiu com quadro de choque caracterizado por hipotensão e hipotermia, tendo chegado a fazer uso de drogas vasoativas de forma não responsiva. O quadro evoluiu para óbito. Os autores chamam a atenção para a importância do diagnóstico e tratamento precoce da estrongiloidíase, principalmente em pacientes imunodeprimidos.

  18. Strongyloides stercoralis-infected dogs as a model for human disseminated strongyloidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikens, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The route of migration of Strongyloides stercoralis third-stage infective larvae was explored in primary and autogenous infections in the dog. Larvae was radiolabeled by one of two means: (1) by culture of the free-living L3 stage in a nutrient medium, deficient in methionine, supplemented with [ 75 Se]Selenomethionine, and (2) by feeding of [ 75 Se]Selenomethionine-labeled bacteria to microbiverous L1 and L2 stages. Third-stage labeled larvae were then injected into 10-day-old pups either subcutaneously, to study primary migration, or into the distal ileum, to study autogenous migration. At intervals after infection pups were killed and whole body compressed organ autoradiography done on individual tissues to determine organ-specific larval transit sites. Autoradiographic recoveries were analyzed in the context of a series of mathematical models designed to test migratory route hypotheses. Postulated routes of migration for primary infections included (1) the Null Hypothesis or Scramble Route in which larvae migrate to the intestines by any available route, (2) the Classical Pulmonary Route in which larvae migrate sequentially from skin, to blood, to lungs, to the trachea, esophagus and intestines, and (3) the Head Migration Route in which larvae move from caudal to cranial sites within the skin and muscle before entering the intestines. Postulated routes for autoinfective migration reiterated 1 and 2 above. Least squares comparisons, of calculated models to observed autoradiographic distributions, led us to conclude that there was no reason to reject the simplest assumption that larvae move by any available route to the definitive site in both forms of migration. Sampling through tracheostomy sites in 14 pups for larval migrants confirmed this conclusion

  19. Strongyloides stercoralis and other Enteroparasites in Children at Uberlândia City, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Rodrigues Machado Eleuza

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the rate of infection by Strongyloides stercoralis and other enteroparasites a survey was conducted in the city of Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A total of 900 stool samples from 300 children aging from four months to seven years, randomly selected in ten nursery schools from September 1994 to December 1995, were examined, both by the Baermann-Moraes and Lutz methods. Thirty nine children (13% were found to be infected by S. stercoralis, 64.1% were boys and 35.9% were girls. Taking all the enteroparasites as a whole the results of the survey pointed out that 265 (88.4% of the 300 children were infected by the following: Giardia lamblia, 78.3%; Ascaris lumbricoides, 15.3%; S. stercoralis, 13%; Hymenolepis nana, 6.7%; hookworms, 6%; Enterobius vermicularis, 4%; Hymenole-pis diminuta, 4% and Trichuris trichiura, 0.7%. From 265 infected children 64.5% were mono-infected, 27.2% were infected by two parasites and 8.3% had a poly-specific parasite burden. It was concluded that strongyloidiasis is hyperendemic in this area

  20. Extracellular traps are associated with human and mouse neutrophil and macrophage mediated killing of larval Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne-Année, Sandra; Kerepesi, Laura A; Hess, Jessica A; Wesolowski, Jordan; Paumet, Fabienne; Lok, James B; Nolan, Thomas J; Abraham, David

    2014-06-01

    Neutrophils are multifaceted cells that are often the immune system's first line of defense. Human and murine cells release extracellular DNA traps (ETs) in response to several pathogens and diseases. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is crucial to trapping and killing extracellular pathogens. Aside from neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils also release ETs. We hypothesized that ETs serve as a mechanism of ensnaring the large and highly motile helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis thereby providing a static target for the immune response. We demonstrated that S. stercoralis larvae trigger the release of ETs by human neutrophils and macrophages. Analysis of NETs revealed that NETs trapped but did not kill larvae. Induction of NETs was essential for larval killing by human but not murine neutrophils and macrophages in vitro. In mice, extracellular traps were induced following infection with S. stercoralis larvae and were present in the microenvironment of worms being killed in vivo. These findings demonstrate that NETs ensnare the parasite facilitating larval killing by cells of the immune system. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of Life Cycle Checkpoints and Developmental Activation of Infective Larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis by Dafachronic Acid.

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    Mennatallah M Y Albarqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex life cycle of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis leads to either developmental arrest of infectious third-stage larvae (iL3 or growth to reproductive adults. In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, analogous determination between dauer arrest and reproductive growth is governed by dafachronic acids (DAs, a class of steroid hormones that are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12. Biosynthesis of DAs requires the cytochrome P450 (CYP DAF-9. We tested the hypothesis that DAs also regulate S. stercoralis development via DAF-12 signaling at three points. First, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA stimulated 100% of post-parasitic first-stage larvae (L1s to develop to free-living adults instead of iL3 at 37°C, while 69.4±12.0% (SD of post-parasitic L1s developed to iL3 in controls. Second, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA prevented post-free-living iL3 arrest and stimulated 85.2±16.9% of larvae to develop to free-living rhabditiform third- and fourth-stages, compared to 0% in the control. This induction required 24-48 hours of Δ7-DA exposure. Third, we found that the CYP inhibitor ketoconazole prevented iL3 feeding in host-like conditions, with only 5.6±2.9% of iL3 feeding in 40 μM ketoconazole, compared to 98.8±0.4% in the positive control. This inhibition was partially rescued by Δ7-DA, with 71.2±16.4% of iL3 feeding in 400 nM Δ7-DA and 35 μM ketoconazole, providing the first evidence of endogenous DA production in S. stercoralis. We then characterized the 26 CYP-encoding genes in S. stercoralis and identified a homolog with sequence and developmental regulation similar to DAF-9. Overall, these data demonstrate that DAF-12 signaling regulates S. stercoralis development, showing that in the post-parasitic generation, loss of DAF-12 signaling favors iL3 arrest, while increased DAF-12 signaling favors reproductive development; that in the post-free-living generation, absence of DAF-12 signaling is crucial for

  2. Cryo-Microtome sections of coproculture larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis and Strongyloides ratti as antigen sources for the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis

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    Julia Maria COSTA-CRUZ

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Cryo-microtome sections of larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis and S. ratti respectively obtained from human and rat feces cultures, were used as antigens. Fluoresceinate conjugates against human IgG were employed at the ideal titer of 10 for S. stercoralis and 100 for S. ratti. The sensitivity of the indirect immunofluorescence reaction (IIF was 94.4% and 92.5% and the specificity 94.2% and 97.1% for the two specific larval antigens, respectively. Sera from 123 persons (54 from carriers of S. stercoralis infections and 69 from controls were submitted to the reaction. The titers of different sera varied from 20 to 2560. There was a significant linear correlation (r = 0.85 p £ 0.001 between the antibodies from the two species of larval antigens. We conclude that both antigens may be used in the IIF reaction for the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. Due to the feasibility of safe and low-cost mass production of S. ratti larvae in the laboratory with a considerable economy of conjugate, their utilization in the serum diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis is recommendedComparou-se o emprego de cortes em congelação de larvas de S. stercoralis e de S. ratti como fonte de antígenos na reação de imunofluorescência indireta (RIF para o diagnóstico da estrongiloidíase humana. Os antígenos foram obtidos de coproculturas de fezes humanas e de ratos, respectivamente. Soros de 123 indivíduos foram analisados sendo 54 de pacientes com estrongiloidíase e 69 controles. Empregou-se conjugado anti IgG humano marcado com fluoresceína nos títulos ideais de 10 para S. stercoralis e 100 para S. ratti. A sensibilidade da RIF foi de 94,4% e 92,5% e a especificidade de 94,2% e 97,1% respectivamente para os antígenos de S. stercoralis e S. ratti. Para os 2 antígenos os títulos dos soros variaram de 20 a 2560. Houve correlação linear significativa (r = 0,85 p £ 0,001 entre os títulos de anticorpos para os 2 antígenos. Concluiu-se que os 2 ant

  3. Accuracy of molecular biology techniques for the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection-A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonfrate, Dora; Requena-Mendez, Ana; Angheben, Andrea; Cinquini, Michela; Cruciani, Mario; Fittipaldo, Andrea; Giorli, Giovanni; Gobbi, Federico; Piubelli, Chiara; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2018-02-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis infection is a neglected tropical disease which can lead to severe symptoms and even death in immunosuppressed people. Unfortunately, its diagnosis is hampered by the lack of a gold standard, as the sensitivity of traditional parasitological tests (including microscopic examination of stool samples and coproculture) is low. Hence, alternative diagnostic methods, such as molecular biology techniques (mostly polymerase chain reaction, PCR) have been implemented. However, there are discrepancies in the reported accuracy of PCR. A systematic review with meta-analysis was conducted in order to evaluate the accuracy of PCR for the diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (record: CRD42016054298). Fourteen studies, 12 of which evaluating real-time PCR, were included in the analysis. The specificity of the techniques resulted high (ranging from 93 to 95%, according to the reference test(s) used). When all molecular techniques were compared to parasitological methods, the sensitivity of PCR was assessed at 71.8% (95% CI 52.2-85.5), that decreased to 61.8% (95% CI 42.0-78.4) when serology was added among the reference tests. Similarly, sensitivity of real-time PCR resulted 64.4% (95% CI 46.2-77.7) when compared to parasitological methods only, 56.5% (95% CI 39.2-72.4) including serology. PCR might not be suitable for screening purpose, whereas it might have a role as a confirmatory test.

  4. Immunization with the recombinant antigen Ss-IR induces protective immunity to infection with Strongyloides stercoralis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, David; Hess, Jessica A; Mejia, Rojelio; Nolan, Thomas J; Lok, James B; Lustigman, Sara; Nutman, Thomas B

    2011-10-19

    Human intestinal infections with the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis remain a significant problem worldwide and a vaccine would be a useful addition to the tools available to prevent and control this infection. The goal of this study was to test single antigens for their efficacy in a vaccine against S. stercoralis larvae in mice. Alum was used as the adjuvant in these studies and antigens selected for analysis were either recognized by protective human IgG (Ss-TMY-1, Ss-EAT-6, and Ss-LEC-5) or were known to be highly immunogenic in humans (Ss-NIE-1 and Ss-IR). Only mice immunized with the Ss-IR antigen demonstrated a significant decrease of approximately 80% in the survival of larval parasites in the challenge infection. Antibodies, recovered from mice with protective immunity to S. stercoralis after immunization with Ss-IR, were used to locate the antigen in the larvae. Confocal microscopy revealed that IgG from mice immunized with Ss-IR bound to the surface of the parasites and observations by electron microscopy indicated that IgG bound to granules in the glandular esophagus. Serum collected from mice immunized with Ss-IR passively transferred immunity to naïve mice. These studies demonstrate that Ss-IR, in combination with alum, induces high levels of protective immunity through an antibody dependent mechanism and may therefore be suitable for further development as a vaccine against human strongyloidiasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and Other Intestinal Parasites among Institutionalized Mentally Disabled Individuals in Rasht, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin SAEIDINIA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to determine the status of strongyloidiasis in mentally disabled population in the institutional places in Rasht City, the capital of Guilan Province, northern Iran.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 8 institutions for mentally retarded population in Rasht in 2013. Before collecting the samples, a questionnaire was filled out for each participant by an expert person. A single  stool sample was obtained from each of the 173 subjects and examined using direct wet mount, formalin-ether concentration technique and agar plate culture method. Results: A total of 173 mentally disabled individuals aged 2-57 (25.69±11.56 yr old were studied. Stool examination showed that 51 (29.5% cases were infected with at least one parasite. Of 173 studied cases only 10 (5.8% individuals were infected with pathogenic parasites, of which 2 (1.2% cases were infected with Strongyloides stercoralis and 8 (4.6% with Giardia lamblia. On the other hand, 42 (24.3% of the studied population were infected with non-pathogenic intestinal protozoa such as Blastocystis hominis (n=29, 16.8%, Entamoeba coli (n=16, 9.2% and Endolimax nana (n=4, 2.3%. Mixed protozoal infections were observed in 8 (4.6% individuals.Conclusion: The prevalence rate of S. stercoralis in mentally disabled individuals in Rasht was somewhat higher than those of normal population of the province. The same picture was seen when the prevalence of G. lamblia and non-pathogenic protozoa in normal and mentally disabled populations were compared.

  6. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and Other Intestinal Parasite Infections in School Children in a Rural Area of Angola: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alegría, María Luisa Aznar Ruiz; Colmenares, Karen; Espasa, Mateu; Amor, Arancha; Lopez, Isabel; Nindia, Arlette; Kanjala, Joaquina; Guilherme, Domingas; Sulleiro, Elena; Barriga, Begoña; Gil, Eva; Salvador, Fernando; Bocanegra, Cristina; López, Teresa; Moreno, Milagros; Molina, Israel

    2017-10-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. stercoralis and other intestinal parasites and identify the risk factors for infection with S. stercoralis in a rural area of Angola. A cross-sectional study was conducted in school-age children (SAC) in Cubal, Angola. A questionnaire collecting clinical and epidemiological variables was used, and two stool samples were collected. A concentration technique (Ritchie) and a technique for detection of larvae migration (Baermann) were performed. Of 230 SAC, 56.1% were female and the mean age was 9.3 years (SD 2.45). Severe malnutrition, according to body mass index (BMI)-for-age, was observed in 20.4% of the SAC, and anemia was found in 59.6%. Strongyloides stercoralis was observed in 28 of the 230 (12.8%) SAC. Eggs of other helminths were observed in 51 (22.2%) students: Hymenolepis spp. in 27 students (11.7%), hookworm in 14 (6.1%), Schistosoma haematobium in four (1.7%), Enterobius vermicularis in four (1.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides in three (1.3%), Taenia spp. in two (0.9%), and Fasciola hepatica in one (0.4%). Protozoa were observed in 17 (7.4%) students. Detection of S. stercoralis was higher using the Baermann technique versus using formol-ether (11.3 vs. 3%). Overall prevalence of S. stercoralis in the school population of 16 studied schools in the municipal area of Cubal was greater than 10%. This fact must be considered when designing deworming mass campaigns. The use of specific tests in larvae detection is needed to avoid overlooking this parasite.

  7. Strongyloides Stercoralis: The Most Prevalent Parasitic Cause of Eosinophilia in Gilan Province, Northern Iran

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    B Rahmati

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eosinophilia occurs in a wide variety of situations such as parasitic infections, aller­gic disorders, and malignancies. Most cases of eosinophilia of parasitic origin, especially those with a tissue migration life cycles consists of human infections by helminth parasites. The aim of present study was to determine the parasitic causes of eosinophilia in patients in a major endemic area of human fascioliasis in Gilan Province, northern part of Iran.Methods: One hundred and fifty patients presenting with an elevated eosinophilia attending infec­tious disease clinics with or without clinical symptoms, were examined. After clinical his­tory evaluation and physical examination, coprological examinations were performed using the formalin-ether and the Kato-Katz techniques for detection of Fasciola sp. and intestinal parasites.Results: Forty two percent of patients were infected with S. stercoralis, nine (6% were found to be infected with Fasciola sp. while only a single patient (0.7% were infected by Ttrichostrongy­lus sp.Conclusion: Local clinicians in Gilan may consider eosinophilia as a suggestive indication for diagnosis of human fascioliasis, especially when microscopic stool and/or serological tests are negative. Based on the results, local physicians should consider S. stercoralis as the potential causes of eosinophilia in patients with elevated eosinophilia.

  8. Albendazole Stimulates the Excretion of Strongyloides stercoralis Larvae in Stool Specimens and Enhances Sensitivity for Diagnosis of Strongyloidiasis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anamnart, Witthaya; Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Intapan, Pewpan Maleewong; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2010-01-01

    We succeeded in stimulation of excretion of Strongyloides stercoralis larvae in stool by oral administration of a single dose of 400 mg albendazole to strongyloidiasis patients. This result overcame the false-negative results of stool examination due to low larval numbers. Stool samples were collected from 152 asymptomatic strongyloidiasis patients in the morning, prior to eating. After breakfast, they were given a dose of 400 mg albendazole, and stool samples were collected the following morning. Agar plate culture (APC), modified formalin-ether concentration technique (MFECT), and direct-smear (DS) methods were used to examine stool specimens within 3 h after defecation. The results before and after albendazole was taken were compared. All APCs that were positive became negative after albendazole administration, while MFECT showed a 1.4- to 18.0-fold increase in larval numbers in 97.4% (148/152) of the samples. The DSs were positive in 3 out of 3 smears at a larval number of ≥45 larvae per g (lpg) of stool, and in 1or 2 out of 3 smears at a larval number between 35 and 44 lpg. At a larval number of albendazole administration became positive by MFECT after the treatment. Thus, MFECT can be effectively used for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis with prior administration of albendazole to the subject. PMID:20844212

  9. Elevated Systemic Levels of Eosinophil, Neutrophil, and Mast Cell Granular Proteins in Strongyloides Stercoralis Infection that Diminish following Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamanickam, Anuradha; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Dolla, Chandra Kumar; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2018-01-01

    Infection with the helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis ( Ss ) is commonly clinically asymptomatic that is often accompanied by peripheral eosinophilia. Granulocytes are activated during helminth infection and can act as immune effector cells. Plasma levels of eosinophil and neutrophil granular proteins convey an indirect measure of granulocyte degranulation and are prominently augmented in numerous helminth-infected patients. In this study, we sought to examine the levels of eosinophil, neutrophil, and mast cell activation-associated granule proteins in asymptomatic Ss infection and to understand their kinetics following anthelmintic therapy. To this end, we measured the plasma levels of eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil major basic protein, neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil proteinase-3, mast cell tryptase, leukotriene C4, and mast cell carboxypeptidase-A3 in individuals with asymptomatic Ss infection or without Ss infection [uninfected (UN)]. We also estimated the levels of all of these analytes in infected individuals following definitive treatment of Ss infection. We demonstrated that those infected individuals have significantly enhanced plasma levels of eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil major basic protein, elastase, myeloperoxidase, mast cell tryptase, leukotriene C4, and carboxypeptidase-A3 compared to UN individuals. Following the treatment of Ss infection, each of these granulocyte-associated proteins drops significantly. Our data suggest that eosinophil, neutrophil, and mast cell activation may play a role in the response to Ss infection.

  10. PREVALENCIA DE Strongyloides stercoralis Y OTROS PARÁSITOS INTESTINALES EN INDIGENTES ALCOHÓLICOS DE CIUDAD BOLÍVAR, ESTADO BOLÍVAR, VENEZUELA | PREVALENCE OF Strongyloides stercoralis AND OTHER INTESTINAL PARASITES IN ALCOHOLIC HOMELESS FROM CIUDAD BOLÍVAR, BOLÍVAR STATE, VENEZUELA

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    Rodolfo Devera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Between may and july 2010 a study was performed in order to determine the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and other intestinal parasites in alcoholic homeless who attend two Alcoholics Anonymous Centers in Ciudad Bolívar, Bolívar State, Venezuela. Eighty stool samples were collected, which were analyzed using the techniques of direct examination, Kato, micro-Baermann, Rugai and agar plate culture. An estimate of 61.3% of the evaluated population was parasitized. The intestinal parasite most prevalent was the chromist Blastocystis (33.8%. Among the protozoan, the most common was Endolimax nana (21.3% and among the helminths it was Strongyloides stercoralis (12.5%.

  11. High prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in school-aged children in a rural highland of north-western Ethiopia: the role of intensive diagnostic work-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Aranzazu; Rodriguez, Esperanza; Saugar, José M; Arroyo, Ana; López-Quintana, Beatriz; Abera, Bayeh; Yimer, Mulat; Yizengaw, Endalew; Zewdie, Derejew; Ayehubizu, Zimman; Hailu, Tadesse; Mulu, Wondemagegn; Echazú, Adriana; Krolewieki, Alejandro J; Aparicio, Pilar; Herrador, Zaida; Anegagrie, Melaku; Benito, Agustín

    2016-12-01

    Soil-transmitted helminthiases (hookworms, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura) are extremely prevalent in school-aged children living in poor sanitary conditions. Recent epidemiological data suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis is highly unreported. However, accurate data are essential for conducting interventions aimed at introducing control and elimination programmes. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 396 randomly selected school-aged children in Amhara region in rural area in north-western Ethiopia, to assess the prevalence of S. stercoralis and other intestinal helminths. We examined stools using three techniques: conventional stool concentration; and two S. stercoralis-specific methods, i.e. the Baermann technique and polymerase chain reaction. The diagnostic accuracy of these three methods was then compared. There was an overall prevalence of helminths of 77.5%, with distribution differing according to school setting. Soil-transmitted helminths were recorded in 69.2%. Prevalence of S. stercoralis and hookworm infection was 20.7 and 54.5%, respectively, and co-infection was detected in 16.3% of cases. Schistosoma mansoni had a prevalence of 15.7%. Prevalence of S. stercoralis was shown 3.5% by the conventional method, 12.1% by the Baermann method, and 13.4% by PCR, which thus proved to be the most sensitive. Our results suggest that S. stercoralis could be overlooked and neglected in Ethiopia, if studies of soil-transmitted helminths rely on conventional diagnostic techniques alone. A combination of molecular and stool microscopy techniques yields a significantly higher prevalence. In view of the fact that current control policies for triggering drug administration are based on parasite prevalence levels, a comprehensive diagnostic approach should instead be applied to ensure comprehensive control of helminth infections.

  12. Soil-Transmitted Helminths in Children in a Remote Aboriginal Community in the Northern Territory: Hookworm is Rare but Strongyloides stercoralis and Trichuris trichiura Persist

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    Deborah C. Holt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: soil-transmitted helminths are a problem worldwide, largely affecting disadvantaged populations. The little data available indicates high rates of infection in some remote Aboriginal communities in Australia. Studies of helminths were carried out in the same remote community in the Northern Territory in 1994–1996 and 2010–2011; (2 Methods: fecal samples were collected from children aged <10 years and examined for helminths by direct smear microscopy. In the 2010–2011 study, some fecal samples were also analyzed by agar plate culture and PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis DNA. Serological analysis of fingerprick dried blood spots using a S. stercoralis NIE antigen was also conducted; (3 Results and Conclusions: a reduction in fecal samples positive for S. stercoralis, hookworm and Trichuris trichiura was seen between the studies in 1994–1996 and 2010–2011, likely reflecting public health measures undertaken in the region to reduce intestinal helminths. Comparison of methods to detect S. stercoralis showed that PCR of fecal samples and serological testing of dried blood spots was at least as sensitive as direct smear microscopy and agar plate culture. These methods have advantages for use in remote field studies.

  13. Comparison of Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction with Parasitological Methods for Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Human Fecal Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifdini, Meysam; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in fecal samples compared with parasitological methods. A total of 466 stool samples were examined by conventional parasitological methods (formalin ether concentration [FEC] and agar plate culture [APC]). DNA was extracted using an in-house method, and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 18S ribosomal genes were amplified by nested PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Among 466 samples, 12.7% and 18.2% were found infected with S. stercoralis by FEC and APC, respectively. DNA of S. stercoralis was detected in 18.9% and 25.1% of samples by real-time PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Considering parasitological methods as the diagnostic gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of nested PCR were 100% and 91.6%, respectively, and that of real-time PCR were 84.7% and 95.8%, respectively. However, considering sequence analyzes of the selected nested PCR products, the specificity of nested PCR is increased. In general, molecular methods were superior to parasitological methods. They were more sensitive and more reliable in detection of S. stercoralis in comparison with parasitological methods. Between the two molecular methods, the sensitivity of nested PCR was higher than real-time PCR. PMID:26350449

  14. Rapid detection of Opisthorchis viverrini and Strongyloides stercoralis in human fecal samples using a duplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janwan, Penchom; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2011-12-01

    Human opisthorchiasis caused by the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is an endemic disease in Southeast Asian countries including the Lao People's Democratic Republic, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Thailand. Infection with the soil-transmitted roundworm Strongyloides stercoralis is an important problem worldwide. In some areas, both parasitic infections are reported as co-infections. A duplex real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR merged with melting curve analysis was developed for the rapid detection of O. viverrini and S. stercoralis in human fecal samples. Duplex real-time FRET PCR is based on fluorescence melting curve analysis of a hybrid of amplicons generated from two genera of DNA elements: the 162 bp pOV-A6 DNA sequence specific to O. viverrini and the 244 bp 18S rRNA sequence specific to S. stercoralis, and two pairs of specific fluorophore-labeled probes. Both O. viverrini and S. stercoralis can be differentially detected in infected human fecal samples by this process through their different fluorescence channels and melting temperatures. Detection limit of the method was as little as two O. viverrini eggs and four S. stercoralis larvae in 100 mg of fecal sample. The assay could distinguish the DNA of both parasites from the DNA of negative fecal samples and fecal samples with other parasite materials, as well as from the DNA of human leukocytes and other control parasites. The technique showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. The introduced duplex real-time FRET PCR can reduce labor time and reagent costs and is not prone to carry over contamination. The method is important for simultaneous detection especially in areas where both parasites overlap incidence and is useful as the screening tool in the returning travelers and immigrants to industrialized countries where number of samples in the diagnostic units will become increasing.

  15. Importance of a Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis in Strongyloides Stercoralis and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 Co-infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Olga; Berini, Carolina A; Waldbaum, Carlos; Avagnina, Alejandra; Juarez, María; Repetto, Silvia; Sorda, Juan; Biglione, Mirna

    2017-01-01

    Strongyloides (S.) stercoralis and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 (HTLV-1) share some endemic regions such as Japan, Jamaica, and South America and are mostly diagnosed elsewhere in immigrants from endemic areas. This co-infection has not been documented in Argentina although both pathogens are endemic in the Northwest. We present a case of S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 co-infection with an initial presentation due to gastrointestinal symptoms which presented neither eosinophilia nor the presence of larvae in stool samples in a non-endemic area for these infections. A young Peruvian woman living in Buenos Aires attended several emergency rooms and finally ended up admitted in a gastroenterology ward due to incoercible vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss. Gastrointestinal symptoms started 3 months before she returned to Argentina from a trip to Peru. She presented malnutrition and abdominal distension parameters. HIV-1 and other immunodeficiencies were discarded. The serial coproparasitological test was negative. Computed tomography showed diffuse thickening of duodenal and jejunal walls. At the beginning, vasculitis was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. The patient worsened rapidly. Skin, new enteral biopsies, and a new set of coproparasitological samples revealed S. stercoralis . Then, HTLV-1 was suspected and infection was confirmed. Ivermectin and albendazole were administrated, until the stool sample remained negative for 2 weeks. Larvae were not observed in fresh stool, Ritchie method, and agar culture 1 week post-treatment. Although she required initial support with parenteral nutrition due to oral intolerance she slowly progressed favorably. It has been highly recommended to include a rapid and sensitive PCR strategy in the algorithm to confirm Strongyloides infection, which has demonstrated to improve early diagnosis in patients at-risk of disseminated strongyloidiasis.

  16. Importance of a Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis in Strongyloides Stercoralis and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 Co-infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Olga Quintero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides (S. stercoralis and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 (HTLV-1 share some endemic regions such as Japan, Jamaica, and South America and are mostly diagnosed elsewhere in immigrants from endemic areas. This co-infection has not been documented in Argentina although both pathogens are endemic in the Northwest. We present a case of S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 co-infection with an initial presentation due to gastrointestinal symptoms which presented neither eosinophilia nor the presence of larvae in stool samples in a non-endemic area for these infections. A young Peruvian woman living in Buenos Aires attended several emergency rooms and finally ended up admitted in a gastroenterology ward due to incoercible vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss. Gastrointestinal symptoms started 3 months before she returned to Argentina from a trip to Peru. She presented malnutrition and abdominal distension parameters. HIV-1 and other immunodeficiencies were discarded. The serial coproparasitological test was negative. Computed tomography showed diffuse thickening of duodenal and jejunal walls. At the beginning, vasculitis was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. The patient worsened rapidly. Skin, new enteral biopsies, and a new set of coproparasitological samples revealed S. stercoralis. Then, HTLV-1 was suspected and infection was confirmed. Ivermectin and albendazole were administrated, until the stool sample remained negative for 2 weeks. Larvae were not observed in fresh stool, Ritchie method, and agar culture 1 week post-treatment. Although she required initial support with parenteral nutrition due to oral intolerance she slowly progressed favorably. It has been highly recommended to include a rapid and sensitive PCR strategy in the algorithm to confirm Strongyloides infection, which has demonstrated to improve early diagnosis in patients at-risk of disseminated strongyloidiasis.

  17. Radiolabeling of infective third-stage larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis by feeding [75Se]selenomethionine-labeled Escherichia coli to first- and second-stage larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikens, L.M.; Schad, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for radiolabeling Strongyloides stercoralis larvae with [ 75 Se]selenomethionine. Cultures of an auxotrophic methionine-dependent stain of Escherichia coli were grown in a medium containing Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 5% nutrient broth, amino acids, and [ 75 Se]selenomethionine. When the 75 Se-labeled bacterial populations were in the stationary phase of growth, cultures were harvested and the bacteria dispersed on agar plates to serve as food for S. stercoralis larvae. Use of nondividing bacteria is important for successful labeling because the isotope is not diluted by cell division and death of larvae attributable to overgrowth by bacteria is prevented. First-stage S. stercoralis larvae were recovered from feces of infected dogs and reared in humid air at 30 C on agar plates seeded with bacteria. After 7 days, infective third-stage larvae were harvested. The mean specific activity of 6 different batches of larvae ranged from 75 to 330 counts per min/larva with 91.8 +/- 9.5% of the population labeled sufficiently to produce an autoradiographic focus during a practicable, 6-wk period of exposure. Labeled infective larvae penetrated the skin of 10-day-old puppies and migrated to the small intestine, where the developed to adulthood

  18. cGMP and NHR signaling co-regulate expression of insulin-like peptides and developmental activation of infective larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis.

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    Jonathan D Stoltzfus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The infectious form of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i, which is morphologically similar to the developmentally arrested dauer larva in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We hypothesize that the molecular pathways regulating C. elegans dauer development also control L3i arrest and activation in S. stercoralis. This study aimed to determine the factors that regulate L3i activation, with a focus on G protein-coupled receptor-mediated regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway signaling, including its modulation of the insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS pathway. We found that application of the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP potently activated development of S. stercoralis L3i, as measured by resumption of feeding, with 85.1 ± 2.2% of L3i feeding in 200 µM 8-bromo-cGMP in comparison to 0.6 ± 0.3% in the buffer diluent. Utilizing RNAseq, we examined L3i stimulated with DMEM, 8-bromo-cGMP, or the DAF-12 nuclear hormone receptor (NHR ligand Δ7-dafachronic acid (DA--a signaling pathway downstream of IIS in C. elegans. L3i stimulated with 8-bromo-cGMP up-regulated transcripts of the putative agonistic insulin-like peptide (ILP -encoding genes Ss-ilp-1 (20-fold and Ss-ilp-6 (11-fold in comparison to controls without stimulation. Surprisingly, we found that Δ7-DA similarly modulated transcript levels of ILP-encoding genes. Using the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, we demonstrated that 400 nM Δ7-DA-mediated activation (93.3 ± 1.1% L3i feeding can be blocked using this IIS inhibitor at 100 µM (7.6 ± 1.6% L3i feeding. To determine the tissues where promoters of ILP-encoding genes are active, we expressed promoter::egfp reporter constructs in transgenic S. stercoralis post-free-living larvae. Ss-ilp-1 and Ss-ilp-6 promoters are active in the hypodermis and neurons and the Ss-ilp-7 promoter is active in the

  19. Albendazole and ivermectin for the control of soil-transmitted helminths in an area with high prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm in northwestern Argentina: A community-based pragmatic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echazú, Adriana; Juarez, Marisa; Vargas, Paola A; Cajal, Silvana P; Cimino, Ruben O; Heredia, Viviana; Caropresi, Silvia; Paredes, Gladys; Arias, Luis M; Abril, Marcelo; Gold, Silvia; Lammie, Patrick; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J

    2017-10-01

    Recommendations for soil-transmitted helminth (STH) control give a key role to deworming of school and pre-school age children with albendazole or mebendazole; which might be insufficient to achieve adequate control, particularly against Strongyloides stercoralis. The impact of preventive chemotherapy (PC) against STH morbidity is still incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a community-based program with albendazole and ivermectin in a high transmission setting for S. stercoralis and hookworm. Community-based pragmatic trial conducted in Tartagal, Argentina; from 2012 to 2015. Six communities (5070 people) were enrolled for community-based PC with albendazole and ivermectin. Two communities (2721 people) were re-treated for second and third rounds. STH prevalence, anemia and malnutrition were explored through consecutive surveys. Anthropometric assessment of children, stool analysis, complete blood count and NIE-ELISA serology for S. stercoralis were performed. STH infection was associated with anemia and stunting in the baseline survey that included all communities and showed a STH prevalence of 47.6% (almost exclusively hookworm and S. stercoralis). Among communities with multiple interventions, STH prevalence decreased from 62% to 23% (palbendazole and ivermectin is effective for the reduction of STH prevalence and morbidity in communities with high prevalence of hookworm and S. stercoralis.

  20. Albendazole and ivermectin for the control of soil-transmitted helminths in an area with high prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm in northwestern Argentina: A community-based pragmatic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Echazú

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recommendations for soil-transmitted helminth (STH control give a key role to deworming of school and pre-school age children with albendazole or mebendazole; which might be insufficient to achieve adequate control, particularly against Strongyloides stercoralis. The impact of preventive chemotherapy (PC against STH morbidity is still incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a community-based program with albendazole and ivermectin in a high transmission setting for S. stercoralis and hookworm.Community-based pragmatic trial conducted in Tartagal, Argentina; from 2012 to 2015. Six communities (5070 people were enrolled for community-based PC with albendazole and ivermectin. Two communities (2721 people were re-treated for second and third rounds. STH prevalence, anemia and malnutrition were explored through consecutive surveys. Anthropometric assessment of children, stool analysis, complete blood count and NIE-ELISA serology for S. stercoralis were performed.STH infection was associated with anemia and stunting in the baseline survey that included all communities and showed a STH prevalence of 47.6% (almost exclusively hookworm and S. stercoralis. Among communities with multiple interventions, STH prevalence decreased from 62% to 23% (p<0.001 after the first PC; anemia also diminished from 52% to 12% (p<0.001. After two interventions S. stercoralis seroprevalence declined, from 51% to 14% (p<0.001 and stunting prevalence decreased, from 19% to 12% (p = 0.009.Hookworm' infections are associated with anemia in the general population and nutritional impairment in children. S. stercoralis is also associated with anemia. Community-based deworming with albendazole and ivermectin is effective for the reduction of STH prevalence and morbidity in communities with high prevalence of hookworm and S. stercoralis.

  1. Albendazole and ivermectin for the control of soil-transmitted helminths in an area with high prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm in northwestern Argentina: A community-based pragmatic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Marisa; Vargas, Paola A.; Cajal, Silvana P.; Cimino, Ruben O.; Heredia, Viviana; Caropresi, Silvia; Paredes, Gladys; Arias, Luis M.; Abril, Marcelo; Gold, Silvia; Lammie, Patrick; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Recommendations for soil-transmitted helminth (STH) control give a key role to deworming of school and pre-school age children with albendazole or mebendazole; which might be insufficient to achieve adequate control, particularly against Strongyloides stercoralis. The impact of preventive chemotherapy (PC) against STH morbidity is still incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a community-based program with albendazole and ivermectin in a high transmission setting for S. stercoralis and hookworm. Methodology Community-based pragmatic trial conducted in Tartagal, Argentina; from 2012 to 2015. Six communities (5070 people) were enrolled for community-based PC with albendazole and ivermectin. Two communities (2721 people) were re-treated for second and third rounds. STH prevalence, anemia and malnutrition were explored through consecutive surveys. Anthropometric assessment of children, stool analysis, complete blood count and NIE-ELISA serology for S. stercoralis were performed. Principal findings STH infection was associated with anemia and stunting in the baseline survey that included all communities and showed a STH prevalence of 47.6% (almost exclusively hookworm and S. stercoralis). Among communities with multiple interventions, STH prevalence decreased from 62% to 23% (p<0.001) after the first PC; anemia also diminished from 52% to 12% (p<0.001). After two interventions S. stercoralis seroprevalence declined, from 51% to 14% (p<0.001) and stunting prevalence decreased, from 19% to 12% (p = 0.009). Conclusions Hookworm’ infections are associated with anemia in the general population and nutritional impairment in children. S. stercoralis is also associated with anemia. Community-based deworming with albendazole and ivermectin is effective for the reduction of STH prevalence and morbidity in communities with high prevalence of hookworm and S. stercoralis. PMID:28991899

  2. Heterologous antigen extract in ELISA for the detection of human IgE anti-Strongyloides stercoralis Extrato antigênico heterólogo em ELISA para a detecção de IgE humana anti-Strongyloides stercoralis

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    Julia Maria Costa-Cruz

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides ratti larval extract was used for the standardization of ELISA to detect genus-specific IgE in human strongyloidiasis. Forty serum samples from monoinfected patients shedding S. stercoralis larvae (Group I, 40 from patients with other intestinal parasites (Group II, and 40 from copronegative healthy subjects (Group III were analyzed. Genus-specific IgE levels (ELISA Index: EI were significantly higher in the group I (EI = 1.43 than groups II (EI = 0.70 and III (EI = 0.71, showing positivity rates of 55%, 2.5% and 0%, respectively. Similarly, sera from copropositive patients had significantly higher levels of total IgE (866 IU/mL as compared to those from group II (302 IU/mL and III (143 IU/mL. A significant positive correlation was found between levels of Strongyloides specific-IgE and total IgE in sera from patients with strongyloidiasis. In conclusion, S. ratti heterologous extract showed to be a useful tool for detecting genus-specific IgE by ELISA, contributing for a better characterization of the immune response profile in human strongyloidiasis.Extrato contendo larvas de Strongyloides ratti foi usado na padronização de um ELISA para detecção de IgE gênero-específica na estrongiloidíase humana. Foram analisadas 40 amostras de soro de pacientes monoinfectados que estavam eliminando larvas de S. stercoralis nas fezes (Grupo I, 40 de pacientes com outros parasitos intestinais (Grupo II, e 40 indivíduos copronegativos (Grupo III. Níveis de IgE gênero-específica (índice ELISA: EI foram significativamente maiores no Grupo I (EI = 1,43 do que no II (EI = 0,70 e III (EI = 0,71, mostrando positividade de 55%, 2,5% e 0%, respectivamente. Similarmente, soros dos pacientes copropositivos (Grupo I apresentaram níveis significativamente maiores de IgE total (866 IU/mL quando comparados com os soros dos Grupo II (302 IU/mL e III (143 IU/mL. Uma significativa correlação positiva foi encontrada entre os níveis de IgE espec

  3. A coproantigen diagnostic test for Strongyloides infection.

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    Alex M Sykes

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of infection with the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis is hampered by the low concentration of larvae in stool, rendering parasitological diagnosis insensitive. Even if the more sensitive agar plate culture method is used repeated stool sampling is necessary to achieve satisfactory sensitivity. In this manuscript we describe the development of a coproantigen ELISA for diagnosis of infection. Polyclonal rabbit antiserum was raised against Strongyloides ratti excretory/secretory (E/S antigen and utilized to develop an antigen capture ELISA. The assay enabled detection of subpatent rodent S. ratti and human S. stercoralis infection. No cross-reactivity was observed with purified E/S from Schistosoma japonicum, the hookworms Ancylostoma caninum, A. ceylanicum, nor with fecal samples collected from rodents harboring Trichuris muris or S. mansoni infection. Strongyloides coproantigens that appear stable when frozen as formalin-extracted fecal supernatants stored at -20 °C remained positive up to 270 days of storage, whereas supernatants stored at 4 °C tested negative. These results indicate that diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis by detection of coproantigen is an approach worthy of further development.

  4. Central Nervous System Strongyloidiasis and Cryptococcosis in an HIV-Infected Patient Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

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    Mónica Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome with central nervous system involvement, in a patient with late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection starting antiretroviral therapy, in whom Strongyloides stercoralis larvae and Cryptococcus neoformans were isolated antemortem from cerebrospinal fluid. Our patient was not from an endemic region for the parasite, so strongyloidiasis was not originally suspected. For this reason, we conclude that Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be suspected in HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in order to avoid potential fatal outcomes.

  5. Therapy of the experimental infection by Strongyloides venezuelensis in rats with injectable ivermectin or levamizole

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    Rubens Campos

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available For the therapy of human strongyloidiasis, are necessary effective drugs to eliminate both larvae and adult worm parasitism, which may also be used by parenteral route, to obviate the particular conditions presented by many patients. A study based on the experimental infection by Strongyloides venezuelensis in rats was done, administering injectable ivermectin or levamizole. Both drugs were shown to be active, when used in single doses of 0.2 to 0.5 mg/kg of ivermectin, or 26 mg/kg for levamizole. Ivermectin was slightly more effective as far as larval stage of the infection is concerned, and the same happened for levamisole for the adult worm stage. Promising perspectives are visualized to improve the therapy of patients with serious disseminated infection by Strongyloides stercoralis.

  6. Application of PCR-Based Tools to Explore Strongyloides Infection in People in Parts of Northern Australia

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    Gemma J. Robertson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis, which is caused by infection with the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis, is endemic to areas of northern Australia. Diagnosis in this region remains difficult due to the distances between endemic communities and diagnostic laboratories, leading to lengthy delays in stool processing for microscopy and culture. PCR represents a viable solution to this difficulty, having potential for high sensitivity detection of S. stercoralis, even in older, unpreserved faecal samples. We prospectively collected 695 faecal specimens that were submitted to The Townsville Hospital Microbiology Laboratory from the North Queensland region for routine parasitological examination, and subjected them to a Strongyloides sp. real-time (qPCR. Results were confirmed with a novel nested conventional PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene, followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP. Of the 695 specimens tested, S. stercoralis was detected in three specimens (0.4% by classical parasitological methods (direct microscopy and formyl-ether acetate concentration, whereas 42 positives were detected by qPCR (6.0%. Conventional PCR confirmed the real-time PCR results in 24 of the samples (3.5%. Several apparent false-positive results occurred at higher cycle times (Ct in the qPCR. Use of real-time PCR in these populations is promising for the enhanced detection of disease and to support eradication efforts.

  7. Development of a Sensitive and Specific Antigen-Detection System for Strongyloides Stercoralis and Hookworm Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    difficult to specifically identify, and failure to implement the correct antibiotic therapy in a timely fashion can result in the onset of acute symptoms...compromised patients are particularly at risk. Treatment is similar to hookworms. Treatment of nematode infection is fairly standard with therapies using...caninum eggs harvested by floatation in ZnSO 4 solution were similarly processed for PAGE fractionation except that eggs were not homogenized. Figures 13a

  8. Strongyloides spp. infections of veterinary importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamsborg, Stig M.; Ketzis, Jennifer; Horii, Yoichiro

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the occurrence and impact of threadworms, Strongyloides spp., in companion animals and large livestock, the potential zoonotic implications and future research. Strongyloides spp. infect a range of domestic animal species worldwide and clinical disease is most often encountered...

  9. A Community-Directed Integrated Strongyloides Control Program in Queensland, Australia

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    Adrian Miller

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes two phases of a community-directed intervention to address strongyloidiasis in the remote Aboriginal community of Woorabinda in central Queensland, Australia. The first phase provides the narrative of a community-driven ‘treat-and-test’ mass drug administration (MDA intervention that was co-designed by the Community Health Service and the community. The second phase is a description of the re-engagement of the community in order to disseminate the key factors for success in the previous MDA for Strongyloides stercoralis, as this information was not shared or captured in the first phase. During the first phase in 2004, there was a high prevalence of strongyloidiasis (12% faecal examination, 30% serology; n = 944 community members tested that resulted in increased morbidity and at least one death in the community. Between 2004–2005, the community worked in partnership with the Community Health Service to implement a S. stercoralis control program, where all of the residents were treated with oral ivermectin, and repeat doses were given for those with positive S. stercoralis serology. The community also developed their own health promotion campaign using locally-made resources targeting relevant environmental health problems and concerns. Ninety-two percent of the community residents participated in the program, and the prevalence of strongyloidiasis at the time of the ‘treat-and-test’ intervention was 16.6% [95% confidence interval 14.2–19.3]. The cure rate after two doses of ivermectin was 79.8%, based on pre-serology and post-serology tests. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of local Aboriginal leadership and governance and a high level of community involvement in this successful mass drug administration program to address S. stercoralis. The commitment required of these leaders was demanding, and involved intense work over a period of several months. Apart from controlling strongyloidiasis

  10. HIPERINFECCIÓN POR STRONGYLOIDES EN ANCIANO CON EPOC

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    Análida Elizabeth Pinilla Roa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de un hombre de 81 años natural de zona rural, agricultor, recolector de café 50 años atrás y jardinero por 22 años en Bogotá. Consultó por dolor abdominal de 10 días de evolución, localizado hacia mesogastrio y epigastrio. Además, disnea, tos productiva. Antecedentes: enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, cor pulmonale, fumador de 25 paquetes /año, había recibido prednisona oral y beclometasona inhalada en diversas ocasiones incluso en la última hospitalización. En el examen físico presentó signos de desnutrición, taquicardia, taquipnea; estertores en base del hemitórax derecho; abdomen: blando, depresible con dolor a la palpación profunda en epigastrio e hipocondrio derecho. Ingresó con síndrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistémica por taquicardia, taquipnea, leucocitosis 37.600 y eosinofilia 52-60%, Ig E: 180 UI/ ml. Se evidenciaron larvas rabditiformes de Strongyloides stercoralis en esputo y materia fecal. La radiografía de tórax mostró derrame pleural derecho, la ecografía hepática fue normal, la endoscopia de vías digestivas altas evidenció gastritis y duodenitis. Se inició tratamiento con ivermectina 200 mg/Kg/dosis, con seguimiento clínico y de laboratorio con evolución clínica satisfactoria.

  11. Genetic characterization of Strongyloides spp. from captive, semi-captive and wild Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) in Central and East Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labes, E M; Nurcahyo, W; Wijayanti, N; Deplazes, P; Mathis, A

    2011-09-01

    Orangutans (Pongo spp.), Asia's only great apes, are threatened in their survival due to habitat loss, hunting and infections. Nematodes of the genus Strongyloides may represent a severe cause of death in wild and captive individuals. In order to better understand which Strongyloides species/subspecies infect orangutans under different conditions, larvae were isolated from fecal material collected in Indonesia from 9 captive, 2 semi-captive and 9 wild individuals, 18 captive groups of Bornean orangutans and from 1 human working with wild orangutans. Genotyping was done at the genomic rDNA locus (part of the 18S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1, ITS1) by sequencing amplicons. Thirty isolates, including the one from the human, could be identified as S. fuelleborni fuelleborni with 18S rRNA gene identities of 98·5-100%, with a corresponding published sequence. The ITS1 sequences could be determined for 17 of these isolates revealing a huge variability and 2 main clusters without obvious pattern with regard to attributes of the hosts. The ITS1 amplicons of 2 isolates were cloned and sequenced, revealing considerable variability indicative of mixed infections. One isolate from a captive individual was identified as S. stercoralis (18S rRNA) and showed 99% identity (ITS1) with S. stercoralis sequences from geographically distinct locations and host species. The findings are significant with regard to the zoonotic nature of these parasites and might contribute to the conservation of remaining orangutan populations.

  12. Associação timoma e estrongiloidíase intestinal grave Thymoma and severe intestinal strongyloidiasis association

    OpenAIRE

    Pérsio Godoy; Christian Marcellus Camargos Campos; Guilherme Costa; Lúcia Porto Fonseca de Castro

    1998-01-01

    Os autores relatam o caso de um homem de 59 anos de idade com timoma e estrongiloidíase intestinal grave. São revistos aspectos da resposta imunitária relacionados ao tumor e, possivelmente, implicados no desenvolvimento da hiperinfecção pelo Strongyloides stercoralis.A 59-years-old man with thymoma and severe intestinal strongyloidiasis is reported. The authors pointed out a possible influence of immunological response related with thymoma in the development of hyperinfection by Strongyloide...

  13. Genetics, chromatin diminution, and sex chromosome evolution in the parasitic nematode genus Strongyloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemetschke, Linda; Eberhardt, Alexander G; Hertzberg, Hubertus; Streit, Adrian

    2010-10-12

    When chromatin diminution occurs during a cell division a portion of the chromatin is eliminated, resulting in daughter cells with a smaller amount of genetic material. In the parasitic roundworms Ascaris and Parascaris, chromatin diminution creates a genetic difference between the soma and the germline. However, the function of chromatin diminution remains a mystery, because the vast majority of the eliminated DNA is noncoding. Within the parasitic roundworm genus Strongyloides, S. stercoralis (in man) and S. ratti (in rat) employ XX/XO sex determination, but the situation in S. papillosus (in sheep) is different but controversial. We demonstrate genetically that S. papillosus employs sex-specific chromatin diminution to eliminate an internal portion of one of the two homologs of one chromosome pair in males. Contrary to ascarids, the eliminated DNA in S. papillosus contains a large number of genes. We demonstrate that the region undergoing diminution is homologous to the X chromosome of the closely related S. ratti. The flanking regions, which are not diminished, are homologous to the S. ratti autosome number I. Furthermore, we found that the diminished chromosome is not incorporated into sperm, resulting in a male-specific transmission ratio distortion. Our data indicate that on the evolutionary path to S. papillosus, the X chromosome fused with an autosome. Chromatin diminution serves to functionally restore an XX/XO sex-determining system. A consequence of the fusion and the process that copes with it is a transmission ratio distortion in males for certain loci. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intestinal strongyloidiasis in a psoriatic patient following immunosuppressive therapy: Seeing the unforeseen

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    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis , an intestinal nematode, has a complicated life cycle. Mostly asymptomatic, if symptomatic it has nonspecific, transient clinical manifestations. The two aggressive forms of the disease are: Hyperinfection syndrome (HS or disseminated syndrome (DS. Several risk factors have been associated with strongyloidiasis including immunosuppressive therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, diabetes, alcoholism, tuberculosis, impaired bowel motility, surgically created intestinal blind loops, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic renal failure. We describe a case of intestinal strongyloidiasis in a psoriatic patient treated with immunosuppressive therapy.

  15. A protocol for chemical mutagenesis in Strongyloides ratti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Chang, Zisong; Dieterich, Christoph; Streit, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    Genetic analysis using experimentally induced mutations has been a most valuable tool in the analysis of various organisms. However, genetic analysis of endoparasitic organisms tends to be difficult because of the limited accessibility of the sexually reproducing adults, which are normally located within the host. Nematodes of the genera Strogyloides and Parastrongyloides represent an exception to this because they can form facultative free-living sexually reproducing generations in between parasitic generations. Here we present a protocol for the chemical mutagenesis of Strongyloides ratti. Further we evaluate the feasibility of identifying the induced mutations by whole genome re-sequencing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tracking radioactive larvae of Strongyloides ratti in the host

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.A.G.

    1979-01-01

    Infective larvae of homogonic Strongyloides ratti grown in faecal culture with 32 P or 75 Se acquired a significant amount of radioactivity which was firmly attached to them. Heating removed most of the 32 P but left 75 Se in place. Subcutaneous injection of virgin and nursing mother rats with living and heat-killed ratioactive larvae resulted in a pattern of labelling in the small intestine of injected animals and, in the case of 75 Se, those of suckling pups, which can only be explained if labelled worms follow the natural migratory routes. The use of this tool in migratory studies is discussed, with precautions to allow for flaws in the technique. (author)

  17. Strongyloides seroprevalence before and after an ivermectin mass drug administration in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.

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    Therese M Kearns

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides seroprevalence is hyper-endemic in many Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, ranging from 35-60%. We report the impact on Strongyloides seroprevalence after two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured Strongyloides seroprevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined changes in serostatus. Serodiagnosis was undertaken by ELISA that used sonicated Strongyloides ratti antigen to detect anti-Strongyloides IgG. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 10-42 days if Strongyloides and/or scabies was diagnosed; others followed a standard alternative algorithm. A questionnaire on clinical symptoms was administered to identify adverse events from treatment and self-reported symptoms associated with serostatus.We surveyed 1013 participants at the baseline population census and 1060 (n = 700 from baseline cohort and 360 new entrants at month 12. Strongyloides seroprevalence fell from 21% (175/818 at baseline to 5% at month 6. For participants from the baseline cohort this reduction was sustained at month 12 (34/618, 6%, falling to 2% at month 18 after the second MDA. For new entrants to the cohort at month 12, seroprevalence reduced from 25% (75/297 to 7% at month 18. Strongyloides positive seroconversions for the baseline cohort six months after each MDA were 2.5% (4/157 at month 6 and 1% at month 18, whilst failure to serorevert remained unchanged at 18%. At 12 months, eosinophilia was identified in 59% of baseline seropositive participants and 89% of seropositive new entrants, compared with 47%baseline seronegative participants and 51% seronegative new entrants. Seropositivity was not correlated with haemoglobin or any self-reported clinical

  18. Microarray analysis of gender- and parasite-specific gene transcription in Strongyloides ratti

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, Helen; Mello, Luciane V.; Fang, Yongxiang; Wit, Ernst; Thompson, Fiona J.; Viney, Mark E.; Paterson, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which parasitic nematodes reproduce and have adapted to life within a host are unclear. In the present study, microarray analysis was used to explore differential transcription among the different stages and sexes of Strongyloides ratti, a parasitic nematode of brown

  19. Disseminated strongyloidiasis in an immunocompromised host: A case report

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    Nurul Suhaiza Hassanudin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis in human are generally asymptomatic, however in immunocompromised individual, hyperinfection may develop with dissemination of larvae to extra-intestinal organs. The diagnosis could be easily missed due to asymptomatic presentation and insufficient exposure towards the infection itself, which may lead to low index of suspicion as a consequence. In this report, a case of a Malaysian male with underlying diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cerebrovascular accident, bullous pemphigus and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion who initially complained of generalized body weakness and poor appetite without any history suggestive of sepsis is presented. However, he developed septicemic shock later, and S. stercoralis larvae was incidentally found in the tracheal aspirate that was sent to look for acid fast bacilli. Regardless of aggressive resuscitation, the patient succumbed due to pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. It was revealed that the current case has alarmed us via incidental finding of S. stercoralis larvae in the tracheal aspirate, indicating that the importance of the disease should be emphasized in certain parts of the world and population respectively.

  20. A British Second World War veteran with disseminated strongyloidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, G V; Beeching, N J; Khoo, S; Bailey, J W; Partridge, S; Blundell, J W; Luksza, A R

    2004-06-01

    A case is described of a 78-year-old British veteran of the Second World War (1939-45) who was stationed in Southeast Asia and who developed a recurrent pneumonia with blood eosinophilia. He was treated with steroids, and eventually died with a severe Pseudomonas pneumonia. Just prior to death, larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis were identified in his sputum, and a specific serum ELISA test was later positive. At autopsy no other organs were involved, but bronchoalveolar carcinoma was found. Longstanding (57 years) chronic strongyloidiasis in a veteran who served in Southeast Asia but who was not a prisoner of war is very unusual. The pattern of dissemination was also not that of a true hyperinfection syndrome, and the case demonstrates the continued need for diagnostic vigilance amongst former soldiers who were based in the Far East.

  1. Strongyloides ratti: implication of mast cell-mediated expulsion through FcεRI-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe K.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine whether FcεRI-dependent degranulation of intestinal mast cells is required for expulsion of intestinal nematode Strongyloides ratti, CD45 exon6-deficient (CD45-/- mice were inoculated with S. ratti. In CD45-/- mice, egg excretion in feces persisted for more than 30 days following S. ratti larvae inoculation, whereas in wild-type (CD45+/+ mice, the eggs completely disappeared by day 20 post-infection. The number of intestinal mucosal mast cells, which are known effector cells for the expulsion of S. ratti, was 75% lower in CD45-/- mice compared with that in CD45+/+ mice. Adoptive transfer of wild-type T cells from CD45+/+ mice into CD45-/- mice reduced the duration of S. ratti infection to comparable levels observed in CD45+/+ mice, with concomitant increases in intestinal mucosal mast cells. These results showed that CD45 is not involved in the effector function of intestinal mucosal mast cells against S. ratti infection. Since FcεRI-dependent degranulation of mast cells is completely impaired in these CD45 knockout mice, we conclude that FcεRIdependent degranulation is not required in the protective function of intestinal mucosal mast cells against primary infection of S. ratti.

  2. Changes in the viability of Strongyloides ransomi larvae (Nematoda, Rhabditida under the influence of synthetic flavourings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Boyko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common nematodes of pigs globally is Strongyloides ransomi Schwartz and Alicata 1930. It usually causes aggravation of physiological indicators of its hosts and damage to their immune system. Also it is a good modelling object for the evaluation of the antiparasitic activity of new antihelminthic drugs. We conducted laboratory experiments to assess the effect of flavouring additives with flower odour (benzaldehyde, citral, D-limonene and β-ionone upon the viability of S. ransomi larvae. The mortality rate was calculated for 24 hours exposure at four concentrations of each substance (10, 1, 0.1 и 0.01 g/l with eight replications. The lowest LD50 values were obtained for citral (97 mg/l and benzaldehyde (142 mg/l. These substances are recommended for further evaluation of their antihelminthic effect in experiments using laboratory animals. Unlike other substances, the effect of β-ionone and D-limonene even at a concentration of 10 g/l after 24 hours caused the death of <50% of S. ransomi larvae. The study of flavouring additives with flowery odour, which are permitted to be used in food for humans and also to be used in cosmetics, is a promising field for research aimed at the development of new antiparasitic drugs.

  3. Strongyloidiasis--an insight into its global prevalence and management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Puthiyakunnon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis, an intestinal parasitic nematode, infects more than 100 million people worldwide. Strongyloides are unique in their ability to exist as a free-living and autoinfective cycle. Strongyloidiasis can occur without any symptoms or as a potentially fatal hyperinfection or disseminated infection. The most common risk factors for these complications are immunosuppression caused by corticosteroids and infection with human T-lymphotropic virus or human immunodeficiency virus. Even though the diagnosis of strongyloidiasis is improved by advanced instrumentation techniques in isolated and complicated cases of hyperinfection or dissemination, efficient guidelines for screening the population in epidemiological surveys are lacking.In this review, we have discussed various conventional methods for the diagnosis and management of this disease, with an emphasis on recently developed molecular and serological methods that could be implemented to establish guidelines for precise diagnosis of infection in patients and screening in epidemiological surveys. A comprehensive analysis of various cases reported worldwide from different endemic and nonendemic foci of the disease for the last 40 years was evaluated in an effort to delineate the global prevalence of this disease. We also updated the current knowledge of the various clinical spectrum of this parasitic disease, with an emphasis on newer molecular diagnostic methods, treatment, and management of cases in immunosuppressed patients.Strongyloidiasis is considered a neglected tropical disease and is probably an underdiagnosed parasitic disease due to its low parasitic load and uncertain clinical symptoms. Increased infectivity rates in many developed countries and nonendemic regions nearing those in the most prevalent endemic regions of this parasite and the increasing transmission potential to immigrants, travelers, and immunosuppressed populations are indications for initiating an

  4. Influence of water infusion of medicinal plants on larvae of Strongyloides papillosus (Nematoda, Strongyloididae

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    A. A. Boyko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common nematodes of ruminants is Strongyloides papillosus (Wedl, 1856. Disease caused by these parasites brings economic losses to livestock operations. Therefore it is necessary to control their numbers. The eggs and three larval stages of S. papillosus live in the environment, while the fourth, fifth and mature individuals live in host organisms. Control of these parasites is necessary at all stages of development, including the free-living stage. An experiment on changes in the number strongiloids under the influence of environmental factors was carried out using aqueous extracts of medicinal plants. In the laboratory experiment we researched the effect on the survival of invasive and noninvasive types of S. papillosus larvae of 24 hours exposure at different doses to Artemisia absinthium Linnaeus, 1753, Artemisia annua Linnaeus, 1753, Echinacea purpurea (Linnaeus, 1753 Moench, 1794, Matricaria chamomilla Linnaeus, 1753, Tanacetum vulgare Linnaeus, 1753, Salvia sclarea Linnaeus, 1753, Levisticum officinale W.D.J. Koch, 1824, Petroselinum crispum (Miller, 1768 Nyman ex A.W. Hill, 1925. The death of 50% of S. papillosus invasive larvae was registered at 464 ± 192 mg/l concentration of aqueous extract of S. sclarea inflorescences. The greatest effect up-on the non-invasive larvae was caused by aqueous extracts of inflorescences of S. sclarea, M. chamomilla and seeds of P. crispum: at concentrations of 327 ± 186, 384 ± 155 and 935 ± 218 mg/l, respectively, 50% of non-invasive larvae died. According to the results of the research, we suggest further study of the nematocidal activity of combinations, contained in the aboveground parts, of clary sage (S. sclarea, camomile (M. chamomilla and seeds of parsley (P. crispum, and also experimental usage of these species in the fodder compound for cattle, sheep, goats and pigs on experimental farms.

  5. Intestinal mass in a one year old child: An unusual presentation of Strongyloides stercolaris infection. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Aragon, MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal strongyloidiasis is a common disease in the world. In children, the worldwide prevalence rates ranged from 0.6% to 5.3% [1]. In Colombia studies report a prevalence of 1.3% in children, although it may be higher [2]. The most frequent symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss. However, on rare occasions the infection can cause duodenal obstruction, pyloric hypertrophy and colonic mass. This article reports the first case of a toddler who presented with a mass in the cecum as a manifestation of Strongyloides stercolaris infection, which required surgical resection as it was initially believed to be a Burkitt lymphoma.

  6. Identification of a bacteria-like ferrochelatase in Strongyloides venezuelensis, an animal parasitic nematode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Nagayasu

    Full Text Available Heme is an essential molecule for vast majority of organisms serving as a prosthetic group for various hemoproteins. Although most organisms synthesize heme from 5-aminolevulinic acid through a conserved heme biosynthetic pathway composed of seven consecutive enzymatic reactions, nematodes are known to be natural heme auxotrophs. The completely sequenced Caenorhabditis elegans genome, for example, lacks all seven genes for heme biosynthesis. However, genome/transcriptome sequencing of Strongyloides venezuelensis, an important model nematode species for studying human strongyloidiasis, indicated the presence of a gene for ferrochelatase (FeCH, which catalyzes the terminal step of heme biosynthesis, whereas the other six heme biosynthesis genes are apparently missing. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that nematode FeCH genes, including that of S. venezuelensis (SvFeCH have a fundamentally different evolutionally origin from the FeCH genes of non-nematode metazoa. Although all non-nematode metazoan FeCH genes appear to be inherited vertically from an ancestral opisthokont, nematode FeCH may have been acquired from an alpha-proteobacterium, horizontally. The identified SvFeCH sequence was found to function as FeCH as expected based on both in vitro chelatase assays using recombinant SvFeCH and in vivo complementation experiments using an FeCH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Messenger RNA expression levels during the S. venezuelensis lifecycle were examined by real-time RT-PCR. SvFeCH mRNA was expressed at all the stages examined with a marked reduction at the infective third-stage larvae. Our study demonstrates the presence of a bacteria-like FeCH gene in the S. venezuelensis genome. It appeared that S. venezuelensis and some other animal parasitic nematodes reacquired the once-lost FeCH gene. Although the underlying evolutionary pressures that necessitated this reacquisition remain to be investigated, it is interesting that the presence of Fe

  7. Strongyloides infections of humans and great apes in Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic and in degraded forest fragments in Bulindi, Uganda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasegawa, H.; Kalousová, B.; McLennan, M. R.; Modrý, David; Profousová-Pšenková, I.; Shutt-Phillips, K. A.; Todd, A.; Huffman, M. A.; Petrželková, Klára Judita

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 5 (2016), s. 367-370 ISSN 1383-5769 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : chimpanzee * Gorilla * Human * Strongyloides * transmission * HVR-IV * cox1 Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.744, year: 2016

  8. Strongyloides infections of humans and great apes in Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic and in degraded forest fragments in Bulindi, Uganda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasegawa, H.; Kalousová, B.; McLennan, M. R.; Modrý, D.; Profousová-Pšenková, I.; Shutt-Phillips, K. A.; Todd, A.; Huffman, M. A.; Petrželková, Klára Judita

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 5 (2016), s. 367-370 ISSN 1383-5769 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05180S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Chimpanzee * Cox1 * Gorilla * Human * HVR-IV * Strongyloides * Transmission Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.744, year: 2016

  9. Occurrence of Strongyloides papillosus associated with extensive pulmonary lesions and sudden deaths in calves on a beef farm in a highland area of South Bohemia (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Vítovec, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2007), s. 10-13 ISSN 0440-6605 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Strongyloides papillosus * beef calves * prevalence * sudden death syndrome Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.373, year: 2007

  10. Multifunctional Thioredoxin-Like Protein from the Gastrointestinal Parasitic Nematodes Strongyloides ratti and Trichuris suis Affects Mucosal Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ditgen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cellular redox state is important for the regulation of multiple functions and is essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and antioxidant defense. In the excretory/secretory (E/S products of Strongyloides ratti and Trichuris suis sequences for thioredoxin (Trx and Trx-like protein (Trx-lp were identified. To characterize the antioxidant Trx-lp and its interaction with the parasite’s mucosal habitat, S. ratti and T. suis Trx-lps were cloned and recombinantly expressed. The primary antioxidative activity was assured by reduction of insulin and IgM. Further analysis applying an in vitro mucosal 3D-cell culture model revealed that the secreted Trx-lps were able to bind to monocytic and intestinal epithelial cells and induce the time-dependent release of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-22, and TSLP. In addition, the redox proteins also possessed chemotactic activity for monocytic THP-1 cells and fostered epithelial wound healing activity. These results confirm that the parasite-secreted Trx-lps are multifunctional proteins that can affect the host intestinal mucosa.

  11. CARACTERÍSTICAS CLÍNICAS Y EPIDEMIOLÓGICAS DE LA ESTRONGILOIDIASIS EN UN HOSPITAL DEL NORTE DEL PERÚ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heber Silva-Diaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Strongyloides stercoralis infection is a neglected tropical disease in endemic areas such as Peru, with an overall frequency of 6.6%. Four clinical syndromes can be distinguished: acute (AS, chronic (CS, hyperinfection (HS and disseminated strongyloidiasis (DS. Objective: To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients diagnosed with strongyloidiasis. Material and methods: 27 clinical charts of patients with estrongioloidiasis admitted from July 2014 to August 2015 at the Hospital Regional Lambayeque, from Peru, were reviewed. Results: The median age was 41 years (Interquartile range: 2 to 84 and 74% (20/27 were males. There were 10 (37.04% cases of CS and 10 cases (37.04% of HS. Of the total, 63% presented eosinophilia, 85.2% anemia and 85.1% diarrhea; 59.3% were some type of immunocompromise and 18.5% died. Conclusions: The majority of patients with strongyloidiasis in this study presented CS and HS, eosinophilia, anemia, diarrhea and some type of immunocompromise. Also, the high frequency of severe strongyloidiasis in patients with immunocompromise reveals the need for a coproparasitological screening with specific methods (Baerman and agar culture to detect and treat previously chronic infection

  12. ELISA technique standardization for strongyloidiasis diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huapaya, P.; Espinoza, I.; Huiza, A.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Sevilla, C.

    2002-01-01

    To standardize ELISA technique for human Strongyloides stercoralis infection diagnosis a crude antigen was prepared using filariform larvae obtained from positive stool samples cultured with charcoal. Harvested larvae were crushed by sonication and washed by centrifugation in order to obtain protein extracts to be used as antigen. Final protein concentration was 600 μg/mL. Several kinds of ELISA plates were tested and antigen concentration, sera dilution, conjugate dilution and cut off were determined to identify infection. Sera from patients with both hyper-infection syndrome and intestinal infection demonstrated by parasitological examination were positive controls and sera from people living in non-endemic areas with no infection demonstrated by parasitological examination were negative controls. Best values were 5 μg/mL for antigen, 1/64 for sera, 1/1000 for conjugate; optical density values for positive samples were 1,2746 (1,1065 - 1,4206, DS = 0,3284) and for negative samples 0,4457 (0,3324 - 0,5538, DS = 0,2230). Twenty sera samples from positive subjects and one hundred from negative subjects were examined, obtaining 90% sensitivity and 88% specificity. The results show this technique could be useful as strongyloidiasis screening test in population studies

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Single and Double Doses of Ivermectin versus 7-Day High Dose Albendazole for Chronic Strongyloidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Premasathian, Nalinee; Bhumimuang, Kid; Waywa, Duangdao; Nilganuwong, Surasak; Karuphong, Ekkapun; Anekthananon, Thanomsak; Wanachiwanawin, Darawan; Silpasakorn, Saowaluk

    2011-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis, caused by an intestinal helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, is common throughout the tropics. It remains an important health problem due to autoinfection, which may result in hyperinfection and disseminated infection in immunosuppressed patients, especially patients receiving chemotherapy or corticosteroid treatment. Ivermectin and albendazole are effective against strongyloidiasis. However, the efficacy and the most effective dosing regimen are to be determined. Methods A prospective, randomized, open study was conducted in which a 7-day course of oral albendazole 800 mg daily was compared with a single dose (200 microgram/kilogram body weight), or double doses, given 2 weeks apart, of ivermectin in Thai patients with chronic strongyloidiasis. Patients were followed-up with 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, then 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 1 year after treatment. Combination of direct microscopic examination of fecal smear, formol-ether concentration method, and modified Koga agar plate culture were used to detect strongyloides larvae in two consecutive fecal samples in each follow-up visit. The primary endpoint was clearance of strongyloides larvae from feces after treatment and at one year follow-up. Results Ninety patients were included in the analysis (30, 31 and 29 patients in albendazole, single dose, and double doses ivermectin group, respectively). All except one patient in this study had at least one concomitant disease. Diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythrematosus, nephrotic syndrome, hematologic malignancy, solid tumor and human immunodeficiency virus infection were common concomitant diseases in these patients. The median (range) duration of follow-up were 19 (2–76) weeks in albendazole group, 39 (2–74) weeks in single dose ivermectin group, and 26 (2–74) weeks in double doses ivermectin group. Parasitological cure rate were 63.3%, 96.8% and 93.1% in albendazole, single dose oral ivermectin

  14. seasonal variation of intestinal parasitic infections among hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    CONCLUSION: Cryptosporidium species and Strongyloides stercoralis were the only parasitic agents that were associated with rainy season. Keywords: Season, Intestinal Parasites, HIV. INTRODUCTION. Despite the worldwide efforts at controlling the menace of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. (AIDS), the number ...

  15. Strongyloidiasis--the most neglected of the neglected tropical diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A.; L., van Lieshout; Marti, H.

    2009-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminths of the genus Strongyloides (S. fuelleborni and the more prevalent S. stercoralis) are currently believed to infect an estimated 30-100 million people worldwide. The health consequences of S. stercoralis infections range from asymptomatic light infections to chronic symp...

  16. Consequences of captivity: health effects of far East imprisonment in World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, D; Welch, E; Beeching, N J; Gill, G V

    2009-02-01

    Though medical consequences of war attract attention, the health consequences of the prisoner-of-war (POW) experience are poorly researched and appreciated. The imprisonment of Allied military personnel by the Japanese during the World War II provides an especially dramatic POW scenario in terms of deprivation, malnutrition and exposure to tropical diseases. Though predominantly British, these POWs also included troops from Australia, Holland and North America. Imprisonment took place in various locations in Southeast Asia and the Far East for a 3.5-year period between 1942 and 1945. Nutritional deficiency syndromes, dysentery, malaria, tropical ulcers and cholera were major health problems; and supplies of drugs and medical equipment were scarce. There have been limited mortality studies on ex-Far East prisoners (FEPOWs) since repatriation, but these suggest an early (up to 10 years post-release) excess mortality due to tuberculosis, suicides and cirrhosis (probably related to hepatitis B exposure during imprisonment). In terms of morbidity, the commonest has been a psychiatric syndrome which would now be recognized as post-traumatic stress disorder--present in at least one-third of FEPOWs and frequently presenting decades later. Peptic ulceration, osteoarthritis and hearing impairment also appear to occur more frequently. In addition, certain tropical diseases have persisted in these survivors--notably infections with the nematode worm Strongyloides stercoralis. Studies 30 years or more after release have shown overall infection rates of 15%. Chronic strongyloidiasis of this type frequently causes a linear urticarial 'larva currens' rash, but can potentially lead to fatal hyperinfection if immunity is suppressed. Finally, about 5% of FEPOW survivors have chronic nutritional neuropathic syndromes--usually optic atrophy or sensory peripheral neuropathy (often painful). The World War II FEPOW experience was a unique, though often tragic, accidental experiment into

  17. Surveillance of strongyloidiasis in Spanish in-patients (1998-2014.

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    Moncef Belhassen-García

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasite that causes strongyloidiasis, a neglected tropical disease. S. stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth that is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Strongyloidiasis can occur without any symptoms or as a chronic infection characterized by mild, unspecific symptoms such as pruritus, abdominal pain or discomfort; respiratory impairment also may manifest as a potentially fatal hyperinfection or disseminated infection. Most studies on strongyloidiasis in Spain have been related to chronic forms in immigrants or travellers from endemic zones and have mainly analysed out-patient populations. Studies of the impact of strongyloidiasis cases admitted to hospitals in Spain are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the impact of strongyloidiasis in hospital care in Spain.We designed a retrospective descriptive study using the Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS, CMBD in Spanish for inpatients with ICD-9: 127.2 (strongyloidiasis diagnoses admitted to hospitals in the Spanish National Health System between 1998 and 2014.A total of 507 hospitalizations with diagnosis of strongyloidiasis were recorded, 324 cases (63.9% were males. The mean (±SD age was 42.1±20.1 years. The impact of strongyloidiasis on the total population of Spain was 0.06 cases per 105 person-years, and the infection burden increased progressively over time (from 0.01 cases per 105 person-years in 1999 to 0.10 cases per 105 person-years in 2014. 40 cases (7.9% died. The total cost was approximately €8,681,062.3, and the mean cost per patient was €17,122.4±97,968.8.Our data suggest that strongyloidiasis is frequent in Spain and is increasing in incidence. Therefore, it would be desirable to improve the oversight and surveillance of this condition. Due to the fact that strongyloidiasis can be fatal, we believe that there is a need to establish risk categories for inclusion in national guidelines

  18. Avaliação da eficiência de cal virgem na inativação de ovos de nematoides - Strongyloides sp. parasitos de pacas - Cuniculus paca criadas em cativeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M.F. Ribeiro

    Full Text Available RESUMO Criadores de animais silvestres sempre buscam métodos eficientes de manter sua criação. Parasitos intestinais afetam os animais em cativeiro, diminuindo sua sobrevivência e reprodução. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a eficácia do uso de cal virgem na desinfecção do solo e na prevenção da reinfestação de endoparasitos em pacas (Cuniculus paca em cativeiro. Amostras de solo das baias de criação foram analisadas usando-se o método de Rugai modificado. Duas etapas foram avaliadas: a primeira aos cinco, 45 e 105 minutos após os tratamentos, e a segunda aos sete dias e aos 14 dias após os tratamentos. Os valores de pH das amostras foram verificados após a aplicação de quatro tratamentos. Foram aplicados 400g/m2 de cal virgem a lanço ou 500mL/m2 de três soluções de cal virgem (10%, 20% ou 40% p/v. Na primeira etapa, a cal a lanço foi ineficaz na modificação do pH do solo e no controle de parasitos. A solução a 10% proporcionou o melhor controle dos parasitos. Na segunda etapa, as soluções foram eficazes na elevação do pH, porém não houve diferença significativa nos achados larvais. Concluiu-se que, nas condições do estudo, a solução a 10% aumentou o pH do solo e teve boa capacidade de inativação dos ovos de Strongyloides sp., o que economicamente é interessante. Porém, para o controle eficiente de Strongyloides sp. em cativeiros de pacas, deve-se considerar a frequência da aplicação de soluções com até 20% de cal, juntamente com a adoção de um programa de vermifugação.

  19. Pilot Study to Assess the Efficacy of Ivermectin and Fenbendazole for Treating Captive-Born Olive Baboons (Papio anubis) Coinfected with Strongyloides fülleborni and Trichuris trichiura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Mason V; Thomas, Jennifer E; Chavez-Suarez, Maria; Cullin, Cassandra O; White, Gary L; Wydysh, Emily C; Wolf, Roman F

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of combined treatment with ivermectin and fenbendazole (IVM-FBZ) for treating captive olive baboons (Papio anubis) infected with Strongyloides fülleborni and Trichuris trichiura, 2 common nematode parasites of these NHP. Infected baboons were treated for a total of 9 wk with ivermectin (400 μg/kg IM twice weekly) and fenbendazole (50 mg/kg PO once daily for 3 d; 3 rounds of treatment, 21 d apart). Five baboons naturally infected with both S. fülleborni and T. trichiura (n = 4) or S. fülleborni alone (n = 1) received the combination therapy; an additional baboon infected with both parasites served as a nontreated control. The efficacy of IVM-FBZ was measured as the reduction in fecal egg counts of S. fülleborni and T. trichiura as determined by quantitative fecal flotation examination after treatment of baboons with IVM-FBZ. All baboons treated with IVM-FBZ stopped shedding S. fülleborni and T. trichiura eggs by 8 d after treatment and remained negative for at least 161 d. The nontreated control baboon shed S. fülleborni and T. trichiura eggs throughout the study period. Our results indicate that the IVM-FBZ regimen was efficacious for treating olive baboons infected with S. fülleborni and T. trichiura.

  20. Occurrence of strongyloidiasis among patients with HTLV-1/2 seen at the outpatient clinic of the Núcleo de Medicina Tropical, Belém, State of Pará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Karen Cristini Yumi Ogawa; Costa, Carlos Araújo da; Ferreira, Louise de Souza Canto; Martins, Luisa Carício; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Ishikawa, Edna Aoba Yassui; Batista, Evander de Jesus Oliveira; Sousa, Maisa Silva de

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of Strongyloides stercoralis infestation and coinfection with HTLV-1/2 in Belém, Brazil. S. stercoralis was investigated in stool samples obtained from individuals infected with HTLV-1/2 and their uninfected relatives. The frequency of S. stercoralis was 9% (9/100), including six patients infected with HTLV-1 (14.3%), two patients infected with HTLV-2 (11.1%), and one uninfected relative. Two cases of hyperinfestation by S. stercoralis were characterized as HTLV-1. These results support the need for the routine investigation of S. stercoralis in patients with HTLV-1, in an attempt to prevent the development of severe forms of strongyloidiasis.

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 1 (2008), Assessment Of Ophthalmic Patients' Satisfaction In Owo, Abstract. CO Omolase, CO Fadamiro, BO Omolase, AS Aina, EO Omolade. Vol 3, No 1 (2010), Case Report: Strongyloides stercoralis coinfection in a Nigerian with HIV. Abstract. A.A Oyekunle, R.A.A Bolarinwa, O.A ...

  2. Associação timoma e estrongiloidíase intestinal grave

    OpenAIRE

    Godoy,Pérsio; Campos,Christian Marcellus Camargos; Costa,Guilherme; Castro,Lúcia Porto Fonseca de

    1998-01-01

    Os autores relatam o caso de um homem de 59 anos de idade com timoma e estrongiloidíase intestinal grave. São revistos aspectos da resposta imunitária relacionados ao tumor e, possivelmente, implicados no desenvolvimento da hiperinfecção pelo Strongyloides stercoralis.

  3. Detecção de formas transmissíveis de enteroparasitas na água e nas hortaliças consumidas em comunidades escolares de Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brasil Detection enteroparasites transmissible forms in water and raw vegetables consumed in pre-schools from Sorocaba, São Paulo state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Maria De Petrini da Silva Coelho

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a presença de formas transmissíveis de enteroparasitas em água e em hortaliças consumidas cruas, no período de agosto de 1997 a julho de 1998. A água foi submetida à filtração em membranas de celulose. A água da lavagem destas membranas foi submetido ao método de Faust. As hortaliças in natura e lavada foram lavadas e a água submetida ao método de sedimentação. Uma escola não apresentou contaminação; duas tiveram todos os materiais contaminados; quatro, 2 materiais contaminados e três, 1 material contaminado. A água apresentou índice de 0,7% de contaminação (Hymenolepis diminuta, Strongyloides stercoralis e ancilostomídeos; a hortaliça in natura, 3,9% (Strongyloides stercoralis, ancilostomídeos, Ascaris lumbricoides e Giardia lamblia e a lavada, 1,3% (Strongyloides stercoralis, Ascaris lumbricoides e Giardia lamblia. As hortaliças e a água são veiculadoras de enteroparasitas. A forma larval foi a mais presente. A hortaliça in naturaapresentou maior contaminação que a lavada. A lavagem não garantiu a ausência dessas formas em hortaliças.Water and raw vegetables consumed in ten nursery schools were evaluated for the presence of transmissible forms of enteroparasites. The water was submitted to filtration through membranes. The washed membrane water was submitted to the Faust method. The in natura and washed vegetables were washed and the water analyzed by the sedimentation method. Contamination was not detected in one school; in two schools, all the materials were contaminated; in four schools, two items were contaminated and in three, one material presented contamination. The water presented a contamination index of 0.7% contamination (Hymenolepis diminuta, Strongyloides stercoralis and Ancylostomatidae; the vegetables in natura, 3.9% (Strongyloides stercoralis, Ancylostomatidae, Ascaris lumbricoides and Giardia lamblia and the washed samples 1.3% (Strongyloides stercoralis, Ascaris lumbricoides and

  4. Disseminated strongyloidiasis in a immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundkur, Suneel C; Aroor, Shrikiran; Jayashree, K

    2011-12-01

    Strongyloidiasis in an immunocompromised patient has the potential to be life threatening. We describe a boy who was on steroids for acute demyelinating myelitis and receiving antibiotics for E. coli UTI and meningitis. He developed anasarca, malabsorption, malnutrition and left ventricular failure. Duodenal biopsy revealed abundant rhabditiform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. The diagnosis went unsuspected and proved fatal. This emphasizes the need to have a high index of suspicion and early intervention for S. stercoralis in immunosuppressed persons who present with refractory gastrointestinal symptoms.

  5. Prevalência de parasitoses intestinais na cidade de Eirunepé, Amazonas Prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in the city of Eirunepé, Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Fernández Araujo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas, pelo método de sedimentação espontânea, amostras de fezes de 413 pacientes e encontrada positividade em 266 (64,4% dos seguintes parasitas: Ascaris lumbricoides (35,6%; Trichuris trichiura (18,6%; Ancilostomídeos(9,9%, Strongyloides stercoralis (1%, Enterobius vermiculares (0,5%, e Entamoeba histolytica (13,3% e Giardia lamblia (1%.Samples of 413 patient were analyzed and positivity was found in 64.4% (266 of the exams. The intestinal parasites most prevalent were: Ascaris lumbricoides (35.6%; Trichuris trichiura (18.6%; Ancylostomides (9.9%; Strongyloides stercoralis (1%, Enterobius vermiculares (0,5%; Entamoeba histolytica (13.3% and Giardia lamblia (1%. The presence of varied degrees of anemia were detected in 39.8% of the exams.

  6. Strongyloidiasis in children five years and below | Dada-Adegbola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dans le hôtes immunocompetent, les strongyloides stercoralis transmise une maladie seulement au mucosal de l'intestin grêle et persiste comme un asymptomatique surtout une infection chronique. Par contraste, en présence de la suppression immenisée il a une capacité de multiplier à l'intérieur de l'hôte homme, appelé ...

  7. Anemia, intractable vomiting, chronic diarrhea, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic secretion: a diagnostic dilemma: Disseminated strongyloidosis in a patient with newly diagnosed HTLV infection-case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Hassan; Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Reddy, Pavithra; Bajantri, Bharat; Niazi, Masooma; Matela, Ajsza; Zeana, Cosmina; Ihimoyan, Ariyo; Dev, Anil; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-12-01

    Strongyloidiasis hyperinfection and disseminated disease have high mortality rates due to several complications and early detection of Strongyloides infection is therefore prudent. A 37-year-old male patient came with chronic diarrhea, intractable vomiting and was found to have hyponatremia, and anemia on the initial laboratory tests. Further work up revealed syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic secretion to be the cause of the hyponatremia in addition to gastrointestinal loses. His hospital course was complicated by persistent hyponatremia and later development of partial small bowel obstruction. Considering his symptoms we had a suspicion of small bowel pathology for which he underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopywith biopsies that revealed strongyloidosis as the cause of his symptoms. He was also found to have human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection, likely contributing to the disseminated disease. He was started on ivermectin with complete resolution of symptoms and improvement of hyponatremia. It is very important to suspect Strongyloides infection in a patient presenting with syndrome ofinappropriate antidiuretic secretion as hyperinfection and disseminated disease can be life threatening without antihelmintic therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intestinal parasite infections in symptomatic children attending hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catrin E; Nget, Phot; Saroeun, Mao; Kuong, Suy; Chanthou, Seng; Kumar, Varun; Bousfield, Rachel; Nader, Johanna; Bailey, J Wendi; Beeching, Nicholas J; Day, Nicholas P; Parry, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Infections with helminths and other intestinal parasites are an important but neglected problem in children in developing countries. Accurate surveys of intestinal parasites in children inform empirical treatment regimens and can assess the impact of school based drug treatment programmes. There is limited information on this topic in Cambodia. In a prospective study of intestinal parasites in symptomatic children attending Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, April-June 2012, samples were examined by microscopy of a direct and concentrated fecal sample. Two culture methods for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were employed when sufficient sample was received. Demographic, clinical and epidemiological data were collected. We studied 970 samples from 865 children. The median (inter-quartile range) age of the children was 5.4 (1.9-9.2) years, 54% were male. The proportion of children with abdominal pain was 66.8%, diarrhea 34.9%, anemia 12.7% and malnutrition 7.4%. 458 parasitic infections were detected in 340 (39.3%) children. The most common parasites using all methods of detection were hookworm (14.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (11.6%) and Giardia lamblia (11.2%). Giardia lamblia was most common in children aged 1-5 years, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were more common with increasing age. Hookworm, Strongloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia were more common in children living outside of Siem Reap town. In a multivariate logistic regression increasing age was associated with all three infections, defecating in the forest for hookworm infection, the presence of cattle for S. stercoralis and not using soap for handwashing for G. lamblia. This study confirms the importance of intestinal parasitic infections in symptomatic Cambodian children and the need for adequate facilities for laboratory diagnosis together with education to improve personal hygiene and sanitation.

  9. Intestinal parasite infections in symptomatic children attending hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrin E Moore

    Full Text Available Infections with helminths and other intestinal parasites are an important but neglected problem in children in developing countries. Accurate surveys of intestinal parasites in children inform empirical treatment regimens and can assess the impact of school based drug treatment programmes. There is limited information on this topic in Cambodia.In a prospective study of intestinal parasites in symptomatic children attending Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, April-June 2012, samples were examined by microscopy of a direct and concentrated fecal sample. Two culture methods for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were employed when sufficient sample was received. Demographic, clinical and epidemiological data were collected.We studied 970 samples from 865 children. The median (inter-quartile range age of the children was 5.4 (1.9-9.2 years, 54% were male. The proportion of children with abdominal pain was 66.8%, diarrhea 34.9%, anemia 12.7% and malnutrition 7.4%. 458 parasitic infections were detected in 340 (39.3% children. The most common parasites using all methods of detection were hookworm (14.3%, Strongyloides stercoralis (11.6% and Giardia lamblia (11.2%. Giardia lamblia was most common in children aged 1-5 years, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were more common with increasing age. Hookworm, Strongloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia were more common in children living outside of Siem Reap town. In a multivariate logistic regression increasing age was associated with all three infections, defecating in the forest for hookworm infection, the presence of cattle for S. stercoralis and not using soap for handwashing for G. lamblia.This study confirms the importance of intestinal parasitic infections in symptomatic Cambodian children and the need for adequate facilities for laboratory diagnosis together with education to improve personal hygiene and sanitation.

  10. Molecular Detection of Strongyloides ratti in Faecal Samples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highly efficient agar plate culture (APC) method ... ssrRNA gene over full-length sequence (68 % ... Japan). Recovery of adult worms from small intestine. Infected rats were killed with high ... Germany) include initial denaturation at 95 °C for.

  11. Strongyloidiasis Current Status with Emphasis in Diagnosis and Drug Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Mendes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic neglected disease caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis affecting 30 to 100 million people worldwide. Complications, strongly associated with alcoholism, organ transplants, and HTLV-1 virus, often arise due to late diagnosis, frequently leading to patient death. Lack of preemptive diagnosis is not the only difficulty when dealing with this parasite, since there are no gold standard diagnostic techniques, and the ones used have problems associated with sensitivity, resulting in false negatives. Treatment is also an issue as ivermectin and benzimidazoles administration leads to inconsistent cure rates and several side effects. Researching new anti-Strongyloides drugs is a difficult task since S. stercoralis does not develop until the adult stages in Mus musculus (with the exception of SCID mice, the main experimental host model. Fortunately, alternative parasite models can be used, namely, Strongyloides ratti and S. venezuelensis. However, even with these models, there are other complications in finding new drugs, which are associated with specific in vitro assay protocol steps, such as larvae decontamination. In this review, we highlight the challenges associated with new drug search, the compounds tested, and a list of published in vitro assay methodologies. We also point out advances being made in strongyloidiasis diagnosis so far.

  12. Strongyloidiasis in Po valley: serological and parasitological screening in blood donors of Cremona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Mangoni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud. Strongyloides stercoralis is a ubiquitous nematode that is present also in Italy in a hypoendemic form, especially in the Po Valley. It is responsable for strongyloidiasis, an intestinal parasitosis usually asymptomatic or paucy-symptomatic that occasionally can cause a hyperinfestation syndrome and disseminated disease. Objectives. To determine the presence of S. stercoralis in asympomatic people afferent to the Cremona hospital by serological screening and direct microscopic search. Study Design. In the period from December 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 we screened 154 donors with absolute eosinophilia >500/μL and percentage of eosinophils 9%. The research of anti-S. stercoralis antibodies was performed through an ELISA method (S.ratti Bordier Products. Donors positive to the screening test were tested for direct parasite search through with phormol-ethyl acetate stool concentration (FEA and culture on S. stercoralis Agar (Biolife, Milan. Results. 13 donors were positive to the screening test (8.4%. 10 of these 13 donors performed coproparassitologic examination. S. stercoralis was identified in the stools of 3/10 tested patients through culture and in 2/10 through FEA. Conclusions. The study results are in line with the data reported in the literature for similar geographic areas. Among the risk factors are to be counted the type of job (agriculture, and the domicile in the rural environment. The culture in S. stercoralis Agar has proved much more sensitive than FEA. The serological diagnosis represent a valuable contribution to traditional coproparassitologic examination, particularlywhen screening asymptomatic individuals at risk.

  13. Molecular diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in a population of an endemic area through nested-PCR.

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    Sharifdini, Meysam; Keyhani, Amir; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Beigom Kia, Eshrat

    2018-01-01

    This study is aimed to diagnose and analyze strongyloidiasis in a population of an endemic area of Iran using nested-PCR, coupled with parasitological methods. Screening of strongyloidiasis infected people using reliable diagnostic techniques are essential to decrease the mortality and morbidity associated with this infection. Molecular methods have been proved to be highly sensitive and specific for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in stool samples. A total of 155 fresh single stool samples were randomly collected from residents of north and northwest of Khouzestan Province, Iran. All samples were examined by parasitological methods including formalin-ether concentration and nutrient agar plate culture, and molecular method of nested-PCR. Infections with S. stercoralis were analyzed according to demographic criteria. Based on the results of nested-PCR method 15 cases (9.7%) were strongyloidiasis positive. Nested-PCR was more sensitive than parasitological techniques on single stool sampling. Elderly was the most important population index for higher infectivity with S. stercoralis . In endemic areas of S. stercoralis , old age should be considered as one of the most important risk factors of infection, especially among the immunosuppressed individuals.

  14. Frecuencia de parásitos intestinales en pacientes VIH+ en la ciudad de Santa Fe de Bogotá

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    Myriam Consuelo López

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective ofthe present work is to find frequency of intestinasl opportunistic parasites in a population of HIV + outpatients that assisted to the program of Sexual Transmited Diseases (STD in University Hospital San Juan de Dios at Santa Fe de Bogotá. Cryptosporidum sp. and lsospora belli were observed in 1% of patients. It is important to emphasize the low frequency of opportunistic parasites in this study. The highest prevelence corresponded to Endolimax-nana (15.1 % and Entamoeba coli  (13.2%. The frequency of nematodes is very low: unicinaria and Strongyloides stercoralis were presentn 1%.

  15. Parasites diversity in carnivorous animals in the territory of Dnipropetrovsk

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    О. О. Boyko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In Dnipropetrovsk sity (Ukraine, Dnipropetrovsk region in carnivorous animals 10 species of parasites (helminths and coccidia were found: Uncinaria sp., Ancylostoma sp., Dictyocaulus immitis (Nematoda, Strongylata, Strongyloides stercoralis (Nematoda, Rhabditata, Spirocerca lupi (Nematoda, Spirurata, Toxocara canis (Nematoda, Ascaridata, Trichuris vulpis (Nematoda, Trichurata, Dipylidium caninum (Cestoda, Hymenolepidata, Cystoisospora sp. and Toxoplasma gondii (Sporozoa, Coccidia. In soil S. stercoralisand Uncinaria sp. weredominanted. In most carnivorous animals registered in L. Globa park and T. Shevchenko park the S. stercoralisand Uncinaria sp., Cystoisosporasp. and T. gondii were found.

  16. Changing Patterns of Gastrointestinal Parasite Infections in Cambodian Children: 2006–2011

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    Hor, Put Chhat; Soeng, Sona; Sun, Sopheary; Lee, Sue J.; Parry, Christopher M.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Stoesser, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    We studied gastrointestinal parasites in symptomatic Cambodian children attending a provincial hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia between 2006 and 2011. A total of 16 372 faecal samples were examined by direct microscopy. Parasites were detected in 3121 (19.1%) samples and most common were Giardia lamblia (8.0% of samples; 47.6% disease episodes), hookworm (5.1%; 30.3%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (2.6%; 15.6%). The proportion of infected children increased, and the number of disease episodes effectively treated with a single dose of mebendazole decreased, over the 5-year period. PMID:22723077

  17. Significant Weight Loss, Nausea, And Vomiting Due to Strongyloidiasis:A Case Report

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    Afshin Shafaghi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is caused by infestation with Strongyloides stercoralis, a free living tropical and semitropical soil helminth that has a larval form that penetrates intact skin.Clinical manifestations may be varied from an asymptomatic infection   in immunocompetent hosts to a diffuse and fatal form in immunocompromised hosts.We report a 56-year-old man from Dezful (south-west of Iran with a 6-month history of nausea, vomiting and significant weight loss (greater than 10%. Abdominal ltrasonography had no significant findings. Upper gastrointestinal series and abdominal CT were performed. Dilated bowel loops especially in the jejunum,with decreased mucosal folds were seen. Abiopsy specimen from the third part of duodenum showed strongyloides larvae,thus albendazole 400 mg twice a day for 3   days was initiated.He responded well to this treatment regimen.  

  18. Occurrence of strongyloidiasis in privately owned and sheltered dogs: clinical presentation and treatment outcome.

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    Paradies, Paola; Iarussi, Fabrizio; Sasanelli, Mariateresa; Capogna, Antonio; Lia, Riccardo Paolo; Zucca, Daniele; Greco, Beatrice; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Otranto, Domenico

    2017-07-20

    The increasing number of reports of human infections by Strongyloides stercoralis from a range of European countries over the last 20 years has spurred the interest of the scientific community towards this parasite and, in particular, towards the role that infections of canine hosts may play in the epidemiology of human disease. Data on the epidemiology of canine strongyloidiasis is currently limited, most likely because of the inherent limitations of current diagnostic methods. Faecal samples were collected directly from the rectal ampulla of 272 animals of varying age and both genders living in Apulia, southern Italy. Dogs included were either privately owned (n = 210), living in an urban area but with unrestricted outdoor access (Group 1), or shelter dogs (n = 62 out of ~400) hosted in a single shelter in the province of Bari in which a history of diarrhoea, weight loss, reduced appetite and respiratory symptoms had been reported (Group 2). Strongyloides stercoralis infection was diagnosed by coproscopy on direct faecal smear and via the Baermann method. Six of 272 dogs were positive for S. stercoralis at the Baermann examination; all but one were from the shelter (Group 2) and displayed gastrointestinal clinical signs. The only owned dog (Group 1) infected with S. stercoralis, but clinically healthy, had been adopted from a shelter 1 year prior to sampling. Five infected dogs were treated with fenbendazole (Panacur®, Intervet, Animal Health, 50 mg/kg, PO daily for 5 days), or with a combination of fenbendazole and moxidectin plus imidacloprid spot-on (Im/Mox; Advocate® spot-on, Bayer). Post-treatment clearance of infection was confirmed in three dogs by Baermann examination, whereas treatment failure was documented in two dogs by Baermann and/or post-mortem detection of adult parasites. This study describes, for the first time, the presence of S. stercoralis infection in sheltered dogs from southern Italy. Data indicate that S. stercoralis infection

  19. Enteroparasitas e Capillaria SP entre o grupo Surui, Parque Indigena Aripuana, Rondonia Enteroparasites and Capillaria SP found in indians of the Surui group, Parque Indigena Aripuana, Rondonia

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    Carlos E. A. Coimbra Júnior

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta dados de enteroparasitas encontradas em índios da comunidade tribal de Suruí, em Rondônia, na Região Amazônica do Brasil. As seguintes espécies foram encontradas: Ascaris lumbricoides (53,3%, Ancilostomidae (43,3%, Strongyloides stercoralis (33,3%, Taenia sp. (5,8%, Trichuris trichiura (5,0%, Hymenolepis nana (4,1%, Giardia lamblia (3,3%, Entamoeba histolytica complex (0,8% e Enterobius vermicularis (0,1%. O encontro de Capillaria sp. nas fezes de dois individuos é discutido.In this paper data on enteroparasites found in indians of the Surui tribal community in Rondônia, Amazon Region of Brazil, are presented. The following species were detected: Ascaris lumbricoides (53.3%, Ancylostomidae (43.3%, Strongyloides stercoralis (33.3%, Taenia sp. (5.8%, Trichuris trichiura (5.0%, Hymenolepis nana (4.1%, Giardia lambia (3.3%, Entamoeba histolytica complex (0.8% and Enterobius vermicularis (0.1%.

  20. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

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    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  1. Púrpura em paciente com estrongiloidíase disseminada Purpura in patient with disseminated strongiloidiasis

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    Luciano C. Ribeiro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Strongyloides stercoralis em associação com imunosupressão pode manifestar-se com lesões em múltiplos órgãos e sistemas, caracterizando a forma disseminada da doença. Lesões cutâneas não são freqüentemente relatadas e, se presentes, manifestam-se como rash e petéquias. Púrpuras bem definidas são pouco descritas. No presente trabalho é descrito um caso de estrongiloidíase disseminada, com acometimento cutâneo em forma de púrpura, que se desenvolveu em um paciente timectomizado e usuário crônico de corticosteróide devido à miastenia gravis.The association of systemic corticosteroid therapy and dissemination of Strongyloides stercoralis has been increasingly documented in the literature. Skin involvement in disseminated strongyloidiasis has been reported and the most commonly described cutaneous manifestations are rash and petechial eruptions. We present a case of an immunosuppressed man that developed disseminated strongyloidiasis with extensive purpura.

  2. Targeted mutagenesis in a human-parasitic nematode

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    Gang, Spencer S.; Castelletto, Michelle L.

    2017-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes infect over 1 billion people worldwide and cause some of the most common neglected tropical diseases. Despite their prevalence, our understanding of the biology of parasitic nematodes has been limited by the lack of tools for genetic intervention. In particular, it has not yet been possible to generate targeted gene disruptions and mutant phenotypes in any parasitic nematode. Here, we report the development of a method for introducing CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene disruptions in the human-parasitic threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis. We disrupted the S. stercoralis twitchin gene unc-22, resulting in nematodes with severe motility defects. Ss-unc-22 mutations were resolved by homology-directed repair when a repair template was provided. Omission of a repair template resulted in deletions at the target locus. Ss-unc-22 mutations were heritable; we passed Ss-unc-22 mutants through a host and successfully recovered mutant progeny. Using a similar approach, we also disrupted the unc-22 gene of the rat-parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti. Our results demonstrate the applicability of CRISPR-Cas9 to parasitic nematodes, and thereby enable future studies of gene function in these medically relevant but previously genetically intractable parasites. PMID:29016680

  3. Prevalence of intestinal nematodes in alcoholic patients

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    Zago-Gomes Maria P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a retrospective study on the frequency of intestinal nematodes among 198 alcoholic and 440 nonalcoholic patients at the University Hospital Cassiano Antonio Moraes in Vitória, ES, Brazil. The control sample included 194 nonalcoholic patients matched according to age, sex and neighborhood and a random sample of 296 adults admitted at the same hospital. Stool examination by sedimentation method (three samples was performed in all patients. There was a significantly higher frequency of intestinal nematodes in alcoholics than in controls (35.3% and 19.2%, respectively, due to a higher frequency of Strongyloides stercoralis (21.7% and 4.1%, respectively. Disregarding this parasite, the frequency of the other nematodes was similar in both groups. The higher frequency of S. stercoralis infection in alcoholics could be explained by immune modulation and/or by some alteration in corticosteroid metabolism induced by chronic ethanol ingestion. Corticosteroid metabolites would mimic the worm ecdisteroids, that would in turn increase the fecundity of females in duodenum and survival of larvae. Consequently, the higher frequency of Strongyloides larvae in stool of alcoholics does not necessarily reflect an increased frequency of infection rate, but only an increased chance to present a positive stool examination using sedimentation methods.

  4. Human strongyloidiasis: identifying knowledge gaps, with emphasis on environmental control

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    Taylor MJ

    2014-08-01

    suggests that the range of Strongyloides extends beyond the reported tropical/subtropical boundary. Localized conditions that might result in this extended boundary include accumulation of moisture within housing because of malfunctioning health hardware inside and outside the house and the presence of dog fecal matter inside or outside housing areas. Keywords: Strongyloides stercoralis, strongyloidiasis, environmental control, parasitology, nematode

  5. Disseminated Strongyloidiasis in an Iranian Immunocompro-mised Patient: A Case Report

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    Narges NAJAFI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth (STH widespread in various part of the world. A 78-yr-old peasant diabetic female from Mazandaran Province northern Iran, was admitted to Infection Department of the Razi Hospital in city of Qaemshahr, north of Iran complaining about abdominal skin rash, pruritus, itching, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, dysuria and cough. This patient had cutaneous migration effects of S. stercoralis larvae in her abdominal skin (larva currents and urticaria. Lung CT without contrast demonstrates bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity draws attention. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastro esophageal reflux with antral gastritis. Duodenal endoscopy showed unusual mucosa and a biopsy from it sent to the pathology laboratory. Histopathology of duodenal bulb and duodenum biopsy showed mild villous atrophy and S. stercoralis infection. The patient was treated with albendazole and clinical sings improved completely after treatment. Strongyloidiasis should be care­fully considered by clinicians who practice in endemic areas. Clinicians must keep a high level of skepticism for patients from endemic area.

  6. Opportunistic and non-opportunistic intestinal parasites in HIV/ AIDS patients in relation to their clinical and epidemiological status in a specialized medical service in Goiás, Brazil.

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    Barcelos, Natane Barbosa; Silva, Lorena de Freitas E; Dias, Regyane Ferreira Guimarães; Menezes Filho, Hélio Ranes de; Rodrigues, Rosângela Maria

    2018-03-08

    Patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) often have opportunistic infections, among which strongyloidiasis and coccidiosis are the most common parasitic infections that aggravate their health status. This study examined the prevalence of intestinal parasites, particularly of Strongyloides stercoralis and intestinal coccidia in patients with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/ Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) who were treated at the Specialized Assistance Service (SAE) of Jataí, State of Goiás, Brazil, and analyzed its correlation with clinical, laboratory, and socio-epidemiological parameters. A total of 270 stool samples were analyzed by the Lutz technique, Rugai's method, Agar Plate Culture, Ritchie's method and specific staining, Ziehl-Neelsen modified technique, Kinyoun's method and the rapid safranin method. The prevalence of intestinal parasites was 28.88% including 3.8% of S. stercoralis, Cryptosporidium sp. and Cystoisospora belli. There was a significant positive correlation between intestinal parasites and the clinical status and the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), smoking, CD4+ lymphocyte counts and sexual orientation. In conclusion, the widespread use of antiretroviral therapy and health assistance contributed to the low prevalence of S. stercoralis and coccidiosis in patients with HIV/ AIDS who were followed up at the SAE.

  7. Diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in an Amazonic community of Peru using multiple diagnostic techniques.

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    Machicado, Jorge D; Marcos, Luis A; Tello, Raul; Canales, Marco; Terashima, Angelica; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2012-06-01

    An observational descriptive study was conducted in a Shipibo-Conibo/Ese'Eja community of the rainforest in Peru to compare the Kato-Katz method and the spontaneous sedimentation in tube technique (SSTT) for the diagnosis of intestinal parasites as well as to report the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in this area. A total of 73 stool samples were collected and analysed by several parasitological techniques, including Kato-Katz, SSTT, modified Baermann technique (MBT), agar plate culture, Harada-Mori culture and the direct smear examination. Kato-Katz and SSTT had the same rate of detection for Ascaris lumbricoides (5%), Trichuris trichiura (5%), hookworm (14%) and Hymenolepis nana (26%). The detection rate for Strongyloides stercoralis larvae was 16% by SSTT and 0% by Kato-Katz, but 18% by agar plate culture and 16% by MBT. The SSTT also had the advantage of detecting multiple intestinal protozoa such as Blastocystis hominis (40%), Giardia intestinalis (29%) and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (16%). The most common intestinal parasites found in this community were B. hominis, G. intestinalis, H. nana, S. stercoralis and hookworm. In conclusion, the SSTT is not inferior to Kato-Katz for the diagnosis of common STH infections but is largely superior for detecting intestinal protozoa and S. stercoralis larvae. Copyright © 2012 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A simple modification of the Baermann method for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis

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    Francisco Hernández-Chavarría

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infections is routinely made by microscopic observation of larvae in stool samples, a low sensitivity method, or by other, most effective methods, such as the Baermann or agar culture plate methods. We propose in this paper a practical modification of Baermann method. One hundred and six stool samples from alcoholic patients were analyzed using the direct smear test, agar culture plate method, the standard Baermann method, and its proposed modification. For this modification the funnel used in the original version of the method is substituted by a test tube with a rubber stopper, perforated to allow insertion of a pipette tip. The tube with a fecal suspension is inverted over another tube containing 6 ml of saline solution and incubated at 37°C for at least 2 h. The saline solution from the second tube is centrifuged and the pellet is observed microscopically. Larva of S. stercoralis were detected in six samples (5.7% by the two versions of the Baermann method. Five samples were positive using the agar culture plate method, and only in two samples the larva were observed using direct microscopic observation of fecal smears. Cysts of Endolimax nana and Entamoeba histolytica/dyspar were also detected in the modification of Baermann method. Data obtained by the modified Baermann method suggest that this methodology may helps concentrate larvae of S. stercoralis as efficiently as the original method.

  9. The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village.

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    Schär, Fabian; Inpankaew, Tawin; Traub, Rebecca J; Khieu, Virak; Dalsgaard, Anders; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Chhoun, Chamnan; Sok, Daream; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In Cambodia, intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent in humans and particularly in children. Yet, information on potentially zoonotic parasites in animal reservoir hosts is lacking. In May 2012, faecal samples from 218 humans, 94 dogs and 76 pigs were collected from 67 households in Dong village, Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. Faecal samples were examined microscopically using sodium nitrate and zinc sulphate flotation methods, the Baermann method, Koga Agar plate culture, formalin-ether concentration technique and Kato Katz technique. PCR was used to confirm hookworm, Ascaris spp., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species and genotypes and allow further insight into the potential for zoonotic cross transmission of parasites in this community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical conditions associated withintestinal strongyloidiasis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Anna Caryna Cabral

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth that produces an infection that can persist for decades. The relationships between certain clinical conditions and strongyloidiasis remains controversial. This study aims to identify the clinical conditions associated with intestinal strongyloidiasis at a reference center for infectious diseases in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS: The clinical conditions that were assessed included HIV/AIDS, HTLV infection, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obstructive respiratory diseases, viral hepatitis, tuberculosis, cancer, chronic renal disease, nutritional/metabolic disorders, psychiatric conditions, rheumatic diseases and dermatologic diseases. We compared 167 S. stercoralis-positive and 133 S. stercoralis-negative patients. RESULTS: After controlling for sex (male/female OR = 2.29; 95% (CI: (1.42 - 3.70, rheumatic diseases remained significantly associated with intestinal strongyloidiasis (OR: 4.96; 95% CI: 1.34-18.37 in a multiple logistic regression model. With respect to leukocyte counts, patients with strongyloidiasis presented with significantly higher relative eosinophil (10.32% ± 7.2 vs. 4.23% ± 2.92 and monocyte (8.49% ± 7.25 vs. 5.39% ± 4.31 counts and lower segmented neutrophil (52.85% ± 15.31 vs. 61.32% ± 11.4 and lymphocyte counts (28.11% ± 9.72 vs. 30.90% ± 9.51 than S. stercoralis-negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: Strongyloidiasis should be routinely investigated in hospitalized patients with complex conditions facilitate the treatment of patients who will undergo immunosuppressive therapy. Diagnoses should be determined through the use of appropriate parasitological methods, such as the Baermann-Moraes technique.

  11. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in five farms in Holambra, São Paulo, Brazil Prevalência de enteroparasitoses em cinco fazendas de Holambra-SP, Brasil

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    Jun Kobayashi

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available A parasitological survey was carried out on 222 inhabitants of five farms in Holambra, located 30 km north of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, on October 1992. Approximately 70% of the inhabitants were found to be infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite. The positive rates of 6 helminths and 7 protozoan species detected are as follows: 5.4% Ascaris lumbricoides; 8.6% Trichuris trichiura; 19.8% Necator americanus; 10.4% Strongyloides stercoralis; 14% Enterobius vermicularis; 0.9% Hymenolepis nana; 3.2% Entamoeba histolytica; 2.7% E. hartmanni; 9.9% E. coli; 14.0% Endolimax nana; 2.3% Iodamoeba butschlii; 10.4% Giardia lamblia; 37.8% Blastocystis hominis. The positive rates of helminth infection were generaly higher in the younger-group under 16 years-old than those in the elder group aged 16 or more, whereas the infection rates of protozoan species were higher in the elder group. The infection rate of Strongyloides was found to be 10.4% by a newly developed sensitive method (an agarplate culture methods.Uma pesquisa coproparasitológica foi realizada em 222 habitantes de cinco fazendas de Holambra, localizada a 30 km ao norte de Campinas, SP, Brasil, em outubro de 1992. Aproximadamente 70% dos habitantes apresentaram pelo menos um tipo de parasitose intestinal. O índice de positividade das 6 espécies de helmintos e de 7 protozoários na população foi o seguinte: Ascaris lumbricoides (5,4%; Trichuris trichiura (8,6%; Necator americanus (19,8%; Strongyloides stercoralis (10,4%; Enterobius vermiculares (1,4%; Hymenolepis nana (0,9%; Entamoeba histolytica (3,2%; E. hartmanni (2,7%; E. coli (9,9%; Endolimax nana (14,0%; Iodamoeba butschlii (2,3%; Giardia lamblia (10,4%; Blastocystis hominis (37,4%. O índice de positividade para infecção por helmitos foi aparentemente maior na população mais jovem (menores de 16 anos do que no grupo de população com idades acima de 16 anos, ao contrário do índice de infecção pelos protozo

  12. Determining intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) in inmates from Kajang Prison, Selangor, Malaysia for improved prison management.

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    Angal, Lorainne; Mahmud, Rohela; Samin, Sajideh; Yap, Nan-Jiun; Ngui, Romano; Amir, Amirah; Ithoi, Init; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-10-29

    The prison management in Malaysia is proactively seeking to improve the health status of the prison inmates. Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) are widely distributed throughout the world and are still gaining great concern due to their significant morbidity and mortality among infected humans. In Malaysia, there is a paucity of information on IPIs among prison inmates. In order to further enhance the current health strategies employed, the present study aims to establish firm data on the prevalence and diversity of IPIs among HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected individuals in a prison, an area in which informed knowledge is still very limited. Samples were subjected to microscopy examination and serological test (only for Strongyloides). Speciation for parasites on microscopy-positive samples and seropositive samples for Strongyloides were further determined via polymerase chain reaction. SPSS was used for statistical analysis. A total of 294 stool and blood samples each were successfully collected, involving 131 HIV positive and 163 HIV negative adult male inmates whose age ranged from 21 to 69-years-old. Overall prevalence showed 26.5% was positive for various IPIs. The IPIs detected included Blastocystis sp., Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., and Trichuris trichiura. Comparatively, the rate of IPIs was slightly higher among the HIV positive inmates (27.5%) than HIV negative inmates (25.8%). Interestingly, seropositivity for S. stercoralis was more predominant in HIV negative inmates (10.4%) compared to HIV-infected inmates (6.9%), however these findings were not statistically significant. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of Blastocystis, Strongyloides, Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar. These data will enable the health care providers and prison management staff to understand the trend and epidemiological situations in HIV/parasitic co-infections in a prison. This information will further

  13. HTLV-I infection in the South West Indian Ocean islands, particularly in La Réunion and the Seychelles.

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    Aubry, P; Bovet, P; Vitrac, D; Schooneman, F; Hollanda, J; Malvy, D; Gaüzère, B-A

    2013-10-01

    Data on HTLV-I are scarce in several Southwest Indian Ocean islands except for La Réunion and The Seychelles. The two cases of HTLV-I have been confirmed by Western-Blot in La Réunion, among blood donors. In Seychelles (87 400 inhabitants in 2012), where blood donors and some other cases are screened, HTLV-I was confirmed with a line immune assay in 43 persons and at least 10-20 patients are known to have tropical spastic paraparesia or adult T-cell lymphoma associated with HTLV-I. In the south-west Indian Ocean, a possibly important other issue may be co-infection of HTLV-1 with the Strongyloides stercoralis roundworm, which is endemic in all countries of the region and which can sometimes lead to severe symptomatic infestation.

  14. Gastrointestinal helminths of arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) from different bioclimatological regions in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, C. M O; Nansen, P.

    1996-01-01

    Nine species of gastrointestinal helminths were recovered from 254 arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) from 8 different localities in Greenland. Prevalences of infection with the helminth species differed from area to area: Toxascaris leonina (3968%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0-14%), Mesocestoides...... of Greenland. In general, the composition of the helminth fauna of arctic foxes in Greenland showed distinct differences geographically. Thus, the diversity of helminth species in foxes caught in the northern districts of Greenland seems lower than in the southern districts; only nematode species with direct...... life cycles were represented equally in all parts of the country. The diversity of the surrounding fauna, and thereby the food items available for the foxes, seems to determine the spectrum of helminth species. Helminths requiring rodents as intermediate hosts were absent on the west coast, even...

  15. Study of the incidence of intestinal parasites in vegetables commercializes in free trade fair and supermarket Londrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Ruzzon Nomura

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the presence of intestinal parasites in samples of lettuce and chicory sold in street market and supermarket Londrina city, Paraná. For this purpose, eight samples of lettuce (Lactuca sativa and eight samples of chicory (Cichorium intybus were collected and analyzed. The analysis was performed at the Laboratory for Extension and Research in Enteroparasitosis – L.E.P.En. Cysts of Endolimax nana, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica, Balantidium coli and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae, Hookworm larvae and eggs, and eggs of Ascaris spp were found in the samples. These results demonstrate the need for hygienic-sanitary measures, aimed at educating the community, enabling the improvement in living conditions of the population.

  16. Encuesta de parásitos intestinales en 615 escolares del Rímac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gonzales-Mugaburu

    1956-12-01

    Full Text Available El examen microscópico de una sola muestra de heces de cada uno de 615 escolares del Rímac, ha mostrado: 1. El elevado porcentaje de protozoarios intestinales encontrados, sugiere una alta contaminación fecal. 2. La alta frecuencia de H. nana 166 (27.0% constituye un problema al que hay que prestar atención. 3. El hallazgo de Strongyloides stercoralis y Ancylostoma o Necator sólo en sujetos que habían estado algún tiempo en la Selva del Perú, sugiere una vez más, que dichos parásitos no son transmitidos en esta parte de la Costa. 4. La presencia de tres casos de Isospora belli nos indica que esta coccidia es más frecuente de lo que se suponía.

  17. Parasitological and immunological diagnoses of strongyloidiasis in immunocompromised and non-immunocompromised children at Uberlândia, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil Diagnóstico parasitológico e imunológico da estrongiloidíase em crianças imunodeprimidas e imunocompetentes na cidade de Uberlândia, MG, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Martins de PAULA

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Parasitological and immunological diagnoses were part of a study conducted among 151 children, 83 immunocompromised (IC and 68 non-immunocompromised (non-IC aged from zero to 12, seen at the University Hospital, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from February, 1996, to June, 1998. Three fecal samples from each child were analyzed for the parasitological diagnosis by Baermann-Moraes and Lutz methods. The immunological diagnosis to detect IgG and IgM antibodies was carried out by the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT with cryo-microtome sections of Strongyloides stercoralis and Strongyloides ratti larvae as antigens and by the ELISA test with an alkaline extract of S. ratti as the antigens. Of the 151 children 5 (3.31% were infected with larvae of S. stercoralis (2 cases IC, 2.41%, and 3 cases non-IC, 4.41%. The IFAT-IgG detected 7 (8.43% serum samples positive among IC, and 2 (2.94% cases among non-IC. The ELISA-IgG test detected 10 (12.05% serum samples positive among IC, and 1 (1.47% case among non-IC. The IFAT-IgM detected 6 (7.22% positive cases among IC, and 3 (4.41% cases among non-IC. ELISA-IgM test detected 10 (12.05% positive cases among IC, and 3 (4.41% cases among non-IC. It was concluded that the immunological tests can help in the diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in immunocompromised children.O diagnóstico parasitológico e imunológico da estrongiloidíase foi realizado em 151 crianças (83 imunodeprimidas -ID e 68 imunocompetentes -IC de zero a 12 anos de idade internadas no Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brasil, no período de fevereiro de 1996 a junho de 1998. Para o diagnóstico parasitológico três amostras de fezes de cada indivíduo foram processadas pelos métodos de Baermann-Moraes e de Lutz. O diagnóstico imunológico para a detecção de anticorpos IgG e IgM foi realizado através das reações de imunofluorescência indireta

  18. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy

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    Hoang van Tong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity.

  19. [Geohelminths].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Pérez, Laura; Pérez-Tanoira, Ramón; Cabello-Úbeda, Alfonso; Petkova-Saiz, Elizabet; Górgolas-Hernández-Mora, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people in in rural areas and deprived tropical and subtropical regions are infected by soil-transmitted helminths: Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus), and Strongyloides stercoralis. Large migratory flows have made their worldwide distribution easier. Besides being debilitating and producing a significant mortality, they cause high morbidity, leading to physical and intellectual impairment in millions of children who live in poverty. Along with the use of benzimidazoles (albendazole and mebendazole), large-scale international campaigns for treatment and prevention have decreased the number of affected individuals. However, re-infestations and benzimidazole-resistance are frequent, so there needs to be awareness about the importance and consequences of these neglected parasites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Estrongiloidíase em pacientes com pênfigo foliáceo

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares-Neto,José; Alves,Denise Barcelos; Franciscon,José Umberto; Serrano,Carlos Roberto S.

    1991-01-01

    Em 30 pacientes com pênfigo foliáceo, a freqüência da estrongiloidíase foi de 40,0%, através de três exames de Baermann-Moraes. No "Hospital do Pênfigo", em Uberaba, as freqüências da estrongiloidíase nos funcionários (n = 14) e escolares (n = 47) da Escola-creche, anexa, também foram altas, respectivamente 35,7% e 23,4%. Em 7 (58,3 %) das 12 amostras do solo, do jardim/pátio do "Hospital", foram observadas formas de vida livre do Strongyloides stercoralis. O fator ambiental e a predisposição...

  1. Exposure to larva migrans syndromes in squares and public parks of cities in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercado Rubén

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Between November 2001 and December 2002, 600 dog fecal samples were collected in main squares and public parks of 13 cities in Chile, from the extreme north to the extreme south of the country. The samples were processed in the laboratory by centrifugal sedimentation and the Harada-Mori methods. T. canis eggs were found in 12 cities. Detection rates ranged from 1.9 to 12.5% with an average of 5.2%. Seven percent of the samples had eggs and 9.5% had rhabditoid and/or filariform larvae of Ancylostomatidae. Strongyloides stercoralis were not found. Squares and public parks in Chile pose a potential risk of exposure to visceral, ocular, and/or cutaneous larva migrans syndromes.

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05047-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ( FC248291 ) CAGH5240.fwd CAGH Nematostella vectensis Nemve La... 42 4e-10 4 ( FL973986 ) CCHY11996.g1 CCHY Panicum virgatum cal...3f09.y2 TBN95TM-SSFH Strongyloides stercoralis... 40 1e-04 2 ( FM992692 ) Candida dubliniensis CD36 chromoso...ynana_abdomen_nosize Bicyclus anyn... 50 0.10 1 ( GD193438 ) G1045P3111FM5.T1 Aplysia californica Pooled...3J15-MGRbd1. 44 6.5 1 ( CK149624 ) CsmgEST00052 Culicoides sonorensis female serum-f... 44 6.5 1 ( CI528724 ) Oryza sativa Japonica...ficus YJ016 DNA, ch... 63 6e-09 CP001071_944( CP001071 |pid:none) Akkermansia muciniphila ATCC BAA..

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02685-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cDNA, clone SSM636. 44 2e-08 3 ( FK735507 ) av02073b04r1.1 Symbiotic sea anemone (Anemonia vi... 60 2e-08 3...yte cDNA Library Porphyra ha... 50 2e-08 3 ( FK721873 ) av02130a08r1.1 Symbiotic sea anemone (Anemonia vi...... 60 2e-08 3 ( FK754800 ) av02104k17r1.1 Symbiotic sea anemone (Anemonia vi... 60 ...3e-08 3 ( BG227669 ) kq13h06.y1 TBN95TM-SSR Strongyloides stercoralis ... 38 3e-08 4 ( FK730953 ) av01010m13r1.1 Symbiotic

  4. Estudos epidemiológicos entre grupos indígenas de Rondônia III: . Parasitoses intestinais nas populações dos vales dos rios Guaporé e Mamoré

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ventura Santos

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram realizados 639 exames parasitológicos das fezes na população indígena dos vales dos rios Guaporé e Mamoré, no Estado de Rondônia, constituída predominantemente por índios Pacaas-Novos e outros grupos populacionalmente menores (Massacá, Ajuru, Canoé, Jabuti, Mequém, Tupari e Macurap. Os resultados foram os seguintes: Ascaris lumbricoides (21,3%, Trichuris trichiura (1,6%, ancilostomídeos (12,2%, Strongyloides stercoralis (3,9%, Enterobius vermicularis (2,0%, Hymenolepis nana (0,3%, Capillaria sp. (0,2%, Giardia lamblia (12,7% e Entamoeba hystolitica (8,8%. Os dados obtidos são comparados com os de outros autores que realizaram inquéritos semelhantes em outras áreas indígenas da Amazônia.This paper reports the results of parasitological studies of stools carried among the amerindian population of the Guaporé and Mamoré river valleys, in the State of Rondônia, Brazil The population is constituted mainly of Pacaas-Novos indians and other smaller groups (Massacá, Ajuru, Canoé, Jabuti, Mequém, Tupari and Macurap. The following species were found: Ascaris lumbricoides (21,3%, Trichuris trichiura (1,6%Ancilostomidae (12,2%, Strongyloides stercoralis (3,9%, Enterobius vermicularis (2,0%, Hymenolepis nana (0,3%, Capillaria sp. (0,2%, Giardia lamblia (12,7% and Entamoeba hystolitica (8,8%. The results are discussed and compared with those obtained by other authors among different Amazonian groups.

  5. Diagnóstico da estrongiloidíase num exame de rotina da expectoração com coloração pela técnica de Ziehi-Neelsen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Pacheco

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Os autores apresentam om caso de infecção por Strongyloides stercoralis noma doente imunocompetente, detectado no decurso de avaliação microbiológica da expectoração para diagnóstico etiológico de hemoptises.A observação de esfregaços de expectoração corados pela técnica de Ziehl-Neelsen, revelou larvas rhabditóides, resistentes à desco’oração pelo ácido­álcool (seguidamente confirmadas noma preparação a fresco da mesma amostra, permitindo a identificação do agente causal provavel. É apontada a atitude terapêutica necessária a resolução do quadro clínico.REV PORT PNEUMOL 1999; V (1: 91-98 ABSTRACT: The authors present a case of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in an immunocompetent patient, detected during microbiological study of sputum for diagnostic work-up of haemoptysis.The observation of Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sputum smears revealed rhabditiform alcohol-acid fast larvae (further confirmed in a wet mount of the same sample, permitting the identification of the probable etiological agent. The therapeutic attitude necessary to the resolution of the clinical picture is pointed out.REV PORT PNEUMOL 1999; V (1: 91-98 Key-words: Helminthiasis, Sputum, acid-fast, Palavras-chave: Helmintíase, Expectoração, ácido­resistência

  6. Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis in adults: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Pannekoek, Y; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2015-12-01

    We describe the incidence and patient characteristics of Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis. We identified S. gallolyticus meningitis in a nationwide cohort of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all reported adult cases in the literature. Five cases were identified (0.3%) in a cohort of 1561 episodes of bacterial meningitis. In one patient, bowel disease (colon polyps) was identified as a predisposing condition for S. gallolyticus infection, whereas no patients were diagnosed with endocarditis. In a combined analysis of our patients and 37 reported in the literature, we found that the median age was 59 years. Predisposing factors were present in 21 of 42 patients (50%), and mainly consisted of immunosuppressive therapy (seven patients), cancer (four patients), and alcoholism (four patients). Colon disease was identified in 15 of 24 patients (63%) and endocarditis in five of 27 patients (18%). Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis was identified in 14 of 34 patients (41%), ten of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus or human T-lymphotropic virus. Outcomes were described for 37 patients; eight died (22%) and one (3%) had neurological sequelae. S. gallolyticus is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with specific predisposing conditions. When it is identified, consultation with a cardiologist and gastroenterologist is warranted to rule out underlying endocarditis or colon disease. Stool examinations for Strongyloides stercoralis should be performed in patients who have travelled to or originate from endemic areas. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intestinal Parasitic Infections in HIV Infected and Non-Infected Patients in a Low HIV Prevalence Region, West-Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenfou, Céline Nguefeu; Nana, Christelle Tafou; Payne, Vincent Khan

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several tropical diseases. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Cameroon. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Dschang -Cameroon. Stool and blood specimens from HIV/AIDS patients and control group were screened respectively for intestinal parasites and for HIV antibodies. Intestinal parasites were identified using direct microscopy, formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl Neelsen methods. Out of 396 participants recruited among patients consulting at hospital, 42 (10.6%) were HIV positive, thirty of them treatment naïve. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 14.64%. Out of 42 HIV/AIDS patients, 59.5% (25/42) were infected with intestinal parasites, while only 9.32% (33/354) of the HIV negative patients were infected with intestinal parasites. The parasites detected in our study population included Crystosporidium parvum (2.53%), Entamoeba histolytica (7.52%), Entamoeba coli (4.04%), Giardia lamblia (0.25%), Trichuris trichura (0.25%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%). In the HIV infected group, Crystosporidium parvum (19.04%), Entamoeba histolytica (19.04%), Entamoeba coli (21.42%), Giardia lamblia (2.38%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%) were found. Crystosporidium parvum was found to be significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients than in controls (Pintestinal parasitosis. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the HIV patients by contributing in reducing morbidity and improving the efficiency of antiretroviral treatment. Even after the introduction of free anti-retroviral drugs, opportunistic intestinal infections are still a threat. HIV patients should be screened

  8. Enteroparasitoses em manipuladores de alimentos de escolas públicas em Uberlândia (Minas Gerais, Brasil Enteroparasitoses in food handlers in public schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique A. de Rezende

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Procedeu-se ao controle das enteroparasitoses em manipuladores de alimentos de escolas públicas de primeiro grau de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, a partir de estudo prospectivo baseado em inquérito parasitológico. Foram acompanhados 264 indivíduos de 57 escolas, com três coletas de fezes (C, sendo C1 em setembro de 1989, C2 em abril de 1990 e C3 em setembro de 1990. Entre os participantes 259 eram do sexo feminino e cinco do sexo masculino, com idades entre 20 e 66 anos. As 792 amostras de fezes foram conservadas em formol a 10% e analisadas pelo método de Hoffman, Pons e Janer. A ocorrência de parasitas intestinais foi de 17, 10 e 10% para C1, C2, e C3, respectivamente. Em C1 detectou-se: Giardia lamblia (8%, ancilostomídeos (6%, Ascaris lumbricoides (3%, Entamoeba histolytica, (2%, Strongyloides stercoralis, Hymenolepis nana, Taenia sp. e Trichuris trichiura (menos de 1% cada um deles. Em C2 detectou-se: ancilostomídeos (5%, G. lamblia (2%, A. lumbricoides (1%, S. stercoralis, H. nana, Taenia sp., Enterobius vermicularis (menos de 1% cada um deles. Em C3 observou-se: ancilostomídeos (5%, G. lamblia (3%, A. lumbricoides (2%, S. stercoralis e E. vermicularis (menos de 1% cada um deles. Os indivíduos infectados receberam tratamento específico após o diagnóstico em cada coleta. Recomendamos a implantação de vigilância epidemiológica através do exame parasitológico periódico, tratamento específico e treinamento sobre manejo higiênico de alimentos e higiene pessoal para todos os manipuladores de alimentos.A prospective study based on a parasitologic survey was carried out with a view toward controlling enteroparasitoses in food handlers who work in public primary schools in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The study subjects were 264 individuals from 57 schools, from whom three fecal samples (C were collected: C1 in September 1989, C2 in April 1990, and C3 in September 1990. The participants were predominantly female (259 women

  9. [Soil transmitted helminthiasis in Argentina. A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socías, M Eugenia; Fernández, Anabel; Gil, José F; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review of surveys performed between 1980 and 2011 (published in MEDLINE/Pubmed and/or LILACS indexed journals, available in the baseline data from a Mass Deworming National Program (MDNP, 2005) was used to identify the prevalence, distribution and detection of risk areas for soil transmitted helminth infections (STH) in Argentina. We found 310 publications in the database using the pre-defined key-words (medical subject headings) for research purposes. Only 24 articles with 26 surveillance sites in 8 provinces and a total of 5495 surveyed individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Frequency rates for STH had a wide range: Ascaris lumbricoides: 0-67%, hookworms: 0-90%, Trichuris trichiura: 0-24.6 and Strongyloides stercoralis: 0-83%. The estimated combined incidence varied from 0.8% to 88.6%. Baseline surveys from the MDNP reporting on 1943 children from 12 provinces confirmed the heterogeneity, with combined STH frequency rates ranging from 0 to 42.7%. Surveys included in this review showed that the distribution of STH in Argentina is not homogeneous, with areas of high incidence (> 20%) in the northeastern and northwestern provinces where mass deworming activities would be highly beneficial. In several surveys, the high overall incidence was mostly due to hookworms and S. stercoralis, a situation to be considered when selecting diagnostic and therapeutic control strategies. The scarcity or absence of data from various provinces and the availability of less than 8000 surveyed individuals should be considered.

  10. Soil-transmitted Helminthiasis in the United States: a systematic review--1940-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Michelle C; Montgomery, Susan P

    2011-10-01

    The epidemiology of soil-transmitted helminth infections (hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis) in the United States is poorly understood. To gain understanding of the status of disease, a systematic review was performed to assess the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections in the United States. Of all studies reviewed, 14 were designated as high-quality. High-quality studies were published from 1942 to 1982 and showed that infection was prevalent throughout the southern United States and Appalachia as recently as 1982, finding that hookworm (19.6%), T. trichiura (55.2%), A. lumbricoides (49.4%), and S. stercoralis (3.8%) affected significant percentages of the population. However, because the most recent high-quality studies were published over 25 years ago, the literature does not provide sufficient data to assess current endemic transmission. Because the status of disease remains unclear, there is a need for additional studies to determine if soil-transmitted helminths remain endemic in the United States.

  11. Parasitological and serological studies on Amoebiasis and other intestinal parasitic infections in Recife and its suburban area, northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsu Okazaki

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available Parasitological examinations were carried out during April to August, 1987, with 187 out-patients of the IMIP hospital, located in the center of Recife City, and 464 inhabitants of several villages around Cabo City, 50 Km southeast of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Approximately 71% of the IMIP patients and 92% of the Cabo inhabitants were infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite. There was minimum difference in the prevalence rate of Trichuris trichiura between two areas, whereas the prevalence rates of Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworms, Strongyloides stercoralis, Schistosoma mansoni and Entamoeba histolytica were higher in the inhabitants of the Cabo City area. Only Giardia lamblia was more prevalent in the out-patients of IMIP hospital. Test tube cultivation revealed that the prevalence rate of Necator americanus in both areas was much higher than that of Ancylostoma duodenale , and also that the prevalence rate of S. stercoralis of the IMIP patients and Cabo inhabitants were 4.5% and 9.6%, respectively. Six hundred and fifteen sera were serologically examined for amoebiasis by the gel diffusion precipitation test (GDP and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using the antigen prepared from axenically cultured trophozoite of E. histolytica (strain HM-ITMSS. No positive reaction was observed in all of the sera as examined by GDP, while 32 out of 615 sera were positive on ELISA.

  12. Enteroparasitoses em manipuladores de alimentos de escolas públicas em Uberlândia (Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique A. de Rezende

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Procedeu-se ao controle das enteroparasitoses em manipuladores de alimentos de escolas públicas de primeiro grau de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, a partir de estudo prospectivo baseado em inquérito parasitológico. Foram acompanhados 264 indivíduos de 57 escolas, com três coletas de fezes (C, sendo C1 em setembro de 1989, C2 em abril de 1990 e C3 em setembro de 1990. Entre os participantes 259 eram do sexo feminino e cinco do sexo masculino, com idades entre 20 e 66 anos. As 792 amostras de fezes foram conservadas em formol a 10% e analisadas pelo método de Hoffman, Pons e Janer. A ocorrência de parasitas intestinais foi de 17, 10 e 10% para C1, C2, e C3, respectivamente. Em C1 detectou-se: Giardia lamblia (8%, ancilostomídeos (6%, Ascaris lumbricoides (3%, Entamoeba histolytica, (2%, Strongyloides stercoralis, Hymenolepis nana, Taenia sp. e Trichuris trichiura (menos de 1% cada um deles. Em C2 detectou-se: ancilostomídeos (5%, G. lamblia (2%, A. lumbricoides (1%, S. stercoralis, H. nana, Taenia sp., Enterobius vermicularis (menos de 1% cada um deles. Em C3 observou-se: ancilostomídeos (5%, G. lamblia (3%, A. lumbricoides (2%, S. stercoralis e E. vermicularis (menos de 1% cada um deles. Os indivíduos infectados receberam tratamento específico após o diagnóstico em cada coleta. Recomendamos a implantação de vigilância epidemiológica através do exame parasitológico periódico, tratamento específico e treinamento sobre manejo higiênico de alimentos e higiene pessoal para todos os manipuladores de alimentos.

  13. Comparing Diagnostic Accuracy of Kato-Katz, Koga Agar Plate, Ether-Concentration, and FLOTAC for Schistosoma mansoni and Soil-Transmitted Helminths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinz, Dominik; Silué, Kigbafori D.; Knopp, Stefanie; Lohourignon, Laurent K.; Yao, Kouassi P.; Steinmann, Peter; Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe; N'Goran, Eliézer K.; Utzinger, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    Background Infections with schistosomes and soil-transmitted helminths exert a considerable yet underappreciated economic and public health burden on afflicted populations. Accurate diagnosis is crucial for patient management, drug efficacy evaluations, and monitoring of large-scale community-based control programs. Methods/Principal Findings The diagnostic accuracy of four copromicroscopic techniques (i.e., Kato-Katz, Koga agar plate, ether-concentration, and FLOTAC) for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni and soil-transmitted helminth eggs was compared using stool samples from 112 school children in Côte d'Ivoire. Combined results of all four methods served as a diagnostic ‘gold’ standard and revealed prevalences of S. mansoni, hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis and Ascaris lumbricoides of 83.0%, 55.4%, 40.2%, 33.9% and 28.6%, respectively. A single FLOTAC from stool samples preserved in sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin for 30 or 83 days showed a higher sensitivity for S. mansoni diagnosis (91.4%) than the ether-concentration method on stool samples preserved for 40 days (85.0%) or triplicate Kato-Katz using fresh stool samples (77.4%). Moreover, a single FLOTAC detected hookworm, A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura infections with a higher sensitivity than any of the other methods used, but resulted in lower egg counts. The Koga agar plate method was the most accurate diagnostic assay for S. stercoralis. Conclusion/Significance We have shown that the FLOTAC method holds promise for the diagnosis of S. mansoni. Moreover, our study confirms that FLOTAC is a sensitive technique for detection of common soil-transmitted helminths. For the diagnosis of S. stercoralis, the Koga agar plate method remains the method of choice. PMID:20651931

  14. Expanding molecular diagnostics of helminthiasis: Piloting use of the GPLN platform for surveillance of soil transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis in Ghana.

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    Lucas J Cunningham

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The efforts to control and eradicate polio as a global health burden have been successful to the point where currently only three countries now report endemic polio, and the number of cases of polio continues to decrease. The success of the polio programme has been dependant on a well-developed network of laboratories termed the global polio laboratory network (GPLN. Here we explore collaborative opportunities with the GPLN to target two of the 18 diseases listed as a neglected tropical diseases (NTD namely soil transmitted helminthiasis (STH and Schistosomiasis (SCH. These were chosen based on prevalence and the use of faecal materials to identify both polio, STH and SCH. Our study screened 448 faecal samples from the Ghana GPLN using three triplex TaqMan assays to identify Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma spp, Trichuris trchiura, Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma spp. Our results found a combined helminth prevalence of 22%. The most common helminth infection was A. lumbricoides with a prevalence of 15% followed by N. americanus (5%, Ancylostoma spp. (2.5%, Schistosoma spp. (1.6% and S. stercoralis (1%. These results show that it is possible to identify alternative pathogens to polio in the samples collected by the GPLN platform and to introduce new diagnostic assays to their laboratories. The diagnostic methods employed were also able to identify S. stercoralis positive samples, which are difficult to identify using parasitological methods such as Kato-Katz. This study raises the possibility of collaboration with the GPLN for the surveillance of a wider range of diseases which would both benefit the efforts to control the NTDs and also increase the scope of the GPLN as a diagnostic platform.

  15. Impact of Helminth Infection on the Clinical and Microbiological Presentation of Chagas Diseases in Chronically Infected Patients.

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    Fernando Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, coexisting in Chagas disease endemic areas. Helminth infections in humans may modulate the host immune system, changing the Th1/Th2 polarization. This immunological disturbance could modify the immune response to other infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between clinical, microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of Chagas disease patients, with the presence of helminth infection.A prospective observational study was conducted at Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain. Inclusion criteria were: age over 18 years, diagnosis of Chagas disease, and not having received specific treatment for Chagas disease previously to the inclusion. The study protocol included Chagas disease assessment (cardiac and digestive evaluation, detection of T. cruzi DNA measured by PCR in peripheral blood, and helminth infection diagnosis (detection of IgG anti-Strongyloides stercoralis by ELISA, microscopic examination of stool samples from three different days, and specific faecal culture for S. stercoralis larvae.Overall, 65 patients were included, median age was 38 years, 75.4% were women and most of them came from Bolivia. Cardiac and digestive involvement was present in 18.5% and 27.7% of patients respectively. T. cruzi PCR was positive in 28 (43.1% patients. Helminth infection was diagnosed in 12 (18.5% patients. No differences were observed in clinical and epidemiological characteristics between patients with and without helminth infection. Nevertheless, the proportion of patients with positive T. cruzi PCR was higher among patients with helminth infection compared with patients without helminth infection (75% vs 35.8%, p = 0.021.We observed a high prevalence of S. stercoralis infection among chronic Chagas disease patients attended in our tropical medicine unit. Strongyloidiasis was associated with significantly higher proportion of

  16. Expanding molecular diagnostics of helminthiasis: Piloting use of the GPLN platform for surveillance of soil transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis in Ghana.

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    Cunningham, Lucas J; Odoom, John; Pratt, Deborah; Boatemaa, Linda; Asante-Ntim, Nana; Attiku, Keren; Banahene, Bismarck; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike; Verweij, Jaco J; Molyneux, David; Stothard, Russell J; Adams, Emily R

    2018-01-01

    The efforts to control and eradicate polio as a global health burden have been successful to the point where currently only three countries now report endemic polio, and the number of cases of polio continues to decrease. The success of the polio programme has been dependant on a well-developed network of laboratories termed the global polio laboratory network (GPLN). Here we explore collaborative opportunities with the GPLN to target two of the 18 diseases listed as a neglected tropical diseases (NTD) namely soil transmitted helminthiasis (STH) and Schistosomiasis (SCH). These were chosen based on prevalence and the use of faecal materials to identify both polio, STH and SCH. Our study screened 448 faecal samples from the Ghana GPLN using three triplex TaqMan assays to identify Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma spp, Trichuris trchiura, Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma spp. Our results found a combined helminth prevalence of 22%. The most common helminth infection was A. lumbricoides with a prevalence of 15% followed by N. americanus (5%), Ancylostoma spp. (2.5%), Schistosoma spp. (1.6%) and S. stercoralis (1%). These results show that it is possible to identify alternative pathogens to polio in the samples collected by the GPLN platform and to introduce new diagnostic assays to their laboratories. The diagnostic methods employed were also able to identify S. stercoralis positive samples, which are difficult to identify using parasitological methods such as Kato-Katz. This study raises the possibility of collaboration with the GPLN for the surveillance of a wider range of diseases which would both benefit the efforts to control the NTDs and also increase the scope of the GPLN as a diagnostic platform.

  17. Clinical, endoscopic and histopathological profiles of parasitic duodenitis cases diagnosed by upper digestive endoscopy

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    Reinaldo Benevides dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Intestinal parasites induce detectable histopathological changes, which have been studied in groups with known diagnosis of parasitic disease. There is no available study with a larger base without previous diagnosis. OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical and histopathological findings of parasitosis diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy in patients submitted to upper digestive endoscopy. METHODS: Recorded biopsies archive at "Complexo Hospitalar Professor Edgar Santos" , a general teaching Hospital in the state of Bahia, Northeast Brazil, from January 1995 to January 2009, were reviewed. One thousand ten duodenal biopsy reports were found. Reports positive for parasites had their specimens reviewed and photographed. All blocks of biopsy selected as case were retrieved and reviewed by an experienced pathologist. Clinical, laboratorial and endoscopic data were collected. RESULTS: Eleven biopsies showed parasites, including cases of Cryptosporidium sp. and Strongyloides stercoralis. Vomiting (91%, abdominal pain (78%, diarrhea (78% and weight loss (78% were usual symptoms. Seventy-five percent had duodenal mucosa changes on endoscopy, while 25% have no changes. Anemia and low serum albumin were important laboratorial data. HIV infection association was observed. Villus atrophy and reactive epithelium were usual in Strongyloides cases. CONCLUSIONS: No endoscopic or histopathologic finding was pathognomonic. One percent of duodenal endoscopic biopsies showed parasites.

  18. Strongyloidiasis and infective dermatitis alter human T lymphotropic virus-1 clonality in vivo.

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    Nicolas A Gillet

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic Virus-1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus that persists lifelong by driving clonal proliferation of infected T-cells. HTLV-1 causes a neuroinflammatory disease and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Strongyloidiasis, a gastrointestinal infection by the helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, and Infective Dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH, appear to be risk factors for the development of HTLV-1 related diseases. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the HTLV-1-infected T-cell population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone. A newly developed biodiversity estimator called "DivE" was used to estimate the total number of clones in the blood. We found that the major determinant of proviral load in all subjects without leukemia/lymphoma was the total number of HTLV-1-infected clones. Nevertheless, the significantly higher proviral load in patients with strongyloidiasis or IDH was due to an increase in the mean clone abundance, not to an increase in the number of infected clones. These patients appear to be less capable of restricting clone abundance than those with HTLV-1 alone. In patients co-infected with Strongyloides there was an increased degree of oligoclonal expansion and a higher rate of turnover (i.e. appearance and disappearance of HTLV-1-infected clones. In Strongyloides co-infected patients and those with IDH, proliferation of the most abundant HTLV-1⁺ T-cell clones is independent of the genomic environment of the provirus, in sharp contrast to patients with HTLV-1 infection alone. This implies that new selection forces are driving oligoclonal proliferation in Strongyloides co-infection and IDH. We conclude that strongyloidiasis and IDH increase the risk of development of HTLV-1-associated diseases by increasing the rate of infection of new clones and the abundance of existing HTLV-1⁺ clones.

  19. Prevalência de parasitos intestinais na comunidade indígena Maxakali, Minas Gerais, Brasil, 2009 Prevalencia de parásitos intestinales en la comunidad indígena Maxakali, Minas Gerais, Brasil, 2009 Prevalence of intestinal parasites in the Maxakali indigenous community in Minas Gerais, Brazil, 2009

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    João Luiz Pena

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a prevalência de parasitos intestinais na etnia Maxakali em Minas Gerais, Brasil. Os exames parasitológico das fezes foram realizados através da técnica TF-Test, sendo as amostras fecais coletadas em três dias alternados, em tubos independentes, contendo formol a 10%, unificados para dupla filtragem por centrifugação. Triplicatas de uma alíquota do sedimento foram examinadas em microscópio (10x e 40x para identificação de ovos, cistos e larvas. A prevalência de parasitos (89,5% e do poliparasitismo (46% foi semelhante quanto ao sexo e idade, e variou entre as aldeias. As espécies prevalentes foram: Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (48,9%, Giardia duodenalis (32%, Entamoeba coli (40,8%, Endolimax nana (10,3%, ancilostomídeos (37,9%, Schistosoma mansoni (23,7%, Hymenolepis nana (18,6%, Strongyloides stercoralis (5,4%, Ascaris lumbricoides (4,9% e Trichuris trichiura (0,5%. Os Maxakali vivem em condições de vulnerabilidade social, e medidas de infraestrutura e de educação em saúde necessitam ser implementadas pelas instituições governamentais.El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la prevalencia de parásitos intestinales en la etnia Maxakali. Los exámenes parasitológicos de las heces se realizaron a través de la técnica TF-Test, las muestras fecales se recogieron en tres días alternados, en tubos independientes, conteniendo formol a un 10%, unificados para un doble filtrado por centrifugación. Triplicados de una alícuota del sedimento se examinaron en microscopio (10x y 40x para la identificación de huevos, quistes y larvas. La prevalencia de parásitos (89,5% y del poliparasitismo (46% fue semejante en cuanto al sexo y edad, y varió entre las aldeas. Las especies prevalentes fueron: Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (48,9%, Giardia duodenalis (32%, Entamoeba coli (40,8%, Endolimax nana (10,3%, ancilostomídeos (37,9%, Schistosoma mansoni (23,7%, Hymenolepis nana

  20. Opportunistic and other intestinal parasitic infections in AIDS patients, HIV seropositive healthy carriers and HIV seronegative individuals in southwest Ethiopia.

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    Mariam, Zelalem T; Abebe, Gemeda; Mulu, Andargachew

    2008-12-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and major causes of morbidity and mortality of such patients are opportunistic infections caused by viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic pathogens. To determine the magnitude of opportunistic and non-opportunistic intestinal parasitic infections among AIDS patients and HIV positive carrier individuals. Cross-sectional study was conducted among AIDS patients, HIV positive healthy carriers and HIV negative individuals in Jimma University Hospital, Mother Theresa Missionary Charity Centre, Medan Acts Projects and Mekdim HIV positive persons and AIDS orphans' national association from January to May, 2004. Convenient sampling technique was employed to identify the study subjects and hence a total of 160 subjects were included. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data of the patients. Stool samples were examined by direct saline, iodine wet mount, formol-ether sedimentation concentration, oocyst concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. Out of 160 persons enrolled in this study 100 (62.5%) (i.e. 65 male and 35 female) were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. The highest rate 36 (69.2%) of intestinal parasites were observed among HIV/AIDS patients, followed by HIV positive healthy carriers 35 (61.4%) of and HIV negative individuals (29 (56.9%). Isospora belli 2 (3.9%), Cryptosporidum parvum 8 (15.4%), Strongyloides stercoralis 6 (11.5%) and Blastocystis 2 (3.9%) were found only in HIV/AIDS groups I. belli, C. parvum, S. stercoralis and Blastocystis are the major opportunistic intestinal parasites observed in HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, early detection and treatment of these parasites are important to improve the quality of life of HIV/AIDS patients with diarrhoea.

  1. Gastrointestinal helminth parasites of pet and stray dogs as a potential risk for human health in Bahir Dar town, north-western Ethiopia

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    Tadiwos Abere

    Full Text Available Aim: A cross-sectional study was carried out from November 2011 to April 2012 to determine the prevalence and species of gastrointestinal (GI helminth parasites in pet and stray dogs as a potential risk for human health in Bahir Dar town, northwestern Ethiopia. Materials and Methods: A total of 384 and 46 faecal samples were collected from pet and stray dogs, respectively and xamined by using standard coprologic techniques. Results: The overall prevalence of GI helminth infection in pet and stray dogs was 75.26 and 84.78%, respectively. The detected parasites with their frequencies in pet dogs were Ancylostoma caninum (78.89%, Toxocara canis (39.79%, Dipylidium caninum (29.75%, Strongyloides stercoralis (29.06%, Taeniidae (23.87% and Trichuris vulpis (7.95%. Stray dogs were found more likely to be polyparasitized and presented higher prevalence of A. caninum, T. canis, S. stercoralis, Trichuris vulpis and Taeniidae (P < 0.05 than domiciled ones. Diphyllobothrium latum was detected only in 10.25% of stray dogs. Toxocara canis and A. caninum (P < 0.05 were detected more frequently in dogs with less than 6 months of age (P <0.05 than old age dogs. The sex or breed groups didn't significantly affect the prevalence of parasites. A significant variation was recorded (P < 0.05 between different feeding systems where higher prevalence was observed in uncontrolled feeding group (82.18% compared to controlled feeding (32.08%. Conclusion: Different gastrointestinal parasites in pet and stray dogs were identified in the study area that can potentially infect humans and cause serious public-health problems. Thus, concerted efforts should therefore be made to educate dog owners to embrace modern dog disease control programs and measures have to be taken on stray dogs. [Vet World 2013; 6(7.000: 388-392

  2. A preliminary study of the prevalence of intestinal parasites in immunocompromised patients with and without gastrointestinal manifestations Frequência de parasitas intestinais em pacientes imunocomprometidos com e sem manifestações gastrointestinais: estudo preliminar

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    Jorge Humberto Botero

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of the intestinal parasites most commonly found in immunocompromised patients. A group of 111 individuals with acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other immunocompromised conditions (principally haematological disorders was selected. A battery of tests was performed on each individual to identify the presence of parasites (three stool specimens with saline solution and Lugol both directly and by concentration, culture and special staining. No significant differences were found among the frequencies of the different parasites with the several types of immunocompromised conditions. The overall frequencies of potentially pathogenic and opportunistic parasites were 32.4% (36/111 and 9% (10/111 respectively, the most frequently encountered among the latter being Cryptosporidium sp., Microsporidia spp. and Strongyloides stercoralis.O objetivo do presente estudo é avaliar a frequência de parasitas intestinais em pacientes com alterações imunológicas. Foram analisadas 111 pessoas com leucemia linfóide aguda (LLA, leucemia mieloide crônica, virus da imunodeficiência humana (VIH e outras doenças, principalmente alterações sanguíneas. Para cada indivíduo foram realizados exames seriados de fezes tanto com solução salina quanto com lugol #3, direto e por concentração, culturas de fezes e colorações específicas. Não houve diferenças significativas na frequência de parasitoses nos distintos grupos avaliados. A frequência de parasitas potencialmente patogênicos foi de 32.4% (36/111 enquanto a de parasitas oportunistas foi de 9.0% (10/111. As espécies mais observadas foram C. parvum, microsporídios spp. e S. stercoralis.

  3. Diagnosing Polyparasitism in a High-Prevalence Setting in Beira, Mozambique: Detection of Intestinal Parasites in Fecal Samples by Microscopy and Real-Time PCR.

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    Lynn Meurs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many different intestinal parasite species can co-occur in the same population. However, classic diagnostic tools can only frame a particular group of intestinal parasite species. Hence, one or two tests do not suffice to provide a complete picture of infecting parasite species in a given population. The present study investigated intestinal parasitic infections in Beira, Mozambique, i.e. in the informal settlement of Inhamudima. Diagnostic accuracy of five classical microscopy techniques and real-time PCR for the detection of a broad spectrum of parasites was compared.A cross-sectional population-based survey was performed. One stool sample per participant (n = 303 was examined by direct smear, formal-ether concentration (FEC, Kato smear, Baermann method, coproculture and real-time PCR. We found that virtually all people (96% harbored at least one helminth, and that almost half (49% harbored three helminths or more. Remarkably, Strongyloides stercoralis infections were widespread with a prevalence of 48%, and Ancylostoma spp. prevalence was higher than that of Necator americanus (25% versus 15%, the hookworm species that is often assumed to prevail in East-Africa. Among the microscopic techniques, FEC was able to detect the broadest spectrum of parasite species. However, FEC also missed a considerable number of infections, notably S. stercoralis, Schistosoma mansoni and G. intestinalis. PCR outperformed microscopy in terms of sensitivity and range of parasite species detected.We showed intestinal parasites-especially helminths-to be omnipresent in Inhamudima, Beira. However, it is a challenge to achieve high diagnostic sensitivity for all species. Classical techniques such as FEC are useful for the detection of some intestinal helminth species, but they lack sensitivity for other parasite species. PCR can detect intestinal parasites more accurately but is generally not feasible in resource-poor settings, at least not in peripheral labs. Hence

  4. Diagnosing Polyparasitism in a High-Prevalence Setting in Beira, Mozambique: Detection of Intestinal Parasites in Fecal Samples by Microscopy and Real-Time PCR.

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    Meurs, Lynn; Polderman, Anton M; Vinkeles Melchers, Natalie V S; Brienen, Eric A T; Verweij, Jaco J; Groosjohan, Bernhard; Mendes, Felisberto; Mechendura, Manito; Hepp, Dagmar H; Langenberg, Marijke C C; Edelenbosch, Rosanne; Polman, Katja; van Lieshout, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    Many different intestinal parasite species can co-occur in the same population. However, classic diagnostic tools can only frame a particular group of intestinal parasite species. Hence, one or two tests do not suffice to provide a complete picture of infecting parasite species in a given population. The present study investigated intestinal parasitic infections in Beira, Mozambique, i.e. in the informal settlement of Inhamudima. Diagnostic accuracy of five classical microscopy techniques and real-time PCR for the detection of a broad spectrum of parasites was compared. A cross-sectional population-based survey was performed. One stool sample per participant (n = 303) was examined by direct smear, formal-ether concentration (FEC), Kato smear, Baermann method, coproculture and real-time PCR. We found that virtually all people (96%) harbored at least one helminth, and that almost half (49%) harbored three helminths or more. Remarkably, Strongyloides stercoralis infections were widespread with a prevalence of 48%, and Ancylostoma spp. prevalence was higher than that of Necator americanus (25% versus 15%), the hookworm species that is often assumed to prevail in East-Africa. Among the microscopic techniques, FEC was able to detect the broadest spectrum of parasite species. However, FEC also missed a considerable number of infections, notably S. stercoralis, Schistosoma mansoni and G. intestinalis. PCR outperformed microscopy in terms of sensitivity and range of parasite species detected. We showed intestinal parasites-especially helminths-to be omnipresent in Inhamudima, Beira. However, it is a challenge to achieve high diagnostic sensitivity for all species. Classical techniques such as FEC are useful for the detection of some intestinal helminth species, but they lack sensitivity for other parasite species. PCR can detect intestinal parasites more accurately but is generally not feasible in resource-poor settings, at least not in peripheral labs. Hence, there is a

  5. [Enteroparasite determination in Lactuca sativa from farms dedicated to its production in Pasto, Colombia].

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    Polo, Giovanni Andrés; Benavides, Carmenza Janneth; Astaiza, Juan Manuel; Vallejo, Dario Antonio; Betancourt, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Currently, vegetables like lettuce are widely recommended as part of the daily diet given their high nutritional value; however, while consumers feel attracted to the benefits provided by the vegetable, they may also be exposed to parasitic intestinal infections. To determine the presence or absence of enteroparasites in lettuce (Lactuca sativa) grown in the rural area in the municipality of Pasto, and to analyze associated factors based on the characterization of the lands. We conducted a descriptive double blind cross-sectional study. We took a total of 105 samples from 21 properties from June to December, 2013, and we processed them by sedimentation and flotation tests. Additionally, the owners were surveyed in order to obtain information about the possible variables influencing the occurrence of enteroparasites. We detected contamination in 100% of the lettuce samples and we found parasite eggs and larvae as follows: 95.25% with Entamoeba spp. cysts; 71.43% with Isospora spp. oocysts; 61.90% with Strongyloides stercoralis larvae (L3); 28.57% with Toxocara spp. eggs, and 4.76% with Eimeria spp. oocysts. Using the chi-square test we found association between Entamoeba spp. and ditches (p=0.008), dogs (p=0.008) and septic tanks (p=0.029); between Isospora spp. and compost (p=0.0001), dogs (p=0.0001) and slugs (p=0.002); between S. stercoralis and handling (p=0.003), and between Toxocara spp. and no use of biodigesters (p= 0.002). We found contamination with enteroparasites in lettuce samples from growing areas in the municipality of Pasto with animal and human sources as their main reservoirs, although others were present in the environment.

  6. Inquérito parasitológico na CECAP, distrito-sede de Botucatu, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil Parasitological survey at CECAP, Botucatu County, S. Paulo State, Brazil

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    Ednir Salata

    1972-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo da prevalência de parasitas intestinais realizado em 370 indivíduos residentes na CECAP, distrito-sede de Botucatu, Estado de São Paulo, permitiu verificar que 41,62% encontravam-se infestados por uma ou mais espécies de parasitas intestinais. Foram encontrados os seguintes parasitas: Entamoeba histolytica 0,54%, E. coli 6,21%, I. butschlii 0,27%, Giardia lamblia 9,72%, Ancylostomidae 5,94%, Strongyloides stercoralis 6,75%, Trichuris trichiura 17,29%, Ascaris lumbricoides 7,56%, Enterobius vermicularis 3,78%, Hymenolepis nana 5,40% e Taenia sp. 1,62%. Apresentam-se dados sobre a distribuição dos parasitas em relação à idade e ao sexo dos indivíduos. O atributo cor não permite maiores considerações por serem os não brancos significantemente pouco numerosos. Dos indivíduos examinados, 25,67% apresentavam apenas uma espécie de parasita e entre as associações parasitárias mais freqüentes encontramos as de Ascaris lumbricoides - Trichuris trichiura e Trichuris trichiura - Giardia lamblia.A parasitological survey among 370 persons was carried out at CECAP, Botucatu County, S. Paulo State, Brazil. It was found that 41.62% of the examinated persons were infected with one or more species of intestinal parasites. The parasite's prevalence was: Entamoeba hystolytica 0.54%, E. coli 6.21%, I. butschlii 0.27%, Giardia lamblia 9.72%, Ancylostomidae 5.94%, Strongyloide stercoralis 6.75%, Trichuris trichiura 17.29%, Ascaris lumbricoides 7.56%, Enterobius vermicularis 3.78%, Hymenolepis nana 5.40% e Taenia sp. 1.62%. Tables are presented showing the distribution of the parasites according to age and sex. Race was not considered because the number of "not white" was significantly low. Of the examinated persons, 25.67% were infected with only one species of parasite and the parasitic associations most frequently found were Ascaris lumbricoides - Trichuris tricriura and Trichuris trichiura - Giardia lamblia.

  7. Enteric parasitic infections in HIV/AIDS patients before and after the highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    Tatiana Paschoalette Rodrigues Bachur

    Full Text Available Enteroparasites are related to gastrointestinal alterations among patients with HIV/AIDS, some causing severe manifestations in the period before the institution of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The prevalence of enteroparasitoses in patients with HIV/AIDS seen at two hospitals in Ceará , Brazil, was compared in the pre-HAART (Group 1; n = 482 and HAART (Group 2; n = 100 eras. Fecal parasitologic examinations (FPE were performed using the direct, Lutz, Baermann-Moraes and modified Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The following parasites were detected in Groups 1 and 2, respectively: Strongyloides stercoralis - 30.1% and 11% (p<0.0001, Ascaris lumbricoides - 15.6% and 2% (p<0.0001, hookworms - 13.7% and 2% (p<0.0001, Trichuris trichiura - 13.1% and 1% (p<0.0001, Hymenolepis nana - 0 and 1% (p = 0.1718, Giardia duodenalis - 7.9% and 1% (p = 0.0076, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar - 3.3% and 1% (p = 0.3301, Isospora belli - 4.8% and 1% (p = 0.0993, Cryptosporidium sp. - 8.1% and 0 (p = 0.0007, and non-pathogenic protozoans as well. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence of enteroparasites between the eras (63.9% to 24%; p<0.0001. In the HAART era, the following observations were made: greater frequency of enteroparasites in patients without antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.0575, as in those with AIDS (p = 0.08, and diarrhea (36% of the patients; lack of association with positive FPE (p = 0.626; and non-detection of Cryptosporidium sp. Strongyloides stercoralis showed an elevated prevalence in the two eras and was more frequent in men (32.41% than women (19.04% of Group 1 (p = 0.018, a finding suggesting the transmission of the helminth through sodomy. The advent of the HAART modified the profile of opportunistic infections, including parasites, probably due to the reconstitution of cellular immunity and the direct action of HAART on the parasites.

  8. Determinación de enteroparásitos en lechuga Lactuca sativa en fincas dedicadas a su producción en Pasto, Nariño, Colombia

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    Giovanni Andrés Polo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Actualmente las verduras, como la lechuga, se recomiendan ampliamente como parte de la dieta diaria por su gran aporte nutricional, sin embargo, los consumidores al sentirse atraídos por los beneficios proporcionados por la hortaliza, están expuestos a infecciones con parásitos intestinales. Objetivo. Determinar la presencia o ausencia de enteroparásitos en la lechuga (Lactuca sativa cultivada en la zona rural de municipio de Pasto y analizar factores asociados previa caracterización de los predios. Materiales y métodos. Se realizó un estudio transversal doble ciego de tipo descriptivo. Se tomaron 105 muestras de 21 predios en el periodo de junio a diciembre de 2013 y se procesaron mediante pruebas de flotación y sedimentación. Adicionalmente, se encuestó a los propietarios para obtener información sobre las posibles variables que influyen en la aparición de enteroparásitos. Resultados. Se encontró contaminación del 100% de las muestras, las cuales presentaban estructuras parasitarias representadas en huevos y larvas correspondientes al 95,25% con quistes de Entamoeba spp., 71,43% con ooquistes de Isospora spp., 61,90% con larvas (L3 de Strongyloides stercoralis, 28,57% con huevos de Toxocara spp. y 4,76% con ooquistes de Eimeria spp. En los factores asociados mediante la prueba de Ji cuadrado, se encontró relación entre Entamoeba spp. con acequia (p= 0,008, perros (p= 0,008 y pozo séptico (p= 0,029 Isospora spp. con compostaje (p= 0,0001, perros (p= 0,0001 y babosas (p=0,002; Strongyloides stercoralis con manipulación (p= 0,003 y Toxocara spp. con el no uso de biodigestores (p= 0,002. Conclusiones. Existe contaminación de la lechuga por enteroparásitos en las áreas de cultivo del municipio de Pasto, los cuales provienen de fuentes animales y humanas como sus principales reservorios, y otros están presentes en el medio ambiente.

  9. Ocorrência de Cryptosporidium spp. e outros parasitas em hortaliças consumidas in natura, no Recife Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and others parasites in vegetables consumed in natura, Recife, Brazil

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    Celiane Gomes Maia da Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a ocorrência de enteroparasitas em hortaliças comercializadas e consumidas em Pernambuco. Foram utilizadas 100 amostras de hortaliças: 40 amostras de alface lisa (Lactuca sativa, 40 de agrião (Nasturtium officinale e 20 de acelga (Beta vulgaris, provenientes de feiras livres e supermercados. A detecção de Cryptosporidium spp. foi realizada conforme Monge e Arias sendo utilizado dois métodos de coloração, Koster modificado e Ziehl-Nielsen. Foi usada a técnica de sedimentação espontânea de Gelli et al. para a análise parasitológica. As análises de coliformes totais e Escherichia coli foram realizadas de acordo com Andrews. Os resultados obtidos mostraram um percentual de contaminação parasitária em 60% de alface, 30% de agrião e 20% de acelga, destacando-se o Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis e Ancylostoma duodenale dentre os helmintos, e o Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba coli e o complexo Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba díspar, dentre os protozoários com maior freqüência. As hortaliças mais contaminadas por coliformes totais e Escherichia coli foram alface nas amostras de supermercado e agrião em feira livre. Esses dados sugerem a necessidade da adoção de medidas educativas aos produtores, e do monitoramento das águas destinadas à irrigação das hortas.The study was carried with the aim to evaluate the occurrence of enteroparasites in vegetables commercialized and consumed in natural form in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Horticultural samples purchased from supermarket and free market: 40 from lettuce (Lactuca sativa, 40 from watercress (Nasturtium officinale and 20 from chard (Beta vulgaris were analyzed. Cryptosporidium spp. detection was realized following Monge and Arias methodology, using two staining processes (Koster modified and Ziehl-Nielsen. Parasitological analysis was determined by the spontaneous sedimentation technique (Gelli et al., and total

  10. Kontaminasi Telur Cacing pada Sayur dan Upaya Pencegahannya

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    Hebert Adrianto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Infeksi cacing merupakan permasalahan yang banyak ditemukan di negara berkembang dan belum tuntas diselesaikan. Sayur lalapan dapat menjadi media penularan telur cacing ke manusia. Tujuan tulisan ini adalah mengidentifikasi jenis telur cacing yang ditemukan pada sayuran dan upaya pencegahan menurut siklus hidup cacing tersebut. Tulisan ini mengkaji 4 jurnal penelitian Indonesia, 22 jurnal penelitian internasional, website WHO, dan buku teks yang relevan dengan topik kajian. Hasil kajian menunjukkan jenis telur cacing yang ditemukan pada sayuran tidak hanya Nematoda Soil Transmitted Helminth (STH seperti Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, dan Strongyloides stercoralis, tetapi juga Nematoda lainnya (Trichostrongylus, Toxocara, Trichocephal, dan Enterobius vermicularis, kelompok cacing Cestoda (Taenia spp., Hymenolepis nana, dan H. diminuta, kelompok Trematoda (Heterophyes heterophyes, Clonorchis sinensis, Fasciola, dan Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Setiap spesies cacing memiliki siklus hidup dan hospes perantara yang berbeda. Upaya pencegahan untuk menghindari risiko infeksi memerlukan kerja sama lintas program, lintas sektor, dan masyarakat dengan memperhatikan siklus hidup cacing. Kata kunci: sayur, telur cacing, pencegahan, kerjasama ABSTRACTHelminth infections are the most common infections in developing countries and still need to be eradicated. Fresh vegetables can be the source for transmission of helminth egg to humans. The aims of this paper are to identify the types of helminth egg which found in vegetables and prevention efforts according to the helminth life cycle. A literature review was arranged by review of 4 articles Indonesian research journal, 22 articles non Indonesia research journal, WHO website, and textbooks relevant to the study topic. The paper describes list of helminth eggs in vegetables, environmental, behaviors, and host-related helminth analyzes in vegetables

  11. IMPORTANT NEMATODE INFECTIONS IN INDONESIA

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    Sri Oemijati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available At least 13 species of intestinal nematodes and 4 species of blood and tissue nematodes have been reported infecting man in Indonesia. Five species of intestinal nematodes are very common and highly prevalent, especially in the rural areas and slums of the big cities. Those species are Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura and Oxyuris vermicularis, while Strongyloides stercoralis is disappearing. The prevalence of the soil transmitted helminths differs from place to place, depending on many factors such as the type of soil, human behaviour etc. Three species of lymph dwelling filarial worms are known to be endemic, the urban Wuchereria bancrofti is low endemic in Jakarta and a few other cities along the north coast of Java, with Culex incriminated as vector, high endemicity is found in Irian Jaya, where Anopheline mosquitoes act as vectors. Brugia malayi is widely distributed and is still highly endemic in many areas. The zoonotic type is mainly endemic in swampy areas, and has many species of Mansonia mosquitoes as vectors. B.timori so far has been found only in the south eastern part of the archipelago and has Anopheles barbirostris as vector. Human infections with animal parasites have been diagnosed properly only when adult stages were found either in autopsies or removed tissues. Cases of infections with A. caninum, A.braziliense, A.ceylanicum, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, T.axei and Oesophagostomum apiostomum have been desribed from autopsies, while infections with Gnathostoma spiningerum have been reported from removed tissues. Infections with the larval stages such as VLM, eosinophylic meningitis, occult filanasis and other could only be suspected, since the diagnosis was extremely difficult and based on the finding and identification of the parasite. Many cases of creeping eruption which might be caused by the larval stages of A.caninum and A.braziliense and Strongyloides stercoralis

  12. Intestinal parasitic infections in HIV infected and non-infected patients in a low HIV prevalence region, West-Cameroon.

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    Céline Nguefeu Nkenfou

    Full Text Available The magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several tropical diseases. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Cameroon. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Dschang -Cameroon. Stool and blood specimens from HIV/AIDS patients and control group were screened respectively for intestinal parasites and for HIV antibodies. Intestinal parasites were identified using direct microscopy, formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl Neelsen methods. Out of 396 participants recruited among patients consulting at hospital, 42 (10.6% were HIV positive, thirty of them treatment naïve. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 14.64%. Out of 42 HIV/AIDS patients, 59.5% (25/42 were infected with intestinal parasites, while only 9.32% (33/354 of the HIV negative patients were infected with intestinal parasites. The parasites detected in our study population included Crystosporidium parvum (2.53%, Entamoeba histolytica (7.52%, Entamoeba coli (4.04%, Giardia lamblia (0.25%, Trichuris trichura (0.25%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25% and Taenia spp. (0.25%. In the HIV infected group, Crystosporidium parvum (19.04%, Entamoeba histolytica (19.04%, Entamoeba coli (21.42%, Giardia lamblia (2.38%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25% and Taenia spp. (0.25% were found. Crystosporidium parvum was found to be significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients than in controls (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that the HIV status and the quality of water were the major risk factors for intestinal parasitosis. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the HIV patients by contributing in reducing morbidity and improving the efficiency of antiretroviral treatment. Even after the introduction

  13. Control of parasitic infections among school children in the peri-urban area of Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil

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    Regina Coeli Cunha Dórea

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Tide prevalence of intestinal parasitosis ivas investigated in a primaiy school located in Rubiâo Júnior, a peri-urban district of Botucatu, São Paulo slate, Brazil, in order to assess the effect of treatment and practical measures of prophylaxis in the control of parasitic infections among 7-to- 18-year-old school children of a low socio-economic status. The first series of parasitological examinations included 219 school children, ef which 123 (56.1 % were found to be infected with one or more parasite species. Eighty- four children canying pathogenic parasites were submitted to various anti-parasitic treatment schedules. We re-evaluated 15 (89 % students after 4 to 6 months post- chemotherapy. The results indicate that the combination of treatment with prophylactic measures has been successful in the control of parasitic infections, since reinfection rates were generally low ( 73-1 % in children infected with most parasite species. The reasons for the apparent failure in the control of infections caused by Hymenolepis nana and Strongyloides stercoralis are discussed.Prôcedeu-se o estudo da prevalência de enteroparasitoses entre escolares de 7 a 18 anos, de condições sõcio-econômicas baixas e residentes no distritoperi-urbano de Rubião Júnior, município de Botucatu, São Paulo, com o objetivo de analisar o papel de medidas profiláticas e terapêuticas no controle das parasitoses diagnosticadas. Dos 219 alunos estudados na primeira avaliação parasitolõgica, 123 (56.1% mostraram-se positivos para unia ou mais parasitoses. O tratamento foi aplicado para 84 escolares, por serem estes portadores de parasitos patogênicos. A segunda avaliação parasitolõgica foi realizada 4 a 6 meses após o tratamento em 75 (89% escolares. Os resultados indicam que o uso combinado do tratamento e medidas profiláticas foi capaz de limitar a ocorrência de novas infecções para níveis 73-1% foram encontradas para a maioria das parasitoses, exceto

  14. intestinal nematodes of medical importance in Colombia: a solved problem? Nemátodos intestinales de importancia médica en Colombia: ¿un problema resuelto?

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    Nora A. Zuluaga Espinosa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasites, in general, constitute a great worldwide, public health problem. Of them, nematodes are among the most outstanding in Colombia. Because these parasites can enter into the organism either by ingestion or through the skin, faulty hygienic-sanitary habits facilitate their transmission and conservation. Among nematodosis the more frequent in Colombia are those caused by Ascaris lumbricoides (roundworm, Trichuris trichiura (whipworm, hookworms (Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale and Strongyloides stercoralis. When the burden of these parasites is considerably high and/or is accompanied by alterations in host defenses, complications can take place that seriously affect health. Presently it is known that pharmacological control of these nematodosis is effective and safe. Nevertheless, without selfcare, and maintenance of good hygienic-sanitary conditions, their eradication will not be feasible. This review of outstanding aspects of nematodosis, with emphasis on their biology, physiopathology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and some epidemiologic data, intends to update physicians as a basis for adequate management of this problem. Las enteroparasitosis, en general, constituyen un gran problema de salud pública en el mundo. De éstas, las nematodosis figuran entre las más destacadas en Colombia. Debido a que estos parásitos pueden ingresar al organismo por vía oral o por la piel, los hábitos higiénico-sanitarios deficientes, entre ellos el fecalismo, facilitan su transmisión y conservación. Entre las nematodosis más prevalentes en nuestro país tenemos aquéllas causadas por Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura (tricocéfalo, uncinarias (Necator americanus y Ancylostoma duodenale y Strongyloides stercoralis. Cuando la carga de dichos parásitos es considerablemente alta o se acompaña de alteraciones en las defensas del hospedero, se pueden producir complicaciones que comprometen seriamente

  15. Economic Analysis of the Impact of Overseas and Domestic Treatment and Screening Options for Intestinal Helminth Infection among US-Bound Refugees from Asia.

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    Brian Maskery

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many U.S.-bound refugees travel from countries where intestinal parasites (hookworm, Trichuris trichuria, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis are endemic. These infections are rare in the United States and may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed, leading to potentially serious consequences. This evaluation examined the costs and benefits of combinations of overseas presumptive treatment of parasitic diseases vs. domestic screening/treating vs. no program.An economic decision tree model terminating in Markov processes was developed to estimate the cost and health impacts of four interventions on an annual cohort of 27,700 U.S.-bound Asian refugees: 1 "No Program," 2 U.S. "Domestic Screening and Treatment," 3 "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin" presumptive treatment, and 4 "Overseas Albendazole and Domestic Screening for Strongyloides". Markov transition state models were used to estimate long-term effects of parasitic infections. Health outcome measures (four parasites included outpatient cases, hospitalizations, deaths, life years, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs.The "No Program" option is the least expensive ($165,923 per cohort and least effective option (145 outpatient cases, 4.0 hospitalizations, and 0.67 deaths discounted over a 60-year period for a one-year cohort. The "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin" option ($418,824 is less expensive than "Domestic Screening and Treatment" ($3,832,572 or "Overseas Albendazole and Domestic Screening for Strongyloides" ($2,182,483. According to the model outcomes, the most effective treatment option is "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin," which reduces outpatient cases, deaths and hospitalization by around 80% at an estimated net cost of $458,718 per death averted, or $2,219/$24,036 per QALY/life year gained relative to "No Program".Overseas presumptive treatment for U.S.-bound refugees is a cost-effective intervention that is less expensive and at least as effective as

  16. Economic Analysis of the Impact of Overseas and Domestic Treatment and Screening Options for Intestinal Helminth Infection among US-Bound Refugees from Asia.

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    Maskery, Brian; Coleman, Margaret S; Weinberg, Michelle; Zhou, Weigong; Rotz, Lisa; Klosovsky, Alexander; Cantey, Paul T; Fox, LeAnne M; Cetron, Martin S; Stauffer, William M

    2016-08-01

    Many U.S.-bound refugees travel from countries where intestinal parasites (hookworm, Trichuris trichuria, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis) are endemic. These infections are rare in the United States and may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed, leading to potentially serious consequences. This evaluation examined the costs and benefits of combinations of overseas presumptive treatment of parasitic diseases vs. domestic screening/treating vs. no program. An economic decision tree model terminating in Markov processes was developed to estimate the cost and health impacts of four interventions on an annual cohort of 27,700 U.S.-bound Asian refugees: 1) "No Program," 2) U.S. "Domestic Screening and Treatment," 3) "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin" presumptive treatment, and 4) "Overseas Albendazole and Domestic Screening for Strongyloides". Markov transition state models were used to estimate long-term effects of parasitic infections. Health outcome measures (four parasites) included outpatient cases, hospitalizations, deaths, life years, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The "No Program" option is the least expensive ($165,923 per cohort) and least effective option (145 outpatient cases, 4.0 hospitalizations, and 0.67 deaths discounted over a 60-year period for a one-year cohort). The "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin" option ($418,824) is less expensive than "Domestic Screening and Treatment" ($3,832,572) or "Overseas Albendazole and Domestic Screening for Strongyloides" ($2,182,483). According to the model outcomes, the most effective treatment option is "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin," which reduces outpatient cases, deaths and hospitalization by around 80% at an estimated net cost of $458,718 per death averted, or $2,219/$24,036 per QALY/life year gained relative to "No Program". Overseas presumptive treatment for U.S.-bound refugees is a cost-effective intervention that is less expensive and at least as effective as domestic

  17. A Retrospective Analysis of the Results of a Five-Year (2005-2009) Parasitological Examination for Common Intestinal Parasites from Bale-Robe Health Center, Robe Town, Southeastern Ethiopia.

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    Chala, Bayissa

    2013-01-01

    A cross-sectional retrospective survey using the past five years clinical records (2005-2009) was conducted. The study was aimed at assessing the status of common intestinal parasites from Bale-Robe Health Center, Southeastern Ethiopia, in 2009/2010. The survey involved collection of data recorded on intestinal parasite from the health center during 2005-2009. Precoded questionnaires and interviews were also supplemented for knowledge attitude practices survey (KAPs survey) to assess awareness level of treatment seekers. Analysis of the various associations and strength of significant variations among qualitative and quantitative variables were assessed. The results revealed that Entamoeba histolytica (36.1%) and Giardia lamblia (11.0%), both being protozoan parasites were found to be the most prevalent intestinal parasites encountered during 2005-2009. The least prevalent intestinal parasite recorded was Strongyloides stercoralis (1.1%). Most intestinal parasites were detected among age group of 15 years and above than 0-4 and 5-14 years as shown in Table 4. There was a significant correlation between intestinal parasites prevalence and the age of treatment seeking individuals (P parasites in the area.

  18. Non-biting cyclorrhaphan flies (Diptera) as carriers of intestinal human parasites in slum areas of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

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    Getachew, Sisay; Gebre-Michael, Teshome; Erko, Berhanu; Balkew, Meshesha; Medhin, Girmay

    2007-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the role of non-biting cyclorrhaphan flies as carriers of intestinal parasites in slum areas of Addis Ababa from January 2004 to June 2004. A total of 9550 flies, comprising of at least seven species were collected from four selected sites and examined for human intestinal parasites using the formol-ether concentration method. The dominant fly species was Chrysomya rufifacies (34.9%) followed by Musca domestica (31%), Musca sorbens (20.5.%), Lucina cuprina (6.8%), Sarcophaga sp. (2.8%), Calliphora vicina (2.2%) and Wohlfahrtia sp. (1.8%). Six intestinal helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworms, Hymenolepis nana, Taenia spp. and Strongyloides stercoralis) and at least four protozoan parasites (Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Entamoeba coli, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium sp.) were isolated from both the external and gut contents of the flies. A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura among the helminths and E. histolytica/dispar and E. coli among the protozoans were the dominant parasites detected both on the external and in the gut contents of the flies, but occurring more in the latter. Among the flies, C. rufifacies and M. sorbens were the highest carriers of the helminth and protozoan parasites, respectively. The public health significance of these findings is highlighted.

  19. Cross-Sectional Study on the Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Risk Factors in Teda Health Centre, Northwest Ethiopia.

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    Abate, Abraraw; Kibret, Biniam; Bekalu, Eylachew; Abera, Sendeku; Teklu, Takele; Yalew, Aregawi; Endris, Mengistu; Worku, Ligabaw; Tekeste, Zinaye

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection and associated risk factors in Teda Health Centre, Northwest Ethiopia. Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Teda Health Centre from February to April, 2011. Stool samples were collected from 410 study participants and analysed by direct wet mount and formal ether concentration techniques. Furthermore, sociodemographic data were collected by using standardized questionnaire. Result. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in this study was 62.3%. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most predominant parasite (23.2%) followed by Giardia intestinalis (12.4%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (4.6%), Schistosoma mansoni (8.9%), hookworm (6.6%), Hymenolepis nana (1.5%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.4%), and Strongyloides stercoralis (0.2%). Absence of toilet and hand washing after toilet was shown to be associated with intestinal parasitic infection (P intestinal parasitic infection in the study area. Absence of toilet and hand washing after toilet was found to be associated with intestinal parasitic infection. Therefore, there is a need for integrated control programme to have a lasting impact on transmission of intestinal parasitic infection.

  20. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and associated risk factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care center at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, northwest Ethiopia.

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    Derso, Adane; Nibret, Endalkachew; Munshea, Abaineh

    2016-09-30

    Parasitic infections affect tens of millions of pregnant women worldwide, and directly or indirectly lead to a spectrum of adverse maternal and fetal/placental effects. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections and associated risk factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care center in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahir Dar city, northwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted from November 2013 to January 2014 among 384 pregnant women. Stool samples were examined for the presence of trophozoites, cysts, oocysts, and ova using direct, formal-ether sedimentation, and modified Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. An overall prevalence of 31.5 % intestinal parasite infections was recorded. Eight different species of intestinal parasites were found: two protozoan and six helminth species. The highest prevalence was due to Giardia lamblia (13.3 %) followed by Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (7.8 %), hookworm (5.5 %), Ascaris lumbricoides (2.9 %), Schistosoma mansoni (2.9 %), Strongyloides stercoralis (1.6 %), Taenia spp. (0.8 %), and Hymenolepis nana (0.3 %). A relatively high prevalence of intestinal parasite infections was observed among pregnant women. Routine stool examination and provision of health education are required for early medical intervention that would affect the pregnant mothers and their foetuses.

  1. Malnutrition and intestinal parasitic infections in school children of Gondar, North West Ethiopia.

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    Worku, Netsanet; Erko, Berhanu; Torben, Workineh; Belay, Mulugeta; Kasssu, Afework; Fetene, Teshome; Huruy, Kahsay

    2009-01-01

    In developing countries, malnutrition is a considerable health problem with prevalence ranges of 4-46%, with 1-10% severely malnourished. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and intestinal parasitoses and identify risk factors of malnutrition in schoolchildren. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 322 schoolchildren, of age 6 to 14 years, attending private and government primary schools, in Gonder town, North West Ethiopia. The study was conducted from December 2006 to February 2007. Nutritional status of these children was determined using anthropometric parameters (weight-for-age, height-for-age and weight-for-height). Epi Info 2000 software was used to evaluate anthropometric results of each individual and formol-ether concentration technique was employed to identify parasites. The prevalence of underweight, stunting, wasting and intestinal parasitoses was 34.8%, 27%, 50% and 55.6%, respectively. Parasites encountered during the study were Ascaris lumbricoides (17.8%), Trichuiris trichiura (3.4%), hookworm (4.3%), Giardia lamblia (9%), Entamoeba histolytica (2.1%), Schistosoma mansoni (2.4%), Hymenolepis nana (4.7%) and Enterobius vermicularis (0.31%), respectively, in single infections. Only two cases of Strongyloides stercoralis was found in multiple infections and none in single infections. The prevalence of multiple parasitoses was 10.9%. Maternal literacy status, sex and age of the child were significantly associated with malnutrition (p intestinal parasitoses in children of the study area.

  2. Dogs, cats, parasites, and humans in Brazil: opening the black box

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    2014-01-01

    Dogs and cats in Brazil serve as primary hosts for a considerable number of parasites, which may affect their health and wellbeing. These may include endoparasites (e.g., protozoa, cestodes, trematodes, and nematodes) and ectoparasites (i.e., fleas, lice, mites, and ticks). While some dog and cat parasites are highly host-specific (e.g., Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Felicola subrostratus for cats, and Angiostrongylus vasorum and Trichodectes canis for dogs), others may easily switch to other hosts, including humans. In fact, several dog and cat parasites (e.g., Toxoplasma gondii, Dipylidium caninum, Ancylostoma caninum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara canis) are important not only from a veterinary perspective but also from a medical standpoint. In addition, some of them (e.g., Lynxacarus radovskyi on cats and Rangelia vitalii in dogs) are little known to most veterinary practitioners working in Brazil. This article is a compendium on dog and cat parasites in Brazil and a call for a One Health approach towards a better management of some of these parasites, which may potentially affect humans. Practical aspects related to the diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases of dogs and cats in Brazil are discussed. PMID:24423244

  3. [The effect of ivermectin on geohelminth frequency (i.e. as used in the onchocerciasis control program in Colombia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Angélica; Ariza, Yoseth; López, Myriam C; Fajardo, Oscar S; Reyes, Patricia; Moncada, Ligia I; Duque, Sofía; Álvarez, Carlos A; Nicholls, Rubén S

    2012-08-01

    Evaluating the effect of ivermectin on soil-transmitted helminthes (STH) infection frequency in a Colombian population included in the Onchocerciasis Elimination Program for the Americas (OEPA). This was an impact evaluation study which adopted a longitudinal approach using the population of Naicioná (1996) as baseline for comparison to people from the same population as controls (2008). The cross-sectional approach involved comparing the reference population of Naicioná (2008) to the population of Dos Quebradas (2008) used as controls. Fecal samples were processed by a modified Ritchie-Frick method. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most frequently found parasite in Naicioná (60/121; 49.6 %: 37.8-63.895%CI) and in Dos Quebradas (36/76; 47.4 %: 33.2-65.6 95 % CI). Ivermectin's main effect on the population aged over 5 years was a decreased risk of Trichiuris trichiura infection in both longitudinal assessment (86 % reduction: 74-93 95 % CI) and cross-sectional assessment (63 %:24-82 95 % CI). A 93 % reduction (45-99 95 % CI) in Strongyloides stercoralis frequency was found in longitudinal assessment, compared to 85 % in cross-sectional assessment (-031-99 95 % CI). Ivermectin use in the OEPA is not sufficient for STH morbidity control. Integrated programs including education and basic sanitation are required.

  4. Decreasing Intestinal Parasites in Recent Northern California Refugees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alicia H.; Perry, Sharon; Du, Jenny N. T.; Agunbiade, Abdulkareem; Polesky, Andrea; Parsonnet, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expanded the overseas presumptive treatment of intestinal parasites with albendazole to include refugees from the Middle East. We surveyed the prevalence of helminths and protozoa in recent Middle Eastern refugees (2008–2010) in comparison with refugees from other geographical regions and from a previous survey (2001–2004) in Santa Clara County, California. Based on stool microscopy, helminth infections decreased, particularly in Middle Eastern refugees (0.1% versus 2.3% 2001–2004, P = 0.01). Among all refugees, Giardia intestinalis was the most common protozoan found. Protozoa infections also decreased somewhat in Middle Eastern refugees (7.2%, 2008–2010 versus 12.9%, 2001–2004, P = 0.08). Serology for Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma spp. identified more infected individuals than stool exams. Helminth infections are increasingly rare in refugees to Northern California. Routine screening stool microscopy may be unnecessary in all refugees. PMID:23149583

  5. Influence of helminth infections on childhood nutritional status in lowland Bolivia.

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    Tanner, S; Leonard, W R; McDade, T W; Reyes-Garcia, V; Godoy, R; Huanca, T

    2009-01-01

    Infectious disease, such as diarrheal disease, respiratory infections, and parasitic infections, are an important source of nutritional and energetic stress in many populations. Inspired by the research and methodological innovations of A. Roberto Frisancho, this work considers the impact of childhood environment and local disease ecology on child health and nutritional patterns among an indigenous group in lowland Bolivia. Specifically, we examine the association between soil-transmitted helminth infection, especially hookworm species, and anthropometric markers of short- and long-term nutritional status. Fecal samples, anthropometric dimensions, and health interviews were collected for 92 children ranging in age from 2.0 to 10.9 years. Microscopic examination revealed high levels of parasitic infection, with 76% of children positive for hookworm species infections (77% of girls and 74% of boys). Less common infections included Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichurius trichiura, and Strongyloides stercoralis with only 15% of children positive for multiple-species infections. After adjusting for sex and age, no statistically significant associations were observed between helminth infections and the frequency of reported illness or anthropometric measures of nutritional status. These data demonstrate the difficulty of assessing nutritional impacts of endemic infections.

  6. A Survey of Intestinal Parasites of Domestic Dogs in Central Queensland

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    Simone Gillespie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia has a very high rate of dog ownership, which in some circumstances may lead to exposure to zoonotic parasitic diseases from those companion animals. Domestic dog faecal samples (n = 300 were collected from public spaces and private property in the greater Rockhampton (Central Queensland region and tested for intestinal helminths and protozoa by direct microscopy, two flotation methods and a modified acid-fast stain for cryptosporidia. Intestinal parasites detected included hookworms (25%, Cystoisospora ohioensis complex (9%, Blastocystis hominis (3%, Giardia duodenalis (3%, Spirometra erinacei (1% and Toxocara canis (1%, Sarcocystis spp. (2%, Cryptosporidium spp. (2% and Cystoisospora canis (1%. One infection each with Trichuris vulpis, Dipylidium caninum and a protozoa belonging to the Entamoeba histolytica complex were identified. Sheather’s sucrose centrifugal flotation was more sensitive than saturated salt passive flotation, but no single test detected all cases of parasitic infection identified. The test methodologies employed are poor at recovering larva of Strongyloides stercoralis, Aleurostrongylus abstrussis and eggs of cestodes such as Echinococcus granulosis, so the potential presence of these parasites in Central Queensland domestic dogs cannot be excluded by this survey alone.

  7. Gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Brazil: frequency and zoonotic risk.

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    Monteiro, Maria Fernanda Melo; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Calado, Andréa Maria Campos; Lima, Victor Fernando Santana; Ramos, Ingrid Carla do Nascimento; Tenório, Rodrigo Ferreira Lima; Faustino, Maria Aparecida da Glória; Alves, Leucio Câmara

    2016-04-12

    Gastrointestinal helminths are considered to be the most common parasites affecting cats worldwide. Correct diagnosis of these parasites in animals living in urban areas is pivotal, especially considering the zoonotic potential of some species (e.g. Ancylostoma sp. and Toxocara sp.). In this study, a copromicroscopic survey was conducted using fecal samples (n = 173) from domestic cats living in the northeastern region of Brazil. Samples were examined through the FLOTAC technique and the overall results showed positivity of 65.31% (113/173) among the samples analyzed. Coinfections were observed in 46.01% (52/113) of the positive samples. The most common parasites detected were Ancylostoma sp., Toxocara cati, Strongyloides stercoralis, Trichuris sp., Dipylidium caninum and Cystoisospora sp. From an epidemiological point of view, these findings are important, especially considering that zoonotic parasites (e.g. Ancylostoma sp. and Toxocara sp.) were the nematodes most frequently diagnosed in this study. Therefore, the human population living in close contact with cats is at risk of infection caused by the zoonotic helminths of these animals. In addition, for the first time the FLOTAC has been used to diagnosing gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Brazil.

  8. Canine Fecal Contamination in a Metropolitan Area (Milan, North-Western Italy): Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Evaluation of Health Risks

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    Zanzani, Sergio Aurelio; Di Cerbo, Anna Rita; Gazzonis, Alessia Libera; Genchi, Marco; Rinaldi, Laura; Musella, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal parasites of dogs represent a serious threat to human health due to their zoonotic potential. Thus, metropolitan areas presenting high concentrations of pets and urban fecal contamination on public areas are at sanitary risk. Major aim of this survey was to determine prevalence of zoonotic parasites in dog fecal samples collected from public soil of Milan (north-western Italy). Differences in parasites prevalence distribution were explored by a geographical information system- (GIS-) based approach, and risk factors (human density, sizes of green parks, and dog areas) were considered. The metropolitan area was divided into 157 rectangular subareas and sampling was performed following a 1-kilometer straight transect. A total of 463 fecal samples were analyzed using centrifugation-flotation technique and ELISA to detect Giardia and Cryptosporidium coproantigens. A widespread fecal contamination of soil was highlighted, being fecal samples found in 86.8% of the subareas considered. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 16.63%. Zoonotic parasites were found, such as Trichuris vulpis (3.67%), Toxocara canis (1.72%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.86%), Ancylostomatidae (0.43%), and Dipylidium caninum (0.43%). Giardia duodenalis was the most prevalent zoonotic protozoa (11.06%), followed by Cryptosporidium (1.10%). Faeces from subareas characterized by broad green areas showed to be particularly prone to infection. PMID:25478583

  9. Gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Brazil: frequency and zoonotic risk

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    Maria Fernanda Melo Monteiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal helminths are considered to be the most common parasites affecting cats worldwide. Correct diagnosis of these parasites in animals living in urban areas is pivotal, especially considering the zoonotic potential of some species (e.g. Ancylostoma sp. and Toxocarasp.. In this study, a copromicroscopic survey was conducted using fecal samples (n = 173 from domestic cats living in the northeastern region of Brazil. Samples were examined through the FLOTAC technique and the overall results showed positivity of 65.31% (113/173 among the samples analyzed. Coinfections were observed in 46.01% (52/113 of the positive samples. The most common parasites detected were Ancylostoma sp., Toxocara cati, Strongyloides stercoralis,Trichuris sp., Dipylidium caninum andCystoisospora sp. From an epidemiological point of view, these findings are important, especially considering that zoonotic parasites (e.g. Ancylostoma sp. and Toxocara sp. were the nematodes most frequently diagnosed in this study. Therefore, the human population living in close contact with cats is at risk of infection caused by the zoonotic helminths of these animals. In addition, for the first time the FLOTAC has been used to diagnosing gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Brazil.

  10. Canine Fecal Contamination in a Metropolitan Area (Milan, North-Western Italy: Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Evaluation of Health Risks

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    Sergio Aurelio Zanzani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasites of dogs represent a serious threat to human health due to their zoonotic potential. Thus, metropolitan areas presenting high concentrations of pets and urban fecal contamination on public areas are at sanitary risk. Major aim of this survey was to determine prevalence of zoonotic parasites in dog fecal samples collected from public soil of Milan (north-western Italy. Differences in parasites prevalence distribution were explored by a geographical information system- (GIS- based approach, and risk factors (human density, sizes of green parks, and dog areas were considered. The metropolitan area was divided into 157 rectangular subareas and sampling was performed following a 1-kilometer straight transect. A total of 463 fecal samples were analyzed using centrifugation-flotation technique and ELISA to detect Giardia and Cryptosporidium coproantigens. A widespread fecal contamination of soil was highlighted, being fecal samples found in 86.8% of the subareas considered. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 16.63%. Zoonotic parasites were found, such as Trichuris vulpis (3.67%, Toxocara canis (1.72%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.86%, Ancylostomatidae (0.43%, and Dipylidium caninum (0.43%. Giardia duodenalis was the most prevalent zoonotic protozoa (11.06%, followed by Cryptosporidium (1.10%. Faeces from subareas characterized by broad green areas showed to be particularly prone to infection.

  11. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and Other Gastrointestinal Parasites in Domestic Cats from Households in Thika Region, Kenya

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    Adele Nyambura Njuguna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GIT parasites of domestic cats (Felis catus not only cause morbidity but are also potential zoonotic agents. The current study aimed at establishing the prevalence of GIT parasites in cats kept by households in Thika region, Kenya. Fecal samples were collected randomly from 103 cats and analyzed for presence of parasites using standard parasitological methods. In descending order, the prevalence of the detected protozoa parasites was Isospora spp. 43.7% (95% CI: 40.4–47%, Cryptosporidium spp. 40.8% (95% CI: 37.5–44.1%, Toxoplasma gondii 7.8% (95% CI: 4.5–11.1%, and Entamoeba spp. 2.9% (95% CI: 1.6–6.2%. The prevalence of the observed helminths was Strongyloides stercoralis 43.7% (95% CI: 40.4–47%, Toxocara cati 23.3% (95% CI: 20–26.6%, Ancylostoma spp. 9.7% (95% CI: 6.4–13%, Dipylidium caninum 8.7% (95% CI: 5.4–12.0%, and Acanthocephala spp. 1.9% (95% CI: 1–4.2%. The percentage of cats excreting at least one species of parasite was 73.2% (95% CI = 69.9–76.5%. The study shows that the cats have high spectrum (9 of parasites which are known to affect the cat’s health and some are of zoonotic significance.

  12. Public health importance of non-biting cyclorrhaphan flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetene, Teshome; Worku, Netsanet

    2009-02-01

    This study was carried out to determine the role of non-biting cyclorrhaphan flies as carriers of human intestinal parasites at Woreta, northwestern Ethiopia. In total, 6530 flies were collected from four breeding sites and then examined for human intestinal parasites, mainly using the formol-ether concentration method. Fly species identified were Musca domestica (32.9%), Chrysomya rufifacies (32.6%), Musca sorbens (23%), Lucina cuprina (4.7%), Calliphora vicina (2.8%), Chrysomya bezziana (2.3%) and Wohlfahrtia magnifica (1.7%). Intestinal parasites such as Ascaris lumbricoides (36.9%), Trichuris trichiura (38.8%), hookworm (13.0%), Hymenolepis nana (0.6%), Taenia spp. (8.4%), Strongyloides stercoralis (1.7%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (48.1%), Entamoeba coli (24.7%), Cryptosporidium spp. (16.7%) and Giardia lamblia (10.4%) were isolated from both external and gut contents of the flies. Trichuris trichiura and A. lumbricoides among the helminths and E. histolytica/dispar and E. coli among the protozoans were the dominant parasites identified. It was observed that more parasites were isolated from gut contents than the external surfaces of the flies examined (PChrysomya rufifacies were found to carry more helminths than M. sorbens and M. domestica. Musca sorbens were the highest carriers of protozoan parasites followed by M. domestica and C. rufifacies. The significance of filth flies as carriers of human intestinal parasites has been highlighted.

  13. Rapid Re-Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths after Triple-Dose Albendazole Treatment of School-Aged Children in Yunnan, People's Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Peiling; Du, Zun-Wei; Wu, Fang-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Yong; Chen, Ran; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Hattendorf, Jan; Utzinger, Jürg; Steinmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Post-treatment soil-transmitted helminth re-infection patterns were studied as part of a randomized controlled trial among school-aged children from an ethnic minority group in Yunnan province, People's Republic of China. Children with a soil-transmitted helminth infection (N = 194) were randomly assigned to triple-dose albendazole or placebo and their infection status monitored over a 6-month period using the Kato-Katz and Baermann techniques. Baseline prevalence of Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, and Strongyloides stercoralis were 94.5%, 93.3%, 61.3%, and 3.1%, respectively, with more than half of the participants harboring triple-species infections. For the intervention group (N = 99), the 1-month post-treatment cure rates were 96.7%, 91.5%, and 19.6% for hookworm, A. lumbricoides, and T. trichiura, respectively. Egg reduction rates were above 88% for all three species. Rapid re-infection with A. lumbricoides was observed: the prevalence 4 and 6 months post-treatment was 75.8% and 83.8%, respectively. Re-infection with hookworm and T. trichiura was considerably slower. PMID:23690551

  14. Intestinal parasites in cancer patients in the South of Brazil

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    S. Jeske

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intestinal parasitic infections in immunocompromised patients can lead to serious complications when not diagnosed and treated early. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of intestinal parasites in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy in the South of Brazil. Three fecal samples collected from each patient (73 individuals were processed by Ritchie and Faust techniques and submitted to specific staining methods for intestinal protozoa. A 61.6% parasite and/or commensal positivity was found. Helminths identified were Ascaris lumbricoides (33.3%, Taenia spp. (6.6%, Strongyloides stercoralis (4.4% and Trichuris trichiura (2.2%. Among protozoans, Giardia lamblia (26.6%, Cryptosporidium spp. (13.3% and Cystoisospora belli (4.4% were identified. The presence of Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana and Entamoeba hartmanni was also recorded. The results obtained warn of the importance of fecal parasitological diagnosis and the use of specific staining methods for the detection of intestinal parasites in cancer patients. These exams should be regularly requested at the patient’s first clinic visit, given the high prevalence found in this study and the possible severity of such conditions for these individuals.

  15. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tong, Hoang; Brindley, Paul J; Meyer, Christian G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2017-02-01

    Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intestinal parasites in cancer patients in the South of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, S; Bianchi, T F; Moura, M Q; Baccega, B; Pinto, N B; Berne, M E A; Villela, M M

    2017-11-27

    Intestinal parasitic infections in immunocompromised patients can lead to serious complications when not diagnosed and treated early. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of intestinal parasites in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy in the South of Brazil. Three fecal samples collected from each patient (73 individuals) were processed by Ritchie and Faust techniques and submitted to specific staining methods for intestinal protozoa. A 61.6% parasite and/or commensal positivity was found. Helminths identified were Ascaris lumbricoides (33.3%), Taenia spp. (6.6%), Strongyloides stercoralis (4.4%) and Trichuris trichiura (2.2%). Among protozoans, Giardia lamblia (26.6%), Cryptosporidium spp. (13.3%) and Cystoisospora belli (4.4%) were identified. The presence of Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana and Entamoeba hartmanni was also recorded. The results obtained warn of the importance of fecal parasitological diagnosis and the use of specific staining methods for the detection of intestinal parasites in cancer patients. These exams should be regularly requested at the patient's first clinic visit, given the high prevalence found in this study and the possible severity of such conditions for these individuals.

  17. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.).

  18. Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among HIV seropositive patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaitey, Yaw Agyekum; Nkrumah, Bernard; Idriss, Ali; Tay, Samuel Crowther Kofi

    2012-08-21

    Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections are aggravating the incidence and progression of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection into Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) more especially in the developing countries. This study was conducted to assess the common gastrointestinal and urinary infections among HIV/AIDS patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Ghana between April and December 2008. This work reports on gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among 500 HIV seropositive and 300 HIV seronegative patients. There was a 35% (175/500) prevalence of intestinal parasites among HIV seropositive patients compared to 4.3% (13/300) in HIV seronegative patients. Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium accounted for 19% (95/500) and 14% (70/500) respectively, while Schistosoma mansoni, Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm together accounted for 2% (10/500) of intestinal parasitic infections among the HIV seropositive patients. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in urinary parasitic infection between HIV seropositive 1% (2/500) and seronegative patients 0.7% (2/300). Most, 60 (86%) out of 70, of the urinary tract infection among the HIV seropositive patients was due to bacteria with E. coli being the most predominant isolate, 28 (47%) out of 60. There was no significant difference in infections based on age and gender. G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium were the most common gastrointestinal parasites detected while bacteria accounted for majority of the urinary tract infections among the HIV seropositive patients at the hospital.

  19. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, pulmonary tuberculosis and visceral leishmaniasis in an adult HIV negative patient

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    Antonio Carlos Toledo Jr.

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a 29 year old male with pneumocystis pneumonia and tuberculosis, and who was initially suspected of having HIV infection, based on risk factor analyses, but was subsequently shown to be HIV negative. The patient arrived at the hospital with fever, cough, weight loss, loss of appetite, pallor, and arthralgia. In addition, he was jaundiced and had cervical lymphadenopathy and mild heptosplenomegaly. He had interstitial infiltrates of the lung, sputum smears positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Pneumocystis carinii, and stool tests were positive for Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma mansoni. He was diagnosed as having AIDS, and was treated for tuberculosis, pneumocystosis, and strongyloidiasis with a good response. The patient did not receive anti-retroviral therapy, pending outcome of the HIV tests. A month later, he was re-examined and found to have worsening hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, fever, and continued weight loss. At this time, it was determined that his HIV ELISA antibody tests were negative. A bone marrow aspirate was done and revealed amastigotes of leishmania, and a bone marrow culture was positive for Leishmania species. He was treated with pentavalent antimony, 20 mg daily for 20 days, with complete remission of symptoms and weight gain. This case demonstrates that immunosuppression from leishmaniasis and tuberculosis may lead to pneumocystosis, and be misdiagnosed as HIV infection. The occurrence of opportunistic infections in severely ill patients without HIV must always be considered and alternate causes of immunosuppression sought.

  20. Cryptosporidium sp. in children suffering from acute diarrhea at Uberlândia City, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Margareth Leitão Gennari-Cardoso

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available This study's objective was to search for Cryptosporidium sp. in diarrheic feces from children aged zero to 12 years and cared for at medical units within Universidade Federal de Uberlândia or at a private practice in Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from September 1992 to August 1993. Three fecal samples preserved in 10% formalin, were collected from 94 children. Oocyst concentration was performed through Ritchie's (modified method and staining of fecal smears for each sample (total of 1128 slides was done by the "Safranin/Methylene Blue" and the "Kinyoun (modified" techniques. The Hoffmann, Pons & Janer method was also employed to look for other enteroparasites. From 94 children, 4.26% excreted fecal Cryptosporidium oocysts. The infection seemed to vary according to age: 5.08% of patients aged zero to two years old; 33.33% of those aging eight to ten years (P>0.05. Cryptosporidium appeared in November, December and March, during the rainy season. 20.21% of the children harbored at least one enteroparasite different from Cryptosporidium, mainly Giardia intestinalis (12.77%. From Cryptosporidium infected patients, two had only this kind, another harbored Giardia intestinalis; the last one hosted Strongyloides stercoralis.

  1. Parasites of edible land snails in Edo State, Nigeria

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    Igbinosa I. B.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Land snails are sources of protein to man and are hosts to a number of parasites. It is imperative that the roles of the snail hosts and parasites are clearly defined. Before then however, the parasites of the different land snails collected in any locality should be identified. Land snails were collected in the wild in both dry and wet seasons. The internal organs and the faeces were examined for the presence of parasite. In the rainy season of 2015, a total of 272 snails were collected across four major towns (Benin, Uromi, Ekpoma and Auchi in Edo State, Nigeria, while in the dry season, fewer snails (n=91 were handpicked. The snail species seen are: Achatina achatina (Linnaeus, 1758, Achatina fulica (Férussac, 1821, Acharchatina marginata (Swainson, 1982, Limicolaria aurora (Jay, 1839, L. flammea (Müller, 1774 and Limicolariopsis spp. The larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis were isolated from the various snail species with overall prevalence of 54.04 %. Snails positive with Alaria mesocercariae were L. aurora, L. flammea and Limicolariopsis spp. Additionally, few L. flammea were positive of the cercariae of Drocoelium dedriticum. Meanwhile, some samples of A. fulica harboured larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonesis, sporocysts of Fasciola gigantica and Schistosoma mansoni. Therefore, these edible snails could pose serious health hazard to man and animals by serving as a possible alternative parasite transmission route.

  2. Intestinal parasite infections in immigrant children in the city of Rome, related risk factors and possible impact on nutritional status

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    Manganelli Laura

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic diseases can represent a social and economic problem among disadvantaged people - even in developed countries. Due to the limited data available concerning Europe, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the presence of parasites in immigrant children and the risk factors favouring the spread of parasites. Subsequently, the possible correlation between nutritional status and parasitic infections was also investigated. Findings A convenience sample of two hundred and forty seven immigrant children (aged 0–15 attending the Poliambulatorio della Medicina Solidale in Rome was examined. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, and parasitological and anthropometric tests were applied. Chi-squared test and binary logistic multiple-regression models were used for statistical analysis. Thirty-seven children (15% tested positive to parasites of the following species: Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba coli, Giardia duodenalis, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides and Strongyloides stercoralis. A monospecific infection was detected in 30 (81% out of 37 parasitized children, while the others (19% presented a polyparasitism. The major risk factors were housing, i.e. living in shacks, and cohabitation with other families (p Conclusions This study shows that parasite infection in children is still quite common, even in a developed country and that children’s growth and parasitism may be related. Extensive improvements in the living, social and economic conditions of immigrants are urgently needed in order to overcome these problems.

  3. [Concordance between the zinc sulphate flotation and centrifugal sedimentation methods for the diagnosis of intestinal parasites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inês, Elizabete De Jesus; Pacheco, Flavia Thamiris Figueiredo; Pinto, Milena Carneiro; Mendes, Patrícia Silva de Almeida; Da Costa-Ribeiro, Hugo; Soares, Neci Matos; Teixeira, Márcia Cristina Aquino

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections depends on the parasite load, the specific gravity density of the parasite eggs, oocysts or cysts, and the density and viscosity of flotation or sedimentation medium where faeces are processed. To evaluate the concordance between zinc sulphate flotation and centrifugal sedimentation in the recovery of parasites in faecal samples of children. Faecal samples of 330 children from day care centers were evaluated by zinc sulphate flotation and centrifugal sedimentation techniques. The frequencies of detection of parasites by each method were determined and the agreement between the diagnostic techniques was evaluated using the kappa index, with 95% confidence intervals. The faecal flotation in zinc sulphate diagnosed significantly more cases of Trichuris trichiura infection when compared to centrifugal sedimentation (39/330; 11.8% vs. 13/330; 3.9%, p<0.001), with low diagnostic concordance between methods (kappa=0.264; 95% CI: 0.102-0.427). Moreover, all positive samples for Enterobius vermicularis eggs (n=5) and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae (n=3) were diagnosed only by zinc sulphate. No statistical differences were observed between methods for protozoa identification. The results showed that centrifugal flotation in zinc sulphate solution was significantly more likely to detect light helminths eggs such as those of T. trichiura and E. vermicularis in faeces than the centrifugal sedimentation process.

  4. [Prevalence of intestinal microsporidia and other intestinal parasites in hiv positive patients from Maracaibo, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Rodríguez, Zulbey; Hernández, Amparo; Bracho, Ángela; Salazar, Solneumar; Villalobos, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    To detect the presence of microsporidia and other enteric parasites in patients with HIVAIDS of the Autonomous Services University Hospital of Maracaibo (SAHUM), where there are no previous studies in this field. Fecal samples were analyzed by means of direct exam, concetration method with formal-ether, Kinyoun coloration and fast Gram-Chromotrope coloration. Separate PCR were perfomed to differentiate Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar , when the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex was observed in the microscope. Information on the patient was obtained trough clinical history. Of 56 individuals that participated, 38 (67.86%) presented some commensal parasite and/ or pathogenic species in their fecal sample. Carriers of pathogenic species were predominat (26/38). Protozoa such as Isospora belli protozoa (17.65%), Blastocystis spp. (17.65%), Cryptosporidium spp. (7.84%), E. histolytica/E. dispar (5.88%), Entamoeba coli (3.92%), Giardia lamblia (3.92%), Endolimax nana (3.92%), Cyclospora cayetanensis (3.92%), and Chilomastix mesnilli (1.96%) were diagnosed. Among the helminths, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Strongyloides stercoralis , had a percentage of 27.27% each, and Hymenolepis nana , 18.18%. Entamoeba histolytica was only detected in one of three cases presenting complex microscopic examination. By Gram-chromotrope, 17 samples showed spores of the Microsporidia phylum, equivalent to 33.33% prevalence. Microsporidia may be first prevalente in HIV positive patients when specific diagnostic techniques are used.

  5. First report of human intestinal sarcocystosis in Cambodia.

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    Khieu, Virak; Marti, Hanspeter; Chhay, Saomony; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Human intestinal sarcocystosis (HIS), caused by Sarcocystis species, is acquired by eating undercooked meat from sarcocyst-containing cattle (S. hominis, S. heydorni) and pigs (S. suihominis). We report on the detection of human intestinal Sarcocystis infections in a cross-sectional survey of Strongyloides stercoralis in early 2014, in Rovieng District, Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Among 1081 participants, 108 (10.0%) were diagnosed with Sarcocystis spp. oocysts in stool samples. Males had a significantly higher risk of infection than females (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9, p=0.001). None of the reported symptoms (abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, muscle pain and itching skin) occurring in the two weeks preceding the examinations were associated with a Sarcocystis infection. Many Sarcocystis cases were found among those who had participated in a wedding celebration and Chinese New Year festivities, where they had consumed raw or insufficiently cooked beef (83.3%) and pork (38.9%) based dishes. This report documents the first HIS cases in Cambodia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diversity of human intestinal helminthiasis in Lao PDR.

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    Sayasone, Somphou; Vonghajack, Youthanavane; Vanmany, Monely; Rasphone, Oroth; Tesana, Smarn; Utzinger, Jürg; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Odermatt, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Food-borne trematodiasis is an emerging public health problem, including in Lao PDR. We investigated the diversity of intestinal helminthes and polyparasitism in patients with hepatobiliary or intestinal symptoms in hospital and community-based surveys. Stool samples from 232 individuals aged >or=15 years were examined by the Kato-Katz method (three samples) and a formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (one sample). Opisthorchis viverrini and minute intestinal flukes (MIF) were common, with prevalences of 86.2% and 62.9%, respectively. Hookworm was the predominant soil-transmitted helminth (65.9%). The prevalences of Taenia spp., Strongyloides stercoralis and Trichuris trichiura were 22.8%, 10.3% and 8.6%, respectively. Additionally, 97 individuals were purged; O. viverrini and Haplorchis taichui were found in 95 and 76 participants, respectively. Other trematodes included Phaneropsolus bonnei (22.7%), Prosthodendrium molenkampi (14.4%), Haplorchis pumilio (5.2%), Haplorchis yokogawai (3.1%) and Echinochasmus japonicus (3.1%). Co-infection with O. viverrini and MIFs was rampant (81.4%). Polytrematode infection is highly prevalent in Lao PDR and hence requires urgent attention.

  7. [Intestinal helminthiasis diagnosed in Dakar, Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, D; Ndiaye, M; Gueye, P A L; Badiane, A; Fall, I D; Ndiaye, Y D; Faye, B; Ndiaye, J L; Tine, R; Ndir, O

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of digestive helminthiasis among patients referred to the laboratory of Parasitology and mycology at Le Dantec Hospital in Dakar for examination of stool samples from 2004 to 2009. Of 1 526 direct stool examinations (Ritchie and Baerman techniques) analyzed at the laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology of Le Dantec Hospital from 2004 to 2009, 310 were positive for intestinal helminthiasis, for a prevalence of 20.3%. The main species found were: Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, Tænia saginata and Tænia solium. Most patients had a single parasite (90.1%, versus 9% with two and 0.9% with three). Men are infected more often than women, accounting respectively for 58% and 42% of the infections, for a sex ratio of 1.38. Children aged 10 to 15 years had the highest prevalence of infection: 34.5%. The results show that digestive helminthiasis is endemic in Dakar, where it is necessary to implement campaigns of deworming, health education and environmental improvement.

  8. Argument for Inclusion of Strongyloidiasis in the Australian National Notifiable Disease List

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    Meruyert Beknazarova

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is an infection caused by the helminth, Strongyloides stercoralis. Up to 370 million people are infected with the parasite globally, and it has remained endemic in the Indigenous Australian population for many decades. Strongyloidiasis has been also reported in other Australian populations. Ignorance of this disease has caused unnecessary costs to the government health system, and been detrimental to the Australian people’s health. This manuscript addresses the 12 criteria required for a disease to be included in the Australian National Notifiable Disease List (NNDL under the National Health Security Act 2007 (Commonwealth. There are six main arguments that provide compelling justification for strongyloidiasis to be made nationally notifiable and added to the Australian NNDL. These are: The disease is important to Indigenous health, and closing the health inequity gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is a priority; a public health response is required to detect cases of strongyloidiasis and to establish the true incidence and prevalence of the disease; there is no alternative national surveillance system to gather data on the disease; there are preventive measures with high efficacy and low side effects; data collection is feasible as cases are definable by microscopy, PCR, or serological diagnostics; and achievement of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG # 6 on clean water and sanitation.

  9. Specific detection of Neospora caninum oocysts in fecal samples from experimentally-infected dogs using the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D E; Liddell, S; Jenkins, M C; Dubey, J P

    2001-04-01

    Neospora caninum oocysts, passed in the feces of a definitive host (dog), were isolated, and genomic DNA was extracted. A polymerase cahin reaction (PCR) targeting the N. caninum-specific Nc 5 genomic sequence was performed using the isolated DNA. A synthesized competitor molecule containing part of the Nc 5 sequence was included in the assay as a check against false-negative PCR results and to quantify N. caninum oocyst DNA in fecal samples. A standard curve of the ratio of fluorescence intensity of PCR-amplified competitor to that of oocyst DNA was constructed to compare oocyst equivalents from fecal samples containing unknown numbers of N. caninum oocysts and to assess the sensitivity of the assay. The specificity of the assay was determined using the Nc 5-specific primers in PCR assays against other parasites likely to be found in canine feces. Genomic DNA sequences from the canine coccidians Hammondia heydorni, Cryptosporidium parvum, Sarcocystis cruzi, S. tenella, and Isospora ohioensis and the canine helminth parasites Strongyloides stercoralis, Toxocara canis, Dipylidium caninum, and Ancylostoma caninum were not amplified. In addition, genomic DNA sequences from oocysts of coccidian parasites that might contaminate dog feces, such as Hammondia hammondi, Toxoplasma gondii, or Eimeria tenella, were not amplified in the PCR assay. The assay should be useful in epidemiological surveys of both domestic and wild canine hosts and in investigations of oocyst biology in experimental infections.

  10. Control of parasitic infections among school children in the peri-urban area of Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil

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    Regina Coeli Cunha Dórea

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Tide prevalence of intestinal parasitosis ivas investigated in a primaiy school located in Rubiâo Júnior, a peri-urban district of Botucatu, São Paulo slate, Brazil, in order to assess the effect of treatment and practical measures of prophylaxis in the control of parasitic infections among 7-to- 18-year-old school children of a low socio-economic status. The first series of parasitological examinations included 219 school children, ef which 123 (56.1 % were found to be infected with one or more parasite species. Eighty- four children canying pathogenic parasites were submitted to various anti-parasitic treatment schedules. We re-evaluated 15 (89 % students after 4 to 6 months post- chemotherapy. The results indicate that the combination of treatment with prophylactic measures has been successful in the control of parasitic infections, since reinfection rates were generally low ( 73-1 % in children infected with most parasite species. The reasons for the apparent failure in the control of infections caused by Hymenolepis nana and Strongyloides stercoralis are discussed.

  11. The Impact of Nutrition, Helminth Infection, and Lifestyle on Elementary School Student’s Achievement

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    Ika Febianti Buntoro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a lot of helminth infections and malnutrition cases in Indonesia. Some of the effects of helminth infection are anemia, diarrhea, malnutrition, intestinal obstruction, growth and developmental disorder, and also cognitive impairment. This study aimed to explore the impact of nutrition, helminth infection, and lifestyle on elementary school students’ achievement. An observational analytical study with the cross-sectional design was used. The study was participated by 65 elementary school students grade 3, 4, and 5. The study was conducted in Pasir Panjang Elementary School, Kupang, Nusa Tenggara Timur, Indonesia. The data was analyzed using chi-square. There were 7 students (10.77% having helminth infections:4 students (57.1% had Ascarislumbricoides infection, 2 students (28.6% had Enterobius vermicularis infection, and 1 student (14.3% had Strongyloides stercoralis infection. There were no differences found on students’ achievement between students with normal and low nutritional state (p = 0.917; p > 0.05 and between different lifestyle habit  (p = 0.768;  p > 0.05. However, a significant difference in students’ achievement was found between students with and without helminth infection (p = 0.036; p < 0.05. Helminth infection had a significant impact on elementary school students’ achievement, but no significant impact found for differences in nutritional state and lifestyle habit.

  12. Gastrointestinal parasitic infection in diverse species of domestic ruminants inhabiting tribal rural areas of southern Rajasthan, India.

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    Choubisa, S L; Jaroli, V J

    2013-10-01

    A total of 415 adult domesticated ruminants, 130 cattle (Bos taurus), 108 buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), 94 goats (Capra hircus) and 83 sheep (Ovis aries) inhabiting tribal rural areas of southern Rajasthan, India were investigated for evidence of gastrointestinal protozoan and helminthic infections. In southern Rajasthan humid ecosystem is predominant and has number of perennial freshwater bodies. Fresh faecal samples of these animals were examined microscopically by direct wet smear with saline and 1 % Lugol's iodine and formalin ether concentration. Of these 296 (71.32 %) were found to be infected with different species of gastrointestinal parasites. The highest (93.84 %) prevalence of these parasitic infections was found in cattle followed by goats (82.97 %), sheep (55.42 %) and buffaloes (46.29 %). Except cattle no other ruminants revealed protozoan infection. A total 8 species of gastrointestinal parasites were encountered. Among these parasites Fasciola hepatica was the commonest (15.18 %) followed by Haemonchus contortus (11.32 %), Ancylostoma duodenale (10.36 %), Trichuris trichiura (9.15 %), Amphistome species (7.95 %), Moniezia expansa (6.98 %), Strongyloides stercoralis (4.57 %) and Balantidium coli (3.37 %). The prevalence rate of these parasitic infections also varied seasonally. The highest prevalence rate was found in rainy season (84.21 %) followed by winter (73.9 %) and summer (52.8 %). The possible causes for variation in prevalence of parasitic infections are also discussed.

  13. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and Other Gastrointestinal Parasites in Domestic Cats from Households in Thika Region, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambura Njuguna, Adele; Kagira, John Maina; Muturi Karanja, Simon; Ngotho, Maina; Mutharia, Lucy; Wangari Maina, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GIT) parasites of domestic cats (Felis catus) not only cause morbidity but are also potential zoonotic agents. The current study aimed at establishing the prevalence of GIT parasites in cats kept by households in Thika region, Kenya. Fecal samples were collected randomly from 103 cats and analyzed for presence of parasites using standard parasitological methods. In descending order, the prevalence of the detected protozoa parasites was Isospora spp. 43.7% (95% CI: 40.4-47%), Cryptosporidium spp. 40.8% (95% CI: 37.5-44.1%), Toxoplasma gondii 7.8% (95% CI: 4.5-11.1%), and Entamoeba spp. 2.9% (95% CI: 1.6-6.2%). The prevalence of the observed helminths was Strongyloides stercoralis 43.7% (95% CI: 40.4-47%), Toxocara cati 23.3% (95% CI: 20-26.6%), Ancylostoma spp. 9.7% (95% CI: 6.4-13%), Dipylidium caninum 8.7% (95% CI: 5.4-12.0%), and Acanthocephala spp. 1.9% (95% CI: 1-4.2%). The percentage of cats excreting at least one species of parasite was 73.2% (95% CI = 69.9-76.5%). The study shows that the cats have high spectrum (9) of parasites which are known to affect the cat's health and some are of zoonotic significance.

  14. Post-travel screening of asymptomatic long-term travelers to the tropics for intestinal parasites using molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonawala, Darius; van Lieshout, Lisette; den Boer, Marion A M; Claas, Eric C J; Verweij, Jaco J; Godkewitsch, André; Ratering, Marchel; Visser, Leo G

    2014-05-01

    The incidence of asymptomatic travel-related parasitic infection is uncertain. Previous studies did not distinguish new incident infections, from past infections. Regardless of symptoms, we performed multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction on pre- and post-travel stool samples of Dutch long-term travelers to the (sub)tropics. Serological screening for Schistosoma spp. was only performed in travelers to sub-Saharan Africa. In total, 679 travelers were included in the study. The follow-up rate was 82% (556 of 679). Participants' median travel duration was 12 weeks. There was one incident infection with Strongyloides stercoralis; there were none with Entamoeba histolytica, 4 with Cryptosporidium spp. (1%), and 22 with Giardia lamblia (4%). Nine of 146 travelers (6%) seroconverted for Schistosoma spp. Routine screening of stool samples for parasitic infection is not indicated for asymptomatic people, who travel to the (sub)tropics for up to 3 months. Screening for Schistosoma spp. should be offered to travelers with fresh-water contact in endemic regions.

  15. Intestinal parasitosis: data analysis 2006-2011 in a teaching hospital of Ancona, Italy.

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    Silvestri, Carmela; Greganti, Gianfranco; Arzeni, Daniela; Morciano, Angela; Castelli, Pamela; Barchiesi, Francesco; Cirioni, Oscar; Giacometti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Intestinal parasites are a serious problem in developing countries, but should not be underestimated in industrialised countries either. Between January 2006 and December 2011, stool specimens and the scotch tests of 5323 Italian and non Italian patients (adults and children) attending the laboratory of our Infectious Diseases Clinic in a teaching Hospital at Ancona were analyzed specifically for intestinal parasites. The present study shows that, over a six-year period, of a total of 5323 patients 305 harboured at least one species of parasite (5.7%). Among the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia was the most common, the overall prevalence of giardiasis being 1.8 % (99/5323). Helminths were found in 0.9% of the patients (48/5323). In particular, Hymenolepis nana, Strongyloides stercoralis and Trichuris trichiura were most commonly recovered in non-Italian children, suggesting that certain intestinal parasites are restricted to endemic areas in the tropics. Eighteen of the 305 infected patients had more than one parasite in their stools. Our study demonstrates that intestinal parasites must be considered even in industrialised areas and stool examination should be supported by epidemiological data and clinical features.

  16. Repurposing drugs for the treatment and control of helminth infections

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    Gordana Panic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are responsible for a considerable public health burden, yet the current drug armamentarium is small. Given the high cost of drug discovery and development, the high failure rates and the long duration to develop novel treatments, drug repurposing circumvents these obstacles by finding new uses for compounds other than those they were initially intended to treat. In the present review, we summarize in vivo and clinical trial findings testing clinical candidates and marketed drugs against schistosomes, food-borne trematodes, soil-transmitted helminths, Strongyloides stercoralis, the major human filariases lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, taeniasis, neurocysticercosis and echinococcosis. While expanding the applications of broad-spectrum or veterinary anthelmintics continues to fuel alternative treatment options, antimalarials, antibiotics, antiprotozoals and anticancer agents appear to be producing fruitful results as well. The trematodes and nematodes continue to be most investigated, while cestodal drug discovery will need to be accelerated. The most clinically advanced drug candidates include the artemisinins and mefloquine against schistosomiasis, tribendimidine against liver flukes, oxantel pamoate against trichuriasis, and doxycycline against filariasis. Preclinical studies indicate a handful of promising future candidates, and are beginning to elucidate the broad-spectrum activity of some currently used anthelmintics. Challenges and opportunities are further discussed.

  17. Opening a Can of Worms: Leprosy Reactions and Complicit Soil-Transmitted Helminths.

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    Hagge, Deanna A; Parajuli, Pawan; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Rana, Divya R S J B; Thapa, Ruby; Neupane, Kapil D; Nicholls, Peter; Adams, Linda B; Geluk, Annemieke; Shah, Mahesh; Napit, Indra B

    2017-09-01

    >94% of new annual leprosy cases are diagnosed in populations co-endemic for soil-transmitted helminths (STH). STH can profoundly dysregulate host immune responses towards Th2 bias, which can be restored over time after deworming. We hypothesize that STH co-infection is associated with leprosy reaction (denoted as simply "reaction" herein) occurrence within a co-endemic population. A cohort study was performed on a cohort of Nepalese leprosy patients across treatment and diagnostic classifications who were screened by routine fecal smear microscopy and multiplex quantitative PCR (qPCR) for Ascaris lumbricoides (Al), Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss), Ancyclostoma duodenale (Ad) and Necator americanus (Na). Among 145 patients, 55% were positive for ≥1 STH (STH+): 34% Al+, 18% Ss+, 17% Ad+and 5% Na+. Significant inverse STH and reaction relationships were evidenced by the bulk of cases: 63% reaction-negative were STH+ of total cases (p=0.030) while 65% reaction-positive were STH- in new cases (96; p=0.023). Strikingly, the majority of STH+ were reaction-negative, even when considering each species: 59% Al+, 60% Ss+, 62% Ad+and 67% Na+of new leprosy cases. Absence of STH co-infection is associated with leprosy reaction at diagnosis within a co-endemic population. This is likely due to immune reconstitution effects after deworming or interruption of chronic STH-mediated immune dysregulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Diagnosis of intestinal parasites in a rural community of Venezuela: Advantages and disadvantages of using microscopy or RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incani, Renzo Nino; Ferrer, Elizabeth; Hoek, Denise; Ramak, Robbert; Roelfsema, Jeroen; Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Kortbeek, Titia; Pinelli, Elena

    2017-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence and diagnostic performance of microscopy and real time PCR (RT-PCR) for 14 intestinal parasites in a Venezuelan rural community with a long history of persistent intestinal parasitic infections despite the implementation of regular anthelminthic treatments. A total of 228 participants were included in this study. A multiplex RT-PCR was used for the detection of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium sp. and a monoplex RT-PCR for Entamoeba histolytica. Furthermore, a multiplex PCR was performed for detection of Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis, Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. Combined microscopy-PCR revealed prevalences of 49.3% for A. lumbricoides, 10.1% for N. americanus (no A. duodenale was detected), 2.0% for S. stercoralis, 40.4% for D. fragilis, 35.1% for G. intestinalis, and 7.9% for E. histolytica/dispar. Significant increases in prevalence at PCR vs. microscopy were found for A. lumbricoides, G. intestinalis and D. fragilis. Other parasites detected by microscopy alone were Trichuris trichiura (25.7%), Enterobius vermicularis (3.4%), Blastocystis sp. (65.8%), and the non-pathogenic Entamoeba coli (28.9%), Entamoeba hartmanni (12.3%), Endolimax nana (19.7%) and Iodamoeba bütschlii (7.5%). Age- but no gender-related differences in prevalences were found for A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura, G. intestinalis, and E. histolytica/dispar. The persistently high prevalences of intestinal helminths are probably related to the high faecal pollution as also evidenced by the high prevalences of non-pathogenic intestinal protozoans. These results highlight the importance of using sensitive diagnostic techniques in combination with microscopy to better estimate the prevalence of intestinal parasites, especially in the case of D. fragilis trophozoites, which deteriorate very rapidly and would be missed by microscopy. In addition, the differentiation between

  19. CONTAMINAÇÃO AMBIENTAL POR LARVAS E OVOS DE HELMINTOS EM AMOSTRAS DE AREIA DE PRAIAS DO MUNICÍPIO DE FORTALEZA-CEARÁ.

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    Ésio Fortaleza Nascimento Chaves Pedrosa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: As praias são importantes focos de infecção humana por microrganismos, tanto através da água quanto do solo, sendo esta última um excelente meio de veiculação de várias espécies de parasitos, entre eles S. stercoralis, Toxocara canis, A. lumbricoides, Ancilostomídeos, entre outros. Objetivo do estudo: avaliar a contaminação das praias de Fortaleza (Praia do Futuro, Barra do Ceará e Beira Mar por parasitas de importância médica.Materiais e Métodos: Foram selecionados seis pontos de cada praia onde foi colhido material (100 g de areia em três amostras (uma superficial, uma com 10 cm de profundidade e outra com 20 cm, totalizando 54 amostras, que foram transportadas imediatamente ao laboratório para a análise. Resultados: Dentre as 54 amostras de areia analisadas, em 39 (72,2% foram encontradas larvas, das quais 35 (64,8% foram positivas para Ancylostoma sp , 3 (5,5% para Strongyloides stercoralis e 4 (7,4%  com ovos de Trichuris trichiura. Discussão: Os resultados apresentados comprovam a contaminação do solo da praia do Futuro, Beira Mar e Barra do Ceará, assim como a possibilidade de ocorrência de infecções humanas por enteroparasitas através do solo. Conclusão: Conclui-se que as praias da Barra do Ceará, Praia do Futuro e Beira Mar da cidade de Fortaleza encontram-se em situação precária de saneamento, visto que foram encontrados ovos e larvas de parasitas potencialmente infectantes em 72,2% das amostras, tornando-se necessário apoio e suporte de medidas da vigilância sanitária nestas praias imediatamente.

  20. Parasitic contamination of fresh vegetables sold at central markets in Khartoum state, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mona Ali; Siddig, Emmanuel Edwar; Elaagip, Arwa Hassan; Edris, Ali Mahmoud Mohammed; Nasr, Awad Ahmed

    2016-03-11

    Fresh vegetables are considered as vital nutrients of a healthy diet as they supply the body with essential supplements. The consumption of raw vegetables is the main way for transmission of intestinal parasitic organisms. This study was aimed at detecting the parasitic contamination in fresh vegetables sold in two central open-aired markets in Khartoum state, Sudan. In this prospective cross-sectional study, a total of 260 fresh vegetable samples and 50 water samples used to sprinkle vegetable(s) were collected from two central open-aired markets (namely; Elshaabi and Central markets) during November 2011 to May 2012. The samples were microscopically examined for detection of parasitic life forms using standardized parasitological techniques for protozoans and helminthes worms. Of the 260 fresh vegetable samples, 35 (13.5 %) were microscopically positive for intestinal parasites whereas 7/50 (14 %) of water samples used to sprinkle vegetable(s) were found positives. Remarkably, high level of contamination in fresh vegetable samples was recorded in lettuce (Lactuca sativa) 36.4 % (4/11) while cayenne pepper (Capsicum annuum) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) were not contaminated. The identified protozoans and helminthes were Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Entamoeba coli, Giardia lamblia, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis, T. trichiura and hookworms. The most predominant parasite encountered was E. histolytica/dispar (42.9 %) whereas both T. trichiura and A. lumbricoides (2.9 %) were the least detected parasites. None of the fresh vegetables had single parasitic contamination. The highest percentages found in water samples used to sprinkle vegetable(s) was for Strongyloides larvae 60 % (3/5). It is worth-mentioned that the rate of contamination in Elshaabi market was higher compared with Central market. However, there was no significant correlation between the type of vegetables and existence of parasites in both markets and a high significant

  1. Enteroparasitosis infantil en un área urbana del nordeste argentino Children enteroparasitosis in North East Argentine urban area

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    Alicia M. F. Milano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar las enteroparasitosis en una población infantil urbana y establecer su relación con factores biológicos y condiciones ambientales. Se investigaron 113 niños entre 0 y 14 años de edad. En cada niño se realizaron exámenes coproparasitológicos y test de Graham y se valoró el estado nutricional. Para el registro de datos ambientales se aplicaron encuestas semiestructuradas. Se analizó la contaminación del suelo. Se identificó Blastocystis hominis, Enterobius vermicularis, coccidios, Giardia intestinalis, uncinarias, Strongyloides stercoralis, Trichuris trichura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana y Taenia sp. La prevalencia de parasitados fue 73.5%. Se verificó mayor frecuencia de enteroparasitosis en la franja etaria de 3 a 8 años. Las viviendas analizadas (n=44 eran de material con techo de chapa, contaban con red de agua potable; el 79.5% poseía baño instalado, las restantes poseían letrinas. En el 95.5% de las unidades domésticas había uno o más perros y gatos. El suelo de nueve viviendas estuvo contaminado con formas infectantes de Toxocara canis y ancilostomídeos. Se comprobó asociación entre parasitosis y uso de letrinas y hacinamiento. Se detectaron cinco casos de desnutrición grado I (4.4%. Se pone de manifiesto la trascendencia de los factores físicos y culturales como condicionantes de las parasitosis entéricas lo que sugiere que se debe insistir, simultáneamente al tratamiento farmacológico, en las medidas preventivas relacionadas con la higiene y la adecuada eliminación de las excretas humanas y de los animales domésticos.The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the importance of enteroparasitosis in a young urban population. The relationship between enteroparasitosis in this population and biological and environmental conditions was established for 113 infants between 0 and 14 years. Serial stool samples were analyzed and Graham

  2. Frequency of Blastocystis hominis and other intestinal parasites in stool samples examined at the Parasitology Laboratory of the School of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the São Paulo State University, Araraquara Freqüência de Blastocystis hominis e outros enteroparasitas em amostras de fezes examinadas no Laboratório de Parasitologia da Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas da Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara

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    Júlio César Miné

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Blastocystis homins is a protozoan that causes an intestinal infection known as human blastocystosis. This infection is diagnosed by means of parasitological examination of stools and by permanent staining techniques. The present study was developed to evaluate the frequency of Blastocystis hominis infection among inhabitants of the Araraquara region, State of São Paulo, and to compare different methods for investigating this protozoan in feces samples. Evaluations on 503 stool samples were performed by means of direct fresh examination and using the techniques of Faust et al., Lutz and Rugai et al. In addition, the iron hematoxylin, trichrome and modified Kinyoun staining techniques were used. Out of the 503 samples examined, 174 (34.6% were found to be positive for the presence of intestinal parasites. The most frequent protozoa and helminths were Entamoeba coli (14.6% and Strongyloides stercoralis (6.7%, respectively. Blastocystis hominis was present in 23 (4.6% fecal samples, with a predominately pasty consistency and without characterizing a condition of diarrhea. Despite the low frequency of Blastocystis hominis found in the Araraquara region, compared with other regions of Brazil, it is important to perform laboratory diagnostic tests for this protozoan. Its finding in fecal material is indicative of food and drinking water contamination. Since the transmission route for this parasite is accepted to be oral-fecal, this implies that the population needs guidance regarding hygiene and basic sanitation measures as a means for controlling health problems caused by enteroparasites.Blastocystis hominis é um protozoário, causador de infecção intestinal denominada blastocistose humana, cujo diagnóstico é realizado pelo exame coproparasitológico e por meio de técnicas de coloração permanente. Este estudo foi desenvolvido para avaliar a freqüência da infecção por Blastocystis hominis em habitantes da região de Araraquara/SP, bem

  3. Prevalência de enteroparasitoses na população do município de Maria Helena, Paraná Prevalence of enteroparasitosis in the population of Maria Helena, Paraná State

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    Simone Aparecida dos Santos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available O estudo epidemiológico dos parasitas intestinais tem por objetivo determinar as principais doenças e seus respectivos agentes etiológicos que se encontram distribuídos por todo o mundo, de forma endêmica ou epidêmica. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a prevalência de infecção por enteroparasitoses, em qual idade há sua maior prevalência, relacionando a infecção com a idade, o sexo e a região em que a pessoa vive, no município de Maria Helen (PR. A coleta de dados foi realizada de junho de 2004 a maio de 2006. Foram analisadas 431 amostras de fezes pelo método de sedimentação espontânea e centrífugo-flutuação. A prevalência de enteroparasitoses foi de 16%, sendo os enteroparasitas mais frequentes: Endolimax nana (6,5%, Entamoeba coli (3,5%, Giardia intestinalis (6,3%, Ascaris lumbricoides (1,4%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0,7%, Entrobius vermicularis (0,7%, Ancilostomídeo (0,2%, Entamoeba hystolitica e Taenia sp (0,2%. O poliparasitismo foi detectado em 3,2% das amostras. A faixa etária que apresentou maior prevalência foi de zero a nove anos, porém não houve diferença estatística entre os fatores analisados, uma vez que p>0,05. Diante desses resultados, conclui-se que o município apresenta características similares em relação à zona rural e urbana.The epidemiological study on intestinal parasites has the purpose of determining the main diseases and their respective etiologic agents, which are endemically or epidemically spread worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the enteroparasitosis infection prevalence, in which age group they prevail, relating the infection with age, gender, and the region in which the person lives, in the city of Maria Helena - PR. Data collection was performed from June of 2004 to May of 2006. 431 samples of feces were analyzed through the spontaneous sedimentation and centrifugal fluctuation methods. The enteroparasitosis prevalence was of 16%, being the most frequent

  4. Enteric parasites and HIV infection: occurrence in AIDS patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Parasitas entéricos e infecção pelo HIV: ocorrência em pacientes com SIDA/AIDS no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

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    H. Moura

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of intestinal parasites, its relation with the transmission mechanism of HIV, and the clinical state of the AIDS patients, were analyzed in 99 Group IV patients (CDC, 1986, treated at "Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto" (HUPE, between 1986 and 1988. The group consisted of 79 (79.8% patients whose HIV transmission mechanism took place through sexual contact and of 16 (20.2% who were infected through blood. Feces samples from each patient were examined by four distincts methods (Faust et al, Kato-Katz, Baermann-Moraes and Baxby et al.. The moste occuring parasites were: Cryptosporidium sp., Entamoeba coli and Endolimax nana (18.2%, Strongyloides stercoralis and Giardia lambia (15.2%. E. histolytica and/or E. hartmanni (13.1%, Ascaris lumbricoides (11.1% and Isospora belli (10.1%. Furthermore, 74.7% of the patients carried at least one species. Intestinal parasites were found in 78.5% of the patients who acquired the HIV through sexual intercourse and in 56,3% of those infected by blood contamination. The difference, was not statistically significant (p > 0.05. In the group under study, the increase of the occurrence of parasitc infections does not seem to depend on the acquisiton of HIV through sexual contact. It appears that in developing countries, the dependancy is more related to the classic mechanisms of parasites transmission and its endemicity.A ocorrência de parasitas intestinais, sua relação com o mecanismo de transmissão do HIV e a apresentação clínica da AIDS foram analisadas em 99 pacientes do grupo IV (CDC, 1986, atendidos no Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto (HUPE entre 1986 e 1988. O grupo era constituído de 79 (79,9% pacientes cujo mecanismos de transmssão do HIV se deu por via sexual e de 16 (20,2% que se infectaram por via sanguínea. Amostras de fezes de cada paciente foram examinadas por quatro métodos distintos (Faust et al., Kato-Katz, Baermann-Moraes e Baxby et al.. Os parasitos mais frq

  5. Frequency of human toxocariasis in a rural population from Cajamarca, Peru determined by DOT-ELISA test Freqüência de toxocaríase humana numa população rural de Cajamarca, Peru, mediante o uso do teste DOT-ELISA

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    William H. Roldán

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of human toxocariasis in Cauday district, Cajamarca, Peru, using a dot-ELISA test. From June to October 2005, a total of 256 adult subjects were studied. Blood samples were collected for serology by a dot-ELISA test and for hematological examination. Parasitological examination was also carried out in stool samples to check cross-reactions in the dot-ELISA. The frequency observed was 44.92%, with a significant higher proportion of positivity in male subjects. From subjects with positive serology, 45.6% had respiratory symptoms, 40.44% abdominal pain, 32.35% hepatic symptoms, 14.7% cutaneous signs, 13.23% ocular manifestations, 43.38% eosinophilia, and all of these were statistically associated to serology. Among the population evaluated, 90.23% (231/256 were parasitized. From subjects with positive serology, 92.17% had at least one intestinal parasite and the most frequent were: Blastocystis hominis (68.38%, Giardia lamblia (28.68%, Hymenolepis nana (20.0%, Ascaris lumbricoides (15.65%, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (13.24%, Cyclospora cayetanensis (4.41%, Cryptosporidium sp. (1.47%, Enterobius vermicularis (0.87%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.87%, Taenia sp. (0.87%, and Trichuris trichiura (0.87%. The rate of false positives in the dot-ELISA test was improved by serum absorption each with A. suum antigens, with a decrease of cross-reactions. In conclusion, human toxocariasis is highly frequent in this population and some risk factors like dog/cat ownership, presence of pets within house, and previous history of geophagia were observed in the present study.O propósito do presente estudo foi estimar a freqüência da toxocaríase no distrito de Cauday, Cajamarca, Peru, usando o dot-ELISA teste. Entre junho e outubro de 2005, um total de 256 pessoas foram avaliadas. Coletaram-se amostras de sangue para o teste de dot-ELISA e para o exame hematológico e amostras de fezes para exame parasitol

  6. Asociación entre geohelmintos y condiciones socioambientales en diferentes poblaciones humanas de Argentina Associations between geohelminths and socioenvironmental conditions among different human populations in Argentina

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    María Inés Gamboa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Analizar la relación entre las especies de geohelmintos identificadas en poblaciones urbanas, suburbanas y rurales de las Provincias de Buenos Aires y Misiones, Argentina, y los aspectos socioambientales que favorecen la infestación por estos parásitos. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal. Se analizaron 700 muestras fecales humanas provenientes de 319 familias residentes en una población urbana (LPU y dos suburbanas (LPS, LPN de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, y una población rural de la provincia de Misiones (MR, en Argentina. Se colectaron 35 muestras fecales de perros y 205 de tierra, y se completaron encuestas sobre las características socioambientales de las localidades estudiadas. Se utilizaron las técnicas de análisis parasitológicos de Ritchie, Carles Barthelemy, Fülleborn y Kato Katz. RESULTADOS: La frecuencia de parasitosis fue mayor en MR (78,4%, seguida de las áreas suburbanas LPN (35,0% y LPS (25,8%, y fue menor en la zona urbana LPU (5,7%. Los ancilostomideos (71,1% y Strongyloides stercoralis (22,2% se detectaron solamente en MR y Ascaris lumbricoides, Hymenolepis nana y Trichuris trichiura fueron más frecuentes en LPN. Las muestras de heces de perros de Misiones presentaron una mayor frecuencia de parásitos (100% que las de las localidades de Buenos Aires, pero el suelo del sector urbano bonaerense resultó más contaminado. Las prácticas de alimentación y defecación poco higiénicas, el hacinamiento, el hábito de no usar calzado y el piso de tierra en las viviendas se asociaron significativamente con una mayor frecuencia de geohelmintos y pseudogeohelmintos intestinales (P OBJECTIVES: To analyze the relationship between the geohelminth species found in urban, suburban, and rural areas of the Buenos Aires and Misiones provinces of Argentina, and the socioenvironmental conditions that promote infection by these parasites. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study that analyzed 700 human fecal samples taken from

  7. Enteroparasites and commensals among children in four peripheral districts of Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais Enteroparasitas e comensais em crianças de quatro bairros da periferia de Uberlândia, Estado de Minas Gerais

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    Eleuza Rodrigues Machado

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of intestinal parasites and commensals among children in four peripheral districts located in the northern, southern, eastern and western sectors of Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, using the Baermann methods as modified by Moraes and Lutz. Out of 160 individuals studied, 93 (58.1% CI: 50.4-65.7 were infected, distributed among the sectors as follows: northern (72.5%, southern (47.5%, eastern (57.5% and western (55%. The positive findings according to age groups were: 0-5 years (26.9%, 5-10 years (21.2% and 10-15 years (10%. Male children presented 2.7 times higher risk of infection than females did (OR: 2.7; CI: 1052-7001. The parasites and commensals identified were: Giardia lamblia (27.5%, Entamoeba coli (20.6%, Ascaris lumbricoides (14.4%, Enterobius vermicularis (8.8%, Hymenolepis nana (7.5%, Hymenolepis diminuta (5%, hookworms (3.1%, Trichuris trichiura (2.5%, Endolimax nana (2.5%, Entamoeba hartmanni (2.5%, Strongyloides stercoralis (1.3%, Iodamoeba butschlii (1.3% and Capillaria hepatica (0.6%. The infection rate in these children was high and showed the need to implement prophylactic education programs in the community.O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a ocorrência de parasitas e comensais intestinais em crianças de quatro bairros periféricos, localizados nos setores norte, sul, leste e oeste em Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, utilizando os métodos de Baermann modificado por Moraes, e de Lutz. Dos 160 indivíduos estudados, 93 (58,1%, IC: 50,4-65,7 estavam infectados, assim distribuídos: setor norte (72,5%, sul (47,5%, leste (57,5% e oeste (55%. A positividade por faixa etária foi: 0 - 5 anos (26,9%, 5 - 10 (21,2% e 10 - 15 anos (10%. As crianças do sexo masculino mostraram 2,7 maior risco de infecção (OR: 2,7, IC: 1052-7001. Os agentes identificados foram: Giardia lamblia (27,5%, Entamoeba coli (20,6%, Ascaris lumbricoides (14,4%, Enterobius vermicularis (8,8%, Hymenolepis nana

  8. Ocorrência de enteroparasitas na população geronte de Nova Olinda do Norte Amazonas, Brasil Occurrence of enteroparasites in the elderly population of Nova Olinda do Norte, Amazonas, Brazil

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    Ana Felisa Hurtado-Guerrero

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo para avaliar a prevalência de enteroparasitas em um grupo de idosos ribeirinhos, moradores do Município de Nova Olinda do Norte, Estado do Amazonas Brasil, no período de abril e agosto de 1999. Por meio de um estudo de corte transversal foram analisados 81 exames, através do método de Sedimentação Espontânea (Método de Hoffman et al., 1934. Foi constatada positividade em 72,8% dos idosos, predominando o monoparasitismo (43,2%. Os helmintos foram os mais freqüentes (70,4%, destacando-se: Ascaris lumbricoides (35,2%, Trichuris trichiura (16,0%, Ancylostoma duodenale (9,0% e Strongyloides stercoralis (9,0%. Dentre os protozoários (29,5%, a ocorrência de Entamoeba coli foi de 18,2%, Giárdia lamblia de 7,0% e Entamoeba histolytica 4,5%. Não houve associação estatisticamente significativa entre sexo e grau de parasitismo e entre faixas etárias e condição parasitária. Estes resultados evidenciam um quadro de alta prevalência de parasitas intestinais nesta população e discordam dos reportados por outros pesquisadores quando afirmam que a intensidade da infestação por parasitas diminui na idade avançada. Os achados anteriores exigem das autoridades governamentais medidas de controle e educação para melhorar a qualidade de vida desses idosos, considerando a grave repercussão que esses parasitas tem no estado nutricional dos gerontes de baixa renda.A study was carried out to determine the prevalence of enteroparasites attacking elderly people living in a riverside city of the Municipal district of Nova Olinda do Norte, Amazonas State Brazil. In this cross sectional study were examined the faecal material from 81 elderly people using the method of spontaneous sedimentation (Hoffman et al., 1934. It was found a positiveness in 72,8% of the elderly people examined, predominating the mono parasitism (43,2%. The helminths were more frequents (70,3%: Ascaris lumbricoides (35,2%, Trichuris trichiura (16

  9. Intestinal parasite infections in a rural community of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil): Prevalence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis subtypes.

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    Barbosa, Carolina Valença; Barreto, Magali Muniz; Andrade, Rosemary de Jesus; Sodré, Fernando; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Peralta, José Mauro; Igreja, Ricardo Pereira; de Macedo, Heloisa Werneck; Santos, Helena Lucia Carneiro

    2018-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are considered a serious public health problem and widely distributed worldwide, mainly in urban and rural environments of tropical and subtropical countries. Globally, soil-transmitted helminths and protozoa are the most common intestinal parasites. Blastocystis sp. is a highly prevalent suspected pathogenic protozoan, and considered an unusual protist due to its significant genetic diversity and host plasticity. A total of 294 stool samples were collected from inhabitants of three rural valleys in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The stool samples were evaluated by parasitological methods, fecal culture, nested PCR and PCR/Sequencing. Overall prevalence by parasitological analyses was 64.3% (189 out of 294 cases). Blastocystis sp. (55.8%) was the most prevalent, followed by Endolimax nana (18.7%), Entamoeba histolytica complex (7.1%), hookworm infection (7.1%), Entomoeba coli (5.8%), Giardia intestinalis (4.1%), Iodamoeba butchilii (1.0%), Trichuris trichiura (1.0%), Pentatrichomonas hominis (0.7%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.7%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (0.7%). Prevalence of IPIs was significantly different by gender. Phylogenetic analysis of Blastocystis sp. and BLAST search revealed five different subtypes: ST3 (34.0%), ST1 (27.0%), ST2 (27.0%), ST4 (3.5%), ST8 (7.0%) and a non-identified subtype. Our findings demonstrate that intestinal parasite infection rates in rural areas of the Sumidouro municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil are still high and remain a challenge to public health. Moreover, our data reveals significant genetic heterogeneity of Blastocystis sp. subtypes and a possible novel subtype, whose confirmation will require additional data. Our study contributes to the understanding of potential routes of transmission, epidemiology, and genetic diversity of Blastocystis sp. in rural areas both at a regional and global scale.

  10. Intestinal Parasitic Infections and Environmental Water Contamination in a Rural Village of Northern Lao PDR.

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    Ribas, Alexis; Jollivet, Chloé; Morand, Serge; Thongmalayvong, Boupha; Somphavong, Silaphet; Siew, Chern-Chiang; Ting, Pei-Jun; Suputtamongkol, Saipin; Saensombath, Viengsaene; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Tan, Boon-Huan; Paboriboune, Phimpha; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Chaisiri, Kittipong

    2017-10-01

    A field survey studying intestinal parasites in humans and microbial pathogen contamination at environment was performed in a Laotian rural village to identify potential risks for disease outbreaks. A parasitological investigation was conducted in Ban Lak Sip village, Luang Prabang, Lao PDR involving fecal samples from 305 inhabitants as well as water samples taken from 3 sites of the local stream. Water analysis indicated the presence of several enteric pathogens, i.e., Aeromonas spp., Vibrio spp., E. coli H7, E. coli O157: H7, verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC), Shigella spp., and enteric adenovirus. The level of microbial pathogens contamination was associated with human activity, with greater levels of contamination found at the downstream site compared to the site at the village and upstream, respectively. Regarding intestinal parasites, the prevalence of helminth and protozoan infections were 68.9% and 27.2%, respectively. Eight helminth taxa were identified in fecal samples, i.e., 2 tapeworm species (Taenia sp. and Hymenolepis diminuta), 1 trematode (Opisthorchis sp.), and 5 nematodes (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, trichostrongylids, and hookworms). Six species of intestinal protists were identified, i.e., Blastocystis hominis, Cyclospora spp., Endolimax nana, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, Entamoeba coli, and Giardia lamblia. Questionnaires and interviews were also conducted to determine risk factors of infection. These analyses together with a prevailing infection level suggested that most of villagers were exposed to parasites in a similar degree due to limited socio-economic differences and sharing of similar practices. Limited access to effective public health facilities is also a significant contributing factor.

  11. Effect of Poor Access to Water and Sanitation As Risk Factors for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: Selectiveness by the Infective Route.

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    Adriana Echazú

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil-transmitted helminth (STH infections are a public health problem in resource-limited settings worldwide. Chronic STH infection impairs optimum learning and productivity, contributing to the perpetuation of the poverty-disease cycle. Regular massive drug administration (MDA is the cardinal recommendation for its control; along with water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH interventions. The impact of joint WASH interventions on STH infections has been reported; studies on the independent effect of WASH components are needed to contribute with the improvement of current recommendations for the control of STH. The aim of this study is to assess the association of lacking access to water and sanitation with STH infections, taking into account the differences in route of infection among species and the availability of adequate water and sanitation at home.Cross-sectional study, conducted in Salta province, Argentina. During a deworming program that enrolled 6957 individuals; 771 were randomly selected for stool/serum sampling for parasitological and serological diagnosis of STH. Bivariate stratified analysis was performed to explore significant correlations between risk factors and STH infections grouped by mechanism of entry as skin-penetrators (hookworms and Strongyloides stercoralis vs. orally-ingested (Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura. After controlling for potential confounders, unimproved sanitation was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of skin-penetrators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.9; 95% CI: 2.6-5.9. Unimproved drinking water was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of orally-ingested (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.7.Lack of safe water and proper sanitation pose a risk of STH infections that is distinct according to the route of entry to the human host used by each of the STH species. Interventions aimed to improve water and sanitation access should be highlighted in the recommendations

  12. Effect of Poor Access to Water and Sanitation As Risk Factors for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: Selectiveness by the Infective Route.

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    Echazú, Adriana; Bonanno, Daniela; Juarez, Marisa; Cajal, Silvana P; Heredia, Viviana; Caropresi, Silvia; Cimino, Ruben O; Caro, Nicolas; Vargas, Paola A; Paredes, Gladys; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J

    2015-09-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are a public health problem in resource-limited settings worldwide. Chronic STH infection impairs optimum learning and productivity, contributing to the perpetuation of the poverty-disease cycle. Regular massive drug administration (MDA) is the cardinal recommendation for its control; along with water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions. The impact of joint WASH interventions on STH infections has been reported; studies on the independent effect of WASH components are needed to contribute with the improvement of current recommendations for the control of STH. The aim of this study is to assess the association of lacking access to water and sanitation with STH infections, taking into account the differences in route of infection among species and the availability of adequate water and sanitation at home. Cross-sectional study, conducted in Salta province, Argentina. During a deworming program that enrolled 6957 individuals; 771 were randomly selected for stool/serum sampling for parasitological and serological diagnosis of STH. Bivariate stratified analysis was performed to explore significant correlations between risk factors and STH infections grouped by mechanism of entry as skin-penetrators (hookworms and Strongyloides stercoralis) vs. orally-ingested (Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura). After controlling for potential confounders, unimproved sanitation was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of skin-penetrators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.9; 95% CI: 2.6-5.9). Unimproved drinking water was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of orally-ingested (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.7). Lack of safe water and proper sanitation pose a risk of STH infections that is distinct according to the route of entry to the human host used by each of the STH species. Interventions aimed to improve water and sanitation access should be highlighted in the recommendations for the

  13. Patterns and risk factors of helminthiasis and anemia in a rural and a peri-urban community in Zanzibar, in the context of helminth control programs.

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    Stefanie Knopp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The control of helminth infections and prevention of anemia in developing countries are of considerable public health importance. The purpose of this study was to determine patterns and risk factors of helminth infections and anemia in a rural and a peri-urban community of Zanzibar, Tanzania, in the context of national helminth control programs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a community-based cross-sectional study in 454 individuals by examining at least two stool samples with different methods for soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Trichuris trichiura and one urine sample for Schistosoma haematobium. Finger-prick blood was taken to estimate anemia levels and to detect antibody reactions against ascariasis, strongyloidiasis and schistosomiasis, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA approach. Parasitological methods determined a helminth prevalence of 73.7% in the rural, and 48.9% in the peri-urban setting. Most helminth infections were of light intensity with school-aged children showing the highest intensities. Multiple helminth species infections were pervasive in rural dwellers regardless of age. More than half of the participants were anemic, with a particularly high prevalence in the peri-urban setting (64.7%. Risk factors for helminth infections were age, sex, consumption of raw vegetables or salad, recent travel history, and socio-economic status. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: After several years of chemotherapy-based morbidity control efforts in Zanzibar, helminth prevalences are still high and anemia is common, but helminth infection intensities are low. Hence, chemotherapy should be continued, and complemented with improved access to clean water, adequate sanitation, and health education, along with poverty alleviation measures for a more enduring impact.

  14. Prevalence of bacteria and intestinal parasites among food-handlers in Gondar town, northwest Ethiopia.

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    Andargie, Gashaw; Kassu, Afework; Moges, Feleke; Tiruneh, Moges; Huruy, Kahsay

    2008-12-01

    Food-handlers with poor personal hygiene working in food-service establishments could be potential sources of infection due to pathogenic organisms. The study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of bacteria and intestinal parasites among 127 food-handlers working in the cafeterias of the University of Gondar and the Gondar Teachers Training College, Gondar, Ethiopia. Fingernail contents of both the hands and stool specimens were collected from all the 127 food-handlers. The samples were examined for bacteria and intestinal parasites following standard procedures. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the predominant bacteria species (41.7%) isolated from fingernail contents, followed by Staphylococcus aureus (16.5%), Klebsiella species (5.5%), Escherichia coli (3.1%), Serratia species (1.58%), Citrobacter species (0.8%), and Enterobacter species (0.8%). Shigella species were isolated from stool samples of four food-handlers (3.1%). None of the food-handlers was positive for Salmonella species and Shigella species in respect of their fingernail contents. No intestinal parasites were detected from fingernail contents. Intestinal parasites detected in the stools of the food-handlers included Ascaris lumbricoides (18.11%), Strongyloides stercoralis (5.5%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (1.6%), Trichuris trichiura (1.6%), hookworm species (0.8%), Gardia lamblia (0.8%), and Schistosoma mansoni (0.8%); 1.6% of the study subjects were positive for each of A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura, hookworm, and G. lamblia. The findings emphasize the importance of food-handlers as potential sources of infections and suggest health institutions for appropriate hygienic and sanitary control measures.

  15. Hymenolepis nana Impact Among Children in the Highlands of Cusco, Peru: An Emerging Neglected Parasite Infection.

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    Cabada, Miguel M; Morales, Maria Luisa; Lopez, Martha; Reynolds, Spencer T; Vilchez, Elizabeth C; Lescano, Andres G; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Garcia, Hector Hugo; White, Clinton A

    2016-11-02

    Hymenolepis nana is the most common cestode infection in the world. However, limited information is available regarding its impact on affected populations. We studied the epidemiology and symptoms associated with hymenolepiasis among children 3-16 years old in 16 rural communities of the highlands of the Cusco region in Peru. Information on demographics, socioeconomic status, symptoms as reported by parents, and parasitological testing was obtained from the database of an ongoing Fasciola hepatica epidemiologic study. A total of 1,230 children were included in the study. Forty-five percent were infected with at least one pathogenic intestinal parasite. Giardia spp. (22.9%) was the most common, followed by Hymenolepis (17.4%), Fasciola (14.1%), Ascaris lumbricoides (6.1%), and Strongyloides stercoralis (2%). The prevalence of Hymenolepis infection varied by community, by other parasitic infections, and by socioeconomic status. However, only years of education of the mother, use of well water, and age less than 10 years were associated with Hymenolepis infection in the multivariate analysis. Hymenolepis nana infection was associated with diarrhea, jaundice, headaches, fever, and fatigue. Children with > 500 eggs/g of stool were more likely to have symptoms of weight loss, jaundice, diarrhea, and fever. Hymenolepis nana infection and age were the only factors retained in the multivariate analysis modeling diarrhea. Hymenolepiasis is a common gastrointestinal helminth in the Cusco region and is associated with significant morbidity in children in rural communities. The impact caused by the emergence of Hymenolepis as a prevalent intestinal parasite deserves closer scrutiny. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. Frecuencia de enteroparásitos en niños y niñas del primer ciclo de la educación escolar básica de Escuelas Públicas de Ciudad del Este, Paraguay

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    Gloria Elena Cardozo Ocampos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades parasitarias tienen amplia distribución mundial, y a pesar de los esfuerzos de los organismos de salud, siguen siendo un problema especialmente en los países en vias de desarrollo como el nuestro. El objetivo del presente trabajo, debidamente evaluado por la Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de la Bioética en Paraguay, fue la de determinar la tasa de frecuencia de enteroparásitos en niños y niñas del primer ciclo de la Educación Escolar Básica de Ciudad del Este (Paraguay. En el periodo de setiembre a diciembre del año 2006, fueron visitadas 48 escuelas públicas, durante el cual se recolectó muestras de materia fecal de 388 niños y niñas, entre 7 a 9 años, escogidos aleatoriamente. Las muestras colectadas fueron examinadas por cuatro métodos para la búsqueda de enteroparásitos, el Directo en fresco, Faust, Ritchie and Lutz. El porcentaje de las muestras positivas fue de 94,23%, donde fueron identificados siete tipos de protozoarios y cinco tipos de helmintos. La frecuencia de los enteroparasitos hallados en la población estudiada de la forma en la que sigue: Giardia duodenalis 67%; Entamoeba coli 52%; Blastocystis hominis 45%; Endolimax nana 31%; Chilomastix mesnili 8 %; Iodamoeba butschilii 3% ; Entamoeba histolytica 2% ; Hymenolepis nana 12%; Enterobius vermicularis 1%; Strongyloides stercoralis 2%; Ascaris lumbricoides 1% ; Uncinarias 2%.

  17. Intestinal parasitic infections among expatriate workers in various occupations in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

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    Abdelmunim Izzeldin Abdelrahman Dafalla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent throughout many countries. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasite carriers among 21,347 expatriate workers, including food handlers and housemaids attending the public health center laboratory in Sharjah, UAE. Stool sample collection was performed throughout the period between January and December 2013. All samples were examined microscopically. Demographic data were also obtained and analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 3.3% (708/21,347 of the studied samples (single and multiple infections. Among positive samples, six hundred and eighty-three samples (96.5% were positive for a single parasite: Giardia lamblia (257; 36.3% and Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (220; 31.1%, respectively, whereas mono-infections with helminths accounted for 206 (29.1% of the samples. Infection rates with single worms were: Ascaris lumbricoides (84; 11.9%, Hookworm (34; 4.8%, Trichuris trichiura (33; 4.7%, Taenia spp. (27; 3.81%, Strongyloides stercoralis (13; 1.8%, Hymenolepis nana (13; 1.8%, and Enterobius vermicularis (2; 0.28%, respectively. Infections were significantly associated with gender (x2 = 14.18; p = 0.002 with males as the most commonly infected with both groups of intestinal parasites (protozoa and helminths. A strong statistical association was noted correlating the parasite occurrence with certain nationalities (x2= 49.5, p <0.001. Furthermore, the study has also found a strong statistical correlation between parasite occurrence and occupation (x2= 15.60; p = 0.029. Multiple infections were not common (3.5% of the positive samples, although one individual (0.14% had four helminth species, concurrently. These findings emphasized that food handlers with different pathogenic parasitic organisms may pose a significant health risk to the public.

  18. Intestinal parasitic infections among expatriate workers in various occupations in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

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    Dafalla, Abdelmunim Izzeldin Abdelrahman; Almuhairi, Shaikha Ali Salem Obaid; AlHosani, Mohamed Hassan Jasim; Mohamed, Mira Yousif; Alkous, Mariam Ibrahim Ahmed; AlAzzawi, Mousa Abdelsattar; Abakar, Adam Dawoud; Nour, Bakri Yousif Mohamed; Hasan, Hayder; AbuOdeh, Ra'ed Omar; ElBakri, Ali

    2017-12-21

    Intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent throughout many countries. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasite carriers among 21,347 expatriate workers, including food handlers and housemaids attending the public health center laboratory in Sharjah, UAE. Stool sample collection was performed throughout the period between January and December 2013. All samples were examined microscopically. Demographic data were also obtained and analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 3.3% (708/21,347) of the studied samples (single and multiple infections). Among positive samples, six hundred and eighty-three samples (96.5%) were positive for a single parasite: Giardia lamblia (257; 36.3%) and Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (220; 31.1%), respectively, whereas mono-infections with helminths accounted for 206 (29.1%) of the samples. Infection rates with single worms were: Ascaris lumbricoides (84; 11.9%), Hookworm (34; 4.8%), Trichuris trichiura (33; 4.7%), Taenia spp. (27; 3.81%), Strongyloides stercoralis (13; 1.8%), Hymenolepis nana (13; 1.8%), and Enterobius vermicularis (2; 0.28%), respectively. Infections were significantly associated with gender (x2 = 14.18; p = 0.002) with males as the most commonly infected with both groups of intestinal parasites (protozoa and helminths). A strong statistical association was noted correlating the parasite occurrence with certain nationalities (x2= 49.5, p parasite occurrence and occupation (x2= 15.60; p = 0.029). Multiple infections were not common (3.5% of the positive samples), although one individual (0.14%) had four helminth species, concurrently. These findings emphasized that food handlers with different pathogenic parasitic organisms may pose a significant health risk to the public.

  19. Geospatial distribution of intestinal parasitic infections in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and its association with social determinants.

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    Faria, Clarissa Perez; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Dias, Gisele Silva; da Silva, Sidnei; de Freitas, Marcelo Bessa; Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Sousa, Maria do Céu

    2017-03-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections remain among the most common infectious diseases worldwide. This study aimed to estimate their prevalence and provide a detailed analysis of geographical distribution of intestinal parasites in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro, considering demographic, socio-economic, and epidemiological contextual factors. The cross-section survey was conducted among individuals attending the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases (FIOCRUZ, RJ) during the period from April 2012 to February 2015. Stool samples were collected and processed by sedimentation, flotation, Kato-Katz, Baermann-Moraes and Graham methods, iron haematoxylin staining and safranin staining. Of the 3245 individuals analysed, 569 (17.5%) were infected with at least one parasite. The most common protozoa were Endolimax nana (28.8%), Entamoeba coli (14.8%), Complex Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (13.5%), Blastocystis hominis (12.7%), and Giardia lamblia (8.1%). Strongyloides stercoralis (4.3%), Schistosoma mansoni (3.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1.6%), and hookworms (1.5%) were the most frequent helminths. There was a high frequency of contamination by protozoa (87%), and multiple infections were observed in 141 participants (24.8%). A positive association between age (young children) and gender (male) with intestinal parasites was observed. Geospatial distribution of the detected intestinal parasitic infections was not random or homogeneous, but was influenced by socioeconomic conditions (through the material deprivation index (MDI)). Participants classified in the highest levels of deprivation had higher risk of having intestinal parasites. This study provides the first epidemiological information on the prevalence and distribution of intestinal parasitic infections in the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area. Intestinal parasites, especially protozoa, are highly prevalent, indicating that parasitic infections are still a serious public health problem

  20. Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria spp. and other endoparasite infections in kennel dogs in central Italy

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    Sauda, Federica; Malandrucco, Livia; Macrì, Gladia; Scarpulla, Manuela; De Liberato, Claudio; Terracciano, Giuliana; Fichi, Gianluca; Berrilli, Federica; Perrucci, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    Prevalence and risk factors of Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria spp. and other potentially zoonotic or canine-specific endoparasite infections were assessed in 639 kennel dogs from central Italy. To this end, individual blood and fecal samples were examined using parasitological, immunological and molecular techniques. The presence of compatible clinical pictures, as well as age and gender were considered as putative risks factors. To evaluate risk factors, multivariable analysis with logistic regression and univariable analysis with a Chi square test and a Fischer’s exact test were performed. Overall, 52.6% of dogs (95% CI 48.6-56.5) were found positive, while 39.6% of dogs (95% CI 35.8-43.5) were infected by potentially zoonotic species. Leishmania infantum and Dirofilaria repens showed prevalences of 2.5% (95% CI 1.5-4.1) and 2.8% (95% CI 1.7-4.5), respectively. The prevalence of cardiorespiratory parasites was 7.8% (95% CI 5.9-10.3) and included the species Angiostrongylus vasorum, Eucoleus aerophilus, Eucoleus boehmi and D. immitis; the latter showed a prevalence of 0.2% (95% CI 0.001-1). Intestinal parasites were significantly prevalent (38.8%, 95% CI 35-42.7) and they consisted mainly of species of major zoonotic concern, including ancylostomatids, Toxocara canis, Giardia duodenalis, Dipylidium caninum, Taeniidae, Strongyloides stercoralis and Cryptosporidium parvum. Endoparasites were significantly prevalent in clinically suspected dogs. Leishmania infantum and cardiorespiratory nematodes were prevalent in older dogs, while intestinal parasites were prevalent in younger dogs. Results show high dog and public health risks in kennels in central Italy, and suggest the need for more effective control measures. PMID:29388550

  1. Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria spp. and other endoparasite infections in kennel dogs in central Italy

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    Sauda Federica

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence and risk factors of Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria spp. and other potentially zoonotic or canine-specific endoparasite infections were assessed in 639 kennel dogs from central Italy. To this end, individual blood and fecal samples were examined using parasitological, immunological and molecular techniques. The presence of compatible clinical pictures, as well as age and gender were considered as putative risks factors. To evaluate risk factors, multivariable analysis with logistic regression and univariable analysis with a Chi square test and a Fischer’s exact test were performed. Overall, 52.6% of dogs (95% CI 48.6-56.5 were found positive, while 39.6% of dogs (95% CI 35.8-43.5 were infected by potentially zoonotic species. Leishmania infantum and Dirofilaria repens showed prevalences of 2.5% (95% CI 1.5-4.1 and 2.8% (95% CI 1.7-4.5, respectively. The prevalence of cardiorespiratory parasites was 7.8% (95% CI 5.9-10.3 and included the species Angiostrongylus vasorum, Eucoleus aerophilus, Eucoleus boehmi and D. immitis; the latter showed a prevalence of 0.2% (95% CI 0.001-1. Intestinal parasites were significantly prevalent (38.8%, 95% CI 35-42.7 and they consisted mainly of species of major zoonotic concern, including ancylostomatids, Toxocara canis, Giardia duodenalis, Dipylidium caninum, Taeniidae, Strongyloides stercoralis and Cryptosporidium parvum. Endoparasites were significantly prevalent in clinically suspected dogs. Leishmania infantum and cardiorespiratory nematodes were prevalent in older dogs, while intestinal parasites were prevalent in younger dogs. Results show high dog and public health risks in kennels in central Italy, and suggest the need for more effective control measures.

  2. Intestinal parasites isolated in a large teaching hospital, Italy, 1 May 2006 to 31 December 2008.

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    Masucci, L; Graffeo, R; Bani, S; Bugli, F; Boccia, S; Nicolotti, N; Fiori, B; Fadda, G; Spanu, T

    2011-06-16

    Intestinal parasites account for the majority of parasitic diseases, particularly in endemic areas. Most are transmitted via contaminated food. Because of increased immigration and travel, enteric parasitoses are now distributed worldwide. Between May 2006 and December 2008, we examined stool specimens from 5,351 patients (4,695 Italians, 656 non-Italians) for ova and parasites using microscopy, culture techniques, and molecular methods. Stools from 594 patients (11.1%) were contaminated and for all patients samples combined, a total of 700 intestinal parasites were counted. Ninety of the 594 infected patients had more than one parasite in their stools. Parasites causing intestinal disease occurred in 8.8% of patients. The prevalence was over twice as high among non-Italians (26.8% vs 8.9% in Italians, p003). Most isolates were pathogenic protozoa, including in decreasing order of frequency: Blastocystis hominis, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Cyclospora cayetanensis. The latter two species tended to be more common in Italians, although not at significant level (3.6% (15/418) vs 1.7% (3/176) in non-Italians, OR: 2.15; 95%CI: 0.60–11.70, p=0.22). Helminthes were found in 28 patients, mainly non-Italians (5.7% (10/176) vs 4.3% (18/418), OR: 1.34; 95%CI: 0.54–3.13, p=0.47). Ascaris lumbricoides and Hymenolepis nana were the most common. Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, Taenia spp. and Trichuris trichiura were also found. Intestinal parasites are a serious problem in developing countries, but should not be underestimated in industrialised countries.

  3. Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in patients with HIV/AIDS by using a simplified iron hematoxylin technique

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    Juliana Alves Garcia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Studies strongly indicate Dientamoeba fragilis as one of the causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients. METHODS: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of D. fragilis associated with the causes of diarrhea in 82 HIV/ AIDS patients hospitalized at the Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas from September 2006 to November 2008. RESULTS: In total, 105 samples were collected from 82 patients. Unprotected sex was the most frequent cause of HIV infection (46.3%, followed by the use of injectable or non-injectable drugs (14.6%. Patients presented with viral loads of 49-750,000 copies/ mL (average: 73,849 ± 124,850 copies/mL and CD4 counts ranging of 2-1,306 cells/mm³ (average: 159 ± 250 cells/mm³. On an average, the odds of obtaining a positive result by using the other techniques (Hoffman, Pons and Janer or Lutz; Ritchie were 2.7 times higher than the chance of obtaining a positive result by using the simplified iron hematoxylin method. Significant differences were found between the methods (p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: The other techniques can detect a significantly greater amount of parasites than the simplified iron hematoxylin method, especially with respect to Isospora belli, Cryptosporidium sp., Schistosoma mansoni, and Strongyloides stercoralis, which were not detected using hematoxylin. Endolimax nana and D. fragilis were detected more frequently on using hematoxylin, and the only parasite not found by the other methods was D. fragilis.

  4. Identification of human intestinal parasites affecting an asymptomatic peri-urban Argentinian population using multi-parallel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

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    Cimino, Rubén O; Jeun, Rebecca; Juarez, Marisa; Cajal, Pamela S; Vargas, Paola; Echazú, Adriana; Bryan, Patricia E; Nasser, Julio; Krolewiecki, Alejandro; Mejia, Rojelio

    2015-07-17

    In resource-limited countries, stool microscopy is the diagnostic test of choice for intestinal parasites (soil-transmitted helminths and/or intestinal protozoa). However, sensitivity and specificity is low. Improved diagnosis of intestinal parasites is especially important for accurate measurements of prevalence and intensity of infections in endemic areas. The study was carried out in Orán, Argentina. A total of 99 stool samples from a local surveillance campaign were analyzed by concentration microscopy and McMaster egg counting technique compared to the analysis by multi-parallel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). This study compared the performance of qPCR assay and stool microscopy for 8 common intestinal parasites that infect humans including the helminths Ascaris lumbricoides, Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Strongyloides stercoralis, Trichuris trichiura, and the protozoa Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, and Entamoeba histolytica, and investigated the prevalence of polyparasitism in an endemic area. qPCR showed higher detection rates for all parasites as compared to stool microscopy except T. trichiura. Species-specific primers and probes were able to distinguish between A. duodenale (19.1%) and N. americanus (36.4%) infections. There were 48.6% of subjects co-infected with both hookworms, and a significant increase in hookworm DNA for A. duodenale versus N. americanus (119.6 fg/μL: 0.63 fg/μL, P parasites in an endemic area that has improved diagnostic accuracy compared to stool microscopy. This first time use of multi-parallel qPCR in Argentina has demonstrated the high prevalence of intestinal parasites in a peri-urban area. These results will contribute to more accurate epidemiological survey, refined treatment strategies on a public scale, and better health outcomes in endemic settings.

  5. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity.

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    Aprilianto E Wiria

    Full Text Available Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth (STH-infected subjects are more insulin sensitive than STH-uninfected subjects.We performed a cross-sectional study on Flores island, Indonesia, an area with high prevalence of STH infections.From 646 adults, stool samples were screened for Trichuris trichiura by microscopy and for Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis by qPCR. No other helminth was found. We collected data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, fasting blood glucose (FBG, mmol/L, insulin (pmol/L, high sensitive C-reactive protein (ng/ml and Immunoglobulin E (IU/ml. The homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMAIR was calculated and regression models were used to assess the association between STH infection status and insulin resistance.424 (66% participants had at least one STH infection. STH infected participants had lower BMI (23.2 vs 22.5 kg/m2, p value = 0.03 and lower HOMAIR (0.97 vs 0.81, p value = 0.05. In an age-, sex- and BMI-adjusted model a significant association was seen between the number of infections and HOMAIR: for every additional infection with STH species, the HOMAIR decreased by 0.10 (p for linear trend 0.01. This effect was mainly accounted for by a decrease in insulin of 4.9 pmol/L for every infection (p for trend = 0.07.STH infections are associated with a modest improvement of insulin sensitivity, which is not accounted for by STH effects on BMI alone.

  6. The Risk of Chronic Gastrointestinal Disorders Following Acute Infection with Intestinal Parasites

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    Jason Blitz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious gastroenteritis (IGE is caused by numerous bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens. A history of IGE has been shown in previous studies to increase the risk of developing chronic gastrointestinal disorders and other chronic conditions. As bacteria and viruses represent the majority of pathogen-specific causes of IGE, post-infectious studies have primarily focused on these organisms. The objective of this study was to investigate an association between a history of parasite-associated IGE and the subsequent development of chronic post-infectious gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal disorders in a military population.Methods: International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM diagnostic coding data for primary exposures and outcomes were obtained for a retrospective cohort study of active component military personnel from 1998 to 2013. Exposed subjects consisted of individuals with documented infection with one of ten parasitic pathogens. Unexposed subjects were matched to exposed subjects on demographic and operational deployment history parameters. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs were estimated using logistic regression for several chronic disorders previously shown to be associated with a history of IGE.Results: A total of 896 subjects with a parasitic exposure were matched to 3681 unexposed subjects for multivariate regression analysis. Individuals infected with Balantidium coli, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis, Necator americanus/Ancylostoma duodenale, and Taenia spp. had higher aOR for development of several chronic gastrointestinal disorders when compared with unexposed subjects after controlling for various covariates.Conclusion: We found that parasite-associated enteric infection increases the risk of development of post-infectious chronic gastrointestinal disorders in a military population. These results require confirmation in similar populations and in the

  7. Prevalencia de helmintos intestinales en caninos del departamento del Quindío.

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    María Isabel Giraldo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los helmintos intestinales son agentes patógenos que afectan animales domésticos y que a través de ellos pueden infectar humanos. Objetivo. El objetivo del trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de helmintos intestinales en perros con dueño del departamento del Quindío. Materiales y métodos. Estudio descriptivo prospectivo. Se aplicó una encuesta epidemiológica a los propietarios de los perros. Se recolectaron muestras de heces de los caninos registrados en la jornada de vacunación antirrábica del 2003 en el departamento del Quindío. Las muestras de materia fecal frescas fueron analizadas utilizando la técnica de diagnóstico de Ritchie. Resultados. Se analizaron 324 muestras de heces caninas; el 67,6% de los perros eran de razas puras y el 32,4% razas mestizas. Se encontró una prevalencia del 22,2%; Ancylostoma caninum fue el parásito más frecuente, 13,9%. También se observó Trichuris vulpis, 4,3%; Toxocara canis, 2,5%, y Strongyloides stercoralis, 4,0%. El 2,46% de las mascotas se encontraron multiparasitadas. Conclusión. La frecuencia de helmintos intestinales en el departamento del Quindío fue de 22,2% y la presencia de estos parásitos coincide con factores como la edad y la permanencia del canino en la calle, entre otros. Por esta razón, es necesario establecer programas de vigilancia y prevención en la población humana y canina.

  8. [Schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis among schoolchildren of Nikki and Pèrèrè, two northeastern towns of Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibikounlé, M; Gbédjissi, L G; Ogouyèmi-Hounto, A; Batcho, W; Kindé-Gazard, D; Massougbodji, A

    2014-08-01

    Infection with schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis are widespread in sub-Saharan Africa and the burden of disease associated with parasites is enormous. A study was performed to determine the transmission and prevalence of human schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis among school children of Nikki and Perere, two north eastern towns of Benin, bordering Republic of Nigeria. Parasitological investigations by urine filtration and Kato-Katz conducted on 1,344 school children indicated a mean prevalence of S. haematobium and S. mansoni 48.44% and 0%, respectively, in the children of Nikki area and 45.24% and 4.11% in Perere area. Only schoolchildren of Sonon locality were infected by S. mansoni with a mean prevalence rate of 36.24%. KatoKatz tests releaved five species of soil-transmitted helminths: Ankylostoma duodenale (8.16% and 6.73%), Ascaris lumbricoides (6.26% and 2.30%), Enterobius vermicularis (1.09% and 1.97%), Trichuris trichiura (1.97% and 1.90%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (2.04% and 0.99%), respectively, in the schoolchildren of Nikki and Perere areas. The malacological investigations carried out in the freshwater points of each visited locality highlighted the presence of four species of freshwater snails known as intermediate host of schistosome: Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Bulinus forskalii, B. globosus and B. truncatus.Two B. globosus and B. pfeifferi collected in Sonon locality were naturally infected by schistosome, indicated the importance of their two species of snail in schistosome transmission cycle.

  9. Patterns and risk factors of helminthiasis and anemia in a rural and a peri-urban community in Zanzibar, in the context of helminth control programs.

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    Knopp, Stefanie; Mohammed, Khalfan A; Stothard, J Russell; Khamis, I Simba; Rollinson, David; Marti, Hanspeter; Utzinger, Jürg

    2010-05-11

    The control of helminth infections and prevention of anemia in developing countries are of considerable public health importance. The purpose of this study was to determine patterns and risk factors of helminth infections and anemia in a rural and a peri-urban community of Zanzibar, Tanzania, in the context of national helminth control programs. We carried out a community-based cross-sectional study in 454 individuals by examining at least two stool samples with different methods for soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Trichuris trichiura) and one urine sample for Schistosoma haematobium. Finger-prick blood was taken to estimate anemia levels and to detect antibody reactions against ascariasis, strongyloidiasis and schistosomiasis, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) approach. Parasitological methods determined a helminth prevalence of 73.7% in the rural, and 48.9% in the peri-urban setting. Most helminth infections were of light intensity with school-aged children showing the highest intensities. Multiple helminth species infections were pervasive in rural dwellers regardless of age. More than half of the participants were anemic, with a particularly high prevalence in the peri-urban setting (64.7%). Risk factors for helminth infections were age, sex, consumption of raw vegetables or salad, recent travel history, and socio-economic status. After several years of chemotherapy-based morbidity control efforts in Zanzibar, helminth prevalences are still high and anemia is common, but helminth infection intensities are low. Hence, chemotherapy should be continued, and complemented with improved access to clean water, adequate sanitation, and health education, along with poverty alleviation measures for a more enduring impact.

  10. Geospatial distribution of intestinal parasitic infections in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and its association with social determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Clarissa Perez; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Dias, Gisele Silva; da Silva, Sidnei; de Freitas, Marcelo Bessa; Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Sousa, Maria do Céu

    2017-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections remain among the most common infectious diseases worldwide. This study aimed to estimate their prevalence and provide a detailed analysis of geographical distribution of intestinal parasites in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro, considering demographic, socio-economic, and epidemiological contextual factors. Methods/Principal findings The cross-section survey was conducted among individuals attending the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases (FIOCRUZ, RJ) during the period from April 2012 to February 2015. Stool samples were collected and processed by sedimentation, flotation, Kato-Katz, Baermann-Moraes and Graham methods, iron haematoxylin staining and safranin staining. Of the 3245 individuals analysed, 569 (17.5%) were infected with at least one parasite. The most common protozoa were Endolimax nana (28.8%), Entamoeba coli (14.8%), Complex Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (13.5%), Blastocystis hominis (12.7%), and Giardia lamblia (8.1%). Strongyloides stercoralis (4.3%), Schistosoma mansoni (3.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1.6%), and hookworms (1.5%) were the most frequent helminths. There was a high frequency of contamination by protozoa (87%), and multiple infections were observed in 141 participants (24.8%). A positive association between age (young children) and gender (male) with intestinal parasites was observed. Geospatial distribution of the detected intestinal parasitic infections was not random or homogeneous, but was influenced by socioeconomic conditions (through the material deprivation index (MDI)). Participants classified in the highest levels of deprivation had higher risk of having intestinal parasites. Conclusions/Significance This study provides the first epidemiological information on the prevalence and distribution of intestinal parasitic infections in the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area. Intestinal parasites, especially protozoa, are highly prevalent, indicating that

  11. Survey of Dogs’ Parasites in Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran

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    GhR Razmi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Dog is known to act as definitive host for some parasites that cause important diseases in man and animals. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Neospora caninum and other intestinal parasites in dogs in Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran. "nMethods: A cross-sectional study was done concerning frequency of N. canium and other in­testinal parasites in dogs in Mashhad area. Totally, 174 fecal samples from 89 farm dogs and 85 household dogs were collected from 2006 to 2007. Fecal samples were examined for de­tecting intestinal parasites by Mini Parasep®SF faecal parasite concentrator in Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran "nResults: The overall prevalence of other intestinal parasites in farm dogs and household dogs were 29.21% and 14.11%, respectively. Seven parasites were found in farm dogs as follows: Toxocara canis 17.9%, Taenia sp. 10.1% , Strongyloides stercoralis 5.6%, Hammondia Neo­spora-like oocysts (HNLO 4.4% , Isospora sp. 7.8 %, Sarcocystis sp. 7.8 % and   Giardia sp. 1.1%  and four parasite in housed dogs:  Toxocara. 4.4%, Taenia sp. 3.3 % , Isospora sp. 2.3 % and  Sarcocystis sp. 4.7 %.  The fecal samples with HNLO were examined by N. caninum -specific PCR, and two of samples were positive for N. caninum. "nConclusion: The farm and household dogs are the source of some important zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases in Iran .

  12. High malnutrition rate in Venezuelan Yanomami compared to Warao Amerindians and Creoles: significant associations with intestinal parasites and anemia.

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    Verhagen, Lilly M; Incani, Renzo N; Franco, Carolina R; Ugarte, Alejandra; Cadenas, Yeneska; Sierra Ruiz, Carmen I; Hermans, Peter W M; Hoek, Denise; Campos Ponce, Maiza; de Waard, Jacobus H; Pinelli, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Children in rural areas experience the interrelated problems of poor growth, anemia and parasitic infections. We investigated the prevalence of and associations between intestinal helminth and protozoan infections, malnutrition and anemia in school-age Venezuelan children. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 390 children aged 4-16 years from three rural areas of Venezuela: the Amazon Region, Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State. Stool samples were collected for direct parasitic examinations. Anthropometric indicators of chronic (height-for-age Z score) and acute (weight-for-height and Body Mass Index (BMI)-for-age Z score in respectively children under 5 years of age and children aged 5 years and above) malnutrition were calculated. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models were built to determine factors associated with nutritional status and polyparasitism. Hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis prevalences were highest in children from the Amazon rainforest (respectively 72% and 18%) while children from the Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State showed higher rates of Ascaris lumbricoides (respectively 28% and 37%) and Trichuris trichiura (40% in both regions). The prevalence of Giardia lamblia infection was not significantly different between regions (average: 18%). Anemia prevalence was highest in the Amazon Region (24%). Hemoglobin levels were significantly decreased in children with a hookworm infection. Malnutrition was present in respectively 84%, 30% and 13% of children from the Amazon Region, Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State. In multivariate analysis including all regions, G. lamblia and helminth infections were significantly and negatively associated with respectively height-for-age and weight-for-height/BMI-for-age Z scores. Furthermore, hemoglobin levels were positively associated with the height-for-age Z score (0.11, 95% CI 0.02 - 0.20). In rural populations in Venezuela helminthiasis and giardiasis were associated with acute and chronic

  13. High malnutrition rate in Venezuelan Yanomami compared to Warao Amerindians and Creoles: significant associations with intestinal parasites and anemia.

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    Lilly M Verhagen

    Full Text Available Children in rural areas experience the interrelated problems of poor growth, anemia and parasitic infections. We investigated the prevalence of and associations between intestinal helminth and protozoan infections, malnutrition and anemia in school-age Venezuelan children.This cross-sectional study was conducted in 390 children aged 4-16 years from three rural areas of Venezuela: the Amazon Region, Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State. Stool samples were collected for direct parasitic examinations. Anthropometric indicators of chronic (height-for-age Z score and acute (weight-for-height and Body Mass Index (BMI-for-age Z score in respectively children under 5 years of age and children aged 5 years and above malnutrition were calculated. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models were built to determine factors associated with nutritional status and polyparasitism.Hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis prevalences were highest in children from the Amazon rainforest (respectively 72% and 18% while children from the Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State showed higher rates of Ascaris lumbricoides (respectively 28% and 37% and Trichuris trichiura (40% in both regions. The prevalence of Giardia lamblia infection was not significantly different between regions (average: 18%. Anemia prevalence was highest in the Amazon Region (24%. Hemoglobin levels were significantly decreased in children with a hookworm infection. Malnutrition was present in respectively 84%, 30% and 13% of children from the Amazon Region, Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State. In multivariate analysis including all regions, G. lamblia and helminth infections were significantly and negatively associated with respectively height-for-age and weight-for-height/BMI-for-age Z scores. Furthermore, hemoglobin levels were positively associated with the height-for-age Z score (0.11, 95% CI 0.02 - 0.20.In rural populations in Venezuela helminthiasis and giardiasis were associated with acute and

  14. Marked seasonality of Cyclospora cayetanensis infections: ten-year observation of hospital cases, Honduras.

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    Kaminsky, Rina Girard; Lagos, Javier; Raudales Santos, Gabriela; Urrutia, Samuel

    2016-02-04

    Document seasonality occurrence and epidemiologic characteristics of Cyclospora cayetanensis infections during a 10-year period from patients consulting at the University Hospital, Honduras. Retrospective non interventional hospital-based study analyzed laboratory results from the period 2002 to 2011 of fresh and Ziehl-Nielsen carbolfuchsin stained routine stool samples received for parasitologic examination. Sporadically a sample with numerous oocysts was allowed to sporulate in 2.5 % potassium dichromate confirming the presence of bi-cystic bi-zoic oocysts. A total of 35,157 fecal samples were examined during a ten-year span, of which a third (28.4 %) was stained by the Ziehl-Neelsen carbolfuchsin method diagnosing a total of 125 (1.3 %) C.cayetanensis infections. A statistically significant apparent seasonality was observed most years during May to August (range p < 0.036-0.001), with 83.3 % of 125 cases occurring in those rainy months. All C. cayetanensis cases came from urban poor neighborhoods; male/female relation was 1:1 except in 2006, when all patients were females (p = 0.05; r(2) = 22,448). Forty four point eight percent of the stool samples were diarrheic or liquid and 65.6 % infections were identified in children 10 years old or less. Enteric helminths and protozoa co-infected Cyclospora positive patients in 52 instances.: 8 % Ascaris lumbricoides, 8 % Giardia duodenalis, 23.2 % Blastocystis spp. and less frequently Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Trichuris trichiura. Results suggest a seasonal pattern for Cyclospora infections diagnosed in a clinical setting during the rainy months in Tegucigalpa and surrounding areas. Community studies should be conducted to support or dispute these observations.

  15. Etiology of Diarrhea in Children Younger Than 5 Years Attending the Bengo General Hospital in Angola.

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    Gasparinho, Carolina; Mirante, Maria Clara; Centeno-Lima, Sónia; Istrate, Claudia; Mayer, António Carlos; Tavira, Luis; Nery, Susana Vaz; Brito, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Diarrheal disease is among the leading causes of death in children younger than 5 years, especially in developing countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the most frequent etiological agents of diarrhea and its associated factors in children younger than 5 years attending the Bengo General Hospital in Angola. From September 2012 through December 2013, stool samples were collected from 344 children presenting with diarrhea to investigate the presence of viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. Relevant sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained from parents and caregivers. An enteric pathogen was detected in 66.6% of stool samples: Cryptosporidium spp. (30.0%), rotavirus (25.1%), Giardia lamblia (21.6%), diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (6.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (4.1%), adenovirus (3.8%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3.5%), astrovirus (2.6%), Hymenolepis nana (1.7%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (0.9%), Taenia spp. (0.6%), Trichuris trichiura (0.3%) and Entamoeba histolytica (0.3%). Children younger than 12 months were more frequently infected with Cryptosporidium spp. compared with older children (age: 12-59 months), independently of sex, season, lethargy and wasting [odds ratio (OR): 3.5, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.0-6.2]. Age (OR: 5.0, 95% CI: 2.6-9.3), vomiting (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8) and type of admission (inpatients, OR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9) were significantly associated with rotavirus infection. This study demonstrates high rates of infection with an enteric pathogen, particularly in children younger than 12 months, emphasizing the need to address diarrheal disease in this age group.

  16. A Schistosoma haematobium-specific real-time PCR for diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis in serum samples of international travelers and migrants.

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    Cnops, Lieselotte; Soentjens, Patrick; Clerinx, Jan; Van Esbroeck, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis by microscopy and serological tests may be elusive in travelers due to low egg load and the absence of seroconversion upon arrival. There is need for a more sensitive diagnostic test. Therefore, we developed a real-time PCR targeting the Schistosoma haematobium-specific Dra1 sequence. The PCR was evaluated on urine (n = 111), stool (n = 84) and serum samples (n = 135), and one biopsy from travelers and migrants with confirmed or suspected schistosomiasis. PCR revealed a positive result in 7/7 urine samples, 11/11 stool samples and 1/1 biopsy containing S. haematobium eggs as demonstrated by microscopy and in 22/23 serum samples from patients with a parasitological confirmed S. haematobium infection. S. haematobium DNA was additionally detected by PCR in 7 urine, 3 stool and 5 serum samples of patients suspected of having schistosomiasis without egg excretion in urine and feces. None of these suspected patients demonstrated other parasitic infections except one with Blastocystis hominis and Entamoeba cyst in a fecal sample. The PCR was negative in all stool samples containing S. mansoni eggs (n = 21) and in all serum samples of patients with a microscopically confirmed S. mansoni (n = 22), Ascaris lumbricoides (n = 1), Ancylostomidae (n = 1), Strongyloides stercoralis (n = 1) or Trichuris trichuria infection (n = 1). The PCR demonstrated a high specificity, reproducibility and analytical sensitivity (0.5 eggs per gram of feces). The real-time PCR targeting the Dra1 sequence for S. haematobium-specific detection in urine, feces, and particularly serum, is a promising tool to confirm the diagnosis, also during the acute phase of urogenital schistosomiasis.

  17. High frequency of parasitic and viral stool pathogens in patients with active ulcerative colitis: report from a tropical country.

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    Banerjee, Debabrata; Deb, Rachana; Dar, Lalit; Mirdha, Bijay R; Pati, Sunil K; Thareja, Sandeep; Falodia, Sushil; Ahuja, Vineet

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoeal relapses in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) may be associated with enteric infections and its diagnosis may lessen avoidable exposure to corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of stool pathogens (parasitic and viral) in patients with active UC. This prospective cross-sectional study included 49 consecutive patients (32 M, 17 F, mean age 35.8+/-12 years) with active UC. Three stool samples were collected from each patient and examined for parasitic infection. Rectal biopsies were obtained during sigmoidoscopy to demonstrate cytomegalovirus (CMV) inclusion bodies and to conduct qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for CMV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA detection. Median duration of illness was 3.9+/-3.7 years and 83.7% of the patients had moderate to severe disease. The prevalence of parasitic infections in UC was 12%. The organisms isolated were Strongyloides stercoralis in 4%, Ankylostoma duodenale in 4%, Cryptosporidium in 2% and Entamoeba histolytica in 2% of the patients. The prevalence of CMV and HSV in rectal biopsies using qualitative PCR was 8% and 10%, respectively. No predictive factor was identified with CMV superinfection in patients with active UC. In India there is a high prevalence of parasitic and viral infections in patients with active UC. The results of the study suggest that, in tropical countries with a known high prevalence of parasitic diseases, aggressive evaluation for parasitic and viral infections should be carried out, as early identification and prompt treatment of such infections can improve the clinical course of patients with active UC.

  18. A cross-sectional study on intestinal parasitic infections in rural communities, northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Boonmars, Thidarut; Kaewsamut, Butsara; Ekobol, Nuttapon; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Juasook, Amornrat; Sriraj, Pranee

    2013-12-01

    Despite the existence of effective anthelmintics, parasitic infections remain a major public health problem in Southeast Asia, including Thailand. In rural communities, continuing infection is often reinforced by dietary habits that have a strong cultural basis and by poor personal hygiene and sanitation. This study presents a survey of the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the people in rural Thailand. The community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in villages in Khon Kaen Province, northeastern Thailand, from March to August 2013. A total of 253 stool samples from 102 males and 140 females, aged 2-80 years, were prepared using formalin-ethyl acetate concentration methods and examined using light microscopy. Ninety-four individuals (37.2%) were infected with 1 or more parasite species. Presence of parasitic infection was significantly correlated with gender (P=0.001); nearly half of males in this survey (49.0%) were infected. Older people had a higher prevalence than younger members of the population. The most common parasite found was Opisthorchis viverrini (26.9%), followed by Strongyloides stercoralis (9.5%), Taenia spp. (1.6%), echinostomes (0.4%), and hookworms (0.4%). The prevalence of intestinal protozoa was Blastocystis hominis 1.6%, Entamoeba histolytica 0.8%, Entamoeba coli 0.8%, Balantidium coli 0.4%, Iodamoeba bütschlii 0.4%, and Sarcocystis hominis 0.4%. Co-infections of various helminths and protozoa were present in 15.9% of the people. The present results show that the prevalence of parasitic infections in this region is still high. Proactive education about dietary habits, personal hygiene, and sanitation should be provided to the people in this community to reduce the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections. Moreover, development of policies and programs to control parasites is needed.

  19. Prevalencia del Enteroparasitismo en escolares de comunidades nativas del Alto Marañon, Amazonas, Perú

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    Nicanor Ibáñez H

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar la prevalencia de infección por protozoarios y helmintos intestinales y su relación con el sexo, localidad de procedencia y grupo etáreo, en escolares nativos de la zona selvática del Alto Marañón, provincia de Bagua, departamento de Amazonas, Perú. Materiales y métodos: En este estudio transversal-observacional se seleccionó a los colegios representativos de la mencionada región lográndose examinar las muestras fecales de 1049 escolares de seis a 15 años de edad, entre octubre de 2001 y octubre de 2002, usando las técnicas microscópicas de observación directa, con solución salina fisiológica y lugol, de Teleman y de Kinnyoun. Resultados: La prevalencia de los protozoos y helmintos intestinales hallados es: Entamoeba coli 68,0%; Blastocystis hominis 28,4%; Endolimax nana 23,9%; Iodamoeba butschlii 32,9%; Giardia lamblia 21,4%; Entamoeba histolytica/dispar 12,9%; Cryptosporidium sp 01,9%; Paragonimus peruvianus 00,7% y Fasciola hepatica 00,2% (que no son parásitos intestinales sino de ubicación pulmonar y de vías biliares, respectivamente, pero sus huevos se encuentran en el contenido intestinal; Ancylostoma/Necartor 30,4%; Ascaris lumbricoides 28,9%; Trichocephalus trichiura 16,6%; Enterobius vermicularis 03,6%; Hymenolepis nana 03,5%; Taenia solium/saginata 00,2%; Strongyloides stercoralis 00,8% e H. diminuta 00,2%. Conclusiones: Ancylostoma/Necartor y A. lumbricoides se presentaron con mayor prevalencia en las poblaciones de menor edad de las comunidades de Mesones Muro y Nazaret, mientras que la infección humana por P. peruvianus se registra por primera vez en la región nororiental del Perú.

  20. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among highland and lowland dwellers in Gamo area, South Ethiopia

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    Wegayehu Teklu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological information on the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in different regions is a prerequisite to develop appropriate control strategies. Therefore, this present study was conducted to assess the magnitude and pattern of intestinal parasitism in highland and lowland dwellers in Gamo area, South Ethiopia. Methods Community-based cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2010 and July 2011 at Lante, Kolla Shelle, Dorze and Geressie kebeles of Gamo Gofa Zone, South Ethiopia. The study sites and study participants were selected using multistage sampling method. Data were gathered through house-to-house survey. A total of 858 stool specimens were collected and processed using direct wet mount and formol-ether concentration techniques for the presence of parasite. Results Out of the total examined subjects, 342(39.9% were found positive for at least one intestinal parasite. The prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar was the highest 98(11.4%, followed by Giardia lamblia 91(10.6%, Ascaris lumbricoides 67(7.8%, Strongyloides stercoralis 51(5.9%, hookworm 42(4.9%, Trichuris trichiura 24(2.8%, Taenia species 18(2.1%, Hymenolepis nana 7(0.6% and Schistosoma mansoni 1(0.12%. No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among lowland (37.9% and highland dwellers (42.3% (P = 0.185. The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was not significantly different among the study sites but it was relatively higher in Geressie (42.8% than other kebeles. Sex was not associated with parasitic infections (P = 0.481. No statistically significant difference of infection was observed among the age groups (P = 0.228 but it was higher in reproductive age group. Conclusions The high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the lowland and highland dwellers in Gamo area indicated that parasitic infections are important public

  1. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among highland and lowland dwellers in Gamo area, South Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegayehu, Teklu; Tsalla, Tsegaye; Seifu, Belete; Teklu, Takele

    2013-02-18

    Epidemiological information on the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in different regions is a prerequisite to develop appropriate control strategies. Therefore, this present study was conducted to assess the magnitude and pattern of intestinal parasitism in highland and lowland dwellers in Gamo area, South Ethiopia. Community-based cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2010 and July 2011 at Lante, Kolla Shelle, Dorze and Geressie kebeles of Gamo Gofa Zone, South Ethiopia. The study sites and study participants were selected using multistage sampling method. Data were gathered through house-to-house survey. A total of 858 stool specimens were collected and processed using direct wet mount and formol-ether concentration techniques for the presence of parasite. Out of the total examined subjects, 342(39.9%) were found positive for at least one intestinal parasite. The prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar was the highest 98(11.4%), followed by Giardia lamblia 91(10.6%), Ascaris lumbricoides 67(7.8%), Strongyloides stercoralis 51(5.9%), hookworm 42(4.9%), Trichuris trichiura 24(2.8%), Taenia species 18(2.1%), Hymenolepis nana 7(0.6%) and Schistosoma mansoni 1(0.12%). No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among lowland (37.9%) and highland dwellers (42.3%) (P = 0.185). The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was not significantly different among the study sites but it was relatively higher in Geressie (42.8%) than other kebeles. Sex was not associated with parasitic infections (P = 0.481). No statistically significant difference of infection was observed among the age groups (P = 0.228) but it was higher in reproductive age group. The high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among the lowland and highland dwellers in Gamo area indicated that parasitic infections are important public health problems. Thus, infection control measures and the

  2. Intestinal parasitosis and shigellosis among diarrheal patients in Gondar teaching hospital, northwest Ethiopia

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    Huruy Kahsay

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrheal diseases are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing world. Understanding the etiologic agents of diarrheal diseases and their association with socio-demographic characteristics of patients would help to design better preventive measures. Thus, this study was aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria in diarrheic patients. Methods A cross-sectional study involving 384 consecutive diarrheal patients who visited Gondar teaching hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia from October 2006 to March 2007 was conducted. Stool specimens were collected and examined for intestinal parasites and enteropathogenic bacteria following standard parasitological and microbiological procedures. Results Intestinal parasites were diagnosed in 36.5% of the patients. The most frequently encountered protozoan parasite was Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (7.3% followed by Giardia lamblia (5.0%, Cryptosporidium parvum (1.8% and Isospora belli (1.3%. The dominant helminthic parasite identified was Ascaris lumbricoides (5.5% followed by Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma mansoni (3.1% each, hookworm infection (1.8%, and Hymenolepis species (1.3%. Multiple infections of intestinal parasites were also observed in 6.3% of the patients. Among the enteropathogenic bacteria Shigella and Salmonella species were isolated from 15.6% and 1.6%, respectively, of the patients. Escherichia coli O57:H7 was not found in any of the stool samples tested. Eighty eight percent and 83.3% of the Shigella and Salmonella isolates were resistant to one or more commonly used antibiotics, respectively. Intestinal parasitosis was higher in patients who live in rural area, in patients who were washing their hands after visiting toilet either irregularly with soap and without soap or not at all, in patients who used well and spring water for household consumption, and in patients who had nausea (P P Conclusions The high

  3. Intestinal parasitic infections in HIV-infected patients, Lao People's Democratic Republic.

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    Phimpha Paboriboune

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV infection is an emerging problem in Laos. We conducted the first prospective study on intestinal parasites, including opportunistic protozoa, in newly diagnosed HIV infected patients, with or without diarrhea. The aims were to describe the spectrum of infections, to determine their prevalence and to assess their associations with diarrhea, CD4 cell count, place of residence and living conditions. METHODOLOGY: One to three stool samples over consecutive days were obtained from 137 patients. The Kato thick smear method, formalin-ethyl concentration and specific stains for coccidia and microsporidia diagnosis were performed on 260 stool samples. Baseline characteristics regarding relevant demographics, place of residence and living conditions, clinical features including diarrhea, were collected using a standardized questionnaire. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 137 patients were young (median age: 36 years and severely immunocompromised (83.9% at WHO stage 3 or 4, median CD4 cell count: 41/mm3. Diarrhea was present in 43.0% of patients. Parasite infection was found in 78.8% of patients, infection with at least two species in 49.6%. Prevalence rates of protozoan and helminth infections were similar (54.7% and 58.4% respectively. Blastocystis sp. was the most frequent protozoa (26.3%. Cryptosporidium sp., Cytoisospora belli and microsporidia, found at low prevalence rates (6.6%, 4.4%, 2.9%, respectively, were described for the first time in Laos. Cryptosporidium sp. was associated with persistent diarrhea. Strongyloides stercoralis was the most prevalent helminth following Opisthorchis viverrini (20.4% and 47.5% respectively. The most immunocompromised patients, as assessed by a CD4 count ≤ 50 cells/mm3, were more likely to be infected with intestinal parasites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV infection was mainly diagnosed at an advanced stage of immunosuppression in Lao patients. Intestinal parasite infections were highly prevalent

  4. Observaciones sobre helmintiasis humanas adquiridas del suelo en la República de Colombia

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    Ernesto Carroll Faust

    1965-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Los datos presentados en este informe se obtuvieron decomunidades poco privilegiadas no seleccionadas de Colombia, tres en el sistema tributario del Valle del Cauca (Medellín, Cali y Popayán, una en el Valle del Magdalena (Bogotá, y otra a nivel del mar en la costa norte (Cartagena. 2. Hay en estas zonas relativamente pocas especies de helmintos que son contraídos por contacto del hombre con el suelo, a saber:Ascaris lumbricoides, Tricburis tricbiura, uncinaria (lo más probablemente Necator americanus }, Strongyloides stercoralis e Hymenolepis nana. 3. La incidencia de estas infecciones es alta, como resultado de la continua oportunidad de exposición dentro y fuera de las viviendas, debido al saneamiento deplorablemente bajo; sin embargo, la cantidad de parásitos basada en los recuentos de huevos varía apreciablemente en dos de los grupos estudiados, Cali y Cartagena. 4. En el Barrio Siloé, Cali, en un período de 5 años, durante el cual se practicaron análisis trimestrales de la prevalencia de helmintos, no hubo evidencia significativa de algún descenso en los índices de Ascaris y Tricburis, aunque durante el mismo período en consideración se impartió instrucción en higiene personal a las madres en el programa de medicina preventiva. 5. Basándose en las observaciones de Cali, Medellín y Cartagena, hay poca posibilidad de que estas helmintiasis sean reducidas apreciablemente sin una campaña general  perseverante que abarque los aspectos sanitarios y de salud pública del problema, para suministrar a cada vivienda agua potable, disposición satisfactoria de excretas humanas y basura, y una cantidad adecuada de alimento bien balanceado, especialmente a los niños de corta edad. 6. Sin estos requerimientos, todo intento de controlar y reducir las helmintiasis, tal como la administración en masa de antihelmínticos modernos, puede inicialmente presentar aspectos favorables, pero a la larga no se evitarán los

  5. The complete mitochondrial genomes for three Toxocara species of human and animal health significance

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    Wu Xiang-Yun

    2008-05-01

    ,Dirofiliria immitis and Strongyloides stercoralis. Phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 protein-coding genes revealed that the newly described species T. malaysiensis was more closely related to T. cati than to T. canis, consistent with results of a previous study using sequences of nuclear internal transcribed spacers as genetic markers. Conclusion The present study determined the complete mt genome sequences for three roundworms of human and animal health significance, which provides mtDNA evidence for the validity of T. malaysiensis and also provides a foundation for studying the systematics, population genetics and ecology of these and other nematodes of socio-economic importance.

  6. Prevalence of endoparasitic infection in children and its relation with cholera prevention efforts in Mexico.

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    Faulkner, Charles T; Garcia, Benito Borrego; Logan, Michael H; New, John C; Patton, Sharon

    2003-07-01

    To investigate whether increased knowledge and use of public health measures promoted for cholera prevention is reflected in lower prevalence of parasitic infection in households in a community in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, that is close to the border with the United States of America. Between 1994 and 1997, fecal samples from 438 children were collected through convenience sampling and then examined for helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts as biologic indicators of household compliance with recommended cholera prevention measures. The suggested measures were to wash hands before meals and after defecation, to drink purified water, to wash fruits and vegetables, and to eat well-cooked food. In addition, information on the knowledge of and the use of cholera preventive measures was collected by interviews with adult informants in 252 households (186 of those households also provided a fecal sample for analysis). Parasitic infections occurred in 131 of the 438 children (30%), who resided in 79 of the 186 households (42%) that provided fecal samples. Giardia lamblia accounted for 12.5% of all infections. Infections with Hymenolepis nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Ancylostoma/Necator, Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba histolytica, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba bütschlii were also noted. Infected children were older and more often had an infected sibling. Households with three or more children were also more likely to have an infected child. The primary caregivers in the households where at least one child had a parasitic infection were distinguished by their inability to list at least three cholera prevention measures from memory. The 42% household prevalence of parasitic infection was relatively high and indicates that some residents of this community may not have fully embraced the public health education efforts promoted for prevention of cholera. The occurrence of

  7. Prevalence of endoparasitic infection in children and its relation with cholera prevention efforts in Mexico

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    Charles T. Faulkner

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether increased knowledge and use of public health measures promoted for cholera prevention is reflected in lower prevalence of parasitic infection in households in a community in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, that is close to the border with the United States of America. METHODS: Between 1994 and 1997, fecal samples from 438 children were collected through convenience sampling and then examined for helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts as biologic indicators of household compliance with recommended cholera prevention measures. The suggested measures were to wash hands before meals and after defecation, to drink purified water, to wash fruits and vegetables, and to eat well-cooked food. In addition, information on the knowledge of and the use of cholera preventive measures was collected by interviews with adult informants in 252 households (186 of those households also provided a fecal sample for analysis. RESULTS: Parasitic infections occurred in 131 of the 438 children (30%, who resided in 79 of the 186 households (42% that provided fecal samples. Giardia lamblia accounted for 12.5% of all infections. Infections with Hymenolepis nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Ancylostoma/Necator, Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba histolytica, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba bütschlii were also noted. Infected children were older and more often had an infected sibling. Households with three or more children were also more likely to have an infected child. The primary caregivers in the households where at least one child had a parasitic infection were distinguished by their inability to list at least three cholera prevention measures from memory. CONCLUSIONS: The 42% household prevalence of parasitic infection was relatively high and indicates that some residents of this community may not have fully embraced the public health education efforts

  8. Application of a Multiplex Quantitative PCR to Assess Prevalence and Intensity Of Intestinal Parasite Infections in a Controlled Clinical Trial

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    Llewellyn, Stacey; Inpankaew, Tawin; Nery, Susana Vaz; Gray, Darren J.; Verweij, Jaco J.; Clements, Archie C. A.; Gomes, Santina J.; Traub, Rebecca; McCarthy, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate quantitative assessment of infection with soil transmitted helminths and protozoa is key to the interpretation of epidemiologic studies of these parasites, as well as for monitoring large scale treatment efficacy and effectiveness studies. As morbidity and transmission of helminth infections are directly related to both the prevalence and intensity of infection, there is particular need for improved techniques for assessment of infection intensity for both purposes. The current study aimed to evaluate two multiplex PCR assays to determine prevalence and intensity of intestinal parasite infections, and compare them to standard microscopy. Methodology/Principal Findings Faecal samples were collected from a total of 680 people, originating from rural communities in Timor-Leste (467 samples) and Cambodia (213 samples). DNA was extracted from stool samples and subject to two multiplex real-time PCR reactions the first targeting: Necator americanus, Ancylostoma spp., Ascaris spp., and Trichuris trichiura; and the second Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia. duodenalis, and Strongyloides stercoralis. Samples were also subject to sodium nitrate flotation for identification and quantification of STH eggs, and zinc sulphate centrifugal flotation for detection of protozoan parasites. Higher parasite prevalence was detected by multiplex PCR (hookworms 2.9 times higher, Ascaris 1.2, Giardia 1.6, along with superior polyparasitism detection with this effect magnified as the number of parasites present increased (one: 40.2% vs. 38.1%, two: 30.9% vs. 12.9%, three: 7.6% vs. 0.4%, four: 0.4% vs. 0%). Although, all STH positive samples were low intensity infections by microscopy as defined by WHO guidelines the DNA-load detected by multiplex PCR suggested higher intensity infections. Conclusions/Significance Multiplex PCR, in addition to superior sensitivity, enabled more accurate determination of infection intensity for Ascaris, hookworms and

  9. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV-positive patients on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea: its relation to sanitary conditions and socioeconomic factors.

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    Roka, Margarita; Goñi, Pilar; Rubio, Encarnación; Clavel, Antonio

    2012-08-15

    The prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases and their associated factors has been investigated in HIV populations from the Island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. The feces of 310 participants from the island of Bioko (260 HIV-positive and 50 HIV-negative) were analyzed by microscopic observation. Immunochromatography was also used to diagnose Giardia, Entamoeba histolytica and Cryptosporidium spp. In addition, patients were asked for sociodemographic, economic and academic status, and CD4+ T cell counts were recorded. For HIV-positive patients, the prevalence of infection by intestinal parasites was 81.5% (212/260), 83.8% (218/260) by pathogenic helminths and 55.4% (168/260) by pathogenic protozoa (E. histolytica/dispar and Giardia duodenalis). Gender association was found between the infection by Ascaris and Schistosoma, a higher proportion being found in women; and between Entamoeba and the place of residence, a higher proportion being observed in the urban belt. Strongyloides stercoralis and Chilomastix mesnili appeared only in the people of this group, all the cases of Chilomastix being in females. For HIV-negative participants, the prevalence of infection by intestinal parasites was 74.0% (37/50), 90.0% (45/50) by pathogenic helminths and 66.0% (43/50) by pathogenic protozoa. Gender, educational level and low hygiene were associated with intestinal parasitic infection. When comparing the two groups (HIV-positive and HIV-negative), statistical association between HIV co-infection and infection by Giardia and Entamoeba was found. Diarrhea was also associated with intestinal parasitic infection in the HIV-positive group. Not only do our findings reflect high rates of intestinal parasitic infections in HIV-positive people, but also in the HIV-negative group, suggesting a closer relationship between sanitary status and living conditions than with immune status, and thus they highlight the need to carry out health education policies in the population. In addition

  10. Ocorrência de protozoários e helmintos em amostras de fezes de cães e gatos da cidade de São Paulo

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    Solange Maria Gennari

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram examinadas, pelo Laboratório de Doenças Parasitárias do Departamento de Medicina Veterinária Preventiva e Saúde Animal, da Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia da Universidade de São Paulo, no período de janeiro de 1991 a janeiro de 1995, amostras de 353 cães e de 187 gatos, com idades variadas e de diferentes áreas da cidade de São Paulo. Os métodos de diagnóstico empregados foram: centrífugo-flutuação em solução de sacarose e centrífugo-sedimentação em água-éter. Aproximadamente 45,0% das amostras de cães examinadas (160 amostras apresentaram-se positivas e o percentual de ocorrência de parasitos, em relação ao total de amostras foi: Ancylostoma spp. 20,40; Toxocara canis 8,49; Giardia sp. 7,65; Cryptosporidium parvum 2,83; Cystoisospora spp. 2,55; Sarcocystis spp. 1,70; Hammondia heydorni 0,85; e Spirocerca lupi, Trichuris vulpis e Dipylidium caninum 0,28. Das 187 amostras recebidas, provenientes de gatos, somente oito eram negativas e observou-se a ocorrência (% de Cystoisospora spp. 38,5; Toxocara sp. 34,22; Giardia sp. 16,04; Cryptosporidium parvum 14,44; Ancylostoma spp. 13,37; Dipylidium caninum 10,69; Sarcocystis spp. 8,56; Physaloptera spp. 4,81; oocistos tipo "Hammondia-Toxoplasma" 1,60; Strongyloides stercoralis 1,60; e Platynosomum concinum 1,07. Em cães, as associações mais freqüentemente observadas foram: Ancylostoma spp. + T. canis em oito amostras e Ancylostoma spp. + Giardia sp. e Ancylostoma spp. + T. vulpis em cinco amostras. Em gatos, Toxocara sp. e Cystoisospora spp., encontrados em 24 amostras, e Toxocara sp. + Ancylostoma spp. em cinco amostras, foram as associações mais comumente observadas.

  11. Prevalencia de microsporidios intestinales y otros enteroparásitos en pacientes con VIH positivo de Maracaibo, Venezuela

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    Zulbey Rivero-Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Desde 1985, los microsporidios se consideran parásitos causantes de infecciones emergentes y oportunistas en individuos inmunocomprometidos en todo el mundo. Objetivo. Detectar la presencia de microsporidios y otros enteroparásitos en pacientes con VIH/sida del Servicio Autónomo Hospital Universitario de Maracaibo (SAHUM, donde no existían estudios previos en este campo. Materiales y métodos. Las muestras fecales se analizaron mediante examen directo, método de concentración con formol-éter, coloración de Kinyoun y coloración Gram-cromotropo rápida. Se realizaron PCR separadas para diferenciar Entamoeba histolytica o Entamoeba dispar, cuando se observó el complejo E. histolytica/dispar al microscopio. Mediante historia clínica se obtuvo información del paciente. Resultados. De los 56 individuos participantes, 38 (67,86 % presentaron alguna especie parasitaria comensal o patógena en su muestra fecal. Predominaron los individuos portadores de especies parásitas patógenas (26/38. Fueron diagnosticados protozoos como Isospora belli (17,65 %, Blastocystis spp. (17,65 %, Cryptosporidium spp. (7,84 %, complejo Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (5,88 %, Entamoeba coli (3,92 %, Giardia lamblia (3,92 %, Endolimax nana (3,92 %, Cyclospora cayetanensis (3,92 % y Chilomastix mesnili (1,96 %. Entre los helmintos, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura y Strongyloides stercoralis, presentaron un porcentaje de 27,27 % cada uno, e Hymenolepis nana, de 18,18 %. Solo se detectó E. histolytica en uno de los tres casos que presentaron el complejo al examen microscópico. Mediante Gram-cromotropo, 17 muestras evidenciaron esporas del filo Microsporidia, lo que equivale a un 33,33 % de prevalencia. Conclusión. Los microsporidios pueden ocupar el primer lugar de prevalencia en pacientes con VIH positivo, cuando se utilizan técnicas diagnósticas específicas.   doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7705/biomedica.v33i4.1468

  12. INTESTINAL PARASITES AND MALARIA IN MUSI BANYU ASIN AND OGAN KOMERING ULU REGENCIES, SOUTH SUMATRA

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    W. Patrick Carney

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Pada bulan Mei 1973 diadakan survey tinja dan darah di lima desa di Sumatra Selatan untuk mengetahui aspek-aspek penyakit parasit pada penduduk asli dan para transmigran yang datang antara tahun 1935 dan 1955. Desa-desa Tanjung Kerang, Simpang Langkap dan Biuku di Kabupaten Musi Banyu Asin yang terletak di sebelah barat laut kota Palembang merupakan daerah hutan-ladang-huma dan perkebunan karet rakyat dikelilingi oleh rawa-rawa, yang di diami oleh penduduk asli. Desa-desa Sidomulyo dan Tanjung Raya di Kabupaten Ogan Komering Ulu, terletak di sebelah tenggara' kota Palembang, adalah tempat transmigrasi yang merupakan daerah persawahan." Dari 358 orang yang diperiksa tinjanya yang terdiri dari 193 laki-laki dan 165 wanita, di keiemukan 97 per cent terinfeksi oleh sedikitnya satu macam parasit, 87 per cent oleh 2 macam parasit atau lebih dan 55 per cent oleh 3 macam parasit atau lebih. Telur-telur cacing yang di temukan antara lain ialah: Trichuris trichiura. (83 per cent, Ascaris lumbricoides (78 per cent dan cacing tambang (59 per cent. Enterobius vermicularis (1 per cent dan Strongyloides stercoralis (0,3 per cent jarang di jumpai. Entamoeba coli (29 per cent merupakan parasit protozoa yang biasa di temukan. Jumlah rata-rata protozoa yang ada dalam usus ialah: Entamoeba histofytica (4 per cent, Entamoeba hartmanni (1 per cent, Endolimax nona (5 per cent, Iodamoeba butschlii (5 per cent, Giardia lamblia (3 per cent dan Chilomastbc mesnili (4 per cent. Distribusi dari parasit usus hampir sama di antara golongan laki-laki dan wanita; meskipun tanah memegang peranan yang sama dalam pemindahan cacing-cacing, tetapi A. lumbricoides dan T. trichiura lebih banyak di jumpai pada wanita, sedangkan cacing tambang lebih banyak pada laki-laki. Prevalensi parasit usus menurut golongan umur adalah sebagai berikut: A. lumbricoides lebih banyak pada golongan muda, T. trichiura merata pada semua golongan umur, tetapi yang terbanyak pada golongan umur antara 30

  13. Distinct clinical characteristics and helminth co-infections in adult tuberculosis patients from urban compared to rural Tanzania.

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    Sikalengo, George; Hella, Jerry; Mhimbira, Francis; Rutaihwa, Liliana K; Bani, Farida; Ndege, Robert; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Kamwela, Lujeko; Said, Khadija; Mhalu, Grace; Mlacha, Yeromin; Hatz, Christoph; Knopp, Stefanie; Gagneux, Sébastien; Reither, Klaus; Utzinger, Jürg; Tanner, Marcel; Letang, Emilio; Weisser, Maja; Fenner, Lukas

    2018-03-24

    Differences in rural and urban settings could account for distinct characteristics in the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB). We comparatively studied epidemiological features of TB and helminth co-infections in adult patients from rural and urban settings of Tanzania. Adult patients (≥ 18 years) with microbiologically confirmed pulmonary TB were consecutively enrolled into two cohorts in Dar es Salaam, with ~ 4.4 million inhabitants (urban), and Ifakara in the sparsely populated Kilombero District with ~ 400 000 inhabitants (rural). Clinical data were obtained at recruitment. Stool and urine samples were subjected to diagnose helminthiases using Kato-Katz, Baermann, urine filtration, and circulating cathodic antigen tests. Differences between groups were assessed by χ 2 , Fisher's exact, and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Logistic regression models were used to determine associations. Between August 2015 and February 2017, 668 patients were enrolled, 460 (68.9%) at the urban and 208 (31.1%) at the rural site. Median patient age was 35 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 27-41.5 years), and 454 (68%) were males. Patients from the rural setting were older (median age 37 years vs. 34 years, P = 0.003), had a lower median body mass index (17.5 kg/m 2 vs. 18.5 kg/m 2 , P urban Tanzania. There was no significant difference in frequencies of HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, and haemoglobin concentration levels between the two settings. The overall prevalence of helminth co-infections was 22.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.4-27.0%). The significantly higher prevalence of helminth infections at the urban site (25.7% vs. 17.3%, P = 0.018) was predominantly driven by Strongyloides stercoralis (17.0% vs. 4.8%, P rural setting (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97, 95% CI: 1.16-13.67) and increasing age (aOR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10). Clinical characteristics and helminth co-infections pattern differ in TB patients in urban and rural Tanzania. The

  14. Ensaio terapêutico com «mebendazole suspensão» nas helmintíases intestinais em crianças

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    Donald Huggins

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available O Autor medicou 24 crianças portadoras de poliverminoses, com idades entre 8 a 14 anos, todas do sexo feminino, com Mebendazole (suspensão, na dose de 5 ml (100 mg duas vezes por dia e durante três dias consecutives. O diagnóstico e o controle de cura parasitológica foram realizados pelas técnicas de Lutz, Willis, Baerman-Moraes e Graham, antes e no 7.°, 14.° e 21.° dias após o tratamento para as três primeiras, enquanto a última foi executada durante sete dias consecutivos a partir do sétimo dia de encerrada a terapêutica. Verificou cura parasitológica em 100% dos casos para ascariase e enterobiase, 69,2% para tricocefalíase, 36,36% para ancilostomíase e 0% para estrongiloidiase. Nenhuma manifestação colateral foi relatada pelos doentes.The Author reports the therapeutic activity of a new anthelmintic drug - Mebendazole suspension, in the treatment of twenty-four children, aged from 8 to 14 years-old, all females, with multiple intestinal parasitic infections. Mebendazole (suspension was given in a dose of 5 ml (100 mg two times per day (taken all at a morning after breakfast, and night after dinner, for three consecutives days. The diagnosis and the control laboratory data were made before the medication, and repeated 7th, 14th, 21th days after its completion and consisting of Lutz, Willis and Baerman-Moraes methods, and the anal swab technique was made for seven consecutives days, beginning the 7th day after completion of treatment. The percentual of parasitological cure rate obtained was the following: 100% for Ascaris lumbricoides and Enterobius vermicularis; 69,2% for Trichuris trichiura; 36,36% for Ancylostomidae sp and 0% for Strongyloides stercoralis. The drug under observation did not produce any side-affects.

  15. An epidemiological study of pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis among pupils in the peri-urban zone of Kumba town, Meme Division, Cameroon

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    Kefie-Arrey Charles

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paragonimiasis have previously been reported in two zones of the Southwest Province of Cameroon including the Kupe mountain and Mundani foci. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and epidemiology of paragonimiasis in the peri-urban zone of Kumba, Meme Division, located about 50 km away from the Kupe mountain focus. Methods Pupils of several government primary schools in 5 villages around Kumba underwent both parasitologic and clinical investigations in search of signs and symptoms of paragonimiasis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was also searched for in the differential diagnosis.Freshwater crabs from neighbouring streams in the five villages were dissected in search of paragonimus metacercariae. Results Out of a total of 1482 pupils examined in all five villages, 309 individuals (147 males and 162 females were recruited for this study based on the presence of one or more signs or symptoms of paragonimiasis. Eggs of Paragonimus africanus were found in stools and/or sputum of pupils from all five villages, giving an overall paragonimus prevalence of 2.56%. There was no significant difference in the disease prevalence between the villages (X2 = 8.36, P = 0.08. The prevalence of Paragonimus africanus eggs amongst pupils with symptoms of paragonimiasis was 12.3% (38 of 309. Males were infected more than females (17.0% versus 8.0%, but the difference was not significant (X2 = 5.76, P = 0.16. All the 38 paragonimus egg positive subjects presented with cough, 23 (60.53% complained of chest pain while 16 (42.11% had haemoptysis. Stool examinations also detected some intestinal parasites including Ascaris lumbricoides (29.45%, Trichuris trichiura (6.47%, Necator americanus (2.27%, Strongyloides stercoralis (1.62%, Enterobius vermicularis (0.65%, and Entamoeba histolytica (4.53%. No case of M. tuberculosis was noted. Out of a total of 85 dissected crabs (Sudanonautes africanus, 6.02 % were infected with paragonimus

  16. Seroprevalence of fascioliasis, toxocariasis, strongyloidiasis and cysticercosis in blood samples diagnosed in Medic Medical Center Laboratory, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam in 2012.

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    Nguyen, Toan; Cheong, Fei Wen; Liew, Jonathan Wee Kent; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-09-05

    Despite the global effort against neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), developing countries with middle to low income are still burdened by them. Vietnam has been undergoing substantial economic growth and urbanization, but underprivileged people living in rural and suburban areas are still having little access to public health infrastructure and proper sanitation. Hitherto, limited information is available for seroprevalence and risk factors of several parasitic diseases in Vietnam. A retrospective study was performed on diagnostic results of Fasciola spp., Toxocara spp., Strongyloides stercoralis and Taenia solium IgG ELISA tests from Medic Medical Center Laboratory, Ho Chi Minh City in 2012. The data were first stratified before statistical analyses were performed. Seroprevalence of fascioliasis, toxocariasis, strongyloidiasis and cysticercosis was determined and the age and gender risk factors were evaluated. Seroprevalence of fascioliasis, toxocariasis, strongyloidiasis and cysticercosis was 5.9 % (590/10,084; 95 % CI: 5.44-6.36), 45.2 % (34,995/77,356; 95 % CI: 44.85-45.55), 7.4 % (3,174/42,920; 95 % CI: 7.15-7.65) and 4.9 % (713/14,601; 95 % CI: 4.55-5.25), respectively. Co-exposure to multiple parasites was detected in 890 males (45.7 %; 95 % CI: 43.49-47.91) and 1,059 females (54.3 %; 95 % CI: 52.09-56.51). Social structure and differences in behavioural factors caused the gender factor to have a significant effect on the prevalence of all the diseases, while the seropositivity for fascioliasis and strongyloidiasis were age group-related. The seroprevalence of fascioliasis, toxocariasis, strongyloidiasis and cysticercosis in the blood samples diagnosed in Medic Medical Center Laboratory, Ho Chi Minh City, in year 2012 were comparatively high. The Vietnamese customs and cultures, dietary habits and agricultural practices exposed them to high risk of contracting NTDs. Despite the possibility of false positive results due to antigenic cross

  17. High Malnutrition Rate in Venezuelan Yanomami Compared to Warao Amerindians and Creoles: Significant Associations WITH Intestinal Parasites and Anemia

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    Verhagen, Lilly M.; Incani, Renzo N.; Franco, Carolina R.; Ugarte, Alejandra; Cadenas, Yeneska; Sierra Ruiz, Carmen I.; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Hoek, Denise; Campos Ponce, Maiza; de Waard, Jacobus H.; Pinelli, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background Children in rural areas experience the interrelated problems of poor growth, anemia and parasitic infections. We investigated the prevalence of and associations between intestinal helminth and protozoan infections, malnutrition and anemia in school-age Venezuelan children. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 390 children aged 4-16 years from three rural areas of Venezuela: the Amazon Region, Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State. Stool samples were collected for direct parasitic examinations. Anthropometric indicators of chronic (height-for-age Z score) and acute (weight-for-height and Body Mass Index (BMI)-for-age Z score in respectively children under 5 years of age and children aged 5 years and above) malnutrition were calculated. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models were built to determine factors associated with nutritional status and polyparasitism. Results Hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis prevalences were highest in children from the Amazon rainforest (respectively 72% and 18%) while children from the Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State showed higher rates of Ascaris lumbricoides (respectively 28% and 37%) and Trichuris trichiura (40% in both regions). The prevalence of Giardia lamblia infection was not significantly different between regions (average: 18%). Anemia prevalence was highest in the Amazon Region (24%). Hemoglobin levels were significantly decreased in children with a hookworm infection. Malnutrition was present in respectively 84%, 30% and 13% of children from the Amazon Region, Orinoco Delta and Carabobo State. In multivariate analysis including all regions, G. lamblia and helminth infections were significantly and negatively associated with respectively height-for-age and weight-for-height/BMI-for-age Z scores. Furthermore, hemoglobin levels were positively associated with the height-for-age Z score (0.11, 95% CI 0.02 - 0.20). Conclusions In rural populations in Venezuela helminthiasis and giardiasis were

  18. Molecular appraisal of intestinal parasitic infection in transplant recipients

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    Pooja Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Diarrhoea is the main clinical manifestation caused by intestinal parasitic infections in patients, with special reference to transplant recipients who require careful consideration to reduce morbidity and mortality. Further, molecular characterization of some important parasites is necessary to delineate the different modes of transmission to consider appropriate management strategies. We undertook this study to investigate the intestinal parasitic infections in transplant recipients with or without diarrhoea, and the genotypes of the isolated parasites were also determined. Methods: Stool samples from 38 transplant recipients comprising 29 post-renal, two liver and seven bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients presenting with diarrhoea and 50 transplant recipients (42 post-renal transplant, eight BMT without diarrhoea were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites by light microscopy using wet mount, modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining for intestinal coccidia and modified trichrome staining for microsporidia. Genotypes of Cryptosporidium species were determined by multilocus genotyping using small subunit ribosomal (SSUrRNA, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR as the target genes. Assemblage study for Giardia lamblia was performed using triose phosphate isomerase (TPI as the target gene. Samples were also screened for bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Results: The parasites that were detected included Cryptosporidium species (21%, 8/38, Cystoisospora (Isospora belli (8%, 3, Cyclospora cayetanensis (5%, 2, G. lamblia (11%, 4, Hymenolepis nana (11%, 4, Strongyloides stercoralis (3%, 1 and Blastocystis hominis (3%, 1. Multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium species at SSUrRNA, COWP and DHFR loci could detect four isolates of C. hominis; two of C. parvum, one of mixed genotype and one could not be genotyped. All the C. hominis isolates were detected in adult post

  19. Impact of helminth diagnostic test performance on estimation of risk factors and outcomes in HIV-positive adults.

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    Michael B Arndt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditional methods using microscopy for the detection of helminth infections have limited sensitivity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays enhance detection of helminths, particularly low burden infections. However, differences in test performance may modify the ability to detect associations between helminth infection, risk factors, and sequelae. We compared these associations using microscopy and PCR. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was nested within a randomized clinical trial conducted at 3 sites in Kenya. We performed microscopy and real-time multiplex PCR for the stool detection and quantification of Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Schistosoma species. We utilized regression to evaluate associations between potential risk factors or outcomes and infection as detected by either method. RESULTS: Of 153 HIV-positive adults surveyed, 55(36.0% and 20(13.1% were positive for one or more helminth species by PCR and microscopy, respectively (p<0.001. PCR-detected infections were associated with farming (Prevalence Ratio 1.57, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.40, communal water source (PR 3.80, 95% CI: 1.01, 14.27, and no primary education (PR 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.33, whereas microscopy-detected infections were not associated with any risk factors under investigation. Microscopy-detected infections were associated with significantly lower hematocrit and hemoglobin (means of -3.56% and -0.77 g/dl and a 48% higher risk of anemia (PR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.17, 1.88 compared to uninfected. Such associations were absent for PCR-detected infections unless infection intensity was considered, Infections diagnosed with either method were associated with increased risk of eosinophilia (PCR PR 2.42, 95% CI: 1.02, 5.76; microscopy PR 2.92, 95% CI: 1.29, 6.60. CONCLUSION: Newer diagnostic methods, including PCR, improve the detection of helminth infections. This heightened sensitivity may improve the

  20. Epidemiology of polyparasitism with Taenia solium, schistosomes and soil-transmitted helminths in the co-endemic village of Malanga, Democratic Republic of Congo.

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    Madinga, Joule; Polman, Katja; Kanobana, Kirezi; van Lieshout, Lisette; Brienen, Eric; Praet, Nicolas; Kabwe, Constantin; Gabriël, Sarah; Dorny, Pierre; Lutumba, Pascal; Speybroeck, Niko

    2017-07-01

    Helminth co-infections are common in sub-Saharan Africa. However, little is known about the distribution and determinants of co-infections with Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis. Building on a previous community-based study on human cysticercosis in Malanga village, we investigated co-infections with Taenia solium, soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) and Schistosoma spp and associated risk factors in a random subsample of 330 participants. Real time PCR assays were used to detect DNA of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), T. solium and Schistosoma in stool samples and Schistosoma DNA in urine samples. Serum samples were tested for T. solium cysticercosis using the B158/B60 monoclonal antibody-based antigen ELISA. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were applied to assess associations of single and co-infections with common risk factors (age, sex, area, hygiene) as well as pair wise associations between helminth species. Overall, 240 (72.7%) participants were infected with at least one helminth species; 128 (38.8%) harbored at least two helminth species (16.1% with STHs-Schistosoma, 14.5% with STHs-T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis and 8.2% with Schistosoma-T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis co-infections). No significant associations were found between Schistosoma-T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis co-infection and any of the risk factors studied. Males (OR=2 (95%CI=1.1-5), p=0.03) and open defecation behavior (OR=3.8 (95%CI=1.1-6.5), p=0.04) were associated with higher odds of STHs-T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis co-infection. Village districts that were found at high risk of T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis were also at high risk of co-infection with STHs and T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis (OR=3.2 (95%CI=1.1-7.8), p=0.03). Significant pair-wise associations were found between T. solium cysticerci and Necator americanus (OR=2.2 (95%CI=1.2-3.8), p<0.01) as well as Strongyloides stercoralis (OR=2.7 (95%CI=1.1-6.5), p=0.02). These findings show that co

  1. Distúrbios da absorção intestinal na estrongiloidose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementino Fraga Filho

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi estudar as manifestações disabsortivas produzidas por infecção pelo Strongyloides stercoralis. Foram selecionados dois grupos de indivíduos, o primeiro de 40 doentes, com evidência de infecção pela demonstração do parasito nas fezes ou no suco duodenal centrifugado e o segundo de 15 indivíduos normais, que serviram como testemunhas. Os pacientes e os testemunhas foram estudados sob o aspecto clínico (distúrbios de ritmo intestinal, dispepsia, intolerância alimentar, dor epigástrica e emagrecimento, laboratorial (gordura fecal em 120 horas, taxa de excreção de d-xilose, carotenemia, prova de sobrecarga com lactcse, etc., radiológico (velocidade de trânsito presença ou não de hipersecreção, fenômenos de floculação, cera ou segmentação e histopatológico (presença ou não de congestão, edema, alargamento, ou diminuição de altura das vilosidades. De posse desses dados, foram os pacientes separados em subgrupos, na tentativa de se correlacionarem os quadros clínicos e laboratoriais com as alterações radiológicas e histológicas na estrongiloidose intestinal. Em 25% dos pacientes as manifestações datavam de mais de dois anos, em 20% menos que 6 meses, tendo sido, no entanto, impossível detectar em todos os pacientes o início da infecção pelo helminto. Quanto à avaliação laboratorial, os indivíduos normais excretaram, em média, 3,1 gramas de gordura fecal nas 24 horas, situando-se o grupo doente em níveis médios superiores a 5,5 g e tendo 10 pacientes perdido mais de 10 g nas 24 horas. Vale ressaltar a coexistência de excreção de gordura fecal alta e alterações morfológicas do intestino delgado. A determinação de gordura fecal, excretada em 24 horas, mostrou-se a prova mais fiel na avaliação de disabsorção intestinal secundária ao Strongyloides stercoralis. As demais provas laboratoriais não foram significativas nos vários subgrupos considerados. Tanto a

  2. Prevalence of endoparasitic infection in children and its relation with cholera prevention efforts in Mexico Prevalencia de la infestación endoparasitaria en niños y su relación con los esfuerzos para la prevención del cólera en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T. Faulkner

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether increased knowledge and use of public health measures promoted for cholera prevention is reflected in lower prevalence of parasitic infection in households in a community in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, that is close to the border with the United States of America. METHODS: Between 1994 and 1997, fecal samples from 438 children were collected through convenience sampling and then examined for helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts as biologic indicators of household compliance with recommended cholera prevention measures. The suggested measures were to wash hands before meals and after defecation, to drink purified water, to wash fruits and vegetables, and to eat well-cooked food. In addition, information on the knowledge of and the use of cholera preventive measures was collected by interviews with adult informants in 252 households (186 of those households also provided a fecal sample for analysis. RESULTS: Parasitic infections occurred in 131 of the 438 children (30%, who resided in 79 of the 186 households (42% that provided fecal samples. Giardia lamblia accounted for 12.5% of all infections. Infections with Hymenolepis nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Ancylostoma/Necator, Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba histolytica, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba bütschlii were also noted. Infected children were older and more often had an infected sibling. Households with three or more children were also more likely to have an infected child. The primary caregivers in the households where at least one child had a parasitic infection were distinguished by their inability to list at least three cholera prevention measures from memory. CONCLUSIONS: The 42% household prevalence of parasitic infection was relatively high and indicates that some residents of this community may not have fully embraced the public health education efforts

  3. Monogenean infestations and mortality in wild and cultured Red Sea fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paperna, I.; Diamant, A.; Overstreet, R. M.

    1984-03-01

    Hyperinfection by the gill-infesting monogenean Allobivagina sp. (Microcotylea) caused mass mortalities in juveniles of Siganus luridus cultured in seawater earthen ponds and holding tanks in Eilat (Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea). Other species of Siganus and adults of S. luridus cultured in the same systems acquired a low intensity of infestation. Most hyperinfected fish were emaciated and anaemic with hematocrit values below 10 %. Skin and mouth infestations by the monogenean Benedenia monticelli (Capsaloidea) caused mass mortalities in grey mullets (Mugilidae). These mortalities occurred in large individuals in wild populations of Liza carinata from lagoonal habitats in the Gulf of Suez and in most species of grey mullets cultured in Eilat. The intensity of infestation correlated positively with severity of infestation, and the common sites of infestation corresponded with areas of severe pathological alterations. Spontaneous recovery followed the climax of an epizootic, both for infested S. luridus and infested grey mullets. Decline in infestation coincided with remission of the pathological signs.

  4. Intestinal parasitic infections and its association with undernutrition and CD4 T cell levels among HIV/AIDS patients on HAART in Butajira, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedle, Dereje; Kumera, Gemechu; Eshete, Tewodros; Ketema, Kasahun; Adugna, Haweni; Feyera, Fetuma

    2017-05-15

    Intestinal parasitic infections and HIV/AIDS have been the major public health problems and remain a vital cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Both problems are linked in a vicious cycle. The magnitude of intestinal parasites was prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS even in the HAART era. However, the pertinent risk factors associated with intestinal parasites among HIV/AIDS patients were not well investigated in Ethiopia particularly at Butajira town. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors among HIV/AIDS patients on HAART in Butajira, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted, and a total of 323 study subjects was involved in the study. A systematic random sampling technique was used to select each participant during data collection. Stool specimen was collected and processed using direct wet mount, formol-ether concentration technique, and modified Ziehl-Neelson staining techniques to identify both common and opportunistic intestinal parasites. Structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic, environmental, clinical, and nutritional data. Both bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association of various explanatory factors on intestinal parasites. P value ≤0.05 at 95% CI was considered statistically significant. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 35.9% (95% CI 31.0-40.9%). Protozoa's (Entanmoeba histolytica/dispar trophozoite, E. histolytica/dispar cyst, Giardia lamblia trophozoite, and G. lamblia cyst), helminths (Tanea species, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloid stercoralis, Hookworm species and H. nana), and opportunistic intestinal parasites (Cryptosporidium parvum, Isospora belli) were observed in 57 (17.1%), 46 (14.4%), and 28 (8.7%) study participants respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of animals (AOR 6. 14; 95% CI 3.13, 12

  5. Concordancia entre los métodos de flotación con sulfato de zinc y sedimentación centrífuga para el diagnóstico de parásitos intestinales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabete de Jesus Inês

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El diagnóstico de infecciones parasitarias intestinales depende de la carga de parásitos, la densidad de la gravedad específica de los huevos/ooquistes/quistes de parásitos y de la densidad y viscosidad de los reactivos de flotación o sedimentación usados para procesar las heces. Objetivo. Evaluar la concordancia entre el método de flotación de sulfato de zinc y la sedimentación por centrifugación en la recuperación de helmintos y protozoos en muestras fecales de niños. Materiales y métodos. Las muestras fecales de 330 niños de las guarderías fueron evaluadas por las técnicas de flotación con sulfato de zinc y de sedimentación por centrifugación. Las frecuencias de detección de parásitos por cada método fueron determinadas y se evaluó la concordancia entre las técnicas de diagnóstico por el índice Kappa, con intervalos de confianza del 95%. Resultados. La flotación fecal con sulfato de zinc diagnosticó significativamente más casos de infección por Trichuris trichiura en comparación con la sedimentación por centrifugación (39/330; 11,8% versus 13/330; 3,9%, p<0,001, con un bajo acuerdo entre los métodos Kappa = 0,264 (95% IC, 0,102-0,427. Además, todas las muestras positivas para huevos de Enterobius vermicularis (n=5 y larvas de Strongyloides stercoralis (n=3 fueron diagnosticados solamente por sulfato de zinc. El método de flotación también detectó la mayor parte de las muestras positivas de Giardia duodenalis (74/83; 89,1% versus 67/83; 80,0%. En contraste, la sedimentación identificó con mayor frecuencia los protozoos Blastocystis spp. (38/46; 82,6% que el método ZS (33/46; 71,7%, aunque no se observaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas, con un considerable acuerdo entre los métodos para la identificación de ambos parásitos, Kappa=0,697 (95% CI, 0,691-0,859 and Kappa=0,675 (95% CI, 0,537-0,801, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Este estudio mostró que la flotación centr

  6. [Detection of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis in cyst samples using a novel single tube multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Hüseyin; İnceboz, Tonay; Caner, Ayşe; Atalay Şahar, Esra; Karakavuk, Muhammet; Döşkaya, Mert; Çelebi, Fehmi; Değirmenci Döşkaya, Aysu; Gülçe İz, Sultan; Gürüz, Yüksel; Korkmaz, Metin

    2016-04-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis, respectively, are important helminthic diseases worldwide as well as in our country. Epidemiological studies conducted in Turkey showed that the prevalence of CE is 291-585/100.000. It has also been showed that the seroprevalence of AE is 3.5%. For the diagnosis of CE and AE, radiological (ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance) and serological methods, in addition to clinical findings, are being used. The definitive diagnosis relies on pathological examination When the hydatid cysts are sterile or does not contain protoscolex, problems may occur during pathological discrimination of E.granulosus and E.multilocularis species. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) targeting mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene of E.granulosus and E.multilocularis using Echi S (5'-TTTATGAATATTGTGACCCTGAGAT-3') and Echi A (5'-GGTCTTAACTCAACTCATGGAG-3') primers and three different probes; Anchor Ech (5'-GTTTGCCACCTCGATGTTGACTTAG-fluoroscein-3'), Granulosus (5'-LC640-CTAAGGTTTTGGTGTAGTAATTGATATTTT-phosphate-3') and Multilocularis (5'-LC705-CTGTGATCTTGGTGTAGTAGTTGAGATT-phosphate-3') that will enable the diagnosis of CE and AE in same assay. During M-RTR-PCR, plasmids containing E.granulosus (GenBank: AF297617.1) and E.multilocularis (GenBank: NC_000928.2) mitochondrial 12S rRNA regions were used as positive controls. Cysts samples of patients which were pathologically confirmed to be CE (n: 10) and AE (n: 15) and healthy human DNA samples (n: 25) as negative control as well as DNA samples of 12 different parasites (Taenia saginata, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Fasciola hepatica, Enterobius vermicularis, Toxoplasma gondii, Pneumocystis jirovecii, Trichomonas vaginalis, Cryptosporidium hominis, Strongyloides stercoralis, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax) were used to develop M

  7. Abundance, zoonotic potential and risk factors of intestinal parasitism amongst dog and cat populations: The scenario of Crete, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulou, Despoina; Claerebout, Edwin; Arvanitis, Dimitrios; Ligda, Panagiota; Voutzourakis, Nikolaos; Casaert, Stijn; Sotiraki, Smaragda

    2017-01-25

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and infection intensity of intestinal parasites in different dog and cat populations in Crete, Greece, estimate the zoonotic risk and identify risk factors. Faecal samples from shelter, household and shepherd dogs and shelter and household cats were analyzed using sedimentation/flotation techniques. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected by a quantitative direct immunofluorescence assay (IFA). PCR and sequencing was performed to evaluate the zoonotic potential of Giardia and Cryptosporidium positive samples. Totals of 879 dog and 264 cat faecal samples were examined. In dogs, the overall prevalence was 25.2% (CI: 22.4-28.1) for Giardia spp.; 9.2% (CI: 7.3-11.1) for Ancylostoma/Uncinaria spp.; 7.6% (CI: 5.9-9.4) for Toxocara spp.; 5.9% (CI: 4.4-7.5) for Cryptosporidium spp.; 4.6% (CI: 3.2-5.9) for Cystoisospora spp.; 2.7% (CI: 1.7-3.8) for Toxascaris leonina; 1.7% (CI: 0.9-2.6) for Capillaria spp.; 0.8% (CI: 0.2-1.4) for taeniid eggs; 0.2% (CI: 0-0.5) for Dipylidium caninum; and 0.1% (CI: 0-0.3) for Strongyloides stercoralis. In cats, the prevalence was 20.5% (CI: 15.6-25.3) for Giardia spp.; 9.5% (CI: 5.9-13.0) for Cystoisospora spp.; 8.3% (CI: 5.0-11.7) for Toxocara spp.; 7.6% (CI: 4.4-10.8) for Ancylostoma/Uncinaria spp.; 6.8% (CI: 3.8-9.9) for Cryptosporidium spp.; 4.2% (CI: 1.8-6.6) for Capillaria spp.; 0.8% (CI: 0-1.8) for taeniid eggs; and 0.4% (CI: 0-1.1) for Hammondia/Toxoplasma. Concerning the risk factors evaluated, there was a negative association between age and Giardia infection and between age and T. leonina infection intensity for dogs. Sequencing results revealed the presence of mainly animal-specific G. duodenalis assemblages C and D in dogs and assemblages F, C and BIV-like in cats, with only a limited number of (co-)infections with assemblage A. As for Cryptosporidium, the dog-specific C. canis and the pig-specific C. scrofarum were detected in dogs and the cat-specific C. felis was

  8. Gastrointestinal Endoparasites Diversity of Macaca fascicularis in Goa Monyet Tenau Garden, Kupang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Komang Oka Wirawan

    2015-11-01

    sp./ 80%, Ancylostoma sp./60%, Strongyloides sp./46.7%. The difference percentages of infection were influenced by several factors, such as vegetation, water sources, sanitation, season, temperature and population.

  9. Microbiological, pathological and histological findings in four Danish pig herds affected by a new neonatal diarrhoea syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Hanne; Jonach, Beata Renata; Haugegaard, Svend

    2013-01-01

    -haemorrhagic. Neither enterotoxigenic E. coli, Clostridium perfringens type A or C, Clostridium difficile, rotavirus, coronavirus, Cryptosporidium spp, Giardia spp, Cystoisospora suis nor Strongyloides ransomi were associated with diarrhoea in the investigated outbreaks. Macroscopically, the diarrhoeic piglets were...

  10. The effect of New Neonatal Porcine Diarrhoea Syndrome (NNPDS) on average daily gain and mortality in 4 Danish pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Hanne; Stege, Helle; Toft, Nils

    2014-01-01

    , which is not caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) type A/C, Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), rotavirus A, coronavirus, Cystoisospora suis, Strongyloides ransomi, Giardia spp or Cryptosporidium spp. Results: Piglets were estimated to have...

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization investigation of potentially pathogenic bacteria involved in neonatal porcine diarrhea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonach, Beata Renata; Boye, Mette; Stockmarr, Anders

    2014-01-01

    pathogens. The microorganisms that for decades have been associated with enteritis and diarrhea in suckling piglets are: rotavirus A, coronavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Clostridium perfringens type C, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., Cystoisospora suis and Strongyloides ransomi...

  12. Taiwo et al (8)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    Ife Journal of Science. (2016) vol. 18, no. 4. SPATIAL ... Ogun State. On the contrary, published work in some parts of Nigeria had ..... Prevalence among. Age Group (%). Cause of Infection. (%). Adeoye et al.,. 2007. Lagos. Kato-Katz. A. lumbricoides =29.7. Hookworm = 0.7. T. Trichiura = 18.4. S. stercoralis =0.3. Total =49.1.

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13840-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ( DQ493594 ) Mycoplasma alligatoris strain A21JP2 beta-galacto... 46 3.6 1 ( DU54...yloides stercoralis ... 46 3.6 1 ( FC820470 ) Sr_pAMT7_017m15_T7 S. ratti mixed stage pAMP Stro... 46 3.6 1

  14. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-09-01

    Sep 1, 2017 ... and the edge of the plate was sealed with adhesive tape to prevent the migration of larvae to outside surface. ... the fecal suspension and migrate to warm water. The upper portion of the water was discarded by ..... reported from Ethiopia (6,7) and from Brazil. (11,16). The prevalence of S. stercoralis infection.

  15. Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunz, Eric C.; Addiss, David G.; Stocks, Meredith E.; Ogden, Stephanie; Utzinger, Jürg; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preventive chemotherapy represents a powerful but short-term control strategy for soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Since humans are often re-infected rapidly, long-term solutions require improvements in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The purpose of this study was to quantitatively summarize the relationship between WASH access or practices and soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the associations of improved WASH on infection with STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm [Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus], and Strongyloides stercoralis). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and LILACS were searched from inception to October 28, 2013 with no language restrictions. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they provided an estimate for the effect of WASH access or practices on STH infection. We assessed the quality of published studies with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. A total of 94 studies met our eligibility criteria; five were randomized controlled trials, whilst most others were cross-sectional studies. We used random-effects meta-analyses and analyzed only adjusted estimates to help account for heterogeneity and potential confounding respectively. Use of treated water was associated with lower odds of STH infection (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% CI 0.36–0.60). Piped water access was associated with lower odds of A. lumbricoides (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.39–0.41) and T. trichiura infection (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.45–0.72), but not any STH infection (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.28–3.11). Access to sanitation was associated with decreased likelihood of infection with any STH (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.57–0.76), T. trichiura (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.50–0.74), and A. lumbricoides (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44–0.88), but not with hookworm infection (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.61–1.06). Wearing shoes was associated with reduced

  16. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in captive Odocoileus virginianus and Tayassu tajacu from Panama Republic

    OpenAIRE

    VALDÉS SÁNCHEZ, Vanessa Vianeth; SALDAÑA PATIÑO, Azael; PINEDA SEGUNDO, Vanessa Jenny; CAMACHO SANDOVAL, Jorge Antonio; CHARPENTIER ESQUIVEL, Claudia Virginia; CRUZ SÁNCHEZ, Tonatiuh Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of the gastrointestinal parasites of Tayassu tajacu (Collared peccary) and Odocoileus virginianus (White-tailed deer) in captivity in the Republic of Panama during the year 2008. The gastrointestinal parasites with major prevalence were Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba sp., Crystosporidium sp., Endolimax nana and Strongyloides sp.

  17. Prevalence of internal parasites in sheep/goats and effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These were Dictyocaulus, Moniezia benideni, Moniezia expensa, Fasciola hepatica, Strongyloides, Nematodirus, Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Trichuris ovis and Bunostomum. The level of parasitic infestation was mostly between 500 to 2000 eggs per gram (EPG) of faeces. Prior to execution of experiment, more than 80% ...

  18. Assessment of intestinal helminths in community school children of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also 286 helminth worms were recovered as follows; 127 (44.4%), 114 (40%), 21 (7.3%), 20 (7%), 3 (1%) and 1 (0.3%) for Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichuira, Hookworms, Fasciola hepatica, Strongyloides stercolaris and Enterobius vermicularis respectively. There was no significant difference in pattern of infection ...

  19. [Biomorphology of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetto, S

    2006-09-01

    Under the term gastrointestinal nematodes are included numerous parasites species of livestock belonging to the families Strongyloididae (Strongyloides), Strongylidae (Chabertia, Oesophagostomum) Trichostrongylidae (Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia, Teladorsagia, Cooperia, Marshallagia), Molineidae (Nematodirus), Ancylostomatidae (Bunostomum) and Trichuridae (Trichuris). This paper reviews the biomorphology aspects of these parasites as well as the controversy by the taxonomists in the classifications.

  20. Aspects of intestinal helminth parasites of dogs in World Bank ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a seven months (February to August, 2002) prevalence study of intestinal helminth parasites of dogs in the New Owerri area of Imo State, Nigeria, using both direct and concentration methods six helminth parasites were recorded. These included Hookworm, Strongyloides sp, Toxocara canis, Trichuris vulpis, Diphylidium ...

  1. Survey of Gastro-Intestinal Parasites of Chimpanzees and Drill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    eggs, 33 (11%) and Hymenolepis sp, segment, 30(11%). ... A drop of saturate saline was placed in the centre of one half of a microscope slide, and a ... Eggs. Segments. 66 (22%). 48 (16%). 120 (40%). 33 (11%)s. Strongyloides sp from Drill Monkey Hymenolepis Ovum from Drill monkeys. African Research Review Vol.

  2. Löffler's syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    temic lupus erythematosis) and neo- plastic disorders (Hodgkin's disease). Infectious causes of Löffler's syn- drome include protozoa, fungi, bacte- ria and helminths.1 In developing countries with high parasitic loads, helminthic causes predominate. The majority of worms implicated are nematodes, including Strongyloides.

  3. 21 CFR 520.1192 - Ivermectin paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... See § 556.344 of this chapter. (d) Special considerations. See § 500.25 of this chapter. (e...): Dictyocaulus arnfieldi; Intestinal Threadworms (adults): Strongyloides westeri; Summer Sores caused by.... For oral use only. Do not treat cattle within 24 days of slaughter. Because withdrawal time in milk...

  4. Spatial patterns of soil-transmitted helminths in soil environment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mapping protocol was used for predictive risk prevalence of parasites. A total of 483 (67.1%) out of the soil samples examined had parasites. Ova of Ascaris and Trichuris species, adults and larva of Strongyloides and larva of hookworm species were encountered. The variation in distribution is statistically significant ...

  5. Jälle need ussid / Reet Lätti

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lätti, Reet, 1983-

    2012-01-01

    Hobustel esinevad parasiitide - askariidid e varsasolkmed (Parascaris equorum), väikesed ümarussid (Cyathostominae), suured strongüliidid (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus), väikesed ümarussid (Strongyloides westeri), paeluss (Anoplocephala perfoliata) - tõrjest ning nakatumise kontrollimisest

  6. CESTODES IN MAN IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri S. Margono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cestodes are found endemic in certain areas of Indonesia. The most common cestodes found are Taenia saginata and Taenia solium. Eggs of Taenia are found in stool samples during surveys in Irian Jaya (2-9 %, Nusa Tenggara Timur (7 %, Bali and resettlement areas of people from Bali (0,4 - 3,3%. Interviews, with questions concerning expelled segments, recovered a prevalence of 9,5 % in inhabitants of the island of Samosir (North Sumatra and 2 % in the people of 6 villages in Abiansemal (Bali. Cases are also reported from Jakarta. Hymenolepis nana (0,2 -1% and Hymenolepis diminuta (0,4 % are rarely found in surveys. A case of hyperinfection with H. nana has been reported in Jakarta in 1968. Occasionally there are reports of infections with Dipylidium caninum, Raillietina madagascariensis, Bertiella studeri and sparganum. Report on treatment of taeniasis in Indonesia mentioned the use of atabrine, mebendazole, bithionol and praziquantel with different results.

  7. An examination of endoparasites and fecal testosterone levels in flying squirrels (Glaucomys spp.) using high performance liquid chromatography-ultra-violet (HPLC-UV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waksmonski, Sarah N; Huffman, Justin M; Mahan, Carolyn G; Steele, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    The immuno-competence hypothesis proposes that higher levels of testosterone increases the susceptibility to parasitism. Here we examined the testosterone levels in two species of flying squirrels ( Glaucomys ): one known to regularly host a nematode species ( Strongyloides robustus ) without ill effects ( G. volans ) and a closely related species that is considered negatively affected by the parasite. We quantified fecal testosterone levels in northern and southern flying squirrels ( G. sabrinus, G. volans ) with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet spectroscopy (HPLC-UV), and compared levels to endoparasites detected in individual squirrels. Qualitatively, we found highest levels of testosterone in male northern flying squirrels infected with Strongyloides robustus . This analytical approach represents an alternative and equally reliable method to using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for detecting and quantifying fecal testosterone levels.

  8. An examination of endoparasites and fecal testosterone levels in flying squirrels (Glaucomys spp. using high performance liquid chromatography-ultra-violet (HPLC-UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N. Waksmonski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The immuno-competence hypothesis proposes that higher levels of testosterone increases the susceptibility to parasitism. Here we examined the testosterone levels in two species of flying squirrels (Glaucomys: one known to regularly host a nematode species (Strongyloides robustus without ill effects (G. volans and a closely related species that is considered negatively affected by the parasite. We quantified fecal testosterone levels in northern and southern flying squirrels (G. sabrinus, G. volans with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet spectroscopy (HPLC-UV, and compared levels to endoparasites detected in individual squirrels. Qualitatively, we found highest levels of testosterone in male northern flying squirrels infected with Strongyloides robustus. This analytical approach represents an alternative and equally reliable method to using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, for detecting and quantifying fecal testosterone levels.

  9. Dicty_cDB: SHH233 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SH (Link to library) SHH233 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11264-1 - (Link to Or...c08.g1 Strongyloides ratti whole genome shotgun library (SRAAGSS 004) Strongyloides ratti genomic...iginal site) - - SHH233Z 563 - - - - Show SHH233 Library SH (Link to library) Clone ID SHH233 (Link to dicty...631_5( AY458631 |pid:none) Uncultured marine bacterium 159 cl... 84 3e-15 CU92816...86F1 NIH_MGC_58 Homo sapiens cDNA clone IMAGE:4069772 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.86 1 AP008210 |AP008210.1 Oryza sativa (japonica culti

  10. The Incidence of Helminth Parasites in Donkeys

    OpenAIRE

    G.B. Shrikhande; S.G. Rewatkar; S.S. Deshmukh; D.K. Maske and Y.M. Raghorte

    2009-01-01

    The faeces of 82 donkeys irrespective of sex and age were collected and examined for any parasitic ova. The faecal sample of68 donkeys were infected with: Strongylus sp. (54.87%), Parascaris sp. (29.26%), Strongyloides sp. (24.39%), Trichonema sp. (15.85%),Oxyuris sp. (8.53%), Gastrodiscus sp. (8.53%), Entamoeba sp. (8.53%), Dictyocaulus sp. (3.65%), and Triodontophorus sp. (2.43%). [Vet World 2009; 2(6.000): 224-224

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10389-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oxylase-lik... 46 2e-05 2 ( BI742499 ) kt51f12.y4 Strongyloides ratti L1 pAMP1 v3 Chiape... 48 4e-05 2 ( CD147...0014 Schistosoma manso... 46 4e-05 3 ( CD147604 ) ML1-0007T-V110-D04-U.B ML1-0007 Schistosoma manso... 46 4e

  12. Gastrointestinal Parasites of Two Populations of Arctic Foxes (Vulpes lagopus) from Northeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, P.N.S.; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Kapel, Christian M. O.

    2017-01-01

    Parasitological examination of 275 faecal samples from Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) collected at Zackenberg Valley and Karupelv Valley in north-east Greenland from 2006 to 2008 was conducted using sieving and microscopy. Overall, 125 (45.5%) samples contained parasite eggs of Taenia crassiceps......, Taenia serialis, Toxascaris leonina, Eucoleus boehmi, Physalopteridae and Ancylostomatidae, and Strongyloides-like larvae. As long-term ecological studies are conducted at both sampling locations, the present findings constitute a baseline data set for further parasitological monitoring....

  13. An examination of endoparasites and fecal testosterone levels in flying squirrels (Glaucomys spp.) using high performance liquid chromatography-ultra-violet (HPLC-UV)

    OpenAIRE

    Waksmonski, Sarah N.; Huffman, Justin M.; Mahan, Carolyn G.; Steele, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The immuno-competence hypothesis proposes that higher levels of testosterone increases the susceptibility to parasitism. Here we examined the testosterone levels in two species of flying squirrels (Glaucomys): one known to regularly host a nematode species (Strongyloides robustus) without ill effects (G. volans) and a closely related species that is considered negatively affected by the parasite. We quantified fecal testosterone levels in northern and southern flying squirrels (G. sabrinus, G...

  14. First Report of Anthelmintic Resistance in Gastrointestinal Nematodes of Sheep from Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, R.; Jiménez, A. E.; Romero, J. J.; Alvarez, V.; De Oliveira, J. B.; Hernández, J.

    2011-01-01

    As the prevalence and severity of anthelmintic resistance continue to rise, nematode infections in sheep correspondingly reduce the profitability of the sheep industry. In Costa Rica, sheep production systems are increasing in both number and importance. A field trial study was carried out to detect the level of anthelmintic resistance to albendazole and ivermectin in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of sheep from seven farms in Costa Rica. Resistance was determined using the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). Three treatment groups were assessed on each farm: control, albendazole, and ivermectin. Haemonchus spp. (71%), Strongyloides sp. (57%), and Trichostrongylus spp. (43%) presented resistance levels to albendazole, whereas Strongyloides sp. (43%), Haemonchus spp. (29%), and Trichostrongylus spp. (29%) were resistant to ivermectin. Haemonchus spp., Strongyloides sp., and Trichostrongylus spp. were the most resistant GIN to both products. This study suggests that frequency of treatment, exclusive chemical control, and visual estimation of animal weight to calculate dosage may contribute to the high levels of anthelmintic resistance that were observed on the farms analyzed herein. PMID:21772962

  15. Epidemiology of intestinal parasitosis in Italy between 2005 and 2008: diagnostic techniques and methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Crotti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study was to keep a real and actual photo relating to 2005-2008 regarding to diagnostic techniques and methodologies for intestinal parasites; so it would be possible to know specific epidemiology and suggest more rational and efficacious guide-lines. All members of AMCLI were involved in the proposal of a retrospective study regarding bowel parasites, helminths and protozoa.To engaged laboratories we asked how O&P was performed, if a specifical research for E. vermicularis and S. stercoralis was performed, if for the identification of D. fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Cryptosporidum spp were performed recommended specific permanent stains. 23 laboratories gave assent; but for an inferior number was possible to use the data for analysis and evaluation. Relating O&P only some laboratories performed permanent stains: Giemsa for D. fragilis, antigen and/or Trichrome stain for E. histolytica/dispar, antigen and/or acid fast stain for Cryptosporidium spp.Not all laboratories research specifically S. stercoralis. So the epidemiology is differentiated and related more to adequate or not adequate techniques than cohorts of examined populations. The overall positivity for parasites ranged from 0% to18.7%,for protozoa (pathogens or not were from 0% to 14.7%; for nematodes from 0% to 3.7%; for cestodes from 0% to 1.0%; for trematodes from 0% to 1.0%.Among helminths, E. vermicularis, followed by S. stercoralis, also in O&P, is the most frequent.The specific research of S. stercoralis gave a positivity from 0% to 33.3%; the cellophane tape test was positive for E. vermicularis from 0% fo 21.9% of cases.Among pathogen protozoa, D. fragilis, when permanent stain were applied, prevailed from 0% to 16.6%; G. duodenalis from 0.8% to 4.3%; E. histolytica/dispar, using a permanent stain or research of antigen, was identified from 0% to 20.6%. Coccidia were very rare, with Cryptosporidium spp observed from 0% to 5.2%. These are our conclusions

  16. Pulmonary Hemorrhage Secondary to Disseminated Strongyloidiasis in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika P. Plata-Menchaca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to disseminated strongyloidiasis is an unusual, well-recognized entity in immunocompromised patients with autoimmune disease, which is associated with the hyperinfection syndrome, sepsis, and a high mortality rate. Case Presentation. We present a case of a 44-year-old Mexican woman with systemic lupus erythematosus and acute bacterial meningitis who developed pulmonary hemorrhage with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, treated with broad spectrum systemic antibiotics and high dose methylprednisolone, who subsequently developed a characteristic purpuric skin eruption and septic shock and died two days later of refractory hypoxemia caused by massive pulmonary bleeding. The postmortem examination reports filariform larvae of S. stercolaris in lung, skin, and other organs. Conclusion. This case highlights the importance of considering disseminated strongyloidiasis in the differential diagnosis of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus, and screening for S. stercolaris infection before initiation of immunosuppressive therapy should be considered, especially in endemic areas. Disseminated strongyloidiasis has a high mortality rate, explained in part by absence of clinical suspicion.

  17. Gastrointestinal parasites of mountain gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) in the Parc National des Volcans, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, J M; Meader, L L; Mudakikwa, A B; Foster, J W; Patton, S

    2000-09-01

    Ninety-eight fecal samples were collected from 74 free-living mountain gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) from the Parc National des Volcans, Rwanda, between July 1995 and January 1997 and examined for parasites by Sheather's sugar and zinc sulfate flotation methods, trichrome staining, and larval cultures. All samples contained at least one parasite. Seventeen endoparasites were identified, including eight protozoa, seven nematodes, one cestode, and one trematode. Two species of arthropod mite were also recovered from the fecal samples. Parasites observed on fecal examinations included strongyle/trichostrongyle-type eggs (72/74) (representing Oesphagostomum sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Hyostrongylus spp., and possibly Murshidia sp.), Strongyloides sp. (1/74), Trichuris trichiura (2/74), Probstmayria sp. (7/74), Anoplocephala sp. (63/74), Entamoeba hartmanni cysts and trophozoites (19/70), Endolimax nana cysts (31/70), Iodamoeba buetschlii cysts (11/70), Endolimax nana or Iodamoeba buetschlii trophozoites (63/70). Entamoeba coli cysts and trophozoites (14/70), Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite (1/70), Chilomastix sp. cysts and trophozoites (31/70), and Giardia sp. cysts (2/70). In addition, one ascarid and one trematode egg were seen. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of parasites between males and females and between age groups: however, infants and juveniles appeared to have a lower prevalence of Anoplocephala gorillae, and the silverbacked males appeared to have a higher prevalence of Probstmayria sp. Parasite prevalence was consistent among the five social groups studied except Susa group had a significantly lower prevalence of Anoplocephala gorillae. Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides sp., Chilomastix sp., and Endolimax nana were identified for the first time in this population, and it is possible that these parasites were of human origin. Although there were no obvious clinical effects due to the presence of these parasites, six parasites

  18. IDENTIFIKASI NEMATODA PARASIT PADA SALURAN PENCERNAAN MARMUT (Cavia cobaya SEBAGAI SUMBER BELAJAR BIOLOGI PADA MATERI INVERTEBRATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septia Nurhasanah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted in the Laboratory of Science Education, University of Muhammadiyah Metro. The research is a descriptive analysis, morphological observations were made by identifying the nematode parasite found that Trichostrongylus sp, Strongyloides sp, Trichuris sp, Trichuris sp. The results showed the prevalence and intensity values is the large number of guinea pigs to parasites divided by the number of guinea pigs that are 100% inspected. While the intensity is seen from the total number of nematode parasites that infect in the number of guinea pigs infected with a parasite that is 2,3. The population in this study was 10 cows pigs (Cavia cobaya . This study took a part in the digestion of marmots (Cavia cobaya the intestines and stomach , then cut and taken part in the large intestine and be Indian ink or coloring 2-3 drops to be easily identified microscopically . Put the preparations into a petri dish , and given alcohol as much as 96 % with 2-3 drops . Taking part in the examination of the large intestine to taste then used the nematode worm structure with Indian ink dye to be observed , and placed in the glass object . Observed with a microscope. Document if the parasites are found by using the camera Erlina 2008. Identification of the observations made have found 3 types of parasites that attack the guinea pig (Cavia cobaya is Strongyloides sp on samples 1,2,3,4,5,6 , dan10 . Then parasite Trichuris sp species found in samples 8 and 9. Trichostrongylus sp parasite species found in sample 7 . Parasitic nematodes found were 3 types of Trichostrongylus sp, Strongyloides sp, Trichuris sp. Number of samples that have been observed as many as 10 cows pigs (Cavia cobaya , with the overall result is as much as 23 tails parasites.               Kata kunci: nematode parasit, marmut (Cavia cobaya, sumber belajar biologi.

  19. Gastrointestinal helminths in migratory Camel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Rewatkar

    Full Text Available Survey of gastrointestinal helminth parasites in camel migrated from U.P., M.P., and Rajasthan at Nagpur region was carried out in early summer, 2008. Total 28 samples (12 males and 16 females were collected from different places of Nagpur region. They revealed parasites as Trichuris sp.(50%, Strongyloides sp.(32.14%, Trichostrongylus sp.(10.71%, Nematodirus sp.(10.71%, Haemonchus sp.(14.28%, Eurytrema sp.(21.42% ,Eimeria sp.(25%, Entamoeba sp.(17.85% and Balantidium sp.(7.14%.All were found positive for mixed helminthic infection. [Vet World 2009; 2(7.000: 258-258

  20. The Incidence of Helminth Parasites in Donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.B. Shrikhande

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The faeces of 82 donkeys irrespective of sex and age were collected and examined for any parasitic ova. The faecal sample of68 donkeys were infected with: Strongylus sp. (54.87%, Parascaris sp. (29.26%, Strongyloides sp. (24.39%, Trichonema sp. (15.85%,Oxyuris sp. (8.53%, Gastrodiscus sp. (8.53%, Entamoeba sp. (8.53%, Dictyocaulus sp. (3.65%, and Triodontophorus sp. (2.43%. [Vet World 2009; 2(6.000: 224-224

  1. Avaliação parasitológica de alfaces (Lactuca sativa comercializadas em feiras livres e supermercados do município de Campo Mourão, Estado do Paraná - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v26i4.1514 Occurence of parasites in lettuce (Lactuca sativa commercializaed in the street markets and supermarkets of Campo Mourão, state of Paraná, Brazil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v26i4.1514

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria Simonelli

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo investigou e comparou a contaminação por enteroparasitas em alfaces (Lactuca sativa comercializadas em supermercados e feiras livres do município de Campo Mourão, Estado do Paraná. Foram analisadas 150 amostras de alfaces, pelo método de sedimentação espontânea (Hoffmann, sendo 75 amostras provenientes de supermercados e 75 amostras de feiras livres. O sedimento foi analisado em microscópio óptico. Das amostras analisadas, 56% (42/75 e 58,7% (44/75 apresentaram contaminação por parasitas, dos supermercados e feiras livres, respectivamente. Os principais parasitas encontrados em supermercados foram: Ascaris spp 54,7%, Toxocara spp 2,4%, Strongyloides spp 4,8%, Entamoeba spp 35,7% e Taenia spp 2,4%; e em feiras livres foram: Ascaris spp 13,6%, Strongyloides spp 11,4%, Entamoeba spp 47,7%, Ancylostoma spp 9,1%, /em>Taenia spp 2,3%, Fasciola hepatica 6,8% e Trichuris spp 9,1%. Esses resultados indicam que as amostras de alfaces estão em desacordo com a legislação vigente e salientam a necessidade de aplicação de um programa de educação sanitária direcionado a horticultores e manipuladores de hortaliçasThis work researched and compared the contamination by enteroparasites in lettuce (Lactuca sativa commercialized in the supermarkets and street markets of Campo Mourão, State of Paraná. 150 samples of lettuce were analyzed through sedimentation method (Hoffmam, being 75 samples from supermarkets and 75 from street markets. The sediment was analyzed in optic microscope. The supermarkets samples showed contamination by parasites of 56% (42/75; while contamination of street markets samples showed 58.7% (44/75. The principal parasites observed in supermarkets samples were: Ascaris spp 54.7%, Toxocara spp 2.4%, Strongyloides spp 4.8%, Entamoeba spp 35.7% and Taenia spp 2.4%. Important parasites observed in street markets were: Ascaris spp 13.6%, Strongyloides spp 11.4%, Entamoeba spp 47.7%, Ancylostoma spp 9.1%, Taenia

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15132-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s) Value N ( C22922 ) Dictyostelium discoideum gamete cDNA, clone FC-AM03. 1122 0.0 1 ( EY489954 ) CBBP17356.rev CBBP Hirudo medicina...lis hermaphrodi... 56 9e-12 4 ( EY481037 ) CBBP11163.rev CBBP Hirudo medicinalis he...( CZ542454 ) SRAA-aad44c05.g1 Strongyloides ratti whole genome... 66 1e-10 3 ( EY491469 ) CBBP18281.fwd CBBP Hirudo medicina...lis hermaphrodi... 56 3e-10 2 ( EY481038 ) CBBP11163.fwd CBBP Hirudo medicina...lis hermaphrodi... 56 3e-10 2 ( EY489955 ) CBBP17356.fwd CBBP Hirudo medicinalis hermaphrodi...

  3. Studies on endoparasites of the black bear (Ursus americanus) in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, J M; Nettles, V F; Davidson, W R

    1978-04-01

    Examination of 53 black bears (Ursus americanus) from six states in the southeastern United States revealed at least 17 species of endoparasites, including Sarcocystis sp., Spirometra mansonoides (spargana), Macracanthorhynchus ingens, Ancylostoma caninum, Arthrocephalus lotoris, Baylisascaris transfuga, Capillaria aerophila, Capillaria putorii, Crenosoma sp., Cyathospirura sp., Dirofilaria immitis, Gnathostoma sp., Gongylonema pulchrum, microfilariae, Molineus barbatus, Physaloptera sp. and Strongyloides sp. Twelve of these represent new host records for black bear, and two are considered to be new species. Data are presented on prevalence, intensity and geographic distribution of each species. Pathologic effects were associated with infections of spargana of S. mansonoides and adults of C. aerophilia.

  4. Gastrintestinal helminths of capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, Linnaeus, 1766 in Cattle Breeding Farm in the area of the Ecological Reserve of Taim, Rio Grande

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso Lodovico Sinkoc

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was we observe the prevalence, intensity and mean intensity of theinfection by gastrintestinal helminths in capybaras. The helminths collected resulted in the following relationship with their respective prevalence and mean intensities of infection: Strongyloides sp. - 62.55% and 168.67; Protozoophaga obesa - 95.83% and 2698.26; Vianella hydrochoeri - 70.83% and 83.82; Hydrochoerisnema anomalobursata - 58.33% and 57.86; Capillaria hydrochoeri - 83.33% and 35.25; Trichuris spp. - 50.00% and 36.58; Hippocrepis hippocrepis - 62.50% and 22.40; Taxorchis schistocotyle - 12.50% and 2.33; Hydrochoeristrema cabrali - 45.83% and 10.73; Monoecocestus hydrochoeri - 50,00% and 28.25 and Monoecocestus jacobi - 41.67% and 5.40. The helminths M. hydrochoeri, Strongyloides sp., Trichuris spp., H. hippocrepis and H. cabrali showed a statistical differences between ages in the mean intensity of parasitism, and the first two presented higher values for the young animals and the last three for the adults.Com o objetivo de observar a prevalência, intensidade e intensidade média de infecção de helmintos gastrintestinais de capivaras foram estudados 24 animais na Granja Santa Maria, região do Banhado do Taim, Município de Rio Grande, RS. As espécies de helmintos coletadas resultaram na seguinte relação, com suas respectivas prevalências e intensidades médias de infecção: Strongyloides sp. - 62,5% e 168,67; Protozoophaga obesa - 95,83% e 2698,26; Vianella hydrochoeri - 70,83% e 83,82; Hydrochoerisnema anomalobursata - 58,33% e 57,86; Capillaria hydrochoeri - 83,33% e 35,25; Trichuris spp. - 50,00% e 36,58; Hippocrepis hippocrepis - 62,50 e 22,40; Taxorchis schistocotyle - 12,50% e 2,33; Hydrochoeristrema cabrali - 45,83% e 10,73; Monoecocestus hydrochoeri - 50,00% e 28,25 e Monoecocestus jacobi - 41,67% e 5,40. Os helmintos M. hydrochoeri, Strongyloides sp., Trichuris spp., H. hippocrepis e H. cabrali diferiram estatisticamente entre

  5. Detection of intestinal parasites on field-grown strawberries in the Federal District of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Morais da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study evaluated the presence of pathogenic human parasites on field-grown strawberries in the Federal District of Brazil. Methods A total of 48 samples of strawberries and 48 soil samples from 16 properties were analyzed. Results Contaminated strawberries were detected in 56% of the properties. Schistosoma mansoni, Ascaris lumbricoides or Ascaris suum, Balantidium coli, Endolimax nana, and Entamoeba spp. were detected. Soil was contaminated with Entamoeba spp., Entamoeba coli, Strongyloides spp., Ancylostomatidae, and Hymenolepis nana. Conclusions Producers should be instructed on the safe handling of strawberries in order to reduce the incidence of strawberries that are contaminated with enteroparasites.

  6. Observações sobre parasitologia humana e veterinária em Mato Grosso Observations on human and veterinary parasitilogy in Mato-Grosso State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pereira

    1941-01-01

    Full Text Available The most interesting observations were: 1 - The "mal de cadeiras" (believed to be an equine trypanosomose, due to Trypanosoma equinum is a syndrome originated from malnutrition, overwork, intense blood-loss through blood-sucking arthropods (chiefly tabanids and bot-flies and aggravated by the conditions prevailing in the "Pantanal" region of Mato-Grosso, when the waters of the Paraguay river basin ebb, after the periodic flood. The trypanosomes act only as one more factor contributing to the horses debility. 2 - The "curso preto dos bezerros" (calves black scour, usually attributed to poly-helminthoses, was observed to be related exclusively to pure Strongyloides papillosus infestations.

  7. Evaluation the effect of albendazole against nematodes in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Al-Farwachi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Six sheep farms in Mosul city, Iraq randomly selected, were surveyed for gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to Albendazole. On each of 6 sheep farms, 20 lambs were randomly distributed into two equal groups untreated control group, and albendazole (benzimidazole group (10 mg/kg BW. Faecal egg counts and larval cultures were done at 7, 14, and 21 days after anthelmintic treatment. Resistance was apparent for albendazole on 4 farms out of 6 (66.7%. Post-treatment larval cultures indicated: Strongyloides papillosus, Marshalligia marshalli, Nematodirus spathiger and Haemonchus contortus.

  8. An investigation of parasitic infections and review of molecular characterization of the intestinal protozoa in nonhuman primates in China from 2009 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junqiang; Dong, Haiju; Wang, Rongjun; Yu, Fuchang; Wu, Yayun; Chang, Yankai; Wang, Chenrong; Qi, Meng; Zhang, Longxian

    2017-04-01

    Parasites are a well-known threat to nonhuman primate (NHP) populations, and potentially cause zoonotic diseases in humans. In this study, the basic data was provided of the parasites in NHPs and the molecular characterization of the Enterocytozoon bieneusi , Giardia duodenalis , Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba spp. were reviewed, which were found in these samples. A total of 3349 fecal samples were collected from 34 species reared at 17 districts in zoos, farms, free-range, or research laboratories, and examined microscopically. Eleven genera of intestinal parasites were detected: five genera of protozoans ( Isospora spp., Entamoeba spp., Giardia sp., Cryptosporidium spp., and Cyclospora spp.) and six genera of helminths ( Trichuris spp., Strongyloides spp., Ascaris spp., Physaloptera spp., Ancylostoma spp., and Enterobius spp.). The overall sample prevalence of parasitic infection was 54.1% (1811/3349). Entamoeba spp. was the most prevalent (36.4%, 1218/3349). The infection rate was the highest in free-range animals (73.0%, 670/918) (P Entamoeba spp., Trichuris spp., and Strongyloides spp.. Molecular characterization was reviewed of Enterocytozoon bieneusi , Giardia duodenalis , Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba spp., as these are zoonotic species or genotypes. This parasitological data for NHPs in China, provides important information for veterinarians and public health authorities for the elimination of such parasites and monitor the potential transmission of zoonotic infections from NHPs.

  9. An investigation of parasitic infections and review of molecular characterization of the intestinal protozoa in nonhuman primates in China from 2009 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiang Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Parasites are a well-known threat to nonhuman primate (NHP populations, and potentially cause zoonotic diseases in humans. In this study, the basic data was provided of the parasites in NHPs and the molecular characterization of the Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba spp. were reviewed, which were found in these samples. A total of 3349 fecal samples were collected from 34 species reared at 17 districts in zoos, farms, free-range, or research laboratories, and examined microscopically. Eleven genera of intestinal parasites were detected: five genera of protozoans (Isospora spp., Entamoeba spp., Giardia sp., Cryptosporidium spp., and Cyclospora spp. and six genera of helminths (Trichuris spp., Strongyloides spp., Ascaris spp., Physaloptera spp., Ancylostoma spp., and Enterobius spp.. The overall sample prevalence of parasitic infection was 54.1% (1811/3349. Entamoeba spp. was the most prevalent (36.4%, 1218/3349. The infection rate was the highest in free-range animals (73.0%, 670/918 (P < 0.01 and Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region (64.8%, 566/873. Mixed infections were mostly detected for Entamoeba spp., Trichuris spp., and Strongyloides spp.. Molecular characterization was reviewed of Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba spp., as these are zoonotic species or genotypes. This parasitological data for NHPs in China, provides important information for veterinarians and public health authorities for the elimination of such parasites and monitor the potential transmission of zoonotic infections from NHPs.

  10. Isolation of Intestinal Parasites of Public Health Importance from Cockroaches (Blattella germanica) in Jimma Town, Southwestern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamu, Haji; Debalke, Serkadis; Zemene, Endalew; Birlie, Belay; Mekonnen, Zeleke; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw

    2014-01-01

    Cockroaches are claimed to be mechanical transmitters of disease causing microorganisms such as intestinal parasites, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. This study assessed the potential of the German cockroach Blattella germanica in the mechanical transmission of intestinal parasites of public health importance. A total of 2010 cockroaches were collected from 404 households in Jimma Town, southwestern Ethiopia. All the collected cockroaches were identified to species as B. germanica. The contents of their gut and external body parts were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites. Overall, 152 (75.6%) of the 210 batches were found to harbor at least one species of human intestinal parasite. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Taenia spp, Strongyloides-like parasite, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovski, Giardia duodenalis and Balantidium coli were detected from gut contents. Moreover, parasites were also isolated from the external surface in 22 (10.95%) of the batches. There was significant difference in parasite carriage rate of the cockroaches among the study sites (P = 0.013). In conclusion, B. germanica was found to harbor intestinal parasites of public health importance. Hence, awareness on the potential role of cockroaches in the mechanical transmission of human intestinal parasites needs to be created. Moreover, further identification of the Strongyloides-like worm is required using molecular diagnostics.

  11. Isolation of Intestinal Parasites of Public Health Importance from Cockroaches (Blattella germanica in Jimma Town, Southwestern Ethiopia

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    Haji Hamu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockroaches are claimed to be mechanical transmitters of disease causing microorganisms such as intestinal parasites, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. This study assessed the potential of the German cockroach Blattella germanica in the mechanical transmission of intestinal parasites of public health importance. A total of 2010 cockroaches were collected from 404 households in Jimma Town, southwestern Ethiopia. All the collected cockroaches were identified to species as B. germanica. The contents of their gut and external body parts were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites. Overall, 152 (75.6% of the 210 batches were found to harbor at least one species of human intestinal parasite. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Taenia spp, Strongyloides-like parasite, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovski, Giardia duodenalis and Balantidium coli were detected from gut contents. Moreover, parasites were also isolated from the external surface in 22 (10.95% of the batches. There was significant difference in parasite carriage rate of the cockroaches among the study sites (P=0.013. In conclusion, B. germanica was found to harbor intestinal parasites of public health importance. Hence, awareness on the potential role of cockroaches in the mechanical transmission of human intestinal parasites needs to be created. Moreover, further identification of the Strongyloides-like worm is required using molecular diagnostics.

  12. Coprological study of gastrointestinal parasites of captive animals at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh

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    M.M. Khatun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in different groups of mammals housed at Rangpur Recreational Garden and Zoo in Bangladesh. A total of 45 fecal samples of different animals (11 carnivores, 26 herbivores and 8 primates were examined from April to September 2011 for the presence of gastrointestinal parasites. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 60% (27/45 of which 35.6% (16/45 were helminth infections and 24% (11/45 were protozoic infections. The identified parasites included protozoa (Balantidium coli and Coccidia sp., nematodes (Toxascaris leonina, Toxocara cati, Strongyloides sp., Dictyocaulus sp., Trichuris sp. and stomach worm, cestodes (Spirometra sp. and Moniezia benedeni and trematodes (Fasciola sp.. At least one parasite was identified in the fecal samples of all animals except of the samples from bear, python, water buck and olive baboon. Mixed infections were observed in Rhesus monkey (Trichuris sp. and Balantidium coli, in deer (Strongyloides sp. and Coccidia sp. and in lion (Toxascaris leonina and Spirometra sp.. Helminth infections were more common than protozoic infections in carnivores and herbivores, whereas in primates, protozoic infections were more common than helminth infections. The high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites found in zoo animals in this study emphasizes the importance of controlling these parasitic infections in order to safeguard the health of housed wild animals and of the humans working with these animals.

  13. Etude comparative de la charge parasitaire des petits ruminants et du guib harnaché dans quatre campements riverains à la forêt classée de Wari-Maro au Nord-Est du Bénin

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    Faihun, AML.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative Study of the Parasitic Load of Small Ruminants and Bushbuck in Four Camps Bordering the Wari-Maro Reserve in the North East of Benin. A comparative survey of the gastro-intestinal parasitical burden of small ruminants (sheep, goat and one species of wild ruminants (bushbuck has been conducted in four camps around the classified forest of Wari-Maro located in the North-East of Benin. The flotation and sedimentation methods, and a semi-quantitative method associated to the flotation method were used to analyze the different samples. Feces samples were collected during the dry and rainy seasons with 100 samples for sheep, 75 for goat and 25 for bushbuck. The small domestic ruminants presented six types of parasites (strongyles, Strongyloides, coccidia, tapeworm, Capillaria, trematodes. The bushbuck presented strongyles and Strongyloides only during the rainy season. The burden of different types of parasites was low in the majority of cases. The wild or domestic nature of the animal influenced its parasitical state (p<0.05. For this study it appeared that no relation exists between the infestation intensity of small ruminants and bushbuck.

  14. MONITORING OF THE INTESTINAL TRACT PARASITE LOAD AND OF THE SANITARY MANGEMENT AT A PACA BREEDING FARM

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    Vânia Maria França Ribeiro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Paca (Cuniculus paca Linnaeus, 1766 rearing has shown development in all Latin America countries. Fresh feces samples were collected from the soil and analyzed by Willis Mollay and Hoffmann’s techniques, aiming at accompanying the sanitary management, determining the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites, and their respective load, of pacas raised in captivity, and evaluating parasite control strategies, between the months of November/2012 and June/2013. A McMaster’s camera was used for quantification. The reading was accomplished by optical microscopy with 25x and 40x lenses, which revealed 21,433 eggs per gram of feces (EPG, with an average of 2,679,12 (± 41.0 Strongyloides spp., and 3,325 EPG, with average of 415.6 (± 57.0 Trychuris spp. Besides, 482,101 oocytes per gram of feces (OPG were found, with an average of 60,263 (± 15.93 Eimeria spp., and 51 larvae of Strongyloides spp., with an average of 6.3 (± 6.86 larvae. Two eggs of Hymenolepis diminuta were identified in only one stall. An anthelminthic (albendazole 10% and trimethopim associated with sulfadiazine were used to treat the disease. We concluded the great index of parasitic infestation presented by the animals, in spite of the anthelminthic treatments, can be associated with the rainfall rates observed, the physical conditions of the instalations, as well as the adequate cleaning and sanitization of the facilities.

  15. Gastrointestinal parasites in feral cats and rodents from the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Brazil

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    Victor Fernando Santana Lima

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal parasites are important pathogens affecting animals, some of them are of medical and veterinary concern. Although the dynamic of parasitic infections is a complex phenomenon that has been studied under experimental conditions, it shows several gaps in knowledge, especially in insular regions where a confined population of animals and parasites co-exists. In this study was assessed the parasitism by endoparasite gastrointestinal in feral cats (n = 37 and rodents (n = 30 from the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago; in addition, the risk of human infection and ecological implications of these findings were discussed. Out of all samples analysed, 100% scored positive for the presence of gastrointestinal parasites in both feral cats and rodents. A total 17 genera and/or species of endoparasite gastrointestinal were identified, Ancylostoma sp., Strongyloides sp., Trichuris campanula and Toxocara cati were the parasites more frequently in feral cats. In rodents Eimeria sp., Strongyloides sp. and Trichuris muris were parasites more frequently herein detected. Human population living in this area are at risk of parasite infections due to the population of rodents and feral cats in the archipelago.

  16. Gastrointestinal parasites in feral cats and rodents from the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Brazil.

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    Lima, Victor Fernando Santana; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Lepold, Raphael; Borges, João Carlos Gomes; Ferreira, Carlos Diógenes; Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Alves, Leucio Câmara

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal parasites are important pathogens affecting animals, some of them are of medical and veterinary concern. Although the dynamic of parasitic infections is a complex phenomenon that has been studied under experimental conditions, it shows several gaps in knowledge, especially in insular regions where a confined population of animals and parasites co-exists. In this study was assessed the parasitism by endoparasite gastrointestinal in feral cats (n = 37) and rodents (n = 30) from the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago; in addition, the risk of human infection and ecological implications of these findings were discussed. Out of all samples analysed, 100% scored positive for the presence of gastrointestinal parasites in both feral cats and rodents. A total 17 genera and/or species of endoparasite gastrointestinal were identified, Ancylostoma sp., Strongyloides sp., Trichuris campanula and Toxocara cati were the parasites more frequently in feral cats. In rodents Eimeria sp., Strongyloides sp. and Trichuris muris were parasites more frequently herein detected. Human population living in this area are at risk of parasite infections due to the population of rodents and feral cats in the archipelago.

  17. Host social rank and parasites: plains zebra (Equus quagga) and intestinal helminths in Uganda.

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    Fugazzola, M C; Stancampiano, L

    2012-08-13

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the social hierarchy of plain zebra, Equus quagga, and the level of parasitism. For the study 141 fecal samples from the same number of animals were collected within the two major populations of E. quagga of Uganda (Lake Mburo Conservation Area and Kidepo Valley National Park). Quantitative (eggs per gram of feces) and qualitative parasite assessment were performed with standard methods. The relationship between parasite burden and individual host features was analyzed using Generalized Linear Models. Strongyles, cestodes, Strongyloides sp. and oxiurids where present in the examined samples. Social rank and age class significantly affect all parasites' abundance with dominant individuals being less parasitized than subordinate individuals, regardless of the parasite groups excluding oxiurids. Sex could not been shown to be related with any of the found parasites. Age was positively related with strongyles and oxiurids abundance and negatively related with cestodes and Strongyloides sp. The main result of the present study was the evidence that social status influences parasite level with dominant zebras shedding less parasite eggs than subordinate ones. Social rank appears, therefore, as an important factor giving rise to parasite aggregation in plain zebras. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The prevalence of intestinal nematodes in cats and dogs from Lancashire, north-west England.

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    Wright, I; Stafford, K; Coles, G

    2016-08-01

    To estimate prevalence of clinically-relevant intestinal nematodes in UK cats and dogs using the sensitive faecal analysis technique FLOTAC. Faecal samples were collected from 171 domestic dogs and 131 domestic cats living in urban areas of Lancashire and examined for the ova of intestinal parasites using the FLOTAC technique. All tested individuals were at least 6 months old, had not been treated with anthelmintics since 6 months of age nor in the 3 weeks prior to testing. In total, 5·3% of dogs (9/171) were positive for Toxocara canis; of these, 5/9 had dogs were positive for Uncinaria stenocephala, and 3 were positive for Strongyloides species. Single animals had Ancylostoma species and Spirocerca lupi infection. All egg counts were cats (34/131) were infected with Toxocara cati; of these, 6/34 had cats were positive for Strongyloides species, four for Ancylostoma species and single case for U. stenocephala, Toxascaris leonina and S. lupi. The high prevalence and zoonotic potential of Toxocara species in cats and dogs suggests the need for greater awareness of the need for repeated treatment. The discovery of S. lupi warrants further investigation and awareness of the clinical signs that this parasite may cause in cats and dogs. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  19. Diarrhoea-associated parasites in HIV-1 seropositive and sero-negative patients in a teaching hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

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    Andualem, Berhanu; Kassu, Afework; Moges, Feleke; Gedefaw, Molla; Diro, Ermias; Mengistu, Getahun; Andargie, Gashaw

    2007-04-01

    to determine the prevalence and type of intestinal parasites in HIV infected and uninfected patients with diarrhea. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Gondar University hospital, Northwest Ethiopia, between March 2003 and October 2004. A total 312 consecutive diarrheic patients were included in the study. Stool specimens were collected and examined for intestinal parasites following direct, formol-ether concentration and modified acid fast staining methods. Among the patients, 63.8% were found to be HIV seropositive. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV seropositive and seronegative diarrheic patients was 30.6% and 33.6%, respectively. The most prevalent parasites were Strongyoides stercoralis (9.0%) and Entamoeba histolytica (8.3%) followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (5.4%) and Cryptosporidium species (5. 1%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites in diarrheic patients was very high. Institution of appropriate intervention measures are needed to reduce morbidity in such patients.

  20. Helminthiases in Montes Claros. Preliminary survey

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    Rina Girard Kaminsky

    1976-04-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary survey was conducted for the presence of helminths in the city of Montes Claros, M. G., Brazil. Three groups of persons were examined by the direct smear, Kato thick film and MIFC techniques; one group by direct smear and Kato only. General findings were: a high prevalence of hookworm, followed by ascariasis, S. mansoni, S. stercoralis and very light infections with T. trichiurá. E. vermicularis and H. nana were ranking parasites at an orphanage, with some hookworm and S. mansoni infections as well. At a pig slaughter house, the dominant parasites were hookworm and S. mansoni. Pig cysticercosis was an incidental finding worth mentioning for the health hazard it represents for humans as well as an economic loss. From the comparative results between the Kato and the MIF the former proved itself again as a more sensitive and reliable concentration method for helminth eggs, of low cost and easy performance.

  1. Helminthic infections mimicking malignancy: a review of published case reports.

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    Pilsczek, Florian H

    2010-08-04

    Infectious diseases, including infections with helminths, can initially present similarly to malignancies. The goal of the article is to review reports of helminthic infections that are initially diagnosed as malignancy. The database PubMed was searched for English language references published as of July 2009. The following published case reports and case series, mainly from Asia and Africa, were identified: Nematodes: 8 publications (1 patient with Angiostrongylus cantonensis, 2 Stronglyloides stercoralis, 1 Toxocara species, 1 Dioctophyma renale, 1 Ascaris species, 1 Gnathostoma spinigerum, 1 Dirofilaria repens); Trematodes: 7 publications (46 patients with Schistosoma species, 2 Fasciola hepatica, 1 Paragonimus westermani); Cestodes: 6 publications (10 patients with Echinococcus species, 1 Sparganum mansoni). To avoid unnecessary investigations and treatment, physicians should be aware when diagnosing patients from Asia or Africa that a large number of helminthic infections can present similar to malignancies.

  2. Prevalência de enteroparasitoses em fezes colhidas durante necrópsias

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    João Antônio de Almeida

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de verificarmos a prevalência de enteroparasitoses, colhemos o conteúdo do tubo digestivo, em três porções distintas, durante a realização de 135 necrópsias completas. As fezes foram conservadas em MIF (mistura de formol, iodo e merthiolate, e analisadas pelo exame protoparasitológico direto. Encontramos enteroparasitas em 40 casos (29,6%, sendo que em 11 deles (27,5% havia poliparasitismo e em 29 casos (72,5% monoparasitismo. As enteroparasitoses mais freqüentes foram o S. stercoralis (31,9%, E. histolytica (23,4%, Ancilostomídeos (19,1% e A. lumbricoides (17%. Os resultados estão de acordo com levantamentos epidemiològicos na região. Além disso, mostram que o exame protoparasitológico de fezes colhidas concomitantemente ao exame necroscópico fornece mais um subsídio ao diagnóstico anatomopatológico.With the Intention to verify the frequency of intestinal parasites, we have taken the inside digestive system material from three differents parts of the intestinal tract while we were doing 135 complete necropsies. The stools were kept in MIF (Formol, iodine and merthiolate mixture being studied in slides by the direct method. We have found intestinal parasites in 40 cases (29.6%, 11 (27.5% with two or more kinds of parasites and 29 cases (72.5% with only one kind ofparasite. The most frequent parasites were: S. stercoralis (31,9%, E. hystolytica (23.4%, hook worm (19.1% and A. lumbricoides (17%. The results are in according with epidemiological research made in this area. Thus, they prove that the parasitological exam made in feces taken during the necroscopy provides further evidence to enrich the anatomo-pathological diagnosis.

  3. Parassitosi intestinali umane nel Perugino nel corso del 2005

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    Maria Letizia D’Annibale

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available During 2005 we analyzed stool specimens of 661 subjects, 221 children (1-16 years old and 440 adults, for O&P (direct and after formalin-etylacetate concentration microscopic observations, Giemsa and modified Ziehl- Neelsen permanent stains when requested. 13.8% of subjects were positive for parasitic infections (13.5% among children and 13.9% among adults. 8.8% of subjects are infected with pathogen parasites (7.2% among children and 9.6% among adults and 5.0% with not pathogens (6.3% and 4.3% respectively. Among pathogen parasites, in children G. duodenalis was observed in 4.1% of cases,D. fragilis in 0.5%, E. vermicularis in 0.9%, T. trichiura in 1.8%. Among adults, D. fragilis was observed in 5.2% of cases, G. duodenalis in 1.8%, Cryptosporidium spp. in 0.5%, E. vermicularis in 0.5%, T. trichiura in 0.7%, S. stercoralis in 0.7%, H. nana in 0.2%, T. saginata in 0.5%, S. mansoni in 0.5%.Among childrens, 76.7% of pathogen parasites were imported from developing countries, particularly G. duodenalis in adopted ones; instead, among adults, 83.6% of pathogens was observed in home/Italian people, particularly D. fragilis. Cellophane tape test was performed on 40 home children and E. vermicularis prevailed in 22%; modified Baermann method was performed on 42 old subjects and S. stercoralis rabdithoid larvae were observed in 7.1% (but the same ones of O&P.The Authors recommend the O&P in subjects with intestinal aspecific troubles, ipereosinophilia, or other justified situations, emphasizing the importance of a rational, good and responsible O&P and/or other techniques for intestinal parasitosis, because are present, even if not frequent, not only imported, particularly D. fragilis, but also helminths, and not only E. vermicularis.

  4. Gastrointestinal parasites in captive and free-ranging Cebus albifrons in the Western Amazon, Ecuador

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    Sarah Martin-Solano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a lack of surveys that report the occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites in the white-headed capuchin monkey (Cebus albifrons. We therefore assessed the presence and richness (= number of different parasite genera of parasites in C. albifrons in wildlife refuges (n = 11 and in a free-ranging group near a human village (n = 15 in the Ecuadorian Amazon. In the 78 samples collected (median of 3 samples per animal, we identified a total of 6 genera of gastrointestinal parasites, representing protozoa, nematodes, acanthocephalans and cestodes. We observed a high prevalence (84% across the 26 individuals, with the most prevalent parasite being Strongyloides sp. (76.9%, followed by Hymenolepis sp. (38.5% and Prosthenorchis elegans (11.5%. We found Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moskovskii/nuttalli and Capillaria sp. in only a minority of the animals (3.8%. In addition, we observed unidentified strongyles in approximately one-third of the animals (34.6%. We found a total of 6 parasite genera for the adult age group, which showed higher parasite richness than the subadult age group (5 and the juvenile age group (3. Faecal egg/cyst counts were not significantly different between captive and free-ranging individuals or between sexes or age groups. The free-ranging group had a higher prevalence than the captive group; however, this difference was not significant. The only genus common to captive and free-ranging individuals was Strongyloides sp. The high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites and the presence of Strongyloides in both populations support results from previous studies in Cebus species. This high prevalence could be related to the high degree of humidity in the region. For the free-ranging group, additional studies are required to gain insights into the differences in parasite prevalence and intensity between age and sex groups. Additionally, our study demonstrated that a serial sampling of each individual increases

  5. Co-infection patterns of intestinal parasites in arboreal primates (proboscis monkeys, Nasalis larvatus in Borneo

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    Annette Klaus

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-human primates of South-East Asia remain under-studied concerning parasite epidemiology and co-infection patterns. Simultaneously, efforts in conservation demand knowledge of parasite abundance and biodiversity in threatened species. The Endangered proboscis monkey, Nasalis larvatus, a primate flagship species for conservation in Borneo, was investigated in the present study. Habitat loss and fragmentation are among the greatest threats to bachelor and harem groups of this folivorous colobine. Designed as a follow-up study, prevalence and co-infection status of intestinal parasites from N. larvatus in a protected area in Malaysian Borneo were analyzed from fecal samples using a flotation method. For the first time, the intestinal parasite co-infection patterns were examined using quantitative analyses. Overall, 92.3% of fecal samples (N = 652 were positive for helminth eggs. Five helminth groups were detected: (1 trichurids (82.7% prevalence including Trichuris spp. (82.1% and Anatrichosoma spp. (1.4%, (2 strongyles (58.9% including Trichostrongylus spp. (48.5% and Oesophagostomum/Ternidens spp. (22.8%, (3 Strongyloides fuelleborni (32.7%, (4 Ascaris lumbricoides (8.6%, and (5 Enterobius spp. (5.5%. On average, an individual was co-infected with two different groups. Significant positive associations were found for co-infections of trichurids with strongyles and S. fuelleborni as well as S. fuelleborni with A. lumbricoides and strongyles. This study shows a high prevalence of various gastrointestinal helminths with potential transmission pathways primarily related to soil and with zoonotic relevance in wild proboscis monkeys in their remaining natural habitats. Observed positive associations of trichurids with strongyles and Strongyloides spp. may result from the high prevalence of trichurids. Similarly, positive associations between Strongyloides and Ascaris were found, both of which typically occur predominantly in juvenile hosts

  6. Frequency of parasites and Salmonella infection in captive maned-wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, kept in Zoos at the State of São Paulo, Brazil

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    Gilioli R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-one captive maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger 1815 from 11 Zoos at the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were screened to investigate the presence of parasites and Salmonella infection by parasitological diagnostic methods and fecal selective culture. The most frequent ecto and endoparasites found were Ctenocephalides felis (56.2%, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (12.5%, Ancylostoma caninum (45.1%, Strongyloides sp. (29.0%, Uncinaria stenocephala (3.2%, Capillaria sp. (3.2%, Entamoeba sp. (22.9%, Sarcocystis sp. (29.0%, Cryptosporidium sp. (19.3%, Eimeria sp. (19.3%, Giardia sp. (9.6% and Isospora sp. (3.2%. Four different serotypes of Salmonella were identified in six animals (25%. Only one infected animal showed clinical signs of diarrhea. The ability to harbor Salmonella spp. as normal nonpathogenic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract may be a physiological adaptation of this specie.

  7. Helmintos e protozoários em fezes de javalis (Sus scrofa scrofa criados em cativeiro Helminths and protozoa in wild boars (Sus scrofa scrofa feces raised in captivity

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    M.J.S. Mundim

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Faecal samples from 79 wild boars (Sus scrofa scrofa were examined by sedimentation method, zinc sulfate flotation method, and centrifugal flotation in sugar solution for endoparasites research. The results showed that 97.5% of the samples were positive for helminths and/or protozoa as follows: strongilides (70.9%, Ascaris suum (46.9%, Trichuris suis (29.1%, Metastrongylus sp. (12.6%, Strongyloides ransomi (3.8%, Balantidium coli (38.0%, Entamoeba spp. (15.2%, Giardia spp. (1.3%, Blastocystis sp. (12.6%. The frequency of Entamoeba was higher in young animals. Coccidian oocysts were observed in 59.5% samples and five species of Eimeria and one Isospora were recovered: Eimeria scabra (31.9%, E. deblieck (31.9%, E. perminuta (23.4%, E. cerdonis (17.0%, E. scrofae (12.8% and Isospora suis (12.8%.

  8. THE PREVALENCE OF GASTROINTESTINAL NEMATODES OF BALI CATTLE BREEDERS IN NUSA PENIDA

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    Putu Agus Trisna Kusuma Antara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nusa Penida is a pure breeding area of bali cattle, in which the cattle are mainly kept in conventional maintenance system and potentially infected by parasite, especially gastrointestinal nematodes. This study aims were to determine the prevalence and type of gastrointestinal nematodes in bali cattle breeders in Nusa Penida. Fecal samples were taken from 50 bali cattle breeders kept in cages (simantri and another 50 samples were from cattle not kept in cage. The floating method was used for morphological examination and prevalence, the data was analyzed with descriptive analysis. The results showed, the prevalence of bovine gastrointestinal nematodes in Nusa Penida was 25%. The prevalence of nematode infection in bali cattle that kept cages was lower compared to the cattle that were not kept in cage. Strongyloides papillosus and Capillaria bovis were the gastrointestinal nematodes found in the infected cattle.

  9. Purification and analyses of the specificity of two putative diagnostic antigens for larval cyathostomin infection in horses.

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    Dowdall, S M J; Proudman, C J; Love, S; Klei, T R; Matthews, J B

    2003-12-01

    Cyathostomins are important equine gastrointestinal parasites. Mass emergence of mucosal stage larvae causes a potentially fatal colitis. Mucosal stages are undetectable non-invasively. An assay that would estimate mucosal larval stage infection would greatly assist in treatment, control and prognosis. Previously, we identified two putative diagnostic antigens (20 and 25 kDa) in somatic larval preparations. Here, we describe their purification and antigen-specific IgG(T) responses to them. Western blots confirmed the purity of the antigens and showed that epitopes in the 20 kDa complex were specific to larval cyathostomins. No cross-reactive antigens appeared to be present in Parascaris equorum or Strongyloides westeri species. Low levels of cross-reactivity were observed in Strongylus edentatus and Strongylus vulgaris species. Use of purified antigens greatly reduced background binding in equine sera. These results indicate that both antigen complexes may be of use in a diagnostic assay.

  10. Transmission of some species of internal parasites in horse foals born in 2013 in the same pasture on a farm in Central Kentucky

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    Tolliver S. C.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present research is a continuation of studies conducted periodically over 40 years on transmission of natural infections of internal parasites in the same horse herd on pasture (Field 10 on a farm in Central Kentucky. It included 12 mixed light horse foals born in 2013 and euthanatized between July, 2013 and April, 2014 for collection of internal parasites. Parasites found: Gasterophilus intestinalis, Strongyloides westeri, Parascaris equorum, Anoplocephala perfoliata, small strongyles (cyathostomes, Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus and Thelazia lacrymalis. Prevalence generally was related to age of the foals. Overall prevalence and number of specimens were lower than in earlier studies except for P. equorum. There were 15 species (much fewer than previously of small strongyles found and recorded by location in the large intestines. All stages of small strongyles encysted in the mucosa of the large intestine were recovered by artificial digestion and in significantly lower numbers in older foals

  11. Helminth parasites of Galictis cuja (Carnivora, Mustelidae, from localities in the Atlantic forest of Brazil

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    Pilar Corrêa

    Full Text Available Abstract The current study aimed to investigate the helminth parasites of a population of Galictis cuja (Carnivora, Mustelidae that occur in Atlantic Forest in the Southeastern region of Brazil. We necropsied 18 specimens of G. cuja, collected between January 2009 and May 2014, ran over victims on BR-040 highway, between the municipalities of Duque de Caxias, state of Rio de Janeiro and Juiz de Fora, state of Minas Gerais, localities inserted in Atlantic rainforest Biome. A total of six species of helminths were identified: Dioctophyme renale, Molineus elegans, Physaloptera sp., Strongyloides sp., Platynosomum illiciens, and Pachysentis gethi. Molineus elegans, Physaloptera sp. and P. illiciens were recorded for the first time in this host. Data provided in the current study when compared to the previous reports of parasitism by helminths in G. cuja in Brazil demonstrate that this study is the most representative with this host species.

  12. Recovery of gastrointestinal swine parasites in anaerobic biodigester systems.

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    Cañon-Franco, William Alberto; Henao-Agudelo, Ricardo Andrés; Pérez-Bedoya, José Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Solid and liquid wastes from livestock operations represent important challenges for animal production regarding their impact in the environment and public health. Parasitological tests performed on 80 samples of affluent and effluent waters from three anaerobic biodigestors with flexible structure from swine farms of Caldas - Colombia, showed the presence of Isospora suis (45%), Eimeria suis (42.5%), E. espinosa (35%), Strongyloides ransomi (28.8%), E. perminuta (12.5%), E. cerdonis (3.8%), and E. porci (2.5%). The additional finding of eggs of Taenia spp. in 10% of the samples was probably caused by a connection between the human sewage system and the biodigester. Although we observed a mean decrease of 65.6% of parasites, these levels were insufficient to meet the minimum requirement set by Engelberg's guidelines regarding water quality. This study demonstrates the serious environmental impact that an inadequately treated animal wastewater represents, and has important implications for water resources and human health.

  13. Endoparasites of American marten (Martes americana: Review of the literature and parasite survey of reintroduced American marten in Michigan

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    Maria C. Spriggs

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The American marten (Martes americana was reintroduced to both the Upper (UP and northern Lower Peninsula (NLP of Michigan during the 20th century. This is the first report of endoparasites of American marten from the NLP. Faeces from live-trapped American marten were examined for the presence of parasitic ova, and blood samples were obtained for haematocrit evaluation. The most prevalent parasites were Capillaria and Alaria species. Helminth parasites reported in American marten for the first time include Eucoleus boehmi, hookworm, and Hymenolepis and Strongyloides species. This is the first report of shedding of Sarcocystis species sporocysts in an American marten and identification of 2 coccidian parasites, Cystoisospora and Eimeria species. The pathologic and zoonotic potential of each parasite species is discussed, and previous reports of endoparasites of the American marten in North America are reviewed.

  14. Clinical disorders observed in anteaters (Myrmecophagidae, Edentata) in captivity.

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    Diniz, L S; Costa, E O; Oliveira, P M

    1995-01-01

    The major health problems found in 103 captive lesser anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) and giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), family Myrmecophagidae, are presented and correlated with management. The most common of 200 recorded clinical disorders involved the digestive system (26%), nutritional deficiency (20%), injury (15.5%), respiratory system (10%), skin (7%) and circulatory system (4.5%), but 13% of the cases were inconclusive. Parasites were identified in 48.5% of faecal samples, mainly the eggs of nematodes (40%), of which the commonest were Trichuris spp (28%) and Strongyloides spp (11%); protozoa (16%), of which the commonest were Eimeria spp (10%), Entamoeba spp (5%) and Giardia spp (1%); and cestodes (8%) and acanthocephalids (1%). Bacteria cultured from the various materials included Salmonella enteritidis, S. cholerasuis, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Streptococcus spp and Staphylococcus spp. The ectoparasites found were Amblyomma spp and Otodectis spp (Arthropoda, Acaridae).

  15. Parasitic Worm in Tiger (Panthera tigris at Serulingmas Zoological Garden Banjarnegara, Bandung Zoological Garden, and Indonesia Safari Park Bogor

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    Risa Tiuria

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was done to infestigate the existence and the type of parasitic worms from feces of tiger (Panthera tigris at Serulingmas Zoological Garden (TRMS at Banjarnegara, Central Java , Bandung Zoological Garden (KBB, and Indonesia Safari Park Bogor (TSI. Total of 35 tigers feces samples were examined. They are taken from 4 Bengal tigers at Serulingmas Zoological Garden, 12 tigers (8 Bengal tigers and 4 Sumatran tigers at Bandung Zoological Garden, and 19 tigers (4 Bengal tigers and 15 Sumatran tigers at Indonesia Safari Park Bogor. All of the feces samples were examined with qualitative (flotation and sedimentation and quantitative (McMaster slide method to know the existence of parasitic worm eggs. Moreover, a tiger feces that contain eggs of strongylid were cultured. Parasitic worms that were found in tigers from the research were ascarid (Toxocara sp, Toxascaris sp, strongylid (Trichostrongylus sp, Ancylostoma sp, Cooperia sp, , oxyurid (Oxyuris sp and Strongyloides sp. The result showed that prevalence index of parasitic worms in tigers at TRMS, KBB, and TSI were 100%, 50%, and 47,4%, respectively. Parasitic worms at TRMS were ascarid (Toxocara sp, strongylid (Ancylostoma sp, Trichostrongylus sp, Cooperia sp and Strongyloides sp. Parasitic worms at KBB were ascarid (Toxocara sp, Toxascaris sp, strongylid (Ancylostoma sp, Trichostrongylus sp, dan oxyurid (Oxyuris sp. Parasitic worms at TSI were ascarid (Toxocara sp, Toxascaris sp, strongylid (Ancylostoma sp, and oxyurid (Oxyuris sp. ABSTRAK Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui jenis cacing parasitik pada harimau (Panthera tigris di Taman Rekreasi Margasatwa Serulingmas (TRMS Banjarnegara Jawa Tengah, Kebun Binatang Bandung (KBB, dan Taman Safari Indonesia (TSI Bogor. Sebanyak 35 sampel tinja harimau dari tiga lembaga konservasi eks-situ, yaitu 4 ekor harimau Benggala dari TRMS, 12 ekor (4 ekor harimau Benggala dan 8 ekor harimau Sumatera dari KBB, dan 19 ekor (4 ekor harimau

  16. Endoparasites of horses from the Formiga city, located in center-west region of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Weslen Fabricio Pires Teixeira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of studying the endoparasite fauna of horses from the Formiga city, located in center-west region of the state of Minas Gerais, 25 animals that were naturally infected with helminths were evaluated. By means of parasitological necropsies, different endoparasites were found. The subfamily Cyathostominae presented the highest incidence, followed by Trichostrongylus axei, Oxyuris equi, Triodontophorus serratus, Strongyloides westeri, Strongylus edentatus, Habronema muscae, Parascaris equorum, Probstmayria vivipara, Strongylus vulgaris, Gasterophilus nasalis, Anoplocephala magna and Anoplocephala perfoliata. In the present study, if the species Probstmayria vivipara was not considered in the prevalence, the frequency of Cyathostominae was equivalent to 94.85%. The results obtained in this study allowed us to detect and identify different species of helminths in horses, and confirmed the high incidence of nematodes belonging to the subfamily Cyathostominae in the center-west region of Minas Gerais.

  17. Proteinograma de caprinos da raça Pardo-Alpina infectados naturalmente por parasitos gastrintestinais Proteinogram of Alpine goat naturally infected by gastrointestinal parasites

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    S.Y. Fernández

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The proteinogram of six 12 month-old Alpine goats, intensively raised and naturally infected by gastrointestinal parasites, was evaluated. Blood and feces samples of each animal were monthly collected. Total serum protein and their fractions were determined by agarose gel eletrophoresis, using Tris buffer, pH 9.2. The identified protein fractions were albumin, alfa-globulin, beta1-globulin, beta2-globulin and gama-globulin, whose average and standard deviation (g/dl were, respectively: 2.35±0.39, 0.69±0.36, 0.70±0.08, 0.48±0.08 and 1.52±0.41. It was not observed significative correlation (P>0.05, according to the Spearman non-parametric test, either between the Strongyloides eggs count per gram of feces or the Haemonchus spp. larval count per gram of feces and the fraction electrophorectly variable.

  18. Stress free oral medication in captive cervids

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    G.M. Das

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of oral administration of fenbendazole was studied against gastrointestinal helminthes in captive Cheetal (Axis axis at Hisar Deer Park from November 2006- January 2007. A novel method of administration of oral medication that included acclimatizing cheetal to feed individually from specific containers and providing drugs in feed after habituation was developed. Efficacy of fenbendazole was assessed by egg per gram EPG count of faecal sample on day 11 and 19 post 1st treatment and 4 days after 2nd treatment i.e. on 22nd day and compared with pre-treatment counts. Fenbendazole was efficacious against Strongyles sp., Strongyloides sp., Ascaris sp., Trichuris sp. and Moniezia sp. and significantly reduced the mean EPG of faeces, decreasing p< 0.01 after provision of drug at doses of 7.5 mg/kg body weight. The method was efficacious and provided adequate dosage to individual animals irrespective of their social hierarchy.

  19. Antiparasitic efficacy of ivermectin in naturally parasitized sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazwinski, T A; Greenway, T; Presson, B L; Pote, L M; Featherstone, H; Williams, M

    1983-11-01

    Sixteen sheep harboring naturally acquired parasitisms were allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups: (i) sheep given ivermectin in an oral solution at the dosage rate of 200 micrograms/kg of body weight, and (ii) those given the vehicle at a dosage rate of 0.25 ml/kg. All animals were necropsied at 2 weeks after treatment. Parasites and percentages of parasitic reductions, as demonstrated in this trial, were: Dictyocaulus filaria (99.4%), Oestrus ovis first stage instars (100%), Trichuris ovis (98.9%), Strongyloides papillosus (99.8%), Nematodirus spathiger (100%), arrested 4th stage Nematodirus spp (96.2%), Trichostrongylus colubriformis (100%), T axei (100%), Oster tagia circumcincta (100%), Haemonchus contortus (100%), and arrested Haemonchus spp 4th stage larvae (99.9%). The sheep showed no adverse effects due to ivermectin or vehicle administration.

  20. Gastrointestinal parasites of sheep, municipality of Lajes, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.

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    de Souza, Maria de Fátima; Pimentel-Neto, Manoel; da Silva, Rízia Maria; Farias, Albeísa Cleyse Batista; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the gastrointestinal parasitism by helminths and protozoa in sheep (Ovis aries) Santa Inês breed, municipality of Lajes, Rio Grande do Norte. Monthly, from April 2005 to August 2007, stool samples were collected from two tracer lambs in the first day of the experiment and performed a necropsy of these animals in 44th day. A total of 64 lambs were sampled, but only 62 lambs were slaughtered. The fecal samples were examined by sedimentation in water. The contents of the abomasum, small intestine and large intestine were examined for the recovery of helminths. The parasitological examination revealed eggs of the following groups of helminths: Strongyloidea, Strongyloides sp., Trichuris sp., and Moniezia sp. Also were found oocysts of Eimeria spp., cysts of Entamoeba ovis and Giardia duodenalis. The helminths identified from examining the contents were: Haemonchus contortus, Cooperia pectinata, Cooperia punctata, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Moniezia expansa, Oesophagostomum sp. Skrjabinema ovis and Trichuris sp.

  1. Seasonal prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of sheep in Northern region of Nile Delta, Egypt.

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    Khalafalla, Reda E; Elseify, Mahmoud A; Elbahy, Nasr M

    2011-02-01

    Over 1 year, from January to December 1999, a total of 173 slaughtered sheep at Al-Mahala abattoir were examined for presence of nematode parasites. Eighteen sheep (10.4%) were infected with eight different species of nematodes. The prevalence rates of detected nematode parasites were; Haemonchus contortus (3.5%), Haemonchus placei (1.7%), Trichuris ovis (5.8%), Parabronema skrjabini (2.9%), Ostertagia trifurcata (1.2%), Chabertia ovina (0.6%) and Strongyloides papillosus (0.6%), and Graphidiops species (2.9%). The seasonal prevalence of the infection with the nematode parasites was studied and the highest rate was during autumn (15.2%) followed by summer (11.1%) and winter (9.4%) while the lowest rate was during spring (5.6%).

  2. Prevalence and Significance of Parasites of Horses in Some States of Northern Nigeria

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    EHIZIBOLO, David O.; KAMANI, Joshua; EHIZIBOLO, Peter O.; EGWU, Kinsley O.; DOGO, Goni I.; SALAMI-SHINABA, Josiah O.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and significance of parasites of horses in northern Nigeria. Blood and faecal samples were randomly collected from 243 horses from different stables in some states of northern Nigeria for laboratory analyses. Fifty-seven horses (23.5%) were found infected with parasites. The hemoparasites detected, 21 (8.6%), include Theileria equi, Babesia caballi, Trypanosoma vivax and Trypanosoma evansi. The endoparasites encountered, 29 (11.9%) were Strongylus spp., Strongyloides spp., Oxyuris equi, Parascaris equorum, Paragonimus spp. and Dicrocoelium spp., 3 (1.2%) was Eimeria spp. Four horses (1.6%) had mixed infection of hemo- and endoparasites. This preliminary finding shows that parasitism is a problem in the horse stables examined, and calls for proper stable hygiene, routine tick control and regular deworming programme. PMID:24833991

  3. Parasitas zoonóticos em fezes de cães em praças públicas do município de Itabuna, Bahia, Brasil Zoonotic parasites in dog feces at public squares in the municipality of Itabuna, Bahia, Brazil

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    Pedro C. Campos Filho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a contaminação de praças públicas da área urbana do município de Itabuna, BA, Brasil, por parasitos zoonóticos presentes em fezes de cães. Foram coletadas 119 amostras fecais de cães em 10 praças. Logo após, estas fezes foram encaminhadas ao Laboratório de Parasitologia da UESC e analisadas pelo método de Mariano e Carvalho. Do total das amostras analisadas, 56,3% continham alguma forma evolutiva parasitária, sendo o parasita mais freqüente Ancylostoma sp. com 47,9%, seguido por 6,7% de Strongyloides stercortalis, 4,2% tanto para ovos de Toxocara canis quanto de Trichuris vulpis, 2,5% para cistos de Endolimax nana, e 0,8% tanto para cistos de Giardia intestinalis quanto para os de Entamoeba coli.The contamination of public squares by zoonotic potential parasites was evaluated at the urban areas in the municipality of Itabuna Brasil. For such, 119 fecal samples of dogs were collected at 10 public squares. After that, these feces samples were transported to the Parasitology Laboratory in the UESC and they were analyzed by Mariano and Carvalho's method. Of the total analized samples, 56.3% show some parasitic evolutive form. Ancylostoma sp. was the most frequently (47.9%, followed by Strongyloides stercortalis (6.7%, Toxocara canis and Trichuris vulpis eggs (4.2% each, Endolimax nana cysts (2.5%, and Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba coli cysts (0.8% each.

  4. Gastrointestinal parasites of the chimpanzee population introduced onto Rubondo Island National Park, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrzelková, Klára J; Hasegawa, Hideo; Appleton, Chris C; Huffman, Michael A; Archer, Colleen E; Moscovice, Liza R; Mapua, Mwanahamissi Issa; Singh, Jatinder; Kaur, Taranjit

    2010-04-01

    The release of any species into a novel environment can evoke transmission of parasites that do not normally parasitize the host as well as potentially introducing new parasites into the environment. Species introductions potentially incur such risks, yet little is currently known about the parasite fauna of introduced primate species over the long term. We describe the results of long-term monitoring of the intestinal parasite fauna of an unprovisioned, reproducing population of chimpanzees introduced 40 years earlier (1966-1969) onto Rubondo Island in Lake Victoria, Tanzania, a non-native habitat for chimpanzees. Two parasitological surveys (March 1997-October 1998 and October 2002-December 2005) identified Entamoeba spp. including E. coli, Iodamoeba buetschlii, Troglodytella abrassarti, Chilomastix mesnili, Trichuris sp., Anatrichosoma sp., Strongyloides spp., Strongylida fam. gen. sp., Enterobius anthropopitheci, Subulura sp., Ascarididae gen. sp., and Protospirura muricola. The parasite fauna of the Rubondo chimpanzees is similar to wild chimpanzees living in their natural habitats, but Rubondo chimpanzees have a lower prevalence of strongylids (9%, 3.8%) and a higher prevalence of E. anthropopitheci (8.6%, 17.9%) than reported elsewhere. Species prevalence was similar between our two surveys, with the exception of Strongyloides spp. being higher in the first survey. None of these species are considered to pose a serious health risk to chimpanzees, but continued monitoring of the population and surveys of the parasitic fauna of the two coinhabitant primate species and other animals, natural reservoir hosts of some of the same parasites, is important to better understand the dynamics of host-parasite ecology and potential long-term implications for chimpanzees introduced into a new habitat. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Gastrointestinal parasite infections and self-medication in wild chimpanzees surviving in degraded forest fragments within an agricultural landscape mosaic in Uganda.

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    Matthew R McLennan

    Full Text Available Monitoring health in wild great apes is integral to their conservation and is especially important where they share habitats with humans, given the potential for zoonotic pathogen exchange. We studied the intestinal parasites of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii inhabiting degraded forest fragments amid farmland and villages in Bulindi, Uganda. We first identified protozoan and helminth parasites infecting this population. Sixteen taxa were demonstrated microscopically (9 protozoa, 5 nematodes, 1 cestode, and 1 trematode. DNA sequence analysis enabled more precise identification of larval nematodes (e.g. Oesophagostomum stephanostomum, O. bifurcum, Strongyloides fuelleborni, Necator sp. Type II and tapeworm proglottids (genus Bertiella. To better understand the ecology of infections, we used multidimensional scaling analysis to reveal general patterns of association among parasites, climate, and whole leaf swallowing-a prevalent self-medicative behaviour at Bulindi linked to control of nodular worms (Oesophagostomum spp.. Prevalence of parasites varied with climate in diverse ways. For example, Oesophagostomum sp. was detected in faeces at higher frequencies with increasing rainfall but was most clearly associated with periods of low temperature. Certain parasites occurred together within chimpanzee hosts more or less frequently than expected by chance. For example, the commensal ciliate Troglodytella abrassarti was negatively associated with Balantidium coli and Oesophagostomum sp., possibly because the latter taxa make the large intestine less suitable for T. abrassarti. Whole leaves in faeces showed independent associations with the prevalence of Oesophagostomum sp., Strongyloides sp., and hookworm by microscopic examination, and with egestion of adult O. stephanostomum by macroscopic inspection. All parasites identified to species or genus have been reported in wild chimpanzees inhabiting less-disturbed environments than

  6. Atividade anti-helmíntica de plantas nativas do continente americano: uma revisão Anthelmintic activity of native American plants: a review

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    R.G. Sousa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho faz uma revisão de plantas nativas do continente americano com atividade anti-helmíntica com a finalidade de subsidiar pesquisas e o desenvolvimento de novos medicamentos na área de produtos naturais. Na literatura, foram citadas 22 famílias de plantas, tais como: Moraceae, Asteraceae e Cucurbitaceae, e estudadas cerca de 35 espécies, como a Ficus sp, Cucurbita máxima, e Ruta graveolens, usadas por sua alegada atividade anti-helmíntica. Destas espécies, 26 foram ativas contra alguns helmintos: Strongyloides stercolaris, Ancylostomidae, Trichostrongylus sp, Capillaria sp, Ascaris lumbricoides, Taenia saginata, Haemonchus contortus, e Hymenolepsis diminuta. Foi verificado maior número de estudos com parasitas de animais, possivelmente devido ao desenvolvimento de resistência dos helmintos aos tratamentos convencionais disponíveis.This paper is a review of native American plants showing anthelmintic activity in order to give support to research and development of new drugs in the field of natural products. In the literature, 22 plant families were cited, such as: Moraceae, Asteraceae and Cucurbitaceae, and around 35 species were studied, including Ficus sp, Cucurbita maxima and Ruta graveolens, used for their putative anthelmintic activity. From these species, 26 were active against some helminthes: Strongyloides stercolaris, Ancylostomidae, Trichostrongylus sp, Capillaria sp, Ascaris lumbricoides, Taenia saginata, Haemonchus contortus and Hymenolepsis diminuta. Data indicated a larger number of studies with animal parasites, probably due to the resistance of these helminthes to the conventional treatments available.

  7. Avaliação do kit "TF-Test" para o diagnóstico das infecções por parasitas gastrintestinais em ovinos

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    Giuliano Lumina

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivos padronizar o kit TF-Test para a quantificação de ovos de parasitas gastrintestinais de ovinos e compará-lo ao método de Gordon & Whitlock modificado (G&W. Vinte quatro cordeiros confinados foram infectados artificialmente com Haemonchus contortus, durante 12 semanas, até o abate, quando foram colhidas amostras fecais e realizada a identificação e contagem dos parasitas abomasais. Nestes animais, ovos de H. contortus foram detectados em 95,8% das amostras fecais por ambos os testes (P>;0,05. Os coeficientes de correlação (r entre a carga parasitária (CP e os valores de OPG obtidos pelos métodos de G&W e TF-Test foram, respectivamente, de r=0,52 e r=0,51 (dados não transformados e r=0,85 e r=0,87 (dados transformados em log. Outras 100 amostras fecais foram colhidas de ovinos naturalmente infectados. Nas amostras destes animais, os testes G&W e TF-Test propiciaram o diagnóstico de ovos de estrongilídeos em 85% e 86% das amostras, respectivamente (P>;0,05. Pelo TF-Test e pelo G&W, oocistos de Eimeria foram detectados em 33% e em 12% das amostras (P<0,001 e ovos de Strongyloides spp. em 15% e 5% das amostras, respectivamente (P<0,05. Ambos os testes foram precisos para o diagnóstico de estrongilídeos gastrintestinais, porém, o TF-Test foi superior para o diagnóstico de oocistos de Eimeria spp. e de ovos de Strongyloides spp., mas, por outro lado, subestimou o número de ovos de estrongilídeos presente nas amostras.

  8. New paleoparasitological investigations from the pre-inca to hispanic contact period in northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Mônica Vieira; da Silva, Lucélia Guedes Ribeiro; Silva-Pinto, Verónica; Mendez-Quiros, Pablo; de Miranda Chaves, Sergio Augusto; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo

    2018-02-01

    Paleoparasitological studies have demonstrated that changes in environment or culture are reflected in the patterns of parasitic infection diseases in populations worldwide. The advent of agriculture and animal domestication, with its accompanying reduction in human mobility and expanding population involves changes in or emergence of, parasites, the so-called first epidemiological transition. Cultural processes related to territory occupation contribute to both loss and acquisition of parasites. The archaeological site Lluta 57 in the Lluta Valley, Chile, provides a chronology of the transition from the pre-Inca or Late Intermediate Period (LIP), through the Late or Inca Period (LP), to the Hispanic Contact Period (HCP), providing the possibility of evaluating this epidemiological transition. The aim of this study was to conduct a paleoparasitological investigation of to gain insight into the dynamics of parasitism in Lluta people throughout the Inca expansion. Fourteen human coprolites from the three periods were rehydrated, submitted to spontaneous sedimentation, and examined by light microscopy for the presence of intestinal parasite eggs, pollen grains, and micro-remains. Eggs of four parasites: Enterobius vermicularis, Trichostrongylus sp., Trichuris sp., and Eimeria macusaniensis were recovered. Frequency, diversity, and number of parasite eggs per sample increased over the studied time period. Trichostrongylus sp. and E. macusaniensis were recorded in the region for the first time. Enterobius vermicularis eggs, absent in the LIP, were present as a hyper-infection in LP. The presence of E. macusaniensis is likely related to exploitation of llamas, which were used for food and transport and as sacrificial offerings. The paleobotanical analysis revealed ten families of pollen grains, as well as phytoliths and floral remains. In contrast to parasitological results, a diachronic pattern was not detected. Evolution of the settlements, with the advent of larger

  9. Helminthiases in Montes Claros. Preliminary survey

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    Rina Girard Kaminsky

    1976-04-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary survey was conducted for the presence of helminths in the city of Montes Claros, M. G., Brazil. Three groups of persons were examined by the direct smear, Kato thick film and MIFC techniques; one group by direct smear and Kato only. General findings were: a high prevalence of hookworm, followed by ascariasis, S. mansoni, S. stercoralis and very light infections with T. trichiurá. E. vermicularis and H. nana were ranking parasites at an orphanage, with some hookworm and S. mansoni infections as well. At a pig slaughter house, the dominant parasites were hookworm and S. mansoni. Pig cysticercosis was an incidental finding worth mentioning for the health hazard it represents for humans as well as an economic loss. From the comparative results between the Kato and the MIF the former proved itself again as a more sensitive and reliable concentration method for helminth eggs, of low cost and easy performance.Um estudo preliminar sobre helmintos foi feito na cidade de Montes Claros, MG, Brasil. Três grupos de pessoas foram examinados pelos métodos direto, de Kato e do MIF e um grupo pelos métodos direto e Kato exclusivamente. Encontrou-se uma alta prevalência de necatorose, seguindo-se ascaríase, S. mansoni, S. stercoralis, e infecções leves pelo T. trichiura. E. vermicularis e H. nana foram osparasitos mais prevalentes num orfanato, com alguns casos de infecção pelo Necator e S. mansoni. Cisticercose dos suinos foi achado incidental e é importante ser mencionada devido ao perigo que representa no plano da Saúde Pública, bem como pela perda econômica que produz. Discutiu-se brevemente a importância do solo na transmissão dos helmintos num clima quente e seco. Da comparação dos métodos de Kato e MIF, o primeiro demonstrou ser o método mais sensível para ovos de helmintos, de baixo custo e fácil preparo.

  10. Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Pregnant Women in Venezuela

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    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intestinal parasitic infections, especially due to helminths, increase anemia in pregnant women. The results of this are low pregnancy weight gain and IUGR, followed by LBW, with its associated greater risks of infection and higher perinatal mortality rates. For these reasons, in the setting of no large previous studies in Venezuela about this problem, a national multicentric study was conducted. Methods. Pregnant women from nine states were studied, a prenatal evaluation with a coproparasitological study. Univariated and multivariated analyses were made to determine risk factors for intestinal parasitosis and related anemia. Results. During 19 months, 1038 pregnant women were included and evaluated. Intestinal parasitosis was evidenced in 73.9%: A lumbricoides 57.0%, T trichiura 36.0%, G lamblia 14.1%, E hystolitica 12.0%, N americanus 8.1%, E vermicularis 6.3%, S stercoralis 3.3%. Relative risk for anemia in those women with intestinal parasitosis was 2.56 ( P<.01 . Discussion. Intestinal parasitoses could be associated with conditions for development of anemia at pregnancy. These features reflect the need of routine coproparasitological study among pregnant women in rural and endemic zones for intestinal parasites. Further therapeutic and prophylactic protocols are needed. Additional research on pregnant intestinal parasitic infection impact on newborn health is also considered.

  11. Enteric parasites in HIV-1/AIDS-infected patients from a Northwestern São Paulo reference unit in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era

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    Luciana Ventura Cardoso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We describe the epidemiology of intestinal parasites in patients from an AIDS reference service in Northeastern São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Retrospective evaluation was done for all HIV-1/AIDS-positive patients whose Hospital de Base/São José do Rio Preto laboratorial analysis was positive for enteroparasites after diagnosis of HIV-1 infection, from January 1998 to December 2008. Statistical analysis was performed using the R statistical software version 2.4.1. The level of significance adopted was 5%. RESULTS: The most frequent protozoan was Isospora belli (4.2%, followed by Giardia lamblia (3.5%, Entamoeba coli (2.8%, and Cryptosporidium parvum (0.3%. Ancylostoma duodenale (1.4% was the most frequently detected helminth, while Taenia saginata and Strongiloides stercoralis were found in 0.7% of the samples. The results showed that diarrhea was significantly associated with giardiasis and isosporiasis. However, no association was observed between CD4+ cell counts, viral load, and the characteristics of any particular parasite. CONCLUSIONS: Our data may be useful for further comparisons with other Brazilian regions and other developing countries. The data may also provide important clues toward improving the understanding, prevention, and control of enteric parasites around the world.

  12. Prevalence of Hookworm infection and Strongyloidiasis in Cats and Potential Risk Factor of Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedionoto, Blego; Anamnart, Witthaya

    2018-02-01

    Hookworm infection and Stronyloidiasis are public health problem in the worldwide which both of them could infective in human by penetrated on skin and they have potential risk from Gastrointestinal zoonotic helminths of pets, including cats. We investigated the prevalence soil transmitted helminths infection in human and cats used modified Formal-Ether Concentration and agar plate culture. Fecal samples of 23 cats and human from Naitung and Subua Villages (area study 1), and fecal samples of 15 cats and 17 humans from Thasala Beach villages (area study 2) were collected. Result of study in area study 1 showed prevalence of infection in human was not hookworm and strongyloidiasis but 10% humans have infected Ascaris and Tricuris, and in cats have infected by hookworm 75.2% and S. strercoralis 8.5%, toxocara 13%, spirometra 13% and overall prevalence 82.5%. In area study 2 showed in human has infected by Trichuris 100% and S. stercoralis 29.4% and in cats have infected by hookworm 100% and S. strercoralis 40%, toxocora 20%, and spirometra 20%. Helminth infection found in both humans in two areas study are S. strercoralis. Hookworms were the most common helminth in cats but did not connection with infection in human, while S. strercoralis was helminth infection in cats which has potential zoonotic disease to human.

  13. Demarcação da atividade anti-helmíntica do albendazol. Estudo referente à estrongiloidíase humana

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    Vicente Amato Neto

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Os Autores utilizaram novo anti-helmíntico, o albendazol, no tratamento de 32 pessoas com estrongiloidíase. A casuística foi composta por adultos, de ambos os sexos, que receberam, pela via oral, dose cotidiana única de 400 mg, repetida em três oportunidades intervaladas por períodos de 24 horas. O controle da terapêutica sucedeu através de exames das fezes realizados sete, 14 e 21 dias após o término da administração, tendo sido empregado o método de Rugai, Mattos e Brisola. A porcentagem de curas verificada correspondeu a 28,1% e, ao lado da boa tolerância observada, essa constatação demonstrou baixa eficácia do medicamento em apreço no combate à infecção causada pelo Strongyloldes stercoralis, a despeito de méritos comprovados em investigações anteriores e concernentes a outras parasitoses intestinais.

  14. Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Pregnant Women in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Barbella, Rosa A.; Case, Cynthia; Arria, Melissa; Ravelo, Marisela; Perez, Henry; Urdaneta, Oscar; Gervasio, Gloria; Rubio, Nestor; Maldonado, Andrea; Aguilera, Ymora; Viloria, Anna; Blanco, Juan J.; Colina, Magdary; Hernández, Elizabeth; Araujo, Elianet; Cabaniel, Gilberto; Benitez, Jesús; Rifakis, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Intestinal parasitic infections, especially due to helminths, increase anemia in pregnant women. The results of this are low pregnancy weight gain and IUGR, followed by LBW, with its associated greater risks of infection and higher perinatal mortality rates. For these reasons, in the setting of no large previous studies in Venezuela about this problem, a national multicentric study was conducted. Methods. Pregnant women from nine states were studied, a prenatal evaluation with a coproparasitological study. Univariated and multivariated analyses were made to determine risk factors for intestinal parasitosis and related anemia. Results. During 19 months, 1038 pregnant women were included and evaluated. Intestinal parasitosis was evidenced in 73.9%: A lumbricoides 57.0%, T trichiura 36.0%, G lamblia 14.1%, E hystolitica 12.0%, N americanus 8.1%, E vermicularis 6.3%, S stercoralis 3.3%. Relative risk for anemia in those women with intestinal parasitosis was 2.56 (P Intestinal parasitoses could be associated with conditions for development of anemia at pregnancy. These features reflect the need of routine coproparasitological study among pregnant women in rural and endemic zones for intestinal parasites. Further therapeutic and prophylactic protocols are needed. Additional research on pregnant intestinal parasitic infection impact on newborn health is also considered. PMID:17093349

  15. Intestinal parasitosis among Yemeni patients with cancer, Sana'a, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qobati, Salah A; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T; Al-Zoa, Abdulla M Bin; Derhim, Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    The profile of intestinal parasitosis was assessed among patients on anticancer chemotherapy in Sana'a city, Yemen during the period from April to December 2011. A total of 206 patients (115 males & 91 females), aged 3 to 18 years with mean of 14.17 +/- 3.13 were subjected to stool examinations by different techniques. The overall rate of intestinal parasites was 63.1%. Cryptosporidium parvum was the highest (30.1%) followed by G. lamblia (18.0%) and then C. cayetanensis (5.3%). Blastocystis hominis and E. histolytica/dispar were detected in 4.9% & 2.4% respectively. E. coli, H. nana and A. lumbricoides were diagnosed in an equal of 1.5% and S. stercoralis was seen in one case only. The majority of infected patients suffered from diarrhea. They showed 4.64 risk of protozoan infections compared to those who passed formed stool with statistically significant difference. Diarrhea was associated with higher risk of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis (OR = 2.73 & 2.67 respectively). The risk of intestinal parasitosis neither differed significantly with patients' age nor sex.

  16. Intestinal parasitosis and anaemia among patients in a Health Center, North Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Megbaru; Kinfe, Birhane; Tadesse, Desalegn; Mulu, Wondemagegn; Hailu, Tadesse; Yizengaw, Endalew

    2017-11-28

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the magnitude of intestinal parasitosis and anaemia in a Health Center, North Ethiopia. A total of 427 outpatients were enrolled and the median age of the participants was 22 years. The prevalence of intestinal parasitosis was 143 (33.5%). Age, place of residence and occupation were significantly associated with intestinal parasitosis. When we see parasite specific factors, significant associations were observed for source of drinking water (P = 0.02), age (P intestinal parasite -infected and non-infected participants was 10.7 and 7.0%, respectively. Study participants infected with S. stercoralis and hookworm were more likely to develop anaemia than the non- infected ones; AOR (adjusted odds ratio) = 5.3, 95% CI (1.01-27.4); P = 0.028 and AOR = 11.1, 95% CI (3.36-36.9); P = 0.000, respectively.

  17. Gastrointestinal parasites of sheep, municipality of Lajes, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil Parasitos do trato gastrintestinal de ovinos, município de Lajes, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil

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    Maria de Fátima de Souza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the gastrointestinal parasitism by helminths and protozoa in sheep (Ovis aries Santa Inês breed, municipality of Lajes, Rio Grande do Norte. Monthly, from April 2005 to August 2007, stool samples were collected from two tracer lambs in the first day of the experiment and performed a necropsy of these animals in 44th day. A total of 64 lambs were sampled, but only 62 lambs were slaughtered. The fecal samples were examined by sedimentation in water. The contents of the abomasum, small intestine and large intestine were examined for the recovery of helminths. The parasitological examination revealed eggs of the following groups of helminths: Strongyloidea, Strongyloides sp., Trichuris sp., and Moniezia sp. Also were found oocysts of Eimeria spp., cysts of Entamoeba ovis and Giardia duodenalis. The helminths identified from examining the contents were: Haemonchus contortus, Cooperia pectinata, Cooperia punctata, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Moniezia expansa, Oesophagostomum sp. Skrjabinema ovis and Trichuris sp.O presente estudo investigou o parasitismo gastrintestinal por helmintos e protozoários em ovinos (Ovis aries da raça Santa Inês, no município de Lajes, Rio Grande do Norte. Mensalmente, entre abril de 2005 e agosto de 2007, foram coletadas amostras fecais de dois cordeiros traçadores no primeiro dia do experimento e realizada a necropsia desses animais no 44º dia. O total de cordeiros amostrados foi 64, mas apenas 62 foram necropsiados. As amostras fecais foram examinadas pela técnica de sedimentação espontânea em água. Os conteúdos do abomaso, intestino delgado e intestino grosso dos cordeiros necropsiados foram examinados para a recuperação dos helmintos. Os exames parasitológicos evidenciaram ovos dos seguintes grupos de helmintos: Strongyloidea, Strongyloides sp. , Trichuris sp., e Moniezia sp. Também foram encontrados oocistos de Eimeria spp., cistos de Entamoeba ovis e de Giardia duodenalis

  18. Fiscalização de hortas produtoras de verduras do município de Ribeirão Preto, SP Monitoring of lettuce crops of Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil

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    Osvaldo M. Takayanagui

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available O consumo de verduras cruas desempenha importante papel na transmissão de várias doenças infecciosas pela freqüente prática de irrigação de hortas com água contaminada. O objetivo deste estudo é a avaliação das condições higiênico-sanitárias de todas as hortas produtoras de verduras de Ribeirão Preto, SP com implantação de um sistema de fiscalização. A análise laboratorial de 129 hortas revelou irregularidades em 20,1% delas, destacando-se elevada concentração de coliformes fecais em 17%, presença de Salmonella em 3,1% e de vários enteroparasitas (Ascaris sp, Ancylostomidae, Strongyloides sp, Hymenolepis nana e Giardia sp em 13,1%. A repetição da análise das hortas irregulares determinou a interdição definitiva de uma delas; todas as demais foram aprovadas, comprovando a eficácia do sistema de fiscalização, particularmente com a implantação, inédita no país, do certificado de vistoria sanitária.The ingesting of raw vegetables plays an important role in the transmission of several infectious diseases due to the high frequency of irrigation with wastewater. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sanitary conditions of all lettuce producing crops in Ribeirão Preto through microbiological and parasitological analysis of both irrigation water and lettuce together with the implantation of an effective crop monitoring. Laboratory analysis of 129 crops showed irregularities in 26 (20.1% of these: high concentration of fecal coliforms in 17% of the lettuce, presence of Salmonella in 3.1% and several enteroparasites (Ascaris sp, Ancylostomidae, Strongyloides sp, Hymenolepis nana, and Giardia sp in 13.1%. Persistent irregularities determined the definitive closing down of one producer; all of the remaining 128 crops were eventually approved, thus demonstrating the efficacy of lettuce crop monitoring. Crops approved in the laboratory analysis were awarded a Sanitary Inspection Certificate - an unprecedented

  19. Recovery of gastrointestinal swine parasites in anaerobic biodigester systems Recuperação de parasitas gastrintestinais de suínos em biodigestores anaeróbicos

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    William Alberto Cañon-Franco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid and liquid wastes from livestock operations represent important challenges for animal production regarding their impact in the environment and public health. Parasitological tests performed on 80 samples of affluent and effluent waters from three anaerobic biodigestors with flexible structure from swine farms of Caldas - Colombia, showed the presence of Isospora suis (45%, Eimeria suis (42.5%, E. espinosa (35%, Strongyloides ransomi (28.8%, E. perminuta (12.5%, E. cerdonis (3.8%, and E. porci (2.5%. The additional finding of eggs of Taenia spp. in 10% of the samples was probably caused by a connection between the human sewage system and the biodigester. Although we observed a mean decrease of 65.6% of parasites, these levels were insufficient to meet the minimum requirement set by Engelberg's guidelines regarding water quality. This study demonstrates the serious environmental impact that an inadequately treated animal wastewater represents, and has important implications for water resources and human health.Resíduos sólidos e líquidos oriundos da suinocultura representam desafios importantes para a produção animal no que diz respeito ao impacto do meio ambiente e em saúde pública. Testes parasitológicos foram realizados em 80 amostras de águas afluentes e efluentes de três biodigestores anaeróbicos com estrutura flexível em granjas de Caldas - Colômbia, demonstrando a presença de Isospora suis (45%, Eimeria suis (42,5%, E. espinosa (35%, Strongyloides ransomi (28,8%, E. perminuta (12,5%, E. cerdonis (3,8% e E. porci (2,5%. A constatação adicional de ovos de Taenia spp. em 10% das amostras foi provavelmente causada pela conexão entre o sistema de esgoto humano e o biodigestor. Embora fosse observada uma diminuição média de 65,6% dos parasitas, estes níveis são insuficientes para atender ao requisito mínimo estabelecido pelas diretrizes Engelberg em relação à qualidade da água. Este estudo demonstra o grave

  20. Parasitos de aves e mamíferos silvestres em cativeiro no estado de Pernambuco

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    Pauline Marie de Souza Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Os animais silvestres são hospedeiros de uma grande variedade de parasitos que podem interferir em sua conservação ex situ. O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar os parasitos gastrointestinais (PGI e ectoparasitos dos animais do Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres (CETAS do Instituto Brasileiro de Meio Ambiente e Recursos Naturais Renováveis (IBAMA de Recife, Pernambuco, além de determinar os aspectos do manejo em cativeiro que possam estar relacionados com os parasitos identificados. Foram coletados ectoparasitos e amostras fecais de 223 aves e mamíferos, as quais foram processadas pelos métodos: microscopia direta, flutuação e sedimentação. Helmintos e/ou protozoários foram detectados em 91 (40,8% amostras fecais, sendo 64 (70,3% de aves e 27 (29,7% de mamíferos. Ovos de Capillaria sp., Ascaridida, Spirurida e oocistos de Eimeria sp. foram detectados nas amostras fecais das aves, enquanto ovos de Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides sp., Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma sp., Strongylida e oocistos de Coccídios foram encontrados nas amostras fecais de mamíferos. Os ectoparasitos identificados em aves foram Colpocephalum turbinatum, Kurodaia (Kurodaia fulvofasciata, Halipeurus sp., Naubates sp., Saemundssonia sp., Austromenopon sp., Paragoniocotes sp., Brueelia sp., Myrsidea sp. and Pseudolynchia sp., enquanto em mamíferos os ectoparasitos identificados foram Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Amblyomma varium, A. calcaratum, A. nodosum, Ornithodoros talaje e Ctenocephalides felis felis. A. calcaratum e O. talaje são registrados pela primeira vez em Pernambuco e T. tetradactyla é apresentado como novo hospedeiro de O. talaje. Nenhum dos animais estudados apresentou sinais clínicos em decorrência da infecção/infestação parasitária. Parasitos com potencial zoonótico como T. trichiura, Strongyloides sp., T. canis e Ancylostoma sp. foram identificados em primatas não humanos e carnívoros. Precárias condições estruturais

  1. Gastrointestinal Parasites of Ecuadorian Mantled Howler Monkeys (Alouatta palliata aequatorialis) Based on Fecal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenbrook, William D; Wade, Susan E; Shields, William M; Stehman, Stephen V; Whipps, Christopher M

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of gastrointestinal parasites of Ecuadorian mantled howler monkeys, Alouatta palliata aequatorialis, was conducted based on examination of fecal smears, flotations, and sedimentations. At least 1 type of parasite was detected in 97% of the 96 fecal samples screened across 19 howler monkey groups using these techniques. Samples averaged 3.6 parasite species per individual (±1.4 SD). Parasites included species representing genera of 2 apicomplexans: Cyclospora sp. (18% of individual samples) and Isospora sp. (3%); 6 other protozoa: Balantidium sp. (9%), Blastocystis sp. (60%), Chilomastix sp. (4%), Dientamoeba sp. (3%), Entamoeba species (56%), Iodamoeba sp. (5%); 4 nematodes: Enterobius sp. (3%), Capillaria sp. (78%), Strongyloides spp. (88%) which included 2 morphotypes, Trypanoxyuris sp. (12%); and the platyhelminth Controrchis sp. (15%). A statistically significant positive correlation was found between group size and each of 3 different estimators of parasite species richness adjusted for sampling effort (ICE: r(2) = 0.24, P = 0.05; Chao2: r(2) = 0.25, P = 0.05, and Jackknife: r(2) = 0.31, P = 0.03). Two significant associations between co-infecting parasites were identified. Based on the prevalence data, individuals infected with Balantidium sp. were more likely to also be infected with Isospora sp. (χ(2) = 6.02, P = 0.01), while individuals harboring Chilomastix sp. were less likely to have Capillaria sp. present (χ(2) = 4.03, P = 0.04).

  2. Gastrointestinal parasites of swine raised in different management systems in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Alynne S. Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: From 2012 to 2013 were surveyed gastrointestinal parasites from pig farms located in different municpaliyies in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Fecal samples from 790 pigs were collected from the rectum on 88 family farms and 702 farms with industrial production. The samples were subjected to Faust et al., Sheather, Ritchie, Lutz and direct examination faecal techniques. The estimated parasite prevalence was 93.1% in family farms and 59.1% in industrial farms. Balantidium coli, coccidia and Entamoeba sp. were the parasites with the highest frequencies, and the male and female reproductive categories and fatteners pigs the most infected (p<0.05. Trophozoites of B. coli were most evident in stool samples from semi-solid followed by solid and diarrheal consistencies. Strongyles eggs and Trichuris suis have been detected exclusively in family farms. Ascaris suum eggs and Strongyloides ransomi showed low frequency. The high degree of parasitism, especially protozoa, indicates the need to reassess the management of pigs in both types of production.

  3. Number of Grooming Partners Is Associated with Hookworm Infection in Wild Vervet Monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Brandi T; Remis, Melissa J; Camp, Joseph W; Gillespie, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    There are many known benefits of social grooming among primates, including maintenance of social relationships, removal of ectoparasites, and improved physiological condition. Recently, however, researchers have noted that social grooming and social contact may also present a significant cost by facilitating transmission of some parasites and pathogens. We investigated whether the number of social grooming partners varied based on infection status for gastrointestinal parasites. We used focal animal sampling and continuous recording to collect data on the number of grooming partners for known individual vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops). We collected non-invasive faecal samples and examined them using faecal flotation, faecal sedimentation, and immunofluorescence microscopy. We detected 6 parasites: Trichuris sp. (92%), hookworm (71%), spirurids (68%), Oesophagostomum sp. (84%), Strongyloides sp. (24%), and Entamoeba coli (92%). The number of grooming partners varied significantly based on infection with hookworm and sex. No significant relationships were detected for other parasites. Associations between host behavioural variation and some parasite taxa (specifically Trichuris, Oesophagostomum, and Entamoeba spp.) were impossible to explore due to an extremely high prevalence among hosts. This is the first report that we are aware of that has detected an association between social grooming behaviours and infection with hookworm. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A Comparative Study of Four Methods for the Detection of Nematode Eggs and Large Protozoan Cysts in Mandrill Faecal Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouillevet, Hanae; Dibakou, Serge-Ely; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Poirotte, Clémence; Charpentier, Marie J E

    2017-01-01

    Coproscopical methods like sedimentation and flotation techniques are widely used in the field for studying simian gastrointestinal parasites. Four parasites of known zoonotic potential were studied in a free-ranging, non-provisioned population of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx): 2 nematodes (Necatoramericanus/Oesophagostomum sp. complex and Strongyloides sp.) and 2 protozoan species (Balantidium coli and Entamoeba coli). Different coproscopical techniques are available but they are rarely compared to evaluate their efficiency to retrieve parasites. In this study 4 different field-friendly methods were compared. A sedimentation method and 3 different McMaster methods (using sugar, salt, and zinc sulphate solutions) were performed on 47 faecal samples collected from different individuals of both sexes and all ages. First, we show that McMaster flotation methods are appropriate to detect and thus quantify large protozoan cysts. Second, zinc sulphate McMaster flotation allows the retrieval of a higher number of parasite taxa compared to the other 3 methods. This method further shows the highest probability to detect each of the studied parasite taxa. Altogether our results show that zinc sulphate McMaster flotation appears to be the best technique to use when studying nematodes and large protozoa. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Endoparasites of rodents from the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Southeastern Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuehrer, Hans-Peter; Baumann, Timo A; Riedl, Julia; Treiber, Moritz; Igel, Petra; Swoboda, Paul; Joachim, Anja; Noedl, Harald

    2012-11-01

    Rodents are a key mammalian group highly successful in adapting to a variety of environments throughout the world and play an important role in many zoonotic cycles. Within this project, the gastrointestinal and extraintestinal parasite fauna of 76 rodents (Muroidea and Sciuridae) was determined in the District of Bandarban (Chittagong Hill Tracts) in Southeastern Bangladesh. Gastrointestinal and extraintestinal parasites were examined with macro- and microscopical tools (e.g. Ziehl-Neelsen Staining) at a field site in Bandarban. A wide variety of parasites were found in rodent hosts, including protozoa-Giardia sp. (n = 8), Cryptosporidium sp. (n = 1), Entamoeba sp. (n = 8), Trichomonadida (n = 4), Isospora sp. (n = 1), trematodes (Echinostoma sp.; n = 3), cestodes-Hymenolepis nana (n = 1), Hymenolepis diminuta (n = 3), Hymenolepis sp. (n = 2), Taenia taeniaeformis-Larven (n = 4), Catenotaenia sp. (n = 1), Taenia sp. (n = 1), nematodes-Heterakis spumosa (n = 4), Heterakis sp. (n = 1), Aspiculuris tetraptera (n = 2), Capillaria hepatica (n = 2), Capillaria sp. (n = 3), Syphacia sp. (n = 2), Strongyloides sp. (n = 10), Trichostrongylus sp. (n = 2) and Trichuris sp. (n = 1)-and acanthocephalans (Moniliformis moniliformis; n = 2). Several of the examined parasites are of zoonotic importance via direct or indirect transmission (e.g. C. hepatica) and may affect humans.

  6. Environmental analyses of the parasitic profile found in the sandy soil from the Santos municipality beaches, SP, Brazil

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    Silvana Rocha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The environmental contamination by geohelminths represents a world public health problem and has been well documented by several authors. However, few papers describe the presence of such contamination in saline soils of coastal beaches. A study was performed on the beaches of the municipality of Santos in the period between May 2004 to April 2005 with the aim of determining the degree of contamination, and the correlation between contamination level and seasonal conditions and characteristics of the environment. Of the 2,520 samples analyzed, 18.2% (458 were contaminated, 32.3% (148 of which were localized in children's recreational areas (playgrounds. The parasite profile found in the analyzed samples indicated the presence of several zoonotic parasites: Ancylostoma larvae (82.5%, Toxocara sp. eggs (59.4%, Ancylostomidae-like eggs (37.1%, coccid oocysts (13.5%, Trichostrongylus sp. eggs and larvae, Ascaris lumbricoides eggs, (11.6%, Entamoeba sp. cysts (10.0%, Strongyloides sp. (4.8%, several free nematoids and some non-identified parasitic structures (3.3%. It was established that the highest frequency of parasitic structures occurred in the months between May and October 2004, and from February to March 2005. An increase in the diversity of parasitic forms was documented in the months between February to December 2004 and from January to April 2005, these periods having the highest rainfall.

  7. Prevalence of Endoparasites in Faecal Samples of Cracids Bred in Captivity at the Parque Dois Irmãos, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

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    A. L. B. Cunha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the many problems arising from poor sanitation that can affect wild birds maintained in captivity, parasitic afflictions are among the most frequent, and their effects can range from subclinical infections to death. Some of the most common cases involve endoparasites, principally if the species under consideration exists at a high population density. This being so, the aim of the current work was to report on the prevalence of endoparasites in faecal samples from cracids (curassows and allies bred in captivity at the Parque Dois Irmãos, Recife, Pernambuco state in Brazil. To do this, faecal and sand samples were collected from the enclosures of birds of the family Cracidae belonging to the collection from the Parque Dois Irmãos, which originated from private collections from the Metropolitan Region and Forest Zone of the State of Pernambuco. Four lots of faecal and sand samples were collected over a 60-day period, giving a total of 84 faecal samples from 58 individuals of 21 species of cracids. The material collected was submitted for coproparasitological tests using the right method and spontaneous sedimentation. The results obtained were positive for Strongyloides sp., Ascaridia sp., Capillaria sp. and cysts of Entamoeba coli, as well as eggs belonging to the superfamily Strongyloidea.

  8. Parasitology of five primates in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooriyama, Takanori; Hasegawa, Hideo; Shimozuru, Michito; Tsubota, Toshio; Nishida, Toshisada; Iwaki, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    Parasitological surveillance in primates has been performed using coprological observation and identification of specimens from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania (Mahale). In this study, we conducted coprological surveillance to identify the fauna of parasite infection in five primate species in Mahale: red colobus (Procolobus badius tephrosceles), red-tailed monkeys (Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti), vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops pygerythrus), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), and chimpanzees. Fecal samples were examined microscopically, and parasite identification was based on the morphology of cysts, eggs, larvae, and adult worms. Three nematodes (Oesophagostomum spp., Strongyloides sp., and Trichuris sp.), Entamoeba coli, and Entamoeba spp. were found in all five primate species. The following infections were identified: Bertiella studeri was found in chimpanzees and yellow baboons; Balantidium coli was found in yellow baboons; three nematodes (Streptopharagus, Primasubulura, an undetermined genus of Spirurina) and Dicrocoeliidae gen. sp. were found in red-tailed monkeys, vervet monkeys, and yellow baboons; Chitwoodspirura sp. was newly identified in red colobus and red-tailed monkeys; Probstmayria gombensis and Troglocorys cava were newly identified in chimpanzees, together with Troglodytella abrassarti; and Enterobius sp. was newly identified in red colobus. The parasitological data reported for red colobus, vervet monkeys, and yellow baboons in Mahale are the first reports for these species.

  9. Diversity and prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in seven non-human primates of the Taï National Park, Côte d’Ivoire

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    Kouassi Roland Yao Wa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasites and infectious diseases are well-known threats to primate populations. The main objective of this study was to provide baseline data on fecal parasites in the cercopithecid monkeys inhabiting Côte d’Ivoire’s Taï National Park. Seven of eight cercopithecid species present in the park were sampled: Cercopithecus diana, Cercopithecus campbelli, Cercopithecus petaurista, Procolobus badius, Procolobus verus, Colobus polykomos, and Cercocebus atys. We collected 3142 monkey stool samples between November 2009 and December 2010. Stool samples were processed by direct wet mount examination, formalin-ethyl acetate concentration, and MIF (merthiolate, iodine, formalin concentration methods. Slides were examined under microscope and parasite identification was based on the morphology of cysts, eggs, and adult worms. A total of 23 species of parasites was recovered including 9 protozoa (Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Entamoeba hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba butschlii, Chilomastix mesnili, Giardia sp., Balantidium coli, and Blastocystis sp., 13 nematodes (Oesophagostomum sp., Ancylostoma sp., Anatrichosoma sp., Capillariidae Gen. sp. 1, Capillariidae Gen. sp. 2, Chitwoodspirura sp., Subulura sp., spirurids [cf Protospirura muricola], Ternidens sp., Strongyloides sp., Trichostrongylus sp., and Trichuris sp., and 1 trematode (Dicrocoelium sp.. Diversity indices and parasite richness were high for all monkey taxa, but C. diana, C. petaurista, C. atys, and C. campbelli exhibited a greater diversity of parasite species and a more equitable distribution. The parasitological data reported are the first available for these cercopithecid species within Taï National Park.

  10. Diversity and prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in seven non-human primates of the Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire.

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    Kouassi, Roland Yao Wa; McGraw, Scott William; Yao, Patrick Kouassi; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Brunet, Julie; Pesson, Bernard; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N'goran, Eliezer Kouakou; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2015-01-01

    Parasites and infectious diseases are well-known threats to primate populations. The main objective of this study was to provide baseline data on fecal parasites in the cercopithecid monkeys inhabiting Côte d'Ivoire's Taï National Park. Seven of eight cercopithecid species present in the park were sampled: Cercopithecus diana, Cercopithecus campbelli, Cercopithecus petaurista, Procolobus badius, Procolobus verus, Colobus polykomos, and Cercocebus atys. We collected 3142 monkey stool samples between November 2009 and December 2010. Stool samples were processed by direct wet mount examination, formalin-ethyl acetate concentration, and MIF (merthiolate, iodine, formalin) concentration methods. Slides were examined under microscope and parasite identification was based on the morphology of cysts, eggs, and adult worms. A total of 23 species of parasites was recovered including 9 protozoa (Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Entamoeba hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba butschlii, Chilomastix mesnili, Giardia sp., Balantidium coli, and Blastocystis sp.), 13 nematodes (Oesophagostomum sp., Ancylostoma sp., Anatrichosoma sp., Capillariidae Gen. sp. 1, Capillariidae Gen. sp. 2, Chitwoodspirura sp., Subulura sp., spirurids [cf Protospirura muricola], Ternidens sp., Strongyloides sp., Trichostrongylus sp., and Trichuris sp.), and 1 trematode (Dicrocoelium sp.). Diversity indices and parasite richness were high for all monkey taxa, but C. diana, C. petaurista, C. atys, and C. campbelli exhibited a greater diversity of parasite species and a more equitable distribution. The parasitological data reported are the first available for these cercopithecid species within Taï National Park. © R.W.Y. Kouassi et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2015.

  11. Environmental analyses of the parasitic profile found in the sandy soil from the Santos municipality beaches, SP, Brazil.

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    Rocha, Silvana; Pinto, Rosa Maria Ferreiro; Floriano, Aline Petrollini; Teixeira, Lais Helena; Bassili, Bianca; Martinez, Araceles; Costa, Sergio Olavo Pinto da; Caseiro, Marcos Montani

    2011-01-01

    The environmental contamination by geohelminths represents a world public health problem and has been well documented by several authors. However, few papers describe the presence of such contamination in saline soils of coastal beaches. A study was performed on the beaches of the municipality of Santos in the period between May 2004 to April 2005 with the aim of determining the degree of contamination, and the correlation between contamination level and seasonal conditions and characteristics of the environment. Of the 2,520 samples analyzed, 18.2% (458) were contaminated, 32.3% (148) of which were localized in children's recreational areas (playgrounds). The parasite profile found in the analyzed samples indicated the presence of several zoonotic parasites: Ancylostoma larvae (82.5%), Toxocara sp. eggs (59.4%), Ancylostomidae-like eggs (37.1%), coccid oocysts (13.5%), Trichostrongylus sp. eggs and larvae, Ascaris lumbricoides eggs, (11.6%), Entamoeba sp. cysts (10.0%), Strongyloides sp. (4.8%), several free nematoids and some non-identified parasitic structures (3.3%). It was established that the highest frequency of parasitic structures occurred in the months between May and October 2004, and from February to March 2005. An increase in the diversity of parasitic forms was documented in the months between February to December 2004 and from January to April 2005, these periods having the highest rainfall.

  12. A Sero-epidemiological Approach to Explore Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans.

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    Kobina Assan Ampah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The debilitating skin disease Buruli ulcer (BU is caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. While various hypotheses on potential reservoirs and vectors of M. ulcerans exist, the mode of transmission has remained unclear. Epidemiological studies have indicated that children below the age of four are less exposed to the pathogen and at lower risk of developing BU than older children. In the present study we compared the age at which children begin to develop antibody responses against M. ulcerans with the age pattern of responses to other pathogens transmitted by various mechanisms. A total of 1,352 sera from individuals living in the BU endemic Offin river valley of Ghana were included in the study. While first serological responses to the mosquito transmitted malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and to soil transmitted Strongyloides helminths emerged around the age of one and two years, sero-conversion for M. ulcerans and for the water transmitted trematode Schistosoma mansoni occurred at around four and five years, respectively. Our data suggest that exposure to M. ulcerans intensifies strongly at the age when children start to have more intense contact with the environment, outside the small movement range of young children. Further results from our serological investigations in the Offin river valley also indicate ongoing transmission of Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of yaws.

  13. Intestinal Parasitosis and Their Associated Factors among People Living with HIV at University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest-Ethiopia.

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    Eshetu, Tegegne; Sibhatu, Getinet; Megiso, Mohammed; Abere, Abrham; Baynes, Habtamu Wondifraw; Biadgo, Belete; Zeleke, Ayalew Jejaw

    2017-07-01

    Most HIV clients die of AIDS related intestinal parasitic infections rather than due to the HIV infection itself. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining the prevalence of intestinal parasite and their associated factors among HIV/AIDS clients at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Institution based cross sectional study was conducted using systematic random sampling technique from March to May 2016. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Stool samples were collected and processed using direct wet mount, formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelson staining techniques. Besides, blood samples were collected for CD4+ count estimation. Both descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used in data analysis. P-values intestinal parasitosis was found to be 29.1%. The most predominant intestinal parasite detected was cyst of Entamoeba histolytica (8.5%) followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (6.7%), Strongyloides sterocoralis (3.6%) and Cryptosporidium parvum (3.1%), whereas Schistosoma mansoni (0.9%) and Hymenolepis nana (0.9%) were the least detected. Absence of toilet (AOR= 19.4, CI: 6.46-58.3), improper hand washing before meal (AOR=11.23, 95% CI: 4.16-30.27 and CD4+ count intestinal parasites. The study indicated that intestinal parasites are still a problem among HIV/AIDS patients in the study area. Thus, routine examination for intestinal parasites and interventions should be carried out for better management of clients.

  14. Determinación de géneros de endoparásitos que afectan a los equinos de las sabanas del Casanare

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    Germán Alonso Prada

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El estudio se desarrolló en las sabanas del departamento del Casanare, con el fin de identificar los géneros de endoparásitos gastrointestinales y pulmonares que afectan a los equinos de esta región del país, se muestrearon cuatro municipios del departamento: Aguazul, Paz de Ariporo, Maní y El Yopal, entre los meses de junio de 2006 y abril de 2007, recolectando en cada uno de los municipios diez muestras de materia fecal fresca, directamente de los potreros y completamente al azar. Las muestras fueron procesadas mediante las técnicas coprológicas de MacMaster, identificando huevos de tipo Strongylido spp., Strongyloide spp., Triodonthoforus spp., Habronema spp., y Oxyuros spp. Coprocultivo que determina la presencia de larvas L3 de pequeños strongylus (86,2%, Strongylus vulgaris (6,2%, Strongylus edentatus (3,6%, Strongylus equinus (2,8%, Strongyliodes westeri (1,1% y Trichostrongylus axei (0,20%. En el presente estudio mediante la técnica de Baermann no se encontraron larvas de Dyctiocaulus spp.

  15. Parasites of domestic and wild canids in the region of Serra do Cipó National Park, Brazil.

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    Santos, Juliana Lúcia Costa; Magalhães, Noele Borges; Dos Santos, Hudson Andrade; Ribeiro, Raul Rio; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, diseases have been shown to be important causes of extinctions among wild species. Greater emphasis has been given to diseases transmitted by domestic animals, which have been increasing in numbers in natural areas, along with human populations. This study had the aim of investigating the presence of intestinal helminths in wild canids (maned wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, and crab-eating fox, Cerdocyon thous) in the Serra do Cipó National Park (43-44º W and 19-20º S) and endo and ectoparasites of domestic dogs in the Morro da Pedreira Environmental Protection Area (an area surrounding the National Park). The Serra do Cipó is located in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Among the enteroparasites found in domestic and wild canids, the following taxons were identified: Ancylostomidae, Trichuridae, Toxocara sp., Spirocerca sp., Physaloptera sp., Strongyloides sp., Cestoda, Dipylidium caninum, Diphyllobothriidae, Hymenolepidae, Anoplocephalidae, Trematoda, Acanthocephala and Isospora sp. Domestic dogs were positive for leishmaniasis and Babesia canis in serological tests. Among the ectoparasites, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Amblyomma cajennense and Ctenocephalides felis felis were observed in domestic dogs. Variations in the chaetotaxy of the meta-episternum and posterior tibia were observed in some specimens of C. felis felis.

  16. Contamination by intestinal parasites in vegetables marketed in an area of Jequitinhonha Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    João Gabriel Guimarães LUZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the presence of helminthes and intestinal protozoa in vegetables commercialized in Diamantina, a municipality located at Jequitinhonha Valley, one of the poorest regions of the world. Methods: A total of 108 specimens, including lettuce, green onion and rocket, were monthly collected from the most popular open street market, green grocery and supermarket of the municipality. The samples were processed by a concentration method and evaluated by light microscopy for parasitological identification. Results: The percentage of contamination was 50.9% (55/108, with predominance of nematode larvae (36.5%, cysts of Entamoeba coli (26.0% and eggs of hookworms/Strongyloides spp. (12.9%. Lettuce showed greater contamination rate (61.1% and samples from the open street market were more contaminated (77.8%. Information collected at each point of sale pointed the field cultivation as the critical step for such contaminations. Conclusion: Vegetables marketed in Diamantina presents a wide variety of intestinal parasites, which may represent a potential risk to the health of consumers of fresh vegetables.

  17. Parasites of importance for human health in Nigerian dogs: high prevalence and limited knowledge of pet owners.

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    Ugbomoiko, Uade Samuel; Ariza, Liana; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2008-12-09

    Dogs are the most common pet animals worldwide. They may harbour a wide range of parasites with zoonotic potential, thus causing a health risk to humans. In Nigeria, epidemiological knowledge on these parasites is limited. In a community-based study, we examined 396 dogs in urban and rural areas of Ilorin (Kwara State, Central Nigeria) for ectoparasites and intestinal helminths. In addition, a questionnaire regarding knowledge and practices was applied to pet owners. Nine ectoparasite species belonging to four taxa and six intestinal helminth species were identified: fleas (Ctenocephalides canis, Pulex irritans, Tunga penetrans), mites (Demodex canis, Otodectes sp., Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis), ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes sp.), and lice (Trichodectes canis); and Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma sp., Trichuris vulpis, Dipylidium caninum, Taenidae and Strongyloides sp. Overall prevalence of ectoparasites was 60.4% and of intestinal helminths 68.4%. The occurrence of C. canis, R. sanguineus, T. canis, Ancylostoma sp. and T. vulpis was most common (prevalence 14.4% to 41.7%). Prevalence patterns in helminths were age-dependent, with T. canis showing a decreasing prevalence with age of host, and a reverse trend in other parasite species. Knowledge regarding zoonoses was very limited and the diseases not considered a major health problem. Treatment with antiparasitic drugs was more frequent in urban areas. Parasites of importance for human health were highly prevalent in Nigerian dogs. Interventions should include health education provided to dog owners and the establishment of a program focusing on zoonotic diseases.

  18. Impact of Enhanced Health Interventions for United States-Bound Refugees: Evaluating Best Practices in Migration Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tarissa; Lee, Deborah; Weinberg, Michelle; Phares, Christina; James, Nicola; Amornpaisarnloet, Kittisak; Aumpipat, Lalita; Cooley, Gretchen; Davies, Anita; Tin Shwe, Valerie Daw; Gajdadziev, Vasil; Gorbacheva, Olga; Khwan-Niam, Chutharat; Klosovsky, Alexander; Madilokkowit, Waritorn; Martin, Diana; Htun Myint, Naing Zaw; Yen Nguyen, Thi Ngoc; Nutman, Thomas B; O'Connell, Elise M; Ortega, Luis; Prayadsab, Sugunya; Srimanee, Chetdanai; Supakunatom, Wasant; Vesessmith, Vattanachai; Stauffer, William M

    2018-03-01

    With an unprecedented number of displaced persons worldwide, strategies for improving the health of migrating populations are critical. United States-bound refugees undergo a required overseas medical examination to identify inadmissible conditions (e.g., tuberculosis) 2-6 months before resettlement, but it is limited in scope and may miss important, preventable infectious, chronic, or nutritional causes of morbidity. We sought to evaluate the feasibility and health impact of diagnosis and management of such conditions before travel. We offered voluntary testing for intestinal parasites, anemia, and hepatitis B virus infection, to U.S.-bound refugees from three Thailand-Burma border camps. Treatment and preventive measures (e.g., anemia and parasite treatment, vaccination) were initiated before resettlement. United States refugee health partners received overseas results and provided post-arrival medical examination findings. During July 9, 2012 to November 29, 2013, 2,004 refugees aged 0.5-89 years enrolled. Among 463 participants screened for seven intestinal parasites overseas and after arrival, helminthic infections decreased from 67% to 12%. Among 118 with positive Strongyloides -specific antibody responses, the median fluorescent intensity decreased by an average of 81% after treatment. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe anemia (hemoglobin migration process to improve the health of refugees before resettlement. With more than 250 million migrants globally, this model may offer insights into healthier migration strategies.

  19. Seasonal patterns of hormones, macroparasites, and microparasites in wild African ungulates: the interplay among stress, reproduction, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizauskas, Carrie A; Turner, Wendy C; Pitts, Neville; Getz, Wayne M

    2015-01-01

    Sex hormones, reproductive status, and pathogen load all affect stress. Together with stress, these factors can modulate the immune system and affect disease incidence. Thus, it is important to concurrently measure these factors, along with their seasonal fluctuations, to better understand their complex interactions. Using steroid hormone metabolites from fecal samples, we examined seasonal correlations among zebra and springbok stress, reproduction, gastrointestinal (GI) parasite infections, and anthrax infection signatures in zebra and springbok in Etosha National Park (ENP), Namibia, and found strong seasonal effects. Infection intensities of all three GI macroparasites examined (strongyle helminths, Strongyloides helminths, and Eimeria coccidia) were highest in the wet season, concurrent with the timing of anthrax outbreaks. Parasites also declined with increased acquired immune responses. We found hormonal evidence that both mares and ewes are overwhelmingly seasonal breeders in ENP, and that reproductive hormones are correlated with immunosuppression and higher susceptibility to GI parasite infections. Stress hormones largely peak in the dry season, particularly in zebra, when parasite infection intensities are lowest, and are most strongly correlated with host mid-gestation rather than with parasite infection intensity. Given the evidence that GI parasites can cause host pathology, immunomodulation, and immunosuppression, their persistence in ENP hosts without inducing chronic stress responses supports the hypothesis that hosts are tolerant of their parasites. Such tolerance would help to explain the ubiquity of these organisms in ENP herbivores, even in the face of their potential immunomodulatory trade-offs with anti-anthrax immunity.

  20. Host immune status affects maturation time in two nematode species--but not as predicted by a simple life-history model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinnee, M A; Gemmill, A W; Chan, B H K; Viney, M E; Read, A F

    2003-11-01

    In theory, the age at which maturation occurs in parasitic nematodes is inversely related to pre-maturational mortality rate, and cross-species data on mammalian nematodes are consistent with this prediction. Immunity is a major source of parasite mortality and parasites stand to gain sizeable fitness benefits through short-term adjustments of maturation time in response to variation in immune-mediated mortality. The effects of thymus-dependent immune responses on maturation in the nematode parasites Strongyloides ratti and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were investigated using congenitally thymus-deficient (nude) rats. As compared with worms in normal rats, reproductive maturity of parasites (presence of eggs in utero) in nude rats occurred later in S. ratti but earlier in N. brasiliensis. Immune-mediated differences in maturation time were not associated with differences in worm length. Thymus-dependent immunity had no effect on prematurational mortality. Results are discussed in relation to theoretical expectations and possible explanations for the observed patterns in parasite maturation.

  1. An estimate of seasonality and intensity of infection with gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep and goats . in West Java

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    Beriajaya

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Tracer Inoodle tbin-tail sheep and Kacang goats were used to measure the seasonal changes in gastrointestinal nematodes parasitism i ~'und[, .xillapek .Fodd~ 'ofis in West Java . Each 3 months for 12 months worm-free male sheep (5 and goats (5 about 5 months of age were ~ $Jri~tgldI o% ef- farmer, and managed as part of their flock for 2 months . Animals were then returned to the laboratory and maintained on "`~^taaan-ftwAiet in elevated slatted pens for 3 weeks prior to slaughter. In all trials sheep had higher faecal egg counts than goats . Egg counts were significantly lower during the late dry-early wet season due mainly to lower burdens of Oesophagostomum spp. than at other times of the year. The predominant genera recovered from faecal larval cultures were Haemonchus and Trichostrongylus . At post mortem more than 94 percent of animals were infected with Trichostrongylus colubriformis, T. axei, Haemonchus contortus, Oesophagostomum columbianwn and Strongyloides papillosus . Other species found, in descending order of occurrence, were Cooperia curticei, Trichuris ovis, Bunostornum trigonocephalum, Oesophagostomumn asperum, Capillaria bovis and Gaigena pachycelis. It was concluded that intensity of exposure of both sheep and goats to H contortus, T. axei and C. curticei was similar throughout the year, but that availability of infectioe larvae of T. colubriformis was higher during the dry than the wet season and vise versa for O. columbianum . Sheep had higher burdens of T. Colubrzformis than goats but similar numbers of other species.

  2. Seasonal distribution of gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep in a semiarid region, northeastern Brazil

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    Maria de Fátima de Souza

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the seasonal distribution and gastrointestinal nematode parasite load in crossbred Santa Inês tracer lambs, and to correlate the rainfall during the study period with occurrences of parasitic infections. Sixty-four male tracer lambs between the ages of four and eight months were used in the study. Two tracer lambs were inserted into the herd every 28 days to determine the pattern of infective larvae available in the environment. Variation in the fecal egg count (FEC of nematodes was observed at the study site, with many samples containing undetectable parasite loads during the dry season. The larvae identified in coprocultures wereHaemonchus sp., Trichostrongylus sp.,Cooperia sp., Strongyloides sp. andOesophagostomum sp. The nematodes recovered at necropsy were Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Cooperia punctata, C. pectinata, Trichuris sp.,Oesophagostomum sp. and Skrajabinema ovis. The total number of larvae and the total number of immature and adult forms recovered from the tracers showed seasonal distributions that significantly correlated with the amount of rainfall received that month (p value ≅ 0.000 in all cases . The species H. contortus was predominant in the herd and should be considered to be main pathogenic nematode species in these hosts under these conditions.

  3. Camel Diseases and Conditions in a Non-traditional Camel Keeping Area: A case study of Kajiado District With Special Emphasis on Trypanosomiasis

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    Chemuliti, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Camels in Kenya are raised in the lowlands of Semi-arid to arid areas of Northern Kenya. Some NGO's (PHI and Farm Africa) introduced some camels into the wetter Southern rangelands of Kenya, specifically in Kajiado in 1989. There is no information so far on the productivity of these animals in this new environment. The objective of this study was to collect data on disease and conditions in Kajiado district with special emphasis on trypanosomosis. Twenty-four herds of camels in three divisions of Kajiado, comprising of 324 animals, were clinically examined and blood as well as faecal samples collected for laboratory examination for haemoparasites, anaemia and helminths as well as other infections and ectoparasites. The mean trypanosome point prevalence was 7.2% although Magadi had the biggest prevalence of 26.4%, while the central division had the least, 1.3% PCV values were proportion to magnitude of infection. T. brucei/T. evansi were shown to be present in varying degrees. Tick infestation comprised of Boophilus, Rhipicephalus and Hyalomma in about 53% of the camels. Helminth infection was observed in about 51% of the camels comprising mainly Haemonchus, Trichosrongylus, Strongyloides and Oesophagostomum. There were also cases of Abscesses, diarrhoea, mange eye infections, wounds and mastitis. It was concluded that new management strategies for the camel in southern rangelands is desirable to counter possible new diseases as well as other challenges of productivity

  4. ANTIPARASITICAL PROTECTION IN SHEEP FARMS

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    DOINA ARDELEANU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Through our researches were carried out at ICDCOC- Palas, Constantza, we proposed ourselves to establish the poly-parasitism structure on sheep, as well as elaborating efficientical methods for anti-parasitical prophylaxis and fighting in sheep populations and pasture sourfaces, in order to ensuring anti-parasitical protection in sheep exploitations The copro-parasitological examinations was carried ovoscopicaly (flotation - by Willis and Mc. Master methods; sediment – by polyvalent method and larvoscopicaly – by Baermann method. The parasitological examination of coprological smears which were harvested on sheep showed the presence of polyparasitism phenomenon with protozoans (coccidiae: Eimeria spp. and helmints (cestodae: Moniesia expansa; gastro-intestinal nemathodes: Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp., Strongyloides papillosus and pulmonary nemathodes: Müellerius capillaris, Protostrongylus rufescens, Dictyocaulus filaria. Also, we proposed ourselves to study the paresites and their intermediary stages on pastures which were exploited with sheep, comparatively with mowed pastures. In the ansamble of research activities a special place is occupied by testing differents methods, in order to prevention and fighting of parasitical infestations on sheep and pasture in sheep farms.

  5. Gastrointestinal parasites and Trypanosoma evansi in buffaloes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sani, R.A.; Chandrawathani, P.; Rosli, M.

    1990-01-01

    Gastrointestinal parasitism is common in buffalo calves. The effect of helminths on growth was studied by administration of an anthelmintic to buffalo calves following natural infections with gastrointestinal parasites. In studies conducted on calves belonging to an institute and a smallholder farmer, the treated calves showed improved weight gains. Serial parasitic examinations showed these animals had moderate to high faecal counts with Strongyloides, Toxocara vitulorum and Haemonchus eggs and Eimeria oocytes. In another study, there was no live weight advantage in treated over untreated calves. Few animals in this study had evidence of parasites and even those which were infested had low faecal egg counts. Hence, in general, helminths at certain levels of infection do affect the live weight gains of young buffalo calves. The prevalence of Trypanosoma evansi, as assessed parasitologically using the haematocrit centrifugation technique and mice inoculation, was 2.7 and 1%, respectively, in cattle and buffaloes. The serological prevalence using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was 35 and 2% for cattle and buffaloes, respectively. (author). 6 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Prevalence and diversity of gastrointestinal helminths in free-ranging Asian house shrew (Suncus murinus in Bangladesh

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    Mizanur Rahman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Asian house shrew (Suncus murinus, a widely distributed small mammal in the South Asian region, can carry helminths of zoonotic importance. The aim of the study was to know the prevalence and diversity of gastrointestinal (GI helminths in free-ranging Asian house shrew (S. murinus in Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: A total of 86 Asian house shrews were captured from forest areas and other habitats of Bangladesh in 2015. Gross examination of the whole GI tract was performed for gross helminth detection, and coproscopy was done for identification of specific eggs or larvae. Results: The overall prevalence of GI helminth was 77.9% (67/86, with six species including nematodes (3, cestodes (2, and trematodes (1. Of the detected helminths, the dominant parasitic group was from the genus Hymenolepis spp. (59%, followed by Strongyloides spp. (17%, Capillaria spp. (10%, Physaloptera spp. (3%, and Echinostoma spp. (3%. Conclusion: The finding shows that the presence of potential zoonotic parasites (Hymenolepis spp. and Capillaria spp. in Asian house shrew is ubiquitous in all types of habitat (forest land, cropland and dwelling in Bangladesh. Therefore, further investigation is crucial to examine their role in the transmission of human helminthiasis.

  7. Prevalence of Gastro-Intestinal Nematodes in Goats in Hyderabad and Adjoining Areas

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    Nasreen Akhter*, A. G. Arijo, M. S. Phulan, Zafar Iqbal1 and K. B. Mirbahar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes of goats (n=1065 in and around Hyderabad using qualitative and quantitative coprological examinations. Results revealed that 43.10% (459 goats were infected with different species of nematodes including Haemonchus contortus (14.65%, Trichuris ovis (8.17%, Trichostrongylus axei (7.61%, Trichostrongylus colubriformis (6.76%, Oesphagostomum columbianum (5.35%, Ostertagia circumcincta (5.35%, Chabertia ovina (4.79% and Strongyloides papillosus (4.51%. Infections with mixed species of nematodes were recorded in 6.54% (n=30/459; T. ovis + H. contortus, 5.23% (n=24/459; C. ovina + H. contortus, 5.88% (n=27/459; S. papillosus + C. ovina, and 12.42% (n=57/459; O. circumcincta + T. ovis goats. Of the total infected (n=459; 51.4, 38.3 and 10.2% goats had light, moderate and heavy infections, respectively. The prevalence, nature and intensity of the helminthiasis in goats warrant an immediate attention to devise strategies for its control to reduce the production losses.

  8. Mobile Diagnostics Based on Motion? A Close Look at Motility Patterns in the Schistosome Life Cycle

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    Ewert Linder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging at high resolution and subsequent image analysis with modified mobile phones have the potential to solve problems related to microscopy-based diagnostics of parasitic infections in many endemic regions. Diagnostics using the computing power of “smartphones” is not restricted by limited expertise or limitations set by visual perception of a microscopist. Thus diagnostics currently almost exclusively dependent on recognition of morphological features of pathogenic organisms could be based on additional properties, such as motility characteristics recognizable by computer vision. Of special interest are infectious larval stages and “micro swimmers” of e.g., the schistosome life cycle, which infect the intermediate and definitive hosts, respectively. The ciliated miracidium, emerges from the excreted egg upon its contact with water. This means that for diagnostics, recognition of a swimming miracidium is equivalent to recognition of an egg. The motility pattern of miracidia could be defined by computer vision and used as a diagnostic criterion. To develop motility pattern-based diagnostics of schistosomiasis using simple imaging devices, we analyzed Paramecium as a model for the schistosome miracidium. As a model for invasive nematodes, such as strongyloids and filaria, we examined a different type of motility in the apathogenic nematode Turbatrix, the “vinegar eel.” The results of motion time and frequency analysis suggest that target motility may be expressed as specific spectrograms serving as “diagnostic fingerprints.”

  9. Seasonal patterns of hormones, macroparasites, and microparasites in wild African ungulates: the interplay among stress, reproduction, and disease.

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    Carrie A Cizauskas

    Full Text Available Sex hormones, reproductive status, and pathogen load all affect stress. Together with stress, these factors can modulate the immune system and affect disease incidence. Thus, it is important to concurrently measure these factors, along with their seasonal fluctuations, to better understand their complex interactions. Using steroid hormone metabolites from fecal samples, we examined seasonal correlations among zebra and springbok stress, reproduction, gastrointestinal (GI parasite infections, and anthrax infection signatures in zebra and springbok in Etosha National Park (ENP, Namibia, and found strong seasonal effects. Infection intensities of all three GI macroparasites examined (strongyle helminths, Strongyloides helminths, and Eimeria coccidia were highest in the wet season, concurrent with the timing of anthrax outbreaks. Parasites also declined with increased acquired immune responses. We found hormonal evidence that both mares and ewes are overwhelmingly seasonal breeders in ENP, and that reproductive hormones are correlated with immunosuppression and higher susceptibility to GI parasite infections. Stress hormones largely peak in the dry season, particularly in zebra, when parasite infection intensities are lowest, and are most strongly correlated with host mid-gestation rather than with parasite infection intensity. Given the evidence that GI parasites can cause host pathology, immunomodulation, and immunosuppression, their persistence in ENP hosts without inducing chronic stress responses supports the hypothesis that hosts are tolerant of their parasites. Such tolerance would help to explain the ubiquity of these organisms in ENP herbivores, even in the face of their potential immunomodulatory trade-offs with anti-anthrax immunity.

  10. Carcinogenesis associated with parasites other than Schistosoma, Opisthorchis and Clonorchis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicado, Claudia; Marcos, Luis A

    2016-06-15

    Only three helminths (Schistosoma haematobium, Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis) are directly associated with carcinogenesis in humans whereas the role of other parasites in cancer remains unclear. This study aimed to perform a systematic review to identify recent insights in the role of other parasite infections in carcinogenesis. We conducted systematic searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE on July 2015. Our primary outcome was the association between parasitic infections and carcinogenesis. Out of 1,266 studies, 19 were selected for detailed evaluation (eight for helminths and 11 for protozoa). The mechanisms of helminth-induced cancer included chronic inflammation, sustained proliferation, modulation of the host immune system, reprogramming of glucose metabolism and redox signaling, induction of genomic instability and destabilization of suppressor tumor proteins, stimulation of angiogenesis, resisting cell death, and activation of invasion and metastasis. In addition to the current knowledge, the following parasites were found in cancers or tumors: Echinococcus, Strongyloides, Fasciola, Heterakis, Platynosomum and Trichuris. Additional parasites were found in this systematic review that could potentially be associated with cancers or tumors but further evidence is needed to elaborate a cause-effect relationship. © 2016 UICC.

  11. Prevalence and diversity of gastrointestinal helminths in free-ranging Asian house shrew (Suncus murinus) in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mizanur; Islam, Shariful; Masuduzzaman, Md.; Alam, Mahabub; Chawdhury, Mohammad Nizam Uddin; Ferdous, Jinnat; Islam, Md. Nurul; Hassan, Mohammad Mahmudul; Hossain, Mohammad Alamgir; Islam, Ariful

    2018-01-01

    Background and Aim Asian house shrew (Suncus murinus), a widely distributed small mammal in the South Asian region, can carry helminths of zoonotic importance. The aim of the study was to know the prevalence and diversity of gastrointestinal (GI) helminths in free-ranging Asian house shrew (S. murinus) in Bangladesh. Materials and Methods A total of 86 Asian house shrews were captured from forest areas and other habitats of Bangladesh in 2015. Gross examination of the whole GI tract was performed for gross helminth detection, and coproscopy was done for identification of specific eggs or larvae. Results The overall prevalence of GI helminth was 77.9% (67/86), with six species including nematodes (3), cestodes (2), and trematodes (1). Of the detected helminths, the dominant parasitic group was from the genus Hymenolepis spp.(59%), followed by Strongyloides spp.(17%), Capillaria spp. (10%), Physaloptera spp. (3%), and Echinostoma spp.(3%). Conclusion The finding shows that the presence of potential zoonotic parasites (Hymenolepis spp. and Capillaria spp.) in Asian house shrew is ubiquitous in all types of habitat (forest land, cropland and dwelling) in Bangladesh. Therefore, further investigation is crucial to examine their role in the transmission of human helminthiasis. PMID:29805224

  12. Health status of newly arrived refugees in Toronto, Ont: Part 1: infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redditt, Vanessa J; Janakiram, Praseedha; Graziano, Daniela; Rashid, Meb

    2015-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of selected infectious diseases among newly arrived refugee patients and whether there is variation by key demographic factors. Retrospective chart review. Primary care clinic for refugee patients in Toronto, Ont. A total of 1063 refugee patients rostered at the clinic from December 2011 to June 2014. Demographic information (age, sex, and region of birth); prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Strongyloides, Schistosoma, intestinal parasites, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and syphilis infections; and varicella immune status. The median age of patients was 29 years and 56% were female. Refugees were born in 87 different countries. Approximately 33% of patients were from Africa, 28% were from Europe, 14% were from the Eastern Mediterranean Region, 14% were from Asia, and 8% were from the Americas (excluding 4% born in Canada or the United States). The overall rate of HIV infection was 2%. The prevalence of hepatitis B infection was 4%, with a higher rate among refugees from Asia (12%, P refugees (64%, P refugees from Africa (6%, P = .003). Schistosoma infection was identified in 15% of patients from Africa. Intestinal parasites were identified in 16% of patients who submitted stool samples. Approximately 8% of patients were varicella nonimmune, with higher rates in patients from the Americas (21%, P refugee patients to provide timely preventive and curative care. Our data also point to possible policy and clinical implications, such as targeted screening approaches and improved access to vaccinations and therapeutics. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  13. Development of cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase based Dot-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the diagnosis of Fasciola gigantica infection in buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Anju; Raina, O K; Nagar, Gaurav; Garg, Rajat; Banerjee, P S; Maharana, B R; Kollannur, Justin D

    2012-02-10

    Native cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase (28 kDa) was purified from the excretory secretory products of Fasciola gigantica and was used for sero-diagnosis of F. gigantica infection in buffaloes by Dot-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Dot-ELISA). The test detected F. gigantica field infection in these animals with a sensitivity of ∼ 90%. No specific IgG antibody binding was displayed by sera obtained from 76 buffaloes considered to be Fasciola and other parasite-free by microscopic examination of faeces and necropsy examination of liver, rumen and intestine. Additionally, sera from 156 Fasciola-free buffaloes, yet infected with Gigantocotyle explanatum, Paramphistomum epiclitum, Gastrothylax spp., Strongyloides papillosus and hydatid cyst were all negative, indicating that F. gigantica cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase does not cross-react with these helminth parasites in natural infection of the host. The data indicated that cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase based Dot-ELISA reached ∼ 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity with relation to above parasites in the detection of bubaline fasciolosis. The present Dot-ELISA diagnostic assay is relevant to the field diagnosis of F. gigantica infection in buffaloes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Parasitism level by helminths and weight gain of calves kept in organic and conventional grazing

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    Jenevaldo Barbosa da Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable production is a principle in which we must meet the needs of the present without compromising the capacity of future generations. Despite the successful development of pesticides against endo and ectoparasites found in domestic ruminants, these parasites are still the major problem of the herbivore production system. The purpose of this study was to know the population of gastrintestinal parasites and their influence on weight gain of calves kept in organic and conventional grazing. Thus, organic and conventional calves were randomly selected in 2008 and 2009. The fecal egg count (FEC indentified the following genders of helminths: Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Oesophagostomum, Cooperia, Strongyloides, Trichuris and oocysts of Eimeria. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 between FEC in organic and conventional animals. Calves younger than 6 months showed significant higher infection (p<0.05 than calves between 7 and 12 months of age. The weight gain observed during the study was of 327g/day and 280g/day for conventional and organic systems animals, respectively. Consequently, the combination of sustainable practices of grazing associated with the selective application of anthelmintics may be a feasible alternative for nematode control in a conventional system and in transition to an organic one.

  15. Gastrointestinal parasites of feral cats from Christmas Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P J; Elliot, A D; Algar, D; Brazell, R I

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the gastrointestinal parasites present in feral cats on Christmas Island, with particular interest in the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Faecal and serum samples were collected from 28 and 25 cats respectively that were trapped as part of an ongoing eradication program being run on Christmas Island by the Department of Environment and Conservation. Faecal samples were screened microscopically for helminth and protozoan parasites. Serum samples were screened for antibodies to T gondii using a commercial indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and a latex agglutination test (LAT). The most common helminth parasites detected were Toxocara cati (present in 15 of 28 faecal samples), Strongyloides sp (13/28), Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, (7/28), an unidentified capillarid (6/28) and Ancylostoma sp (4/28). Based on serology, T gondii was the most common parasite detected (protozoan or otherwise) with antibodies detected in 24 serum samples by IFA and 23 serum samples by LAT. Cats on Christmas Island harbour many of the helminth and protozoan parasites reported from feral cats elsewhere in Australia. The high seroprevalence of T gondii in these cats indicates a high level of exposure to the parasite in this environment.

  16. Prevalensi Infeksi Cacing Ancylostoma Spp Pada Kucing Lokal (Felis catus Di Kota Denpasar

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    Putu Anna Oktaviana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A long time ago local cat (Felis catus is a symbol of faith and now it turns to mice controller or even pet. The efficiency of maintains and food make more people interested to take care of cat. Based on the area of living, cat can be categorized into three such as: (1 Domestic pet cats , (2 Stray cats  and (3 Feral cats. Domestic pet cats can be categorized into three also based on authority area such as  Indoor, Limited range and Free range. Cat disease can cause by parasite, virus, bacteria and fungus. There are some species of parasite which often be found in cat digest track such as Ancylostoma spp,  Toxocara spp and Strongyloides spp. The purpose of this research is to know the prevalence of Ancylostomma spp. infection in local cat. This research use 80 samples which divide into 40 stray cat feces and 40 home cat feces using floatation method. From 40 samples of examinated stray cat feces, 19 samples (47.5% positively found the egg of Ancylostoma spp. Meanwhile from 40 samples of examinated home cat feces, 10 samples  (25.0 %  positively found the egg of Ancylostoma spp. After analyzed by Chi-square test, there is a clear relation between the prevalence of Ancylostoma spp. infection in home cat and stray cat. (P<0,05

  17. Occurrence of Intestinal Parasitic Contamination in Select Consumed Local Raw Vegetables and Fruits in Kuantan, Pahang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Afzan Mat; Mohammad, Mardhiah; Abdullahi, Muna Abshir; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Zakaria, Robaiza; Wahab, Ridhwan Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are one of the most common causes of human diseases that result in serious health and economic issues in many developing and developed countries. Raw vegetables and fruits play an important role in transmitting parasites to humans. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the parasitological contamination of select commonly consumed local leafy vegetables and fruits in Kuantan, Malaysia. One kilogram of locally consumed raw vegetables and fruits were collected randomly from the Kuantan wet market (Pasar Tani) during the monsoon season (November 2014–January 2015) and the dry season (February 2015–April 2015). A standard wet mount procedure and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining were used for the detection of parasites. In the present study, the examination of vegetables revealed five different parasite species. The vegetable samples collected from Kuantan’s wet market were positive for both helminthes and protozoa. However, the fruits samples were negative for parasitic contamination. Pegaga was the most contaminated leafy vegetable in this study, and Strongyloides was the parasite found most frequently. Furthermore, there was a high diversity in the type of parasites observed during the dry season compared to the monsoon season. Therefore, further action should be taken to reduce the occurrence of parasitic contamination in vegetables by implementing the principles of good agricultural practice and improving water treatment efficacy. PMID:28228914

  18. Research Note. Occurrence of gastrointestinal helminths in commensal rodents from Tabasco, Mexico

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    Cigarroa-Toledo N.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and species composition of helminths in commensal rodents captured inside private residences in the city of Villahermosa in Tabasco, Mexico. Trapping was performed at each house for three consecutive nights from October to December 2015. Fifty commensal rodents were captured: 23 Rattus norvegicus, 16 Mus musculus and 11 Rattus rattus. Rodents were transported alive to the laboratory and held in cages until they defecated. Feces were analyzed for helminth eggs using the Sheather’s flotation technique. The overall prevalence of helminths in rodents was 60 %: R. norvegicus was more likely to be parasitized (87.0 % than R. rattus (63.6 % and M. musculus (18.8 %. Eggs from at least 13 species of helminths were identified: Hymenolepis diminuta, Rodentolepis nana, Moniliformis moniliformis, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Heterakis spumosa, Mastophorus muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Strongyloides ratti, Syphacia obvelata, Syphacia muris, Toxocara sp., Trichosomoides crassicauda, and Trichuris muris. This is the first study to report the presence of H. polygyrus, S. ratti and T. crassicauda in commensal rodents in Mexico. In conclusion, our results suggest that helminths commonly infect commensal rodents in Villahermosa and therefore rodents present a health risk to inhabitants in this region.

  19. Coprological Assessment of Enteric Parasites in Argali Sheep ( Ovis ammon , Siberian Ibex ( Capra sibirica , and Domestic Sheep and Goats at the Ikh Nart Nature Reserve in Mongolia

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    David E. Kenny

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2009 (April/May the Denver Zoological Foundation in collaboration with the Mongolian Academy of Sciences conducted a fi eld coprological assessment feasibility study at the Ikh Nart Nature Reserve in southeastern Mongolia. Our initial effort was directed at fi nding simple methodologies that would work consistently in the fi eld for identifying some of the enteric parasites for argali sheep ( Ovis ammon and Siberian ibex ( Capra sibirica , and then to compare these to samples from local nomad domestic fat-tailed sheep ( Ovis aries and cashmere goats ( Capra hircus . Direct fecal examination yielded less eggs than the fl otation techniques, but was still felt to be useful as a quick screening tool. From the fl otation techniques we settled on using sugar because it appeared to yield the most eggs and sugar is readily available in Mongolia. We successfully recovered Entamoeba sp., Eimeria spp., trichostrongyles, large trichostrongyle species, Trichuris ovis and Strongyloides papillosus . We are using the digital images we captured to create a fi eld guide for common enteric parasites found in wildlife and domestics ungulates found in the reserve. In the future, we plan to use the fi eld guide and the quantitative modi fi ed McMaster technique to compare parasite egg-type numbers in both wild and domestic ungulates during different seasons.

  20. Activity of luxabendazole against liver flukes, gastrointestinal roundworms, and lungworms in naturally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassai, T; Takáts, C; Fok, E; Redl, P

    1988-01-01

    The anthelmintic potential of luxabendazole was investigated in sheep harboring mixed naturally acquired helminth infections. Results were assessed by comparing worm counts of the treated groups (seven animals each) on days 7-8 posttreatment with those of the nontreated control group, except for protostrongylid lungworms, for which the changes in pre- and posttreatment group mean larval counts/g feces were assessed for intensity effect. A single oral treatment at doses of 10.0 or 12.5 mg/kg body wt removed 97.6% of the adult Fasciola hepatica and 63.2%-83.8% of the Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Luxabendazole at 7.5, 10.0, and 12.5 mg/kg proved 100% effective in removing adult worms of the genera Haemonchus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Cooperia and Nematodirus as well as tissue-associated larval stages of gastrointestinal nematodes of the abomasal mucosa. The drug showed an intensity effect of 79.7%-87.6% against Strongyloides papillosus. Luxabendazole removed all Dictyocaulus filaria and reduced the fecal excretion of larvae of protostrongylid species (Protostrongylus rufescens, Neostrongylus linearis, Cystocaulus ocreatus, Muellerius capillaris) by 97.8%-99.6%. The efficacy of luxabendazole compared favorably with that of Diplin Kombi (oxyclozanide and levamisole), which was used as a reference drug.

  1. Infection levels of gastrointestinal parasites in sheep and goats in Papua New Guinea.

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    Koinari, M; Karl, S; Ryan, U; Lymbery, A J

    2013-12-01

    Gastrointestinal parasites of livestock cause diseases of important socio-economic concern worldwide. The present study investigated the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in sheep and goats in lowland and highland regions of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Faecal samples were collected from a total of 165 small ruminants (110 sheep and 55 goats) from February to April 2011. Analysis by a modified McMaster technique revealed that 128 animals (72% of sheep and 89% of goats) were infected with one or more species of gastrointestinal parasites. The gastrointestinal parasites found and their prevalences in sheep (S) and in goats (G) were as follows: strongyle 67.3% (S), 85.5% (G); Eimeria 17.3% (S), 16.4% (G); Strongyloides, 8.2% (S), 23.6% (G); Fasciola, 5.5% (S), 18.2% (G); Trichuris, 1.8% (S), 3.6% (G); and Nematodirus, 1.8% (S), 3.6% (G). Two additional genera were found in goats: Moniezia (9.1%) and Dictocaulus (3.6%). This is the first study to quantitatively examine the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in goats in PNG. The high rates of parasitism observed in the present study are likely to be associated with poor farming management practices, including lack of pasture recovery time, lack of parasite control measures and poor-quality feed.

  2. Seasonal and demographic factors influencing gastrointestinal parasitism in ungulates of Etosha National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Wendy C; Getz, Wayne M

    2010-10-01

    Host-parasite dynamics can be strongly affected by seasonality and age-related host immune responses. We investigated how observed variation in the prevalence and intensity of parasite egg or oocyst shedding in four co-occurring ungulate species may reflect underlying seasonal variation in transmission and host immunity. This study was conducted July 2005-October 2006 in Etosha National Park, Namibia, using indices of parasitism recorded from 1,022 fecal samples collected from plains zebra (Equus quagga), springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis), blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), and gemsbok (Oryx gazella). The presence and intensity of strongyle nematodes, Strongyloides spp. and Eimeria spp. parasites, were strongly seasonal for most host-parasite combinations, with more hosts infected in the wet season than the dry season. Strongyle intensity in zebra was significantly lower in juveniles than adults, and in springbok hosts, Eimeria spp. intensity was significantly greater in juveniles than adults. These results provide evidence that acquired immunity is less protective against strongyle nematodes than Eimeria spp. infections. The seasonal patterns in parasitism further indicate that the long dry season may limit development and survival of parasite stages in the environment and, as a result, host contact and parasite transmission.

  3. Parasitic Contamination of Raw Vegetables in Zanjan Markets, Iran

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    Negin Torabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complex surface of vegetables facilitate attachment and transmission of several pathogens. No previous study has been conducted in survey of parasitic contamination of vegetables in Zanjan. This study aimed to detect the parasitic contamination in common raw vegetables in Zanjan markets. Methods: A total of 352 raw vegetable samples, including leek, parsley, basil, mint, radish, cress and dill were collected from grocery stores using cluster sampling in different regions of the city during 2014. The edible parts of vegetables were separated and immersed in normal saline solution. Floating vegetables were removed and the solution was allowed to sediment at room temperature for 24 hours. The pellet was examined following sedimentation and floatation methods. Results:Various Organisms were detected in 54% (190 of the 352 samples, but only 2.8% of samples had pathogenic parasites including; Trichostrongylus eggs (3, Hookworm eggs (2, Eimeria oocysts (2, Sarcocystis oocyst (1, Strongyloides larvae (1, and Fasciola eggs (1. The contamination rate of vegetables was highest (90.4% in the fall (p˂0.05. Conclusion: Vegetable contamination with parasitic organisms in this area was low, maybe due to irrigation of vegetables with sources other than sewage water, but it is still necessary to improve sanitary conditions of vegetables.

  4. Effects of Parasitic Infections on Erythrocyte Indices of Camels in Nigeria

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    Jalailudeen Lawal Rabana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and effect of parasitic infection on erythrocyte indices in trade camels slaughtered in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Two hundred adult one humped camels comprised of 87 (43.5 % males and 113 (56.5 % females were examined for helminths and hemoparasites at their slaughter time according to the standard procedures. An overall prevalence of 79 % for single and mixed infections was observed. Examination of faecal samples from camels shows 82 (41 % were harbouring different nematodes, mostly Strongyle, Strongyloides and Hemonchus species. Buffy coat and thin smear examination of blood samples showed Babesia and Anaplasma species. More females (44.5 % than males (34.5 % were positive for various parasitic infections. But the percentage was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Packed cell volume (PCV, mean haemoglobin concentration (MCH, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC and red blood cell counts were significantly (P < 0.01 affected in the infected camels compared to the non-infected ones. Parasite infection in camels leads to macrocytic anaemia.

  5. Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths of sheep in Sherpur, Bangladesh

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    Prianka Rani Poddar

    2017-09-01

    Results: Out of 106 samples, 67.9% (n=72/106 revealed the presence of ova of different helminths. The prevalence of helminth infection was associated with Fasciola gigantica (11.3%; n=12/106, Paramphistomes (13.2%; n=14/106, Schistosoma indicum (3.8%; n=4/106, Moniezia sp. (3.8%; n=4/106, Strongyle-type (24.5%; n=26/106, hook worm (6.6%; n=7/106, Strongyloides sp. (12.3%; n=13/106 and Trichuris sp. (1.9%; n=2/106. Egg count per gram (EPG was calculated which was ranged between 100 and 600. Parasitic counts in lambs, young and adult showed no significant variations (P=0.511 from one other. Infection was significantly (P=0.04 higher in poor body conditioned sheep (76.3 % as contrasted to normal body conditioned sheep (57.4%. No significant variation (P=0.601 was noticed in infection rates between sexes. Females displayed a higher infection (70.0% as compared to males (65.2%. In rearing system, the result was found statistically insignificant (P=0.247. Conclusion: Utterly, GI helminths are endemic at great levels among sheep in the study area. Also, their infestation differs within various age groups, sexes, nutritional condition and rearing system of sheep. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(3.000: 274-280

  6. Prevalence and burden of gastrointestinal parasites of Djallonke sheep in Ayeduase, Kumasi, Ghana

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    Moses Owusu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and burden of gastrointestinal (GIT parasites of Djallonke sheep in Ayeduase, Kumasi from January 2015 to July 2015. Materials and Methods: The presence of nematodal eggs and coccidial oocysts in fecal samples were analyzed using the saturated sodium chloride floatation technique. Identification of eggs or oocysts was done on the basis of morphology and size of the eggs or oocysts. Results: Out of 110 fecal samples of sheep examined, 108 were infected with GIT parasites, representing a prevalence rate of 98.2%. The total infection rate of GIT nematodes and coccidia oocysts were 94.5% and 51.8%, respectively. Strongyle nematode (94.5% was the most prevalent GIT nematode detected, followed by strongyloides (27.3%. The average nematodal burden in g/feces was significantly higher (p0.05 from each other. The average coccidia oocysts count in g/feces was significantly higher (p0.05 in the coccidia oocysts count of rams under 1 year, gimmers, ewes, and rams over 1 year. From the studied animals, 40%, 6.36%, 48.18%, and 5.45% had heavy, moderate, light, and no infestation, respectively, with GIT nematodes. Conclusion: Djallonke sheep in Ayeduase, Kumasi, were infested with varying amounts of GIT parasites. The infestation of Djallonke sheep by GIT parasites also varies among different age groups and sexes.

  7. Seasonal variations in the gastro-intestinal nematode populations of Scottish hil sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J F; Armour, J

    1975-05-01

    In each of two consecutive years, groups of breeding ewes were removed from a hill farm in the west of Scotland on four occasions, namely late pregnancy, early lactation, autumn and early winter. At slaughter the major nematode genus present in the alimentary tract was Ostertagia, with O circumcincta the predominant species but three species previously found in Scottish hill sheep, Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Strongyloides papillosis and Chabertia ovina were absent. An absolute increase in total nematode burden and faecal egg count was apparent in the ewes commencing in late pregnancy, reaching a maximum during lactation and falling again in autumn and early winter. This peri-parturient increase in the nematode population could not be solely attributed to the maturation of previously inhibited larval stages but was primarily the result of the development of recently ingested infection; the latter situation thought to be due to a temporary relaxation of immunological response by the ewe at parturition or early lactation. Serum pepsinogen values in ewes remained elevated throughout the grazing season and were always higher than those of their lambs, suggesting that the ewe, although allowing few parasites to become established, was under considerable challenge in the autumn. The worm burdens of the lambs were always low in autumn and early winter with Ostertagia spp being the major genus present during the autumn and Trichostrongylus spp being the predominant genus during the early winter.

  8. Prevalence and diversity of gastrointestinal helminths in free-ranging Asian house shrew (Suncus murinus) in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mizanur; Islam, Shariful; Masuduzzaman, Md; Alam, Mahabub; Chawdhury, Mohammad Nizam Uddin; Ferdous, Jinnat; Islam, Md Nurul; Hassan, Mohammad Mahmudul; Hossain, Mohammad Alamgir; Islam, Ariful

    2018-04-01

    Asian house shrew ( Suncus murinus ), a widely distributed small mammal in the South Asian region, can carry helminths of zoonotic importance. The aim of the study was to know the prevalence and diversity of gastrointestinal (GI) helminths in free-ranging Asian house shrew ( S. murinus ) in Bangladesh. A total of 86 Asian house shrews were captured from forest areas and other habitats of Bangladesh in 2015. Gross examination of the whole GI tract was performed for gross helminth detection, and coproscopy was done for identification of specific eggs or larvae. The overall prevalence of GI helminth was 77.9% (67/86), with six species including nematodes (3), cestodes (2), and trematodes (1). Of the detected helminths, the dominant parasitic group was from the genus Hymenolepis spp.(59%), followed by Strongyloides spp.(17%), Capillaria spp. (10%), Physaloptera spp. (3%), and Echinostoma spp.(3%). The finding shows that the presence of potential zoonotic parasites (Hymenolepis spp. and Capillaria spp.) in Asian house shrew is ubiquitous in all types of habitat (forest land, cropland and dwelling) in Bangladesh. Therefore, further investigation is crucial to examine their role in the transmission of human helminthiasis.

  9. Rickettsiae, protozoa, and opisthokonta/metazoa.

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    Schmutzhard, Erich; Helbok, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobiales (formerly named Rickettsiales) cause in rare instances meningitis and meningovasculitis, respectively. In case of history of exposure, infection by Rhizobiales needs to be considered since both diagnosis and therapy may be extremely difficult and pathogen-specific. The same applies to protozoa; in this chapter, Babesia species, free-living amoebae and Entamoeba histolytica infection, including severe meningitis and brain abscess, infection by Trypanosoma species (South American and African trypanosomiasis) are discussed with respect to history, epidemiology, clinical signs, and symptoms as well as differential diagnosis and therapy. Parasitic flatworms and roundworms, potentially able to invade the central nervous system, trematodes (flukes), cestodes (in particular, Cysticercus cellulosae), but also nematodes (in particular, Strongyloides spp. in the immunocompromised) are of worldwide importance. In contrast, filarial worms, Toxocara spp., Trichinella spp., Gnathostoma and Angiostrongylus spp. are seen only in certain geographically confined areas. Even more regionally confined are infestations of the central nervous system by metazoa, in particular, tongue worms (=arthropods) or larvae of flies (=maggots). The aim of this chapter is (1) to alert the neurologist to these infections, and (2) to enable the attending emergency neurologist to take a knowledgeable history, with an emphasis on epidemiology, clinical signs, and symptoms as well as therapeutic management possibilities. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminth parasites of zoonotic significance in dogs and cats in lower Northern Thailand.

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    Pumidonming, Wilawan; Salman, Doaa; Gronsang, Dulyatad; Abdelbaset, Abdelbaset E; Sangkaeo, Khamphon; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Igarashi, Makoto

    2017-01-10

    Gastrointestinal zoonotic helminths of dogs and cats have a public health concern worldwide. We investigated the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths of zoonotic significance in dogs and cats in lower Northern Thailand and utilized molecular tools for species identification of hookworms and Opisthorchis viverrini. Fecal samples of 197 dogs and 180 cats were collected. Overall prevalence of infection using microscopy was 40.1% in dogs and 33.9% in cats. Helminth infection found in both dogs and cats included hookworms, Spirometra spp., Taenia spp., Toxocara spp., O. viverrini, Strongyloides spp. and Trichuris spp. Hookworms were the most common helminth in dogs, while Spirometra spp. were the most prevalent in cats. Among hookworm infection in dogs and cats, Ancylostoma ceylanicum was the most prevalent hookworm, being 82.1% in hookworm infected dogs and 95.8% in hookworm infected cats. Mixed-infection due to hookworms and Spirometra spp. was the most dominant in both dogs and cats. Our finding showed that zoonotic helminth infection is highly prevalent in dogs and cats in the lower Northern area of Thailand.

  11. Fascioliasis and Eosinophilia in the Highlands of Cuzco, Peru and Their Association with Water and Socioeconomic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M.; Goodrich, Mary R.; Graham, Brittany; Villanueva-Meyer, Pablo G.; Lopez, Martha; Arque, Eulogia; White, A. Clinton

    2014-01-01

    There are limited data about the epidemiology of fascioliasis in Cuzco, Peru. We studied children 3–12 years old from six communities in the highlands of Cuzco to evaluate the epidemiology of fascioliasis; 227 children were included, one-half were female, the mean age was 7.5 (±2.6) years, and 46.2±% had one or more parasites, including Fasciola (9.7%), Ascaris (12.8%), Hymenolepis (9.3%), Trichuris (1.3%), hookworm (1.8%), Strongyloides (0.9%), and Giardia (27.8%). Fasciola was associated with the number of siblings in the household, drinking untreated water, and giardiasis. Eosinophilia was encountered in 21% of children and more common in those drinking untreated water at home and those infected with a parasite, but the differences were not significant. Eating water plants was not associated with Fasciola or eosinophilia. Fascioliasis and eosinophilia were common in the highlands of Cuzco. Fascioliasis was associated with socioeconomic factors and drinking water. PMID:25200257

  12. Fascioliasis and eosinophilia in the highlands of Cuzco, Peru and their association with water and socioeconomic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M; Goodrich, Mary R; Graham, Brittany; Villanueva-Meyer, Pablo G; Lopez, Martha; Arque, Eulogia; White, A Clinton

    2014-11-01

    There are limited data about the epidemiology of fascioliasis in Cuzco, Peru. We studied children 3-12 years old from six communities in the highlands of Cuzco to evaluate the epidemiology of fascioliasis; 227 children were included, one-half were female, the mean age was 7.5 (±2.6) years, and 46.2±% had one or more parasites, including Fasciola (9.7%), Ascaris (12.8%), Hymenolepis (9.3%), Trichuris (1.3%), hookworm (1.8%), Strongyloides (0.9%), and Giardia (27.8%). Fasciola was associated with the number of siblings in the household, drinking untreated water, and giardiasis. Eosinophilia was encountered in 21% of children and more common in those drinking untreated water at home and those infected with a parasite, but the differences were not significant. Eating water plants was not associated with Fasciola or eosinophilia. Fascioliasis and eosinophilia were common in the highlands of Cuzco. Fascioliasis was associated with socioeconomic factors and drinking water. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. BIO-ECOLGICAL PHENOMENON OF POLY-PARASITISM – ACTUAL MAJOR PROBLEM IN BREEDING OF SHEEP AND GOATS

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    DOINA ARDELEANU

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a extensive study concerning the parasites andcomplexe problems of the poly-parasitism on sheep and goats in Dobrudja. In thispaper we proposed ourselves to establish the sheep and goats endoparasites, thedistribution and frequency of these function to age, sex and maintenance conditions.The increase of morbidity through parasitical diseases, as well as the ecological andeconomic consequences of poly-parasitism represent a important problem in theintegration conditions of Romania in UE and imposes to apply some efficientmethods of prophylaxis and control of parasitosis and parasito- zoonozis. Thedrawing of copro-parazitologic samples was effected directly from rectum of sheepand goats, testing 10% of each lot, during grazing season and in period of keepingin sheds. The copro-parasitological examinations were carried out ovoscopicaly(flotation, by next methods: Willis, Mc. Master and sediment, by Benedect-Nemesseri and polyvalent methods, as well as larvoscopicaly by Baermann method.After copro-parasitological examinations of samples which were harvested fromthese animals it comes out that both sheep and goats presents poly-parasitism withsporozoa (coccidiae: Eimeria spp. , cestodae (Moniezia expansa and Monieziabenedeni, gastro-intestinal nematodes (Nematodirus spp. ,Trichostrongylidae,Strongyloides papillosus and pulmonary nematodes (Protostrongylus rufescens,Dictyocaulus filaria, Muellerius capillaris, the degree of parasitical infestationdepending on species, age, sex, maintenance conditions and environmental factors.

  14. Associations between mild-to-moderate anaemia in pregnancy and helminth, malaria and HIV infection in Entebbe, Uganda.

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    Muhangi, Lawrence; Woodburn, Patrick; Omara, Mildred; Omoding, Nicholas; Kizito, Dennison; Mpairwe, Harriet; Nabulime, Juliet; Ameke, Christine; Morison, Linda A; Elliott, Alison M

    2007-09-01

    It is suggested that helminths, particularly hookworm and schistosomiasis, may be important causes of anaemia in pregnancy. We assessed the associations between mild-to-moderate anaemia (haemoglobin >8.0 g/dl and pregnancy in Entebbe, Uganda. The prevalence of anaemia was 39.7%. The prevalence of hookworm was 44.5%, Mansonella perstans 21.3%, Schistosoma mansoni 18.3%, Strongyloides 12.3%, Trichuris 9.1%, Ascaris 2.3%, asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia 10.9% and HIV 11.9%. Anaemia showed little association with the presence of any helminth, but showed a strong association with malaria (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 3.22, 95% CI 2.43-4.26) and HIV (AOR 2.46, 95% CI 1.90-3.19). There was a weak association between anaemia and increasing hookworm infection intensity. Thus, although highly prevalent, helminths showed little association with mild-to-moderate anaemia in this population, but HIV and malaria both showed a strong association. This result may relate to relatively good nutrition and low helminth infection intensity. These findings are pertinent to estimating the disease burden of helminths and other infections in pregnancy. [Clinical Trial No. ISRCTN32849447].

  15. CONTROLE DE VERMINOSE EM EQUINOS NO NORTE DE MINAS GERAIS COM ASSOCIAÇÃO DE PAMOATO DE PIRANTEL E IVERMECTINA

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    Eduardo Robson Duarte

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the North of Minas Gerais the equineculture is an important activity because it corroborates the success in the breeding of beef cattle. The equine verminosis control in this region has not been applied considering the anthelmintic resistances of nematodes and this resistance has been observed in some equine herds in Brazil. The present study has the objective to evaluate the effectiveness of pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin association in mare verminosis in the North of Minas Gerais, during the peripatum. After fourteen days of the first faecal egg count (FEC and treatment of the animals with these respective bases, the FEC reduction test indicated 98.1% effectiveness and the coprocultures were negative. After the worm identification from the control group, was observed 30% of filariod worms of Strongyloides spp., 30% of the genus Haemonchus, 20% were worms of Cyathosminae, 10% of the genus Trichostrongylgys and 10% of the genus Oesophagodontus. The results observed suggest that the use of pyrantel pamoate associated with ivermectin was safe during the peripartum and efficient in the FEC reduction of naturally infected mares raised in pastures of the North of Minas Gerais.

  16. Efficacy of fenbendazole and levamisole treatments in captive Houston toads (Bufo [Anaxyrus] houstonensis).

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    Bianchi, Catherine M; Johnson, Cassidy B; Howard, Lauren L; Crump, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Effective disease monitoring and prevention is critical to the success of captive amphibian care. Nematodes, including the genera Rhabdias and Strongyloides, are known to contribute to mortality in captive amphibians and have been identified in the Houston Zoo's endangered Houston toad (Bufo [Anaxyrus] houstonensis) captive assurance colony. Five years of fecal data for the toad colony were compiled and analyzed in order to investigate the efficacy of two anthelminthic medications, fenbendazole (FBZ) and levamisole (LMS), which were used to control nematode infections. Both FBZ (dusted onto food items) and topical LMS (6.5 to 13.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced the number of nematode eggs, larvae, and adults observed by fecal parasitologic examination. There were no significant differences between treatments, and egg reappearance periods were difficult to compare as a result of low sample size. No adverse effects from either anthelminthic treatment were observed. Both topical LMS and oral FBZ appear to be safe and efficacious treatments for the reduction of the internal nematode burden in captive Houston toads.

  17. Efficacy of an ivermectin controlled-release capsule against nematode and arthropod endoparasites in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehbein, S; Batty, A F; Barth, D; Visser, M; Timms, B J; Barrick, R A; Eagleson, J S

    1998-03-28

    Five controlled trials were conducted in Germany or in the United Kingdom, using 74 female sheep of merino or Dorset horn breeds, to evaluate the efficacy of an ivermectin controlled-release capsule against naturally acquired or induced infections of gastrointestinal nematodes, lungworms and nasal bot larvae and against incoming infections with gastrointestinal and pulmonary nematodes. Half of the animals were treated with one ivermectin controlled-release capsule that delivered ivermectin at the rate of 1.6 mg per day for 100 days while the other half remained untreated. Parasites were counted 21, 28, 35 or 56 days after administration of the capsule. The treatment was highly effective (> or = 99 per cent) against established parasites of the following species: Haemonchus contortus (adults and fourth-stage larvae), Ostertagia circumcincta, O pinnata, O trifurcata, Ostertagia species fourth-stage larvae, Trichostrongylus axei, T colubriformis, T vitrinus, Cooperia curticei, Nematodirus battus, N filicollis, Strongyloides papillosus, Chabertia ovina, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Trichuris ovis, Tr skrjabini, Dictyocaulus filaria, Protostrongylus rufescens and Oestrus ovis (larvae). The treatment prevented the establishment of the gastrointestinal nematodes H contortus, O circumcincta, T axei, T colubriformis, C curticei, N battus, N filicollis, Ch ovina, Oe vennulosum and the establishment of the lungworm D filaria by > 99 per cent compared with untreated controls (P < or = 0.01).

  18. Linear distribution of nematodes in the gastrointestinal tract of tracer lambs.

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    Makovcová, Katerina; Langrová, Iva; Vadlejch, Jaroslav; Jankovská, Ivana; Lytvynets, Andriy; Borkovcová, Marie

    2008-12-01

    Forty-eight tracer lambs were killed in 2004-2007. The abomasum, duodenum, small intestine (jejunum and ileum), colon and caecum were collected and processed for parasites enumeration and identification-mucosal scrapings of both abomasums and intestines were digested. Out of 48 gastrointestinal tracts examined, all were found to be positive for nematode infection. Seventeen species of gastrointestinal nematodes were recovered: Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Cooperia curticei, Haemonchus contortus, Chabertia ovina, Nematodirus battus, Nematodirus filicollis, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Strongyloides papillosus, Trichuris ovis, Trichuris globulosa, Trichuris skrjabini and Skrjabinema ovis. All species were searched for in the entire gastrointestinal tract. Six species of nematodes were recovered from abnormal sites, naturally in small numbers of lambs as well as in small amounts: Nematodirus battus in the abomasums (6.67% of lambs), N. filicollis in the caecum and in the colon (%4 and 8%, respectively), T. axei in the colon (9.52%), T. colubriformis in the colon (13.89%), T. vitrinus in the caecum (16.67%), in the colon (20.00%) and in the abomasum (3.33%). T. ovis was found in one case in the small intestine.

  19. Seasonal distribution of gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep in a semiarid region, northeastern Brazil.

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    de Souza, Maria de Fátima; Pimentel-Neto, Manoel; de Pinho, André Luís Santos; da Silva, Rízia Maria; Farias, Albeísa Cleyse Batista; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the seasonal distribution and gastrointestinal nematode parasite load in crossbred Santa Inês tracer lambs, and to correlate the rainfall during the study period with occurrences of parasitic infections. Sixty-four male tracer lambs between the ages of four and eight months were used in the study. Two tracer lambs were inserted into the herd every 28 days to determine the pattern of infective larvae available in the environment. Variation in the fecal egg count (FEC) of nematodes was observed at the study site, with many samples containing undetectable parasite loads during the dry season. The larvae identified in coprocultures were Haemonchus sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Cooperia sp., Strongyloides sp. and Oesophagostomum sp. The nematodes recovered at necropsy were Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Cooperia punctata, C. pectinata, Trichuris sp., Oesophagostomum sp. and Skrajabinema ovis. The total number of larvae and the total number of immature and adult forms recovered from the tracers showed seasonal distributions that significantly correlated with the amount of rainfall received that month (p value ≅ 0.000 in all cases ). The species H. contortus was predominant in the herd and should be considered to be main pathogenic nematode species in these hosts under these conditions.

  20. Epidemiology and control of Schistosomiasis and other intestinal parasitic infections among school children in three rural villages of south Saint Lucia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Rajini; Hunjan, Gurdip S

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of parasitic infections and the efficacy of treatment among school children in rural villages of south Saint Lucia. A total of 554 school children participated in this study. Parasitic infections were confirmed by using Kato- Katz method. Overall, 61.6% of the school children were infected by any parasitic infection. The helminths identified were Ascaris lumbricoides (15.7%), Hookworm (11.9%), Strongyloides (9.7%), Trichuris trichiura (4.7%), Schistosoma mansoni (0.6%), Taenia solium (0.8%) and Enterobius vermicularis (2.1%), Entamoeba coli (9.7%), Iodameba butschlii (5%), Entamoeba histolytica (1.1%), Giardia lamblia (1.8%) and Endolimax nana (2.1%). The control intervention included treatment with albendazole 400 mg and praziquantel 40 mg/kg as well as awareness campaigns. Post-interventional assessment showed the total prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection reduced from 61.6 to 3.6% with a cure rate of 94.2%, following the control methods.

  1. Profile of intestinal parasitosis among school-aged children in Kiliba (eastern DR Congo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyambikwa Bisangamo, C; Jabari Mutwa, P; Mulongo Mbarambara, P

    2017-06-01

    This study of feces sought to determine the prevalence of human intestinal parasites in the Kiliba area of the eastern DR Congo. Feces of 602 school children aged from 9 to 20 years were collected from April to June 2014 and examined. Direct analyses were supplemented with the Kato and Ritchie methods. The global prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in school-aged children in the Kiliba area was 91.4 % [95 % CI: 87.6-94.3%]. The frequency of helminthiasis was high at 73.8 % (95 % CI: 68.4-78.6%) and that of protozoa reached 32.9 % (95 % CI: 27.7-38.6%). Girls were infected more often than boys. The group aged 17-20 years had the highest infection rate (97.7 %), but no statistically significant difference was observed among the age groups studied. The most frequent parasite species were: Schistosoma mansoni (30.6 %), Strongyloides stercolaris (21.3 %), Entamoeba histolytica (17.6 %), Trichomonas intestinalis (14.6 %), Ankylostoma duodenale (13.6 %), Ascaris lumbricoides (12.6 %), Trichuris trichiura (9.0 %), Taenia saginata (6.6 %), and Giardia intestinalis (5.0 %). This investigation demonstrated the extreme frequency of these fecal infections. Preventive measures, including water distribution, sanitary installations, and hygiene education, should be implemented.

  2. Enteric parasites in HIV-1/AIDS-infected patients from a Northwestern São Paulo reference unit in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era Enteroparasitas em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1/AIDS em uma unidade de referência do noroeste paulista na era da terapia antirretroviral de alto impacto

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    Luciana Ventura Cardoso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We describe the epidemiology of intestinal parasites in patients from an AIDS reference service in Northeastern São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Retrospective evaluation was done for all HIV-1/AIDS-positive patients whose Hospital de Base/São José do Rio Preto laboratorial analysis was positive for enteroparasites after diagnosis of HIV-1 infection, from January 1998 to December 2008. Statistical analysis was performed using the R statistical software version 2.4.1. The level of significance adopted was 5%. RESULTS: The most frequent protozoan was Isospora belli (4.2%, followed by Giardia lamblia (3.5%, Entamoeba coli (2.8%, and Cryptosporidium parvum (0.3%. Ancylostoma duodenale (1.4% was the most frequently detected helminth, while Taenia saginata and Strongiloides stercoralis were found in 0.7% of the samples. The results showed that diarrhea was significantly associated with giardiasis and isosporiasis. However, no association was observed between CD4+ cell counts, viral load, and the characteristics of any particular parasite. CONCLUSIONS: Our data may be useful for further comparisons with other Brazilian regions and other developing countries. The data may also provide important clues toward improving the understanding, prevention, and control of enteric parasites around the world.INTRODUÇÃO: Descrevemos a epidemiologia de enteroparasitoses em pacientes de um serviço de referência de AIDS, no noroeste paulista, Brasil. MÉTODOS: Durante o período de janeiro de 1998 a dezembro de 2008, foi realizado este estudo retrospectivo por meio da análise dos prontuários dos pacientes diagnosticados com HIV-1/AIDS atendidos no Ambulatório de Doenças Infecto-Parasitárias do Hospital de Base, São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo. As análises estatísticas foram realizadas usando a versão 2.4.1 do software estatístico R. O nível de significância adotado foi de 5%. RESULTADOS: O protozoário mais frequente foi o Isospora belli

  3. Helminthiasis: Hookworm Infection Remains a Public Health Problem in Dera District, South Gondar, Ethiopia.

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    Melashu Balew Shiferaw

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasitic infections are significant cause of morbidity and mortality in endemic countries. In Ethiopia, helminthiasis was the third leading cause of outpatient visits. Despite the health extension program was launched to address this problem, there is limited information on the burden of intestinal parasites after implementation of the program in our setting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the intestinal helminthic infections among clients attending at Anbesame health center, South Gondar, Ethiopia.A cross sectional study was conducted at Anbesame health center from March to June 2015. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 464 study participants selected consecutively. Stool specimen collection, processing through formol-ether concentration technique and microscopic examination for presence of parasites were carried out. Data were entered, cleaned and analyzed using SPSS Version 20.Among the total 464 study participants with median (±IQR age of 25.0 (±21.75 years, 262 (56.5% were females. Helminthic infection was found in 97 (20.9% participants. Hookworm (68 [14.7%] was the predominant parasite followed by S. mansoni (11 [2.4%], E. vermicularis (9 [1.9%] and S. stercoralis (5 [1.1%]. Patients with age group ≥15 years (AOR: 5.26; 95% CI: 2.05-13.46; P: 0.001 and walking barefoot (AOR: 2.20; 95% CI: 1.08-4.48; P: 0.031 were more vulnerable from the hookworm infections.There was a high burden of hookworm infections in our setting. Hence, regular shoes wearing, considering all age groups in the albendazole deworming as mass treatment and environmental hygiene are important interventions to reduce the burden of such neglected tropical disease.

  4. Helminthiasis: Hookworm Infection Remains a Public Health Problem in Dera District, South Gondar, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiferaw, Melashu Balew; Mengistu, Agmas Dessalegn

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections are significant cause of morbidity and mortality in endemic countries. In Ethiopia, helminthiasis was the third leading cause of outpatient visits. Despite the health extension program was launched to address this problem, there is limited information on the burden of intestinal parasites after implementation of the program in our setting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the intestinal helminthic infections among clients attending at Anbesame health center, South Gondar, Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at Anbesame health center from March to June 2015. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 464 study participants selected consecutively. Stool specimen collection, processing through formol-ether concentration technique and microscopic examination for presence of parasites were carried out. Data were entered, cleaned and analyzed using SPSS Version 20. Results Among the total 464 study participants with median (±IQR) age of 25.0 (±21.75) years, 262 (56.5%) were females. Helminthic infection was found in 97 (20.9%) participants. Hookworm (68 [14.7%]) was the predominant parasite followed by S. mansoni (11 [2.4%]), E. vermicularis (9 [1.9%]) and S. stercoralis (5 [1.1%]). Patients with age group ≥15 years (AOR: 5.26; 95% CI: 2.05–13.46; P: 0.001) and walking barefoot (AOR: 2.20; 95% CI: 1.08–4.48; P: 0.031) were more vulnerable from the hookworm infections. Conclusions There was a high burden of hookworm infections in our setting. Hence, regular shoes wearing, considering all age groups in the albendazole deworming as mass treatment and environmental hygiene are important interventions to reduce the burden of such neglected tropical disease. PMID:26657490

  5. Are soil and waterborne parasitic infections health risk for worker populations in southeast Turkey?

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    Sibel Ak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The soil and waterborne parasitic infections rate is high degree in developed and developing countries. Migratory workers have greater exposure to these parasitic infections and a lot of morbidity due to these infections in workers. For this reason, we aimed to investigate the presence of soil and waterborne parasites in the Gaziantep Organized Industrial Zone of southeast Turkey. Methods: A total of 25 environmental samples (18 soil samples and 7 water samples were taken from The Gaziantep Organized Industrial Zone, in two different seasons (summer and winter. All of the samples were screened for parasites using microscopic examination and culture methods. The parasites were genotyped with polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing analysis. Results: The prevalence of soil and water transmitted parasites was found to be positive 52% (13/25 in summer while there is no any parasites in winter. It was found 22.3% (4/18 Acanthamoeba (genotype4, 16.6% (3/18 Ascaris lumbricoides, 11.1% (2/18 Strongoides stercoralis in soil samples and 14.3% (1/7 Acanthamoeba (genotype 4, 42.9% (3/7 Blastocystis (subtype3 in all of water samples. Conclusion: The migratory worker waves have always shaped the ethnic composition and public health problem of the province of Gaziantep. Climate change has the potential to influence prevalence of parasite and our study has shown that increased prevalence of parasite in summer. The global target for the coming years should be to remove the deaths from earth and waterborne parasitic infections in the worker populations. Thus, we prevent the distribution of parasitic infections in our country.

  6. Helminthiasis: Hookworm Infection Remains a Public Health Problem in Dera District, South Gondar, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiferaw, Melashu Balew; Mengistu, Agmas Dessalegn

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are significant cause of morbidity and mortality in endemic countries. In Ethiopia, helminthiasis was the third leading cause of outpatient visits. Despite the health extension program was launched to address this problem, there is limited information on the burden of intestinal parasites after implementation of the program in our setting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the intestinal helminthic infections among clients attending at Anbesame health center, South Gondar, Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted at Anbesame health center from March to June 2015. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 464 study participants selected consecutively. Stool specimen collection, processing through formol-ether concentration technique and microscopic examination for presence of parasites were carried out. Data were entered, cleaned and analyzed using SPSS Version 20. Among the total 464 study participants with median (±IQR) age of 25.0 (±21.75) years, 262 (56.5%) were females. Helminthic infection was found in 97 (20.9%) participants. Hookworm (68 [14.7%]) was the predominant parasite followed by S. mansoni (11 [2.4%]), E. vermicularis (9 [1.9%]) and S. stercoralis (5 [1.1%]). Patients with age group ≥15 years (AOR: 5.26; 95% CI: 2.05-13.46; P: 0.001) and walking barefoot (AOR: 2.20; 95% CI: 1.08-4.48; P: 0.031) were more vulnerable from the hookworm infections. There was a high burden of hookworm infections in our setting. Hence, regular shoes wearing, considering all age groups in the albendazole deworming as mass treatment and environmental hygiene are important interventions to reduce the burden of such neglected tropical disease.

  7. Parásitos intestinales en monos congo Alouatta palliata (Primates: Cebidae de Costa Rica

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    Misael Chinchilla Carmona

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron las heces de 102 monos de la especie Alouatta palliata (monos aulladores o congos de las siguientes regiones de Costa Rica. Valle Central: San Ramón (Alajuela; Pacífico Central: Isla Chira y Parque Manuel Antonio (Puntarenas; Pacífico Norte: Palo Verde, Playa Potrero, Nicoya (Guanacaste y Caribe: Cahuita (Limón. Los animales capturados fueron anestesiados con dardos conteniendo Telazol®. La mayoría defecaron espontáneamente o se les estimulaba a defecar. Las muestras se estudiaron en el laboratorio en forma directa en solución salina (0.85% y una solución de yodo o teñidas con hematoxilina para identificar los parásitos correspondientes. El material fue cultivado en el medio de Dobell para determinar la presencia de amebas y flagelados. Se encontraron helmintos de los géneros Trypanoxyuris, Strongyloides y Controrchis y protozoarios de los géneros Endolimax, Entamoeba, Trichomonas y Giardia. Los porcentajes de infección por protozoarios oscilaron entre 16.7% y 80% y se encontraron helmintos en un 3.4% a un 80% de los animales de acuerdo con la zona estudiada. No se encontraron diferencias importantes de parasitosis relacionadas con el sexo pero si existió mayor infección en los animales más jóvenes. Se establece la relación entre los índices de infección y algunos parámetros tales como las áreas estudiadas, el peso de los animales y el contacto con el ser humano.Intestinal parasites in howler monkeys Alouatta palliata (Primates: Cebidae of Costa Rica. Fecal samples of 102 howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata from several sites of Costa Rica were studied for intestinal parasites. The zones studied were: Central Valley (San Ramón, Alajuela, Central Pacific (Chomes and Manuel Antonio National Park, Puntarenas, North Pacific (Palo Verde Park and Playa Potrero, Guanacaste, Chira Island in the Nicoya Gulf and Caribean area (Cahuita, Limón. Animals were anesthetized with dards containing Telazol in order to collect

  8. Seguimiento anual de la parasitosis gastrointestinal de venados cola blanca Odocoileus virginianus (Artiodactyla: Cervidae en cautiverio en Yucatán, México

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    Rubén C. Montes Pérez

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar los géneros y estimar la cantidad de huevecillos y ooquistes de parásitos gastrointestinales (PGI excretados durante un año en heces de venados cola blanca (Odocoileus virginianus yucatenensis mantenidos en cautiverio en Yucatán, México. Se recolectaron muestras fecales en tres confinamientos ubicados en la zona centro del estado de Yucatán, de enero a diciembre de 1995. Diez muestras fueron colectadas de cada confinamiento cada dos semanas. Las muestras fueron procesadas mediante la técnica de Flotación Centrifugada y McMaster. Se realizaron cultivos de heces para obtener larvas infectantes L3 mediante la técnica de Corticelli-Lai. Las heces positivas a ooquistes fueron cultivados en dicromato de potasio al 2%. Se determinaron siete géneros (Haemonchus spp, Cooperia spp, Isospora spp, Eimeria spp, Trichuris spp, Strongyloides spp y Moniezia spp correspondientes a cinco órdenes. Haemonchus spp, Isospora spp y Eimeria spp fueron los géneros más frecuentes. El género Isospora se reporta por primera vez en venados de la región, aunque no fue posible explicar el origen de este hallazgo. La frecuencia y nivel de excresión de huevecillos y ooquistes de PGI fue variable durante el año, con incremento en la época de lluvia. Se encontró correlación positiva entre humedad relativa, temperatura ambiente y precipitación pluvial con los órdenes Coccidia y Strongylida. En la zona centro del estado de Yucatán, México, las condiciones meteorológicas en la época de lluvia son propicias para el desarrollo del parasitismo gastrointestinal, lo que permite mayor riesgo de infección en los venados.Gastrointestinal parasites, and egg and oocyst output in the faeces of captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus yucatanensis were recorded in Yucatan, Mexico. Feces were obtained from from January through December 1995 (ten samples every two weeks per place. Samples were processed by

  9. Eficácia anti-helmíntica comparativa da associação albendazole, levamisole e ivermectina à moxidectina em ovinos Comparative anthelmintic efficacy of the association albendazol, levamisol and ivermectin to moxidectin in sheep

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    Carolina Buzzulini

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a eficácia anti-helmíntica da associação de albendazole 2,0%, cloridrato de levamisole 2,55% e ivermectina 0,08% comparativamente à moxidectina 1% em ovinos naturalmente infectados. Foram selecionados 24 ovinos para a composição de três grupos experimentais com oito animais cada: T1, ovinos tratados com a associação albendazole, levamisole e ivermectina, na dosagem de 1 mL 4 kg-1 de peso corporal; T2, ovinos tratados com moxidectina, na dosagem de 1 mL 50 kg-1 de peso corporal e T3, ovinos sem tratamento anti-helmíntico. Foram realizadas contagens de ovos por grama de fezes (OPG no primeiro, terceiro, quinto e sétimo dia após os tratamentos. No sétimo dia todos os ovinos foram necropsiados e todos os helmintos encontrados no trato gastrintestinal foram quantificados e identificados quanto ao gênero e à espécie. A associação dos diferentes princípios ativos foi 100% eficaz no combate às espécies Cooperia punctata, C. pectinata, C. spatulata, Trichostrongylus axei, Oesophagostomum columbianum, Trichuris ovis, C. curticei e Strongyloides papillosus e, a moxidectina eliminou as seis primeiras espécies citadas. Contra Haemonchus contortus a associação apresentou eficácia superior (93% à moxidectina (51,4%. Ambas formulações foram eficazes contra Trichostrongylus colubriformis. A associação medicamentosa utilizada constitui alternativa no controle das nematodioses ovinas.The anthelmintic efficacy of 2.0% albendazol, 2.55% levamisol chloridrate and 0.08% ivermectin formulation to 1% moxidectin in sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes was compared. Twenty-four animals were selected by faecal egg counts (FEC means, composing three experimental groups with eight sheep each: T1, sheep treated with albendazol, levamisol and ivermectin association; T2, sheep treated with 1% moxidectin and T3, untreated group. FEC was estimated at 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th day post-treatment. All animals were

  10. Nematóides resistentes a alguns anti-helmínticos em rebanhos caprinos no Cariri Paraibano Nematode resistant to some anthelmintics in dairy goats in Cariri Paraibano, Brazil

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    Wagner C. Lima

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a resistência de nematódeos a alguns anti-helmínticos em rebanhos caprinos no Cariri Paraibano. Foram utilizados 144 animais no período seco e 120 animais no período chuvoso, fêmeas com idade acima de oito meses de vida e lactantes, distribuídos em 4 grupos: Grupo I não tratado, Grupo II tratado com albendazole a 10%, Grupo III tratado com ivermectina a 1% e Grupo IV tratado com fosfato de levamisole a 18,8%, nas doses recomendadas pelos fabricantes. Para avaliar a resistência, aplicou-se o teste de redução na contagem de ovos por grama de fezes (RCOF e o cultivo de larvas de helmintos. As amostras fecais foram coletadas no dia do tratamento (dia base e 7, 14 e 21 dias após o tratamento. No grupo tratado com Albendazole, observaram-se eficácias de 61%, 11% e 24% no período seco e de 55%, 14% e 12% no período chuvoso, aos 7, 14, e 21 dias, respectivamente. No grupo tratado com Ivermectina, a eficácia foi de 14%, 70% e 66% para o período seco, e de 76%, 34% e 71% para o período chuvoso, aos 7, 14 e 21 dias, respectivamente. O grupo tratado com fosfato de Levamisole apresentou percentuais de eficácia de 89%, 79% e 73% no período seco e de 76%, 69% e 67% no período chuvoso, aos 7, 14 e 21 dias, respectivamente. Os resultados obtidos indicam que os nematódeos gastrintestinais de alguns rebanhos caprinos no Cariri Paraibano não são sensíveis aos princípios ativos Albendazole, Levamisole e Ivermectina. Durante o período de estudo foi identificada a presença de parasitas dos gêneros Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Oesophagostomum e Strongyloides.The aim of this paper was to evaluate the resistance of nematodes to some anthelmintics in dairy goats in Cariri Paraibano, Brazil. A total of 144 female goats, over 8 months of age, were used in the dry season and 120 ones during the rainy season, divided into four groups: Group I untreated, Group II treated with albendazole 10%, Group III treated with ivermectin

  11. Parasites of domestic and wild canids in the region of Serra do Cipó National Park, Brazil Parasitos de canídeos domésticos e silvestres na região do Parque Nacional da Serra do Cipó - Brasil

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    Juliana Lúcia Costa Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, diseases have been shown to be important causes of extinctions among wild species. Greater emphasis has been given to diseases transmitted by domestic animals, which have been increasing in numbers in natural areas, along with human populations. This study had the aim of investigating the presence of intestinal helminths in wild canids (maned wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, and crab-eating fox, Cerdocyon thous in the Serra do Cipó National Park (43-44º W and 19-20º S and endo and ectoparasites of domestic dogs in the Morro da Pedreira Environmental Protection Area (an area surrounding the National Park. The Serra do Cipó is located in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Among the enteroparasites found in domestic and wild canids, the following taxons were identified: Ancylostomidae, Trichuridae, Toxocara sp., Spirocerca sp., Physaloptera sp., Strongyloides sp., Cestoda, Dipylidium caninum, Diphyllobothriidae, Hymenolepidae, Anoplocephalidae, Trematoda, Acanthocephala and Isospora sp. Domestic dogs were positive for leishmaniasis and Babesia canis in serological tests. Among the ectoparasites, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Amblyomma cajennense and Ctenocephalides felis felis were observed in domestic dogs. Variations in the chaetotaxy of the meta-episternum and posterior tibia were observed in some specimens of C. felis felis.Nas últimas décadas, as doenças têm sido apontadas como importantes causas de extinção de espécies silvestres. Maior ênfase tem sido dada às doenças transmitidas por animais domésticos que crescem em número, bem como as populações humanas, em áreas naturais. O presente estudo objetivou verificar a presença de helmintos intestinais de canídeos silvestres (lobo-guará - Chrysocyon brachyurus e cachorro-do-mato - Cerdocyon thous do Parque Nacional da Serra do Cipó (43-44º W e 19-20º S e endo e ectoparasitos de cães domésticos da Área de Proteção Ambiental Morro da Pedreira (entorno do

  12. Helmintos do cachorro do campo, Pseudalopex gymnocercus (Fischer, 1814 e do cachorro do mato, Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1766 no sul do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Helminths of Pampas fox Pseudalopex gymnocercus (Fischer, 1814 and of Crab-eating fox Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1766 in the Southern of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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    Jerônimo L. Ruas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Quarenta canídeos selvagens foram capturados por "live trap" nos municípios de Pedro Osório e Pelotas, sul do estado do Rio Grande do Sul e transportados para o Laboratório de Parasitologia da Universidade Federal de Pelotas. Após serem necropsiados, segmentos do intestino, respiratório, urinário e fígado foram separados e examinados. Os crânios dos animais foram usados para identificação taxonômica. Dos 40 animais capturados, 22 (55% foram Pseudalopex gymnocercus e 18 (45% Cerdocyon thous. Os nematóides mais prevalentes foram: Ancylostoma caninum (45,4 em P. gymnocercus e 22,2% em C. thous, Molineus felineus (9,9 em P. gymnocercus e 5,6% em C. thous, Strongyloides sp. (22,7 em P. gymnocercus e 16,7% em C. thous, Trichuris sp. (13,6 em P. gymnocercus e 11,1% em C. thous, e Capillaria hepatica (13,6 em P. gymnocercus e 5,5 % em C. thous. Os trematódeos observados foram: Alaria alata (50,0% em C. thous e 36,4 em P. gymnocercus, e Asthemia heterolecithodes em 5,6% dos C. thous. Cestóides foram identificados como Spirometra sp. (61,1% em C. thous e 54,5 em P. gymnocercus, Diphyllobothriidae (81,8 em P. gymnocercus e 77,8% em C. thous, e Acantocephala do gênero Centrorhynchus foi observado somente em 5,6% dos C. thous. Estes resultados indicaram a helmintofauna de canídeos selvagens nas áreas estudadas.Forty wild canids were captured by live trap at Municipalities of Pedro Osorio and Pelotas in Southern of the State of Rio Grande do Sul and they were transported to the Parasitology Laboratory at the Universidade Federal de Pelotas. After they were posted, segments of intestinal, respiratory and urinary tracts and liver were separated and examined. Animal skulls were used for taxonomic identification. Of forty wild animals trapped, 22 (55% were Pseudalopex gymnocercus and 22 (55% Cerdocyon thous. The most prevalent nematodes were: Ancylostoma caninum (45.4 in P. gymnocercus and 22.2% in C. thous, Molineus felineus (9.9 in P

  13. Parasitosis intestinal en monos capuchinos cariblancos Cebus capucinus (Primates: Cebidae de un área protegida en la provincia de Limón, noreste de Costa Rica

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    Misael Chinchilla

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La deforestación de bosques tropicales está amenazando la biodiversidad de las especies de primates y su estado de salud, dependiente de un lugar ecológicamente equilibrado. Con el fin de evaluar esta relación, se analizó la presencia de parásitos en los intestinos de esta especie. El estudio se realizó en la Estación Biológica La Suerte (EBLS, Limón, Costa Rica. El grupo de monos capuchinos cariblancos (Cebus capucinus fue observado entre marzo y diciembre de 2006. Se recolectaron 75 muestras de heces a las que se les identificó las plantas ingeridas, y se procesaron en el laboratorio para evaluar la prevalencia de parásitos. Moraceae fue la familia de plantas más reportada. Strongyloides spp. y acantocéfalos fueron los más comunes. La distribución positiva de las mismas fue similar independientemente del sexo y la edad. Microsporidios se reportaron mayoritariamente en heces asociadas con la familia Piperaceae. Fue encontrada una baja existencia de éstos parásitos en muestras asociadas con Myrtaceae en cuyo género Psidium, se han reportado compuestos activos antiparasitarios. La aparición de parásitos fue relativamente mayor en la EBLS, comparado con muestras de otras regiones más secas de Costa Rica. Por lo tanto, esa expresión parasitaria puede deberse al hecho de ser la EBLS una selva lluviosa, además de estar rodeada por zonas con actividades antrópicas. Se sugiere incrementar las investigaciones de parasitología de campo en primates neotropicales con el fin de entender plenamente las relaciones parásitos-hospederos, para en un largo plazo poder comprender los ecosistemas donde conviven, y en consecuencia, preservar la diversidad biológica.Intestinal parasites in white-faced capuchin monkeys Cebus capucinus Primates: Cebidae inhabiting a protected area in the Limón province of Northeastern Costa Rica. Deforestation of tropical forests is threatening monkey biodiversity and their health status, dependent of an

  14. PRESENCE OF HELMINTH EGGS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE FROM CAMPO GRANDE (MS, BRAZIL MUNICIPALITY AFTER ANAEROBIC TREATMENT LEVANTAMENTO DE OVOS DE HELMINTOS EM LODO DE ESGOTO ORIUNDO DE CAMPO GRANDE (MS APÓS TRATAMENTO ANAERÓBICO

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    Juliana Rosa Carrijo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the helminth eggs presence in sewage sludge, previously treated in anerobic digestion process like anaerobic liquid fluid reactor. First of all were evaluated different kinds of materials to choose the best filter which permitted to filter the Taenia saginata eggs. The filter that showed better adaptation was the fine toilet paper one sheet. The helminth eggs were classified for their genera, according to their morphology. The Taenia sp, Trichuris, Dipylidium and Strongyloides were find only in one collect. The number of nematode eggs prevailed on the cestodes. The quantity of helminths eggs found was variable, indicatting complementary treatments process to the sewage sludge. It was concluded that the filter tested was efficient to Taenia sp eggs and to other helminth eggs present in sewage sludge. KEY WORDS: Biossolid, filter, Taenia sp. O presente trabalho avaliou a presença de ovos de helmintos em lodo de esgoto, previamente tratado em sistema de digestão anaeróbia do tipo reator anaeróbio de lodo fluidizado (RALF. Primeiramente testaram-se diferentes tipos de materiais para a escolha do filtro que possibilitasse a passagem de ovos de Taenia saginata. O filtro mais adequado foi o papel higiênico fino, folha única. Classificaram-se os ovos de helmintos por gênero, de acordo com sua morfologia. Encontraram-se ovos de Taenia sp, Trichuris, Dipylidium e Strongyloides

  15. Efficacy of a combined oral formulation of derquantel-abamectin against the adult and larval stages of nematodes in sheep, including anthelmintic-resistant strains.

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    Little, Peter R; Hodge, Andrew; Maeder, Steven J; Wirtherle, Nicole C; Nicholas, David R; Cox, George G; Conder, George A

    2011-09-27

    and respiratory nematode parasites of sheep, as follows: ≥ 98.9% efficacy against Haemonchus contortus (adult and L4); Teladorsagia circumcincta (adult, L4 and hypobiotic L4); Teladorsagia trifurcata (L4); Trichostrongylus axei (adult and L4); Trichostrongylus colubriformis (adult and L4); Trichostrongylus falculatus (adult); Trichostrongylus rugatus (adult); Trichostrongylus vitrinus (adult and L4); Cooperia curticei (adult and L4); Cooperia oncophora (adult and L4); Nematodirus spathiger (adult); Nematodirus battus (adult); Nematodirus spp. (hypobiotic L4); Strongyloides papillosus (adult); Strongyloides spp. (L4); Chabertia ovina (adult); Oesophagostomum venulosum (adult); Dictyocaulus filaria (adult); and Protostrongylus rufescens (adult); ≥ 97.0% efficacy against Trichuris ovis (adult); and ≥ 95.9% efficacy against T. trifurcata (adult). Derquantel-abamectin is a highly effective combination anthelmintic, which will provide an important new tool for controlling helminths of sheep when used in conjunction with sustainable drenching practices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Parasitological analyses of the male chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda.

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    Muehlenbein, Michael P

    2005-02-01

    Numerous intestinal parasites identified in populations of wild nonhuman primates can be pathogenic to humans. Furthermore, nonhuman primates are susceptible to a variety of human pathogens. Because of increasing human encroachment into previously nonimpacted forests, and the potential for disease transmission between human and nonhuman primate populations, further detailed investigations of primate ecological parasitology are warranted. For meaningful comparisons to be made, it is important for methods to be standardized across study sites. One aspect of methodological standardization is providing reliable estimates of parasite prevalence and knowing how many samples are needed to adequately estimate an individual's parasite prevalence. In this study the parasitic fauna of 37 adult, adolescent, and juvenile male chimpanzees from the Ngogo group, Kibale National Park, Uganda, were assessed from 121 fecal samples collected over a 3-month period. Twelve taxa of intestinal species (five helminth and seven protozoan) were recovered from the samples. The four most prevalent species were Troglodytella abrassarti (97.3%), Oesophagostomum sp. (81.1%), Strongyloides sp. (83.8%), and Entamoeba chattoni (70.3%). No one species was found in all samples from any one animal, and Troglodytella abrassarti, the most common intestinal organism, was found in all of the serial samples of only 69.4% of the chimpanzees. The cumulative species richness for individuals significantly increased for every sequential sample (up to three to four samples) taken per animal during this study. The results indicate that to accurately diagnose total intestinal infection and evaluate group prevalence, three to four sequential samples from each individual must be collected on nonconsecutive days. This conclusion applies only to short study periods in which possible seasonal effects are not taken into consideration. Validation of these results at different study sites in different regions with

  17. Prevalence and seasonal incidence of nematode parasites and fluke infections of sheep and goats in eastern Ethiopia.

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    Sissay, Menkir M; Uggla, Arvid; Waller, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    A 2-year abattoir survey was carried out to determine the prevalence, abundance and seasonal incidence of gastro-intestinal (GI) nematodes and trematodes (flukes) of sheep and goats in the semi-arid zone of eastern Ethiopia. During May 2003 to April 2005, viscera including liver, lungs and GI tracts were collected from 655 sheep and 632 goats slaughtered at 4 abattoirs located in the towns of Haramaya, Harar, Dire Dawa and Jijiga in eastern Ethiopia. All animals were raised in the farming areas located within the community boundaries for each town. Collected materials were transported within 24 h to the parasitology laboratory of Haramaya University for immediate processing. Thirteen species belonging to 9 genera of GI nematodes (Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus axei, T. colubriformis, T. vitrinus, Nematodirus filicollis, N. spathiger Oesopha-gostomum columbianum, O. venulosum, Strongyloides papillosus, Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Trichuris ovis, Cooperia curticei and Chabertia ovina), and 4 species belonging to 3 genera of trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, Paramphistomum {Calicohoron} microbothrium and Dicrocoelium dendriticum) were recorded in both sheep and goats. All animals in this investigation were infected with multiple species to varying degrees. The mean burdens of adult nematodes were generally moderate in both sheep and goats and showed patterns of seasonal abundance that corresponded with the bi-modal annual rainfall pattern, with highest burdens around the middle of the rainy season. In both sheep and goats there were significant differences in the mean worm burdens and abundance of the different nematode species between the four geographic locations, with worm burdens in the Haramaya and Harar areas greater than those observed in the Dire Dawa and Jijiga locations. Similar seasonal variations were also observed in the prevalence of flukes. But there were no significant differences in the prevalence of each fluke species between the

  18. Zoonotic intestinal parasites in Papio anubis (baboon) and Cercopithecus aethiops (vervet) from four localities in Ethiopia.

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    Legesse, Mengistu; Erko, Berhanu

    2004-05-01

    A total of 59 faecal samples from ranging Papio anubis (baboons) and another 41 from Cercopithecus aethiops (vervet) from the Rift Valley areas of Ethiopia were microscopically examined to determine the prevalence and species of major gastro-intestinal parasites of zoonotic importance. Faecal smears were prepared from fresh faecal samples, stained using modified Ziehl-Neelsen method and microscopically examined. About 3 gm of the dropping was also preserved separately in clean and properly labelled containers containing 10% formalin. The specimens were microscopically examined after formalin-ether concentration for ova, larvae, cysts and oocyst of intestinal parasites. The results of microscopic examination of faecal samples of baboons demonstrated the presence of Trichuris sp. (27.1%), Strongyloides sp. (37.3%), Trichostrongylus sp. (8.5%), Oesophagostomum sp. (10.2%), Schistosoma mansoni (20.3%), Entamoeba coli (83.1%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (16.9%), Blastocystis hominis (3.3%), Cyclospora sp. (13.3%) and Cryptosporidium sp. (11.9%). Likewise, the results of microscopic examination of faecal samples of vervets demonstrated the presence of Trichuris sp. (36.6%), Oesophagostomum sp. (4.9%), E. coli (61.0%), E. histolytica/dispar (24.4%), B. hominis (34.2%), Cyclospora sp. (22.0%) and Cryptosporidium sp. (29.3%). The presence of parasitic protozoa and helminths in baboons and vervets in the study areas is a high risk to human welfare because these non-human primates use the same water sources as humans and range freely in human habitats. An implication of such parasitic infection for the control programme is discussed.

  19. Survey of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and intestinal parasites among food handlers working at Gondar University, Northwest Ethiopia.

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    Dagnew, Mulat; Tiruneh, Moges; Moges, Feleke; Tekeste, Zinaye

    2012-10-02

    Food borne disease are major health problems in developing countries like Ethiopia. Food handlers with poor personal hygiene working in food establishments could be potential sources of disease due to pathogenic organisms. However; information on disease prevalence among food handlers working in University of Gondar cafeterias are very scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, their drug resistance pattern and prevalence of intestinal parasites among food handlers working in University of Gondar student's cafeterias. A cross sectional study was conducted among food handlers working in University of Gondar student's cafeterias. A pretested structured questionnaire was used for collecting data. Nasal swab and stool were investigated for S. aureus and intestinal parasites; respectively as per the standard of the laboratory methods. Among 200 food handlers, females comprised 171(85.5%). The majority (67.5%) of the food-handlers were young adults aged 18-39 years. One hundred ninety four (97%) of the food handlers were not certified as a food handler. Forty one (20.5%) food handlers were positive for nasal carriage of S. aureus, of these 4(9.8%) was resistant for methicilin. Giardia lamblia was the most prevalent parasites 22 (11%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides 13(6.5%), Entamoeba histolytica 12 (6%), Strongyloides stercolaris (0.5), Taenia species 1(0.5%) and Schistosoma mansoni 1(0.5%). The finding stressed that food handlers with different pathogenic micro organisms may pose significant risk on the consumers. Higher officials should implement food handler's training on food safety, periodic medical checkup and continuous monitoring of personal hygiene of food handlers.

  20. Parasites of importance for human health in Nigerian dogs: high prevalence and limited knowledge of pet owners

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    Heukelbach Jorg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dogs are the most common pet animals worldwide. They may harbour a wide range of parasites with zoonotic potential, thus causing a health risk to humans. In Nigeria, epidemiological knowledge on these parasites is limited. Methods In a community-based study, we examined 396 dogs in urban and rural areas of Ilorin (Kwara State, Central Nigeria for ectoparasites and intestinal helminths. In addition, a questionnaire regarding knowledge and practices was applied to pet owners. Results Nine ectoparasite species belonging to four taxa and six intestinal helminth species were identified: fleas (Ctenocephalides canis, Pulex irritans, Tunga penetrans, mites (Demodex canis, Otodectes sp., Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis, ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes sp., and lice (Trichodectes canis; and Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma sp., Trichuris vulpis, Dipylidium caninum, Taenidae and Strongyloides sp. Overall prevalence of ectoparasites was 60.4% and of intestinal helminths 68.4%. The occurrence of C. canis, R. sanguineus, T. canis, Ancylostoma sp. and T. vulpis was most common (prevalence 14.4% to 41.7%. Prevalence patterns in helminths were age-dependent, with T. canis showing a decreasing prevalence with age of host, and a reverse trend in other parasite species. Knowledge regarding zoonoses was very limited and the diseases not considered a major health problem. Treatment with antiparasitic drugs was more frequent in urban areas. Conclusion Parasites of importance for human health were highly prevalent in Nigerian dogs. Interventions should include health education provided to dog owners and the establishment of a program focusing on zoonotic diseases.

  1. Survey of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and intestinal parasites among food handlers working at Gondar University, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Dagnew Mulat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food borne disease are major health problems in developing countries like Ethiopia. Food handlers with poor personal hygiene working in food establishments could be potential sources of disease due to pathogenic organisms. However; information on disease prevalence among food handlers working in University of Gondar cafeterias are very scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, their drug resistance pattern and prevalence of intestinal parasites among food handlers working in University of Gondar student’s cafeterias. Method A cross sectional study was conducted among food handlers working in University of Gondar student’s cafeterias. A pretested structured questionnaire was used for collecting data. Nasal swab and stool were investigated for S. aureus and intestinal parasites; respectively as per the standard of the laboratory methods. Results Among 200 food handlers, females comprised 171(85.5%. The majority (67.5% of the food-handlers were young adults aged 18–39 years. One hundred ninety four (97% of the food handlers were not certified as a food handler. Forty one (20.5% food handlers were positive for nasal carriage of S. aureus, of these 4(9.8% was resistant for methicilin. Giardia lamblia was the most prevalent parasites 22 (11%, followed by Ascaris lumbricoides 13(6.5%, Entamoeba histolytica 12 (6%, Strongyloides stercolaris (0.5, Taenia species 1(0.5% and Schistosoma mansoni 1(0.5%. Conclusion The finding stressed that food handlers with different pathogenic micro organisms may pose significant risk on the consumers. Higher officials should implement food handler’s training on food safety, periodic medical checkup and continuous monitoring of personal hygiene of food handlers.

  2. OCORRÊNCIA E DISTRIBUIÇÃO ESTACIONAL DE HELMINTOS GASTRINTESTINAIS DE CAPRINOS NO MUNICÍPIO DE TERESINA, PIAUÍ

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    Eneide Santiago Girão

    1992-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetiva verificar a ocorrência e distribuição estacional de helmintos gastrintestinais parasitas de caprinos durante as estações seca e chuvosa visando o estabelecimento de medidas adequadas para o controle da verminose. O experimento foi conduzido na base física da EMBRAPA/UEPAE de Teresina, no município de Teresina. Em um piquete de Brachiaria humidicola medindo dois hectares, foram colocados oito caprinos machos, entre seis a oito meses de idade. Cinco animais ficaram permanentes no piquete e não receberam tratamento anti-helmíntico durante todo o período (Testemunhas e três (incorporados ao trabalho a cada mês, após receberem três tratamentos anti-helmínticos, ficaram expostos à infecção helmíntica durante 30 dias no piquete (traçadores. Mensalmente, após 14 dias de estabulação, eram abatidos e necropsiados três caprinos traçadores e no final do experimento, os testemunhas para coleta, contagem e identificação dos helmintos. De janeiro/88 a fevereiro/90 foram necropsiados 70 caprinos traçadores e cinco testemunhas. Os helmintos identificados foram: Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Strongyloides papillosus, Moniezia expansa, Cooperia punctata, C. curticei, Oesophagostomum columbianum, Trichuris spp (T. ovis, Trichuris sp., T. skrjabini, Skrjabinema ovis, Cysticercus tenuicollis e Paramphistomum spp. As necropsias nos caprinos traçadores indicaram que ocorreu transmissão de helmintos durante o ano todo sendo em intensidades mais elevadas na época chuvosa e início da época seca e que o helminto de maior intensidade nos caprinos traçadores foi H. contortus, e nos testemunhas T. colubriformis.

  3. Persistence of pathogens in liquid pig manure processed in manure tanks and biodigesters

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    Oscar Betancur H.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the persistence of virus, bacteria, mold, yeast and parasites in liquid pig manure, processed in biodigesters and manure tanks in the central-western part of Colombia. Materials and methods. A directed observational study analyzed descriptively was carried out in three pig farms located where the manure tanks were assembled and its biodigesters were used. A sampling of liquid pig manure was taken to assess the presence of 26 pathogens at the beginning of the study and another one at the end of the process in manure tanks and biodigesters. For the manure tank, a 250 liters tank was filled with fresh pig manure and was analyzed after three days of storage. The biodigesters were of continuous flow and its effluents were analyzed, according to the specific hydraulic retention times. The diagnostic techniques were those recommended specifically for each microorganism and were carried out in certified labs by the Colombian Animal Health authority. Results. Of the 26 pathogens that were investigated, 15 appeared in the fresh pig manure used in pig manure tanks and 12 in the one used in biodigestors. In manure tanks, Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2, mold, yeast, Salmonella spp., Balantidium coli and Strongylids did not persist. In biodigesters, PCV2, yeast, Strongylids, B. coli and Strongyloides spp., did not persist. Conclusions. In both manure tanks and biodigesters, a variation could be seen in pathogen persistency, indicating that they act as transformation systems of pig manure for the removal of the latter, as long as the storage times are increased if the efficiency wants to be improved.

  4. Radular Teeth Morphology in Limax (Caspilimax Keyserlingi (Martens, 1880 and Parmacella Ibera (Eichwald, 1841 from Northern Iran

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    M Yakhchali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Slugs have been known worldwide as important pests of agricultural and horticultural production. They also play a role as intermediate or definitive hosts of helminths parasite. In this pur­pose, current study was carried out to examine slug radular teeth structure and slug infection with helminths larvae in north of Iran.Methods: A total number of 114 slugs were collected from center and east parts of Mazandaran prov­ince from May 2011 to June 2012. The specimens were rinsed, measured, and identified. The radula of all collected slugs was extracted and stained by using Mallory II. For detecting the hel­minths parasite infection, foot- head and viscera of examined slugs were removed, minced, and di­gested with 4.5% acid pepsin.Results: Two species of Limax (Caspilimax keyserlingi (Martens 1880 (11.4%, 13/114 and Parmacella ibera (Eichwald 1841 (88.6%, 101/114 were prevalent in the region. There was significant difference between body length and shell size. P. ibera had the highest number of teeth rows (145±5. The radu­lar teeth formula was approximately similar in both identified slugs. In P. ibera, there was no signifi­cant difference in the average length and width of radula. The radular teeth in L. keyserlingi were larger and thicker than P. ibera. In all examined slugs for helminths larvae infection, P. ibera (7.69%, 1/13 was infected with Strongyloid larvae from Fereidonkenar area.Conclusion: Two prevalent species of slugs exist in the