WorldWideScience

Sample records for strongly temperature-dependent part

  1. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of the strong visible photoluminescence of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkbeiner, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Weber, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    1995-01-15

    The temperature dependence of the strong visible photoluminescence (550-850nm) is studied in differently prepared porous silicon samples. The variation in the photoluminescence intensity with temperature is a result of a decrease in the radiative decay time and an increase in the non-radiative recombination process with increasing temperatures. The strong visible photoluminescence is interpreted by a recombination of singlet and triplet excitons. The singlet-triplet splitting is comparable for all samples but depends on the detection wavelength and on sample preparation. We present similar data for the recombination process in siloxene which supports the model of a common origin of the strong visible photoluminescence in these very differently prepared samples. ((orig.))

  2. Strongly enhanced temperature dependence of the chemical potential in FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, L. C.; Watson, M. D.; Haghighirad, A. A.; Eschrig, M.; Kim, T. K.

    2017-05-01

    Employing a 10-orbital tight-binding model, we present a set of hopping parameters fitted directly to our latest high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data for the high-temperature tetragonal phase of FeSe. Using these parameters, we predict a large 10 meV shift of the chemical potential as a function of temperature. To confirm this large temperature dependence, we performed ARPES experiments on FeSe and observed a ˜25 meV rigid shift to the chemical potential between 100 and 300 K. This strong shift has important implications for theoretical models of superconductivity and of nematic order in FeSe materials.

  3. On the penetration of a hot diapir through a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, S. F.; Raefsky, A.

    1985-01-01

    The ascent of a hot spherical body through a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity has been studied using an axisymmetric finite element method. Numerical solutions range over Peclet numbers of 0.1 - 1000 from constant viscosity up to viscosity variations of 100,000. Both rigid and stress-free boundary conditions were applied at the surface of the sphere. The dependence of drag on viscosity variation was shown to have no dependence on the stress boundary condition except for a Stokes flow scaling factor. A Nusselt number parameterization based on the stress-free constant viscosity functional dependence on the Peclet number scaled by a parameter depending on the viscosity structure fits both stress-free and rigid boundary condition data above viscosity variations of 100. The temperature scale height was determined as a function of sphere radius. For the simple physical model studied in this paper pre-heating is required to reduce the ambient viscosity of the country rock to less than 10 to the 22nd sq cm/s in order for a 10 km diapir to penetrate a distance of several radii.

  4. Strong temperature dependence of extraordinary magnetoresistance correlated to mobility in a two-contact device

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-02-21

    A two-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device has been fabricated and characterized at various temperatures under magnetic fields applied in different directions. Large performance variations across the temperature range have been found, which are due to the strong dependence of the EMR effect on the mobility. The device shows the highest sensitivity of 562ω/T at 75 K with the field applied perpendicularly. Due to the overlap between the semiconductor and the metal shunt, the device is also sensitive to planar fields but with a lower sensitivity of about 20 to 25% of the one to perpendicular fields. © 2012 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  5. Effect of delayed link failure on probability of loss of assured safety in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak and strong links.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J. D. (ProStat, Mesa, AZ); Oberkampf, William Louis; Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ)

    2007-05-01

    Weak link (WL)/strong link (SL) systems constitute important parts of the overall operational design of high consequence systems, with the SL system designed to permit operation of the system only under intended conditions and the WL system designed to prevent the unintended operation of the system under accident conditions. Degradation of the system under accident conditions into a state in which the WLs have not deactivated the system and the SLs have failed in the sense that they are in a configuration that could permit operation of the system is referred to as loss of assured safety. The probability of such degradation conditional on a specific set of accident conditions is referred to as probability of loss of assured safety (PLOAS). Previous work has developed computational procedures for the calculation of PLOAS under fire conditions for a system involving multiple WLs and SLs and with the assumption that a link fails instantly when it reaches its failure temperature. Extensions of these procedures are obtained for systems in which there is a temperature-dependent delay between the time at which a link reaches its failure temperature and the time at which that link actually fails.

  6. Verification test problems for the calculation of probability of loss of assured safety in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak and strong links.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jay Dean (ProStat, Mesa, AZ); Oberkampf, William Louis; Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ)

    2006-06-01

    Four verification test problems are presented for checking the conceptual development and computational implementation of calculations to determine the probability of loss of assured safety (PLOAS) in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak links (WLs) and strong links (SLs). The problems are designed to test results obtained with the following definitions of loss of assured safety: (1) Failure of all SLs before failure of any WL, (2) Failure of any SL before failure of any WL, (3) Failure of all SLs before failure of all WLs, and (4) Failure of any SL before failure of all WLs. The test problems are based on assuming the same failure properties for all links, which results in problems that have the desirable properties of fully exercising the numerical integration procedures required in the evaluation of PLOAS and also possessing simple algebraic representations for PLOAS that can be used for verification of the analysis.

  7. Analytical Modelling and Optimization of the Temperature-Dependent Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Fused Deposition Fabricated Parts Made of PC-ABS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Omar Ahmed; Masood, Syed Hasan; Bhowmik, Jahar Lal

    2016-11-04

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) additive manufacturing has been intensively used for many industrial applications due to its attractive advantages over traditional manufacturing processes. The process parameters used in FDM have significant influence on the part quality and its properties. This process produces the plastic part through complex mechanisms and it involves complex relationships between the manufacturing conditions and the quality of the processed part. In the present study, the influence of multi-level manufacturing parameters on the temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of FDM processed parts was investigated using IV-optimality response surface methodology (RSM) and multilayer feed-forward neural networks (MFNNs). The process parameters considered for optimization and investigation are slice thickness, raster to raster air gap, deposition angle, part print direction, bead width, and number of perimeters. Storage compliance and loss compliance were considered as response variables. The effect of each process parameter was investigated using developed regression models and multiple regression analysis. The surface characteristics are studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Furthermore, performance of optimum conditions was determined and validated by conducting confirmation experiment. The comparison between the experimental values and the predicted values by IV-Optimal RSM and MFNN was conducted for each experimental run and results indicate that the MFNN provides better predictions than IV-Optimal RSM.

  8. Analytical Modelling and Optimization of the Temperature-Dependent Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Fused Deposition Fabricated Parts Made of PC-ABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ahmed Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modeling (FDM additive manufacturing has been intensively used for many industrial applications due to its attractive advantages over traditional manufacturing processes. The process parameters used in FDM have significant influence on the part quality and its properties. This process produces the plastic part through complex mechanisms and it involves complex relationships between the manufacturing conditions and the quality of the processed part. In the present study, the influence of multi-level manufacturing parameters on the temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of FDM processed parts was investigated using IV-optimality response surface methodology (RSM and multilayer feed-forward neural networks (MFNNs. The process parameters considered for optimization and investigation are slice thickness, raster to raster air gap, deposition angle, part print direction, bead width, and number of perimeters. Storage compliance and loss compliance were considered as response variables. The effect of each process parameter was investigated using developed regression models and multiple regression analysis. The surface characteristics are studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Furthermore, performance of optimum conditions was determined and validated by conducting confirmation experiment. The comparison between the experimental values and the predicted values by IV-Optimal RSM and MFNN was conducted for each experimental run and results indicate that the MFNN provides better predictions than IV-Optimal RSM.

  9. An important role of temperature dependent scattering time in understanding the high temperature thermoelectric behavior of strongly correlated system: La0.75Ba0.25CoO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Kumar, Devendra; Pandey, Sudhir K

    2017-03-15

    In the present work, we report the temperature dependent thermopower (α) behavior of La 0.75 Ba 0.25 CoO 3 compound in the temperature range 300-600 K. Using the Heikes formula, the estimated value of α corresponding to high-spin configuration of Co 3+ and Co 4+ ions is found to be  ∼16 [Formula: see text], which is close to the experimental value, ∼13 [Formula: see text], observed at  ∼600 K. The temperature dependent TE behavior of the compound is studied by combining the WIEN2K and BoltzTrap code. The self consistency field calculations show that the compound have ferromagnetic ground state structure. The electronic structure calculations give half metallic characteristic with a small gap of  ∼50 meV for down spin channel. The large and positive value for down spin channel is obtained due to the unique band structure shown by this spin channel. The temperature dependent relaxation time for both the spin-channel charge carriers is considered to study the thermopower data in temperature range 300-600 K. For evaluation of α, almost linear values of [Formula: see text] and a non-linear values of [Formula: see text] are taken into account. By taking the temperature dependent values of relaxation time for both the spin channels, the calculated values of α using two current model are found to be in good agreement with experimental values in the temperature range 300-600 K. At 300 K, the calculated value of electrical conductivity by using the same value of relaxation time, i.e. 0.1 [Formula: see text] 10 -14 seconds for spin-up and [Formula: see text] seconds for spin-dn channel, is found to be equal to the experimentally reported value.

  10. Temperature dependence of Brewster's angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei

    2018-01-01

    In this work, a dielectric at a finite temperature is modeled as an ensemble of identical atoms moving randomly around where they are trapped. Light reflection from the dielectric is then discussed in terms of atomic radiation. Specific calculation demonstrates that because of the atoms' thermal motion, Brewster's angle is, in principle, temperature-dependent, and the dependence is weak in the low-temperature limit. What is also found is that the Brewster's angle is nothing but a result of destructive superposition of electromagnetic radiation from the atoms.

  11. Temperature dependent properties of InSb and InAs nanowire field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Henrik A.; Caroff, Philippe; Thelander, Claes; Lind, Erik; Karlström, Olov; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2010-04-01

    We present temperature dependent electrical measurements on InSb and InAs nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs). The FETs are fabricated from InAs/InSb heterostructure nanowires, where one complete transistor is defined within each of the two segments. Both the InSb and the InAs FETs are n-type with good current saturation and low voltage operation. The off-current for the InSb FET shows a strong temperature dependence, which we attribute to a barrier lowering due to an increased band-to-band tunneling in the drain part of the channel.

  12. Temperature dependence of plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, L.

    2018-03-01

    Plastic scintillator detectors have been studied as dosimeters, since they provide a cost-effective alternative to conventional ionization chambers. Several articles have reported undesired response dependencies on beam energy and temperature, which provides the motivation to determine appropriate correction factors. In this work, we studied the light yield temperature dependency of four plastic scintillators, BCF-10, BCF-60, BC-404, RP-200A and two clear fibers, BCF-98 and SK-80. Measurements were made using a 50 kVp X-ray beam to produce the scintillation and/or radioluminescence signal. The 0 to 40 °C temperature range was scanned for each scintillator, and temperature coefficients were obtained.

  13. Temperature dependent electronic conduction in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, G.G.; Munn, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This review describes the temperature dependence of bulk-controlled electronic currents in semiconductors. The scope of the article is wide in that it contrasts conduction mechanisms in inorganic and organic solids and also single crystal and disordered semiconductors. In many experimental situations it is the metal-semiconductor contact or the interface between two dissimilar semiconductors that governs the temperature dependence of the conductivity. However, in order to keep the length of the review within reasonable bounds, these topics have been largely avoided and emphasis is therefore placed on bulk-limited currents. A central feature of electronic conduction in semiconductors is the concentrations of mobile electrons and holes that contribute to the conductivity. Various statistical approaches may be used to calculate these densities which are normally strongly temperature dependent. Section 1 emphasizes the relationship between the position of the Fermi level, the distribution of quantum states, the total number of electrons available and the absolute temperature of the system. The inclusion of experimental data for several materials is designed to assist the experimentalist in his interpretation of activation energy curves. Sections 2 and 3 refer to electronic conduction in disordered solids and molecular crystals, respectively. In these cases alternative approaches to the conventional band theory approach must be considered. For example, the velocities of the charge carriers are usually substantially lower than those in conventional inorganic single crystal semiconductors, thus introducing the possibility of an activated mobility. Some general electronic properties of these materials are given in the introduction to each of these sections and these help to set the conduction mechanisms in context. (orig.)

  14. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the influence of the reduced translational symmetry on the magnetic properties of thin itinerant-electron films and surfaces is investigated within the strongly correlated Hubbard model. Firstly, the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model is discussed for the case of systems with full translational symmetry. Different approximation schemes for the solution of the many-body problem of the Hubbard model are introduced and discussed in detail. It is found that it is vital for a reasonable description of spontaneous ferromagnetism to be consistent with exact results concerning the general shape of the single-electron spectral density in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction between the electrons. The temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic solutions is discussed in detail by use of the magnetization curves as well as the spin-dependent quasi particle spectrum. For the investigation of thin films and surfaces the approximation schemes for the bulk system have to be generalized to deal with the reduced translational symmetry. The magnetic behavior of thin Hubbard films is investigated by use of the layer dependent magnetization as a function of temperature as well as the thickness of the film. The Curie-temperature is calculated as a function of the film thickness. Further, the magnetic stability at the surface is discussed in detail. Here it is found that for strong Coulomb interaction the magnetic stability at finite temperatures is reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin

  15. Temperature dependence of elastic properties of paratellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrova, I.M.; Pisarevskii, Y.V.; Senyushenkov, P.A.; Krupny, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    New data are presented on the temperature dependence of the elastic wave velocities, elastic stiffness constants, and thermal expansion of paratellurite. It is shown that the external pressure appreciably influences the elastic properties of TeO 2 , especially the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus connected with the crystal soft mode. (author)

  16. Electronically induced nuclear transitions - temperature dependence and Rabi oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Niez, J J

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with a nucleus electromagnetically coupled with the bound states of its electronic surroundings. It describes the temperature dependence of its dynamics and the onset of potential Rabi oscillations by means of a Master Equation. The latter is generalized in order to account for possible strong resonances. Throughout the paper the approximation schemes are discussed and tested. (authors)

  17. Theory of temperature dependent photoemission spectrum of heavy fermion semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseborough, P.S.

    1998-01-01

    The heavy fermion semiconductors are a class of strongly correlated materials, that at high temperatures show properties similar to those of heavy fermion materials, but at low temperatures show a cross-over into a semi-conducting state. The low temperature insulating state is characterized by an anomalously small energy gap, varying between 10 and 100 K. The smallness of the gap is attributed to the result of a many-body renormalization, and is temperature dependent. The temperature dependence of the electronic spectral density of states is calculated, using the Anderson lattice model at half filling. The spectrum is calculated to second order in 1/N, where N is the degeneracy of the 'f' orbitals, using a slave boson technique. The system is an indirect gap semi-conductor, with an extremely temperature dependent electronic spectral density A(k, ω). The indirect gap is subject to a temperature dependent many-body renormalization, and leads to a sharp temperature dependent structure in the angle resolved photo-emission spectrum at the indirect threshold. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations on FeSi. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  18. Evaluation of temperature dependent neutron resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.V.G.; Sahni, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    The Fourier transform method is extended for evaluating temperature dependent resonance integrals and Doppler coefficients. With the temperature dependent cross-sections, the slowing-down equation is transformed into a Fredholm integral equation of second kind. A method of solution is presented using the familiar Gauss-Hermite quadrature formulae. As a byproduct of the above technique, a fast and accurate method for computing the resonance integral J-function is given. (orig.) [de

  19. Temperature-dependent Transport Properties of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bochen; Singh, Amol; Uddin, Ahsan; Koley, Goutam; Webb, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Temperature-dependent transport properties of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a Cu thin sheet have been investigated. Raman spectra of our samples show good quality of the CVD graphene. We have measured the temperature dependence of conductivity, charge-carrier density and Hall mobility of graphene by patterning them into micrometer-sized Hall bars. Quantum Hall effect has been observed when the temperature is about 60 Kelvin, which is the evidence for single-layer graphene. Furthermore, the results of temperature dependence of Hall mobility indicate that impurity and defect scattering is the primary scattering mechanism at low temperature, while substrate surface polar phonon scattering is dominant at high temperature.

  20. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian; Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  1. Investigation Of Temperature Dependent Characteristics Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure, magnetization and magnetostriction of Laves phase compound TbCo2 were investigated by temperature dependent high resolution neutron powder diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the cubic Laves phase C15 structure above its Curie temperature, TC and exhibits a rhombohedral distortion (space ...

  2. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 7. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion and depolarization behaviours in Zr4+-modified BiFeO3–BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics. Weidong Zeng Changrong Zhou Jianrong Xiao Jiafeng Ma. Volume 38 Issue 7 December 2015 pp ...

  3. The temperature dependence of the magnetoelastic characteristics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Industrial Research Institute for Automation and Measurements, Al. Jerozolimskie 202,. 02-486 Warszawa, Poland. 2Institute of Metrology and Measuring Systems, ... One of the most significant limitations in the practical, industrial application of amorphous alloys as cores of force sensors is the temperature dependence of ...

  4. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of vanadium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 23; Issue 5. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of vanadium substituted BPSCCO system between 10 and 150 K. A K Dhami T K ... Keywords. Thermal conductivity; high temperature superconductors; vanadium substitution; electron + phonon approach.

  5. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  6. Temperature dependence of giant dipole resonance width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Storozhenko, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    The quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model extended to finite temperature within the framework of the thermo field dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ d own of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 12S n and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that the width Γ d own increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones existing in the literature

  7. Temperature dependence of radiation effects in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G; Katsumura, Y.; Kudoh, H.; Morita, Y.; Seguchi, T.

    2000-01-01

    Temperature dependence of crosslinking and gas evolution under γ-irradiation was studied for high-density and low-density polyethylene samples in the 30-360degC range. It was found that crosslinking was the predominant process up to 300degC and the gel point decreased with increasing temperature. At above 300degC, however, the gel fraction at a given dose decreased rapidly with temperature and the action of radiation turned to enhance polyethylene degradation. Yields of H 2 and hydrocarbon gases increased with temperature and the compositions of hydrocarbons were dose dependent. (author)

  8. Temperature dependent coordinating self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijie; Gao, Xuedong; Xiao, Yunlong; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Jiang; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin

    2015-04-14

    Self-assemblies dominated by coordination interaction are hardly responsive to thermal stimuli. We show that in case the coordinating mode changes with temperature, the resultant assemblies also exhibit temperature dependence. The self-assemblies are constructed with perylene tetracarboxylate and metal ions. Compounds containing a perylene skeleton often self-assemble into micro-belts, which is also true for the combination of perylene tetracarboxylate and metal ions. However, a unique pinecone structure was observed upon increasing the temperature of the coordinating system. The structural transition is triggered by the change of coordinating mode between the carboxylate group and the metal ion. At low temperature, intermolecular coordination occurs which favours the growth of the coordinating self-assembly along the long axis of the perylene. However, upon the elevation of temperature, the coordination is overwhelmed by intra-molecular mode. This is against the extension of the coordinating assembly due to the loss of connection between neighbouring perylenes. As a result, the pinecone structure is observed. We expect that the cases introduced in this work may inspire the design of structurally controllable temperature-dependent soft materials based on coordinating self-assembly.

  9. Temperature dependence of the step free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Gurlu, O.; Poelsema, Bene

    2001-01-01

    We have derived an expression for the step free energy that includes the usual thermally induced step meandering term and a vibrational entropy term related to the step edge atoms. The latter term results from the reduced local coordination of the step atoms with respect to the terrace atoms and was introduced recently by Frenken and Stoltze as well as by Bonzel and Emundts. Additionally, we have added third and fourth terms that deal with the vibrational entropy contribution of the thermally generated step and kink atoms. At elevated temperatures the two latter vibrational entropy terms are of the same order of magnitude. Incorporation of these vibrational entropy terms results in a faster decrease of the step free energy with increasing temperature than anticipated previously. This enhanced temperature dependence of the step free energy results in a lower thermal roughening temperature of the facet

  10. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Y.C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.G., E-mail: jglin@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chun, S.H.; Kim, K.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state. - Highlights: • For the first time Ferromagnetic Resonance is used to probe the local magnetic structure of Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22.} • The multiphases in the single crystal is identified, which provides important information toward its future application for the magnetoelectric devices.

  11. Temperature dependences of hydrous species in feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. D.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, K. Y.; Xia, Q. K.

    2018-01-01

    Feldspars are abundant in the crust of the Earth. Multiple hydrogen species such as OH, H2O and NH4 + can occur in the structure of feldspars. Hydrogen species play a critical role in influencing some properties of the host feldspars and the crust, including mechanical strength, electrical property of the crust, and evolution of the crustal fluids. Knowledge of hydrous species in feldspars to date has been mostly derived from spectroscopic studies at ambient temperature. However, the speciation and sites of hydrous species at high temperatures may not be quenchable. Here, we investigated the temperature dependences of several typical hydrous components (e.g., type IIa OH, type IIb OH and type I H2O) in feldspars by measuring the in situ FTIR spectra at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. We found that the hydrous species demonstrated different behaviors at elevated temperatures. With increasing temperature, type IIa OH redistributes on the various sites in the anorthoclase structure. Additionally, O-H vibration frequencies increase for types IIa and IIb OH, and they decrease for type I H2O with increasing temperature. In contrast to type I H2O which drastically dehydrates during the heating process, types IIa and IIb OH show negligible loss; however, the bulk integral absorption coefficients drastically decrease with increasing temperature. These results may have implications in understanding the properties of hydrous species and feldspars at non-ambient temperatures, not only under geologic conditions but also at cold planetary surface conditions.

  12. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, L. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: luciaff@usc.es; Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Iglesias, A. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pardo, J. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pazos, A. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pena, J. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Zapata, M. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-05-10

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a {approx}20 deg. C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27x10{sup -2}K{sup -1} for an operation electric field of 1.67x10{sup 6}Vm{sup -1} has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  13. Temperature dependence of the Brewer global UV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Redondas, Alberto; Lakkala, Kaisa; Berjon, Alberto; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Doppler, Lionel; Feister, Uwe; Heikkila, Anu; Karppinen, Tomi; Karhu, Juha M.; Koskela, Tapani; Garane, Katerina; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Savastiouk, Volodya

    2017-11-01

    Spectral measurements of global UV irradiance recorded by Brewer spectrophotometers can be significantly affected by instrument-specific optical and mechanical features. Thus, proper corrections are needed in order to reduce the associated uncertainties to within acceptable levels. The present study aims to contribute to the reduction of uncertainties originating from changes in the Brewer internal temperature, which affect the performance of the optical and electronic parts, and subsequently the response of the instrument. Until now, measurements of the irradiance from various types of lamps at different temperatures have been used to characterize the instruments' temperature dependence. The use of 50 W lamps was found to induce errors in the characterization due to changes in the transmissivity of the Teflon diffuser as it warms up by the heat of the lamp. In contrast, the use of 200 or 1000 W lamps is considered more appropriate because they are positioned at longer distances from the diffuser so that warming is negligible. Temperature gradients inside the instrument can cause mechanical stresses which can affect the instrument's optical characteristics. Therefore, during the temperature-dependence characterization procedure warming or cooling must be slow enough to minimize these effects. In this study, results of the temperature characterization of eight different Brewer spectrophotometers operating in Greece, Finland, Germany and Spain are presented. It was found that the instruments' response changes differently in different temperature regions due to different responses of the diffusers' transmittance. The temperature correction factors derived for the Brewer spectrophotometers operating at Thessaloniki, Greece, and Sodankylä, Finland, were evaluated and were found to remove the temperature dependence of the instruments' sensitivity.

  14. Temperature dependent dynamic susceptibility calculations for itinerant ferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, J. F.

    1980-10-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments have revealed a variety of interesting and unusual phenomena associated with the spin dynamics of the 3-d transition metal ferromagnets nickel and iron. An extensive series of calculations based on the itinerant electron formalism has demonstrated that the itinerant model does provide an excellent quantitative as well as qualitative description of the measured spin dynamics of both nickel and iron at low temperatures. Recent angular photo emission experiments have indicated that there is a rather strong temperature dependence of the electronic spin-splitting which, from relatively crude arguments, appears to be inconsistent with neutron scattering results. In order to investigate this point and also the origin of spin-wave renormalization, a series of calculations of the dynamic susceptibility of nickel and iron has been undertaken. The results of these calculations indicate that a discrepancy exists between the interpretations of neutron and photoemission experimental results regarding the temperature dependence of the spin-splitting of the electronic energy bands.

  15. Heat experiment design to estimate temperature dependent thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovski, M

    2008-01-01

    Experimental conditions are studied to optimize transient experiments for estimating temperature dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. A mathematical model of a specimen is the one-dimensional heat equation with boundary conditions of the second kind. Thermal properties are assumed to vary nonlinearly with temperature. Experimental conditions refer to the thermal loading scheme, sampling times and sensor location. A numerical model of experimental configurations is studied to elicit the optimal conditions. The numerical solution of the design problem is formulated on a regularization scheme with a stabilizer minimization without a regularization parameter. An explicit design criterion is used to reveal the optimal sensor location, heating duration and flux magnitude. Results obtained indicate that even the strongly nonlinear experimental design problem admits the aggregation of its solution and has a strictly defined optimal measurement scheme. Additional region of temperature measurements with allowable identification error is revealed.

  16. Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Isotropic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadzyn, J.; Czechowski, G.; Lech, T.

    1999-04-01

    Temperature dependence of the shear viscosity measured for isotropic liquids belonging to the three homologous series: 4-(trans-4'-n-alkylcyclohexyl) isothiocyanatobenzenes (Cn H2n+1 CyHx Ph NCS; nCHBT, n=0-12), n-alkylcyanobiphenyls (CnH2n+1 Ph Ph CN; nCB, n=2-12) and 1,n-alkanediols (HO(CH2)nOH; 1,nAD, n=2-10) were analysed with the use of Arrhenius equation and its two modifications: Vogel--Fulcher and proposed in this paper. The extrapolation of the isothermal viscosity of 1,n-alkanediols (n=2-10) to n=1 leads to an interesting conclusion concerning the expected viscosity of methanediol, HOCH2OH, the compound strongly unstable in a pure state.

  17. Sample holder for studying temperature dependent particle guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereczky, R.J.; Toekesi, K.; Kowarik, G.; Aumayr, F.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The so called guiding effect is a complex process involving the interplay of a large number of charged particles with a solid. Although many research groups joined this field and carried out various experiments with insulator capillaries many details of the interactions are still unknown. We investigated the temperature dependence of the guiding since it opens new possibilities both for a fundamental understanding of the guiding phenomenon and for applications. For the temperature dependent guiding experiments a completely new heatable sample holder was designed. We developed and built such a heatable sample holder to make accurate and reproducible studies of the temperature dependence of the ion guiding effect possible. The target holder (for an exploded view see Fig. 1) consists of two main parts, the front and the back plates. The two plates of the sample holder, which function as an oven, are made of copper. These parts surround the capillary in order to guarantee a uniform temperature along the whole tube. The temperature of the copper parts is monitored by a K-Type thermocouple. Stainless steel coaxial heaters surrounding the oven are used for heating. The heating power up to a few watts is regulated by a PID controller. Cooling of the capillary is achieved by a copper feed-through connected to a liquid nitrogen bath outside the UHV chamber. This solution allows us to change the temperature of the sample from -30 deg C up to 90 deg C. Our experiments with this newly developed temperature regulated capillary holder show that the glass temperature (i.e. conductivity) can be used to control the guiding properties of the glass capillary and adjust the conditions from guiding at room temperature to simple geometrical transmission at elevated temperatures. This holds the promise to investigate the effect of conductivity on particle transport (build-up and removal of charge patches) through capillaries in more details

  18. Temperature dependency of silicon structures for magnetic field gradient sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabsch, Alexander; Rosenberg, Christoph; Stifter, Michael; Keplinger, Franz

    2018-02-01

    This work describes the temperature dependence of two sensors for magnetic field gradient sensors and demonstrates a structure to compensate for the drift of resonance frequency over a wide temperature range. The temperature effect of the sensing element is based on internal stresses induced by the thermal expansion of material, therefore FEM is used to determine the change of the eigenvalues of the sensing structure. The experimental setup utilizes a Helmholtz coil system to generate the magnetic field and to excite the MEMS structure with Lorentz forces. The MEMS structure is placed on a plate heated with resistors and cooled by a Peltier element to control the plate temperature. In the second part, we describe how one can exploit temperature sensitivity for temperature measurements and we show the opportunity to include the temperature effect to increase the sensitivity of single-crystal silicon made flux density gradient sensors.

  19. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultra-thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, A

    1999-01-01

    shown that in contrast to other works the temperature driven spin reorientation transition in the monolayer is discontinuous also in the simulations, whereas in general it is continuous for the bilayer. Consequently the molecular field theory and the Monte Carlo simulations agree qualitatively. Exemplary for thicker films the influence of an external magnetic field is investigated in the bilayer, furthermore the effective anisotropies K sub n (T) of the phenomenological Landau theory are calculated numerically for the microscopic model. Analytic expressions for the dependence of the anisotropies K sub n (T) on the parameters of the model are obtained by the means of perturbation theory, which lead to a deeper understanding of the spin reorientation transition. Accordingly to this the origin for the spin reorientation transition lies in the differing temperature dependence of the dipolar and spin-orbit parts of the K sub n (T). Additionally the magnetization in the surface of the film decreases more rapidly wi...

  20. Temperature dependent electron Lande g-factor and interband matrix element in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, Jens; Doehrmann, Stefanie; Haegele, Daniel; Oestreich, Michael [Institute for Solid State Physics, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hannover (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    High precision measurements of the electron Lande g-factor in GaAs are presented using spin quantum beat spectroscopy at low excitation densities and temperatures ranging from 2.6 to 300 K. Influences of nuclear spin polarization at low temperatures have been fully compensated. Comparing these measurements with available data for the temperature dependent effective mass reveals an unexpected strong temperature dependence of the interband matrix element and resolves a long lasting discrepancy between experiment and kp - theory. The strong decrease of the interband matrix element with increasing temperature is explained by phonon induced fluctuations of the interatomic spacing and adiabatic following of the electrons.

  1. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models...... for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending...

  2. Temperature dependence of grain boundary free energy and elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foiles, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the suggestion that the temperature dependence of the grain boundary free energy can be estimated from the temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The temperature-dependent elastic constants and free energy of a symmetric Σ79 tilt boundary are computed for an embedded atom method model of Ni. The grain boundary free energy scales with the product of the shear modulus times the lattice constant for temperatures up to about 0.75 the melting temperature.

  3. A Temperature-Dependent Hysteresis Model for Relaxor Ferroelectric Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raye, Julie K; Smith, Ralph C

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a homogenized free energy model which characterizes the temperature-dependent hysteresis and constitutive nonlinearities inherent to relaxor ferroelectric materials...

  4. A Study of the Temperature Dependence of Bienzyme Systems and Enzymatic Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kotov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that most enzyme-facilitated reactions are highly temperature dependent processes. In general, the temperature coefficient, Q10, of a simple reaction reaches 2.0–3.0. Nevertheless, some enzyme-controlled processes have much lower Q10 (about 1.0, which implies that the process is almost temperature independent, even if individual reactions involved in the process are themselves highly temperature dependent. In this work, we investigate a possible mechanism for this apparent temperature compensation: simple mathematical models are used to study how varying types of enzyme reactions are affected by temperature. We show that some bienzyme-controlled processes may be almost temperature independent if the modules involved in the reaction have similar temperature dependencies, even if individually, these modules are strongly temperature dependent. Further, we show that in non-reversible enzyme chains the stationary concentrations of metabolites are dependent only on the relationship between the temperature dependencies of the first and last modules, whilst in reversible reactions, there is a dependence on every module. Our findings suggest a mechanism by which the metabolic processes taking place within living organisms may be regulated, despite strong variation in temperature.

  5. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for ...

  6. Temperature dependence of the kinetic coefficients of superconductors in the intermediate state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, L.Y.; Kadigrobov, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    It is demonstrated that in the case of a superconductor in the intermediate state at temperature T such that e0/T 0 denoting the characteristic superconductor energy gap) the sound absorption coefficient can be strongly temperature dependent and thermal conductivity along the layers of normal metal can be nonlinearly dependent on the temperature

  7. Temperature dependence of the Hall angle in a correlated three-dimensional metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, T. F.; Husmann, A.; Carter, S. A.; Honig, J. M.

    1998-06-01

    The Hall coefficient, RH, of the Mott-Hubbard system vanadium sesquioxide has a strong temperature dependence in the barely delocalized metal. As in the case of the cuprate superconductors, we find that the resistivity and the Hall angle of V2-yO3 follow different power laws in temperature, implying different longitudinal and transverse scattering mechanisms. Far from half-filling, only one transport scattering rate is needed to describe the data, at which point the temperature dependence of RH disappears.

  8. Temperature dependence of interlayer coupling in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with GdOX barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse-Illige, T.; Xu, Y. H.; Liu, Y. H.; Huang, S.; Kato, H.; Bi, C.; Xu, M.; LeRoy, B. J.; Wang, W. G.

    2018-02-01

    Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with GdOX tunneling barriers have shown a unique voltage controllable interlayer magnetic coupling effect. Here, we investigate the quality of the GdOX barrier and the coupling mechanism in these junctions by examining the temperature dependence of the tunneling magnetoresistance and the interlayer coupling from room temperature down to 11 K. The barrier is shown to be of good quality with the spin independent conductance only contributing a small portion, 14%, to the total room temperature conductance, similar to AlOX and MgO barriers. The interlayer coupling, however, shows an anomalously strong temperature dependence including sign changes below 80 K. This non-trivial temperature dependence is not described by previous models of interlayer coupling and may be due to the large induced magnetic moment of the Gd ions in the barrier.

  9. Temperature dependence of the two photon absorption in indium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors have long been a source of interesting physics. Two photon absorption (TPA) is one such process, in which two photons provide the energy for the creation of an electron-hole pair. Researchers at other FEL centers have studied room temperature TPA in InSb, InAs, and HgCdTe. Working at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center, we have extended and refined this work by measuring the temperature dependence of the TPA coefficient in InAs over the range from 80 to 350 K at four wavelengths: 4.5, 5.06, 6.01, and 6.3 microns. The measurements validate the functional dependence of recent band structure calculations with enough precision to discriminate parabolic from non-parabolic models, and to begin to observe smaller effects, such as contributions due to the split-off band. These experiments therefore serve as a strong independent test of the Kane band theory, as well as providing a starting point for detailed observations of other nonlinear absorption mechanisms

  10. Temperature dependence of APD-based PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keereman, Vincent; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vanhove, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Solid state detectors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are increasingly being used in PET detectors. One of the disadvantages of APDs is the strong decrease of their gain factor with increasing ambient temperature. The light yield of most scintillation crystals also decreases when ambient temperature is increased. Both effects lead to considerable temperature dependence of the performance of APD-based PET scanners. In this paper, the authors propose a model for this dependence and the performance of the LabPET8 APD-based small animal PET scanner is evaluated at different temperatures.Methods: The model proposes that the effect of increasing temperature on the energy histogram of an APD-based PET scanner is a compression of the histogram along the energy axis. The energy histogram of the LabPET system was acquired at 21 °C and 25 °C to verify the validity of this model. Using the proposed model, the effect of temperature on system sensitivity was simulated for different detector temperature coefficients and temperatures. Subsequently, the effect of short term and long term temperature changes on the peak sensitivity of the LabPET system was measured. The axial sensitivity profile was measured at 21 °C and 24 °C following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. System spatial resolution was also evaluated. Furthermore, scatter fraction, count losses and random coincidences were evaluated at different temperatures. Image quality was also investigated.Results: As predicted by the model, the photopeak energy at 25 °C is lower than at 21 °C with a shift of approximately 6% per °C. Simulations showed that this results in an approximately linear decrease of sensitivity when temperature is increased from 21 °C to 24 °C and energy thresholds are constant. Experimental evaluation of the peak sensitivity at different temperatures showed a strong linear correlation for short term (2.32 kcps/MBq/°C = 12%/°C, R = −0.95) and long term (1.92 kcps/MBq/°C = 10%/

  11. Non-temperature dependent resistor at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Akira; Iwasa, Akio

    2003-01-01

    We measured the temperature dependence of metal film chip resistors (SUSUMU Co., Ltd. RR1220 100 Ω, 1 kΩ, 10 kΩ and 1 MΩ) from 45 mK to 300 K. Although the temperature dependence of these resistors R was not monotonic, the changes in resistance (R(T)-R(T=300 K))/R(T=300 K) were ∼1% (except 1 MΩ). Therefore we can make a filter and a divider without taking the temperature dependence of the resistor into consideration. Below liquid helium temperature, the resistance of the chip resistor increases as log T with decreasing temperature. It is expected that the temperature dependence of log T is due to the Kondo effect

  12. Temperature dependence of mobility in silicon (100) inversion layers at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Kawaji, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron mobility of Si(100) n-inversion layers in MOSFETs having μsub(peak) (4.2 K) = 4000.6500 and 12000 cm 2 /V x s has been measured at temperatures between 1 and 80 K. The carrier concentration dependence of the mobility extrapolated to T = O and the temperature dependent part of the scattering probability are investigated. (orig.)

  13. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  14. Temperature dependence of sound velocity in yttrium ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'vov, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the phonon-magnon and phonon-phonon interoctions on the temperature dependence of the longitudinal sound velocity in yttrium ferrite is considered. It has been shown that at low temperatures four-particle phonon-magnon processes produce the basic contribution to renormalization of the sound velocity. At higher temperatures the temperature dependence of the sound velocity is mainly defined by phonon-phonon processes

  15. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  16. Temperature dependence of three-body ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehringer, H.; Arnold, F.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ion-molecule association reactions (i) N 2 + + N 2 + M → N 4 + + M (M=N 2 , He), (ii) O 2 + + O 2 + M → O 4 + + M (M=O 2 , He) and (iii) He + + 2He → He 2 + + He have been studied over an extended temperature range to temperatures as low as 30K with a recently constructed liquid helium-cooled ion drift tube. Over most of the temperature range the threebody reaction rate coefficients show an inverse temperature dependence proportional to Tsup(-n) with n in the range 0.6 to 2.9. This temperature dependence is quite consistent with current theories of ion molecule association. At low temperatures, however, a deviation from the Tsup(-n) dependence was observed for the association reactions (ii). For reactions (i) different temperature dependences were obtained for N 2 and He third bodies indicating an additional temperature dependence of the collisional stabilisation process. (Authors)

  17. Effect of temperature dependent properties on MHD convection of water near its density maximum in a square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankaran, S.; Hoa, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Natural convection of water near its density maximum in the presence of magnetic field in a cavity with temperature dependent properties is studied numerically. The viscosity and thermal conductivity of the water is varied with reference temperature and calculated by cubic polynomial. The finite volume method is used to solve the governing equations. The results are presented graphically in the form of streamlines, isotherms and velocity vectors and are discussed for various combinations of reference temperature parameter, Rayleigh number, density inversion parameter and Hartmann number. It is observed that flow and temperature field are affected significantly by changing the reference temperature parameter for temperature dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity cases. There is no significant effect on fluid flow and temperature distributions for temperature dependent viscosity case when changing the values of reference temperature parameter. The average heat transfer rate considering temperature-dependent viscosity are higher than considering temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and both temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity. The average Nusselt number decreases with an increase of Hartmann number. It is observed that the density inversion of water leaves strong effects on fluid flow and heat transfer due to the formation of bi-cellular structure. The heat transfer rate behaves non-linearly with density inversion parameter. The direction of external magnetic field also affect the fluid flow and heat transfer. (authors)

  18. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik; Frandsen, Cathrine; Mørup, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending on the ratio of the exchange coupling constants. This is in agreement with experimental observations. - Highlights: ► The magnetization of a canted spin structure has been calculated. ► In some cases the magnetization shows an anomalous increase at low temperatures. ► In other cases the magnetization shows an anomalous decrease at low temperatures. ► The results are in accordance with many experimental observations.

  19. Energy based model for temperature dependent behavior of ferromagnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, Sanjay; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2017-01-01

    An energy based model for temperature dependent anhysteretic magnetization curves of ferromagnetic materials is proposed and benchmarked against experimental data. This is based on the calculation of macroscopic magnetic properties by performing an energy weighted average over all possible orientations of the magnetization vector. Most prior approaches that employ this method are unable to independently account for the effect of both inhomogeneity and temperature in performing the averaging necessary to model experimental data. Here we propose a way to account for both effects simultaneously and benchmark the model against experimental data from ~5 K to ~300 K for two different materials in both annealed (fewer inhomogeneities) and deformed (more inhomogeneities) samples. This demonstrates that this framework is well suited to simulate temperature dependent experimental magnetic behavior. - Highlights: • Energy based model for temperature dependent ferromagnetic behavior. • Simultaneously accounts for effect of temperature and inhomogeneities. • Benchmarked against experimental data from 5 K to 300 K.

  20. Temperature dependence of fluorescence decay time and emission spectrum of bismuth germanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melcher, C.L.; Liberman, A.; Schweitzer, J.S.; Simonetti, J.

    1985-01-01

    Bismuth germanate has become an increasingly popular replacement for NaI(Tl) scintillators in recent years, mainly due to its higher detection efficiency. However, its scintillation efficiency and fluorescence decay time are strongly temperature dependent. Optimum performance of detector systems which employ BGO crystals depends on knowledge of the BGO pulse shape and intensity and its emission spectrum at the operating temperature of the detector. Measurements of these quantities are presented over the temperature range -47 0 C to +111 0 C. Although the emission spectrum shifts only slightly over this temperature range, the scintillation efficiency and fluorescence decay time are strongly temperature dependent. In addition to the usefulness of these data for optimizing detector design, the results imply that luminescence quenching in BGO cannot be characterized by a single thermal activation to a radiationless transition but that a more complex model is required to characterize the light output from BGO crystals

  1. Study of Cu-Al-Zn alloys hardness temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurmanova, D.T.; Skakov, M.K.; Melikhov, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the results of studies for the Cu-Al-Zn ternary alloys hardness temperature dependence are presented. The method of 'hot hardness' has been used during study of the solid state phase transformations and under determination of the hot stability boundaries. Due to the samples brittleness a hardness temperature dependence definition is possible only from 350-400 deg. C. Sensitivity of the 'hot hardness' method is decreasing within high plasticity range, so the measurements have been carried out only up to 700-800 deg. C. It is shown, that the alloys hardness dependence character from temperature is close to exponential one within the certain structure modification existence domain

  2. Temperature dependent charge transport in poly(3-hexylthiophene) diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Abdulla Bin; Sarkar, Atri; Banerjee, Debamalya

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we present charge transport properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) diodes under dark conditions. Temperature dependent current-voltage (J-V) characteristics shows that charge transport represents a transition from ohomic to trap limited current. The forward current density obeys a power law J˜Vm, m>2 represents the space charge limited current region in presence of traps within the band gap. Frequency dependent conductivity has been studied in a temperature range 150K-473K. The dc conductivity values show Arrhenius like behavior and it gives conductivity activation energy 223 meV. Temperature dependent conductivity indicates a thermodynamic transition of our system.

  3. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...... on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules.......This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...

  4. Temperature dependence of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB/MgO

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoung-Min Lee; Jun Woo Choi; Junghyun Sok; Byoung-Chul Min

    2017-01-01

    The interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB (1.2 ∼ 3 nm)/MgO thin film structures is strongly dependent on temperature, and is significantly reduced at high temperature. The interfacial magnetic anisotropy is generally proportional to the third power of magnetization, but an additional factor due to thermal expansion is required to explain the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin CoFeB films. The reduction of the magnetic anisotropy is more prominent...

  5. Temperature dependence of shot noise in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jiasen; Liu, Liang; Feng, J. F.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wei, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Shot noise reveals spin dependent transport properties in a magnetic tunnel junction. We report measurement of shot noise in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions, which shows a strong temperature dependence. The Fano factor used to characterize shot noise increases with decreasing temperature. A sequential tunneling model can be used to account for these results, in which a larger Fano factor results from larger spin relaxation length at lower temperatures.

  6. Temperature dependent damping studies of Ni–Mn–Ga polymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 34, No. 4, July 2011, pp. 739–743. © Indian Academy of Sciences. 739. Temperature dependent damping studies of Ni–Mn–Ga polymer composites ... martensite transformation (Ullakko et al 1996; Mullner and Ullakko 1998 ... on twin boundaries (Kokorin et al 1996; Segui et al 2004;. Vijay Kumar ...

  7. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell; alcohol. Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in 0.5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated ...

  8. Temperature Dependence Viscosity and Density of Different Biodiesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to assess the effect of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME concentration in diesel fuel on its viscosity and density behaviour. The density and dynamic viscosity were observed at various mixing ratios of RME and diesel fuel. All measurements were performed at constant temperature of 40 °C. Increasing ratio of RME in diesel fuel was reflected in increased density value and dynamic viscosity of the blend. In case of pure RME, pure diesel fuel, and a blend of both (B30, temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was examined. Temperature range in the experiment was −10 °C to 80 °C. Considerable temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was found and demonstrated for all three samples. This finding is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and reference data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 3rd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.796, −0.948, and −0.974 between measured and calculated values were found. Temperature dependence of density was modeled using a 2nd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.994, −0.979, and −0.976 between measured and calculated values were acquired. The proposed models can be used for flow behaviour prediction of RME, diesel fuel, and their blends.

  9. Temperature dependence of nitrogen solubility in iron base multicomponent melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.M.; Koval'chuk, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Method for calculating temperature dependence of nitrogen solubility in iron base multicomponent melts is suggested. Application areas of existing methods were determined and advantages of the new method for calculating nitrogen solubility in multicomponent-doped iron melts (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo, Fe-Ni-Cr-Mn, Fe-Mo-V) at 1773-2073 K are shown

  10. Temperature Dependent FMR on CoCr Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuvekamp, E.M.C.M.; Reuvekamp, E.M.C.M.; de Witte, A.M.; Aarnink, W.A.M.; Gerritsma, G.J.; Lodder, J.C.; Aarnink, W.A.M.; Rogalla, Horst

    1989-01-01

    Temperature dependent FMR measurements were performed on two series of rf sputtered films. The FMR measuring temperature could be varied between 77 and 300 K. There is indication of the existence of 2 CoCr phases in the film from ion-milled samples. The perpendicular anisotropy increased with both

  11. Anomalous temperature dependence of excitation transfer between quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2015), 325-330 ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011; GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : excitation transfer * quantum dots * temperature dependence * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  12. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, George J; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R; Holland, Christy K

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T ≤ 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E eff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole -1 . E eff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole -1 . A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies

  13. Temperature-dependent viscosity effects on free convection flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temperature-dependent viscosity effects on free convection flow over a vertical moving cylinder with constant axial velocity under consideration of radial ... Prandtl number, viscosity-variation parameter, thermal conductivity-variation parameter and magnetic parameter on free convection flow and heat transfer is discussed.

  14. Temperature dependence of anuran distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meenderink, Sebastlaan W. F.; Van Dijk, Pim

    To study the possible involvement of energy dependent mechanisms in the transduction of sound within the anuran ear, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were recorded in the northern leopard frog over a range of body temperatures. The effect of body temperature depended on the stimulus

  15. On the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on temperature rise in biologic tissues during microwave heating. The method of asymptotic expansion is used for finding solution. An appropriate matching procedure was used in our method. Our result reveals the possibility of multiple solutions and it ...

  16. Crossing regimes of temperature dependence in animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Jean P; Chelini, Marie-Claire; Rosenthal, Malcolm F; DeLong, John P

    2016-05-01

    A pressing challenge in ecology is to understand the effects of changing global temperatures on food web structure and dynamics. The stability of these complex ecological networks largely depends on how predator-prey interactions may respond to temperature changes. Because predators and prey rely on their velocities to catch food or avoid being eaten, understanding how temperatures may affect animal movement is central to this quest. Despite our efforts, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how the effect of temperature on metabolic processes scales up to animal movement and beyond. Here, we merge a biomechanical approach, the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and empirical data to show that animal movement displays multiple regimes of temperature dependence. We also show that crossing these regimes has important consequences for population dynamics and stability, which depend on the parameters controlling predator-prey interactions. We argue that this dependence upon interaction parameters may help explain why experimental work on the temperature dependence of interaction strengths has so far yielded conflicting results. More importantly, these changes in the temperature dependence of animal movement can have consequences that go well beyond ecological interactions and affect, for example, animal communication, mating, sensory detection, and any behavioral modality dependent on the movement of limbs. Finally, by not taking into account the changes in temperature dependence reported here we might not be able to properly forecast the impact of global warming on ecological processes and propose appropriate mitigation action when needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorobogatov, P.K.; Nikiforov, A.Y.; Demidov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    2-D numerical modeling was carried out to analyze the temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy in application to p-n junction ionising current. Experimental validation was performed using test structure in the temperature range of 0 to 100 deg.C. (authors)

  18. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The current study employs free energy calculations to elucidate the thermodynamics of the formation of salt bridge interactions and the temperature dependence, using acetate and methylguanidium ions as model systems. Three different orientations of the methylguanidinium approaching the carboxylate group have been ...

  19. Pressure–temperature dependence of thermodynamic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haleh Kangarlou and Arash Abdollahi properties of materials under high pressures and temperatures for microscopic under- standing as well as technological applications. In this paper, we report our theoretical study of both pressure and temperature dependences of the thermal properties of rutile within the Debye and ...

  20. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the tool shoulder and pin to predict the thermal history of aluminium alloy was developed by. Rajamanickam et al .... where σy is the temperature dependent yield stress of the workpiece material as shown in table 2. ... greater than the material yield shear stress, hence the material accelerates to a velocity less than the tool ...

  1. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W. [Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

  2. Effect of strong electrolytes on edible oils part III: viscosity of canola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of strong electrolytes on the viscosity of canola oil in 1,4 dioxane was undertaken. The viscosity of oil in 1,4 dioxane was found to increase with the concentration of oil and decrease with rise in temperature. Strong electrolytes reduce the rate of flow of oil in 1,4 dioxane. It was noted that amongst these electrolytes, ...

  3. Strong winds in South Africa, part 2: mapping of updated statistics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, AC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available the mixed strong wind climate and the topography. This applies to especially the escarpment and the Cape Folded Mountains, which extend to Cape Town and surroundings. The present wind maps for South Africa are based on a network of 14 Dines pressure..., at least for TC-I to TC-III. Data extraction and analysis Strong wind climatology data Goliger and Retief (2002) provided an indica- tion of the regional contribution of the main strong wind mechanisms. Consideration of the regional distribution...

  4. Temperature dependent structural evolution in liquid Ag50Ga50 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Cao, Q. P.; Ruett, U.; Zhang, D. X.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2018-01-01

    The temperature dependence of atomic structural evolution in liquid Ag50Ga50 alloy has been studied using an in situ high energy x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiment combined with first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. The experimental data show a reversible structural crossover at the temperature of about 1050 K. Changes in both electrical resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power at about 1100 K strongly support the XRD results. Additionally, FPMD simulations reveal the abnormal temperature dependent behavior of partial coordination number and atomic diffusivity at about 1200 K, elucidating that the partition experimentally observed changes in structure and properties could be linked with the repartition between Ag and Ga atoms in the liquid at around 1050–1200 K. This finding will trigger more studies on the structural evolution of noble-polyvalent metals in particular and metallic liquids in general.

  5. Temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of chemically derived gallium zinc oxide thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of sol-gel prepared ZnO and 3% Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films have been explored. The power factor of GZO films, as compared to ZnO, is improved by nearly 17% at high temperature. A stabilization anneal, prior to thermoelectric measurements, in a strongly reducing Ar/H2 (95/5) atmosphere at 500°C was found to effectively stabilize the chemically derived films, practically eliminating hysteresis during thermoelectric measurements. Subtle changes in the thermoelectric properties of stabilized films have been correlated to oxygen vacancies and excitonic levels that are known to exist in ZnO-based thin films. The role of Ga dopants and defects, formed upon annealing, in driving the observed complex temperature dependence of the thermoelectric properties is discussed. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  6. Temperature-Dependent Polarization in Field-Effect Transport and Photovoltaic Measurements of Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labram, John G; Fabini, Douglas H; Perry, Erin E; Lehner, Anna J; Wang, Hengbin; Glaudell, Anne M; Wu, Guang; Evans, Hayden; Buck, David; Cotta, Robert; Echegoyen, Luis; Wudl, Fred; Seshadri, Ram; Chabinyc, Michael L

    2015-09-17

    While recent improvements in the reported peak power conversion efficiency (PCE) of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells have been truly astonishing, there are many fundamental questions about the electronic behavior of these materials. Here we have studied a set of electronic devices employing methylammonium lead iodide ((MA)PbI3) as the active material and conducted a series of temperature-dependent measurements. Field-effect transistor, capacitor, and photovoltaic cell measurements all reveal behavior consistent with substantial and strongly temperature-dependent polarization susceptibility in (MA)PbI3 at temporal and spatial scales that significantly impact functional behavior. The relative PCE of (MA)PbI3 photovoltaic cells is observed to reduce drastically with decreasing temperature, suggesting that such polarization effects could be a prerequisite for high-performance device operation.

  7. On the Temperature Dependence of the UNIQUAC/UNIFAC Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Steen; Rasmussen, Peter; Fredenslund, Aage

    1980-01-01

    of the simultaneous correlation. The temperature dependent parameters have, however, little physical meaning and very odd results are frequently obtained when the interaction parameters obtained from excess enthalpy information alone are used for the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models...... are modified in this work by the introduction of a general temperature dependence of the coordination number. The modified UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models are especially suited for the representation of mixtures containing non-associating components. The modified models contain the same number of interaction parameters...... parameters based on excess enthalpy data, and the prediction of excess enthalpy information from only one isothermal set of vapor-liquid equilibrium data is qualitatively acceptable. A parameter table for the modified UNIFAC model is given for the five main groups: CH2, C = C, ACH, ACCH2 and CH2O....

  8. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in lanthanum manganite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubkin, M.K.; Zalesskii, A.V.; Perekalina, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetoresistivity in the La0.9Na0.1Mn0.9(V,Co)0.1O3 and LaMnO3+δ ceramics was studied. The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in these specimens was found to differ qualitatively from that in the La0.9Na0.1MnO3 single crystal (the magnetoresistance value remains rather high throughout the measurement range below the Curie temperature), with the maximum values being about the same (20-40% in the field of 20 kOe). Previously published data on magnetization, high frequency magnetic susceptibility, and local fields at the 139La nuclei of the specimens with similar properties attest to their magnetic inhomogeneity. The computation of the conductivity of the nonuniformly ordered lanthanum manganite was performed according to the mean field theory. The calculation results allow one to interpret qualitatively various types of experimental temperature dependences of magnetoresistance

  9. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Lattice Dynamics of Lithium 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beg, M. M.; Nielsen, Mourits

    1976-01-01

    parameter is found to be 3.490 ± 0.003 Å at 110 K and 3.537 ± 0.003 Å at 424 K. The elastic constants obtained at 293 K from the model parameters are (1011 dyn/cm2) C11=1.73±0.10, C12=1.31±0.20, and C44=0.84±0.060. The temperature dependence of elastic constants is also determined....... 10% smaller than those at 100 K. Temperature dependences of selected phonons have been studied from 110 K to near the melting point. The energy shifts and phonon linewidths have been evaluated at 293, 383, and 424 K by comparing the widths and energies to those measured at 110 K. The lattice...

  11. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in. 0⋅5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated from the cyclic voltammetric data in the low potential region (0⋅3–0⋅5 V vs SHE). The. CV results ...

  12. Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin; Jung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity are simulated. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of the scalar field. • An identity for the Stanton number is derived and analyzed. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of scalar transfer rate. • Modification of turbulent flow field leads to an enhanced scalar transfer rate. - Abstract: Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over isothermally heated walls were performed, and the influence of the wall-heating on the thermal boundary layers was investigated. The DNS adopt an empirical relation for the temperature-dependent viscosity of water. The Prandtl number therefore changes with temperature, while the Péclet number is constant. Two wall temperatures (T w = 70 °C and 99 °C) were considered relative to T ∞ = 30 °C, and a reference simulation of TBL with constant viscosity was also performed for comparison. In the variable viscosity flow, the mean and variance of the scalar, when normalized by the friction temperature deficit, decrease relative to the constant viscosity flow. A relation for the mean scalar which takes into account the variable viscosity is proposed. Appropriate scalings for the scalar fluctuations and the scalar flux are also introduced, and are shown to be applicable for both variable and constant viscosity flows. Due to the modification of the near-wall turbulence, the Stanton number and the Reynolds analogy factor are augmented by 10% and 44%, respectively, in the variable viscosity flow. An identity for the Stanton number is derived and shows that the mean wall-normal velocity and wall-normal scalar flux cause the increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, the augmented near-wall velocity fluctuations lead to an increase of the wall-normal scalar flux, which contributes favorably to the enhanced heat transfer at the wall

  13. Temperature dependence of photonic crystals based on thermoresponsive magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shengli; Bai Xuekun; Wang Lunwei

    2011-01-01

    The influence mechanisms of temperature on the band gap properties of the magnetic fluids based photonic crystals are elaborated. A method has been developed to obtain the temperature-dependent structure information (A sol /A) from the existing experimental data and then two critical parameters, i.e. the structure ratio (d/a) and the refractive index contrast (Δn) of the magnetic fluids photonic crystals are deduced for band diagram calculations. The temperature-dependent band gaps are gained for z-even and z-odd modes. Band diagram calculations display that the mid frequencies and positions of the existing forbidden bands are not very sensitive to the temperature, while the number of the forbidden bands at certain strengths of magnetic field may change with the temperature variation. The results presented in this work give a guideline for designing the potential photonic devices based on the temperature characteristics of the magnetic fluids based photonic crystals and are helpful for improving their quality. - Highlights: → Mechanisms of temperature dependence of magnetic fluids based photonic crystals are elaborated. → Properties of existing forbidden bands have relatively fine temperature stability. → Disappearance of existing forbidden band is found for some magnetic fields. → Emergence of new forbidden band with temperature is found for some magnetic fields.

  14. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. Y. [Nanosurface Science and Engineering Research Institute, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060 Guangdong (China); Yang, G. W., E-mail: stsygw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  15. Temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhongjian, E-mail: zhongjian.xie521@gmail.com; Sebald, Gael; Guyomar, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric (eC) effect in natural rubber (NR) has been studied. This material exhibits a large eC effect over a broad temperature range from 0 °C to 49 °C. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) occurred at 10 °C and the behavior could be predicted by the temperature dependence of the strain-induced crystallization (SIC) and the temperature-induced crystallization (TIC). The eC performance of NR was then compared with that of shape memory alloys (SMAs). This study contributes to the SIC research of NR and also broadens the application of elastomers. - Highlights: • A large elastocaloric effect over a broad temperature range was found in natural rubber (NR). • The caloric performance of NR was compared with that of shape memory alloys. • The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in NR can be prediced by the theory of strain-induced crystallization.

  16. Strong association between corticosterone levels and temperature-dependent metabolic rate in individual zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimeno Revilla, Blanca; Hau, Michaela; Verhulst, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs) are often assumed to be indicators of stress. At the same time, one of their fundamental roles is to facilitate metabolic processes to accommodate changes in energetic demands. Although the metabolic function of GCs is thought to be ubiquitous across vertebrates, we are

  17. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation and the rise of Bergmann's rule in species with aquatic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Njal; Rowe, Locke

    2018-02-21

    Bergmann's rule is the propensity for species-mean body size to decrease with increasing temperature. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation has been hypothesized to help drive temperature-size relationships among ectotherms, including Bergmann's rule, where organisms reduce body size under warm oxygen-limited conditions, thereby maintaining aerobic scope. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation should be most pronounced among aquatic ectotherms that cannot breathe aerially, as oxygen solubility in water decreases with increasing temperature. We use phylogenetically explicit analyses to show that species-mean adult size of aquatic salamanders with branchial or cutaneous oxygen uptake becomes small in warm environments and large in cool environments, whereas body size of aquatic species with lungs (i.e., that respire aerially), as well as size of semiaquatic and terrestrial species do not decrease with temperature. We argue that oxygen limitation drives the evolution of small size in warm aquatic environments for species with aquatic respiration. More broadly, the stronger decline in size with temperature observed in aquatic versus terrestrial salamander species mirrors the relatively strong plastic declines in size observed previously among aquatic versus terrestrial invertebrates, suggesting that temperature-dependent oxygen availability can help drive patterns of plasticity, micro- and macroevolution. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. The temperature--dependent expression of GST of Schistosoma japonicum (Philippine strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Z H; Song, G C; Xu, Y X; Liu, S X

    1993-03-01

    Obtained from pSj5, the cDNA gene encoding GST antigen of Schistosoma japonicum (Philippine strain) was ligated with efficient temperature-dependent PBV220 vector which was constructed in CAPM, and then introduced into host bacterium-DH5 alpha (E. coli) by transformation. Transformants were selected by ampicillin and recombinant clones were identified by restriction mapping. The result showed that recombinant clone 43 was the one carrying recombinant plasmid PBV 220 with the correct insertion of the gene fragment. The GST expression ability of clone 43 was investigated by GST enzymic activity assay and SDS-PAGE. A relatively high level of GST enzymic activity was expressed by this clone under the temperature-dependent condition, that is, cultured at 30 degrees C and expressed at 42 degrees C. A more strongly stained 26 kDa protein band was identified by SDS-PAGE. The result indicated that GST of S. japonicum (Philippine strain) could be expressed not only by IPTG induction, but also by the temperature-dependent method.

  19. Temperature dependence of the dynamics of zone boundary phonons in ZnO:Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Harish Kumar; Sreenivas, K.; Gupta, Vinay; Katiyar, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    Investigations of zone boundary phonons in ZnO:Li system (Li concentration: 10%) and their dynamics with temperature are reported. Additional modes at 127, 157, and 194 cm-1 are observed and assigned to zone boundary phonons at critical point M in the Brillouin zone [J. M. Calleja and M. Cardona, Phys. Rev. B 16, 3753 (1977)] due to breakdown of crystal translational symmetry with Li incorporation in ZnO. Anharmonicity in peak frequency and linewidth of the zone boundary phonons in a temperature range from 100 to 1000 K is also analyzed taking into account the decay of zone boundary phonons into three- and four-phonon modes (cubic and quadratic anharmonicities). The anharmonic behavior of peak frequency is found to be feebly dependent on three-phonon decay process but thermal expansion of lattice together with four-phonon decay process appropriately defines the temperature dependence. Linewidths, however, follow the simple four-phonon decay mechanism. E2(low) mode, on the other hand, shows a linear temperature dependency and therefore follows a three-phonon decay channel. The calculated values of phonon lifetimes at 100 K for the 127, 157, 194 cm-1, and E2(low) modes are 8.23, 6.54, 5.32, and 11.39 ps. Decay of the zone boundary phonon modes compared to E2(low) mode reveals that dopant induced disorder has a strong temperature dependency.

  20. Coexistence of genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in pejerrey Odontesthes bonariensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Yamamoto

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined whether a homolog of the master sex-determining gene amhy of Odontesthes hatcheri is present and plays any role in testis determination of pejerrey O. bonariensis, a species otherwise known for its strong temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD. Screening of wild and laboratory-reared pejerrey for amhy revealed a high, although not complete linkage with phenotypic sex. The sex ratio in an amhy+/-/amhy-/- full sibling progeny reared during the thermolabile period of sex determination at an intermediate temperature of 25°C was 68.7% male:31.3% female; all amhy+/- fish developed as males whereas about 2/3 and 1/3 of the amhy-/- were female and male, respectively. Expression analyses revealed that amhy transcription began during embryo stage and decreased by the end of sex determination period. The autosomal amha was present in all individuals regardless of amhy genotype; its expression increased significantly from the end of the same period in the gonads of all amhy+/- but only in part of the amhy-/- animals. After histological gonadal differentiation, all gonads of amhy-/- animals with amha ISH signals were testes and those without it were ovaries. These results suggest that amhy is important for testicular differentiation in pejerrey, at least at intermediate temperatures. Thus, we hypothesize that amhy+/- animals differentiate as males by expression of either amhy alone or amhy and amha together whereas the amhy-/- probably rely solely on amha expression. These findings represent the first clear genomic evidence that genotypic and environmental sex determinants can coexist in species with marked TSD such as the pejerrey. The finding of amhy will make possible to monitor wild pejerrey populations for mismatches between genotypic and phenotypic sex and may prove instrumental for field studies addressing the effects of endocrine disruptors or abnormal temperatures on reproduction and the ecological relevance of TSD

  1. Global patterns in lake ecosystem responses to warming based on the temperature dependence of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Benjamin M; Chandra, Sudeep; Dell, Anthony I; Dix, Margaret; Kuusisto, Esko; Livingstone, David M; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Silow, Eugene; Sitoki, Lewis M; Tamatamah, Rashid; McIntyre, Peter B

    2017-05-01

    Climate warming is expected to have large effects on ecosystems in part due to the temperature dependence of metabolism. The responses of metabolic rates to climate warming may be greatest in the tropics and at low elevations because mean temperatures are warmer there and metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature (with exponents >1). However, if warming rates are sufficiently fast in higher latitude/elevation lakes, metabolic rate responses to warming may still be greater there even though metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature. Thus, a wide range of global patterns in the magnitude of metabolic rate responses to warming could emerge depending on global patterns of temperature and warming rates. Here we use the Boltzmann-Arrhenius equation, published estimates of activation energy, and time series of temperature from 271 lakes to estimate long-term (1970-2010) changes in 64 metabolic processes in lakes. The estimated responses of metabolic processes to warming were usually greatest in tropical/low-elevation lakes even though surface temperatures in higher latitude/elevation lakes are warming faster. However, when the thermal sensitivity of a metabolic process is especially weak, higher latitude/elevation lakes had larger responses to warming in parallel with warming rates. Our results show that the sensitivity of a given response to temperature (as described by its activation energy) provides a simple heuristic for predicting whether tropical/low-elevation lakes will have larger or smaller metabolic responses to warming than higher latitude/elevation lakes. Overall, we conclude that the direct metabolic consequences of lake warming are likely to be felt most strongly at low latitudes and low elevations where metabolism-linked ecosystem services may be most affected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  3. Temperature dependence of acceptor-hole recombination in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darken, L.S.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The recombination kinetics of several centers (Zn - , Cu - , B - , CuH - 2 , CuH - x , Zn = , Cu = , and CuH = x ) in high-purity Ge have been measured as a function of temperature from 8 to 160 K by transient capacitance techniques and are significantly faster than expected from cascade theory. The cascade theory also gives the wrong temperature dependence, and the wrong z dependence. Instead, the data are generally fit by the expression N v /4pτ c congruent kT/h (p and τ c are, respectively, the free-hole concentration in the sample and the experimental mean capture time for a center)

  4. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    for combined heat and moisture transport in materials. There is a need for further elaboration of the importance of these issues, and it is the intent of this paper to contribute to such elaboration. The paper seeks to contribute to the knowledge base about such sorption characteristic by presenting some new...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  5. Temperature Dependence of GaN HEMT Small Signal Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Ali M. Darwish; Amr A. Ibrahim; H. Alfred Hung

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the temperature dependence of small signal parameters of GaN/SiC HEMTs across the 0–150°C range. The changes with temperature for transconductance ( m ), output impedance ( d s and d s ), feedback capacitance ( d g ), input capacitance ( g s ), and gate resistance ( g ) are measured. The variations with temperature are established for m , d s , d s , d g , g s , and g in the GaN technology. This information is useful for MMIC designs....

  6. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    The continuous production of gases at relatively high rates under fusion irradiation conditions may enhance the nucleation of cavities. This can cause dimensional changes and could induce embrittlement arising from gas accumulation on grain boundaries. Computer calculations have been made...... of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...

  7. Temperature-dependent Photodegradation in UV-resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hikaru; Saito, Yuika; Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Taguchi, Atushi; Verma, Prabhat; Kawata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Temperature-dependent photodegradation during UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy was investigated. Photodegradation was quantitatively probed by monitoring the temporal evolution of UV-resonance Raman spectra obtained from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) showing, resonance effect at a 355-nm excitation wavelength. At 80 K, the molecular photodecomposition rate was 5-times lower than that at room temperature. The decomposition rates of BChl were analyzed by the Arrhenius formula, indicating that the mechanism of photodegradation includes a thermal process having an activation energy of 1.4 kJ/mol.

  8. Measurement of Temperature Dependent Apparent Specific Heat Capacity in Electrosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaki, Wafaa; Akyildiz, Ali; Borca Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of temperature dependent apparent specific heat of ex-vivo porcine liver tissue during radiofrequency alternating current heating for a large temperature range. The difference between spatial and temporal evolution of experimental temperature, obtained during electrosurgical heating by infrared thermometry, and predictions based on finite element modeling was minimized to obtain the apparent specific heat. The model was based on transient heat transfer with internal heat generation considering heat storage along with conduction. Such measurements are important to develop computational models for real time simulation of electrosurgical procedures.

  9. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  10. Temperature-dependent imaging of living cells by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenel, Cedric; Giocondi, Marie-Cecile; Seantier, Bastien; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of lateral organization of plasma membranes is a prerequisite to the understanding of membrane structure-function relationships in living cells. Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions are responsible for the existence of various membrane microdomains involved in cell signalization and in numerous pathologies. Developing approaches for characterizing microdomains associate identification tools like recognition imaging with high-resolution topographical imaging. Membrane properties are markedly dependent on temperature. However, mesoscopic scale topographical information of cell surface in a temperature range covering most of cell biology experimentation is still lacking. In this work we have examined the possibility of imaging the temperature-dependent behavior of eukaryotic cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results establish that the surface of living CV1 kidney cells can be imaged by AFM, between 5 and 37 deg. C, both in contact and tapping modes. These first temperature-dependent data show that large cell structures appeared essentially stable at a microscopic scale. On the other hand, as shown by contact mode AFM, the surface was highly dynamic at a mesoscopic scale, with marked changes in apparent topography, friction, and deflection signals. When keeping the scanning conditions constant, a progressive loss in the image contrast was however observed, using tapping mode, on decreasing the temperature

  11. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence from CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yue Li; Li, Yong; Ji, Peng Fei; Zhou, Feng Qun; Sun, Xiao Jun; Yuan, Shu Qing; Wan, Ming Li [Pingdingshan University, Department of Physics, Solar New Energy Research Center, Pingdingshan (China); Ling, Hong [North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Department of Mathematics and Information Science, Zhengzhou (China)

    2016-12-15

    CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions have been fabricated by growing nanocrystal CdS (nc-CdS) on the silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) through using a chemical bath deposition method. The nanoheterojunctions have been constructed by three layers: the upper layer being a nc-CdS thin films, the intermediate layer being the interface region including nc-CdS and nanocrystal silicon (nc-Si), and the bottom layer being nc-Si layer grown on sc-Si substrate. The room temperature and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) have been measured and analyzed to provide some useful information of defect states. Utilizing the Gauss-Newton fitting method, five emission peaks from the temperature-dependent PL spectra can be determined. From the high energy to low energy, these five peaks are ascribed to the some luminescence centers which are formed by the oxygen-related deficiency centers in the silicon oxide layer of Si-NPA, the band gap emission of nc-CdS, the transition from the interstitial cadmium (I{sub Cd}) to the valence band, the recombination from I{sub Cd} to cadmium vacancies (V{sub Cd}), and from sulfur vacancies (V{sub s}) to the valence band, respectively. Understanding of the defect states in the CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions is very meaningful for the performance of devices based on CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions. (orig.)

  12. Temperature-dependent transport properties of FeRh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankovsky, S.; Polesya, S.; Chadova, K.; Ebert, H.; Staunton, J. B.; Gruenbaum, T.; Schoen, M. A. W.; Back, C. H.; Chen, X. Z.; Song, C.

    2017-04-01

    The finite-temperature transport properties of FeRh compounds are investigated by first-principles density-functional-theory-based calculations. The focus is on the behavior of the longitudinal resistivity with rising temperature, which exhibits an abrupt decrease at the metamagnetic transition point, T =Tm , between ferro- and antiferromagnetic phases. A detailed electronic structure investigation for T ≥0 K explains this feature and demonstrates the important role of (i) the difference of the electronic structure at the Fermi level between the two magnetically ordered states and (ii) the different degree of thermally induced magnetic disorder in the vicinity of Tm, giving different contributions to the resistivity. To support these conclusions, we also describe the temperature dependence of the spin-orbit-induced anomalous Hall resistivity and Gilbert damping parameter. For the various response quantities considered, the impact of thermal lattice vibrations and spin fluctuations on their temperature dependence is investigated in detail. Comparison with corresponding experimental data shows, in general, very good agreement.

  13. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17 degrees C nights, 23 degrees C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4 per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in (13)C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0 per thousand at 27 degrees C/33 degrees C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process

  14. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  15. Temperature dependence of low-frequency polarized Raman scattering spectra in TlInS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paucar, Raul; Wakita, Kazuki [Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Shim, YongGu; Mimura, Kojiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan); Alekperov, Oktay; Mamedov, Nazim [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-06-15

    In this work, we examined phase transitions in the layered ternary thallium chalcogenide TlInS{sub 2} by studying the temperature dependence of polarized Raman spectra with the aid of the Raman confocal microscope system. The Raman spectra were measured over the temperature range of 77-320 K (which includes the range of successive phase transitions) in the low-frequency region of 35-180 cm{sup -1}. The optical phonons that showed strong temperature dependence were identified as interlayer vibrations related to phase transitions, while the phonons that showed weak temperature dependence were identified as intralayer vibrations. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Galactic Dynamos and Density Wave Theory - Part Two - an Alternative Treatment for Strong Non-Axisymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, K.; Mestel, L.

    1993-12-01

    A steady density wave in a disc-like galaxy could lead to a spiral form for the crucial α-effect term in standard dynamo theory. We had earlier studied this problem under the thin-disc approximation and by effecting an approximate separation of variables between the z-dependence and the r, φ-dependences of the magnetic field. We return to this problem by making an alternative approximation of our equations, which allows a better treatment of the case of strong departures from axisymmetry, albeit with a cruder treatment of the z-dependence. The numerical solution of the equations reveals, as in our earlier work, the existence of rapidly growing, global, bisymmetric magnetic modes, corotating with the density wave. The modes extend several kiloparsecs around the radius r_c_ where the wave corotates with the gas. The magnetic spiral is closely aligned with the density wave in regions where it has maximum strength; leading within r_c_ and trailing outside. These results are remarkably similar to that obtained in our earlier work, under a very different approximation scheme, encouraging belief in the robustness of the results obtained in both papers.

  17. Relaxation of strongly coupled electron and phonon fields after photoemission and high-energy part of ARPES spectra of cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasnikova, A. E.; Zhileeva, E. A.; Moseykin, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    An approach to considering systems with a high concentration of correlated carriers and strong long-range electron–phonon interaction and to calculating the high-energy part of the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) spectra of such systems is suggested. Joint relaxation of strongly coupled fields—a field of correlated electrons and phonon field—after photoemission is studied to clarify the nature of characteristic features observed in the high-energy part of the ARPES spectra of cuprate superconductors. Such relaxation occurs in systems with strong predominantly long-range electron–phonon interaction at sufficiently high carrier concentration due to the coexistence of autolocalized and delocalized carriers. A simple method to calculate analytically a high-energy part of the ARPES spectrum arising is proposed. It takes advantage of using the coherent states basis for the phonon field in the polaron and bipolaron states. The approach suggested yields all the high-energy spectral features like broad Gaussian band and regions of ‘vertical dispersion’ being in good quantitative agreement with the experiments on cuprates at any doping with both types of carriers. Demonstrated coexistence of autolocalized and delocalized carriers in superconducting cuprates changes the idea about their ground state above the superconducting transition temperature that is important for understanding transport and magnetic properties. High density of large-radius autolocalized carriers revealed may be a key to the explanation of charge ordering in doped cuprates.

  18. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy

  19. Temperature-dependent chemical changes of metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Young Sang; Lee, Jeong Mook; KimJong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong Yun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    We observed the temperature-dependent variations of UZr alloy using surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive Xray spectroscope (EDS). In this work, we exhibited the results of XPS, Raman, XRD, and SEM-EDS for U-10wt%Zr alloy at room temperature, 610 and 1130 .deg. C. In SEM-EDS data, we observed that uranium and zirconium elements uniformly exist. After the annealing of U-10Zr sample at 1130 .deg. C, the formation of zirconium carbide is verified through Raman spectroscopy and XRD results. Additionally, the change of valence state for uranium element is also confirmed by XPS analysis.

  20. Temperature dependence of carrier capture by defects in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report examines the temperature dependence of the capture rate of carriers by defects in gallium arsenide and compares two previously published theoretical treatments of this based on multi phonon emission (MPE). The objective is to reduce uncertainty in atomistic simulations of gain degradation in III-V HBTs from neutron irradiation. A major source of uncertainty in those simulations is poor knowledge of carrier capture rates, whose values can differ by several orders of magnitude between various defect types. Most of this variation is due to different dependence on temperature, which is closely related to the relaxation of the defect structure that occurs as a result of the change in charge state of the defect. The uncertainty in capture rate can therefore be greatly reduced by better knowledge of the defect relaxation.

  1. Temperature dependence of the infrared optical constants of germanium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dandan, E-mail: ldd6162@163.com; Liu, Huasong; Jiang, Chenghui; Leng, Jian; Zhang, Yanmin; Zhao, Zhihong; Zhuang, Kewen; Jiang, Yugang; Ji, Yiqin

    2015-10-01

    High-temperature transmittance spectrum of germanium films was obtained by a Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy with a high-temperature accessory. The optical constants were determined by transmittance spectrum fitting with a Gaussian oscillator as the dispersion model. The analysis results showed that both the refractive index and extinction coefficient increased with the increasing temperature. The square of the refractive index increased linearly with the increasing temperature. The higher the temperature was, the faster the absorption coefficient increased. The germanium films were deposited on chemical vapor deposition ZnS substrates by ion-beam-assisted deposition. The region of temperature was between room temperature and 773 K, and the analysis spectrum was between 2000 nm and 5000 nm. - Highlights: • Temperature dependence of transmittance spectrum of Germanium films • Temperature properties of refractive index of Germanium films • Temperature properties of absorption coefficient of Germanium films.

  2. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced

  3. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced.

  4. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  5. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of spark plasma sintered alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheb Nouari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report temperature-dependent thermal properties of alumina powder and bulk alumina consolidated by spark plasma sintering method. The properties were measured between room temperature and 250ºC using a thermal constants analyzer. Alumina powder had very low thermal properties due to the presence of large pores and absence of bonding between its particles. Fully dense alumina with a relative density of 99.6 % was obtained at a sintering temperature of 1400°C and a holding time of 10 min. Thermal properties were found to mainly dependent on density. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat of the fully dense alumina were 34.44 W/mK, 7.62 mm2s-1, and 1.22 J/gK, respectively, at room temperature. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity decreased while specific heat increased with the increase in temperature from room temperature to 250ºC.

  6. Temperature dependence of muonium reaction rates in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, D.G.; Garner, D.M.; Mikula, R.J.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver

    1981-01-01

    A study of the temperature dependence of reaction rates has long been an important tool in establishing reaction pathways in chemical reactions. This is particularly true for the reactions of muonium (in comparison with those of hydrogen) since a measurement of the activation energy for chemical reaction is sensitive to both the height and the position of the potential barrier in the reaction plane. For collision controlled reactions, on the other hand, the reaction rate is expected to exhibit a weak T 1 sup(/) 2 dependence characteristic of the mean collision velocity. These concepts are discussed and their effects illustrated in a comparison of the chemical and spin exchange reaction rates of muonium and hydrogen in the temperature range approx.300-approx.500 K. (orig.)

  7. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-11

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  8. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in copper single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2018-03-01

    Transverse magnetoresistance of copper single crystals has been measured in the orientation of open-orbit from 2 K to 20 K for fields up to 9 T. The experimental Kohler's plots display deviation between individual curves below 16 K and overlap in the range of 16 K-20 K. The violation of the Kohler's rule below 16 K indicates that the magnetotransport can not be described by the classical theory of electron transport on spherical Fermi surface with a single relaxation time. A theoretical model incorporating two energy bands, spherical and cylindrical, with different relaxation times has been developed to describe the magnetoresistance data. The calculations show that the electron-phonon scattering rates at belly and neck regions of the Fermi surface have different temperature dependencies, and in general, they do not follow T3 law. The ratio of the relaxation times in belly and neck regions decreases parabolically with temperature as A - CT2 , with A and C being constants.

  9. Temperature Dependent Variations of Phonon Interactions in Nanocrystalline Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandha Dogra Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of nanocrystalline CeO2 was investigated in the temperature range of 80–440 K. The anharmonic constants have been derived from the shift in phonon modes fitted to account for the anharmonic contributions as well as the thermal expansion contribution using the high pressure parameters derived from our own high pressure experimental data reported previously. The total anharmonicity has also been estimated from the true anharmonicity as well as quasiharmonic component. In the line-width variation analysis, the cubic anharmonic term was found to dominate the quartic term. Finally, the phonon lifetime also reflected the trend so observed.

  10. Temperature dependence effect of viscosity on ultrathin lubricant film melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V.Khomenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the melting of an ultrathin lubricant film under friction between atomically flat surfaces at temperature dependencies of viscosity described by Vogel-Fulcher relationship and by power expression, which are observed experimentally. It is shown that the critical temperature exists in both cases the exceeding of which leads to the melting of lubricant and, as a result, the sliding mode of friction sets in. The values of characteristic parameters of lubricant are defined, which are needed for friction reduction. In the systems, where the Vogel-Fulcher dependence is fulfilled, it is possible to choose the parameters at which the melting of lubricant takes place even at zero temperature of friction surfaces. The deformational defect of the shear modulus is taken into account in describing the lubricant melting according to the mechanism of the first-order transition.

  11. Temperature dependence of the acid base equilibrium constants of substituted pyridine N-oxides in acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Ewa; Wróbel, Roman; Liwo, Adam; Chmurzyński, Lech

    1999-03-01

    Temperature dependence of acid-base equilibrium constants in systems consisting of substituted pyridine N-oxides was studied in acetonitrile, a strongly ionizing polar protophobic aprotic solvent. N-oxides, which have an enhanced tendency towards formation of cationic homo- and heteroconjugates, (OHO +) as a result of their relatively strong basicity, were investigated. For the sake of comparison, also aliphatic trimethylamine N-oxide and pyridine, the parent compound of its N-oxide, were included. Of particular interest were acid dissociation constants of cations of the protonated bases, homoconjugation equilibria of the cationic acids with conjugate bases, as well as cationic heteroconjugation equilibria of the protonated bases with non-conjugated bases. The constants were determined at three temperatures, 292.1, 298.1 and 304.1 K. On the basis of the temperature dependence of the constants, enthalpy changes were calculated for the acid dissociation of the cationic acids, as well as for cationic homo- and heteroconjugation. These values were derived from the known thermodynamic relationships, Δ G = - RTln K and Δ G = Δ H - TΔ S. It has been found that enthalpy changes for the dissociation reactions of the cationic acids and for cationic homoconjugation reactions are consistent with the variations of the protonation and homoconjugation energies, respectively calculated by both the semi-empirical and the ab initio methods on the 4-31G level.

  12. Temperature Dependences of Mechanisms Responsible for the Water-Vapor Continuum Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The water-vapor continuum absorption plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H2O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: far-wings of allowed transition lines, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of absorptions from the far-wings of the strong allowed transition lines. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed, and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the continuum characters mentioned above. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the continuum absorption.

  13. Temperature dependent conformation studies of Calmodulin Protein using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Sahil; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Negi, Sunita

    2016-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) protein plays a very crucial role in the calcium signaling inside the eukaryotic cell structure [1, 2]. It can also bind to other proteins/targets and facilitate various activities inside the cell [3, 4]. Temperature dependent conformation changes in the CaM protein are studied with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The quantitative comparison of simulation data with various forms of experimental results probing different aspects of the folding process can facilitate robust assessment of the accuracy of the calculations. It can also provide a detailed structural interpretation for the experimental observations as well as physical interpretation for theory behind different aspects of the experiment. Earlier these kinds of studies have been performed experimentally using fluorescence measurements as in [5]. The calcium bound form of CaM is observed to undergo a reversible conformation change in the range 295-301 K at calcium ion concentration 150 mM. The transition temperature was observed to depend on the calcium ion concentration of the protein. Leap-dynamics approach was used earlier to study the temperature dependent conformation change of CaM [6]. At 290 K, both the N- and C-lobes were stable, at 325 K, the C-lobe unfolds whereas at 360 both the lobes unfold [6]. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of 100 ns each for the temperatures 325 K and 375 K on the apo form of CaM, 3CLN and 1CFD. A remarkable dependence of the temperature is observed on the overall dynamics of both the forms of the protein as reported in our earlier study [7, 8]. 1CFD shows a much flexible linker as compared to 3CLN whereas the overall dynamics of the lobes mainly N-lobe is observed to be more in later case. Salt bridge formation between the residues 2 (ASP) and 148 (LYS) leads to a more compact form of 1CFD at 325 K. The unfolding of the protein is observed to increase with the increase in the temperature similar to the earlier reported

  14. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Young, Peter R.; Stenborg, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode have revealed large areas of high-speed outflows at the periphery of many solar active regions. These outflows are of interest because they may connect to the heliosphere and contribute to the solar wind. In this paper, we use slit rasters from EIS in combination with narrowband slot imaging to study the temperature dependence and morphology of an outflow region and show that it is more complicated than previously thought. Outflows are observed primarily in emission lines from Fe XI to Fe XV. Observations at lower temperatures (Si VII), in contrast, show bright fan-like structures that are dominated by inflows. These data also indicate that the morphology of the outflows and the fans is different, outflows are observed in regions where there is no emission in Si VII. This suggests that the fans, which are often associated with outflows in studies involving imaging data, are not directly related to the active region outflows.

  15. Temperature dependence of 1H chemical shifts in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, Nicola J.; Williamson, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured by 2D NMR methods for the amide and CαH proton chemical shifts in two globular proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and hen egg-white lysozyme.The temperature-dependent changes in chemical shift are generally linear up to about 15 deg. below the global denaturation temperature, and the derived coefficients span a range of roughly -16 to +2 ppb/K for amide protons and -4 to +3 ppb/K for CαH. The temperature coefficients can be rationalized by the assumption that heating causes increases in thermal motion in the protein. Precise calculations of temperature coefficients derived from protein coordinates are not possible,since chemical shifts are sensitive to small changes in atomic coordinates.Amide temperature coefficients correlate well with the location of hydrogen bonds as determined by crystallography. It is concluded that a combined use of both temperature coefficients and exchange rates produces a far more reliable indicator of hydrogen bonding than either alone. If an amide proton exchanges slowly and has a temperature coefficient more positive than-4.5 ppb/K, it is hydrogen bonded, while if it exchanges rapidly and has a temperature coefficient more negative than -4.5 ppb/K, it is not hydrogen bonded. The previously observed unreliability of temperature coefficients as measures of hydrogen bonding in peptides may arise from losses of peptide secondary structure on heating

  16. Temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants for different plant sesquiterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-11-01

    Sesquiterpenes are plant-produced hydrocarbons with important ecological functions in plant-to-plant and plant-to-insect communication, but due to their high reactivity they can also play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. So far, there is little information of gas/liquid phase partition coefficients (Henry's law constants) and their temperature dependencies for sesquiterpenes, but this information is needed for quantitative simulation of the release of sesquiterpenes from plants and modeling atmospheric reactions in different phases. In this study, we estimated Henry's law constants (Hpc) and their temperature responses for 12 key plant sesquiterpenes with varying structure (aliphatic, mono-, bi- and tricyclic sesquiterpenes). At 25 °C, Henry's law constants varied 1.4-fold among different sesquiterpenes, and the values were within the range previously observed for monocyclic monoterpenes. Hpc of sesquiterpenes exhibited a high rate of increase, on average ca. 1.5-fold with a 10 °C increase in temperature (Q10). The values of Q10 varied 1.2-fold among different sesquiterpenes. Overall, these data demonstrate moderately high variation in Hpc values and Hpc temperature responses among different sesquiterpenes. We argue that these variations can importantly alter the emission kinetics of sesquiterpenes from plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Temperature dependent kinematic viscosity of different types of engine oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Severa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to measure how the viscosity of engine oil changes with temperature. Six different commercially distributed engine oils (primarily intended for motorcycle engines of 10W–40 viscosity grade have been evaluated. Four of the oils were of synthetic type, two of semi–synthetic type. All oils have been assumed to be Newtonian fluids, thus flow curves have not been determined. Oils have been cooled to below zero temperatures and under controlled temperature regulation, kinematic viscosity (mm2 / s have been measured in the range of −5 °C and +115 °C. Anton Paar digital viscometer with concentric cylinders geometry has been used. In accordance with expected behavior, kinematic viscosity of all oils was decreasing with increasing temperature. Viscosity was found to be independent on oil’s density. Temperature dependence has been modeled using se­ve­ral mathematical models – Vogel equation, Arrhenius equation, polynomial, and Gaussian equation. The best match between experimental and computed data has been achieved for Gaussian equation (R2 = 0.9993. Knowledge of viscosity behavior of an engine oil as a function of its temperature is of great importance, especially when considering running efficiency and performance of combustion engines. Proposed models can be used for description and prediction of rheological behavior of engine oils.

  18. Unraveling the Transcriptional Basis of Temperature-Dependent Pinoxaden Resistance in Brachypodium hybridum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maor Matzrafi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change endangers food security and our ability to feed the ever-increasing human population. Weeds are the most important biotic stress, reducing crop-plant productivity worldwide. Chemical control, the main approach for weed management, can be strongly affected by temperature. Previously, we have shown that temperature-dependent non-target site (NTS resistance of Brachypodium hybridum is due to enhanced detoxification of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors. Here, we explored the transcriptional basis of this phenomenon. Plants were characterized for the transcriptional response to herbicide application, high-temperature and their combination, in an attempt to uncover the genetic basis of temperature-dependent pinoxaden resistance. Even though most of the variance among treatments was due to pinoxaden application (61%, plants were able to survive pinoxaden application only when grown under high-temperatures. Biological pathways and expression patterns of members of specific gene families, previously shown to be involved in NTS metabolic resistance to different herbicides, were examined. Cytochrome P450, glucosyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase genes were found to be up-regulated in response to pinoxaden application under both control and high-temperature conditions. However, biological pathways related to oxidation and glucose conjugation were found to be significantly enriched only under the combination of pinoxaden application and high-temperature. Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS was conducted at several time points after treatment using a probe detecting H2O2/peroxides. Comparison of ROS accumulation among treatments revealed a significant reduction in ROS quantities 24 h after pinoxaden application only under high-temperature conditions. These results may indicate significant activity of enzymatic ROS scavengers that can be correlated with the activation of herbicide-resistance mechanisms. This study shows that up

  19. Temperature-dependent electronic decay profiles in CZT: probe of bulk and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessick, Royal; Maupin, Hugh; Tepper, Gary C.; Szeles, Csaba

    2003-01-01

    The electronic performance of CZT-based gamma radiation spectrometers is governed by a synergism of bulk and surface properties. Compensation is used to increase the bulk resistivity of Cd1-xZnxTe (x~0.1), but the same electronic states that are introduced to increase the material resistivity can also trap charge and reduce the carrier lifetime. Electrical and mechanical surface defects introduced during or subsequent to crystal harvesting are also known to interfere with device performance. Using a contactless, pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation technique, electronic decay profiles were studied in high pressure Bridgman CZT as a function of temperature. The electronic decay profile was found to depend very strongly on temperature and was modeled using a function consisting of two exponential terms with temperature-dependent amplitudes and time constants. The model was used to relate the observed temperature dependent decay kinetics in CZT to specific trap energies. It was found that, at low temperatures, the electronic decay process is dominated by a deep trap with an energy of approximately 0.69 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. As the temperature is increased, the charge trapping becomes dominated by a second trap with an energy of approximately 0.60 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. Surface damage introduces additional charge traps that significantly alter the decay kinetics particularly at low temperatures.

  20. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Wikfeldt, K. Thor; Skinner, Lawrie B.; Benmore, Chris J.; Nilsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates a collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ∼13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ∼20 K.

  1. Study on temperature-dependent carrier transport for bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yali; Li, Weilong; Qi, Mei; Li, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yixuan; Ren, Zhaoyu

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the temperature-dependent carrier transport property of the bilayer graphene, graphene films were synthesized on Cu foils by a home-built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with C2H2. Samples regularity, transmittance (T) and layer number were analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) images, transmittance spectra and Raman spectra. Van Der Pauw method was used for resistivity measurements and Hall measurements at different temperatures. The results indicated that the sheet resistance (Rs), carrier density (n), and mobility (μ) were 1096.20 Ω/sq, 0.75×1012 cm-2, and 7579.66 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature, respectively. When the temperature increased from 0 °C to 240 °C, carrier density (n) increased from 0.66×1012 cm-2 to 1.55×1012 cm-2, sheet resistance (Rs) decreased from 1215.55 Ω/sq to 560.77 Ω/sq, and mobility (μ) oscillated around a constant value 7773.99 cm2 V-1 s-1. The decrease of the sheet resistance (Rs) indicated that the conductive capability of the bilayer graphene film increased with the temperature. The significant cause of the increase of carrier density (n) was the thermal activation of carriers from defects and unconscious doping states. Because the main influence on the carrier mobility (μ) was the lattice defect scattering and a small amount of impurity scattering, the carrier mobility (μ) was temperature-independent for the bilayer graphene.

  2. NMR-based microbial metabolomics and the temperature-dependent coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Vizcaino, Maria I; Meyers, Alexander; Pollock, Elizabeth C; Huynh, Sara Lien; Schock, Tracey B; Morris, Pamela J; Bearden, Daniel W

    2009-10-15

    Coral bleaching occurs when the symbioses between coral animals and their zooxanthellae is disrupted, either as part of a natural cycle or as the result of unusual events. The bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus (type strain ATCC BAA-450) has been linked to coral disease globally (for example in the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Great Barrier Reef) and like many other Vibrio species exhibits a temperature-dependent pathogenicity. The temperature-dependence of V. corallillyticus in regard to its metabolome was investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained of methanol-water extracts of intracellula rmetabolites (endometabolome) from multiple samples of the bacteria cultured into late stationary phase at 27 degrees C (virulent form) and 24 degrees C (avirulent form). The spectra were subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and significant temperature-based separations in PC1, PC2, and PC3 dimensions were observed. Betaine, succinate, and glutamate were identified as metabolites that caused the greatest temperature-based separations in the PC scores plots. With increasing temperature, betaine was shown to be down regulated, while succinate and glutamate were up regulated.

  3. Solubility Temperature Dependence Predicted from 2D Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avdeef

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to find a computational procedure to normalize solubility data determined at various temperatures (e.g., 10 – 50 oC to values at a “reference” temperature (e.g., 25 °C. A simple procedure was devised to predict enthalpies of solution, ΔHsol, from which the temperature dependence of intrinsic (uncharged form solubility, log S0, could be calculated. As dependent variables, values of ΔHsol at 25 °C were subjected to multiple linear regression (MLR analysis, using melting points (mp and Abraham solvation descriptors. Also, the enthalpy data were subjected to random forest regression (RFR and recursive partition tree (RPT analyses. A total of 626 molecules were examined, drawing on 2040 published solubility values measured at various temperatures, along with 77 direct calori    metric measurements. The three different prediction methods (RFR, RPT, MLR all indicated that the estimated standard deviations in the enthalpy data are 11-15 kJ mol-1, which is concordant with the 10 kJ mol-1 propagation error estimated from solubility measurements (assuming 0.05 log S errors, and consistent with the 7 kJ mol-1 average reproducibility in enthalpy values from interlaboratory replicates. According to the MLR model, higher values of mp, H‑bond acidity, polarizability/dipolarity, and dispersion forces relate to more positive (endothermic enthalpy values. However, molecules that are large and have high H-bond basicity are likely to possess negative (exothermic enthalpies of solution. With log S0 values normalized to 25 oC, it was shown that the interlaboratory average standard deviations in solubility measurement are reduced to 0.06 ‑ 0.17 log unit, with higher errors for the least-soluble druglike molecules. Such improvements in data mining are expected to contribute to more reliable in silico prediction models of solubility for use in drug discovery.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Henry's Law Constants of Atmospheric Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Roberts, Jason E; Dwebi, Iman; Chon, Nara; Liu, Yong

    2015-08-20

    There has been growing interest in understanding atmospheric amines in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase because of their potential roles in cloud chemistry, secondary organic aerosol formation, and the fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants (KH) of atmospheric amines, a key parameter in atmospheric chemical transport models to account for mass transfer, are mostly unavailable. In this work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibria of five prevalent atmospheric amines, namely 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine using bubble column technique. We reported effective KH, intrinsic KH, and gas phase diffusion coefficients of these species over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere for the first time. The measured KH at 298 K and enthalpy of solution for 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine are 61.4 ± 4.9 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.0 ± 4.8 kJ mol(-1); 14.5 ± 1.2 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -72.5 ± 6.8 kJ mol(-1); 8.9 ± 0.7 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.6 ± 4.7 kJ mol(-1); 103.5 ± 10.4 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -42.7 ± 4.3 kJ mol(-1); and 952.2 ± 114.3 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -82.7 ± 9.7 kJ mol(-1), respectively. In addition, we evaluated amines' characteristic times to achieve gas-liquid equilibrium for partitioning between gas and aqueous phases. Results show gas-liquid equilibrium can be rapidly established at natural cloud droplets surface, but the characteristic times may be extended substantially at lower temperatures and pHs. Moreover, our findings imply that atmospheric amines are more likely to exist in cloud droplets, and ambient temperature, water content, and pH of aerosols play important roles in their partitioning.

  5. Bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets viscoelasticity and temperature dependency in the draping process

    CERN Document Server

    Ropers, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Within the scope of this work, Steffen Ropers evaluates the viscoelastic and temperature-dependent nature of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets in order to further enhance the predictability of the draping simulation. This simulation is a useful tool for the development of robust large scale processes for continuously fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). The bending behavior thereby largely influences the size and position of wrinkles, which are one of the most common processing defects for continuously fiber-reinforced parts. Thus, a better understanding of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets as well as an appropriate testing method along with corresponding material models contribute to a wide-spread application of CFRPs in large scale production. Contents Thermoplastic Prepregs Draping Simulation of Thermoplastic Prepregs Bending Characterization of Textile Composites Modeling of Bending Behavior Target Groups Researchers and students in the field of polymer, lightweight,...

  6. Temperature dependence of flexoelectricity in BaTiO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} perovskite nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbarki, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Haskins, J.B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Kinaci, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cagin, T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-06-13

    Piezoelectricity is a property of non-centrosymmetric crystals. In most typically used ferroelectrics, this property is lost as the temperature is increased beyond the Curie point thus strongly reducing the availability of efficient materials that can be used for high temperature energy harvesting. Flexoelectricity, as can be shown from simple symmetry arguments, is a universal and linear electromechanical coupling that dictates the development of polarization upon application of inhomogeneous strains. The implications of this phenomenon become amplified at the nanoscale. In this communication, we develop a molecular dynamics approach predicated on a specially tailored interatomic force-field to extract the temperature dependence of flexoelectricity. Surprisingly, we find that it, at least for Barium Titanate and Strontium Titanate nano structures, increases with temperature. Apart from cataloging this interesting observation for the future use in high temperature energy harvesting, we also examine the physical mechanisms that lead to the observed temperature dependence.

  7. Temperature dependence of flexoelectricity in BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 perovskite nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbarki, R.; Haskins, J.B.; Kinaci, A.; Cagin, T.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectricity is a property of non-centrosymmetric crystals. In most typically used ferroelectrics, this property is lost as the temperature is increased beyond the Curie point thus strongly reducing the availability of efficient materials that can be used for high temperature energy harvesting. Flexoelectricity, as can be shown from simple symmetry arguments, is a universal and linear electromechanical coupling that dictates the development of polarization upon application of inhomogeneous strains. The implications of this phenomenon become amplified at the nanoscale. In this communication, we develop a molecular dynamics approach predicated on a specially tailored interatomic force-field to extract the temperature dependence of flexoelectricity. Surprisingly, we find that it, at least for Barium Titanate and Strontium Titanate nano structures, increases with temperature. Apart from cataloging this interesting observation for the future use in high temperature energy harvesting, we also examine the physical mechanisms that lead to the observed temperature dependence

  8. Temperature dependence of flexoelectricity in BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 perovskite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbarki, R.; Haskins, J. B.; Kinaci, A.; Cagin, T.

    2014-06-01

    Piezoelectricity is a property of non-centrosymmetric crystals. In most typically used ferroelectrics, this property is lost as the temperature is increased beyond the Curie point thus strongly reducing the availability of efficient materials that can be used for high temperature energy harvesting. Flexoelectricity, as can be shown from simple symmetry arguments, is a universal and linear electromechanical coupling that dictates the development of polarization upon application of inhomogeneous strains. The implications of this phenomenon become amplified at the nanoscale. In this communication, we develop a molecular dynamics approach predicated on a specially tailored interatomic force-field to extract the temperature dependence of flexoelectricity. Surprisingly, we find that it, at least for Barium Titanate and Strontium Titanate nano structures, increases with temperature. Apart from cataloging this interesting observation for the future use in high temperature energy harvesting, we also examine the physical mechanisms that lead to the observed temperature dependence.

  9. Rate of egg maturation in marine turtles exhibits 'universal temperature dependence'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sam B; Blount, Jonathan D; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J; Broderick, Annette C

    2011-09-01

    1. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) predicts that, after correcting for body mass variation among organisms, the rates of most biological processes will vary as a universal function of temperature. However, empirical support for 'universal temperature dependence' (UTD) is currently equivocal and based on studies of a limited number of traits. 2. In many ectothermic animals, the rate at which females produce mature eggs is temperature dependent and may be an important factor in determining the costs of reproduction. 3. We tested whether the rate of egg maturation in marine turtles varies with environmental temperature as predicted by MTE, using the time separating successive clutches of individual females to estimate the rate at which eggs are formed. We also assessed the phenotypic contribution to this rate, by using radio telemetry to make repeated measurements of interclutch intervals for individual green turtles (Chelonia mydas). 4. Rates of egg maturation increased with seasonally increasing water temperatures in radio-tracked green turtles, but were not repeatable for individual females, and did not vary according to maternal body size or reproductive investment (number and size of eggs produced). 5. Using a collated data set from several different populations and species of marine turtles, we then show that a single relationship with water temperature explains most of the variation in egg maturation rates, with a slope that is statistically indistinguishable from the UTD predicted by MTE. However, several alternative statistical models also described the relationship between temperature and egg maturation rates equally parsimoniously. 6. Our results offer novel support for the MTE's predicted UTD of biological rates, although the underlying mechanisms require further study. The strong temperature dependence of egg maturation combined with the apparently weak phenotypic contribution to this rate has interesting behavioural implications in ectothermic

  10. Temperature dependent transport characteristics of graphene/n-Si diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parui, S.; Ruiter, R.; Zomer, P. J.; Wojtaszek, M.; van Wees, B. J.; Banerjee, T.

    2014-01-01

    Realizing an optimal Schottky interface of graphene on Si is challenging, as the electrical transport strongly depends on the graphene quality and the fabrication processes. Such interfaces are of increasing research interest for integration in diverse electronic devices as they are thermally and

  11. What is the temperature dependence of the Casimir effect?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeye, J S [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Brevik, I [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Aarseth, J B [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Milton, K A [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2006-05-19

    There has been recent criticism of our approach to the Casimir force between real metallic surfaces at finite temperature, saying it is in conflict with the third law of thermodynamics and in contradiction with experiment. We show that these claims are unwarranted, and that our approach has strong theoretical support, while the experimental situation is still unclear.

  12. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  13. Temperature-dependent residual shear strength characteristics of smectite-bearing landslide soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Tatsuya; Matsuura, Sumio; Hasegawa, Yoichi

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents experimental investigations regarding the effect of temperature on the residual strength of landslide soils at slow-to-moderate shearing velocities. We performed ring-shear tests on 23 soil samples at temperatures of 6-29°C. The test results show that the shear strength of smectite-rich soils decreased when temperatures were relatively low. These positive temperature effects (strength losses at lower temperatures) observed for smectite-bearing soils are typical under relatively slow shearing rates. In contrast, under relatively high shearing rates, strength was gained as temperature decreased. As rheological properties of smectite suspensions are sensitive to environmental factors, such as temperature, pH, and dissolved ions, we inferred that temperature-dependent residual strengths of smectitic soils are also attributed to their specific rheological properties. Visual and scanning electron microscope observations of Ca-bentonite suggest that slickensided shear surfaces at slow shearing rates are very shiny and smooth, whereas those at moderate shearing rates are not glossy and are slightly turbulent, indicating that platy smectite particles are strongly orientated at slow velocities. The positive temperature effect is probably due to temperature-dependent microfriction that is mobilized in the parallel directions of the sheet structure of hydrous smectite particles. On the contrary, the influence of microviscous resistance, which appears in the vertical directions of the lamination, is assumed to increase at faster velocities. Our results imply that if slip-surface soils contain high fractions of smectite, decreases in ground temperature can lead to lowered shear resistance of the slip surface and trigger slow landslide movement.

  14. Temperature-dependent THz vibrational spectra of clenbuterol hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YuPing; Lei, XiangYun; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Zhenwei

    2013-04-01

    Using the high-resolution Terahertz Time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the standard sample pellet technique, the far-infrared vibrational spectra of clenbuterol hydrochloride (CH), a β 2-adrenergic agonist for decreasing fat deposition and enhancing protein accretion, were measured in temperature range of 77-295 K. Between 0.2 and 3.6 THz (6.6-120.0 cm-1), seven highly resolved spectral features, strong line-narrowing and a frequency blue-shift were observed with cooling. However, ractopamine hydrochloride, with some structural and pharmacological similarities to clenbuterol hydrochloride, showed no spectral features, indicating high sensitivity and strong specificity of THz-TDS. These results could be used for the rapid and nondestructive CH residual detection in food safety control.

  15. Microstructural effects on the yield strength and its temperature dependence in a bainitic precipitation hardened Cr-Mo-V steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.; Kotilainen, H.; Nenonen, P.

    1980-03-01

    The plastic deformation behaviour of a precipitation hardened bainitic Cr-Mo-V steel is analyzed at ambient and low temperatures. The temperature dependent component of the yield strength is composed of the Peierls-Nabarro force and also partly of the strengthening contribution of the lath- and cell boundaries or the solid solution hardening. The temperature dependence below 230 K is in accordance with the models presented by Yanoshevich and Ryvkina as well as Dorn and Rajnak. The temperature independent component can be calculated merely from the dislocation density, which is stabilized by the vanadium-rich carbides. The linear additivity cannot be used for the superposition of the strengthening effects of various strengthening parameters, By using the phenomenological approach starting from the dislocation movement mechanisms upon yielding the laws for the superposition are discussed. (author)

  16. Temperature-dependent and optimized thermal emission by spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, K. L.; Merchiers, O.; Chapuis, P.-O.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the temperature and size dependencies of thermal emission by homogeneous spheres as a function of their dielectric properties. Different power laws obtained in this work show that the emitted power can depart strongly from the usual fourth power of temperature given by Planck's law and from the square or the cube of the radius. We also show how to optimize the thermal emission by selecting permittivities leading to resonances, which allow for the so-called super-Planckian regime. These results will be useful as spheres, i.e. the simplest finite objects, are often considered as building blocks of more complex objects.

  17. Carbonate clumped isotope variability in shallow water corals: Temperature dependence and growth-related vital effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Casey; Affek, Hagit P.; Felis, Thomas; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Lough, Janice M.; Holcomb, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Geochemical variations in shallow water corals provide a valuable archive of paleoclimatic information. However, biological effects can complicate the interpretation of these proxies, forcing their application to rely on empirical calibrations. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry (Δ47) is a novel paleotemperature proxy based on the temperature dependent "clumping" of 13C-18O bonds. Similar Δ47-temperature relationships in inorganically precipitated calcite and a suite of biogenic carbonates provide evidence that carbonate clumped isotope variability may record absolute temperature without a biological influence. However, large departures from expected values in the winter growth of a hermatypic coral provided early evidence for possible Δ47 vital effects. Here, we present the first systematic survey of Δ47 in shallow water corals. Sub-annual Red Sea Δ47 in two Porites corals shows a temperature dependence similar to inorganic precipitation experiments, but with a systematic offset toward higher Δ47 values that consistently underestimate temperature by ˜8 °C. Additional analyses of Porites, Siderastrea, Astrangia and Caryophyllia corals argue against a number of potential mechanisms as the leading cause for this apparent Δ47 vital effect including: salinity, organic matter contamination, alteration during sampling, the presence or absence of symbionts, and interlaboratory differences in analytical protocols. However, intra- and inter-coral comparisons suggest that the deviation from expected Δ47 increases with calcification rate. Theoretical calculations suggest this apparent link with calcification rate is inconsistent with pH-dependent changes in dissolved inorganic carbon speciation and with kinetic effects associated with CO2 diffusion into the calcifying space. However, the link with calcification rate may be related to fractionation during the hydration/hydroxylation of CO2 within the calcifying space. Although the vital effects we describe will

  18. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  19. Temperature-dependent infrared reflectivity studies of multiferroic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have measured near normal incidence far-infrared (FIR) reflectivity spec- tra of a single crystal of TbMnO3 from 10 K to 300 K in the spectral range of 50 cm−1–700 cm−1. Fifteen transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) modes are identified in the imaginary part of the dielectric function ε2(ω) and energy ...

  20. Temperature dependence of lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As on GaAs substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    We measure the temperature dependence of the lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As by X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As shows similar temperature dependence to that of GaAs, and no obvious change is observed in the vicinity of its Curie temperature.

  1. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.L.; Wang, J.L., E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Tian, B.B.; Liu, B.L.; Zou, Y.H.; Wang, X.D.; Sun, S.; Sun, J.L., E-mail: jlsun@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Meng, X.J.; Chu, J.H.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The ferroelectric polymer was fabricated by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • The electrons as the dominant injected carrier were conformed in the ferroelectric polymer films. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms in ferroelectric polymer were investigated. - Abstract: The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel–Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed.

  2. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Mahajan, R L

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present our experimental results on the determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues using a transient technique based on the principles of the cylindrical hot-wire method. A novel, 1.45 mm diameter, 50 mm long hot-wire probe was deployed. Initial measurements were made on sponge, gelatin and Styrofoam insulation to test the accuracy of the probe. Subsequent experiments conducted on sheep collagen in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity to be a linear function of temperature. Further, these changes in the thermal conductivity were found to be reversible. However, when the tissue was heated beyond 55 degrees C, irreversible changes in thermal conductivity were observed. Similar experiments were also conducted for determining the thermal conductivity of cow liver. In this case, the irreversible effects were found to set in much later at around 90 degrees C. Below this temperature, in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity, as for sheep collagen, varied linearly with temperature. In the second part of our study, in vivo measurements were taken on the different organs of a living pig. Comparison with reported values for dead tissues shows the thermal conductivities of living organs to be higher, indicating thereby the dominant role played by blood perfusion in enhancing the net heat transfer in living tissues. The degree of enhancement is different in different organs and shows a direct dependence on the blood flow rate.

  3. Phase dependent impedance and temperature dependent response of microwave SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callegari, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    We report measurements of the microwave impedance of superconducting point contacts as a function of the quantum mechanical phase difference phi. They yield a conductance of the form G(phi) = G/sub o/(1+alpha cos phi) where alpha is a dimensionless parameter reflecting an interference between the Cooper pairs and the quasiparticles. Experimental results agree with a negative alpha approximately equal to -.5 which can be interpreted in terms of a phenomenological model that follows essentially the Time Dependent Landau Ginzburg theory (TDLG). In the second part we report measurements of the response of a microwave SQUID using a Ta point contact at various temperatures. They give a progression of operating conditions from the non-hysteretic to the hysteretic mode. The responses calculated by Soerensen and by Burhman and Jackel are in qualitative agreement with the measurements. We also present a theory based on a calculation of the reflection coefficient from the point contact. This theory reproduces the results of Bunhman and Jackel and Soerensen and is directly adaptable to our microwave geometry. In the last chapter we present a calculation that exhibits explicitly the dependence of the response on OMEGA = PHI/sub o/nu/I/sub X sub/R where nu is the microwave frequency, I/sub c/ and R the critical current and resistance of the junction and PHI/sub o/ fluxoid quantum, and that agrees with their data and their interpretation of it in terms of a limiting time tau for the supercurrent response with tau varies as DELTA(T)/sup -1/ where DELTA (T) is the BCS gap parameter

  4. The temperature dependence of pulse shape discrimination with NE213 scintillation counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, R.B.; Sharaf, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the pulse shape discrimination between neutrons and gamma rays has been investigated for two scintillation counters using NE213 liquid scintillator. One counter used the zero cross-over timing technique of pulse shape discrimination and showed no significant temperature dependence over the range 35 to -8 0 C. The other used the space charge saturation technique of pulse shape discrimination and showed a marked temperature dependence. The findings are compared with previously published contradictory results. The influence of temperature on the gain of the detectors is found to be more important than the influence on the pulse shape discrimination. (orig.)

  5. Annealing temperature dependence of exchange bias in BiFeO3/CoFe bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T.; Naganuma, H.; Wang, W. X.; Ando, Y.; Han, X. F.

    2012-04-01

    BiFeO3/CoFe bilayers with different BiFeO3 (BFO) crystalities were fabricated by chemical solution deposition and sputtering method. Exchange bias has been successfully induced in these bilayers by post-annealing. The annealing temperature dependence of exchange bias as well as coercivity was investigated. Two kinds of annealing temperature dependence behaviors were observed. It is found that, similar to the conventional antiferromagnet/ferromagnet system, the temperature dependence of exchange bias is dominated by direct interface coupling, and the crystality of BFO has no profound effect on exchange bias.

  6. Temperature-dependent elastic properties of Ti1−xAlxN alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulumba, Nina; Hellman, Olle; Rogström, Lina; Raza, Zamaan; Tasnádi, Ferenc; Odén, Magnus; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Ti 1−x Al x N is a technologically important alloy that undergoes a process of high temperature age-hardening that is strongly influenced by its elastic properties. We have performed first principles calculations of the elastic constants and anisotropy using the symmetry imposed force constant temperature dependent effective potential method, which include lattice vibrations and therefore the effects of temperature, including thermal expansion and intrinsic anharmonicity. These are compared with in situ high temperature x-ray diffraction measurements of the lattice parameter. We show that anharmonic effects are crucial to the recovery of finite temperature elasticity. The effects of thermal expansion and intrinsic anharmonicity on the elastic constants are of the same order, and cannot be considered separately. Furthermore, the effect of thermal expansion on elastic constants is such that the volume change induced by zero point motion has a significant effect. For TiAlN, the elastic constants soften non-uniformly with temperature: C 11 decreases substantially when the temperature increases for all compositions, resulting in an increased anisotropy. These findings suggest that an increased Al content and annealing at higher temperatures will result in a harder alloy

  7. Temperature dependent evolution of wrinkled single-crystal silicon ribbons on shape memory polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Kai; Qi, H Jerry; Xiao, Jianliang

    2017-10-25

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can remember two or more distinct shapes, and thus can have a lot of potential applications. This paper presents combined experimental and theoretical studies on the wrinkling of single-crystal Si ribbons on SMPs and the temperature dependent evolution. Using the shape memory effect of heat responsive SMPs, this study provides a method to build wavy forms of single-crystal silicon thin films on top of SMP substrates. Silicon ribbons obtained from a Si-on-insulator (SOI) wafer are released and transferred onto the surface of programmed SMPs. Then such bilayer systems are recovered at different temperatures, yielding well-defined, wavy profiles of Si ribbons. The wavy profiles are shown to evolve with time, and the evolution behavior strongly depends on the recovery temperature. At relatively low recovery temperatures, both wrinkle wavelength and amplitude increase with time as evolution progresses. Finite element analysis (FEA) accounting for the thermomechanical behavior of SMPs is conducted to study the wrinkling of Si ribbons on SMPs, which shows good agreement with experiment. Merging of wrinkles is observed in FEA, which could explain the increase of wrinkle wavelength observed in the experiment. This study can have important implications for smart stretchable electronics, wrinkling mechanics, stimuli-responsive surface engineering, and advanced manufacturing.

  8. Temperature dependence of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB/MgO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Min Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB (1.2 ∼ 3 nm/MgO thin film structures is strongly dependent on temperature, and is significantly reduced at high temperature. The interfacial magnetic anisotropy is generally proportional to the third power of magnetization, but an additional factor due to thermal expansion is required to explain the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin CoFeB films. The reduction of the magnetic anisotropy is more prominent for the thinner films; as the temperature increases from 300 K to 400 K, the anisotropy is reduced ∼50% for the 1.2-nm-thick CoFeB, whereas the anisotropy is reduced ∼30% for the 1.7-nm-thick CoFeB. Such a substantial reduction of magnetic anisotropy at high temperature is problematic for data retention when incorporating W/CoFeB/MgO thin film structures into magneto-resistive random access memory devices. Alternative magnetic materials and structures are required to maintain large magnetic anisotropy at elevated temperatures.

  9. Viscous heating in fluids with temperature-dependent viscosity: implications for magma flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscous heating plays an important role in the dynamics of fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity because of the coupling between the energy and momentum equations. The heat generated by viscous friction produces a local temperature increase near the tube walls with a consequent decrease of the viscosity which may dramatically change the temperature and velocity profiles. These processes are mainly controlled by the Peclét number, the Nahme number, the flow rate and the thermal boundary conditions. The problem of viscous heating in fluids was investigated in the past for its practical interest in the polymer industry, and was invoked to explain some rheological behaviours of silicate melts, but was not completely applied to study magma flows. In this paper we focus on the thermal and mechanical effects caused by viscous heating in tubes of finite lengths. We find that in magma flows at high Nahme number and typical flow rates, viscous heating is responsible for the evolution from Poiseuille flow, with a uniform temperature distribution at the inlet, to a plug flow with a hotter layer near the walls. When the temperature gradients  induced by viscous heating are very pronounced, local instabilities may occur and the triggering of secondary flows is possible. For completeness, this paper also describes magma flow in infinitely long tubes both at steady state and in transient phase.

  10. Plasmon resonance enhanced temperature-dependent photoluminescence of Si-V centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shaoheng [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Jie; Wang, Qiliang; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong, E-mail: hdli@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Baolin [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Temperature dependent optical property of diamond has been considered as a very important factor for realizing high performance diamond-based optoelectronic devices. The photoluminescence feature of the zero phonon line of silicon-vacancy (Si-V) centers in Si-doped chemical vapor deposited single crystal diamond (SCD) with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) induced by gold nanoparticles has been studied at temperatures ranging from liquid nitrogen temperature to 473 K, as compared with that of the SCD counterpart in absence of the LSPR. It is found that with LSPR the emission intensities of Si-V centers are significantly enhanced by factors of tens and the magnitudes of the redshift (width) of the emissions become smaller (narrower), in comparison with those of normal emissions without plasmon resonance. More interestingly, these strong Si-V emissions appear remarkably at temperatures up to 473 K, while the spectral feature was not reported in previous studies on the intrinsic Si-doped diamonds when temperatures are higher than room temperature. These findings would lead to reaching high performance diamond-based devices, such as single photon emitter, quantum cryptography, biomarker, and so forth, working under high temperature conditions.

  11. Temperature dependence of shear viscosity of SU(3)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrakhantsev, N.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,9 Institutskii per., 141700, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Braguta, V.V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for High Energy Physics NRC “Kurchatov Institute”,1 Pobedy St., Protvino, 142281 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University,8 Sukhanova St., 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Kotov, A.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-18

    In this paper we study the SU(3)-gluodynamics shear viscosity temperature dependence on the lattice. To do so, we measure the correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the range of temperatures T/T{sub c}∈[0.9,1.5]. To extract the shear viscosity we used two approaches. The first one is to fit the lattice data with a physically motivated ansatz for the spectral function with unknown parameters and then determine the shear viscosity. The second approach is to apply the Backus-Gilbert method allowing to extract the shear viscosity from the lattice data nonparametrically. The results obtained within both approaches agree with each other. Our results allow us to conclude that within the range T/T{sub c}∈[0.9,1.5] the SU(3)-gluodynamics reveals the properties of a strongly interacting system, which cannot be described perturbatively, and has the ratio η/s close to the value 1/4π of the N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  12. Temperature dependence of shear viscosity of SU(3)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrakhantsev, N. Yu.; Braguta, V. V.; Kotov, A. Yu.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we study the SU(3)-gluodynamics shear viscosity temperature dependence on the lattice. To do so, we measure the correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the range of temperatures T /T c ∈ [0 .9 , 1 .5]. To extract the shear viscosity we used two approaches. The first one is to fit the lattice data with a physically motivated ansatz for the spectral function with unknown parameters and then determine the shear viscosity. The second approach is to apply the Backus-Gilbert method allowing to extract the shear viscosity from the lattice data nonparametrically. The results obtained within both approaches agree with each other. Our results allow us to conclude that within the range T /T c ∈ [0 .9 , 1 .5] the SU(3)-gluodynamics reveals the properties of a strongly interacting system, which cannot be described perturbatively, and has the ratio η/s close to the value 1 /4 π of the N = 4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  13. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  14. Temperature Dependence of Mineral Solubility in Water. Part 2. Alkaline and Alkaline Earth Bromides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumgalz, B. S.

    2018-03-01

    Databases of alkaline and alkaline earth bromide solubilities in water at various temperatures were created using experimental data from publications over about the last two centuries. Statistical critical evaluation of the created databases was produced since there were enough independent data sources to justify such evaluation. The reliable experimental data were adequately described by polynomial expressions over various temperature ranges. Using the Pitzer approach for ionic activity and osmotic coefficients, the thermodynamic solubility products for the discussed bromide minerals have been calculated at various temperature intervals and also represented by polynomial expressions.

  15. Temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of equiatomic solid solution alloys with face-centered cubic crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.; Bei, H.; Pharr, G.M.; George, E.P.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to decades-old theories of strengthening in dilute solid solutions, the mechanical behavior of concentrated solid solutions is relatively poorly understood. A special subset of these materials includes alloys in which the constituent elements are present in equal atomic proportions, including the high-entropy alloys of recent interest. A unique characteristic of equiatomic alloys is the absence of “solvent” and “solute” atoms, resulting in a breakdown of the textbook picture of dislocations moving through a solvent lattice and encountering discrete solute obstacles. To clarify the mechanical behavior of this interesting new class of materials, we investigate here a family of equiatomic binary, ternary and quaternary alloys based on the elements Fe, Ni, Co, Cr and Mn that were previously shown to be single-phase face-centered cubic (fcc) solid solutions. The alloys were arc-melted, drop-cast, homogenized, cold-rolled and recrystallized to produce equiaxed microstructures with comparable grain sizes. Tensile tests were performed at an engineering strain rate of 10 −3 s −1 at temperatures in the range 77–673 K. Unalloyed fcc Ni was processed similarly and tested for comparison. The flow stresses depend to varying degrees on temperature, with some (e.g. NiCoCr, NiCoCrMn and FeNiCoCr) exhibiting yield and ultimate strengths that increase strongly with decreasing temperature, while others (e.g. NiCo and Ni) exhibit very weak temperature dependencies. To better understand this behavior, the temperature dependencies of the yield strength and strain hardening were analyzed separately. Lattice friction appears to be the predominant component of the temperature-dependent yield stress, possibly because the Peierls barrier height decreases with increasing temperature due to a thermally induced increase of dislocation width. In the early stages of plastic flow (5–13% strain, depending on material), the temperature dependence of strain hardening is due

  16. A physical explanation of the temperature dependence of physiological processes mediated by cilia and flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The majority of biological rates are known to exhibit temperature dependence. Here I reveal a direct link between temperature and ecologically relevant rates such as swimming speeds in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes as well as fluid-pumping and filtration rates in many metazoans, and show that this relationship is driven by movement rates of cilia and flagella. I develop models of the temperature dependence of cilial and flagellar movement rates and evaluate these with an extensive compilation of data from the literature. The model captures the temperature dependence of viscosity and provides a mechanistic and biologically interpretable explanation for the temperature dependence of a range of ecologically relevant processes; it also reveals a clear dependence on both reaction rate-like processes and the physics of the environment. The incorporation of viscosity allows further insight into the effects of environmental temperature variation and of processes, such as disease, that affect the viscosity of blood or other body fluids. PMID:23959901

  17. Phonon effect on the temperature dependence of spin susceptibility and magnetization in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.J.; Tanaka, C.; Ukon, S.

    1985-06-01

    In many transition metals the paramagnetic spin susceptibility X increases with increasing temperature much beyond ordinary theories could account for. We demonstrate how the effect of the electron-phonon interactions enable us to understand such temperature dependence of X.

  18. Measurement of Linear Coefficient of Thermal Expansion and Temperature-Dependent Refractive Index Using Interferometric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James A.; Green, William E.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Schmidt, Greg R.; Moore, Duncan T.

    2017-01-01

    A system combining an interferometer with an environmental chamber for measuring both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and temperature-dependent refractive index (dn/dT) simultaneously is presented. The operation and measurement results of this instrument are discussed.

  19. Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved. Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated gonads remains to be elucidated, the genes downstream in the sex differentiation pathway are shared between sex-determining mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent advances on the molecular players that participate in the sex determination and differentiation in fish species, by putting emphasis on temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation, which include temperature-dependent sex determination and genetic sex determination plus temperature effects. Application of temperature-dependent sex differentiation in farmed fish and the consequences of temperature-induced sex reversal are discussed. PMID:24735220

  20. Eliashberg Analysis of Temperature Dependent Pairing Mechanism in d-Wave Superconductors: Application to High Temperature Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, O.; Coffey, L.

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented for the temperature and frequency dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the diagonal self energy for a d-wave superconductor. An Eliashberg analysis, which has been successful in recent fitting of superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction conductances for BiSrCaCuO (Bi-2212), is extended to finite temperatures. The effect of the temperature dependence of the 40 meV spin resonance mode, measured in inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in Bi-2212, on th...

  1. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of metallic work functions at low temperatures. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipes, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made under ERDA Contract No. EY-76-S-02-2314.002 is described. Efforts to gain theoretical insight into the temperature dependence of the contact potential of Nb near the superconducting transition have only been qualitatively successful. Preliminary measurements of adsorbed 4 He gas on the temperature dependence of the contact potentials of metals were performed and compared with a previously developed theory

  2. Analysis of microwave heating of materials with temperature-dependent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayappa, K.G.; Davis, H.T.; Davis, E.A.; Gordon, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper transient temperature profiles in multilayer slabs are predicted, by simultaneously solving Maxwell's equations with the heat conduction equation, using Galerkin-finite elements. It is assumed that the medium is homogeneous and has temperature-dependent dielectric and thermal properties. The method is illustrated with applications involving the heating of food and polymers with microwaves. The temperature dependence of dielectric properties affects the heating appreciably, as is shown by comparison with a constant property model

  3. Wide-range temperature dependences of Brillouin scattering properties in polymer optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Hayashi, Neisei; Shinohara, Yuri; Tahara, Masaki; Hosoda, Hideki; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the temperature dependences of the Brillouin scattering properties in a perfluorinated graded-index (PFGI-) polymer optical fiber (POF) in a wide temperature range from -160 to 125 °C. The temperature dependences of the Brillouin frequency shift, linewidth, and Stokes power are almost linear at lower temperature down to -160 °C while they show nonlinear dependences at higher temperature. These behaviors appear to originate from the partial glass transition of the polymer material.

  4. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR relaxation time, T2, for intact and neoplastic plant tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewa, Czesław J.; Lewa, Maria

    Temperature dependences of the spin-spin proton relaxation time, T2, have been shown for normal and tumorous tissues collected from kalus culture Nicotiana tabacum and from the plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. For neoplastic plant tissues, time T2 was increased compared to that for intact plants, a finding similar to that for animal and human tissues. The temperature dependences obtained were compared to analogous relations observed with animal tissues.

  5. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  6. Effect of temperature-dependent energy-level shifts on a semiconductor's Peltier heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Peltier heat of a charge carrier in a semiconductor is calculated for the situation in which the electronic energy levels are temperature dependent. The temperature dependences of the electronic energy levels, generally observed optically, arise from their dependences on the vibrational energy of the lattice (e.g., as caused by thermal expansion). It has been suggested that these temperature dependences will typically have a major effect on the Peltier heat. The Peltier heat associated with a given energy level is a thermodynamic quantity; it is the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a carrier is added in that level. As such, the energy levels cannot be treated as explicitly temperature dependent. The electron-lattice interaction causing the temperature dependence must be expressly considered. It is found that the carrier's interaction with the atomic vibrations lowers its electronic energy. However, the interaction of the carrier with the atomic vibrations also causes an infinitesimal lowering (approx.1/N) of each of the N vibrational frequencies. As a result, there is a finite carrier-induced increase in the average vibrational energy. Above the Debye temperature, this cancels the lowering of the carrier's electronic energy. Thus, the standard Peltier-heat formula, whose derivation generally ignores the temperature dependence of the electronic energy levels, is regained. This explains the apparent success of the standard formula in numerous analyses of electronic transport experiments

  7. Seasonal cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products, dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols in fine and coarse air particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. Y.; Müller, L.; Winterhalter, R.; Moortgat, G. K.; Hoffmann, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-08-01

    Filter samples of fine and coarse air particulate matter (PM) collected over a period of one year in central Europe (Mainz, Germany) were analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs), including the α- and β-pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), as well as a variety of dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features in fine, coarse, and total PM (TSP) are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks in comparison to data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid and phthalic acid to azelaic acid indicate that the investigated aerosol samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. A strong Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature (R2 = 0.79, n = 52, Ea = 126 ± 10 kJ mol-1, temperature range 275-300 K). Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence observed for 3-MBTCA can be explained by enhanced photochemical production due to an increase of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration with increasing temperature, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. The results indicate that the OH-initiated oxidation of pinonic acid is the rate-limiting step in the formation of 3-MBTCA, and that 3-MBTCA may be a suitable tracer for the chemical aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by OH radicals. An Arrhenius-type temperature dependence was also observed for the concentration of pinic acid (R2 = 0.60, n = 56, Ea = 84 ± 9 kJ mol-1); it can be tentatively explained by the temperature dependence of biogenic pinene emission as the rate-limiting step of pinic acid formation.

  8. Filled and unfilled temperature-dependent epoxy resin blends for lossy transducer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Matthew D C; Hossack, John A

    2009-04-01

    In the context of our ongoing investigation of low-cost 2-dimensional (2-D) arrays, we studied the temperature- dependent acoustic properties of epoxy blends that could serve as an acoustically lossy backing material in compact 2-D array-based devices. This material should be capable of being machined during array manufacture, while also providing adequate signal attenuation to mitigate backing block reverberation artifacts. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of 5 unfilled epoxy blends and 2 filled epoxy blends - tungsten and fiberglass fillers - were analyzed across a 35 degrees C temperature range in 5 degrees C increments. Unfilled epoxy materials possessed an approximately linear variation of impedance and sigmoidal variation of attenuation properties over the range of temperatures of interest. An intermediate epoxy blend was fitted to a quadratic trend line with R(2) values of 0.94 and 0.99 for attenuation and impedance, respectively. It was observed that a fiberglass filler induces a strong quadratic trend in the impedance data with temperature, which results in increased error in the characterization of attenuation and impedance. The tungsten-filled epoxy was not susceptible to such problems because a different method of fabrication was required. At body temperature, the tungsten-filled epoxy could provide a 44 dB attenuation of the round-trip backing block echo in our application, in which the center frequency is 5 MHz and the backing material is 1.1 mm thick. This is an 11 dB increase in attenuation compared with the fiberglass-filled epoxy in the context of our application. This work provides motivation for exploring the use of custom-made tungsten-filled epoxy materials as a substitute PCB-based substrate to provide electrical signal interconnect.

  9. Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

    2011-01-25

    Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  10. Filled and Unfilled Temperature-Dependent Epoxy Resin Blends for Lossy Transducer Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Matthew D.C.; Hossack, John A.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of our ongoing investigation of low-cost 2-dimensional (2-D) arrays, we studied the temperature-dependent acoustic properties of epoxy blends that could serve as an acoustically lossy backing material in compact 2-D array-based devices. This material should be capable of being machined during array manufacture, while also providing adequate signal attenuation to mitigate backing block reverberation artifacts. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of 5 unfilled epoxy blends and 2 filled epoxy blends—tungsten and fiberglass fillers—were analyzed across a 35°C temperature range in 5°C increments. Unfilled epoxy materials possessed an approximately linear variation of impedance and sigmoidal variation of attenuation properties over the range of temperatures of interest. An intermediate epoxy blend was fitted to a quadratic trend line with R2 values of 0.94 and 0.99 for attenuation and impedance, respectively. It was observed that a fiberglass filler induces a strong quadratic trend in the impedance data with temperature, which results in increased error in the characterization of attenuation and impedance. The tungsten-filled epoxy was not susceptible to such problems because a different method of fabrication was required. At body temperature, the tungsten-filled epoxy could provide a 44 dB attenuation of the round-trip backing block echo in our application, in which the center frequency is 5 MHz and the backing material is 1.1 mm thick. This is an 11 dB increase in attenuation compared with the fiberglass-filled epoxy in the context of our application. This work provides motivation for exploring the use of custom-made tungsten-filled epoxy materials as a substitute PCB-based substrate to provide electrical signal interconnect. PMID:19406716

  11. Temperature dependence of1H NMR chemical shifts and its influence on estimated metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermter, Felizitas C; Mitschke, Nico; Bock, Christian; Dreher, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    Temperature dependent chemical shifts of important brain metabolites measured by localised 1 H MRS were investigated to test how the use of incorrect prior knowledge on chemical shifts impairs the quantification of metabolite concentrations. Phantom measurements on solutions containing 11 metabolites were performed on a 7 T scanner between 1 and 43 °C. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences was fitted by a linear model. Spectra were simulated for different temperatures and analysed by the AQSES program (jMRUI 5.2) using model functions with chemical shift values for 37 °C. Large differences in the temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences were determined with a maximum slope of about ±7.5 × 10 -4  ppm/K. For 32-40 °C, only minor quantification errors resulted from using incorrect chemical shifts, with the exception of Cr and PCr. For 1-10 °C considerable quantification errors occurred if the temperature dependence of the chemical shifts was neglected. If 1 H MRS measurements are not performed at 37 °C, for which the published chemical shift values have been determined, the temperature dependence of chemical shifts should be considered to avoid systematic quantification errors, particularly for measurements on animal models at lower temperatures.

  12. Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from genetic to temperature-dependent sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleley, Clare E; O'Meally, Denis; Sarre, Stephen D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq; Matsubara, Kazumi; Azad, Bhumika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Georges, Arthur

    2015-07-02

    Sex determination in animals is amazingly plastic. Vertebrates display contrasting strategies ranging from complete genetic control of sex (genotypic sex determination) to environmentally determined sex (for example, temperature-dependent sex determination). Phylogenetic analyses suggest frequent evolutionary transitions between genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in environmentally sensitive lineages, including reptiles. These transitions are thought to involve a genotypic system becoming sensitive to temperature, with sex determined by gene-environment interactions. Most mechanistic models of transitions invoke a role for sex reversal. Sex reversal has not yet been demonstrated in nature for any amniote, although it occurs in fish and rarely in amphibians. Here we make the first report of reptile sex reversal in the wild, in the Australian bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and use sex-reversed animals to experimentally induce a rapid transition from genotypic to temperature-dependent sex determination. Controlled mating of normal males to sex-reversed females produces viable and fertile offspring whose phenotypic sex is determined solely by temperature (temperature-dependent sex determination). The W sex chromosome is eliminated from this lineage in the first generation. The instantaneous creation of a lineage of ZZ temperature-sensitive animals reveals a novel, climate-induced pathway for the rapid transition between genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination, and adds to concern about adaptation to rapid global climate change.

  13. Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Fitzgerald, Megan E; Wasik, Bethany R; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Turner, Paul E; Pyle, Anna Marie; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-01-20

    Most isolates of human rhinovirus, the common cold virus, replicate more robustly at the cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at core body temperature (37 °C). To gain insight into the mechanism of temperature-dependent growth, we compared the transcriptional response of primary mouse airway epithelial cells infected with rhinovirus at 33 °C vs. 37 °C. Mouse airway cells infected with mouse-adapted rhinovirus 1B exhibited a striking enrichment in expression of antiviral defense response genes at 37 °C relative to 33 °C, which correlated with significantly higher expression levels of type I and type III IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) at 37 °C. Temperature-dependent IFN induction in response to rhinovirus was dependent on the MAVS protein, a key signaling adaptor of the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Stimulation of primary airway cells with the synthetic RLR ligand poly I:C led to greater IFN induction at 37 °C relative to 33 °C at early time points poststimulation and to a sustained increase in the induction of ISGs at 37 °C relative to 33 °C. Recombinant type I IFN also stimulated more robust induction of ISGs at 37 °C than at 33 °C. Genetic deficiency of MAVS or the type I IFN receptor in infected airway cells permitted higher levels of viral replication, particularly at 37 °C, and partially rescued the temperature-dependent growth phenotype. These findings demonstrate that in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense response of infected cells at cool temperature.

  14. Amino acid behavior in aqueous amide solutions: Temperature dependence of the L-phenylalanine–N,N-dimethylformamide interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics of amino acid solvation in aqueous DMF solutions was studied at 288–318 K. • The pair interaction parameters were compared with those for urea solutions. • For hydrophobic solutes enthalpies and entropies of interaction reveal strong temperature changes. • The relationship between the temperature dependence of solvation and solute–solute interactions was found. - Abstract: We have studied thermodynamics of the L-phenylalanine (Phe) pair interaction with denaturing agents – urea (U) and dimethylformamide (DMF) at 288–318 K. Our study does indicate that enthalpies and entropies of the Phe–U interaction reveal the anomalous temperature dependence which does not occur for DMF solutions. The anomalous Phe behavior in U solutions appears to be closely related to peculiarities of U hydration. One more result is in the fact that for hydrophobic solutes such as L-phenylalanine and substituted amides it is not justified to use the results obtained at 298 K for predicting the solute behavior at physiological temperatures

  15. Temperature dependence of a refractive index sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ning; Teng, Chuanxin; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the temperature dependence of a refractive index (RI) sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber (m-POF) both theoretically and experimentally. The performance of the RI sensor at different temperatures (10°C-70°C) is measured and simulated over an RI range from 1.33 to 1.45. It is found that the temperature dependent bending loss and RI measurement deviation monotonically change with temperature, and the RI deviation has a higher gradient with temperature variation for a higher measured RI. Because of the linear trend of temperature dependence of the sensor, it is feasible to correct for changes in ambient temperature.

  16. Temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} UV absorption spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, J.B.; Talukdar, R.K.; Ravishankara, A.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, < 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, {approximately} 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. The authors ClONO{sub 2} absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina.

  17. Temperature dependence of the ClONO2 UV absorption spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, less than 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, about 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. Our ClONO2 absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina (1979).

  18. Temperature dependence of resistance in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q. L.; Wang, S. G.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Yan; Ward, R. C. C.; Wang, C.; Kohn, A.; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2009-08-01

    The temperature dependence of resistance in parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) configurations (RP,AP) has been investigated in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe junctions with varying MgO barrier thicknesses tMgO. RAP exhibits a substantial decrease with increasing temperature for samples with tMgO ranging from 3.0 to 1.5 nm. In contrast, RP is approximately temperature independent when tMgO=3.0 nm and increases with temperature when tMgO=2.1 and 1.5 nm. Possible origins of this temperature dependence of resistance, which include taking into account a spin independent term and consideration of spin-flip scattering, are discussed. We attribute the temperature dependence of RP,AP to the misalignment of magnetic moments in the electrodes due to thermal excitations and its effect on the spin dependent tunneling.

  19. Temperature Dependence in the Terahertz Spectrum of Nicotinamide: Anharmonicity and Hydrogen-Bonded Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Okamura, Nubuyuki; Fan, Xinyi; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2017-04-06

    We have investigated the terahertz-spectral property of nicotinamide focusing on the temperature dependence in the range of 14-300 K. We observed that almost all peaks in the terahertz spectrum of the nicotinamide crystal showed a remarkable shift with temperature, whereas the lowest-frequency peak at 34.8 cm -1 showed a negligible shift with temperature. By analyzing the terahertz spectrum with the dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations, we found that the difference in the temperature dependence of the peak shift is well understood in terms of the presence/absence of stretching vibration of the intermolecular hydrogen bond in the mode and the change of cell parameters. The anharmonicity in the dissociation potential energy of very weak intermolecular hydrogen bonding causes the remarkable peak shift with temperature in the terahertz spectrum of nicotinamide. This finding suggests that the assignment and identification of peaks in the terahertz spectrum are systematically enabled by temperature-dependent measurements.

  20. Temperature dependence of the Ho L2-edge XMCD spectra of Ho6Fe23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Roberto; Laguna-Marco, María Angeles; Chaboy, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    An X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) study performed at the Ho L2,3-edges in Ho6Fe23 as a function of temperature is presented. It is demonstrated that the anomalous temperature dependence of the Ho L2-edge XMCD signal is due to the magnetic contribution of Fe atoms. By contrast, the Ho L3-edge XMCD directly reflects the temperature dependence of the Ho magnetic moment. By combining the XMCD at both Ho L2- and L3-edges, the possibility of determining the temperature dependence of the Fe magnetic moment is demonstrated. Then, both microHo(T) and microFe(T) have been determined by tuning only the absorption L-edges of Ho. This result opens new possibilities of applying XMCD at these absorption edges to obtain quantitative element-specific magnetic information that is not directly obtained by other experimental tools.

  1. Anisotropic temperature dependence of the magnetic-field penetration in superconducting UPt3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broholm, C.; Aeppli, G.; Kleiman, R.N.; Harshman, D.R.; Bishop, D.J.; Bucher, E.; Williams, D.L.; Ansaldo, E.J.; Heffner, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The anisotropy and temperature dependence of the magnetic-field penetration in superconducting UPt 3 have been measured by muon spin relaxation. The extrapolated zero-temperature values for the penetration depths parallel and perpendicular to the c axis are λ parallel =7070±30 A and λ perpendicular =7820±30 A, respectively. The temperature dependences of λ parallel and λ perpendicular are different and can both be accounted for by a superconducting gap function with a line of nodes in the basal plane and axial point nodes

  2. The Temperature Dependence of the Debye-Waller Factor of Magnesium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sledziewska-Blocka, D.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi-harmonic appro......The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi...

  3. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  4. Optical power limiting and transmitting properties of cadmium iodide single crystals: Temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)] [Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)] [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2009-09-14

    Optical limiting properties of the single crystals of cadmium iodide are investigated using ns laser pulses. It is found that the transmissions in the crystals increase with increasing temperature. However, they limit the transmissions at high input powers. The limiting power is found to be higher at higher temperature. From the measured transmission data, the photon absorption coefficients are estimated. The temperature dependence of the coefficients shows a decrease in magnitude with increasing temperature. This might be due to the temperature-dependent bandgap shift of the material. The results demonstrate that the cadmium iodide single crystals are promising materials for applications in optical power limiting devices.

  5. Optical power limiting and transmitting properties of cadmium iodide single crystals: Temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2009-01-01

    Optical limiting properties of the single crystals of cadmium iodide are investigated using ns laser pulses. It is found that the transmissions in the crystals increase with increasing temperature. However, they limit the transmissions at high input powers. The limiting power is found to be higher at higher temperature. From the measured transmission data, the photon absorption coefficients are estimated. The temperature dependence of the coefficients shows a decrease in magnitude with increasing temperature. This might be due to the temperature-dependent bandgap shift of the material. The results demonstrate that the cadmium iodide single crystals are promising materials for applications in optical power limiting devices.

  6. Temperature dependence of residual electrical resistivity of Cu-Au in pseudopotential approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khwaja, F.A.; Ahmed, I.; Shaukat, A.

    1986-08-01

    The problem of temperature dependence of residual electrical resistivity of Cu-Au system is re-examined in the light of static distortion and thermal vibration of the lattice along with the short-range-order of atoms above critical temperature. The extended version of Ziman's formula for resistivity obtained yields a unified version for the calculation of resistivity in pseudopotential approximation. The temperature dependence of the quantity Δρ/ρ in this framework for Cu-Au system is found to be in better agreement with the experimental data as compared to previous calculation. (author)

  7. Synthesis, structure and temperature dependent luminescence of Eu3+ doped hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaobing; Luo, Xiaoxia; Wang, Hongwei; Deng, Yue; Yang, Peixin; Tian, Yili

    2018-01-01

    A series of Eu3+ substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) were prepared by co-precipitation reactions. The phase, fluorescence and temperature dependent luminescence of the phosphors were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL). It is found that the doped Eu3+ ions have entered the hexagonal lattice with no obvious secondary phase were detected by XRD. The 5D0 → 7F0 transition was clearly split into two even at room temperature. The predominate 573 nm peak illustrates Eu3+ ions occupy more Ca(II) sites. The temperature dependent luminescent results show HA:xEu might be applied as one potential optical thermometry material.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Triplet–Triplet Annihilation Upconversion in Phospholipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the temperature dependency of triplet–triplet annihilation upconversion (TTA-UC) is important for optimizing biological applications of upconversion. Here the temperature dependency of red-to-blue TTA-UC is reported in a variety of neutral PEGylated phospholipid liposomes. In these systems a delicate balance between lateral diffusion rate of the dyes, annihilator aggregation, and sensitizer self-quenching leads to a volcano plot, with the maximum upconversion intensity occurring near the main order–disorder transition temperature of the lipid membrane. PMID:28059523

  9. Mobility and its temperature dependence in underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 interpreted as viscous motion of charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'Kov, Lev P.; Teitel'Baum, Gregory B.

    2008-05-01

    We argue that charges in underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 move in a dissipative environment of strong spatial and temporal fluctuations. The unusual temperature dependence of the Hall angle known as “the separation of lifetimes” is reinterpreted and attributed to the appearance of the thermally activated component in the effective number of carriers with the temperature increase. We consider the temperature interval above Tc where localization effects can be neglected.

  10. Microtremor Array Measurement Survey and Strong Ground Motion observation activities of The SATREPS, MarDiM project -Part 3-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, Seckin; Safa Arslan, Mehmet; Karagoz, Ozlem; Chimoto, Kosuke; Ozel, Oguz; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Behiye Aksahin, Bengi; Hatayama, Ken; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Ohori, Michihiro; Safak, Erdal; Hori, Muneo

    2017-04-01

    Since 1939, devastating earthquakes with magnitude greater than seven ruptured North Anatolian Fault (NAF) westward, starting from 1939 Erzincan (Ms=7.9) at the eastern Turkey and including the latest 1999 Izmit-Golcuk (Ms=7.4) and the Duzce (Ms=7.2) earthquakes in the eastern Marmara region, Turkey. On the other hand, the west of the Sea of Marmara an Mw7.4 earthquake ruptured the NAF' s Ganos segment in 1912. The only un-ruptured segments of the NAF in the last century are within the Sea of Marmara, and are identified as a "seismic gap" zone that its rupture may cause a devastating earthquake. In order to unravel the seismic risks of the Marmara region a comprehensive multidisciplinary research project The MarDiM project "Earthquake And Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey", has already been started since 2003. The project is conducted in the framework of "Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS)" sponsored by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). One of the main research field of the project is "Seismic characterization and damage prediction" which aims to improve the prediction accuracy of the estimation of the damages induced by strong ground motions and tsunamis based on reliable source parameters, detailed deep and shallow velocity structure and building data. As for detailed deep and shallow velocity structure microtremor array measurement surveys were conducted in Zeytinburnu district of Istanbul, Tekirdag, Canakkale and Edirne provinces at about 140 sites on October 2013, September 2014, 2015 and 2016. Also in September 2014, 11 accelerometer units were installed mainly in public buildings in both Zeytinburnu and Tekirdag area and are currently in operation. Each accelerometer unit compose of a Network Sensor (CV-374A) by Tokyo Sokushin, post processing PC for data storage and power supply unit. The Network Sensor

  11. RECENT STRONG EARTHQUAKES IN CENTRAL ASIA: REGULAR TECTONOPHYSICAL FEATURES OF LOCATIONS IN THE STRUCTURE AND GEODYNAMICS OF THE LITHOSPHERE. PART 1. MAIN GEODYNAMIC FACTORS PREDETERMINING LOCATIONS OF STRONG EARTHQUAKES IN THE STRUCTURE OF THE LITHOSPHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Sherman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying locations of strong earthquakes (М≥8 in space and time in Central Asia has been among top prob-lems for many years and still remains challenging for international research teams. The authors propose a new ap-proach that requires changing the paradigm of earthquake focus – solid rock relations, while this paradigm is a basis for practically all known physical models of earthquake foci. This paper describes the first step towards developing a new concept of the seismic process, including generation of strong earthquakes, with reference to specific geodynamic features of the part of the study region wherein strong earthquakes were recorded in the past two centuries. Our analysis of the locations of М≥8 earthquakes shows that in the past two centuries such earthquakes took place in areas of the dynamic influence of large deep faults in the western regions of Central Asia. In the continental Asia, there is a clear submeridional structural boundary (95–105°E between the western and eastern regions, and this is a factor controlling localization of strong seismic events in the western regions. Obviously, the Indostan plate’s pressure from the south is an energy source for such events. The strong earthquakes are located in a relatively small part of the territory of Central Asia (i.e. the western regions, which is significantly different from its neighbouring areas at the north, east and west, as evidenced by its specific geodynamic parameters. (1 The crust is twice as thick in the western regions than in the eastern regions. (2 In the western regions, the block structures re-sulting from the crust destruction, which are mainly represented by lense-shaped forms elongated in the submeridio-nal direction, tend to dominate. (3 Active faults bordering large block structures are characterized by significant slip velocities that reach maximum values in the central part of the Tibetan plateau. Further northward, slip velocities decrease

  12. Temperature dependence of ac response in diluted half-metallic CrO{sub 2} powder compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yajie; Zhang Xiaoyu; Cai Tianyi; Li Zhenya

    2004-10-06

    We present a study on temperature dependence of impedance spectra of the cold-pressed chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2})-titanic dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) composite over the temperature range of 77-300 K, and over the frequency range of 40 Hz-500 kHz. The microstructure of the sample is analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The impedance spectra exhibit a strong dependence upon temperature. By evaluating the ac electricity behavior of the composite, we find the experimental data are successfully described by a power-law behavior {sigma}{sub ac}=A(T){omega}{sup s}, in which the frequency exponent s shows slightly greater than a universal value (0{<=}s{<=}1), and rises approximately linearly with temperature over a broad range of low temperature.

  13. Frequency doubling in LiNbO3 using temperature dependent QPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmonte, Michele; Skettrup, Torben; Pedersen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We report the application of temperature-dependent quasi-phase matching (QPM) for second harmonic generation of green light using periodically field poled LiNbO3. In contrast to the usual QPM devices, here the fundamental and second harmonic waves are polarized orthogonally so that the second...

  14. Observed and simulated temperature dependence of the liquid water path of low clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Genio, A.D.; Wolf, A.B. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Data being acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site can be used to examine the factors determining the temperature dependence of cloud optical thickness. We focus on cloud liquid water and physical thickness variations which can be derived from existing ARM measurements.

  15. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Ahmed S.; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  16. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of magnetorheological elastomers under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Benxiang, E-mail: jubenxiang@qq.com [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Tang, Rui; Zhang, Dengyou; Yang, Bailian [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Yu, Miao; Liao, Changrong [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) samples were fabricated by using as-prepared polyurethane (PU) matrix and carbonyl iron particles. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of MRE were investigated and analyzed. Due to the unique structural features of as-prepared matrix, temperature has a greater impact on the properties of as-prepared MRE, especially isotropic MRE. With increasing of temperature and magnetic field, MR effect of isotropic MRE can reach up to as high as 4176.5% at temperature of 80 °C, and the mechanism of the temperature-dependent in presence of magnetic field was discussed. These results indicated that MRE is a kind of temperature-dependent material, and can be cycled between MRE and MR plastomer (MRP) by varying temperature. - Highlights: • Both anisotropic and isotropic MRE were fabricated by using as-prepared matrix. • Temperature-dependent properties of MRE under magnetic field were investigated. • As-prepared MRE can transform MRE to MRP by adjusting temperature.

  17. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Ahmed S., E-mail: ahmedhassan117@yahoo.com; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-08

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  18. Demonstrating the Temperature Dependence of Density via Construction of a Galilean Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Marie A.; Padgett, Lea W.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the construction of a Galilean thermometer out of common chemistry glassware is described. Students in a first-semester physical chemistry (thermodynamics) class can construct the Galilean thermometer as an investigation of the thermal expansivity of liquids and the temperature dependence of density. This is an excellent first…

  19. Dynamic temperature dependence patterns in future energy demand models in the context of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Moll, H.C.; Schoot Uiterkamp, A.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand depends on outdoor temperature in a 'u' shaped fashion. Various studies have used this temperature dependence to investigate the effects of climate change on energy demand. Such studies contain implicit or explicit assumptions to describe expected socio-economic changes that may affect

  20. Temperature dependence of UV radiation effects in Arctic and temperate isolates of three red macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, W.H.; Eggert, A.; Buma, A.G.J.; Breeman, Arno

    The temperature dependence of UV effects was studied for Arctic and temperate isolates of the red macrophytes Palmaria palmata, Coccotylus truncatus and Phycodrys rubens. The effects of daily repeated artificial ultraviolet B and A radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm, UVAR: 320-400 nm) treatments were

  1. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Properties of Injection Molding Tool Materials Used in Induction Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the heating phase of an induction heated injection molding tool precisely, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties, B–H curves, and the hysteresis loss are necessary for the molding tool materials. Hence, injection molding tool steels, core materials among other materials have...

  2. Temperature-dependent indentation behavior of transformation-toughened zirconia-based ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikare, Veena; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    Indentation behavior of Ce-TZP, Y-TZP, and Mg-PSZ between room temperature and 1300 C was investigated. Hardness decreased with increasing temperature for all three materials, but indentation cracking increased with increasing temperature. The opposing temperature dependences are discussed in terms of dislocation and transformation plasticity.

  3. Transient thermal stresses in multiple connected region exhibiting temperature dependence of material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Yoshihiro; Maekawa, Toshiya.

    1983-01-01

    The examples of the analysis of thermal stress in multiple connection regions such as heat exchangers, nuclear reactor cores, ingot cases and polygonal region with elliptic holes are not few, but the temperature dependence of material constants was neglected in these researches because of the difficulty of analysis though the industrial problems related to thermal stress are apt to occur in the condition of relatively large temperature gradient. Also, the analysis of heat conduction problems taking the temperature dependence of material constants into account was limited to one-dimensional problems for which Kirchhoff's transmission can be used. The purpose of this study is to derive the equation of condition which assures the one-value property of rotation and displacement, taking the temperature dependence of material constants into account, and to complete the formulation of the plane thermal stress problems in multiple connection regions by stress function method. Also the method of numerical analysis using difference method is shown to examine the effectiveness of various formulated equations and the effect of the temperature dependence of material constants on temperature and thermal stress. The example of numerical calculation on a thin rectangular plate with a rectangular hole is shown. (Kako, I.)

  4. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLORO- ETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environmental test chambers. The temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45°C....

  5. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup

    2016-01-01

    circuits or overloads. The updated Cauer thermal model with varying thermal parameters is obtained by means of FEM thermal simulations with temperature-dependent physical parameters. The proposed method is applied to a case study of a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module. Furthermore, a testing setup is built up...

  6. Dissecting the frog inner ear with Gaussian noise .2. Temperature dependence of inner ear function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDijk, P; Wit, HP; Segenhout, JM

    1997-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the response of single primary auditory nerve fibers (n = 31) was investigated in the European edible frog, Rana esculenta (seven ears). Nerve fiber responses were analyzed with Wiener kernel analysis and polynomial correlation. The responses were described with a

  7. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  8. Study on the effect of testing machine rigidity on strength and ductility temperature dependences obtained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krashchenko, V.P.; Statsenko, V.E.; Rudnitskij, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation procedures are described for rigidity of testing machines and mechanical properties of tantalum and nickel in the temperature range 293-1873K. Temperature dependences are presented for strength characteristics of the investigated materials obtained with the use of installations of different rigidity. Dependence analysis is carried out and recommendations are given as to the characteristics application

  9. Indications for a changing electricity demand pattern : The temperature dependence of electricity demand in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Benders, R. M. J.; Moll, H. C.; Uiterkamp, A. J. M. Schoot

    This study assesses the electricity demand pattern in the relatively temperate climate of the Netherlands (latitude 52 degrees 30'N). Daily electricity demand and average temperature during the period from 1970 until 2007 are investigated for possible trends in the temperature dependence of

  10. Unravelling the size and temperature dependence of exciton lifetimes in colloidal ZnSe quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, Joren; Van Hest, Jacobine; Meijerink, A; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2014-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the band-edge photoluminescence decay of organically capped colloidal ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) in the size range from 4.0 to 7.5 nm. A similar trend is observed for all investigated sizes: the decay time is short (∼5 ns) above 20 K and increases sharply

  11. Temperature-Dependent Effects of Cutaneous Bacteria on a Frog’s Tolerance of Fungal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Robak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Defense against pathogens is one of many benefits that bacteria provide to animal hosts. A clearer understanding of how changes in the environment affect the interactions between animals and their microbial benefactors is needed in order to predict the impact and dynamics of emerging animal diseases. Due to its dramatic effects on the physiology of animals and their pathogens, temperature may be a key variable modulating the level of protection that beneficial bacteria provide to their animal hosts. Here we investigate how temperature and the makeup of the skin microbial community affect the susceptibility of amphibian hosts to infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, one of two fungal pathogens known to cause the disease chytridiomycosis. To do this, we manipulated the skin bacterial communities of susceptible hosts, northern cricket frogs (Acris crepitans, prior to exposing these animals to Bd under two different ecologically relevant temperatures. Our manipulations included one treatment where antibiotics were used to reduce the skin bacterial community, one where the bacterial community was augmented with the antifungal bacterium, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and one in which the frog’s skin bacterial community was left intact. We predicted that frogs with reduced skin bacterial communities would be more susceptible (i.e., less resistant to and/or tolerant of Bd infection, and frogs with skin bacterial communities augmented with the known antifungal bacterium would be less susceptible to Bd infection and chytridiomycosis. However, we also predicted that this interaction would be temperature dependent. We found a strong effect of temperature but not of skin microbial treatment on the probability and intensity of infection in Bd-exposed frogs. Whether temperature affected survival; however, it differed among our skin microbial treatment groups, with animals having more S. maltophilia on their skin surviving longer at 14 but not at

  12. Seasonal cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products, dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols in fine and coarse air particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Filter samples of fine and coarse air particulate matter (PM collected over a period of one year in central Europe (Mainz, Germany were analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs, including the α- and β-pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA, as well as a variety of dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features in fine, coarse, and total PM (TSP are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks in comparison to data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid and phthalic acid to azelaic acid indicate that the investigated aerosol samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. A strong Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature (R2 = 0.79, n = 52, Ea = 126 ± 10 kJ mol−1, temperature range 275–300 K. Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence observed for 3-MBTCA can be explained by enhanced photochemical production due to an increase of hydroxyl radical (OH concentration with increasing temperature, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. The results indicate that the OH-initiated oxidation of pinonic acid is the rate-limiting step in the formation of 3-MBTCA, and that 3-MBTCA may be a suitable tracer for the chemical aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA by OH radicals. An Arrhenius-type temperature dependence was also observed for the concentration of pinic acid (R2 = 0.60, n = 56, Ea = 84 ± 9 kJ mol−1; it can be tentatively explained by the temperature dependence of biogenic pinene emission as the rate-limiting step of pinic acid formation.

  13. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  14. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3 145 dpa at 380 503 C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm 3mm 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa ffiffiffiffiffi m p at 350 450 C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperatureP430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  15. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk, E-mail: jhbaek@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Byun, Thak Sang [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Maloy, Start A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Toloczko, Mychailo B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 °C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 °C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180–200MPa√(m) at 350–450 °C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature ⩾430 °C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 °C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  16. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Start A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3-145 dpa at 380-503 °C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180-200 MPa √{m} at 350-450 °C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature ⩾430 °C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 °C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  17. Brominated flame retardants in the urban atmosphere of Northeast China: Concentrations, temperature dependence and gas-particle partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Hong; Li, Wen-Long; Liu, Li-Yan; Song, Wei-Wei; Ma, Wan-Li, E-mail: mawanli002@163.com; Li, Yi-Fan, E-mail: ijrc_pts_paper@yahoo.com

    2014-09-01

    57 pairs of air samples (gas and particle phases) were collected using a high volume air sampler in a typical city of Northeast China. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including 13 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, including BDEs 17, 28, 47, 49, 66, 85, 99, 100, 138, 153, 154, 183, and 209) and 9 alternative BFRs (p-TBX, PBBZ, PBT, PBEB, DPTE, HBBZ, γ-HBCD, BTBPE, and DBDPE) were analyzed. The annual average total concentrations of the 13 PBDEs and the 9 alternative BFRs were 69 pg/m{sup 3} and 180 pg/m{sup 3}, respectively. BDE 209 and γ-HBCD were the dominant congeners, according to the one-year study. The partial pressure of BFRs in the gas phase was significantly correlated with the ambient temperature, except for BDE 85, γ-HBCD and DBDPE, indicating the important influence of ambient temperature on the behavior of BFRs in the atmosphere. It was found that the gas–particle partitioning coefficients (logK{sub p}) for most low molecular weight BFRs were highly temperature dependent as well. Gas–particle partitioning coefficients (logK{sub p}) also correlated with the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (logP{sub L}{sup o}). Our results indicated that absorption into organic matter is the main control mechanism for the gas–particle partitioning of atmospheric PBDEs. - Highlights: • Both PBDEs and alternative BFRs were analyzed in the atmosphere of Northeast China. • Partial pressure of BFRs was significantly correlated with the ambient temperature. • A strong temperature dependence of gas-particle partitioning was found. • Absorption into organic matter was the control mechanism for G-P partitioning.

  18. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P.K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A.K.; Avasthi, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 10 12 ions/cm 2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 10 13 ions/cm 2 . The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures

  19. Temperature dependent transport of two dimensional electrons in the integral quantum Hall regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wi, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the temperature dependent electronic transport properties of a two dimensional electron gas subject to background potential fluctuations and a perpendicular magnetic field. The author carried out an extensive temperature dependent study of the transport coefficients, in the region of an integral quantum plateau, in an In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/As/InP heterostructure for 4.2K 10 cm -2 meV -1 ) even at the middle between two Landau levels, which is unexpected from model calculations based on short ranged randomness. In addition, the different T dependent behavior of rho/sub xx/ between the states in the tails and those near the center of a Landau level, indicates the existence of different electron states in a Landau level. Additionally, the author reports T-dependent transport measurements in the transition region between two quantum plateaus in several different materials

  20. Temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond films studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of residual stress and its components with increasing temperature in chemical vapor deposited (CVD diamond films has a crucial impact on their high temperature applications. In this work we investigated temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond film deposited on Si(100 substrate in the temperature range of 30 °C to 480 °C by Raman mapping measurement. Raman shift of the characteristic diamond band peaked at 1332 cm-1 was studied to evaluate the residual stress distribution at the diamond surface. A new approach was applied to calculate thermal stress evolution with increasing tempera­ture by using two commonly known equations. Comparison of the residts obtained from the two methods was presented. The intrinsic stress component was calculated from the difference between average values of residual and thermal stress and then its temperature dependence was discussed.

  1. Temperature dependence of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interactions in GaAs wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.; Fu, J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown [Fu and Egues, Phys. Rev. B 91 (2015) 075408] unusual properties of the spin–orbit (SO) interaction in relatively wide quantum wells, e.g., the second subband Rashba term can vanish even in asymmetric configurations. Here we report our theoretical investigation on the temperature dependence of Rashba and Dresselhaus SO interactions in GaAs both relatively narrow and wide wells, having the electron occupancy of one and two subbands, respectively. We consider all relevant intra- and intersubband SO terms. We find that the variation of intrasubband couplings as temperatures range from 0.3 to 300 K could attain, ∼meV Å, the order of usual magnitudes for SO terms in GaAs wells. Moreover, we observe distinct behaviors of the SO interaction of the two subbands, as functions of temperature. On the other band, we find that the intersubband SO terms have a relatively weak temperature dependence.

  2. Temperature dependence of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interactions in GaAs wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. [Department of Physics, Jining University, 273155 Qufu, Shandong (China); Fu, J.Y., E-mail: jiyongfu78@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, 273165 Qufu, Shandong (China); Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-02-01

    We have recently shown [Fu and Egues, Phys. Rev. B 91 (2015) 075408] unusual properties of the spin–orbit (SO) interaction in relatively wide quantum wells, e.g., the second subband Rashba term can vanish even in asymmetric configurations. Here we report our theoretical investigation on the temperature dependence of Rashba and Dresselhaus SO interactions in GaAs both relatively narrow and wide wells, having the electron occupancy of one and two subbands, respectively. We consider all relevant intra- and intersubband SO terms. We find that the variation of intrasubband couplings as temperatures range from 0.3 to 300 K could attain, ∼meV Å, the order of usual magnitudes for SO terms in GaAs wells. Moreover, we observe distinct behaviors of the SO interaction of the two subbands, as functions of temperature. On the other band, we find that the intersubband SO terms have a relatively weak temperature dependence.

  3. Resistance to broomrape (Orobanche spp.) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is temperature dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizenberg, H; Plakhine, D; Hershenhorn, J; Kleifeld, Y; Rubin, B

    2003-04-01

    The effects of various temperature regimes in the range 29-17/21-9 degrees C day/night on each stage of the parasitism process of Orobanche cumana and O. aegyptiaca on sunflower were studied under controlled conditions in polyethylene bags. The response of the resistant sunflower variety 'Ambar' was expressed as the degeneration of the parasite tissues after its establishment in the plant roots, and this stage was found to be temperature dependent. The degeneration rate of Orobanche tubercles in the resistant sunflower variety was also found to be temperature dependent and was about five times as great as that in the sensitive variety in the highest temperature regime tested of 29/21 degrees C day/night. The ability to reject the parasite by causing its degeneration and death is the main factor that determines the resistance. As the temperature rises, more tubercles degenerate and die, that is the sunflower plant expresses higher levels of resistance.

  4. The effect of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity in heat transfer simulations of frozen biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Y

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity value of pure water ice is inversely proportional to the temperature and decreases about 5-fold as the temperature increases from the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature (77 K to the freezing point of pure water. The temperature dependency of the thermal conductivity is typically overlooked in bioheat transfer simulations. A closed-form solution of the one-dimensional temperature distribution in frozen water and blood is presented in this study, based on a new thermal conductivity model. Results indicate that temperatures are overestimated up to 38K, and heat fluxes through the frozen region boundaries are underestimated by a factor of 2, when the temperature dependency of the thermal conductivity is neglected.

  5. Temperature dependent optical properties of stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouerghui, W. [Unite de Recherche Des Physiques des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, Institut Preparatoire aux Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia)], E-mail: ouerghuiwalid@yahoo.fr; Martinez-Pastor, J.; Gomis, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materials, Universidad de Valencia, P.O. Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Maaref, M. [Unite de Recherche Des Physiques des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, Institut Preparatoire aux Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia); Granados, D.; Garcia, J.M. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Isaac newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we describe the results of temperature dependent photoluminescence intensity and decay time measurements of In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum rings where the depth of barrier is varied from sample to sample. The activation energy found for the reduction of the exciton decay time as a function of the temperature is approximately half the value of the thermionic escape energy of excitons. The temperature dependant behaviour is ascribed to the carriers lost via the excited state to the WL. The time resolved PL study indicates that thermal escape mechanisms is not so affected by reducing the spacer thickness, but it's influenced essentially by the excited state recombination.

  6. Memory effects, two color percolation, and the temperature dependence of Mott variable-range hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Oded; Aleiner, Igor L.

    2014-06-01

    There are three basic processes that determine hopping transport: (a) hopping between normally empty sites (i.e., having exponentially small occupation numbers at equilibrium), (b) hopping between normally occupied sites, and (c) transitions between normally occupied and unoccupied sites. In conventional theories all these processes are considered Markovian and the correlations of occupation numbers of different sites are believed to be small (i.e., not exponential in temperature). We show that, contrary to this belief, memory effects suppress the processes of type (c) and manifest themselves in a subleading exponential temperature dependence of the variable-range hopping conductivity. This temperature dependence originates from the property that sites of type (a) and (b) form two independent resistor networks that are weakly coupled to each other by processes of type (c). This leads to a two-color percolation problem which we solve in the critical region.

  7. Temperature dependence of hardness in yttria-stabilized zirconia single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pirouz, Pirouz; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hardness and microcracking in single-crystal 9.5-mol pct-Y2O3-fully-stabilized cubic-ZrO2 was studied as a function of orientation. Crack lengths increased with increased temperature up to 500 C; above 800 C, no cracks were found, indicating an indentation brittle-to-ductile transition of about 800 C. The temperature dependence of hardness was reduced around 500 C. Etching studies to delineate the plastic zone around and below indents identified the operative slip systems. The role of dislocations and their interactions within the plastic zone on the hardness and indentation fracture behavior of cubic-ZrO2 are discussed.

  8. Temperature Dependence of the Energy Band Diagram of AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependence of the energy band diagram of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was investigated by theoretical calculation and experiment. Through solving Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently by using the Silvaco Atlas software, the energy band diagram with varying temperature was calculated. The results indicate that the conduction band offset of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure decreases with increasing temperature in the range of 7 K to 200 K, which means that the depth of quantum well at AlGaN/GaN interface becomes shallower and the confinement of that on two-dimensional electron gas reduces. The theoretical calculation results are verified by the investigation of temperature dependent photoluminescence of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure. This work provides important theoretical and experimental basis for the performance degradation of AlGaN/GaN HEMT with increasing temperature.

  9. Yolk-albumen testosterone in a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination: relation with development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Victoria; Bowden, Rachel M; Crews, David

    2013-06-01

    The leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination as well as temperature-influenced polymorphisms. Research suggests that in oviparous reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination, steroid hormones in the yolk might influence sex determination and sexual differentiation. From captive leopard geckos that were all from the same incubation temperature regime, we gathered freshly laid eggs, incubated them at one of two female-biased incubation temperatures (26 or 34°C), and measured testosterone content in the yolk-albumen at early or late development. No differences in the concentration of testosterone were detected in eggs from different incubation temperatures. We report testosterone concentrations in the yolk-albumen were higher in eggs of late development than early development at 26°C incubation temperatures, a finding opposite that reported in other TSD reptiles studied to date. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Temperature dependent magneto-crystalline anisotropy of thin films: A relativistic disordered local moment approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruzs, Á.; Szunyogh, L.; Udvardi, L.; Weinberger, P.; Staunton, J. B.

    2007-09-01

    In order to study the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy of thin ferromagnetic films from first principles we combined the relativistic extension of the disordered local moment approach with the screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker technique for layered systems. We first apply the new method for a Fe monolayer on a Cu(1 1 1) surface and a Co monolayer on a Cu(1 0 0) surface referring to an out-of-plane and an in-plane magnetization, respectively. Interestingly, the magnetic anisotropy energy follows a remarkably different temperature dependence for these two cases. This different behavior is also demonstrated in terms of the relationship between the magnetic anisotropy energy and the average magnetization.

  11. Mechanical and thermal postbuckling of shear-deformable FGM plates with temperature-dependent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, N. D.; Tung, H. V.

    2010-12-01

    An analytical approach to investigating the stability of simply supported rectangular functionally graded plates under in-plane compressive, thermal, and combined loads is presented. The material properties are assumed to be temperature-dependent and graded in the thickness direction according to a simple power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of constituents. The equilibrium and compatibility equations for the plates are derived by using the first-order shear deformation theory of plates, taking into account both the geometrical nonlinearity in the von Karman sense and initial geometrical imperfections. The resulting equations are solved by employing the Galerkin procedure to obtain expressions from which the postbuckling load-deflection curves can be traced by an iterative procedure. A stability analysis performed for geometrically midplane-symmetric FGM plates shows the effects of material and geometric parameters, in-plane boundary conditions, temperature-dependent material properties, and imperfections on the postbuckling behavior of the plates.

  12. On the temperature dependence of the reaction O+NO-NO2(asterisk). [in earth atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    The published data on the temperature dependence of the radiative combination of atomic oxygen with nitric oxide at pressures near 1 torr is examined. Arguments are advanced to suggest that radiation near the cut-off wavelength (about 3875A) is coming from the unstabilized activated complex, NO2(asterisk). At 4000A a positive activation energy of 1 kcal/mole is deduced. Application of this temperature dependence with the rate coefficient at 5200A is made to airglow measurements in aurora. The deduced NO concentration is about 10 to the 9th per cu cm, in general agreement with that deduced from the measured NO(+)/O2(+) ratio as well as an auroral model prediction.

  13. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  14. Temperature dependence of positron lifetime in ordered porous silica (SBA-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishige, S.; Koshimizu, M.; Asai, K.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of positron lifetime in uniform mesopores was analyzed. We used SBA-3 as the sample material, which possesses an ordered porous structure with uniform cylindrical mesopores. The positron lifetime corresponding to the annihilation in the mesopores increased gradually with a decrease in temperature down to 100 K, and its relative intensity also increased concomitantly. This result was attributed to the lower probability of the escape of the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) from the mesopores into the intergrain space at lower temperatures. An anomalous and sudden increase in the lifetime was observed at around 100 K; this result was in agreement with an increase in the positron lifetime reported in a previous study. It was revealed that the increase in the lifetime is very steep in cases of uniform mesopores, suggesting that the temperature dependence is influenced by the pore size.

  15. Temperature dependence of Raman scattering in β-(AlGa2O3 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a detailed investigation on temperature-dependent Raman scattering of β-(AlGa2O3 thin films with different Al content (0-0.72 under the temperature range of 77-300 K. The temperature-dependent Raman shifts and linewidths of the phonon modes were obtained by employing Lorentz fitting. The linewidths broadening of phonon modes with the temperature can be well explained by a model involving the effects of thermal expansion, lattice-mismatch-induced strain, and decay of optical phonon into two and three phonons. It is clearly demonstrated dependence of the linewidths and decay process on the Al content in β-(AlGa2O3 thin films, which can provide an experimental basis for realization of (AlGa2O3-based optoelectronic device applications.

  16. Temperature dependence of magnetic excitations in the frustrated antiferromagnetic spinel ZnMn2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hun; Hwang, In-Yong; Chung, Jae-Ho; Stewart, J. Ross; Higemoto, Wataru; Miyake, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of spin ordering and excitations of the frustrated tetragonal (c >a ) spinel ZnMn2O4 across the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic transition. Muon spin relaxation indicates full development of ordered magnetic moments immediately below TN=62.7 (2 ) K in spite of the apparent low-dimensional ordering. Using inelastic neutron scattering, we obtained the spin Hamiltonian accounting for the temperature-dependent spin excitations. The damped spin waves at high temperature exhibit a continuous increase in their lifetime on cooling across TN. In contrast, the finite anisotropy gap appears suddenly below TN indicating that single-ion anisotropy stabilizes the antiferromagnetic chains. We also observed the frustrated out-of-plane exchange contributing to the high-energy modes.

  17. Probing Temperature-Dependent Recombination Kinetics in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells by Electric Noise Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Landi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of solvent additives on the temperature behavior of both charge carrier transport and recombination kinetics in bulk heterojunction solar cells has been investigated by electric noise spectroscopy. The observed differences in charge carrier lifetime and mobility are attributed to a different film ordering and donor-acceptor phase segregation in the blend. The measured temperature dependence indicates that bimolecular recombination is the dominant loss mechanism in the active layer, affecting the device performance. Blend devices prepared with a high-boiling-point solvent additive show a decreased recombination rate at the donor-acceptor interface as compared to the ones prepared with the reference solvent. A clear correlation between the device performance and the morphological properties is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of the mobility-lifetime product.

  18. EXACT SOLUTION FOR TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT BUCKLING ANALYSIS OF FG-CNT-REINFORCED MINDLIN PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Mousavi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the buckling analysis of nanocomposite polymeric temperature-dependent plates reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. For the carbon-nanotube reinforced composite (CNTRC plate, uniform distribution (UD and three types of functionally graded (FG distribution patterns of SWCNT reinforcements are assumed. The material properties of FG-CNTRC plate are graded in the thickness direction and estimated based on the rule of mixture. The CNTRC is located in a elastic medium which is simulated with temperature-dependent Pasternak medium. Based on orthotropic Mindlin plate theory, the governing equations are derived using Hamilton’s principle and solved by Navier method. The influences of the volume fractions of carbon nanotubes, elastic medium, temperature and distribution type of CNTs are considered on the buckling of the plate. Results indicate that CNT distribution close to top and bottom are more efficient than those distributed nearby the mid-plane for increasing the stiffness of plates.

  19. Temperature dependence of conductivity in high mobility MIS structures on a base of (001) silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyrodov, E.A.; Dolgopolov, V.T.; Dorozhkin, C.I.; Zhitenev, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the temperature dependence of the conductivity of two-dimensional electrons in silicon MIS structures were carried out. It is shown that the observed dependence is well described by the equation σ(T) = σ(0)(1-Q(kT var-epsilon F )-P(kT/var-epsilon F )3/2 + O[(kT/var-epsilon F ) 2 ]). The variation of the coefficient Q with the density N S of the two-dimensional electrons is determined, and it is shown that the observed trend of the Q(s) curve is described by consideration of the temperature dependence of the dielectric function of a two-dimensional electron gas

  20. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin Fe film on vicinal Si(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong-Sheng; He, Wei; Ye, Jun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Jin; Zhang, Xiang-Qun [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin Fe film with different thickness epitaxially grown on vicinal Si(111) substrate has been quantitatively investigated using the anisotropic magnetoresistance(AMR) measurements. Due to the effect of the vicinal substrate, the magnetic anisotropy is the superposition of a four-fold, a two-fold and a weakly six-fold contribution. It is found that the temperature dependence of the first-order magnetocrystalline anisotropies coefficient follows power laws of the reduced magnetization m(T)(=M(T)/M(0)) being consistent with the Callen and Callen's theory. However the temperature dependence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) shows novel behavior that decreases roughly as a function of temperature with different power law for samples with different thickness. We also found that the six-fold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is almost invariable over a wide temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different exponents are discussed.

  1. An improved stochastic algorithm for temperature-dependent homogeneous gas phase reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, M

    2003-01-01

    We propose an improved stochastic algorithm for temperature-dependent homogeneous gas phase reactions. By combining forward and reverse reaction rates, a significant gain in computational efficiency is achieved. Two modifications of modelling the temperature dependence (with and without conservation of enthalpy) are introduced and studied quantitatively. The algorithm is tested for the combustion of n-heptane, which is a reference fuel component for internal combustion engines. The convergence of the algorithm is studied by a series of numerical experiments and the computational cost of the stochastic algorithm is compared with the DAE code DASSL. If less accuracy is needed the stochastic algorithm is faster on short simulation time intervals. The new stochastic algorithm is significantly faster than the original direct simulation algorithm in all cases considered.

  2. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal...... capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circuit-level simulation to achieve an improved accuracy of the estimation on IGBT junction temperature and its...... relevant reliability aspect performance. A test bench is built up with an ultra-fast infrared (IR) camera to validate the proposed thermal impedance model....

  3. Temperature-dependent surface density of alkylthiol monolayers on gold nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuepeng; Lu, Pin; Zhai, Hua; Wu, Yucheng

    2018-03-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the surface density of passivating monolayers of alkylthiol chains on gold nanocrystals at temperatures ranging from 1 to 800 K. The results show that the surface density of alkylthiol monolayer reaches a maximum value at near room temperature (200-300 K), while significantly decreases with increasing temperature in the higher temperature region (> 300 {{K}}), and slightly decreases with decreasing temperature at low temperature (< 200 {{K}}). We find that the temperature dependence of surface ligand density in the higher temperature region is attributed to the substantial ligand desorption induced by the thermal fluctuation, while that at low temperature results from the reduction in entropy caused by the change in the ordering of passivating monolayer. These results are expected helpful to understand the temperature-dependent surface coverage of gold nanocrystals.

  4. Temperature dependence of structural parameters in the perovskite Na0.74WO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlington, C.N.W.; Hriljac, J.A.; Knight, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    Na x WO 3 undergoes three phase transitions involving tilting of the oxygen octahedra about left angle 100 right angle pseudocubic directions. We have measured the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters between 200 and 750 K - a temperature range that spans the three transitions - and determined the evolution of the structure within each phase as temperature changes. The experiments were performed on the high-resolution powder diffractometer HRPD, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. The critical exponent that describes the temperature dependence of the total tilt angle has been evaluated. An unexpected change in the thermal expansion coefficient in the cubic phase is not understood: an argument based on Landau's theory of phase transitions is used to demonstrate that the change is not the result of co-existence of two phases. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. A Model of Temperature-Dependent Young's Modulus for Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the different sensitivities of material properties to temperature between ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs and traditional ceramics, the original empirical formula of temperature-dependent Young's modulus of ceramic materials is unable to describe the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UHTCs which are used as thermal protection materials. In this paper, a characterization applied to Young's modulus of UHTC materials under high temperature which is revised from the original empirical formula is established. The applicable temperature range of the characterization extends to the higher temperature zone. This study will provide a basis for the characterization for strength and fracture toughness of UHTC materials and provide theoretical bases and technical reserves for the UHTC materials' design and application in the field of spacecraft.

  6. Temperature dependences of photoconductivity of CdHgTe crystals with photoactive inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasenko, A.I.; Vlasenko, Z.K.

    1999-01-01

    Temperature dependences of life time τ and spectral characteristics of photoconductivity for Cd x Hg 1-x Te crystals (x = 0.2) with photoactive inclusions are investigated. It is shown that the N-type character of effective lifetime temperature dependences in nonhomogeneous crystals, in particular, its sharp temperature activation in the region of transition from the impurity to the intrinsic conductivity is determined by not the Shockley-Read mechanism, but by the interband impact mechanism with changing effective geometrical sizes of recombination active regions under temperature increase. Within the frames of this model the smoothing of the non-monotone character of the photoconductivity spectral characteristics in the region of fundamental absorption under the heating is explained. The calculation results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data are presented [ru

  7. Parasitic bipolar amplification in a single event transient and its temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zheng; Chen Shu-Ming; Chen Jian-Jun; Qin Jun-Rui; Liu Rong-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Using three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, parasitic bipolar amplification in a single event transient (SET) current of a single transistor and its temperature dependence are studied. We quantify the contributions of different current components in a SET current pulse, and it is found that the proportion of parasitic bipolar amplification in total collected charge is about 30% in both 130-nm and 90-nm technologies. The temperature dependence of parasitic bipolar amplification and the mechanism of the SET pulse are also investigated and quantified. The results show that the proportion of charge induced by parasitic bipolar increases with rising temperature, which illustrates that the parasitic bipolar amplification plays an important role in the charge collection of a single transistor

  8. Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce N. Smith; Jillian L. Walker; Rebekka L. Stone; Angela R. Jones; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion...

  9. Temperature dependency of the hysteresis behaviour of PZT actuators using Preisach model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangeot, Charles; Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Preisach model is a powerful tool for modelling the hysteresis phenomenon on multilayer piezo actuators under large signal excitation. In this paper, measurements at different temperatures are presented, showing the effect on the density of the Preisach matrix. An energy-based approach...... is presented, aiming at defining a temperature-dependent phenomenological model of hysteresis for a better understanding of the non-linear effects in piezo actuators....

  10. On the temperature dependence of spin pumping in ferromagnet–topological insulator–ferromagnet spin valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baker

    Full Text Available Topological insulators (TIs have a large potential for spintronic devices owing to their spin-polarized, counter-propagating surface states. Recently, we have investigated spin pumping in a ferromagnet–TI–ferromagnet structure at room temperature. Here, we present the temperature-dependent measurement of spin pumping down to 10 K, which shows no variation with temperature. Keywords: Topological insulator, Spin pumping, Spintronics, Ferromagnetic resonance

  11. On the temperature dependence of possible S8 infrared bands in planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1977-01-01

    The temperature dependence between 77 and 333 K of the infrared spectrum of cyclic S8 in the Jupiter atmosphere has been measured. It was found that the 23-micron Jovian feature (identified by Houck et al., 1975), if real, cannot be attributed to cyclic S8. Other features of S8, however, such as the band with a room-temperature central frequency of 835/cm may prove to be useful temperature calibrators in planetary or satellite spectra.

  12. Anomalous temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for the substitutionally-disordered hopping conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaelle, R.P.; Parris, P.E.; Anderson, H.U.; Sparlin, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermoelectric power measurements are presented for the (La,Sr)(Cr,Mn)O 3 series. The nonlinear temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is analyzed in terms of a random distribution of energetically equivalent hopping sites. The limitations of Heikes' formula, which has been traditionally used to calculate small polaron carrier densities in these systems, are discussed. Recent theoretical developments in the interpretation of Seebeck measurements in substitutionally-disordered high-temperature hopping conductors are reviewed

  13. Temperature dependence of the 2D′ mode of an isotopically labelledgraphene double layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verhagen, Timotheus; Valeš, Václav; Frank, Otakar; Kalbáč, Martin; Vejpravová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 12 (2016), 2342-2346 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * isotope labelling * Raman spectroscopy * temperature dependence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CG - Electrochemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2016

  14. Temperature Dependent Sellmeier Equation for the Refractive Index of GaP (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30 January 2018 Interim 30 July 2015 – 30 December 2017 4. TITLE...0.7 and 12.5 μm over a temperature range of 78 to 450 K, is presented. The temperature dependence values of the generated wavelengths in nonlinear...frequency conversion calculated using this equation match well the experimentally measured values . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nonlinear optical materials

  15. An analytical method for determining the temperature dependent moisture diffusivities of pumpkin seeds during drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Trakya, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents an analytical method, which determines the moisture diffusion coefficients for the natural and forced convection hot air drying of pumpkin seeds and their temperature dependence. In order to obtain scientific data, the pumpkin seed drying process was investigated under both natural and forced hot air convection regimes. This paper presents the experimental results in which the drying air was heated by solar energy. (author)

  16. Temperature dependence of CIE-x,y color coordinates in YAG:Ce single crystal phosphor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejman, M.; Babin, Vladimir; Kučerková, Romana; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 187, Jul (2017), s. 20-25 ISSN 0022-2313 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04010135 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : YAG:Ce * single-crystal * simulation * energy level lifetime * white LED * CIE * temperature dependence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  17. Derivation of temperature dependent material properties of polymer foam core materials using optical extensometry

    OpenAIRE

    Dulieu-Barton, J.M.; Boyenval Langlois, C.; Thomsen, O.T.; Zhang, S.; Fruehmann, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology for determining the temperature dependence of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio of polymer foams core materials is presented. The design of the test specimen is described in detail, covering the parasitic effects resulting from departures from the uniform strain condition. The measurement approach is based on a non-contact technique so that the behaviour of the complaint foam is not modified by the attachment of strain gauges or extensometers. Firstly experiments are con...

  18. Effect of excitation frequency on temperature dependent electroluminescence of ZnS : Cu, Mn : (H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, L.K.

    1986-04-01

    The temperature dependent electroluminescence yields of Hydrogen coactivated (ZnS : Cu, Mn) Phosphor have been investigated under the influence of excitation field frequencies. It was observed that brightness maximum of electroluminescent intensity shifts towards higher temperature region for all emissions. The shift for blue emission is remarkable at some higher frequency. Electroluminescent output under simultaneous effect of frequency and temperature shows the validity of interrelation, f=A e(-c/KT). (author)

  19. Quark mass density- and temperature- dependent model for bulk strange quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    al, Yun Zhang et.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the quark mass density-dependent model can not be used to explain the process of the quark deconfinement phase transition because the quark confinement is permanent in this model. A quark mass density- and temperature-dependent model in which the quark confinement is impermanent has been suggested. We argue that the vacuum energy density B is a function of temperature. The dynamical and thermodynamical properties of bulk strange quark matter for quark mass density- and temper...

  20. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  1. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Anandan, P.; Malathi, N.; Mohankumar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resi...

  2. Does N2 fixation amplify the temperature dependence of ecosystem metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Jill R; Benstead, Jonathan P; Cross, Wyatt F; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Williamson, Tanner J

    2015-03-01

    Variation in resource supply can cause variation in temperature dependences of metabolic processes (e.g., photosynthesis and respiration). Understanding such divergence is particularly important when using metabolic theory to predict ecosystem responses to climate warming. Few studies, however, have assessed the effect of temperature-resource interactions on metabolic processes, particularly in cases where the supply of limiting resources exhibits temperature dependence. We investigated the responses of biomass accrual, gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and N2 fixation to warming during biofilm development in a streamside channel experiment. Areal rates of GPP, CR, biomass accrual, and N2 fixation scaled positively with temperature, showing a 32- to 71-fold range across the temperature gradient (approximately 7 degrees-24 degrees C). Areal N2-fixation rates exhibited apparent activation energies (1.5-2.0 eV; 1 eV = approximately 1.6 x 10(-19) J) approximating the activation energy of the nitrogenase reaction. In contrast, mean apparent activation energies for areal rates of GPP (2.1-2.2 eV) and CR (1.6-1.9 eV) were 6.5- and 2.7-fold higher than estimates based on metabolic theory predictions (i.e., 0.32 and 0.65 eV, respectively) and did not significantly differ from the apparent activation energy observed for N2 fixation. Mass-specific activation energies for N2 fixation (1.4-1.6 eV), GPP (0.3-0.5 eV), and CR (no observed temperature relationship) were near or lower than theoretical predictions. We attribute the divergence of areal activation energies from those predicted by metabolic theory to increases in N2 fixation with temperature, leading to amplified temperature dependences of biomass accrual and areal rates of GPP and R. Such interactions between temperature dependences must be incorporated into metabolic models to improve predictions of ecosystem responses to climate change.

  3. Accounting of the influence of temperature dependant transient thermodynamic processes on gas laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    In this paper the effect of the presence of temperature dependent transient thermodynamic processes such as the dissociation, condensation and excitation of vibrational degrees of freedom on the peculiarities of the behaviour of an imperfect gas was considered on a quantitative level. We also discussed the influence of the nonequilibrium thermodynamic effects on the behaviour of real gas and estimated the order of their magnitudes.

  4. An unusual temperature dependence in the oxidation of oxycarbide layers on uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Walton P.

    1981-09-01

    An anomalous temperature dependence has been observed for the oxidation kinetics of outermost oxycarbide layers on polycrystalline uranium metal. Normally, oxidation or corrosion reactions are expected to proceed more rapidly as the temperature is elevated. Thus, it came as a surprise when we observed that the removal of the outermost atomic layers of carbon from uranium oxycarbide by O 2 reproducibly proceeds at a much faster rate at 25°C than at 280°C.

  5. Identification of microscopic domain wall motion from temperature dependence of nonlinear dielectric response.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mokrý, Pavel; Sluka, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 16 (2017), č. článku 162906. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-32228S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : microscopic domain wall * electric fields * temperature dependence Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4981874

  6. Brillouin scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of sound velocity and acoustic absorption in simple alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J. R.; Coakley, R. W.

    2011-07-01

    A scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to measure Brillouin spectra of methanol, isopropanol and a 95% ethanol-water mixture for temperatures ranging between 285 K and 320 K. The Brillouin frequency shifts and linewidths were used to calculate the velocities and absorption coefficients of hypersonic acoustic waves in these liquids. The temperature dependence of sound speed and acoustic attenuation was determined. For all three materials, both sound velocity and absorption coefficient decreased with temperature.

  7. The temperature dependence of the gas gain in sealed proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanha-Honko, V.

    1980-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the gas gain in sealed proportional counters has been studied. It is found that the temperature coefficient of the gas gain can be explained by the thermal expansion of the counter materials. A simple model for the temperature coefficient, based on the Diethorn gas amplification formula, is presented. Abnormal temperature coefficients, attributed to impurities present in the counter gas, have been found in some individual counters. (orig.)

  8. Temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of soils; Tsuchi no hiteiko no ondo izonsei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.; Matsui, T. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Park, M.; Fujiwara, H. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Kinds of ground materials, porosity, electrical resistivity of pores, degree of saturation, and content of clays are the factors affecting the electrical resistivity of soils. In addition to these factors, the electrical resistivity of soils around hot spring water and geothermal areas depends on the temperature due to fluctuation of cation mobility in the pore water with the temperature. In this paper, the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of groundwater and soils is investigated by recognizing that of groundwater as that of pore water. As a result, it was found that the electrical resistivity of groundwater becomes lower as increasing the amount of dissolved cation, and that the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity is not significant because of the small mobility of cation. The electrical resistivity of soils was significantly affected by that of pore water, in which the mobility of cation was changed with temperature changes. Accordingly, the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of soils has a similar tendency as that of groundwater. 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Estimation of the temperature dependent interaction between uncharged point defects in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); GlobalWafers Japan Co., Ltd., 30 Soya, Hadano, Kanagawa, 257-8566 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    A method is described to estimate the temperature dependent interaction between two uncharged point defects in Si based on DFT calculations. As an illustration, the formation of the uncharged di-vacancy V{sub 2} is discussed, based on the temperature dependent attractive field between both vacancies. For that purpose, all irreducible configurations of two uncharged vacancies are determined, each with their weight given by the number of equivalent configurations. Using a standard 216-atoms supercell, nineteen irreducible configurations of two vacancies are obtained. The binding energies of all these configurations are calculated. Each vacancy is surrounded by several attractive sites for another vacancy. The obtained temperature dependent of total volume of these attractive sites has a radius that is closely related with the capture radius for the formation of a di-vacancy that is used in continuum theory. The presented methodology can in principle also be applied to estimate the capture radius for pair formation of any type of point defects.

  10. Temperature dependence of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and organochlorine pesticide concentrations in Chicago air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofuoglu, Aysun; Odabasi, Mustafa; Tasdemir, Yucel; Khalili, Nasrin R.; Holsen, Thomas M.

    The temperature dependence of gas-phase atmospheric concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides measured in Chicago, IL between June and October 1995 were investigated using plots of the natural logarithm of partial pressures (ln P) vs. reciprocal mean temperatures (1/ T). For the eight lowest molecular weight PAHs, temperature dependence was statistically significant (at the 95% confidence level) and temperature accounted for 23-49% of the variability in gas-phase concentrations. The relatively higher slopes for most of the PAHs suggested that volatilization from local sources and short-range transport influenced their concentrations. For pesticides, temperature dependence was statistically significant for DDD and for trans-nonachlor (at the 95% and 90% confidence levels), and was not statistically significant for the other five compounds (2-18% of the variability in their gas-phase concentrations). The relatively lower slopes for individual pesticides suggested that they have mostly non-urban and distant sources. Results of back trajectory analyses suggested that the region, southwest of Chicago, might be an important local or regional source sector for PAHs and organochlorine pesticides. No statistically significant relationship was observed between wind speed and PAH or pesticide concentrations. None of the variables (temperature, wind speed, wind direction, local and regional sources) could fully explain the variation in their concentrations measured in Chicago, therefore, this variation can be attributed to the combined effect of those factors.

  11. Effects of the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus on magnetic exchange-entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.A. da; Plaza, E.J.R.; Campoy, J.C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic route for the field-induced additional exchange-entropy was studied. • The temperature dependence of bulk modulus leads to the additional exchange-entropy. • The total entropy change matches with the sum of conventional and additional terms. • We obtained analytical expressions for deformation and additional exchange-entropy. - Abstract: We have studied the field-induced additional exchange-entropy on an elastic ferromagnet as a response effect of the dependence of its bulk modulus with temperature. We consider that the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus follows a linear behavior or a Wachtman-type equation. Our analysis is based on a free energy model containing exchange, Zeeman and elastic terms. From the deduced expressions for the exchange parameter, the additional exchange-entropy was obtained. This quantity must be the difference between the conventional and the total entropy change which were calculated from well-established thermodynamic expressions, i.e., configurational spin disorder and Maxwell’s equation, respectively. In addition, we established an analytical relation between the field-induced additional exchange-entropy and the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus

  12. Temperature dependence of bulk respiration of crop stands. Measurement and model fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Takashi; Arai, Ryuji; Tako, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine whether the temperature dependence of respiration at a crop-stand scale could be directly represented by an Arrhenius function that was widely used for representing the temperature dependence of leaf respiration. We determined temperature dependences of bulk respiration of monospecific stands of rice and soybean within a range of the air temperature from 15 to 30degC using large closed chambers. Measured responses of respiration rates of the two stands were well fitted by the Arrhenius function (R 2 =0.99). In the existing model to assess the local radiological impact of the anthropogenic carbon-14, effects of the physical environmental factors on photosynthesis and respiration of crop stands are not taken into account for the calculation of the net amount of carbon per cultivation area in crops at harvest which is the crucial parameter for the estimation of the activity concentration of carbon-14 in crops. Our result indicates that the Arrhenius function is useful for incorporating the effect of the temperature on respiration of crop stands into the model which is expected to contribute to a more realistic estimate of the activity concentration of carbon-14 in crops. (author)

  13. Temperature Dependence of Volumetric and Dynamic Properties of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Fardin; Zhang, Yong; Xue, Lianjie; Quitevis, Edward L; Maginn, Edward J; Khare, Rajesh

    2018-03-01

    Atomistically detailed molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the temperature dependence of the specific volume, dynamic properties, and viscosity of linear alkyl chain ([C n C 1 Im][NTf 2 ], n = 3-7) and branched alkyl chain ([(n - 2)mC n-1 C 1 Im][NTf 2 ]) ionic liquids (ILs). The trend of the glass transition temperature (T g ) values obtained in the simulations as a function of the alkyl chain length of cations was similar to the trend seen in experiments. In addition, the system relaxation behavior as determined from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient, rotational relaxation time, and viscosity close to T g was observed to follow the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann expression. Furthermore, the reciprocal of the diffusion coefficient of the anion and cation in both linear and branched IL systems showed a linear correlation with viscosity, thus confirming the validity of the Stokes-Einstein relationship for these systems. Similarly, the average rotational relaxation time of the ions was also found to correlate linearly with the viscosity of the ILs over a wide range of temperatures, thereby validating the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship for the ILs. These simulation findings suggest that the temperature dependence of the relaxation time of ILs is very similar to that of other glass-forming liquids.

  14. Power-law temperature dependence of collision broadening and shift of atomic and molecular rovibronic lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Bielski, Andrzej; Ciuryło, Roman; Szudy, Józef; Trawiński, Ryszard S.

    2013-01-01

    The classical phase-shift theory of spectral line shapes is used to examine various aspects of the applicability of the power-law relations to the description of temperature variations of pressure broadening and shifting coefficients of the isolated atomic and rovibronic molecular lines in a wide temperature range. Model calculations performed for potentials of the Lennard-Jones type indicate that the temperature dependence exponents of the broadening and shifting can be related to the details of the intermolecular interactions. It is shown that they are sensitive to the range of temperatures assumed in the fit and therefore extreme care must be taken when the power-law temperature dependence is used as a scaling law. The problems of the failure of the power-law and of variations in the sign of pressure shift coefficients with increasing temperature are discussed. Very good fits of Frost's empirical formula for temperature dependence of pressure shift to the theoretical ones are obtained. -- Highlights: ► Classical theory of line shapes is used to examine the power-law relations. ► The broadening and shifting exponents depend on the range of temperatures in the fit. ► Extreme care must be taken when using the power-law dependence as a scaling law

  15. Observing the temperature dependent transition of the GP2 peptide using terahertz spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Sun

    Full Text Available The GP2 peptide is derived from the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (HER2/nue, a marker protein for breast cancer present in saliva. In this paper we study the temperature dependent behavior of hydrated GP2 at terahertz frequencies and find that the peptide undergoes a dynamic transition between 200 and 220 K. By fitting suitable molecular models to the frequency response we determine the molecular processes involved above and below the transition temperature (T(D. In particular, we show that below T(D the dynamic transition is dominated by a simple harmonic vibration with a slow and temperature dependent relaxation time constant and that above T(D, the dynamic behavior is governed by two oscillators, one of which has a fast and temperature independent relaxation time constant and the other of which is a heavily damped oscillator with a slow and temperature dependent time constant. Furthermore a red shifting of the characteristic frequency of the damped oscillator was observed, confirming the presence of a non-harmonic vibration potential. Our measurements and modeling of GP2 highlight the unique capabilities of THz spectroscopy for protein characterization.

  16. Effects of the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus on magnetic exchange-entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J.A. da [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Plaza, E.J.R., E-mail: ejrplaza@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Campoy, J.C.P. [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36301-160 São João del Rei, MG (Brazil)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic route for the field-induced additional exchange-entropy was studied. • The temperature dependence of bulk modulus leads to the additional exchange-entropy. • The total entropy change matches with the sum of conventional and additional terms. • We obtained analytical expressions for deformation and additional exchange-entropy. - Abstract: We have studied the field-induced additional exchange-entropy on an elastic ferromagnet as a response effect of the dependence of its bulk modulus with temperature. We consider that the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus follows a linear behavior or a Wachtman-type equation. Our analysis is based on a free energy model containing exchange, Zeeman and elastic terms. From the deduced expressions for the exchange parameter, the additional exchange-entropy was obtained. This quantity must be the difference between the conventional and the total entropy change which were calculated from well-established thermodynamic expressions, i.e., configurational spin disorder and Maxwell’s equation, respectively. In addition, we established an analytical relation between the field-induced additional exchange-entropy and the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus.

  17. Dynamic temperature dependence patterns in future energy demand models in the context of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Moll, H.C.; Uiterkamp, A.J.M. Schoot

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand depends on outdoor temperature in a 'u' shaped fashion. Various studies have used this temperature dependence to investigate the effects of climate change on energy demand. Such studies contain implicit or explicit assumptions to describe expected socio-economic changes that may affect future energy demand. This paper critically analyzes these implicit or explicit assumptions and their possible effect on the studies' outcomes. First we analyze the interaction between the socio-economic structure and the temperature dependence pattern (TDP) of energy demand. We find that socio-economic changes may alter the TDP in various ways. Next we investigate how current studies manage these dynamics in socio-economic structure. We find that many studies systematically misrepresent the possible effect of socio-economic changes on the TDP of energy demand. Finally, we assess the consequences of these misrepresentations in an energy demand model based on temperature dependence and climate scenarios. Our model results indicate that expected socio-economic dynamics generally lead to an underestimation of future energy demand in models that misrepresent such dynamics. We conclude that future energy demand models should improve the incorporation of socio-economic dynamics. We propose dynamically modeling several key parameters and using direct meteorological data instead of degree days. (author)

  18. Simulation of phase separation with temperature-dependent viscosity using lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heping; Zang, Duyang; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-12-27

    This paper presents an exploration of the phase separation behavior and pattern formation in a binary fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity via a coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). By introducing a viscosity-temperature relation into the LBM, the coupling effects of the viscosity-temperature coefficient [Formula: see text] , initial viscosity [Formula: see text] and thermal diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] , on the phase separation were successfully described. The calculated results indicated that an increase in initial viscosity and viscosity-temperature coefficient, or a decrease in the thermal diffusion coefficient, can lead to the orientation of isotropic growth fronts over a wide range of viscosity. The results showed that droplet-type phase structures and lamellar phase structures with domain orientation parallel or perpendicular to the walls can be obtained in equilibrium by controlling the initial viscosity, thermal diffusivity, and the viscosity-temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the dataset was rearranged for growth kinetics of domain growth and thermal diffusion fronts in a plot by the spherically averaged structure factor and the ratio of separated and continuous phases. The analysis revealed two different temporal regimes: spinodal decomposition and domain growth stages, which further quantified the coupled effects of temperature and viscosity on the evolution of temperature-dependent phase separation. These numerical results provide guidance for setting optimum temperature ranges to obtain expected phase separation structures for systems with temperature-dependent viscosity.

  19. Re-estimating temperature-dependent consumption parameters in bioenergetics models for juvenile Chinook salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, John M.; Moffitt, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have cautioned against the borrowing of consumption and growth parameters from other species and life stages in bioenergetics growth models. In particular, the function that dictates temperature dependence in maximum consumption (Cmax) within the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha produces estimates that are lower than those measured in published laboratory feeding trials. We used published and unpublished data from laboratory feeding trials with subyearling Chinook Salmon from three stocks (Snake, Nechako, and Big Qualicum rivers) to estimate and adjust the model parameters for temperature dependence in Cmax. The data included growth measures in fish ranging from 1.5 to 7.2 g that were held at temperatures from 14°C to 26°C. Parameters for temperature dependence in Cmax were estimated based on relative differences in food consumption, and bootstrapping techniques were then used to estimate the error about the parameters. We found that at temperatures between 17°C and 25°C, the current parameter values did not match the observed data, indicating that Cmax should be shifted by about 4°C relative to the current implementation under the bioenergetics model. We conclude that the adjusted parameters for Cmax should produce more accurate predictions from the bioenergetics model for subyearling Chinook Salmon.

  20. Modelled temperature-dependent excitability behaviour of a generalised human peripheral sensory nerve fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jacoba E; Hanekom, Tania; Hanekom, Johan J

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a recently developed human Ranvier node model, which is based on a modified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, could predict the excitability behaviour in human peripheral sensory nerve fibres with diameters ranging from 5.0 to 15.0 microm. The Ranvier node model was extended to include a persistent sodium current and was incorporated into a generalised single cable nerve fibre model. Parameter temperature dependence was included. All calculations were performed in Matlab. Sensory nerve fibre excitability behaviour characteristics predicted by the new nerve fibre model at different temperatures and fibre diameters compared well with measured data. Absolute refractory periods deviated from measured data, while relative refractory periods were similar to measured data. Conduction velocities showed both fibre diameter and temperature dependence and were underestimated in fibres thinner than 12.5 microm. Calculated strength-duration time constants ranged from 128.5 to 183.0 micros at 37 degrees C over the studied nerve fibre diameter range, with chronaxie times about 30% shorter than strength-duration time constants. Chronaxie times exhibited temperature dependence, with values overestimated by a factor 5 at temperatures lower than body temperature. Possible explanations include the deviated absolute refractory period trend and inclusion of a nodal strangulation relationship.

  1. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M., E-mail: tsoi@physics.utexas.edu [Physics Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Cao, G. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States); Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  2. Temperature dependency of the Ga/In distribution in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorbers in high temperature processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, B. J.; Demes, T.; Lill, P. C.; Haug, V.; Hergert, F.; Zweigart, S.; Herr, U.

    2016-05-01

    The current article reports about the influence of temperature and glass substrate on Ga/In interdiffusion and chalcopyrite phase formation in the stacked elemental layer process. According to the Shockley-Queisser limit the optimum for single junction devices is near 1.4 eV, which is strongly coupled on the Ga/(Ga+In) ratio of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells. To increase the Ga content in the active region of the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 a 70:30 CuGa alloy target is used. An increase of the selenization temperature leads to a more homogeneous Ga/In distribution and a less pronounced Ga agglomeration at the back contact. The Ga/In interdiffusion rates for different selenization temperatures and substrates were estimated with the model of a two layer system. At the highest selenization temperature used an absorber band gap of 1.12 eV was realized, which is similar to typical values of absorbers produced during the co-evaporation process. The Na diffusion into the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 is weakly temperature dependent but strongly influenced by the choice of the glass substrate composition.

  3. Temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy studies of the interface coupling effect of monolayer ReSe2 single crystals on Au foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaolong; Zhao, Liyun; Shi, Yuping; Xie, Chunyu; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Zhepeng; Huan, Yahuan; Yang, Pengfei; Hong, Min; Zhou, Xiebo; Shi, Jianping; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2018-05-01

    Rhenium diselenide (ReSe2), which bears in-plane anisotropic optical and electrical properties, is of considerable interest for its excellent applications in novel devices, such as polarization-sensitive photodetectors and integrated polarization-controllers. However, great challenges to date in the controllable synthesis of high-quality ReSe2 have hindered its in-depth investigations and practical applications. Herein, we report a feasible synthesis of monolayer single-crystal ReSe2 flakes on the Au foil substrate by using a chemical vapor deposition route. Particularly, we focus on the temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy investigations of monolayer ReSe2 grown on Au foils, which present concurrent red shifts of Eg-like and Ag-like modes with increasing measurement temperature from 77–290 K. Linear temperature dependences of both modes are revealed and explained from the anharmonic vibration of the ReSe2 lattice. More importantly, the strong interaction of ReSe2 with Au, with respect to that with SiO2/Si, is further confirmed by temperature-dependent Raman characterization. This work is thus proposed to shed light on the optical and thermal properties of such anisotropic two-dimensional three-atom-thick materials.

  4. Temperature-dependent absorption coefficient of the fourth sound in bulk liquid 4He near absolute zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Chul Won; Um, C. I.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature-dependent absorption coefficient of the fourth sound is evaluated explicitly near absolute zero temperature via the temperature-dependent anomalous excitation spectrum in bulk liquid helium. The coefficient increases with decreasing temperature, and the main contribution is due to the thermal conductivity

  5. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in nonaqueous electrolyte solutions: temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Tuhin; Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Biswas, Ranjit

    2009-08-07

    Temperature dependence of the excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) in ethyl acetate (EA), acetonitrile (ACN), and ethanol at several concentrations of lithium perchlorate (LiClO(4)) has been investigated by using the steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The temperature range considered is 267-343 K. The temperature dependent spectral peak shifts and reaction driving force (-DeltaG(r)) in electrolyte solutions of these solvents can be explained qualitatively in terms of interaction between the reactant molecule and ion-atmosphere. Time resolved studies indicate that the decay kinetics of P4C is biexponential, regardless of solvents, LiClO(4) concentrations, and temperatures considered. Except at higher electrolyte concentrations in EA, reaction rates in solutions follow the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence where the estimated activation energy exhibits substantial electrolyte concentration dependence. The average of the experimentally measured activation energies in these three neat solvents is found to be in very good agreement with the predicted value based on data in room temperature solvents. While the rate constant in EA shows a electrolyte concentration induced parabolic dependence on reaction driving force (-DeltaG(r)), the former in ethanol and ACN increases only linearly with the increase in driving force (-DeltaG(r)). The data presented here also indicate that the step-wise increase in solvent reorganization energy via sequential addition of electrolyte induces the ICT reaction in weakly polar solvents to crossover from the Marcus inverted region to the normal region.

  6. Temperature dependent dynamics of DegP-trimer: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Rai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DegP is a heat shock protein from high temperature requirement protease A family, which reacts to the environmental stress conditions in an ATP independent way. The objective of the present analysis emerged from the temperature dependent functional diversity of DegP between chaperonic and protease activities at temperatures below and above 28 °C, respectively. DegP is a multimeric protein and the minimal functional unit, DegP-trimer, is of great importance in understanding the DegP pathway. The structural aspects of DegP-trimer with respect to temperature variation have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations (for 100 ns and principal component analysis to highlight the temperature dependent dynamics facilitating its functional diversity. The DegP-trimer revealed a pronounced dynamics at both 280 and 320 K, when compared to the dynamics observed at 300 K. The LA loop is identified as the highly flexible region during dynamics and at extreme temperatures, the residues 46–80 of LA loop express a flip towards right (at 280 and left ( at 320 K with respect to the fixed β-sheet connecting the LA loop of protease for which Phe46 acts as one of the key residues. Such dynamics of LA loop facilitates inter-monomeric interaction with the PDZ1 domain of the neighbouring monomer and explains its active participation when DegP exists as trimer. Hence, the LA loop mediated dynamics of DegP-trimer is expected to provide further insight into the temperature dependent dynamics of DegP towards the understanding of its assembly and functional diversity in the presence of substrate.

  7. Temperature dependence of the electric field gradient in AgPd and AgPt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolas, K.

    1977-07-01

    The measurements of temperature dependence of the electric field gradient (EFG) on 111 Cd nuclei in AgPd and AgPt alloys were performed using the time dependent perturbed angular correlation method. The EFG caused by impurities distributed in further coordination shells decrease stronaer with increasing temperature than the EFG due to single impurity being the nearest neighbour of the probe atom. These results were explained assuming different modes of thermal vibrations of single impurity atoms and impurity complexes in silver host lattice. (author)

  8. On the temperature dependence of H-U iso in the riding hydrogen model

    OpenAIRE

    Lübben, Jens; Volkmann, Christian; Grabowsky, Simon; Edwards, Alison; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Fabbiani, Francesca P. A.; Sheldrick, George M.; Dittrich, Birger

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of H-Uiso in N-acetyl-l-4-hydroxyproline monohydrate is investigated. Imposing a constant temperature-independent multiplier of 1.2 or 1.5 for the riding hydrogen model is found to be inaccurate, and severely underestimates H-Uiso below 100 K. Neutron diffraction data at temperatures of 9, 150, 200 and 250 K provide benchmark results for this study. X-ray diffraction data to high resolution, collected at temperatures of 9, 30, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200...

  9. A temperature-dependent theory for HeII: Application to the liquid structure factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Ghassib, H.B.

    1981-08-01

    A temperature-dependent theory is presented for HeII, which is based on both a gauge-theoretic formulation as well as a mean-field (Hartree) approach. A simple model calculation is then performed within this framework for the liquid structure factor of the system. In particular, explicit expressions are obtained for the low-momentum-transfer and low-temperature limits, which seem to conform with the available experimental data. Further, the curvature of the structure factor is predicted, under these circumstances, to be only mildly dependent on temperature. Throughout, we compare and contrast with other theoretical attempts, including Feynman's. (author)

  10. Temperature-dependent exciton recombination in asymmetrical ZnCdSe/ZnSe double quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Guang You; Zhang, J Y; Zheng, Z H; Yang, B J; Zhao Xiao Wei; Shen De Zhen; Kong Xiang Gui

    1999-01-01

    Temperature-dependent exciton recombination in asymmetrical ZnCdSe/ZnSe double quantum wells is studied by recording photoluminescence spectra and photoluminescence decay spectra. The exciton tunnelling from the wide well to the narrow well and the thermal dissociation of excitons are two factors that influence the exciton recombination in this structure. In the narrow well, both of the two processes decrease the emission intensity, whereas, in the wide well, these two processes have contrary influences on the exciton density. The change of the emission intensity depends on which is the stronger one. (author)

  11. Defect-induced change of temperature-dependent elastic constants in BCC iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, N.; Setyawan, W.; Zhang, S. H.; Wang, Z. G.

    2017-07-01

    The effects of radiation-induced defects (randomly distributed vacancies, voids, and interstitial dislocation loops) on temperature-dependent elastic constants, C11, C12, and C44 in BCC iron, are studied with molecular dynamics method. The elastic constants are found to decrease with increasing temperatures for all cases containing different defects. The presence of vacancies, voids, or interstitial loops further decreases the elastic constants. For a given number of point defects, the randomly distributed vacancies show the strongest effect compared to voids or interstitial loops. All these results are expected to provide useful information to combine with experimental results for further understanding of radiation damage.

  12. Temperature dependence of dislocation-related luminescence in silicon-germanium heterostructure

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H S

    1998-01-01

    We measured the photoluminescence spectra of very thin and partially strained Si sub 0 sub . sub 6 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 4 alloys grown on silicon substrate with varying degrees of strain relaxation. We observed photoluminescence lines, so called D-lines, which arose from dislocations in the SiGe/Si alloys. We identified the origin of the D-lines as the dislocations in Si substrate extending from the SiGe/Si interface. We also studied the temperature dependence of the Si D-lines and determined the dissociation energy of the defect energy levels.

  13. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of supported MoS2 monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Andrzej; Judek, Jarosław; Łapińska, Anna; Zdrojek, Mariusz

    2015-03-11

    Thermal properties can substantially affect the operation of various electronics and optoelectronics devices based on two-dimensional materials. In this work, we describe our investigation of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance of molybdenum disulfide monolayers supported on SiO2/Si substrates, using Raman spectroscopy. We observed that the calculated thermal conductivity (κ) and interfacial thermal conductance (g) decreased with increasing temperature from 62.2 W m(-1) K(-1) and 1.94 MW m(-2) K(-1) at 300 K to 7.45 W m(-1) K(-1) and 1.25 MW m(-2) K(-1) at 450 K, respectively.

  14. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  15. Study of the temperature dependence of giant magnetoresistance in metallic granular composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Sheng; Li, Z.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic granular composite is studied. It is considered that the composite contains both large magnetic grains with surface spin S' and small magnetic impurities. It is found that the decrease of surface spin S' of grain is the main cause of an almost linear decrease of giant magnetoresistance with the increase of temperature in high temperature range. The magnetic impurities, composed of several atoms, lead to an almost linear increase of the giant magnetoresistance with the decrease of temperature in low temperature range. Our calculations are in good agreement with recent experimental data for metallic nanogranular composites

  16. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of insulating single crystal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Langenberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of 27 different single crystal oxides is reported from ≈20 K to 350 K. These crystals have been selected among the most common substrates for growing epitaxial thin-film oxides, spanning over a range of lattice parameters from ≈3.7 Å to ≈12.5 Å. Different contributions to the phonon relaxation time are discussed on the basis of the Debye model. This work provides a database for the selection of appropriate substrates for thin-film growth according to their desired thermal properties, for applications in which heat management is important.

  17. Leading temperature dependence of the conductance in Kondo-correlated quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aligia, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Using renormalized perturbation theory in the Coulomb repulsion, we derive an analytical expression for the leading term in the temperature dependence of the conductance through a quantum dot described by the impurity Anderson model, in terms of the renormalized parameters of the model. Taking these parameters from the literature, we compare the results with published ones calculated using the numerical renormalization group obtaining a very good agreement. The approach is superior to alternative perturbative treatments. We compare in particular to the results of a simple interpolative perturbation approach.

  18. Temperature dependent electrical properties of polyaniline film grown on paper through aniline vapor polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deb, K.; Bera, A.; Saha, B., E-mail: biswajit.physics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Jirania, West Tripura 799046 (India); Bhowmik, K. L. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Jirania, West Tripura 799046 (India); Department of Chemistry, Bir Bikram Memorial College, Agartala, West Tripura 799004 (India); Chattopadhyay, K. K. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polyaniline thin film has been prepared on paper by aniline vapor deposition technique. Ferric chloride has been used as polymerizing agent in this approach. The prepared films were studied through electrical resistivity and optical properties measurements. The electrical resistivity of the polyaniline film shows significant temperature dependence. The resistance sharply falls with the increase in temperature. The optical absorbance measurements shows characteristics absorbance peak indicating the formation of conducting emeraldine salt form of polyaniline. The optical energy band gap of the film was calculated from the transmittance spectra. The optical energy band gap and electrical conductivity of the polyaniline film is well suited for their applications in electronic devices.

  19. Temperature-dependent charge transport mechanisms in carbon sphere/polyaniline composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Cesar A.; Martinez, Luis M.; Meléndez, Anamaris; Ortiz, Margarita; Ramos, Idalia; Pinto, Nicholas J.; Zimbovskaya, Natalya

    2017-12-01

    Charge transport in the temperature range 80 K polyaniline (PANi). PANi was synthesized via the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) in acidic media. The CS/PANi composite was prepared by coating the spheres with a thin polyaniline (PANi) film doped with hydrochloric acid (HCl) in situ during the polymerization process. Temperature dependent conductivity measurements show that three dimensional variable range hopping of electrons between polymeric chains in PANi-filled gaps between CS is the predominant transport mechanism through CS/PANi composites. The high conductivity of the CS/PANi composite makes the material attractive for the fabrication of devices and sensors.

  20. Study of temperature dependence of light yield from NaBi(WO4)2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosov, C.Yu.; Kalinin, B.N.; Krechetov, Yu.F.; Moiseenko, A.V.; Naumenko, G.A.; Potylitsin, A.P.; Sarytchev, V.P.; Shuvalov, Ye.N.; Vznuzdaev, Ye.A.; Samsonov, V.M.; Solodov, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The scintillation time structure and the temperature dependence of the light yield from NaBi(WO 4 ) 2 crystals bombarded by 500 MeV electrons have been measured experimentally. These crystals showed a tendency to exhibit scintillator properties when the temperature of the samples was decreased. The light yield increased by more than an order of magnitude with the temperature falling from the room level to that of liquid nitrogen. The scintillation time structure was of a complex pattern, and a slow luminescent component (τ=30 ns) was present in the spectrum. ((orig.))

  1. Tiny optical fiber temperature sensor based on temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qiang; Song, Zhangqi; Song, Dongyu; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Bingsheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Yuzhong

    2018-03-01

    The temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film can be used to develop a tiny, low cost and film-coated optical fiber temperature sensor. Pulse reference-based compensation technique is used to largely reduce the background noise which makes it possible to detect the minor reflectivity change of the film in different temperatures. The temperature sensitivity is 0.0034dB/° and the background noise is measured to be 0.0005dB, so the resolution can achieve 0.2°.

  2. Anomalous temperature-dependent anchoring in liquid crystals mediated by thermodynamic smectic wetting sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aya, Satoshi; Araoka, Fumito

    2017-11-01

    We present an unusual temperature dependence of polar anchoring torque in a nematic liquid crystal contacting with a perfluoropolymer surface. Whereas the anchoring torque is conventionally expected to increase with decreasing temperature, we show that the polar anchoring torque in the present system decreases with decreasing temperature. This causes an orientational transition from planar to vertical during cooling. We explain the origin of this phenomenon as the result of thermodynamic growth and spreading of surface-localized smectic wetting sheets. We clearly show that the coverage of these wetting sheets on the surface creates a vertical state that violates the initial planar anchoring in the bulk, thereby reducing the effective polar anchoring torque.

  3. Riemann solvers for multi-component gas mixtures with temperature dependent heat capacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccantini, A.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis represents a contribution to the development of upwind splitting schemes for the Euler equations for ideal gaseous mixtures and their investigation in computing multidimensional flows in irregular geometries. In the preliminary part we develop and investigate the parameterization of the shock and rarefaction curves in the phase space. Then, we apply them to perform some field-by-field decompositions of the Riemann problem: the entropy-respecting one, the one which supposes that genuinely-non-linear (GNL) waves are both shocks (shock-shock one) and the one which supposes that GNL waves are both rarefactions (rarefaction-rarefaction one). We emphasize that their analysis is fundamental in Riemann solvers developing: the simpler the field-by-field decomposition, the simpler the Riemann solver based on it. As the specific heat capacities of the gases depend on the temperature, the shock-shock field-by-field decomposition is the easiest to perform. Then, in the second part of the thesis, we develop an upwind splitting scheme based on such decomposition. Afterwards, we investigate its robustness, precision and CPU-time consumption, with respect to some of the most popular upwind splitting schemes for polytropic/non-polytropic ideal gases. 1-D test-cases show that this scheme is both precise (exact capturing of stationary shock and stationary contact) and robust in dealing with strong shock and rarefaction waves. Multidimensional test-cases show that it suffers from some of the typical deficiencies which affect the upwind splitting schemes capable of exact capturing stationary contact discontinuities i.e the developing of non-physical instabilities in computing strong shock waves. In the final part, we use the high-order multidimensional solver here developed to compute fully-developed detonation flows. (author)

  4. Band spectrum transformation and temperature dependences of thermoelectric power of Hg1-xRxBa2Ca2Cu3O8+δ system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vasyuk

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependences of thermoelectric power S(T at T>Tc of the Hg-based high temperature superconductors Hg1-xRxBa2Ca2Cu3O8+δ (R=Re, Pb have been analyzed with accounting for strong scattering of charge carriers. Transformation of parameters of a narrow conducting band in the region of the Fermi level was studied. The existence of correlation between the effective bandwidth and the temperature of a superconductive transition Tc is shown.

  5. A Higher-Order Thermomechanical Vibration Analysis of Temperature-Dependent FGM Beams with Porosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, thermomechanical vibration characteristics of functionally graded (FG Reddy beams made of porous material subjected to various thermal loadings are investigated by utilizing a Navier solution method for the first time. Four types of thermal loadings, namely, uniform, linear, nonlinear, and sinusoidal temperature rises, through the thickness direction are considered. Thermomechanical material properties of FG beam are assumed to be temperature-dependent and supposed to vary through thickness direction of the constituents according to power-law distribution (P-FGM which is modified to approximate the porous material properties with even and uneven distributions of porosities phases. The governing differential equations of motion are derived based on higher order shear deformation beam theory. Hamilton’s principle is applied to obtain the governing differential equations of motion which are solved by employing an analytical technique called the Navier type solution method. Influences of several important parameters such as power-law exponents, porosity distributions, porosity volume fractions, thermal effects, and slenderness ratios on natural frequencies of the temperature-dependent FG beams with porosities are investigated and discussed in detail. It is concluded that these effects play significant role in the thermodynamic behavior of porous FG beams.

  6. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for PEDOT:PSS and corresponding solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fernanda; Myers, Brooke; Lucas, Tyler; Barnes, Brandon; Wang, Weining

    Conducting polymers have been studied and used widely; applications include light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and sensors. In our previous work, we have shown that conducting polymers can be used as the back contact of CdTe solar cells. Our results show that the efficiency of the CdTe solar cell increases as the conductivity of the polymer increases. For this reason, it is of interest to study the polymer conductivity's temperature dependence, and how it affects the solar cell. In this work, we show our studies on temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS), and its effect on the CdTe/PEDOT:PSS solar cells. A series of PEDOT:PSS with different conductivities were studied, and a temperature-varying apparatus built in house, using a thermoelectric cooler module, was used to vary the temperature of the polymer films. The activation energy of PEDOT:PSS with different conductivity will be reported. The effect of the temperature on the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage and efficiency of the solar cells will also be discussed. Clare Boothe Luce Foundation, Cottrell College Science Award from Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  7. On the temperature dependence of H-Uiso in the riding hydrogen model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lübben, Jens; Volkmann, Christian; Grabowsky, Simon; Edwards, Alison; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Fabbiani, Francesca P. A.; Sheldrick, George M.; Dittrich, Birger

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen U iso and parent U eq in the riding hydrogen model is investigated by neutron diffraction, aspherical-atom refinements and QM/MM and MO/MO cluster calculations. Fixed values of 1.2 or 1.5 appear to be underestimated, especially at temperatures below 100 K. The temperature dependence of H-U iso in N-acetyl-l-4-hydroxyproline monohydrate is investigated. Imposing a constant temperature-independent multiplier of 1.2 or 1.5 for the riding hydrogen model is found to be inaccurate, and severely underestimates H-U iso below 100 K. Neutron diffraction data at temperatures of 9, 150, 200 and 250 K provide benchmark results for this study. X-ray diffraction data to high resolution, collected at temperatures of 9, 30, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250 K (synchrotron and home source), reproduce neutron results only when evaluated by aspherical-atom refinement models, since these take into account bonding and lone-pair electron density; both invariom and Hirshfeld-atom refinement models enable a more precise determination of the magnitude of H-atom displacements than independent-atom model refinements. Experimental efforts are complemented by computing displacement parameters following the TLS+ONIOM approach. A satisfactory agreement between all approaches is found

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF GREEN’S FUNCTION APPROACH CONSIDERING TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT MATERIAL PROPERTIES AND ITS APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN-OK KO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available About 40% of reactors in the world are being operated beyond design life or are approaching the end of their life cycle. During long-term operation, various degradation mechanisms occur. Fatigue caused by alternating operational stresses in terms of temperature or pressure change is an important damage mechanism in continued operation of nuclear power plants. To monitor the fatigue damage of components, Fatigue Monitoring System (FMS has been installed. Most FMSs have used Green's Function Approach (GFA to calculate the thermal stresses rapidly. However, if temperature-dependent material properties are used in a detailed FEM, there is a maximum peak stress discrepancy between a conventional GFA and a detailed FEM because constant material properties are used in a conventional method. Therefore, if a conventional method is used in the fatigue evaluation, thermal stresses for various operating cycles may be calculated incorrectly and it may lead to an unreliable estimation. So, in this paper, the modified GFA which can consider temperature-dependent material properties is proposed by using an artificial neural network and weight factor. To verify the proposed method, thermal stresses by the new method are compared with those by FEM. Finally, pros and cons of the new method as well as technical findings from the assessment are discussed.

  9. Temperature Dependence on Density, Viscosity, and Electrical Conductivity of Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengguo Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids are considered environmentally friendly media for various industrial applications. Basic data on physicochemical properties are significant for a new material, in terms of developing its potential applications. In this work, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium fluoride ([EMIm]F ionic liquid was synthesized via an anion metathesis process. Physical properties including the density, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability of the product were measured. The results show that the density of [EMIm]F decreases linearly with temperature increases, while dynamic viscosity decreases rapidly below 320 K and the temperature dependence of electrical conductivity is in accordance with the VFT (Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann equation. The temperature dependence of the density, conductivity, and viscosity of [EMIm]F can be expressed via the following equations: ρ = 1.516 − 1.22 × 10−3 T, σm = 4417.1exp[−953.17/(T − 166.65] and η = 2.07 × 10−7exp(−5.39 × 104/T, respectively. [EMIm]F exhibited no clear melting point. However, its glass transition point and decomposition temperature are −71.3 °C and 135 °C, respectively.

  10. Efficient Temperature-Dependent Green's Functions Methods for Realistic Systems: Compact Grids for Orthogonal Polynomial Transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananenka, Alexei A; Phillips, Jordan J; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-02-09

    The Matsubara Green's function that is used to describe temperature-dependent behavior is expressed on a numerical grid. While such a grid usually has a couple of hundred points for low-energy model systems, for realistic systems with large basis sets the size of an accurate grid can be tens of thousands of points, constituting a severe computational and memory bottleneck. In this paper, we determine efficient imaginary time grids for the temperature-dependent Matsubara Green's function formalism that can be used for calculations on realistic systems. We show that, because of the use of an orthogonal polynomial transform, we can restrict the imaginary time grid to a few hundred points and reach micro-Hartree accuracy in the electronic energy evaluation. Moreover, we show that only a limited number of orthogonal polynomial expansion coefficients are necessary to preserve accuracy when working with a dual representation of the Green's function or self-energy and transforming between the imaginary time and frequency domain.

  11. Temperature-dependent ordinary and thermal diffusion of hydrogen isotopes through thermonuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, J.H.

    1976-09-01

    To permit more accurate calculations of tritium permeation for design purposes, theoretical expressions for quasiunidirectional ordinary diffusion of hydrogen isotopes through nonisothermal plane, cylindrical shell, and spherical shell barriers are presented. Arrhenium-type dependence of mass diffusivity on temperature and steady-state constant-thermal-conductivity temperature gradients through the barriers are considered. Analyses that consider thermal diffusion with both constant and temperature-dependent heat of transport are also presented. Other topics discussed are amounts of dissolved hydrogen, variable-thermal-conductivity temperature profiles, hydrogen isotope trapping by chemical impurities, crystal lattice imperfections, and grain boundaries, and mixing rules for dilute dissolution of hydrogen isotope mixtures in metals. Numerical results are given which reveal that neglect of thermal diffusion can lead to errors of up to several hundred percent in calculations of hydrogen isotope transfer through reactor components having large temperature gradients through them. Calculations of combined ordinary and thermal diffusion that rigorously treat the temperature dependences of thermophysical properties typically yield results that differ by only a few percent from results based on physical property evaluations at the arithmetic average of barrier face temperatures.

  12. SHUTTER-LESS TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT CORRECTION FOR UNCOOLED THERMAL CAMERA UNDER FAST CHANGING FPA TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional temperature-dependant correction methods for uncooled cameras are not so valid for images under the condition of fast changing FPA temperature as usual, therefore, a shutter-less temperature-dependant correction method is proposed here to compensate for these errors and stabilize camera's response only related to the object surface temperature. Firstly, sequential images are divided into the following three categories according to the changing speed of FPA temperature: stable (0°C/min, relatively stable (<0.5°C/min, unstable (>0.5°C/min. Then all of the images are projected into the same level using a second order polynomial relation between FPA temperatures and gray values from stable images. Next, a third order polynomial relation between temporal differences of FPA temperatures and the above corrected images is implemented to eliminate the deviation caused by fast changing FPA temperature. Finally, radiometric calibration is applied to convert image gray values into object temperature values. Experiment results show that our method is more effective for fast changing FPA temperature data than FLIR GEV.

  13. Temperature dependent polymorphism of pyrazinamide: An in situ Raman and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Poornima; Nandi, Rajib; Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Anurag; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2018-02-01

    The α and γ polymorphs of drug pyrazinamide have been detected with the help of temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic technique. Pyrazinamide is a very useful drug used for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and plays a significant role in destroying the dormant tubercle bacilli which are not destroyed by other common TB drugs. Temperature dependent Raman spectra suggest polymorphic phase change from α → γ form of pyrazinamide between 145 and 146 °C. In situ Raman spectra of pyrazinamide between 145 and 146 °C show the conversion of α → γ form by the shift in Cdbnd O stretching vibration accompanied by several other changes. The phase change is characterized by the breaking of two linear Nsbnd H ⋯ O type hydrogen bonds associated with Cdbnd O stretching vibration in α dimer and formation of one linear Nsbnd H ⋯ N type hydrogen bond along with a weak intramolecular Csbnd H ⋯ O type hydrogen bond in the γ dimer.

  14. Requirements for investigating the temperature-dependent fracture behavior of irradiated materials by indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Irène, E-mail: irene.sacksteder@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hostettler, Simon [Synton-MDP Inc., Nidau (Switzerland); Charbonneau, Grégoire; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A custom-made indenter is designed for indentations at high temperature. • The instrumented indentation technique at high temperature will be used to investigate temperature dependent fracture mechanisms in structural materials. • A finite-element based model has been validated with a view to predict crack initiation and propagation in Eurofer97 and tungsten-like materials. -- Abstract: The instrumented indentation technique is an interesting testing tool to examine temperature-dependent fracture mechanisms. It is planned to be used to generate cracks at defined temperatures in hard and brittle metallic materials. The present study describes the properties needed for the use of a new type of indenter operating at high temperature. The indenter was designed to meet mechanical and thermal requirements and other constraints relating to the operation of functional units of the indentation instrument. Additionally, a finite element model has been built with a view to predict indentation induced cracks in Eurofer97 and tungsten. The model has been validated both with the theory of Hertz and experimentally by comparison with indentation curves.

  15. Allele- and temperature-dependency of in vitro HLA class I assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Garzillo, C; Butler, R H; Tanigaki, N

    2001-08-01

    Allelic variations of in vitro HLA class I assembly have been investigated in both the absence and the presence of binding peptides by flow cytometry using human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alpha chains isolated by alkali treatment from cultured HLA homozygous B cells and polystyrene beads coated with anti-HLA class I alpha chain antibodies specific to the C-terminal segment (anti-HLA class I beads). The specificity of assembly was temperature dependent, while the stability of the assembled complex depended on the bound peptide. The efficiency of assembly was allele dependent and primarily ruled by the binding affinity of alpha chains with beta(2)m. Thus, an allele hierarchy could be defined for the binding of HLA-B alpha chain with beta(2)-microglobulin: B7, B18 > B35, B62 > B27, B51. Allele and temperature dependency was found in HLA class I reassembly on acid treated B cells. The HLA class I proteins, reassembled with specific single peptides, could be efficiently transferred to anti-HLA class I beads. These findings would be used to produce microspheres coupled at high surface density with oriented single-peptide loaded HLA class I molecules and also to improve the preparation efficiency of HLA class I tetramers by the use of site-specific biotinylation.

  16. Analysis of convective longitudinal fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Sobamowo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, analysis of heat transfer in a longitudinal rectangular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation was carried out using finite difference method. The developed systems of non-linear equations that resulted from the discretization using finite difference scheme were solved with the aid of MATLAB using fsolve. The numerical solution was validated with the exact solution for the linear problem. The developed heat transfer models were used to investigate the effects of thermo-geometric parameters, coefficient of heat transfer and thermal conductivity (non-linear parameters on the temperature distribution, heat transfer and thermal performance of the longitudinal rectangular fin. From the results, it shows that the fin temperature distribution, the total heat transfer, and the fin efficiency are significantly affected by the thermo-geometric parameters of the fin. Also, for the solution to be thermally stable, the fin thermo-geometric parameter must not exceed a specific value. However, it was established that the increase in temperature-dependent properties and internal heat generation values increases the thermal stability range of the thermo-geometric parameter. The results obtained in this analysis serve as basis for comparison of any other method of analysis of the problem.

  17. Dimorphic DNA methylation during temperature-dependent sex determination in the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Daniela; Marmolejo-Valencia, Alejandro; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Govenzensky, Tzipe; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Merchant-Larios, Horacio

    2016-09-15

    Sex determination in vertebrates depends on the expression of a conserved network of genes. Sea turtles such as Lepidochelys olivacea have temperature-dependent sex determination. The present work analyses some of the epigenetic processes involved in this. We describe sexual dimorphism in global DNA methylation patterns between ovaries and testes of L. olivacea and show that the differences may arise from a combination of DNA methylation and demethylation events that occur during sex determination. Irrespective of incubation temperature, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine was abundant in the bipotential gonad; however, following sex determination, this modification was no longer found in pre-Sertoli cells in the testes. These changes correlate with the establishment of the sexually dimorphic DNA methylation patterns, down regulation of Sox9 gene expression in ovaries and irreversible gonadal commitment towards a male or female differentiation pathway. Thus, DNA methylation changes may be necessary for the stabilization of the gene expression networks that drive the differentiation of the bipotential gonad to form either an ovary or a testis in L. olivacea and probably among other species that manifest temperature-dependent sex determination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. POINT 2012: ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    2012-02-26

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B [R1]. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes: (1) publicly available nuclear data (the current ENDF/B data, available on-line at the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/) and, (2) publicly available computer codes (the current PREPRO codes, available on-line at the Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, http://www-nds.iaea.or.at/ndspub/endf/prepro/) and, (3) My own personal computer located in my home. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and described in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results: by its very nature I consider this data to be born in the public domain.

  19. Temperature-Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Reaction of CH2OO with Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with hydrogen sulfide was measured with transient UV absorption spectroscopy in a temperature-controlled flow reactor, and bimolecular rate coefficients were obtained from 278 to 318 K and from 100 to 500 Torr. The average rate coefficient at 298 K and 100 Torr was (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -13 cm 3 s -1 . The reaction was found to be independent of pressure and exhibited a weak negative temperature dependence. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of the temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficient at the QCISD(T)/CBS level are in reasonable agreement with the experiment. The reaction of CH 2 OO with H 2 S is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the reaction with H 2 O monomer. Though rates of CH 2 OO scavenging by water vapor under atmospheric conditions are primarily controlled by the reaction with water dimer, the H 2 S loss pathway will be dominated by the reaction with monomer. The agreement between experiment and theory for the CH 2 OO + H 2 S reaction lends credence to theoretical descriptions of other Criegee intermediate reactions that cannot easily be probed experimentally.

  20. Ceramic/Metal Composites with Positive Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhui; Yu Qi; Sun Wei; Zhang Rui; Wang Ke; Li Jingfeng; Ichigozaki, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Most materials show decreasing thermal conductivity with increasing temperature, but an opposite temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is required for some industrial applications. The present work was conducted with a motivation to develop composite materials with a positive temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. ZrO 2 / stainless steel powders (304L) composite, with 3% stearic acid, was prepared by normal sintering under the protecting of Ar after mixing by mechanical ball milling technique. With the 304L content increasing from 10% to 20%, the thermal conductivity values increased. For all samples, the thermal conductivity in the temperature range of room temperature to 700 °C decreased with temperature below 300 °C, and then began to increase. The increasing thermal conductivity of the composites (within the high temperature range was attributed to the difference of the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient between ZrO 2 ceramic and 304L stainless steel powders. Two simple models were also used to estimate the thermal conductivity of the composites, which were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  1. NF3: UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence and the Atmospheric and Climate Forcing Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C.; McGillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) is an atmospherically persistent greenhouse gas that is primarily removed by UV photolysis and reaction with O((sup 1)D) atoms. In this work, the NF3 gas-phase UV absorption spectrum, sigma(delta,T), was measured at 16 wavelengths between 184.95 and 250 nm at temperatures between 212 and 296 K. A significant spectrum temperature dependence was observed in the wavelength region most relevant to atmospheric photolysis (200-220 nm) with a decrease in sigma(210 nm,T) of approximately 45 percent between 296 and 212 K. Atmospheric photolysis rates and global annually averaged lifetimes of NF3 were calculated using the Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model and the sigma(delta,T) parameterization developed in this work. Including the UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence increased the stratospheric photolysis lifetime from 610 to 762 years and the total global lifetime from 484 to 585 years; the NF3 global warming potentials on the 20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons increased less than 0.3, 1.1, and 6.5 percent to 13,300, 17,700, and 19,700, respectively.

  2. Temperature dependence of HU values for various water equivalent phantom materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homolka, P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.homolka@univie.ac.at; Nowotny, R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Gahleitner, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Osteology, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2002-08-21

    The temperature dependence of water equivalent phantom materials used in radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging has been investigated. Samples of phantom materials based on epoxy resin, polyethylene, a polystyrene-polypropylene mixture and commercially available phantom materials (Solid Water{sup TM}, Gammex RMI and Plastic Water{sup TM}, Nuclear Associates) were scanned at temperatures from 15 to 40 deg. C and HU values determined. At a reference temperature of 20 deg. C materials optimized for CT applications give HU values close to zero while the commercial materials show an offset of 119.77 HU (Plastic Water) and 27.69 HU (Solid Water). Temperature dependence was lowest for epoxy-based materials (EPX-W: -0.23 HU deg. C{sup -1}; Solid Water: -0.25 HU deg. C{sup -1}) and highest for a polyethylene-based material (X0: -0.72 HU deg. C{sup -1}). A material based on a mixture of polystyrene and polypropylene (PSPP1: -0.27 HU deg. C{sup -1}) is comparable to epoxy-based materials and water (-0.29 HU deg. C{sup -1}). (author)

  3. POINT 2012: ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B [R1]. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes: (1) publicly available nuclear data (the current ENDF/B data, available on-line at the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/) and, (2) publicly available computer codes (the current PREPRO codes, available on-line at the Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, http://www-nds.iaea.or.at/ndspub/endf/prepro/) and, (3) My own personal computer located in my home. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and described in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results: by its very nature I consider this data to be born in the public domain.

  4. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Apartado Postal 207, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Parma (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The temperature behavior of the integrated intensity of photoluminescence (PL) emission from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layer was measured at temperatures of 10 - 300 K. Within this temperature range the PL emission is dominated by band-to-band radiative recombination. The PL intensity temperature dependence has two regions: at low temperatures it quenches rapidly as the temperature increases, and above 100 K it reduces slowly. This temperature behavior is compared with that of disordered GaInP{sub 2} layer. The specter of the PL emission of the disordered layer has two peaks, which are identified as due to donor-accepter (D-A) and band-to-band recombination. The PL intensity quenching of these spectral bands is very different: With increasing temperature, the D-A peak intensity remains almost unchanged at low temperatures and then decreases at a higher rate. The intensity of the band-to-band recombination peak decays gradually, having a higher rate at low temperatures than at higher temperatures. Comparing these temperature dependencies of these PL peaks of ordered and disordered alloys and the temperature behavior of their full width at half maximum (FWHM), we conclude that the different morphology of these alloys causes their different temperature behavior. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Temperature-dependent growth of Geomyces destructans, the fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L.; Boyles, Justin G.; Waldrep, William; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Blehert, David S.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emergent disease estimated to have killed over five million North American bats. Caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, WNS specifically affects bats during hibernation. We describe temperature-dependent growth performance and morphology for six independent isolates of G. destructans from North America and Europe. Thermal performance curves for all isolates displayed an intermediate peak with rapid decline in performance above the peak. Optimal temperatures for growth were between 12.5 and 15.8°C, and the upper critical temperature for growth was between 19.0 and 19.8°C. Growth rates varied across isolates, irrespective of geographic origin, and above 12°C all isolates displayed atypical morphology that may have implications for proliferation of the fungus. This study demonstrates that small variations in temperature, consistent with those inherent of bat hibernacula, affect growth performance and physiology of G. destructans, which may influence temperature-dependent progression and severity of WNS in wild bats.

  6. Investigation of temperature dependent barrier height of Au/ZnO/Si schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, M.; Mahmood, K.; Rabia, S.; BM, S.; Shahid, M. Y.; Hasan, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements have been performed to investigate the inhomogeneity in the temperature dependent barrier heights of Au/ZnO/Si Schottky barrier diode in the temperature range 150 - 400K. The room temperature values for ideality factor and barrier height were found to be 2.9 and 0.60 eV respectively indicating the inhomogenity in the barrier heights of grown samples. The Richardson plot and ideality factor verses barrier height graph were also drawn to verified the discontinuity between Au and ZnO. This barrier height inhomogenity was explained by applying Gaussian distribution model. The extrapolation of the linear Fap (n) plot to n= 1 has given a homogeneous barrier height of approximately 1.1 eV. Fap versus 1/T plot was drawn to obtain the values of mean barrier height for Au/ZnO/Si Schottky diode (1.1 eV) and standard deviation(ds) (0.02 V) at zero bais. (author)

  7. Investigation of temperature dependent barrier height of Au/ZnO/Si schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, M; Mahmood, K; Rabia, S; M, Samaa B; Shahid, M Y; Hasan, M A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements have been performed to investigate the inhomogeneity in the temperature dependent barrier heights of Au/ZnO/Si Schottky barrier diode in the temperature range 150 – 400K. The room temperature values for ideality factor and barrier height were found to be 2.9 and 0.60 eV respectively indicating the inhomogenity in the barrier heights of grown samples. The Richardson plot and ideality factor verses barrier height graph were also drawn to verified the discontinuity between Au and ZnO. This barrier height inhomogenity was explained by applying Gaussian distribution model. The extrapolation of the linear Φ ap (n) plot to n= 1 has given a homogeneous barrier height of approximately 1.1 eV. Φ ap versus 1/T plot was drawn to obtain the values of mean barrier height for Au/ZnO/Si Schottky diode (1.1 eV) and standard deviation(δ s ) (0.02 V) at zero bais

  8. Temperature dependence of the calibration factor of radon and radium determination in water samples by SSNTD

    CERN Document Server

    Hunyadi, I; Hakl, J; Baradacs, E; Dezso, Z

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of a sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra determination method of water samples by SSNTD was measured as a function of storage temperature during exposure. The method is based on an etched track type radon monitor, which is closed into a gas permeable foil and is immersed in the water sample. The sample is sealed in a glass vessel and stored for an exposure time of 10-30 days. The sensitivity increased more than a factor of two when the storage temperature was raised from 2 deg. C to 30 deg. C. Temperature dependence of the partition coefficient of radon between water and air provides explanation for this dependence. For practical radio- analytical application the temperature dependence of the calibration factor is given by fitting the sensitivity data obtained by measuring sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra standard solutions (in the activity concentration range of 0.1-48.5 kBq m sup - sup 3) at different storage temperatures.

  9. Temperature dependence of the current in Schottky-barrier source-gated transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporea, R. A.; Overy, M.; Shannon, J. M.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the drain current is an important parameter in thin-film transistors. In this paper, we propose that in source-gated transistors (SGTs), this temperature dependence can be controlled and tuned by varying the length of the source electrode. SGTs comprise a reverse biased potential barrier at the source which controls the current. As a result, a large activation energy for the drain current may be present which, although useful in specific temperature sensing applications, is in general deleterious in many circuit functions. With support from numerical simulations with Silvaco Atlas, we describe how increasing the length of the source electrode can be used to reduce the activation energy of SGT drain current, while maintaining the defining characteristics of SGTs: low saturation voltage, high output impedance in saturation, and tolerance to geometry variations. In this study, we apply the dual current injection modes to obtain drain currents with high and low activation energies and propose mechanisms for their exploitation in future large-area integrated circuit designs.

  10. Temperature dependence of energy-transducing functions and inhibitor sensitivity in chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurmans, J.J.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Francke, J.A.; Torres-Pereira, J.M.G.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the temperature dependence of energy-transducing reactions in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts and their sensitivity for uncouplers and energy-transfer inhibitors at different temperatures is presented. Arrhenius plots reveal two groups of transitions, around 19/sup 0/C and around 12/sup 0/C. Activities that show transitions around 19/sup 0/C include linear electron flow from water to ferricyanide, its coupled photophosphorylation, the dark-release of the fluorescent probe atebrin, and the slow component of the 515 nm (carotenoid) absorbance decay after a flash. The transitions around 12/sup 0/C are observed with pyocyanine-mediated cyclic photophosphorylation, light- and dithioerythritol-activated ATP hydrolysis, the dark-release of protons, and the fast 515 nm decay component. It is suggested that both groups of temperature transitions are determined by proton displacements in different domains of the exposed thylakoid membranes. The effects of various uncouplers and an energy-transfer inhibitor are temperature dependent. Some uncouplers also show a different relative inhibition of proton uptake and ATP synthesis at lower temperatures. The efficiency of energy transduction (ATP/e/sub 3/) varied with temperature and was optimal around 10/sup 0/C.

  11. Analysis of thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency with linear and nonlinear temperature dependence in material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, Daehyun

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of temperature dependent material properties on performance is studied. → The main simplification is to approximate the temperature profile with a linear one. → Accurate inclusion of the Thomson effect is essential to understand thermoelectrics. - Abstract: A novel approach to estimate energy conversion efficiency for a power-generating thermoelectric element, whose material properties possess both linear (first order) and nonlinear (second order) dependence on temperature, is developed by solving the differential equation governing its temperature distribution, which includes both the Joule heat and the Thomson effect. In order to obtain analytic expressions for power output and energy conversion efficiency, several steps of simplification are taken. Most notably, the material properties are evaluated with a linear temperature profile between the hot and cold ends. The model is further applied to a high-performance n-type half-Heusler alloy, matching the results of direct numerical analysis. The close correspondence between the proposed model and the numerical solution indeed proves that the approximations we have made are valid. The effect of linear and nonlinear components in the temperature dependence of material properties on the energy conversion efficiency is analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively with the model. The results suggest that the accurate inclusion of the Thomson effect is essential to understand even the qualitative behavior of thermoelectric energy conversion.

  12. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of water-soluble quantum dots for a bioprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tiancai; Huang Zhenli; Wang Haiqiao; Wang Jianhao; Li Xiuqing; Zhao Yuandi; Luo Qingming

    2006-01-01

    The photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots is found to be temperature-dependent: as temperature arising from 280 K to 351 K, the photoluminescence declines with emission peak shifting towards the red at a rate of ∼0.11 nm K -1 . And the studies show that the photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with core capped by a thinner ZnS shell is more sensitive to temperature than that of ones with core capped by a thicker one. That is, with 50% decrement of the quantum yield the temperature of the former need to arise from 280 K to 295 K, while the latter requires much higher temperature (315.6 K), which means that the integrality of shell coverage is a very important factor on temperature-sensitivity to for the photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. Moreover, it is found that the water-soluble CdSe quantum dots with different core sizes, whose cores are capped by thicker ZnS shells, possess almost the same sensitivity to the temperature. All of the studies about photoluminescence temperature-dependence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots show an indispensable proof for their applications in life science

  13. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Holding, J. M.

    2015-08-31

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate1 and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification2, 3. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs4, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production5. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145–2,099 μatm; however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  14. Temperature-dependent striped antiferromagnetism of LaFeAsO in a Green's function approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guibin; Liu Banggui

    2009-01-01

    We use a Green's function method to study the temperature-dependent average moment and magnetic phase-transition temperature of the striped antiferromagnetism of LaFeAsO, and other similar compounds, as the parents of FeAs-based superconductors. We consider the nearest and the next-nearest couplings in the FeAs layer, and the nearest coupling for inter-layer spin interaction. The dependence of the transition temperature T N and the zero-temperature average spin on the interaction constants is investigated. We obtain an analytical expression for T N and determine our temperature-dependent average spin from zero temperature to T N in terms of unified self-consistent equations. For LaFeAsO, we obtain a reasonable estimation of the coupling interactions with the experimental transition temperature T N = 138 K. Our results also show that a non-zero antiferromagnetic (AFM) inter-layer coupling is essential for the existence of a non-zero T N , and the many-body AFM fluctuations reduce substantially the low-temperature magnetic moment per Fe towards the experimental value. Our Green's function approach can be used for other FeAs-based parent compounds and these results should be useful to understand the physical properties of FeAs-based superconductors.

  15. Low-temperature dependence of yielding in AISI 316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobler, R.L.; Reed, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile tests at temperatures between 323 and 4 K were performed on one heat of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel having the composition Fe-17.34Cr-12.17Ni-1.55Mn-2.16Mo-0.051C. The temperature dependences of the yield and flow strengths at plastic strain increments from 0.2 to 3.65% are analyzed. At the yield strain (0.2%), no body-centered cubic (bcc) martensite phase transformation is detected. At higher strains (approx.3.2 +- 0.6%), bcc martensite forms from the parent austenite phase at test temperatures below 190 K, but there are no discontinuities in the temperature dependence of flow strength. A review of data available for three heats of AISI 316 at temperatures between 973 and 4 K reveals that deviations from thermally activated plastic flow theory occur at temperatures below 175 K, apparently depending on heat-to-heat compositional variations. Grain size and magnetic transition effects on the yield strength are discussed

  16. Temperature dependence of immunoreactions using shear horizontal surface acoustic wave immunosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogai, Takashi; Yatsuda, Hiromi; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, which are antibody-antigen reactions, on a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) immunosensor is described. The immunosensor is based on a reflection-type delay line on a 36° Y-cut 90° X-propagation quartz substrate, where the delay line is composed of a floating electrode unidirectional transducer (FEUDT), a grating reflector, and a sensing area between them. In order to evaluate the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, human serum albumin (HSA) antigen-antibody reactions are investigated. The SH-SAW immunosensor chip is placed in a thermostatic chamber and the changes in the SH-SAW velocity resulting from the immunoreactions are measured at different temperatures. As a result, it is observed that the HSA immunoreactions are influenced by the ambient temperature and that higher temperatures provide more active reactions. In order to analyze the immunoreactions, an analytical approach using an exponential fitting method for changes in SH-SAW velocity is employed.

  17. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  18. Temperature-dependent elastic properties of Ti{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}N alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulumba, Nina [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Functional Materials, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Hellman, Olle [Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Rogström, Lina; Raza, Zamaan; Tasnádi, Ferenc; Odén, Magnus [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Abrikosov, Igor A. [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Materials Modeling and Development Laboratory, NUST “MISIS,” 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); LACOMAS Laboratory, Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    Ti{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}N is a technologically important alloy that undergoes a process of high temperature age-hardening that is strongly influenced by its elastic properties. We have performed first principles calculations of the elastic constants and anisotropy using the symmetry imposed force constant temperature dependent effective potential method, which include lattice vibrations and therefore the effects of temperature, including thermal expansion and intrinsic anharmonicity. These are compared with in situ high temperature x-ray diffraction measurements of the lattice parameter. We show that anharmonic effects are crucial to the recovery of finite temperature elasticity. The effects of thermal expansion and intrinsic anharmonicity on the elastic constants are of the same order, and cannot be considered separately. Furthermore, the effect of thermal expansion on elastic constants is such that the volume change induced by zero point motion has a significant effect. For TiAlN, the elastic constants soften non-uniformly with temperature: C{sub 11} decreases substantially when the temperature increases for all compositions, resulting in an increased anisotropy. These findings suggest that an increased Al content and annealing at higher temperatures will result in a harder alloy.

  19. Temperature dependence of dissociative electron attachment to bromo-chlorotoluene isomers: Competition between detachment of Cl- and Br-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi-Darian, Masoomeh; Huber, Stefan E.; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2018-02-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to three isomers of bromo-chlorotoluene was investigated in the electron energy range from 0 to 2 eV for gas temperatures in the range of 392-520 K using a crossed electron-molecular beam apparatus with a temperature regulated effusive molecular beam source. For all three molecules, both Cl- and Br- are formed. The ion yields of both halogenides show a pronounced temperature effect. In the case of Cl- and Br-, the influence of the gas temperature can be observed at the threshold peak close to 0 eV. The population of molecules that have some of their out-of-plane modes excited varies strongly in the temperature range investigated, indicating that such vibrations might play a role in the energy transfer towards bond breaking. Potential energy curves for the abstraction of Cl- and Br- were calculated and extrapolated into the metastable domain. The barriers in the diabatic curves approximated in this way agree well with the ones derived from the temperature dependence observed in the experiments.

  20. Anomalously temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer GaN with large deviations from the traditional 1 /T law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Huimin; Hu, Ming

    2017-05-01

    Efficient heat dissipation, which is featured by high thermal conductivity, is one of the crucial issues for the reliability and stability of nanodevices. However, due to the generally fast 1 /T decrease of thermal conductivity with temperature increase, the efficiency of heat dissipation quickly drops down at an elevated temperature caused by the increase of work load in electronic devices. To this end, pursuing semiconductor materials that possess large thermal conductivity at high temperature, i.e., slower decrease of thermal conductivity with temperature increase than the traditional κ ˜1 /T relation, is extremely important to the development of disruptive nanoelectronics. Recently, monolayer gallium nitride (GaN) with a planar honeycomb structure emerges as a promising new two-dimensional material with great potential for applications in nano- and optoelectronics. Here, we report that, despite the commonly established 1 /T relation of thermal conductivity in plenty of materials, monolayer GaN exhibits anomalous behavior that the thermal conductivity almost decreases linearly over a wide temperature range above 300 K, deviating largely from the traditional κ ˜1 /T law. The thermal conductivity at high temperature is much larger than the expected thermal conductivity that follows the general κ ˜1 /T trend, which would be beneficial for applications of monolayer GaN in nano- and optoelectronics in terms of efficient heat dissipation. We perform detailed analysis on the mechanisms underlying the anomalously temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer GaN in the framework of Boltzmann transport theory and further get insight from the view of electronic structure. Beyond that, we also propose two required conditions for materials that would exhibit similar anomalous temperature dependence of thermal conductivity: large difference in atom mass (huge phonon band gap) and electronegativity (LO-TO splitting due to strong polarization of bond). Our

  1. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of atmospheric organics of biogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Hiltner, Joseph; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2013-10-10

    There have been growing interests in modeling studies to understand oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase for their potential roles in cloud chemistry, formation of secondary organic aerosols, and fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, key parameters in the atmospheric models to account for mass transfer, are often unavailable. In the present work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibriums of isoprene, limonene, α-pinene, and linalool using a bubble column technique. These compounds, originating from biogenic sources, were selected for their implications in atmospheric cloud chemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation. We reported Henry's law constants (K(H)), first order loss rates (k), and gas phase diffusion coefficients over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere (278-298 K) for the first time. The measurement results of K(H) values for isoprene, limonene, α-pinene, and linalool at 298 K were 0.036 ± 0.003; 0.048 ± 0.004; 0.029 ± 0.004; and 21.20 ± 0.30 mol L(-1) atm(-1), respectively. The fraction for these compounds in stratocumulus and cumulonimbus clouds at 278 K were also estimated in this work (isoprene, 1.0 × 10(-6), 6.8 × 10(-6); limonene, 1.5 × 10(-6), 1.0 × 10(-5); α-pinene, 4.5 × 10(-7), 3.1 × 10(-6); and linalool, 6.2 × 10(-4), 4.2 × 10(-3)). Our measurements in combination with literature results indicated that noncyclic alkenes could have smaller K(H) values than those of cyclic terpenes and that K(H) values may increase with an increasing number of double bonds. It was also shown that estimated Henry's law constants and their temperature dependence based on model prediction can differ from experimental results considerably and that direct measurements of temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of atmospheric organics are necessary for future work.

  2. Understanding Biological Rates and their Temperature Dependence, from Enzymes to Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, E.; Arcus, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature responses over various scales in biological systems follow a similar pattern; negative curvature results in an optimum temperature (Topt) for activity/growth/turnover, with decreases in rates on either side of Topt. Previously this downturn in rates at high temperatures has been attributed to enzyme denaturation, where a failing of the basic driving units of metabolism was used to describe curvature at the enzyme and organism level. However, recent developments in our understanding of the factors governing enzyme rates at different temperatures have guided a new understanding of the responses of biological systems. Enzymes catalyse reactions by driving the substrate through a high energy species, which is tightly bound to the enzyme. Macromolecular rate theory (MMRT) has recently been developed to account for the changes in the system brought about by this tight binding, specifically the change in the physical parameter heat capacity (ΔCǂp), and the effect this has on the temperature dependence of enzyme reactions. A negative ΔCǂp imparts the signature negative curvature to rates in the absence of denaturation, and finds that Topt, ΔCǂp and curvature are all correlated, placing constraints on biological systems. The simplest of cells comprise thousands of enzymatically catalysed reactions, functioning in series and in parallel in metabolic pathways to determine the overall growth rate of an organism. Intuitively, the temperature effects of enzymes play a role in determining the overall temperature dependence of an organism, in tandem with cellular level regulatory responses. However, the effect of individual Topt values and curvature on overall pathway behaviour is less apparent. Here, this is investigated in the context of MMRT through the in vitro characterisation of a six-step metabolic pathway to understand the steps in isolation and functioning in series. Pathway behaviour is found to be approximately an average of the properties of the

  3. Bare-Part Color in Female Budgerigars Changes from Brown to Structural Blue following Testosterone Treatment but Is Not Strongly Masculinized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, Stefanie E. P.; Eens, Marcel; Darras, Veerle M.; Pinxten, Rianne

    2014-01-01

    Whereas several studies have shown that experimentally increased levels of the androgenic steroid testosterone can affect female behavior, fewer studies have focused on the activational effects of exogenous testosterone on female morphology. With respect to colorful displays in birds, almost exclusively the effects of testosterone manipulation on female carotenoid-based colorations have been studied. Other color types such as structural colors (i.e. UV, blue and violet colors that result from differential light reflection in the nanostructures of the tissue) remain largely unstudied. Here, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of exogenous testosterone on the expression of structural bare-part coloration in female budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus. In this parrot species, bare-part coloration is expressed in the cere, a structure over the beak which is brown in females and structural blue in males. We experimentally increased plasma testosterone levels in testosterone-treated females (T-females) compared to controls (C-females) and we performed weekly spectrophotometric measurements of the cere for five weeks after implantation and one measurement after ten weeks. We also estimated the extent to which testosterone masculinized female cere color by comparing the experimental females with untreated males. We found significant effects of testosterone on cere color from week four after implantation onwards. T-females expressed significantly bluer ceres than C-females with higher values for brightness and UV reflectance. T-female cere color, however, remained significantly less blue than in males, while values for brightness and UV reflectance were significantly higher in T-females than in males. Our quantitative results show that exogenous testosterone induces the expression of structural blue color in females but does not strongly masculinize female cere coloration. We provide several potential pathways for the action of testosterone on structural color

  4. Bare-part color in female budgerigars changes from brown to structural blue following testosterone treatment but is not strongly masculinized.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie E P Lahaye

    Full Text Available Whereas several studies have shown that experimentally increased levels of the androgenic steroid testosterone can affect female behavior, fewer studies have focused on the activational effects of exogenous testosterone on female morphology. With respect to colorful displays in birds, almost exclusively the effects of testosterone manipulation on female carotenoid-based colorations have been studied. Other color types such as structural colors (i.e. UV, blue and violet colors that result from differential light reflection in the nanostructures of the tissue remain largely unstudied. Here, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of exogenous testosterone on the expression of structural bare-part coloration in female budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus. In this parrot species, bare-part coloration is expressed in the cere, a structure over the beak which is brown in females and structural blue in males. We experimentally increased plasma testosterone levels in testosterone-treated females (T-females compared to controls (C-females and we performed weekly spectrophotometric measurements of the cere for five weeks after implantation and one measurement after ten weeks. We also estimated the extent to which testosterone masculinized female cere color by comparing the experimental females with untreated males. We found significant effects of testosterone on cere color from week four after implantation onwards. T-females expressed significantly bluer ceres than C-females with higher values for brightness and UV reflectance. T-female cere color, however, remained significantly less blue than in males, while values for brightness and UV reflectance were significantly higher in T-females than in males. Our quantitative results show that exogenous testosterone induces the expression of structural blue color in females but does not strongly masculinize female cere coloration. We provide several potential pathways for the action of testosterone on

  5. Generalized Magneto-thermo-microstretch Response of a Half-space with Temperature-dependent Properties During Thermal Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-lin Xiong

    Full Text Available Abstract The generalized magneto-thermoelastic problem of an infinite homogeneous isotropic microstretch half-space with temperature-dependent material properties placed in a transverse magnetic field is investigated in the context of different generalized thermoelastic theories. The upper surface of the half-space is subjected to a zonal time-dependent heat shock. By solving finite element governing equations, the solution to the problem is obtained, from which the transient magneto-thermoelastic responses, including temperature, stresses, displacements, microstretch, microrotation, induced magnetic field and induced electric field are presented graphically. Comparisons are made in the results obtained under different generalized thermoelastic theories to show some unique features of generalized thermoelasticity, and comparisons are made in the results obtained under three forms of temperature dependent material properties (absolute temperature dependent, reference temperature dependent and temperature-independent to show the effects of absolute temperature and reference temperature. Weibull or Log-normal.

  6. Temperature-Dependent Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Methyl-Benzoate Anions: Observation of Steric Effect in Ortho-Methyl-Benzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Xue B.; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-12-22

    Temperature-dependent photoelectron spectra of benzoate anion (C6H5CO2-) and its three methyl-substituted isomers (o-, m-, p-CH3C6H4CO2-) have been obtained using a newly developed low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy apparatus that features an electrospray source and a cryogenically controlled ion trap. Detachment channels due to removing electrons from the carboxylate group and benzene ring electrons were distinctly observed. Well-resolved vibrational structures were obtained in the lower binding energy region due to the OCO bending modes, except for o-CH3C6H4CO2-, which yielded broad spectra even at the lowest ion trap temperature (18 K). Theoretical calculations revealed a large geometry change in the OCO angles between the anion and neutral ground states, consistent with the broad ground state bands observed for all species. A strong steric effect was observed between the carboxylate and the methyl group in o-CH3C6H4CO2-, such that the -CO2- group is pushed out of the plane of the benzene ring by {approx}25 degrees and its internal rotational barrier is significantly reduced. The low rotational barrier in o-CH3C6H4CO2-, which makes it very difficult to be cooled vibrationally, and the strong coupling between the OCO bending and CO2 torsional modes yielded the broad PES spectra for this isomer. It is shown that there is no C-H?O hydrogen bond in o-CH3C6H4CO2- and the interaction between the carboxylate and methyl groups in this anion is found to be repulsive in nature.

  7. Systems of reduced electron concentration and dimensionality. Pt. 1. Temperature dependence of the chemical potential and the electrical resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durczewski, K.; Ausloos, M.

    1994-01-01

    Semi-conductors, semi-metals and high critical temperature superconductors are systems with a reduced number of carriers and present effects which are sometimes related to a reduced dimensionality. We consider such effects from the point of view of transport properties in particular, in this paper, the electrical resistivity. We show the influence of the temperature dependence of the chemical potential for such systems. In particular, this leads to a nonlinear temperature dependence of the resistivity at high temperature. (orig.)

  8. Temperature-dependent remineralization in a warming ocean increases surface pCO2through changes in marine ecosystem composition

    OpenAIRE

    Segschneider, Joachim; Bendtsen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Temperature-dependent remineralization of organic matter is, in general, not included in marine biogeochemistry models currently used for CMIP5 climate projections. Associated feedbacks have therefore not been quantified. In this study we aim at investigating how temperature dependent remineralization rates (Q10 = 2) in a warming ocean impact on the marine carbon cycle, and if this may weaken the oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2. We perturb an Earth system model used for CMIP5 with temperat...

  9. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties in ITO/AF/Al device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyun-Min; Kim, Won-Jong; Lee, Jong-Yong; Hong, Jin-Woong; Kim, Tae-Wan

    2010-01-01

    Temperature-dependent dielectric properties were studied in a device with a structure of ITO/amorphous fluoropolymer (AF)/Al. The AF was thermally deposited at a deposition rate of 0.1 A/s to a thickness of 20 nm under a pressure of 5 x 10 -6 Torr. From the dielectric properties of the device, an equivalent circuit for and the equivalent complex impedance Z eq of the device were obtained. The interfacial resistance was found to be approximately 38 Ω. As the temperature was increased, the radius of the Cole-Cole plot and β also increased for a constant applied voltage. However, as the applied voltage was increased, those values decreased at a constant temperature. These behaviors are thought to be due to an orientational polarization effect of the molecules inside the AF layer.

  10. Temperature dependence of the hyperfine interaction in the cubic phase of BaHfO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Garcia, A.R.; de la Presa, P.; Rodriguez, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the hyperfine interaction in the paraelectric phase of BaHfO 3 in the temperature range from liquid-nitrogen temperature to 1350 K has been studied. The experimental results show an Abragam-Pound mechanism for the attenuation of the angular correlation. In this cubic structure the attenuation would be consistent with a relaxation mechanism that involves O-ion hopping between vacant sites in the lattice. Using the point-charge model for the estimation of the electric field gradient produced by an O vacancy in the coordination sphere of the probe ion, the process is characterized by a correlation time τ c =12±1 ps at RT

  11. Temperature Dependence of Oxide Semiconductor and Channel Effect of Thin Film Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    ZTO was prepared on SiOC/ITO glass and the electrical characteristics were analyzed in accordance with the annealing temperature to research the temperature dependence and an amorphous structure. SiOC annealed at 150 °C as a gate insulator became an amorphous structure. The ZTO annealed at 150 °C had the capacitance without any variation. However, the capacitance of ZTO on SiOC annealed at 150 °C was increased due to the reduction of energy loss. ZTO/SiOC transistor was observed the ambipolar transfer characteristics with high stability and mobility in accordance with the decrement of drain voltages as a result of tunneling effect. Therefore it was obtained that the SiOC annealed at 150 °C means the highest Schottky barrier (SB) at the interface of ZTO/SiOC as the optimization parameter.

  12. Temperature dependence of luminescence for different surface flaws in high purity silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, J.; Grua, P.; Neauport, J.; Fargin, E.; Jubera, V.; Talaga, D.; Del Guerzo, A.; Raffy, G.; Jouannigot, S.

    2013-01-01

    In situ temperature dependence of the Photoluminescence under 325 nm irradiation is used to investigate defect populations existing in different surface flaws in high purity fused silica. Five photoluminescence bands peaking at 1.9, 2.1, 2.3, 2.63 and 3.11 eV have been detected in the spectral area ranging from 1.6 up to 3.6 eV. The Gaussian deconvolution of spectra allows dividing the five luminescence bands in two categories. The former corresponds to bands showing a significant intensity enhancement while temperature decreases; the latter corresponds to bands remaining insensitive to the temperature evolution. Such a behavior brings new information on defects involved in laser damage mechanism at 351 nm in nanosecond regime. (authors)

  13. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of individual glass spherules, Apollo 11, 12, and 14 lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A. N.; Sullivan, S.; Alexander, C. C.; Senftle, F. E.; Dwornik, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 14 lunar fines have been measured from room temperature to 4 K. Data taken at room temperature, 77 K, and 4.2 K, show that the soft saturation magnetization was temperature independent. In the temperature range 300 to 77 K the temperature-dependent component of the magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie law. Susceptibility measurements on these same specimens and in addition 14 similar spherules from the Apollo 11 and 12 mission show a Curie-Weiss relation at temperatures less than 77 K with a Weiss temperature of 3-7 degrees in contrast to 2-3 degrees found for tektites and synthetic glasses of tektite composition. A proposed model and a theoretical expression closely predict the variation of the susceptibility of the glass spherules with temperature.

  14. Temperature dependence of Brillouin light scattering spectra of acoustic phonons in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Kevin S.; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. The need for a better understanding of such non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report the measured BLS spectra of silicon at different temperatures. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons

  15. Temperature dependent dielectric properties and ion transportation in solid polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengwa, R. J.; Dhatarwal, Priyanka; Choudhary, Shobhna

    2016-05-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) film consisted of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blend matrix with lithium tetrafluroborate (LiBF4) as dopant ionic salt and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as plasticizer has been prepared by solution casting method followed by melt pressing. Dielectric properties and ionic conductivity of the SPE film at different temperatures have been determined by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. It has been observed that the dc ionic conductivity of the SPE film increases with increase of temperature and also the decrease of relaxation time. The temperature dependent relaxation time and ionic conductivity values of the electrolyte are governed by the Arrhenius relation. Correlation observed between dc conductivity and relaxation time confirms that ion transportation occurs with polymer chain segmental dynamics through hopping mechanism. The room temperature ionic conductivity is found to be 4 × 10-6 S cm-1 which suggests the suitability of the SPE film for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  16. On the temperature dependence of the spontaneous polarization of lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailzade, I.G.; Ismailov, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The temperature dependence of spontaneous polarization Psub(s)(T) of LiNbO 3 and LiTaO 3 ferroelectrics is studied by the precision X-ray diffraction method up to the Curie temperature - 1140 and 650 deg C, respectively. It is shown that for LiTaO 3 a deviation from continuous variation of spontaneous polarization with temperature is observed, expressing itself more disticntly at temperatures corresponding to intermediate ferroelectric phase transitions. The Psub(s)(T) obtained has whown that up to 210 deg C the value of LiNbO 3 spontaneous polarization practically remains constant and it decreases with the temperature increase, and near the phase transition temperature (transition of the first order) Psub(s)(T) is 40% of spontaneous polarization at room temperature. As in the case of lithium tantalate stepwise changes of Psub(s)(T) for LiNbO 3 are observed

  17. Unusual temperature dependence of the magnetic moment in URu2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faak, B.; Flouquet, J.; Lejay, P.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the sample quality on the magnetic properties of the heavy-fermion superconductor URu 2 Si 2 has been studied by elastic neutron scattering. Two single crystals prepared under identical conditions received different heat treatments. The as-grown crystal shows an unusual temperature dependence of the magnetic Bragg peak intensity. The annealed sample behaves normally. The low-temperature magnetic moment is identical for the two samples, showing that the small moment of 0.023 (3) μ B is intrinsic. By varying the instrumental resolution, we show that the ordered moment as well as the limited correlation length (200-400 A) are of static origin. The finite correlation length appears related to defects. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  18. Transresistance calibrations and temperature dependence evaluation of a magnetic bridge current sensor with shunt standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T; Kon, S; Tadatsu, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a magnetic bridge current sensor for dc current measurements and a calibration system developed for the current sensor. The current sensor forms a magnetic bridge structure with a magnetic fluid core. The calibration system has been developed by using standard shunts for a test current range of 1 mA to 100 A and establishing a comparison method with a switching/sampling system. In the calibration system, the transresistances of the current sensor are measured and the uncertainties of the system are estimated for the input test current range. Also, the temperature dependence on the transresistances is investigated for temperatures ranging from −40 to 100 °C

  19. Temperature dependence of barrier height in Ni/n-GaN Schottky barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takuya; Okada, Masaya; Ueno, Masaki; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Kimoto, Tsunenobu; Horita, Masahiro; Suda, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The temperature dependence of barrier height in a Ni/n-GaN Schottky barrier diode fabricated on a GaN homoepitaxial layer was investigated by capacitance-voltage, current-voltage, and internal photoemission measurements in the range of 223-573 K. The barrier height obtained by these methods linearly decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature coefficient was -(1.7-2.3) × 10-4 eV/K, which is about half of the temperature coefficient of the band gap reported previously. This indicates that the decrease in the barrier height may mainly reflect the shrinkage of the band gap (lowering of the conduction band edge) in GaN with increasing temperature.

  20. Temperature-dependent sex determination in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, B E; Tousignant, A; Ewert, M A; Nelson, C E; Crews, D

    1993-05-01

    The leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, has temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Previous reports have shown that females are produced predominantly at cool incubation temperatures and males are produced predominantly at warm incubation temperatures (Pattern Ib). We report here that incubation at even higher temperatures (34 and 35 degrees C) produces mostly females (Pattern II). The lethal maximum constant incubation temperature for this species appears to be just above 35 degrees C. Although a previous study indicated that females from a warm incubation temperature (32 degrees C) failed to lay eggs, we found that 12 of 14 mature females incubated at 32.5 degrees C, and 5 of 6 mature females incubated at 34 degrees C produced fertile eggs and viable hatchlings.

  1. Periodic MHD flow with temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity past an isothermal oscillating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rubel; Rana, B. M. Jewel; Ahmmed, S. F.

    2017-06-01

    Temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conducting heat and mass transfer flow with chemical reaction and periodic magnetic field past an isothermal oscillating cylinder have been considered. The partial dimensionless equations governing the flow have been solved numerically by applying explicit finite difference method with the help Compaq visual 6.6a. The obtained outcome of this inquisition has been discussed for different values of well-known flow parameters with different time steps and oscillation angle. The effect of chemical reaction and periodic MHD parameters on the velocity field, temperature field and concentration field, skin-friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number have been studied and results are presented by graphically. The novelty of the present problem is to study the streamlines by taking into account periodic magnetic field.

  2. Temperature dependence of the chromium(III) R1 linewidth in emerald

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceller-Pastor, Ivana; Hutchison, Wayne D.; Riesen, Hans

    2013-03-01

    The temperature dependent contribution to the R1 (2E ← 4A2) linewidth in emerald, Be3Al2Si6O18:Cr3, has been measured by employing spectral hole-burning, fluorescence line narrowing and conventional luminescence experiments. The contribution varies from 0.6 MHz at 6.5 K to ˜420 GHz at 240 K and the line red-shifts by ˜570 GHz. Above 60 K, the dependence is well described by a non-perturbative formalism for two-phonon Raman scattering. Below this temperature the direct one-phonon process between the levels of the split 2E excited state dominates. However, it appears that a localized low-energy phonon leads to a deviation from the standard pattern at lowest temperatures.

  3. Temperature-dependent resonance energy transfer from semiconductor quantum wells to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Keun Soo; Nam, Jungtae; Kwon, Se Ra; Byun, Hyeryoung; Lee, Kwanjae; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D; Kim, Jeomoh; Ahn, Gwanghyun; Ryu, Sunmin; Ryu, Mee-Yi; Kim, Jin Soo

    2015-02-11

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) has been employed for interpreting the energy interaction of graphene combined with semiconductor materials such as nanoparticles and quantum-well (QW) heterostructures. Especially, for the application of graphene as a transparent electrode for semiconductor light emitting diodes, the mechanism of exciton recombination processes such as RET in graphene-semiconductor QW heterojunctions should be understood clearly. Here, we characterized the temperature-dependent RET behaviors in graphene/semiconductor QW heterostructures. We then observed the tuning of the RET efficiency from 5% to 30% in graphene/QW heterostructures with ∼60 nm dipole-dipole coupled distance at temperatures of 300 to 10 K. This survey allows us to identify the roles of localized and free excitons in the RET process from the QWs to graphene as a function of temperature.

  4. Temperature dependence of Brillouin frequency shift in polymers controlled by plasticization effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Koike, Kotaro; Du, Qiming; Hayashi, Neisei; Koike, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-04-01

    The temperature-dependence coefficient of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) in perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers is known to change drastically, because of the glass transition, at a certain critical temperature (Tc), above which the BFS becomes more sensitive to temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate that the Tc value can be adjusted by varying the dopant concentration, which is originally used to form the graded-index profile in the core region. Furthermore, we show that the temperature sensitivity of the BFS is enhanced in the presence of dopant probably because the temperature sensitivity of Young's modulus is increased. The results indicate a big potential of the temperature sensors based on Brillouin scattering with an extremely high sensitivity in a specific desired temperature range.

  5. Temperature dependence of the radiation induced change of depletion voltage in silicon PIN detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Holzscheiter, K.; Morgan, A.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Ellison, J.; Heinson, A.P.; Mason, M.; Wimpenny, S.J.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Grillo, A.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Rahn, J.; Rinaldi, P.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Webster, A.; Wichmann, R.; Wilder, M.; Coupal, D.; Pal, T.

    1993-01-01

    The silicon microstrip detectors that will be used in the SDC experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will be exposed to very large fluences of charged particles, neutrons, and gammas. The authors present a study of how temperature affects the change in the depletion voltage of silicon PIN detectors damaged by radiation. They study the initial radiation damage and the short-term and long-term annealing of that damage as a function of temperature in the range from -10 degrees C to +50 degrees C, and as a function of 800 MeV proton fluence up to 1.5 x 10 14 p/cm 2 . They express the pronounced temperature dependencies in a simple model in terms of two annealing time constants which depend exponentially on the temperature

  6. Derivation of temperature dependent mechanical properties of polymer foam core materials using optical extensometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fruehmann R.K.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for determining the temperature dependence of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio of polymer foams core materials is presented. The design of the test specimen is described in detail, covering the parasitic effects resulting from departures from the uniform strain condition. The measurement approach is based on a non-contact technique so that the behaviour of the complaint foam is not modified by the attachment of strain gauges or extensometers. Firstly experiments are conducted at room temperature and then at elevated temperatures in a thermal chamber. Readings are taken through an optical window using a standard digital camera. Digital image correlation is used to obtain the strains.

  7. Temperature dependence of clusters with attracting vortices in superconducting niobium studied by neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautrat, A; Brûlet, A

    2014-06-11

    We investigated the intermediate mixed state of a superconducting niobium sample using very small angle neutron scattering. We show that this state is stabilized through a sequence where a regular vortex lattice appears, which then coexists with vortex clusters before vanishing at low temperature. Vortices in clusters have a constant periodicity regardless of the applied field and exhibit a temperature dependence close to the one of the penetration depth. The clusters disappear in the high temperature limit. All the results agree with an explanation in terms of vortex attraction due to non-local effects and indicate a negligible role for pinning. Phase coexistence between the Abrikosov vortex lattice and vortex clusters is reported, showing the first-order nature of the boundary line.

  8. Transport through (Ga,Mn)As nanoislands: Coulomb blockade and temperature dependence of the conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapps, Markus; Lermer, Teresa; Geissler, Stefan; Neumaier, Daniel; Sadowski, Janusz; Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; Weiss, Dieter

    2009-09-01

    We report on magnetotransport measurements of nanoconstricted (Ga,Mn)As devices showing very large resistance changes that can be controlled by both an electric and a magnetic field. Based on the bias voltage and temperature-dependent measurements down to the millikelvin range we compare the models currently used to describe transport through (Ga,Mn)As nanoconstrictions. We provide an explanation for the observed spin-valvelike behavior during a magnetic field sweep by means of the magnetization configurations in the device. Furthermore, we prove that Coulomb blockade plays a decisive role for the transport mechanism and show that modeling the constriction as a granular metal describes the temperature and bias dependence of the conductance correctly and allows to estimate the number of participating islands located in the constriction.

  9. Temperature dependence of quantum efficiency of Schottky diodes based on 4H-SiC

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, T V; Kalinina, E V; Konstantinov, O V; Konstantinov, A O; Hallen, A

    2001-01-01

    The metal-semiconductor structures, which made it possible to create the photoreceivers of the Cr-4H-SiC ultraviolet radiation with the photosensitivity maximum by 4.9 eV and quantum efficiency up to 0.3 were manufactured on the basis of the n-4H-SiC pure epitaxial layer. The experimental study on the temperature dependence of the quantum efficiency of the photoelectric transformation showed, that by the photons energy of 3.4-4.7 eV and the temperatures above 300 K there takes place fast growth of the quantum efficiency with growth of temperatures, which is conditioned by participation of the phonons in the indirect interzonal transitions

  10. Molecular-dynamics theory of the temperature-dependent surface phonons of W(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Z.; Fasolino, A.; Tosatti, E.

    1987-04-01

    We study the temperature-dependent zone-boundary surface phonons across the c(2x2)→1x1 reconstruction phase transition of the clean W(001) surface. Velocity-velocity correlations and hence the phonon spectral densities are calculated by molecular dynamics for the surface atoms of a finite thickness (001) slab, with interatomic potentials established in a previous study of the surface statics. Our calculated k = (1/2,1/2)(2π/a) surface phonon are dominated by three main low-frequency modes. Of these, the longitudinal and the shear horizontal are reconstruction-related and display critical broadening and softening at the phase transition, while the third, the shear vertical, is basically unaffected. The reconstruction phase mode, shear horizontal, appears to be responsible for the phase fluctuations which destroy long-range order at the transition. (author). 30 refs, 12 figs

  11. Unusual temperature dependence of the dissociative electron attachment cross section of 2-thiouracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopyra, Janina [Faculty of Science, Siedlce University, 3 Maja 54, 08-110 Siedlce (Poland); Abdoul-Carime, Hassan [Université de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2016-01-21

    At low energies (<3 eV), molecular dissociation is controlled by dissociative electron attachment for which the initial step, i.e., the formation of the transient negative ion, can be initiated by shape resonance or vibrational Feshbach resonance (VFR) mediated by the formation of a dipole bound anion. The temperature dependence for shape-resonances is well established; however, no experimental information is available yet on the second mechanism. Here, we show that the dissociation cross section for VFRs mediated by the formation of a dipole bound anion decreases as a function of a temperature. The change remains, however, relatively small in the temperature range of 370-440 K but it might be more pronounced at the extended temperature range.

  12. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  13. Temperature dependence of the optical energy gap and thermoelectric studies of ? crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, G. A.

    1998-02-01

    A single crystal of 0268-1242/13/2/005/img2 was prepared by a new crystal growth technique. The interband absorption coefficients were measured, near the fundamental absorption edge, as a function of the wavelength of the incident photons at various temperatures. The energy gap 0268-1242/13/2/005/img3 is temperature dependent and the absorption edge shifts to lower energy values with increasing temperature. The energy gap, at room temperature, was found to be 2.24 eV. The dependence of the energy gap on temperature is linear in the temperature range 77 to 300 K with a negative temperature coefficient 0268-1242/13/2/005/img4 equal to 0268-1242/13/2/005/img5. The thermoelectric phenomenon is also investigated. On the basis of a two-band model the results are discussed.

  14. Temperature-dependent toxicity of artemisinin toward the macrophyte Lemna minor and the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessing, Karina Knudsmark; Andresen, Marianne; Cedergreen, Nina

    2014-01-01

    - and groundwater. To make better risk assessments of A. annua which is cultivated under varying climatic conditions, the temperature-dependent toxicity of artemisinin toward the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the macrophyte Lemna minor was evaluated at temperatures ranging from 10 to 30°C....... To include a possible effect of temperature on the degradation rate of artemisinin, artemisinin concentrations were measured during the experiment and toxicity was related to the time-weighted averages of exposure concentrations. The toxicity of artemisinin toward the macrophyte L. minor and the algae P......Artemisinin, an antimalarial compound derivated from the cultivated plant Artemisia annua L., is produced in situ through cultivation of A. annua under different climatic conditions. The bioactive compound artemisinin has been observed to spread to the surroundings as well as to leach to surface...

  15. Temperature dependence of the thermal expansion of neutron-irradiated pyrolytic carbon and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation and annealing on the temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion of pyrolytic carbon and graphite were investigated after irradiation at 930-1280 0 C to a maximum neutron fluence of 2.84 x 10 25 m -2 (E > 29 fJ). After irradiation, little change in the thermal expansion of pyrolytic graphite was observed. However, as-deposited pyrolytic carbon showed an increase in thermal expansion in the perpendicular direction, a decrease in the direction parallel to the deposition plane, and also an increase in the anisotropy of the thermal expansion. Annealing at 2000 0 C did not cause any effective changes for irradiated specimens of either as-deposited pyrolytic carbon or pyrolytic graphite. (author)

  16. Temperature dependence of mobility of macromolecules in radiation-crosslinked polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusevich, Yu.I.; Krul, L.P. [Belarussian State Univ., Minsk (Belarus)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of temperature and dose on the molecular mobility in the amorphous regions of polyethylene was studied using a spin-probe technique. The molecular mobility was characterized by a rotational correlation time {tau}{sub c} of the nitroxyl radical TEMPOL introduced into the polymer by diffusion from its solution in alcohol. It was shown that the temperature dependence of this parameter is linear and has an inflection in the region 323-353 K. The dependence in the low-temperature region is affected by the radiation dose: the higher the dose is, the greater the parameter {tau}{sub c}. The dose and temperature effects on {tau}{sub c} were found to be independent of the orientation degree of the polymer.

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Inhibition of Positronium by Chlorine- Substituted Hydrocarbons in Non-Polar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikander, G.; Mogensen, O.E.; Pedersen, Niels Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured for solutions of 1,2,3,5-C6H2Cl4 in hexane, toluene, m-xylene and mesitylene, CCl4 in hexane and toluene, and C2HCl3 in n-hexane for concentrations below 1 M and at various temperatures between −30°C and 67°C. The Ps inhibition by C6H2Cl4...... was roughly 14 times stronger at −30°C than at 67°C in toluene, m-xylene, and mesitylene, while that of CCl4 displayed hardly any temperature dependence in hexane and toluene. Previously, the Ps inhibition by C6H2Cl4 in various liquids at 20°C was explained by a competition between electron pick off...

  18. A temperature-dependent coarse-grained model for the thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Lauren J.; Stevens, Mark J., E-mail: msteve@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    A coarse-grained (CG) model is developed for the thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), using a hybrid top-down and bottom-up approach. Nonbonded parameters are fit to experimental thermodynamic data following the procedures of the SDK (Shinoda, DeVane, and Klein) CG force field, with minor adjustments to provide better agreement with radial distribution functions from atomistic simulations. Bonded parameters are fit to probability distributions from atomistic simulations using multi-centered Gaussian-based potentials. The temperature-dependent potentials derived for the PNIPAM CG model in this work properly capture the coil–globule transition of PNIPAM single chains and yield a chain-length dependence consistent with atomistic simulations.

  19. Theory of Temperature Dependence of the Magnetization in Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments and Curie and ferrimagnetic compensation temperatures for Gdl-xTx (T = Co, Ni, and Fe) and Y1-xCox can be accounted for by a simple model assuming a RKKY interaction between the rare-earth moments and the transition-metal pseudo-spin......1-xCox durch ein einfaches Model1 erklärt werden können, das eine RKKY-Wechsel-wirkung zwischen den Momenten der Seltenen Erden und des Pseudo-Spins des Übergangsmetalls annimmt. Die Wechselwirkung wird durch ein effektives Legierungsmedium übermittelt, das mit der CPA-Theorie und elliptischen...

  20. Evaluation of enthalpy of interfacial reactions from temperature dependency of interfacial equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallay, Nikola; Cop, Ana

    2005-01-01

    Temperature dependency of equilibrium at metal oxide-aqueous electrolyte solution interface was analyzed by numerical simulation. Derivations of inner surface potential with respect to temperature were performed at constant values of several different parameters. When surface charge density in inner plane was kept constant the reasonable results were obtained, i.e. the electrostatic contribution to enthalpy of protonation of amphotheric surface sites was found to be positive in the pH region below the point of zero potential and negative above this point. All other examined possibilities produced opposite results. Derivation of empirical interfacial equilibrium constant at constant surface potential indicated that electrostatic effect on protonation entropy is negligible and that electrostatic contributions to reaction Gibbs energy and enthalpy are equal and directly related to the surface potential in the inner plane

  1. Time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in nanostructured copper: Stress relaxation tests and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Guo-Yong; Zhai, Hui-Ru; Dai, L.H.; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, stress relaxation tests, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted on coarse-grained (cg), nanograined (ng), and nanotwinned (nt) copper at temperatures of 22 °C (RT), 30 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C, and 75 °C. The comprehensive investigations provide sufficient information for the building-up of a formula to describe the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation and clarify the relationship among the strain rate sensitivity parameter, stress exponent, and activation volume. The typically experimental curves of logarithmic plastic strain rate versus stress exhibited a three staged relaxation process from a linear high stress relaxation region to a subsequent nonlinear stress relaxation region and finally to a linear low stress relaxation region, which only showed-up at the test temperatures higher than 22 °C, 22 °C, and 30 °C, respectively, in the tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens. The values of stress exponent, stress-independent activation energy, and activation volume were determined from the experimental data in the two linear regions. The determined activation parameters, HRTEM images, and MD simulations consistently suggest that dislocation-mediated plastic deformation is predominant in all tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens in the initial linear high stress relaxation region at the five relaxation temperatures, whereas in the linear low stress relaxation region, the grain boundary (GB) diffusion-associated deformation is dominant in the ng- and cg-Cu specimens, while twin boundary (TB) migration, i.e., twinning and detwinning with parallel partial dislocations, governs the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in the nt-Cu specimens.

  2. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistive properties in bottom spin valve films employing very thin Cu spacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Soonchul [School of Electronic Engineering, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jschul@ssu.ac.kr; Seigler, Michael A. [Seagate Research, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Temperature dependence of magnetoresistive properties in bottom spin valve films having very thin Cu spacers are reported. NiFeCr55 A/NiFe10 A/IrMn70 A/CoFetA/Ru4 A/CoFe(t+3)A/Cu/CoFe tA/NiFe10 A/Ta50 A bottom spin valve films were deposited using a DC magnetron sputter deposition system. Magnetoresistance (MR) ratio reached a maximum of 13.5% and 11.9% at the Cu thickness of 10.4 A, when the thickness of the CoFe layers t was 20 and 10 A, respectively. Unlike the top spin valves reported earlier, the dip in the MR ratio was not observed when the interlayer coupling between the free layer and reference layer became zero. Sheet resistance change (DR{sub s}) reached a maximum of 4.22 {omega}/{open_square} at the Cu spacer thickness of 10 A when the CoFe thickness t was 10 A. Temperature dependences of MR ratio, DR{sub s}, interlayer coupling field (H {sub i}), and sensitivity showed mostly monotonic decrease as the temperature was increased up to 200 deg. C. It turns out that DR{sub s} for the film having 10.4 A of Cu spacer thickness at 200 deg. C was larger than the DR{sub s} for the film having 20 A of Cu spacer thickness at 40 deg. C. This suggests a high output voltage of the spin valve sensor made of the thin Cu spacer even at high operating temperature. These very thin Cu spacers could be utilized for very small devices where the interlayer coupling field is dominated by high demagnetizing fields.

  3. Glutamine Hydrolysis by Imidazole Glycerol Phosphate Synthase Displays Temperature Dependent Allosteric Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Lisi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme imidazole glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS is a model for studies of long-range allosteric regulation in enzymes. Binding of the allosteric effector ligand N'-[5'-phosphoribulosylformimino]-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-ribonucleotide (PRFAR stimulates millisecond (ms timescale motions in IGPS that enhance its catalytic function. We studied the effect of temperature on these critical conformational motions and the catalytic mechanism of IGPS from the hyperthermophile Thermatoga maritima in an effort to understand temperature-dependent allostery. Enzyme kinetic and NMR dynamics measurements show that apo and PRFAR-activated IGPS respond differently to changes in temperature. Multiple-quantum Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments performed at 303, 323, and 343 K (30, 50, and 70°C reveal that millisecond flexibility is enhanced to a higher degree in apo IGPS than in the PRFAR-bound enzyme as the sample temperature is raised. We find that the flexibility of the apo enzyme is nearly identical to that of its PRFAR activated state at 343 K, whereas conformational motions are considerably different between these two forms of the enzyme at room temperature. Arrhenius analyses of these flexible sites show a varied range of activation energies that loosely correlate to allosteric communities identified by computational methods and reflect local changes in dynamics that may facilitate conformational sampling of the active conformation. In addition, kinetic assays indicate that allosteric activation by PRFAR decreases to 65-fold at 343 K, compared to 4,200-fold at 303 K, which mirrors the decreased effect of PRFAR on ms motions relative to the unactivated enzyme. These studies indicate that at the growth temperature of T. maritima, PFRAR is a weaker allosteric activator than it is at room temperature and illustrate that the allosteric mechanism of IGPS is temperature dependent.

  4. Temperature dependent surface modification of molybdenum due to low energy He+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, J.K.; Novakowski, T.J.; Joseph, G.; Linke, J.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the temperature dependent surface modifications in molybdenum (Mo) samples due to 100 eV He + ion irradiation in extreme conditions as a potential candidate to plasma-facing components in fusion devices alternative to tungsten. The Mo samples were irradiated at normal incidence, using an ion fluence of 2.6 × 10 24 ions m −2 (with a flux of 7.2 × 10 20 ions m −2 s −1 ). Surface modifications have been studied using high-resolution field emission scanning electron-(SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopy. At 773 K target temperature homogeneous evolution of molybdenum nanograins on the entire Mo surface were observed. However, at 823 K target temperature appearance of nano-pores and pin-holes nearby the grain boundaries, and Mo fuzz in patches were observed. The fuzz density increases significantly with target temperatures and continued until 973 K. However, at target temperatures beyond 973 K, counterintuitively, a sequential reduction in the fuzz density has been seen till 1073 K temperatures. At 1173 K and above temperatures, only molybdenum nano structures were observed. Our temperature dependent studies confirm a clear temperature widow, 823–1073 K, for Mo fuzz formation. Ex-situ high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on Mo fuzzy samples show the evidence of MoO 3 3d doublets. This elucidates that almost all the Mo fuzz were oxidized during open air exposure and are thick enough as well. Likewise the microscopy studies, the optical reflectivity measurements also show a sequential reduction in the reflectivity values (i.e., enhancement in the fuzz density) up to 973 K and after then a sequential enhancement in the reflectivity values (i.e., reduction in the fuzz density) with target temperatures. This is in well agreement with microscopy studies where we observed clear temperature window for Mo fuzz growth

  5. POINT 2011: ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta2 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and presented in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results. The latest ENDF/B-VII.1 beta2 data library was recently and is now freely available through the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Brookhaven National Laboratory. This release completely supersedes all preceding releases of ENDF/B. As distributed the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in our applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. All results are in the computer independent ENDF-6 character format (R2), which allows the data to be easily transported between computers. In its processed form the POINT 2011 library is approximately 16 gigabyte in size and is distributed on one compressed DVDs (see, below for the details of the contents of each DVD).

  6. Temperature dependence and GABA modulation of [3H]triazolam binding in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, M.E.; Concas, A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-01-01

    The hypnotic triazolam (TZ), a triazolobenzodiazepine displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) effect of [ 3 H]TZ binding in the rat brain. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity with increasing temperatures (K/sub d/ = 0.27 +/- 08 nM at 0 0 C; K/sub d/ = 1.96 +/- 0.85 nM at 37 0 C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1220 +/- 176 fmoles/mg protein at 0 0 C and 1160 +/- 383 fmoles/mg protein at 37 0 C). Saturation studies of [ 3 H]TZ binding in the presence or absence of GABA (100μM) showed a GABA-shift. At 0 0 C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.16 +/- 0.04/+GABA) and at 37 0 C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 1.84 +/- 0.44 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.95 +/- 0.29 nM/+GABA). In contrast to reported literature, the authors findings show that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors with a temperature dependence and GABA-shift consistent with predicted behavior for benzodiazepine agonists. 20 references, 3 tables

  7. POINT 2011: ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta2 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    2011-04-07

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and presented in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results. The latest ENDF/B-VII.1 beta2 data library was recently and is now freely available through the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Brookhaven National Laboratory. This release completely supersedes all preceding releases of ENDF/B. As distributed the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in our applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. All results are in the computer independent ENDF-6 character format [R2], which allows the data to be easily transported between computers. In its processed form the POINT 2011 library is approximately 16 gigabyte in size and is distributed on one compressed DVDs (see, below for the details of the contents of each DVD).

  8. Temperature dependence of plankton community metabolism in the subtropical and tropical oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia-Corral, Lara S.

    2017-06-22

    Here we assess the temperature dependence of the metabolic rates (gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and the ratio GPP/CR) of oceanic plankton communities. We compile data from 133 stations of the Malaspina 2010 Expedition, distributed among the subtropical and tropical Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. We used the in vitro technique to measured metabolic rates during 24 h incubations at three different sampled depths: surface, 20%, and 1% of the photosynthetically active radiation measured at surface. We also measured the % of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) penetrating at surface waters. GPP and CR rates increased with warming, albeit different responses were observed for each sampled depth. The overall GPP/CR ratio declined with warming. Higher activation energies (E-a) were derived for both processes (GPP(Chla) = 0.97; CRChla = 1.26; CRHPA = 0.95 eV) compared to those previously reported. The Indian Ocean showed the highest E-a (GPP(Chla) = 1.70; CRChla = 1.48; CRHPA = 0.57 eV), while the Atlantic Ocean showed the lowest (GPP(Chla) = 0.86; CRChla = 0.77; CRHPA = -0.13 eV). We believe that the difference between previous assessments and the ones presented here can be explained by the overrepresentation of Atlantic communities in the previous data sets. We found that UVB radiation also affects the temperature dependence of surface GPP, which decreased rather than increased under high levels of UVB. Ocean warming, which causes stratification and oligotrophication of the subtropical and tropical oceans, may lead to reduced surface GPP as a result of increased penetration of UVB radiation.

  9. Temperature Dependence of the Oxygen Reduction Mechanism in Nonaqueous Li–O 2 Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bin [Energy; Xu, Wu [Energy; Zheng, Jianming [Energy; Yan, Pengfei [Environmental; Walter, Eric D. [Environmental; Isern, Nancy [Environmental; Bowden, Mark E. [Environmental; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental; Kim, Sun Tai [Energy; Department; Read, Jeffrey [Power; Adams, Brian D. [Energy; Li, Xiaolin [Energy; Cho, Jaephil [Department; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental; Zhang, Ji-Guang [Energy

    2017-10-11

    The temperature dependence of the oxygen reduction mechanism in Li-O2 batteries was investigated using carbon nanotube-based air electrodes and 1,2-dimethoxyethane-based electrolyte within a temperature range of 20C to 40C. It is found that the discharge capacity of the Li-O2 batteries decreases from 7,492 mAh g-1 at 40C to 2,930 mAh g-1 at 0C. However, a sharp increase in capacity was found when the temperature was further decreased and a very high capacity of 17,716 mAh g-1 was observed at 20C at a current density of 0.1 mA cm-2. When the temperature increases from 20C to 40C, the morphologies of the Li2O2 formed varied from ultra-small spherical particles to small flakes and then to large flake-stacked toroids. The lifetime of superoxide and the solution pathway play a dominate role on the battery capacity in the temperature range of -20C to 0C, but the electrochemical kinetics of oxygen reduction and the surface pathway dominate the discharge behavior in the temperature range of 0C to 40C. These findings provide fundamental understanding on the temperature dependence of oxygen reduction process in a Li-O2 battery and will enable a more rational design of Li-O2 batteries.

  10. Temperature-dependent inhibition of opportunistic Vibrio pathogens by native coral commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenborg, Beck R; Krediet, Cory J; Teplitski, Max; Ritchie, Kim B

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria living within the surface mucus layer of corals compete for nutrients and space. A number of stresses affect the outcome of this competition. The interactions between native microorganisms and opportunistic pathogens largely determine the coral holobiont's overall health and fitness. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that commensal bacteria isolated from the mucus layer of a healthy elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, are capable of inhibition of opportunistic pathogens, Vibrio shiloi AK1 and Vibrio coralliilyticus. These vibrios are known to cause disease in corals and their virulence is temperature dependent. Elevated temperature (30 °C) increased the cell numbers of one commensal and both Vibrio pathogens in monocultures. We further tested the hypothesis that elevated temperature favors pathogenic organisms by simultaneously increasing the fitness of vibrios and decreasing the fitness of commensals by measuring growth of each species within a co-culture over the course of 1 week. In competition experiments between vibrios and commensals, the proportion of Vibrio spp. increased significantly under elevated temperature. We finished by investigating several temperature-dependent mechanisms that could influence co-culture differences via changes in competitive fitness. The ability of Vibrio spp. to utilize glycoproteins found in A. palmata mucus increased or remained stable when exposed to elevated temperature, while commensals' tended to decrease utilization. In both vibrios and commensals, protease activity increased at 30 °C, while chiA expression increased under elevated temperatures for Vibrio spp. These results provide insight into potential mechanisms through which elevated temperature may select for pathogenic bacterial dominance and lead to disease or a decrease in coral fitness.

  11. A fully automated temperature-dependent resistance measurement setup using van der Pauw method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shivendra Kumar; Manivannan, Anbarasu

    2018-03-01

    The van der Pauw (VDP) method is widely used to identify the resistance of planar homogeneous samples with four contacts placed on its periphery. We have developed a fully automated thin film resistance measurement setup using the VDP method with the capability of precisely measuring a wide range of thin film resistances from few mΩ up to 10 GΩ under controlled temperatures from room-temperature up to 600 °C. The setup utilizes a robust, custom-designed switching network board (SNB) for measuring current-voltage characteristics automatically at four different source-measure configurations based on the VDP method. Moreover, SNB is connected with low noise shielded coaxial cables that reduce the effect of leakage current as well as the capacitance in the circuit thereby enhancing the accuracy of measurement. In order to enable precise and accurate resistance measurement of the sample, wide range of sourcing currents/voltages are pre-determined with the capability of auto-tuning for ˜12 orders of variation in the resistances. Furthermore, the setup has been calibrated with standard samples and also employed to investigate temperature dependent resistance (few Ω-10 GΩ) measurements for various chalcogenide based phase change thin films (Ge2Sb2Te5, Ag5In5Sb60Te30, and In3SbTe2). This setup would be highly helpful for measurement of temperature-dependent resistance of wide range of materials, i.e., metals, semiconductors, and insulators illuminating information about structural change upon temperature as reflected by change in resistances, which are useful for numerous applications.

  12. Moessbauer study of local environment effects in the ordered Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} Invar alloy: Temperature dependence of isomer shift in the spin-glass phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delyagin, N.N., E-mail: delyagin@srd.sinp.msu.ru [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Erzinkyan, A.L.; Parfenova, V.P.; Rozantsev, I.N. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The systematic studies of the magnetic hyperfine field distribution for {sup 57}Fe in the spin-glass (SG) phase of the ordered Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} Invar alloy have been performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy technique in the temperature range from 5 to 80 K. Particular emphasis has been placed on the low-field component of the distribution, which is considered as corresponding to the Fe sites in the SG magnetic configurations. The main result is the observation of the pronounced temperature dependence of isomer shift for several atomic SG configurations. The temperature behavior of the local electron density is strongly correlated to the Invar properties of the Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} alloy. We argue that the observed temperature dependence of the isomer shift due to a local volume effect. The temperature range, for which the pronounced decrease in atomic volume is observed, coincides with the range of the existence of the Invar effect. The influence of the competition between opposite in sign exchange interactions on the Invar properties is discussed. - Highlights: > Spin-glass phase of the ordered Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} Invar alloy has been investigated using Moessbauer spectroscopy technique. > Main result is the observation of the pronounced temperature dependence of isomer shifts for several atomic configurations. > Observed temperature dependencies due to a local volume effect. > Temperature variations of the isomer shifts are strongly correlated to the Invar properties of the Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} alloys.

  13. Population Dynamics and Temperature-Dependent Development of Chrysomphalus aonidum (L.) to Aid Sustainable Pest Management Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolo, O; Malacrinò, A; Laudani, F; Maione, V; Zappalà, L; Palmeri, V

    2014-10-01

    The increasing worldwide trades progressively led to decreased impact of natural barriers on wild species movement. The exotic scale Chrysomphalus aonidum (L.) (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), recently reported on citrus in southern Italy, may represent a new threat to Mediterranean citriculture. We studied C. aonidum population dynamics under field conditions and documented its development under various temperatures. To enable describing temperature-dependent development through the use of linear and non-linear models, low temperature thresholds and thermal constants for each developmental stage were estimated. Chrysomphalus aonidum was able to perform four generations on green parts (leaves, sprouts) of citrus trees and three on fruits. In addition, an overall higher population density was observed on samples collected in the southern part of the tree canopy. Temperature had a significant effect on the developmental rate; female needed 625 degree days (DD) to complete its development, while male needed 833 DD. The low threshold temperatures, together with data from population dynamics, demonstrated that C. aonidum is able to overwinter as second instar and as an adult. The results obtained, validated by those collected in the field, revealed few differences between predicted and observed dates of first occurrence of each C. aonidum instar in citrus orchards. Data on C. aonidum phenology and the definition of the thermal parameters (lower and upper threshold temperatures, optimum temperature, and the thermal constant) by non-linear models could allow the estimation of the occurrence in the field of each life stage and would be helpful in developing effective integrated control strategies.

  14. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  15. The kinetics and temperature dependence of the pace-maker current if in sheep Purkinje fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, G

    1983-04-01

    The kinetic properties of the if channel in shortened sheep Purkinje fibres were investigated using a two-micro-electrode voltage-clamp technique in the presence of Ba2+, Mn2+ and tetrodotoxin (TTX). The time course of the hyperpolarization-activated if currents (DiFrancesco, 1981 b) at potentials within the activation range was found to depend on whether the channel was switching 'on' or 'off'. At potentials positive to the half-activation point if decay was faster than if onset; at potentials negative to the half-activation point if onset was faster than if decay. The time courses of if onset and decay become similar only at potentials close to the centre of the activation range. If a single exponential was fitted to the time course of if switching, the time constant (tau y) was found to vary as a function of potential from approximately 50 msec to several seconds. The tau y - voltage relation is an extremely steep bell-shaped distribution. Reducing external Na+ (range 140-17.5 mM) did not alter the voltage dependence of the if time course. Increasing external K+ (range 5-60 mM) shifted the if time constants and activation curve by similar amounts in a depolarizing direction. The temperature dependence of if was investigated over the range 27.5-41 degrees C. Cooling reversibly slowed the time course of if activation with a Q10 of 3.13 (S.D. +/- 0.85, n = 62). A reversible reduction in the slope of the fully-activated current-voltage relation was observed on cooling, the Q10 being 1.35 (S.D. +/- 0.07), and was usually accompanied by a small depolarizing shift of the half-activation point and the reversal potential Ef. It is concluded that the if time course shows a marked potential dependence and does not obey Hodgkin-Huxley kinetics. Its temperature dependence resembles that of if in the sino-atrial node (DiFrancesco & Ojeda, 1980).

  16. Temperature dependence of microwave absorption phenomena in single and biphase soft magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kammouni, Rhimou, E-mail: elkammounirhimou@gmail.com [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vázquez, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lezama, Luis [Depto. Química Inorgánica, Universidad País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain); Kurlyandskaya, Galina [Depto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain); Dept. Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kraus, Ludek [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-15

    The microwave absorption phenomena of single and biphase magnetic microwires with soft magnetic behavior have been investigated as a function of DC applied magnetic field using two alternative techniques: (i) absorption measurements in the temperature range of 4–300 K using a spectrometer operating at X-band frequency, at 9.5 GHz, and (ii) room-temperature, RT, ferromagnetic resonance measurements in a network analyzer in the frequency range up to 20 GHz. Complementary low-frequency magnetic characterization was performed in a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer. Studies have been performed for 8 μm diameter small-magnetostriction amorphous CoFeSiB single-phase microwire, coated by micrometric Pyrex layer, and after electroplating an external shell, 2 µm or 4 µm thick, of FeNi alloys. For single phase CoFeSiB microwire, a single absorption is observed, whose DC field dependence of resonance frequency at RT fits to a Kittel-law behavior for in-plane magnetized thin film. The temperature dependence behavior shows a monotonic increase in the resonance field, H{sub r}, with temperature. A parallel reduction of the circular anisotropy field, H{sub K}, is deduced from the temperature dependence of hysteresis loops. For biphase, CoFeSiB/FeNi, microwires, the absorption phenomena at RT also follow the Kittel condition. The observed opposite evolution with temperature of resonance field, H{sub r}, in 2 and 4 µm thick FeNi samples is interpreted considering the opposite sign of magnetostriction of the respective FeNi layers. The stress-induced magnetic anisotropy field, H{sub K}, in the FeNi shell is deduced to change sign at around 130 K. - Highlights: • A single absorption phenomenon is observed for single phase CoFeSiB. • The T dependence of the microwave behavior shows a monotonic increase of H{sub r} with T. • The absorption at RT follows the Kittel condition for biphase CoFe/FeNi microwires. • The T dependence of resonant field of CoFe/FeNi is interpreted to be

  17. Non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of high pressure thermal inactivation of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type B in foods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian B Maier

    Full Text Available The effect of high pressure thermal (HPT processing on the inactivation of spores of proteolytic type B Clostridium botulinum TMW 2.357 in four differently composed low-acid foods (green peas with ham, steamed sole, vegetable soup, braised veal was studied in an industrially feasible pressure range and temperatures between 100 and 120°C. Inactivation curves exhibited rapid inactivation during compression and decompression followed by strong tailing effects. The highest inactivation (approx. 6-log cycle reduction was obtained in braised veal at 600 MPa and 110°C after 300 s pressure-holding time. In general, inactivation curves exhibited similar negative exponential shapes, but maximum achievable inactivation levels were lower in foods with higher fat contents. At high treatment temperatures, spore inactivation was more effective at lower pressure levels (300 vs. 600 MPa, which indicates a non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of the HPT spore inactivation efficiency. A comparison of spore inactivation levels achievable using HPT treatments versus a conventional heat sterilization treatment (121.1°C, 3 min illustrates the potential of combining high pressures and temperatures to replace conventional retorting with the possibility to reduce the process temperature or shorten the processing time. Finally, experiments using varying spore inoculation levels suggested the presence of a resistant fraction comprising approximately 0.01% of a spore population as reason for the pronounced tailing effects in survivor curves. The loss of the high resistance properties upon cultivation indicates that those differences develop during sporulation and are not linked to permanent modifications at the genetic level.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigation of temperature-dependent electrical fatigue studies on 1-3 type piezocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Mohan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available 1-3 type piezocomposites are very attractive materials for transducers and biomedical application, due to its high electromechanical coupling effects. Reliability study on 1-3 piezocomposites subjected to cyclic loading condition in transducer application is one of the primary concern. Hence, this study focuses on 1-3 piezocomposites for various PZT5A1 fiber volume fraction subjected to electrical fatigue loading up-to 106 cycles and at various elevated temperature. Initially experiments are performed on 1-3 piezocomposites, in order to understand the degradation phenomena due to various range in amplitude of electric fields (unipolar & bipolar, frequency of applied electric field and for various ambient temperature. Performing experiments for high cycle fatigue and for different fiber volume fraction of PZT5A1 is a time consuming process. Hence, a simplified macroscopic uni-axial model based on physical mechanisms of domain switching and continuum damage mechanics has been developed to predict the non-linear fatigue behaviour of 1-3 piezocomposites for temperature dependent electrical fatigue loading conditions. In this model, damage effects namely domain pinning, frozen domains and micro cracks, are considered as a damage variable (ω. Remnant variables and material properties are considered as a function of internal damage variable and the growth of the damage is derived empirically based on the experimental observation to predict the macroscopic changes in the properties. The measured material properties and dielectric hysteresis (electric displacement vs. electric field as well as butterfly curves (longitudinal strain vs. electric field are compared with the simulated results. It is observed that variation in amplitude of bipolar electric field and temperature has a strong influence on the response of 1-3 piezocomposites.

  19. Short-term temperature-dependent air-surface exchange and atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated naphthalenes and organochlorine pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.G.M.; Burnett, V.; Harner, T.; Jones, K.C.

    2000-02-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of five organochlorine (OC) pesticides, some of which have been banned for a number of years, and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) were measured at a U.K. site over periods of 6 h for 7 days resulting in 28 samples. Mean concentrations of the pesticides were {alpha}-HCH 90 pg m{sup {minus}3}, {gamma}-HCH 500, {rho},{rho}{prime}-DDE 8, dieldrin 63, endrin 22, and HCB 39. PCN mean homologue concentrations were {sub 3}CNs 67 pg m{sup {minus}3}, {sub 4}CNs 78, {sub 5}CNs 5, {sub 6}CNs 0.6, {sub 7}CNs 0.6, and {Sigma}PCNs 152. TEQ concentrations for those PCNs ascribed TEF values ranged between 0.36 and 3.6 fg m{sup {minus}3} which corresponds to {approximately}3.0--30% of the TEQ concentrations of PCDD/Fs at the same site. All the compounds measured, except HCB, exhibited a strong temperature-dependent diurnal cycling. Results from Clausius-Clapeyron plots show that pesticide concentrations were controlled by temperature-driven air-surface recycling throughout the first 5 days when stable atmospheric conditions were dominant, while during the last 2 days advection became more influential as more unstable and cooler weather started to influence the site. PCN concentrations were controlled primarily by a mixture of recycling and advection throughout the first 5 days and then by advection in the final 2 days, suggesting that there are ongoing emissions from diffuse point sources of PCNs into the U.K. atmosphere. This study provides further evidence of the rapid air-surface exchange of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) and shows how different factors alone or in combination can produce rapid changes in the atmospheric concentrations of past and present SOCs.

  20. Temperature dependence of third order ion molecule reactions. The reaction H+3 + 2H2 = H+5 + H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, K.; Kebarle, P.

    1975-01-01

    The rate constants k 1 for Reaction (1): H + 3 +2H 2 = H + 5 +H 2 were measured in the temperature range 100--300 degreeK. The temperature dependence of k 1 has the form k 1 proportionalT - /subn/, where n=2.3. Pierce and Porter have reported a much stronger negative temperature dependence with n=4.6. The difference arises from a determination of k 1 at 300 degreeK obtained by Arifov and used by Porter. The present k 1 (300 degreeK) =9times10 -30 (cm 6 molecules -2 center-dotsec -1 ). This is more than an order of magnitude larger than the Arifov value. The temperature dependence of third body dependent association reactions like (1) is examined on the basis of the energy transfer theory and the recently proposed trimolecular complex transition state theory by Meot-Ner, Solomon, Field, and Gershinowitz. The temperature dependence of the rate constant for the reverse reaction (-1) is obtained from k 1 and the previously determined temperature dependence of the equilibria (1). k/sub -//sub 1/ gives a good straight line Arrhenius plot leading to k/sub -//sub 1/ =8.7times10 -6 exp(-8.4/RT) cm 3 molecules -1 center-dotsec -1 . The activation energy is in kcal/mole. The preexponential factor is much larger than the rate constant for Langevin collisions. This is typical for pyrolysis of ions involving second order activation

  1. Unexpected resilience of species with temperature-dependent sex determination at the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Sherman; Geisler, Jonathan H; Bolortsetseg, Minjin

    2011-04-23

    It has been suggested that climate change at the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) boundary, initiated by a bolide impact or volcanic eruptions, caused species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), including dinosaurs, to go extinct because of a skewed sex ratio towards all males. To test this hypothesis, the sex-determining mechanisms (SDMs) of Cretaceous tetrapods of the Hell Creek Formation (Montana, USA) were inferred using parsimony optimizations of SDMs on a tree, including Hell Creek species and their extant relatives. Although the SDMs of non-avian dinosaurs could not be inferred, we were able to determine the SDMs of 62 species; 46 had genotypic sex determination (GSD) and 16 had TSD. The TSD hypothesis for extinctions performed poorly, predicting between 32 and 34 per cent of survivals and extinctions. Most surprisingly, of the 16 species with TSD, 14 of them survived into the Early Palaeocene. In contrast, 61 per cent of species with GSD went extinct. Possible explanations include minimal climate change at the K-Pg, or if climate change did occur, TSD species that survived had egg-laying behaviour that prevented the skewing of sex ratios, or had a sex ratio skewed towards female rather than male preponderance. Application of molecular clocks may allow the SDMs of non-avian dinosaurs to be inferred, which would be an important test of the pattern discovered here.

  2. Modelling temperature-dependent heat production over decades in High Arctic coal waste rock piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollesen, Jørgen; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    .5–32.5 °C lower and that the pile would have been frozen 12–27 years earlier if the pile had been initially saturated with water, constructed with a thickness half of the original or a combination of both. Simulation show that the pile thickness and waste rock pyrite content are important factors......Subsurface heat production from oxidation of pyrite is an important process that may increase subsurface temperatures within coal waste rock piles and increase the release of acid mine drainage, AMD. Waste rock piles in the Arctic are especially vulnerable to changes in subsurface temperatures...... as the release of AMD normally is limited by permafrost. Here we show that temperatures within a 20 year old heat-producing waste rock pile in Svalbard (78°N) can be modelled by the one-dimensional heat and water flow model (CoupModel) with a new temperature-dependent heat-production module that includes both...

  3. Temperature dependence of the cosphi conductance in Josephson tunnel junctions determined from plasma resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, N.F.; Soerensen, O.H.; Mygind, J.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave response at 9 GHz of Sn-O-Sn tunnel-junction current biased at zero dc voltage has been measured just below the critical temperature T/sub c/ of the Sn films. The temperature dependence of the cosphi conductance is determined from the resonant response at the junction plasma frequency f/sub p/ as the temperature is decreased from T/sub c/. We used three different schemes for observation of the plasma oscillations: (a) second-harmonic generation (excitation at approx. 4.5 GHz, f/sub p/ approx. 4.5 GHz); (b) mixing (excitations at approx. 9 and approx. 18 GHz, f/sub p/ approx. 9 GHz); (c) parametric half-harmonic oscillation (excitation at approx. 18 GHz, f/sub p/ approx. 9 GHz). Measurements were possible in two temperature intervals; 0.994 or = T/T/sub c/ > or = 0.930, with the result that as the temperature was decreased the cosphi amplitude first increased from about zero to positive values and then at lower temperatures decreased approaching -1 at the lowest temperatures of the experiment

  4. Temperature-Dependent Kinetic Model for Nitrogen-Limited Wine Fermentations▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Matthew C.; Fish, Russell; Block, David E.

    2007-01-01

    A physical and mathematical model for wine fermentation kinetics was adapted to include the influence of temperature, perhaps the most critical factor influencing fermentation kinetics. The model was based on flask-scale white wine fermentations at different temperatures (11 to 35°C) and different initial concentrations of sugar (265 to 300 g/liter) and nitrogen (70 to 350 mg N/liter). The results show that fermentation temperature and inadequate levels of nitrogen will cause stuck or sluggish fermentations. Model parameters representing cell growth rate, sugar utilization rate, and the inactivation rate of cells in the presence of ethanol are highly temperature dependent. All other variables (yield coefficient of cell mass to utilized nitrogen, yield coefficient of ethanol to utilized sugar, Monod constant for nitrogen-limited growth, and Michaelis-Menten-type constant for sugar transport) were determined to vary insignificantly with temperature. The resulting mathematical model accurately predicts the observed wine fermentation kinetics with respect to different temperatures and different initial conditions, including data from fermentations not used for model development. This is the first wine fermentation model that accurately predicts a transition from sluggish to normal to stuck fermentations as temperature increases from 11 to 35°C. Furthermore, this comprehensive model provides insight into combined effects of time, temperature, and ethanol concentration on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activity and physiology. PMID:17616615

  5. Temperature Dependence of the Thermal Conductivity of a Trapped Dipolar Bose-Condensed Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, H.

    2018-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of a trapped dipolar Bose condensed gas is calculated as a function of temperature in the framework of linear response theory. The contributions of the interactions between condensed and noncondensed atoms and between noncondensed atoms in the presence of both contact and dipole-dipole interactions are taken into account to the thermal relaxation time, by evaluating the self-energies of the system in the Beliaev approximation. We will show that above the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature ( T > T BEC ) in the absence of dipole-dipole interaction, the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity reduces to that of an ideal Bose gas. In a trapped Bose-condensed gas for temperature interval k B T > k B T, since the relaxation rate {τ}_{c12}^{-1} is independent of temperature and the relaxation rate due to dipolar interaction goes to zero exponentially, the T 2 temperature behavior for the thermal conductivity comes from the thermal mean velocity of the particles. We will also show that in the high-temperature limit ( k B T > n 0 g B ) and low momenta, the relaxation rates {τ}_{c12}^{-1} and {τ}_{dd12}^{-1} change linearly with temperature for both dipolar and contact interactions and the thermal conductivity scales linearly with temperature.

  6. Correlation between temperature dependent dielectric and DC resistivity of Cr substituted barium hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Supriya, Sweety; Kar, Manoranjan

    2017-12-01

    The chromium substituted barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) crystallize to the hexagonal symmetry (P63/mmc space group), which has been studied by employing the XRD technique. The XRD analysis is supported by the Raman spectra and, microstructural analysis has been carried out by the FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscope) technique. Average particle size is found to be around 85 nm. Two peaks are observed in the temperature versus dielectric constant plots and, these two transition temperatures are identified as T d and T m. The temperature T d is due to dipole relaxation, whereas T m is assigned as dielectric phase transition. Both T d and T m increase with the increase in frequency. However, the former one (i.e. T d) increases more rapidly compare to that of later one (i.e. T m). Both the temperature (T d and T m) are also well identified in the temperature dependent DC resistivity. All the samples exhibit the negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behavior, which reveals the semiconducting behavior of the material. The Mott VRH model could explain the DC electrical conductivity. Both dielectric constant and DC resistivity is well correlated with each other to explain the transport properties in Cr3+ substituted barium hexaferrite.

  7. On the temperature dependence of H-U iso in the riding hydrogen model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübben, Jens; Volkmann, Christian; Grabowsky, Simon; Edwards, Alison; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Fabbiani, Francesca P. A.; Sheldrick, George M.; Dittrich, Birger

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of H-U iso in N-acetyl-l-4-hydroxyproline monohydrate is investigated. Imposing a constant temperature-independent multiplier of 1.2 or 1.5 for the riding hydrogen model is found to be inaccurate, and severely underestimates H-U iso below 100 K. Neutron diffraction data at temperatures of 9, 150, 200 and 250 K provide benchmark results for this study. X-ray diffraction data to high resolution, collected at temperatures of 9, 30, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250 K (synchrotron and home source), reproduce neutron results only when evaluated by aspherical-atom refinement models, since these take into account bonding and lone-pair electron density; both invariom and Hirshfeld-atom refinement models enable a more precise determination of the magnitude of H-atom displacements than independent-atom model refinements. Experimental efforts are complemented by computing displacement parameters following the TLS+ONIOM approach. A satisfactory agreement between all approaches is found. PMID:25970187

  8. On the temperature dependence of H-U(iso) in the riding hydrogen model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübben, Jens; Volkmann, Christian; Grabowsky, Simon; Edwards, Alison; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Fabbiani, Francesca P A; Sheldrick, George M; Dittrich, Birger

    2014-07-01

    The temperature dependence of H-U(iso) in N-acetyl-L-4-hydroxyproline monohydrate is investigated. Imposing a constant temperature-independent multiplier of 1.2 or 1.5 for the riding hydrogen model is found to be inaccurate, and severely underestimates H-U(iso) below 100 K. Neutron diffraction data at temperatures of 9, 150, 200 and 250 K provide benchmark results for this study. X-ray diffraction data to high resolution, collected at temperatures of 9, 30, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250 K (synchrotron and home source), reproduce neutron results only when evaluated by aspherical-atom refinement models, since these take into account bonding and lone-pair electron density; both invariom and Hirshfeld-atom refinement models enable a more precise determination of the magnitude of H-atom displacements than independent-atom model refinements. Experimental efforts are complemented by computing displacement parameters following the TLS+ONIOM approach. A satisfactory agreement between all approaches is found.

  9. Temperature-dependent transport properties of graphene decorated by alkali metal adatoms (Li, K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, S.; Hemmatiyan, S.; Morrison, T. D.; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.; Lyuksyutov, I. F.; Naugle, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    We report the electrical transport properties of graphene for dilute alkali metal decoration (n ˜ 2 × 1012 cm-2) at cryogenic temperatures. Upon deposition of K and Li atoms at T = 20 K, graphene devices are doped with electrons, and the charge carrier mobility is decreased. As temperature is increased, the number of electrons donated to the graphene and the number of charged scatterers are reduced, and the mobility of the metal decorated graphene is increased. This differs from the typical temperature-dependent transport in undecorated graphene, where the mobility decreases with increasing temperature. To investigate the kinetic behavior of adatoms on graphene, we estimate the hopping time of the Li and K adatoms on graphene based on the migration barrier in the low concentration regime of the metal adatoms by Density Functional Theory calculations. The calculations reveal that these adatoms are mobile even at cryogenic temperatures and become more mobile with increasing temperature, allowing for cluster formation of adatoms. This indicates that the dominant factor in the electron transport on warming is a cluster formation.

  10. The temperature dependence of sputtering based on a thermal spike effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature dependence of sputtering on silver surfaces, which until now has been assumed to be a direct relationship, has been measured under conditions that eliminate spurious effects due to changes in residual gas pressure and target temperature and restricted to a newly determined energy range relevant for thermal sputtering. The result indicates that the dependence on temperature is an inverse relationship. This result is thought to be due basically to the thermal spike effect and agreement is shown with a postulated thermal spike model in which the instantaneous variation of spike temperature against thermal diffusivity is treated on the basis of Carslaw'-s solution of the normal heat conduction equation under a proportionate relation between thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity versus preheated target temperature curve matches the Makinson electronic thermal conductivity curve for metals. The relevant energy range for thermal sputtering is found to be around 0.4 - 2 KeV. It is thought that at such very low energies the electronic transitions may take place easily due to the dominant occurrence of Ar + and Ar in metastable states, and the broad angular distribution of scattered Ar + and recoiled Ar to the target plane may be important for the formation of thermal spikes. (author)

  11. Temperature dependence of the shear modulus of soft tissues assessed by ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapin-de Brosses, E; Gennisson, J-L; Pernot, M; Fink, M; Tanter, M [Langevin Institute (CNRS UMR 7587), INSERM ERL U979, ESPCI ParisTech, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75 005 Paris (France)], E-mail: emilie.sapin@espci.fr

    2010-03-21

    Soft tissue stiffness was shown to significantly change after thermal ablation. To better understand this phenomenon, the study aims (1) to quantify and explain the temperature dependence of soft tissue stiffness for different organs, (2) to investigate the potential relationship between stiffness changes and thermal dose and (3) to study the reversibility or irreversibility of stiffness changes. Ex vivo bovine liver and muscle samples (N = 3 and N = 20, respectively) were slowly heated and cooled down into a thermally controlled saline bath. Temperatures were assessed by thermocouples. Sample stiffness (shear modulus) was provided by the quantitative supersonic shear imaging technique. Changes in liver stiffness are observed only after 45 deg. C. In contrast, between 25 deg. C and 65 deg. C, muscle stiffness varies in four successive steps that are consistent with the thermally induced proteins denaturation reported in the literature. After a 6 h long heating and cooling process, the final muscle stiffness can be either smaller or bigger than the initial one, depending on the stiffness at the end of the heating. Another important result is that stiffness changes are linked to thermal dose. Given the high sensitivity of ultrasound to protein denaturation, this study gives promising prospects for the development of ultrasound-guided HIFU systems.

  12. Preliminary study of subsurface temperature estimation by analyzing temperature dependent geo-electromagnetic conductivity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. K.; Lee, Y.; Lee, C.

    2016-12-01

    Estimation of deep temperature is significant procedure for exploration, development and sustainable use of geothermal resources in the geothermal area. For estimating subsurface temperature, there have been suggested many techniques for indirect geothermometers, such as mineral geothermometer, hydrochemical geothermometer, isotropic geothermometer, electromagnetic (EM) geothermometer and so forth. In this study, we have tested the feasibility of EM geothermometer using integrated frameworks of geothermal and geo-electromagnetic models. For this purpose, we have developed geothermal temperature model together with EM model based on common earth model, which satisfies all observed geoscientific data set including surface geology, structural geology, well log data, and geophysical data. We develop a series of plugin modules for integration of geo-electromagnetic modeling and inversion algorithms on a common geological modeling platform. The subsurface temperature with time are modeled by solving heat transfer equations using finite element method (FEM). The temperature dependent conductivity model are obtained by the temperature-conductivity relations to perform geo-electromagnetic modeling, such as magnetotelluric to analyze temperature model from EM data.

  13. Temperature dependence of scintillation properties of SrMoO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailik, V.B., E-mail: vmikhai@hotmail.com [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Elyashevskyi, Yu. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Scientific-technical and Educational Centre of Low Temperature Studies, I. Franko National University of Lviv, 50 Dragomanova Str., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Kim, H.J. [Department of Physics of Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sangyeok-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kapustianyk, V.; Panasyuk, M. [Scientific-technical and Educational Centre of Low Temperature Studies, I. Franko National University of Lviv, 50 Dragomanova Str., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-08-21

    Studies of the X-ray luminescence and scintillation properties of a SrMoO{sub 4} crystal as function of temperature down to T=10 K have been carried out. The luminescence in SrMoO{sub 4} is quenched at room temperature, but below T<200 K the crystal exhibits a broad emission band with a maximum at a wavelength of 520 nm. The emission is attributed to the radiative decay of self-trapped excitons and defects acting as traps for the exactions at low temperatures. Such complex character of radiative decay is reflected in the kinetics which contains several components plus a contribution from delayed recombination at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of scintillation light output of SrMoO{sub 4} was studied. Comparing with a reference ZnWO{sub 4} crystal measured under the same experimental conditions it was found that the light output of SrMoO{sub 4} is 15±5%. It is suggested, therefore, that there is scope for optimisation of strontium molybdate for application as scintillator in cryogenic rare event searches.

  14. Emergence of coherent localized structures in shear deformations of temperature dependent fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-11-25

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states - in the form of similarity solutions - that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in \\\\cite{KT}.

  15. Temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in InGaN quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J.; Zhu, Tongtong; Jarman, John C.; Kocher, Claudius C.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in semiconductor quantum dots using a non-polar (11-20) a-plane InGaN system, up to the on-chip Peltier cooling threshold of 200 K. At 5 K, a statistical average splitting of 443 ± 132 μeV has been found based on 81 quantum dots. The degree of fine structure splitting stays relatively constant for temperatures less than 100 K and only increases above that temperature. At 200 K, we find that the fine structure splitting ranges between 2 and 12 meV, which is an order of magnitude higher than that at low temperatures. Our investigations also show that phonon interactions at high temperatures might have a correlation with the degree of exchange interactions. The large fine structure splitting at 200 K makes it easier to isolate the individual components of the polarized emission spectrally, increasing the effective degree of polarization for potential on-chip applications of polarized single-photon sources.

  16. Temperature dependent PAC studies with the rare earth '$^{172}$Lu' in ZnO

    CERN Document Server

    Nédélec, R

    2006-01-01

    Wide band-gap semiconductors have become an important base material for applications in optoelectronics and in high power, high temperature electronics. After doping with various rare earths, electroluminescence throughout the whole visible spectrum has been observed. We have studied the implantation behaviour of the rare earth Lu in ZnO. Our samples were implanted at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. In order to recover the sustained implantation damage the samples were treated in a rapid thermal annealing furnace. In a first attempt to measure the temperature dependence of the electric field gradient at the site of 172Lu/172Yb in ZnO a large jump in the quadrupole interaction frequency was observed between measurements at room temperature and 200 °C. Above 200 °C the frequency only changed very little. In order to understand this unusual behaviour we prepared another sample and studied the temperature range between room temperature and 200 °C in more detail. The results obtained previously could be confirmed....

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Seebeck Coefficient in Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Amirreza; Masoumi, Saeed; Hashemi, Najmeh

    2017-12-01

    Thermoelectric devices are reliable tools for converting waste heat into electricity as they last long, produce no noise or vibration, have no moving elements, and their light weight makes them suitable for the outer space usage. Materials with high thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) have the most important role in the fabrication of efficient thermoelectric devices. Metal oxide semiconductors, specially zinc oxide has recently received attention as a material suitable for sensor, optoelectronic and thermoelectric device applications because of their wide direct bandgap, chemical stability, high-energy radiation endurance, transparency and acceptable zT. Understanding the thermoelectric properties of the undoped ZnO thin films can help design better ZnO-based devices. Here, we report the results of our experimental work on the thermoelectric properties of the undoped polycrystalline ZnO thin films. These films are deposited on alumina substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc in vacuum followed by a controlled oxidation process in air carried out at the 350-500 °C temperature range. The experimental setup including gradient heaters, thermometry system and Seebeck voltage measurement equipment for high resistance samples is described. Seebeck voltage and electrical resistivity of the samples are measured at different conditions. The observed temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is discussed.

  18. Temperature dependence and interferences of NO and N₂O microelectrodes used in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, Sarina; Mohn, Joachim; Emmenegger, Lukas; Udert, Kai M

    2012-02-21

    Electrodes for nitric and nitrous oxide have been on the market for some time, but have not yet been tested for an application in wastewater treatment processes. Both sensors were therefore assessed with respect to their (non)linear response, temperature dependence and potential cross sensitivity to dissolved compounds, which are present and highly dynamic in nitrogen conversion processes (nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ammonia, hydrazine, hydroxylamine, nitrous acid, oxygen, and carbon dioxide). Off-gas measurements were employed to differentiate between cross sensitivity to interfering components and chemical nitric oxide or nitrous oxide production. Significant cross sensitivities were detected for both sensors: by the nitrous oxide sensor to nitric oxide and by the nitric oxide sensor to ammonia, hydrazine, hydroxylamine and nitrous acid. These interferences could, however, be removed by correction functions. Temperature fluctuations in the range of ±1 °C lead to artifacts of ±3.5% for the nitric oxide and ±3.9% for the nitrous oxide sensor and can be corrected with exponential equations. The results from this study help to significantly shorten and optimize the determination of the correction functions and are therefore relevant for all users of nitric and nitrous oxide electrodes.

  19. Temperature-Dependent Species Interactions Shape Priority Effects and the Persistence of Unequal Competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Tess Nahanni; Rego, Adam Ivan; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    The order of species arrival at a site can determine the outcome of competitive interactions when early arrivers alter the environment or deplete shared resources. These priority effects are predicted to be stronger at high temperatures, as higher vital rates caused by warming allow early arrivers to more rapidly impact a shared environment. We tested this prediction using a pair of congeneric aphid species that specialize on milkweed plants. We manipulated temperature and arrival order of the two aphid species and measured aphid population dynamics and milkweed survival and defensive traits. We found that warming increased the impact of aphids on the quantity and quality of milkweed, which amplified the importance of priority effects by increasing the competitive exclusion of the inferior competitor when it arrived late. Warming also enhanced interspecific differences in dispersal, which could alter relative arrival times at a regional scale. Our experiment provides a first link between temperature-dependent trophic interactions, priority effects, and dispersal. This study suggests that the indirect and cascading effects of temperature observed here may be important determinants of diversity in the temporally and spatially complex landscapes that characterize ecological communities.

  20. Temperature dependent absorption measurement of various transition metal doped laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horackova, Lucie; Šulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena; Jambunathan, Venkatesan; Lucianetti, Antonio; Mocek, Tomás.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a vast development of high energy class lasers of the order of 100 J to kJ level which have potential applications in the field of science and technology. Many such systems use the gain media cooled at cryogenic temperatures which will help in enhancing the spectroscopic and thermo-optical properties. Nevertheless, parasitic effects like amplified spontaneous emission enhance and affect the overall efficiency. The best way to suppress this effect is to use cladding element attached to the gain material. Based on these facts, this work was focused on the systematic investigation of temperature dependent absorption of several materials doped with transition metals, which can be used as cladding, as laser gain material, or as passive Q-switching element. The Ti:sapphire, Cr:YAG, V:YAG, and Co:MALO samples were measured in temperature range from 80 K to 330 K by step of 50 K. Using Beer-Lambert law we estimated the absorption coefficient of these materials.

  1. Temperature dependence of the magnetic volume susceptibility of human breast fat tissue: an NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkhuizen, Sara M; Bakker, Chris J G; Ippel, Johannes H; Boelens, Rolf; Viergever, Max A; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2012-02-01

    Proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS)-based MR thermometry (MRT) is hampered by heat-induced susceptibility changes when applied in tissues containing fat, e.g., the human breast. In order to assess the impact of fat susceptibility changes on PRFS-based MRT during thermal therapy in the human breast, reliable knowledge of the temperature dependence of the magnetic volume susceptibility of fat, dχ(fat)/dT, is a prerequisite. In this work we have measured dχ(fat)/dT of human breast fat tissue, using a double-reference method to ensure invariance to temperature-induced changes in the proton electron screening constant. Ex vivo measurements were taken on a 14.1 T five mm narrow bore NMR spectrometer. Breast fat tissue samples were collected from six subjects, directly postmortem. The susceptibility was measured over a temperature range from 24°C to 65°C. A linear behavior of the susceptibility over temperature was observed for all samples. The resulting dχ(fat)/dT of human breast fat ranged between 0.0039 and 0.0076 ppm/°C. It is concluded that the impact of heat-induced susceptibility changes of fat during thermal therapy in the breast may not be neglected.

  2. The temperature dependence of cell mechanics measured by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunyer, R; Trepat, X; Farré, R; Navajas, D; Fredberg, J J

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex polymer network that regulates the structural stability of living cells. Although the cytoskeleton plays a key role in many important cell functions, the mechanisms that regulate its mechanical behaviour are poorly understood. Potential mechanisms include the entropic elasticity of cytoskeletal filaments, glassy-like inelastic rearrangements of cross-linking proteins and the activity of contractile molecular motors that sets the tensional stress (prestress) borne by the cytoskeleton filaments. The contribution of these mechanisms can be assessed by studying how cell mechanics depends on temperature. The aim of this work was to elucidate the effect of temperature on cell mechanics using atomic force microscopy. We measured the complex shear modulus (G*) of human alveolar epithelial cells over a wide frequency range (0.1–25.6 Hz) at different temperatures (13–37 °C). In addition, we probed cell prestress by mapping the contractile forces that cells exert on the substrate by means of traction microscopy. To assess the role of actomyosin contraction in the temperature-induced changes in G* and cell prestress, we inhibited the Rho kinase pathway of the myosin light chain phosphorylation with Y-27632. Our results show that with increasing temperature, cells become stiffer and more solid-like. Cell prestress also increases with temperature. Inhibiting actomyosin contraction attenuated the temperature dependence of G* and prestress. We conclude that the dependence of cell mechanics with temperature is dominated by the contractile activity of molecular motors

  3. Ruthenium-modified cytochrome c: temperature dependence of the rate of intramolecular electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isied, S.S.; Kuehn, C.; Worosila, G.

    1984-01-01

    The ruthenium-modified horse heart cytochrome c, Ru(III)-cyt c(III), where the ruthenium is bound to the histidines-33 residue has been synthesized and characterized by ruthenium analysis, UV-vis and CD spectra, and differential pulse polarography and cyclic voltammetry. The intermediate Ru(III)-cyt c(III) has been generated by pulse-radioanalysis with use of four different radicals, CO 2 -., (CH 3 )COH., (CH 2 OH) 3 CCHOH, and -OCCH(OH)C(OH)CO 2 -. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer within the Ru(III)-cyt c(III) complex and its temperature dependence were determined over a 40 0 C temperature range with the CO 2 -. radical. At 25 0 C, these values are k/sub u/=53 +/- s/sup -1/ (pH 7.01 M phosphate buffer, 0.1 M NaHCO 2 ), ΔH/sup +/=3.5 +/- 0.2 kcal mol/sup -1/, and ΔS/sup +/=-39 +/- 1 eu

  4. Temperature-dependent morphology of hybrid nanoflowers from elastin-like polypeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Ghosh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic “nanoflowers” using calcium or copper ions as the inorganic component and a recombinantly expressed elastin-like polypeptide (ELP as the organic component. Polypeptides provide binding sites for the dynamic coordination with metal ions, and then such noncovalent complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of metal phosphates. We have shown that the interaction between the stimuli-responsive ELP and Ca2+ or Cu2+, in the presence of phosphate, leads to the growth of micrometer-sized particles featuring nanoscale patterns shaped like flower petals. The morphology of these flower-like composite structures is dependent upon the temperature of growth and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The composition of nanoflowers has also been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature-dependent morphologies of these hybrid nanostructures, which arise from the controllable phase transition of ELPs, hold potential for morphological control of biomaterials in emerging applications such as tissue engineering and biocatalysis.

  5. Temperature-dependent morphology of hybrid nanoflowers from elastin-like polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Koushik; Balog, Eva Rose M.; Sista, Prakash; Williams, Darrick J.; Martinez, Jennifer S., E-mail: jenm@lanl.gov, E-mail: rcrocha@lanl.gov; Rocha, Reginaldo C., E-mail: jenm@lanl.gov, E-mail: rcrocha@lanl.gov [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kelly, Daniel [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic “nanoflowers” using calcium or copper ions as the inorganic component and a recombinantly expressed elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) as the organic component. Polypeptides provide binding sites for the dynamic coordination with metal ions, and then such noncovalent complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of metal phosphates. We have shown that the interaction between the stimuli-responsive ELP and Ca{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}, in the presence of phosphate, leads to the growth of micrometer-sized particles featuring nanoscale patterns shaped like flower petals. The morphology of these flower-like composite structures is dependent upon the temperature of growth and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The composition of nanoflowers has also been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature-dependent morphologies of these hybrid nanostructures, which arise from the controllable phase transition of ELPs, hold potential for morphological control of biomaterials in emerging applications such as tissue engineering and biocatalysis.

  6. Temperature-dependent Schottky barrier in high-performance organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; He, Dan; Zhou, Qing; Mao, Peng; Cao, Jiamin; Ding, Liming; Wang, Jizheng

    2017-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have attracted great attention in the past 30 years, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) now reaches around 10%, largely owning to the rapid material developments. Meanwhile with the progress in the device performance, more and more interests are turning to understanding the fundamental physics inside the OSCs. In the conventional bulk-heterojunction architecture, only recently it is realized that the blend/cathode Schottky junction serves as the fundamental diode for the photovoltaic function. However, few researches have focused on such junctions, and their physical properties are far from being well-understood. In this paper based on PThBDTP:PC71BM blend, we fabricated OSCs with PCE exceeding 10%, and investigated temperature-dependent behaviors of the junction diodes by various characterization including current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and impedance measurements between 70 to 290 K. We found the Schottky barrier height exhibits large inhomogeneity, which can be described by two sets of Gaussian distributions. PMID:28071700

  7. Low temperature-dependent salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein processing and recombinant virus-like particle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Metz

    Full Text Available Pancreas disease (PD and sleeping disease (SD are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV, an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus. SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Outbreaks of SAV are associated with large economic losses of ~17 to 50 million $/year. Current control strategies rely on vaccination with inactivated virus formulations that are cumbersome to obtain and have intrinsic safety risks. In this research we were able to obtain non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs of SAV via expression of recombinant baculoviruses encoding SAV capsid protein and two major immunodominant viral glycoproteins, E1 and E2 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. However, this was only achieved when a temperature shift from 27°C to lower temperatures was applied. At 27°C, precursor E2 (PE2 was misfolded and not processed by host furin into mature E2. Hence, E2 was detected neither on the surface of infected cells nor as VLPs in the culture fluid. However, when temperatures during protein expression were lowered, PE2 was processed into mature E2 in a temperature-dependent manner and VLPs were abundantly produced. So, temperature shift-down during synthesis is a prerequisite for correct SAV glycoprotein processing and recombinant VLP production.

  8. Temperature dependence of underdense nanostructure formation in tungsten under helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, G.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Nordlund, K.; Lasa, A.; Björkas, C.; Safi, E.; Perlado, J.M.; Rivera, A.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, tungsten has been found to form a highly underdense nanostructured morphology (“W fuzz”) when bombarded by an intense flux of He ions, but only in the temperature window 900–2000 K. Using object kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (pseudo-3D simulations) parameterized from first principles, we show that this temperature dependence can be understood based on He and point defect clustering, cluster growth, and detrapping reactions. At low temperatures (<900 K), fuzz does not grow because almost all He is trapped in very small He-vacancy clusters. At high temperatures (>2300 K), all He is detrapped from clusters, preventing the formation of the large clusters that lead to fuzz growth in the intermediate temperature range. - Highlights: •OKMC simulation of temperature window for fuzz formation. •Stable He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at low temperatures. •Dissociation of He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at high temperatures. •Fuzz formation rate increases with increasing temperature. •An incubation fluence observed in the simulations, similar to experimental observations.

  9. Temperature dependence of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering in holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgesen, G.; Hill, J.P.; Thurston, T.R.; Gibbs, D.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering experiments on bulk and thin-film single crystals of holmium. The scattering at the principal magnetic reflection has been characterized as a function of the temperature in the spiral phases near and below their respective Neel temperatures. The integrated intensity of the principal magnetic peak in both samples shows power-law behavior versus reduced temperature with nearly equal exponents. The exponents for the scattering at the resonant second and third harmonics in the bulk sample are not simple integer multiples of the first, and motivate the consideration of simple scaling corrections to mean-field theory. We also present and compare the results of high-resolution measurements of the temperature dependence of the magnetic wave vectors, c-axis lattice constants, and correlation lengths of the magnetic scattering of the two samples in their spiral phases. Although the qualitative behavior is similar, systematic differences are found, including uniformly larger magnetic wave vectors and the suppression of the 1/6 phase in the film. The spiral magnetic structure of the film forms a domain state at all temperatures in the ordered phase. The magnetic correlation lengths of both samples are greatest near the Neel temperature, where that of the film appears to exceed the translational correlation lengths of the lattice. As the temperature decreases, the magnetic correlation lengths also decrease. These results are discussed in terms of the strain present in the samples

  10. Effect of the temperature dependence of the viscosity of pseudoplastic lubricants on the boundary friction regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyashenko, I. A.

    2013-07-01

    The boundary friction regime appearing between two atomically smooth solid surfaces with an ultrathin lubricating layer between them is considered. The interrupted (stick-slip) regime of motion typical of the boundary lubrication is represented as a first-order phase transition between the structural states of the lubricant. The thermodynamic and shear melting is described. The universal dependence of the viscosity of high-molecular alkanes (lubricants) on the temperature and velocity gradient is taken into account. The dependence of the friction force on the lubricant temperature and the relative shear velocity of the interacting surfaces are analyzed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the viscosity makes it possible to describe some experimentally observed effects. The possibility of prolonged damped oscillations after lubricant melting prior to the stabilization of the steady-state sliding mode is predicted. In the stick-slip regime in a wide range of parameters, a reversive motion is observed when the upper block moves in both directions after melting.

  11. Role of heat advection in a channeled lava flow with power law, temperature-dependent rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, Marilena; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2013-06-01

    The cooling of a lava flow, both in the transient and the steady state, is investigated considering that lava rheology is pseudoplastic and dependent on temperature. Lava exits from the vent with constant velocity and flows down a slope under the effect of gravity force inside a channel of rectangular cross section. We consider that cooling of lava is caused by thermal radiation into the atmosphere and thermal conduction at the channel walls and at the ground. The heat equation is solved numerically in a 3-D computational domain, and the solution is tested to evaluate the numerical errors. We study the steady state and the initial transient period of lava cooling. Results indicate that the advective heat transport significantly modifies the cooling rate of lava, slowing down the cooling process. Since the lava velocity depends on temperature, the cooling rate depends on the effusion temperature. Velocity profiles are modified during cooling showing two marginal static zones where the crust can form and remain stable. The fraction of crust coverage is calculated under the assumption that the solid lava is a plastic body with temperature-dependent yield strength. We numerically confirm that heat advection cannot be neglected in the mechanism of formation of lava tubes.

  12. Temperature dependent ENDF/B-VI, release 7 cross section library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D E

    2000-01-01

    The ENDF/B data library has recently been updated and is now freely available through the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Brookhaven National Laboratory. This most recent library is identified as ENDF/B-VI, Release 7. Release 7 completely supersedes all preceding releases. As distributed the ENDF/B-VI, Release 7 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications this library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight temperatures between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. All results are in the computer independent ENDF/B-VI character format [1], which allows the data to be easily transported between computers. In its processed form this library is approximately 1.6 gigabyte in size and is distributed on three CDs

  13. Temperature-Dependent Expression of NodC and Community Structure of Soybean-Nodulating Bradyrhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiro, Sokichi; Kuranaga, Chika; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Sameshima-Saito, Reiko; Saeki, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the physiological responses of bradyrhizobia and competition for the nodulation of soybean at different temperatures, we investigated the expression of the nodC gene at 20, 25, and 30°C and the abilities of bacteria to nodulate soybean in microcosms at day/night cultivation temperatures of 23/18°C, 28/23°C, and 33/28°C for 16/8 h. We tested five Bradyrhizobium USDA strains: B. diazoefficiens USDA 110(T) and 122, B. japonicum USDA 123, and B. elkanii USDA 31 and 76(T). The expression of nodC was up-regulated by increasing culture temperatures in USDA 110(T), 122, 31, and 76(T), but was down-regulated in USDA 123. The proportions of USDA 110(T) and 122 within the community were the greatest at 28/23°C. The population of USDA 31 increased, whereas that of USDA 123 decreased with increasing cultivation temperatures. On the other hand, infection by USDA 76(T) was not detected, and low numbers of USDA 76(T) nodules confirmed its poor nodulation ability. These results indicate that the competitiveness of and infection by USDA 110(T), 122, 123, and 31 for soybean nodulation depend on cultivation temperatures, and suggest that the temperature dependence of nodC expression affects the bradyrhizobial community structure.

  14. Embryonic origin of mate choice in a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Oliver; Crews, David

    2006-01-01

    Individual differences in the adult sexual behavior of vertebrates are rooted in the fetal environment. In the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), hatchling sex ratios differ between incubation temperatures, as does sexuality in same-sex animals. This variation can primarily be ascribed to the temperature having direct organizing actions on the brain. Here we demonstrate that embryonic temperature can affect adult mate choice in the leopard gecko. Given the simultaneous choice between two females from different incubation temperatures (30.0 and 34.0 degrees C), males from one incubation temperature (30.0 degrees C) preferred the female from 34.0 degrees C, while males from another incubation temperature (32.5 degrees C) preferred the female from 30.0 degrees C. We suggest that this difference in mate choice is due to an environmental influence on brain development leading to differential perception of opposite-sex individuals. This previously unrecognized modulator of adult mate choice lends further support to the view that mate choice is best understood in the context of an individual's entire life-history. Thus, sexual selection results from a combination of the female's as well as the male's life history. Female attractiveness and male choice therefore are complementary. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Temperature Dependence of Micro-Leakage between Restorative and Pulp Capping Materials by Cu Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, Kamalak; A, Mumcu; S, Altin

    2015-01-01

    We used the Cu ions for the leakage analysis between pulp capping and restorative materials. Theoretically, Cu has more advantages than Ag ions due to their smaller radii (rCu2+=73 pm and rAg2+=94 pm), lower mass density (dCu=8.96 g/cm3 and dAg=10.49 g/cm3) and higher radio opacity which can be more useful by X-ray or EDX detectors, cheaper price and more abundance in planet when compared with Ag element which is generally used in the leakage studies. The micro leakage between dental restorations and pulp capping materials has been determined by using Micro Computed Tomography, Scanning Electron Microscopy and EDX analysis. It is found that the leakage has temperature dependent mechanism which increases with the increasing temperature. As a result, using Cu solution for leakage studies in dentine is an effective and easy method which can be used in dental science. PMID:25926897

  16. Non-linear panel flutter for temperature-dependent functionally graded material panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hesham Hamed; Tawfik, Mohammad; Al-Ajmi, Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The non-linear flutter and thermal buckling of an FGM panel under the combined effect of elevated temperature conditions and aerodynamic loading is investigated using a finite element model based on the thin plate theory and von Karman strain-displacement relations to account for moderately large deflection. The aerodynamic pressure is modeled using the quasi-steady first order piston theory. The governing non-linear equations are obtained using the principal of virtual work adopting an approach based on the thermal strain being a cumulative physical quantity to account for temperature dependent material properties. This system of non-linear equations is solved by Newton-Raphson numerical technique. It is found that the temperature increase has an adverse effect on the FGM panel flutter characteristics through decreasing the critical dynamic pressure. Decreasing the volume fraction enhances flutter characteristics but this is limited by structural integrity aspect. The presence of aerodynamic flow results in postponing the buckling temperature and in suppressing the post buckling deflection while the temperature increase gives way for higher limit cycle amplitude.

  17. Influence of the temperature-dependent viscosity on convective flow in the radial force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travnikov, Vadim; Zaussinger, Florian; Beltrame, Philippe; Egbers, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    The numerical investigation of convective flows in the radial force field caused by an oscillating electric field between spherical surfaces has been performed. A temperature difference (T_{1}>T_{2}) as well as a radial force field triggers a fluid flow similar to the Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The onset of convective flow has been studied by means of the linear stability analysis as a function of the radius ratio η=R_{1}/R_{2}. The influence of the temperature-dependent viscosity has been investigated in detail. We found that a varying viscosity contrast β=ν(T_{2})/ν(T_{1}) between β=1 (constant viscosity) and β=50 decreases the critical Rayleigh number by a factor of 6. Additionally, we perform a bifurcation analysis based on numerical simulations which have been calculated using a modified pseudospectral code. Numerical results have been compared with the GeoFlow experiment which is located on the International Space Station (ISS). Nonturbulent three-dimensional structures are found in the numerically predicted parameter regime. Furthermore, we observed multiple stable solutions in both experiments and numerical simulations, respectively.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Magnetic Response of Antiferromagnetic Doping in Cobalt Ferrite Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeela Nairan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work MnxCo1−xFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. Phase purity and structural analyses of synthesized NPs were performed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM reveals the presence of highly crystalline and narrowly-dispersed NPs with average diameter of 14 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrum was measured in the range of 400–4000 cm−1 which confirmed the formation of vibrational frequency bands associated with the entire spinel structure. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties in anti-ferromagnet (AFM and ferromagnet (FM structure were investigated with the aid of a physical property measurement system (PPMS. It was observed that magnetic interactions between the AFM (Mn and FM (CoFe2O4 material arise below the Neel temperature of the dopant. Furthermore, hysteresis response was clearly pronounced for the enhancement in magnetic parameters by varying temperature towards absolute zero. It is shown that magnetic properties have been tuned as a function of temperature and an externally-applied field.

  19. Temperature-Dependent Magnetic Response of Antiferromagnetic Doping in Cobalt Ferrite Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairan, Adeela; Khan, Maaz; Khan, Usman; Iqbal, Munawar; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad

    2016-04-18

    In this work Mn x Co 1- x Fe₂O₄ nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. Phase purity and structural analyses of synthesized NPs were performed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals the presence of highly crystalline and narrowly-dispersed NPs with average diameter of 14 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum was measured in the range of 400-4000 cm -1 which confirmed the formation of vibrational frequency bands associated with the entire spinel structure. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties in anti-ferromagnet (AFM) and ferromagnet (FM) structure were investigated with the aid of a physical property measurement system (PPMS). It was observed that magnetic interactions between the AFM (Mn) and FM (CoFe₂O₄) material arise below the Neel temperature of the dopant. Furthermore, hysteresis response was clearly pronounced for the enhancement in magnetic parameters by varying temperature towards absolute zero. It is shown that magnetic properties have been tuned as a function of temperature and an externally-applied field.

  20. In-Flight Calibration Methods for Temperature-Dependent Offsets in the MMS Fluxgate Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromund, K. R.; Plaschke, F.; Strangeway, R. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Huang, B. G.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Leinweber, H. K.; Russell, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    During the first dayside season of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, the in-flight calibration process for the Fluxgate magnetometers (FGM) implemented an algorithm that selected a constant offset (zero-level) for each sensor on each orbit. This method was generally able to reduce the amplitude of residual spin tone to less than 0.2 nT within the region of interest. However, there are times when the offsets do show significant short-term variations. These variations are most prominent in the nighttime season (phase 1X), when eclipses are accompanied by offset changes as large as 1 nT. Eclipses are followed by a recovery period as long as 12 hours where the offsets continue to change as temperatures stabilize. Understanding and compensating for these changes will become critical during Phase 2 of the mission in 2017, when the nightside will become the focus of MMS science. Although there is no direct correlation between offset and temperature, the offsets are seen for the period of any given week to be well-characterized as function of instrument temperature. Using this property, a new calibration method has been developed that has proven effective in compensating for temperature-dependent offsets during phase 1X of the MMS mission and also promises to further refine calibration quality during the dayside season.

  1. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2015-09-11

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6oC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μat the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 106 cells mL-1 and generally covaried with μbut, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μand K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. © FEMS 2015.

  2. A novel theoretical model for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peiji; Li, Weiguo; Zhang, Xianhe; Zhang, Xuyao; Deng, Yong; Kou, Haibo

    2017-10-01

    We report a novel theoretical model without any fitting parameters for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors. This model relates the band gap energy at the elevated temperature to that at the arbitrary reference temperature. As examples, the band gap energies of Si, Ge, AlN, GaN, InP, InAs, ZnO, ZnS, ZnSe and GaAs at temperatures below 400 K are calculated and are in good agreement with the experimental results. Meanwhile, the band gap energies at high temperatures (T  >  400 K) are predicted, which are greater than the experimental results, and the reasonable analysis is carried out as well. Under low temperatures, the effect of lattice expansion on the band gap energy is very small, but it has much influence on the band gap energy at high temperatures. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effect of lattice expansion at high temperatures, and the method considering the effect of lattice expansion has also been given. The model has distinct advantages compared with the widely quoted Varshni’s semi-empirical equation from the aspect of modeling, physical meaning and application. The study provides a convenient method to determine the band gap energy under different temperatures.

  3. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopy to study order-disorder transitions in charge transfer complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Rohan; Goetz, Katelyn P.; Roberts, Drew; Jurchescu, Oana D.; McNeil, L. E.

    2018-02-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) complexes are a promising class of materials for the semiconductor industry because of their versatile properties. This class of compounds shows a variety of phase transitions, which are of interest because of their potential impact on the electronic characteristics. Here temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopy is used to study structural phase transitions in a set of organic CT complexes. Splitting and broadening of infrared-active phonons in the complex formed between pyrene and pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) confirm the structural transition is of the order-disorder type and complement previous x-ray diffraction (XRD) results. We show that this technique is a powerful tool to characterize transitions, and apply it to a range of binary CT complexes composed of polyaromatic hyrdocarbons (anthracene, perylene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and stilbene) and PMDA. We extend the understanding of transitions in perylene-PMDA and pyrene-PMDA, and show that there are no order-disorder transitions present in anthracene-PMDA, stilbene-PMDA and phenanthrene-PMDA in the temperature range investigated here.

  4. Temperature-dependent plastic hysteresis in highly confined polycrystalline Nb films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, S.; Hao, R.; Zheng, Z.; Wheeler, J. M.; Michler, J.; Balint, D. S.; Giuliani, F.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of temperature on the cyclic deformation behaviour of a confined polycrystalline Nb film is investigated. Micropillars encapsulating a thin niobium interlayer are deformed under cyclic axial compression at different test temperatures. A distinct plastic hysteresis is observed for samples tested at elevated temperatures, whereas negligible plastic hysteresis is observed for samples tested at room temperature. These results are interpreted using planar discrete dislocation plasticity incorporating slip transmission across grain boundaries. The effect of temperature-dependent grain boundary energy and dislocation mobility on dislocation penetration and, consequently, the size of plastic hysteresis is simulated to correlate with the experimental results. It is found that the decrease in grain boundary energy barrier caused by the increase in temperature does not lead to any appreciable change in the cyclic response. However, dislocation mobility significantly affects the size of plastic hysteresis, with high mobilities leading to a larger hysteresis. Therefore, it is postulated that the experimental observations are predominantly caused by an increase in dislocation mobility as the temperature is increased above the critical temperature of body-centred cubic niobium.

  5. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D Z; Wang, T; Sui, W B; Si, M S; Guo, D W; Shi, Z; Wang, F C; Xue, D S

    2015-09-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature.

  6. Ab Initio Simulations of Temperature Dependent Phase Stability and Martensitic Transitions in NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Thompson, Alexander E.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    For NiTi based alloys, the shape memory effect is governed by a transition from a low-temperature martensite phase to a high-temperature austenite phase. Despite considerable experimental and computational work, basic questions regarding the stability of the phases and the martensitic phase transition remain unclear even for the simple case of binary, equiatomic NiTi. We perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to describe the temperature-dependent behavior of NiTi and resolve several of these outstanding issues. Structural correlation functions and finite temperature phonon spectra are evaluated to determine phase stability. In particular, we show that finite temperature, entropic effects stabilize the experimentally observed martensite (B19') and austenite (B2) phases while destabilizing the theoretically predicted (B33) phase. Free energy computations based on ab initio thermodynamic integration confirm these results and permit estimates of the transition temperature between the phases. In addition to the martensitic phase transition, we predict a new transition between the B33 and B19' phases. The role of defects in suppressing these phase transformations is discussed.

  7. Temperature dependence of an abiotic glucose/air alkaline fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Dane; Scott, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The temperature dependence of a previously developed glucose fuel cell is explored. This cell uses a small molecule dye mediator to transport oxidizable electrons from glucose to a carbon felt anode. This reaction is driven by an air breathing MnO2 cathode. This research investigates how the temperature of the system affects the power production of the fuel cell. Cell performance is observed using either methyl viologen, indigo carmine, trypan blue, or hydroquinone as a mediator at temperatures of 15, 19, 27, 32, 37, 42, and 49 °C. Cyclic voltammetry of the cell anode at the given temperatures with the individual dyes is also presented. The highest power production amongst all of the cells occurs at 32 °C. This occurs with the mediator indigo carmine or with the mediator methyl viologen. These sustained powers are 2.31 mW cm-2 and 2.39 mW cm-2, respectively. This is approximately a 350% increase for these cells compared to their power produced at room temperature. This dramatic increase is likely due to increased solubility of the mediator dye at higher temperatures.

  8. Temperature dependencies of Henry’s law constants for different plant sesquiterpenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2018-01-01

    Sesquiterpenes are plant-produced hydrocarbons with important ecological functions in plant-to-plant and plant-to-insect communication, but due to their high reactivity they can also play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. So far, there is little information of gas/liquid phase partition coefficients (Henry’s law constants) and their temperature dependencies for sesquiterpenes, but this information is needed for quantitative simulation of the release of sesquiterpenes from plants and modeling atmospheric reactions in different phases. In this study, we estimated Henry’s law constants (Hpc) and their temperature responses for 12 key plant sesquiterpenes with varying structure (aliphatic, mono-, bi- and tricyclic sesquiterpenes). At 25 °C, Henry’s law constants varied 1.4-fold among different sesquiterpenes, and the values were within the range previously observed for monocyclic monoterpenes. Hpc of sesquiterpenes exhibited a high rate of increase, on average ca. 1.5-fold with a 10 °C increase in temperature (Q10). The values of Q10 varied 1.2-fold among different sesquiterpenes. Overall, these data demonstrate moderately high variation in Hpc values and Hpc temperature responses among different sesquiterpenes. We argue that these variations can importantly alter the emission kinetics of sesquiterpenes from plants. PMID:26291755

  9. On the Pressure and Temperature Dependence of the Absorption Coefficient of NH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Aousgi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pressure and temperature on the absorption coefficient of ammonia (NH3 gas self-perturbed and perturbed by nitrogen (N2 gas have been measured. We varied the gas pressure from 10 to 160 Torr and the temperature from 235 to 296 K in order to study the absorption coefficient at the center and the wings of lines in the ν4 band of NH3. These measurements were made using a high resolution (0.0038 cm-1 Bruker Fourier-transform spectrometer. These spectra have been analyzed using the method of multipressure technique permitting to succeed to an evolution of the absorption coefficient with the pressure and the quantum numbers J and K of the NH3 molecule. The results show that the absorption coefficient varies as a quadratic function of the pressure at the center of a given line. However, it has a linear evolution in the wings of the line. Moreover, the absorption coefficients are inversely proportional to temperature in the wings when NH3 lines are broadened by N2. The retrieved values of these coefficients were used to derive the temperature dependence of N2 broadening NH3 lines. The absorption coefficients were shown to fit closely the well-known exponential law.

  10. Absolute determination of the temperature-dependent penetration depth in superconducting V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, D.K.; Sekula, S.T.; Kerchner, H.R.; Chang, Y.K.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature-dependent penetration depth lambda(T) is the fundamental length that describes the spatial variation of a static magnetic field within a superconductor, including the field decay from the core of an isolated flux line (FL) in a type-II superconductor in the mixed state. The penetration depth has been the subject of extensive investigation in a number of superconducting pure materials and alloys. Few experimental techniques enable an absolute determination of lambda; usually one may obtain only relative changes with temperature. The authors have shown that for an extreme (high-kappa) type-II superconductor, such as V 3 Si, it is possible to measure lambda(T) absolutely from the low-field flux-line lattice (FLL) form factor F/sub hk/, which is extracted from the intensity of neutrons diffracted at small angles from the FLL. Since this technique provides an absolute determination, it enables a direct comparison to the predictions of microscopic theory. Here the authors compare the observed lambda to the BCS theory and its modifications due to many-body effects

  11. Temperature dependence of the Faraday rotation for CdMnCoTe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, J. Y.; Tanaka, M.; Imamura, M.

    2001-01-01

    The temperature dependence of magneto-optical property in the visible wavelength region has been studied on four-element semimagnetic semiconductor CdMnCoTe films deposited on quartz glass substrates by using MBE equipment. A large dispersion of Faraday rotation was observed, and the peak of the Faraday rotation was shifted to the higher photon energies with increasing Mn concentration at low temperatures. At 180 K, the value of the Faraday rotation observed for the Cd 0.647 Mn 0.34 Co 0.013 Te film on quartz glass was -0.36 deg/cmG at 630 nm. It is equivalent to the value of -0.36 deg/cmG observed at 77 K for the Cd 0.52 Mn 0.48 Te film on quartz glass. At 77 K, the Faraday rotation observed for the Cd 0.647 Mn 0.34 Co 0.013 Te film on quartz glass was -0.49 deg/cmG at 610 nm. The value is approximately two times larger than that of the Cd 0.52 Mn 0.48 Te film deposited on the same quartz glass substrate. The origin of the enhancement of Faraday rotation in CdMnCoTe films has been discussed in terms of the magnetic susceptibility χ. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  12. Temperature dependent optical characterization of Ni-TiO2 thin films as potential photocatalytic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rajnarayan; Haque, S. Maidul; Tripathi, S.; Rao, K. Divakar; Singh, Ranveer; Som, T.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2017-09-01

    Along with other transition metal doped titanium dioxide materials, Ni-TiO2 is considered to be one of the most efficient materials for catalytic applications due to its suitable energy band positions in the electronic structure. The present manuscript explores the possibility of improving the photocatalytic activity of RF magnetron sputtered Ni-TiO2 films upon heat treatment. Optical, structural and morphological and photocatalytic properties of the films have been investigated in detail for as deposited and heat treated samples. Evolution of refractive index (RI) and total film thickness as estimated from spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization are found to be in agreement with the trend in density and total film thickness estimated from grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity measurement. Interestingly, the evolution of these macroscopic properties were found to be correlated with the corresponding microstructural modifications realized in terms of anatase to rutile phase transformation and appearance of a secondary phase namely NiTiO3 at high temperature. Corresponding morphological properties of the films were also found to be temperature dependent which leads to modifications in the grain structure. An appreciable reduction of optical band gap from 2.9 to 2.5 eV of Ni-TiO2 thin films was also observed as a result of post deposition heat treatment. Testing of photocatalytic activity of the films performed under UV illumination demonstrates heat treatment under atmospheric ambience to be an effective means to enhance the photocatalytic efficiency of transition metal doped titania samples.

  13. Nanostructures study of CNT nanofluids transport with temperature-dependent variable viscosity in a muscular tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Abid, Syed Ali; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Mir, Nazir Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    The transport of single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofluids with temperature-dependent variable viscosity is analyzed by peristaltically driven flow. The main flow problem has been modeled using cylindrical coordinates and flow equations are simplified to ordinary differential equations using long wavelength and low Reynolds' number approximation. Analytical solutions have been obtained for axial velocity, pressure gradient and temperature. Results acquired are discussed graphically for better understanding. It is observed that with an increment in the Grashof number the velocity of the governing fluids starts to decrease significantly and the pressure gradient is higher for pure water as compared to single-walled carbon nanotubes due to low density. As the specific heat is very high for pure water as compared to the multi-wall carbon nanotubes, it raises temperature of the muscles, in the case of pure water, as compared to the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, it is noticed that the trapped bolus starts decreasing in size as the buoyancy forces are dominant as compared to viscous forces. This model may be applicable in biomedical engineering and nanotechnology to design the biomedical devices.

  14. Temperature dependence of the Al2O3:C response in medical luminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last years, attention has been given to applications of Al 2 O 3 :C in space and medical dosimetry. One such application is in vivo dose verification in radiotherapy of cancer patients and here we investigate the temperature effects on the radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals in the room-to-body temperature region. We found that the OSL response changes with both irradiation and stimulation temperatures as well as the OSL integration time. We conclude that temperature effects on the OSL response can be removed by integration if the irradiation temperature is not varied. The RL response only depends on the irradiation temperature. We recommend that calibration should be carried out at the same irradiation temperature at which the measurement is performed (i.e. at body temperature for in vivo measurements). The overall change in the integrated OSL and RL signals with irradiation and stimulation temperature covers an interval from -0.2% to 0.6% per deg. C. This indicates the correction factor one must take into account when performing luminescence dosimetry at different temperatures. The same effects were observed regardless of crystal type, test doses and stimulation and detection wavelengths. The reported temperature dependence seems to be a general property of Al 2 O 3 :C

  15. Temperature dependence of stacking faults in catalyst-free GaAs nanopillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Joshua N; Lin, Andrew; Ratsch, Christian; Huffaker, D L

    2013-11-29

    Impressive opto-electronic devices and transistors have recently been fabricated from GaAs nanopillars grown by catalyst-free selective-area epitaxy, but this growth technique has always resulted in high densities of stacking faults. A stacking fault occurs when atoms on the growing (111) surface occupy the sites of a hexagonal-close-pack (hcp) lattice instead of the normal face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattice sites. When stacking faults occur consecutively, the crystal structure is locally wurtzite instead of zinc-blende, and the resulting band offsets are known to negatively impact device performance. Here we present experimental and theoretical evidence that indicate stacking fault formation is related to the size of the critical nucleus, which is temperature dependent. The difference in energy between the hcp and fcc orientation of small nuclei is computed using density-function theory. The minimum energy difference of 0.22 eV is calculated for a nucleus with 21 atoms, so the population of nuclei in the hcp orientation is expected to decrease as the nucleus grows larger. The experiment shows that stacking fault occurrence is dramatically reduced from 22% to 3% by raising the growth temperature from 730 to 790 ° C. These data are interpreted using classical nucleation theory which dictates a larger critical nucleus at higher growth temperature.

  16. Temperature-dependent stability of stacking faults in Al, Cu and Ni: first-principles analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogra, Meha; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2014-09-24

    We present comparative analysis of microscopic mechanisms relevant to plastic deformation of the face-centered cubic (FCC) metals Al, Cu, and Ni, through determination of the temperature-dependent free energies of intrinsic and unstable stacking faults along [1 1̄ 0] and [1 2̄ 1] on the (1 1 1) plane using first-principles density-functional-theory-based calculations. We show that vibrational contribution results in significant decrease in the free energy of barriers and intrinsic stacking faults (ISFs) of Al, Cu, and Ni with temperature, confirming an important role of thermal fluctuations in the stability of stacking faults (SFs) and deformation at elevated temperatures. In contrast to Al and Ni, the vibrational spectrum of the unstable stacking fault (USF[1 2̄ 1]) in Cu reveals structural instabilities, indicating that the energy barrier (γusf) along the (1 1 1)[1 2̄ 1] slip system in Cu, determined by typical first-principles calculations, is an overestimate, and its commonly used interpretation as the energy release rate needed for dislocation nucleation, as proposed by Rice (1992 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 40 239), should be taken with caution.

  17. Temperature dependence of Young's modulus for Ca(1-x)SrxTiO3 Perovskite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, J.; Finlayson, T.R.; Latella, B.A.; Liu, T.; Thomson, S.K.; Vance, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The CaTiO 3 -SrTiO 3 series of perovskites exhibits a variety of structural transformations. The focus of the present work is to examine whether these mostly weak second-order transformations can be revealed by anomalies in the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus. Samples containing 50, 60 and 70 mole% Sr were studied for this purpose at temperatures between 77 and 800K. The samples were prepared by graphite die hot-pressing of powders prepared by the liquid alkoxide/nitrate method to achieve near-theoretical density. The Young's modulus measurements below room temperature were made by attaching a bar-shaped sample to a quartz crystal and measuring the resonant frequency, while those at elevated temperatures were carried out by an impulse exitation technique, again using a bar specimen. Data above room temperature for Sr 0.5 Ca 0.5 TiO 3 agreed well with previous data obtained by Redfern, and new data have been obtained below room temperature for each sample. The reducing conditions imposed by the use of graphite die hot-pressing have no observable effect on the data; Raman scattering data on hot-pressed Sr 0.7 Ca 0.3 TiO 3 showed the structural transformation at ∼230K as observed by others on material prepared by sintering in air

  18. Experimental Investigation of Strain Rate and Temperature Dependent Response of an Epoxy Resin Undergoing Large Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, Sandeep; Ganesh, Raja; Sockalingam, Subramani; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the effect of strain rate and temperature on large inelastic deformation of an epoxy resin is presented. Uniaxial compression tests were conducted on DER 353 epoxy resin at strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 12,000/s. Experimental results showed significant rate sensitivity in yield stress, which increased from 85 MPa at 0.001/s to 220 MPa at 12,000/s strain rate. Thermal softening became more prominent as the strain rate was increased, resulting in complete absence of strain hardening at high strain rates. Rise in temperature under high strain rate, due to adiabatic heating, was estimated to increase above glass transition temperature (T g ). A series of compression tests carried out at temperatures ranging from ambient to T g + 80 °C showed yield stress vanishing at T g . Above T g , the epoxy became completely rubbery elastic at quasi-static loading rate. Epoxy became less sensitive to strain rate as the temperature was increased further above T g . The strain rate and temperature dependent yield behavior of the epoxy resin is predicted using Ree-Eyring model.

  19. Electron-phonon coupling in solubilized LHC II complexes of green plants investigated by line-narrowing and temperature-dependent fluorescence spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pieper, J K; Renger, G; Schödel, R; Voigt, J

    2001-01-01

    Line-narrowed and temperature-dependent fluorescence spectra are reported for the solubilized trimeric light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II (LHC II). Special attention has been paid to eliminate effects owing to reabsorption and to ensure that the line-narrowed fluorescence spectra are virtually unaffected by hole burning or scattering artifacts. Analysis of line-narrowed fluorescence spectra at 4.2 K indicates that the lowest Q//y-state of LHC II is characterized by weak electron-phonon coupling with a Huang-Rhys factor of similar to 0.9 and a broad and strongly asymmetric one- phonon profile with a peak frequency omega//m of 15 cm**-**1 and a width of Gamma = 105 cm**-**1. The 4.2 K fluorescence data are further consistent with the assignment of the lowest Q//y-state at similar to 680.0 nm and an inhomogeneous width of similar to 80 cm**- **1 gathered from a recent hole-burning study (Pieper et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 1999, 103, 2412). The temperature dependence of the fluorescence spectra of LHC II is s...

  20. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of R6(Fesub(1-x)Mnsub(x))23 compounds in the temperature range 4.2 to 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, E.; Kirchmayr, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity rho of binary R 6 Mn 23 , R 6 Fe 23 (R=Y,Dy,Ho,Er,Tm) and pseudobinary R 6 (Fesub(1-x)Mnsub(x)) 23 (R=Y,Er,Ho) compounds has been determined by a four-probe measuring technique in the temperature range 4 to 300 K. The binary compounds exhibit a rho prop. T 2 dependence at low temperatures, while above 100 K a negative curvature of the rho-T-curves is observed. These experimental results are discussed on the basis of electron-spin wave scattering in the low temperature range and on the basis of s-d scattering in the high temperature range, taking explicitly into account the temperature dependence of the chemical potentials. The pseudobinary compounds generally exhibit a decreasing resistivity with increasing temperature, combined with a high residual resistivity. These facts are explained by the so-called strong scattering mechanism and the appearance of 'quasilocalized' states. (Auth.)

  1. Temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules and associated crystallization kinetics of noncentrosymmetric Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods in microemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kass, Moustafa [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Ladj, Rachid [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Université Lyon1, CNRS, UMR 5007, LAGEP, CPE, 43 bd 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Mugnier, Yannick, E-mail: Yannick.Mugnier@univ-savoie.fr [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Le Dantec, Ronan [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Hadji, Rachid [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS n°7198, Université de Lorraine, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Marty, Jean-Christophe [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Rouxel, Didier [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS n°7198, Université de Lorraine, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Durand, Christiane [Université de Savoie, Laboratoire SYMME, BP 80439, 74944 Annecy Le Vieux Cedex (France); Fontvieille, Dominique [UMR CARRTEL (INRA/Université de Savoie), Laboratoire de Microbiologie Aquatique, BP 511, 74203 Thonon Cedex (France); Rogalska, Ewa [Structure et Réactivité des Systèmes Moléculaires Complexes, UMR 7565, Nancy Université, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy cedex (France); and others

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Crystallization of Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} in microemulsions probed by hyper-Rayleigh scattering. • A faster growth and a better shape control of nanorods are obtained at 80 °C. • Different persistent cell deformations are related to the crystallization kinetics. • A temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants on nanorods is suggested. - Abstract: Aggregation-induced crystallization of iron iodate nanorods within organic–inorganic aggregates of primary amorphous precursors is probed by time-dependent hyper-Rayleigh scattering measurements in Triton X-100 based-microemulsions. In the context of a growing interest of noncentrosymmetric oxide nanomaterials in multi-photon bioimaging, we demonstrate by a combination of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy that an increase in the synthesis of temperature results in faster crystallization kinetics and in a better shape-control of the final Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods. For initial microemulsions of fixed composition, room-temperature synthesis leads to bundles of 1–3 μm long nanorods, whereas shorter individual nanorods are obtained when the temperature is increased. Results are interpreted in terms of kinetically unfavorable mesoscale transformations due to the strong binding interactions with Triton molecules. The interplay between the nanorod crystallization kinetics and their corresponding unit cell deformation, evidenced by lattice parameter refinements, is attributed to a temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants molecules at the organic–inorganic interface.

  2. Mössbauer study of local environment effects in the ordered Fe 70Al 30 Invar alloy: Temperature dependence of isomer shift in the spin-glass phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delyagin, N. N.; Erzinkyan, A. L.; Parfenova, V. P.; Rozantsev, I. N.

    2011-12-01

    The systematic studies of the magnetic hyperfine field distribution for 57Fe in the spin-glass (SG) phase of the ordered Fe70Al30 Invar alloy have been performed using Mössbauer spectroscopy technique in the temperature range from 5 to 80 K. Particular emphasis has been placed on the low-field component of the distribution, which is considered as corresponding to the Fe sites in the SG magnetic configurations. The main result is the observation of the pronounced temperature dependence of isomer shift for several atomic SG configurations. The temperature behavior of the local electron density is strongly correlated to the Invar properties of the Fe70Al30 alloy. We argue that the observed temperature dependence of the isomer shift due to a local volume effect. The temperature range, for which the pronounced decrease in atomic volume is observed, coincides with the range of the existence of the Invar effect. The influence of the competition between opposite in sign exchange interactions on the Invar properties is discussed.

  3. Quantum rotation and translation of hydrogen molecules encapsulated inside C₆₀: temperature dependence of inelastic neutron scattering spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsewill, A J; Goh, K; Rols, S; Ollivier, J; Johnson, M R; Levitt, M H; Carravetta, M; Mamone, S; Murata, Y; Chen, J Y-C; Johnson, J A; Lei, X; Turro, N J

    2013-09-13

    The quantum dynamics of a hydrogen molecule encapsulated inside the cage of a C60 fullerene molecule is investigated using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The emphasis is on the temperature dependence of the INS spectra which were recorded using time-of-flight spectrometers. The hydrogen endofullerene system is highly quantum mechanical, exhibiting both translational and rotational quantization. The profound influence of the Pauli exclusion principle is revealed through nuclear spin isomerism. INS is shown to be exceptionally able to drive transitions between ortho-hydrogen and para-hydrogen which are spin-forbidden to photon spectroscopies. Spectra in the temperature range 1.6≤T≤280 K are presented, and examples are given which demonstrate how the temperature dependence of the INS peak amplitudes can provide an effective tool for assigning the transitions. It is also shown in a preliminary investigation how the temperature dependence may conceivably be used to probe crystal field effects and inter-fullerene interactions.

  4. Temperature dependent dielectric and conductivity studies of polyvinyl alcohol-ZnO nanocomposite films by impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemalatha, K. S.; Damle, R.; Rukmani, K., E-mail: rukmani9909@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560056 (India); Sriprakash, G. [Department of Physics, Maharani' s Science College for Women, Bangalore 560001 (India); Ambika Prasad, M. V. N. [Department of Physics, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585106 (India)

    2015-10-21

    Dielectric and conductivity behaviors of nano ZnO doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites for various concentrations of dopant were investigated using impedance spectroscopy for a wide range of temperatures (303 K–423 K) and frequencies (5 Hz–30 MHZ). The dielectric properties of host polymer matrix have been improved by the addition of nano ZnO and are found to be highly temperature dependent. Anomalous dielectric behavior was observed in the frequency range of 2.5 MHz–5 MHz. Increase in dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss was observed with respect to temperature. The Cole-Cole plot could be modeled by low resistance regions in a high resistance matrix and the lowest resistance was observed for the 10 mol. % films. The imaginary part of the electric modulus showed asymmetric peaks with the relaxation following Debye nature below and non-Debye nature above the peaks. The ac conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's power law, whereas the variation of dc conductivity with temperature was found to follow Arrhenius behavior. Two different activation energy values were obtained from Arrhenius plot indicating that two conduction mechanisms are involved in the composite films. Fitting the ac conductivity data to Jonscher's law indicates that large polaron assisted tunneling is the most likely conduction mechanism in the composites. Maximum conductivity is observed at 423 K for all the samples and it is optimum for 10 mol. % ZnO doped PVA composite film. Significant increase in dc and ac conductivities in these composite films makes them a potential candidate for application in electronic devices.

  5. Temperature Dependency of the Correlation between Secondary Organic Aerosol and Monoterpenes Concentrations at a Boreal Forest Site in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Zhang, W.; Rinne, J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate feedbacks represent the large uncertainty in the climate projection partly due to the difficulties to quantify the feedback mechanisms in the biosphere-atmosphere interaction. Recently, a negative climate feedback mechanism whereby higher temperatures and CO2-levels boost continental biomass production, leading to increased biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations, tending to cause cooling, has been attached much attention. To quantify the relationship between biogenic organic compounds (BVOCs) and SOA, a five-year data set (2008, 2010-2011,2013-2014) for SOA and monoterpenes concentrations (the dominant fraction of BVOCs) measured at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Finland, is analyzed. Our results show that there is a moderate linear correlation between SOA and monoterpenes concentration with the correlation coefficient (R) as 0.66. To rule out the influence of anthropogenic aerosols, the dataset is further filtered by selecting the data at the wind direction of cleaner air mass, leading to an improved R as 0.68. As temperature is a critical factor for vegetation growth, BVOC emissions, and condensation rate, the correlation between SOA and monoterpenes concentration at different temperature windows are studied. The result shows a higher R and slope of linear regression as temperature increases. To identify the dominant oxidant responsible for the BVOC-SOA conversion, the correlations between SOA concentration and the monoterpenes oxidation rates by O3 and OH are compared, suggesting more SOA is contributed by O3 oxidation process. Finally, the possible processes and factors such as the atmospheric boundary layer depth, limiting factor in the monoterpenes oxidation process, as well as temperature sensitivity in the condensation process contributing to the temperature dependence of correlation between BVOA and SOA are investigated.

  6. On the temperature dependence of the Adam-Gibbs equation around the crossover region in the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Michel; Andraca, Adriana; Goldstein, Patricia; del Castillo, Luis Felipe

    2018-04-01

    The Adam-Gibbs equation has been used for more than five decades, and still a question remains unanswered on the temperature dependence of the chemical potential it includes. Nowadays, it is a well-known fact that in fragile glass formers, actually the behavior of the system depends on the temperature region it is being studied. Transport coefficients change due to the appearance of heterogeneity in the liquid as it is supercooled. Using the different forms for the logarithmic shift factor and the form of the configurational entropy, we evaluate this temperature dependence and present a discussion on our results.

  7. Vortex-pair nucleation at defects: A mechanism for anomalous temperature dependence in the superconducting screening length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebard, A.F.; Fiory, A.T.; Siegal, M.P.; Phillips, J.M.; Haddon, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Low-field ac screening measurements on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ films and (BEDT-TTF) 2 Cu(SCN) 2 crystals [where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene], both thought to contain a high density of defects, reveal a diminution of screening and a common extrinsic temperature dependence of the screening length λ. Vortex-core pinning at the defects is shown to give a low-temperature T 2 power-law temperature dependence to λ that, in contrast to the exponential behavior expected from s-wave pairing, can be mistaken as evidence for lines or nodes of the energy gap on the Fermi surface

  8. Temperature-dependent mid-IR absorption spectra of gaseous hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingbeil, Adam E.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative mid-IR absorption spectra (2500-3400 cm -1 ) for 12 pure hydrocarbon compounds are measured at temperatures ranging from 25 to 500 deg. C using an FTIR spectrometer. The hydrocarbons studied are n-pentane, n-heptane, n-dodecane, 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane (iso-octane), 2-methyl-butane, 2-methyl-pentane, 2,4,4-trimethyl-1-pentene, 2-methyl-2-butene, propene, toluene, m-xylene, and ethylbenzene. Room-temperature measurements of neat hydrocarbon vapor were made with an instrument resolution of both 0.1 and 1 cm -1 (FWHM) to confirm that the high-resolution setting was required only to resolve the propene absorption spectrum while the spectra of the other hydrocarbons could be resolved with 1 cm -1 resolution. High-resolution (0.1 cm -1 ), room-temperature measurements of neat hydrocarbons were made at low pressure (∼1 Torr, 133 Pa) and compared to measurements of hydrocarbon/N 2 mixtures at atmospheric pressure to verify that no pressure broadening could be observed over this pressure range. The temperature was varied between 25 and 500 o C for atmospheric-pressure measurements of hydrocarbon/N 2 mixtures (X hydrocarbon ∼0.06-1.5%) and it was found that the absorption cross section shows simple temperature-dependent behavior for a fixed wavelength over this temperature range. Comparisons with previous FTIR data over a limited temperature range and with high-resolution laser absorption data over a wide temperature range show good agreement

  9. Relative fragmentation in ternary systems within the temperature-dependent relativistic mean-field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, M. T. Senthil; Kumar, Bharat; Balasubramaniam, M.; Agrawal, B. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2017-06-01

    For the first time, we apply the temperature-dependent relativistic mean-field (TRMF) model to study the ternary fragmentation of heavy nuclei using the level density approach. The relative fragmentation probability of a particular fragment is obtained by evaluating the convolution integrals that employ the excitation energy and the level density parameter for a given temperature calculated within the TRMF formalism. To illustrate, we have considered the ternary fragmentations in 252Cf, 242Pu, and 236U with a fixed third fragment A3=48Ca , 20O, and 16O, respectively. The relative fragmentation probabilities are studied for the temperatures T =1 , 2, and 3 MeV. For the comparison, the relative fragmentation probabilities are also calculated from the single-particle energies of the finite range droplet model (FRDM). In general, the larger phase space for the ternary fragmentation is observed indicating that such fragmentations are most probable ones. For T =2 and 3 MeV, Sn +Ni +Ca is the most probable combination for the nucleus 252Cf. However, for the nuclei 242Pu and 236U, the maximum fragmentation probabilities at T =2 MeV differ from those at T =3 MeV. For T =3 MeV, the closed shell (Z =8 ) light-mass fragment with its corresponding partners has larger scission point probabilities. But, at T =2 MeV, Si, P, and S are favorable fragments with the corresponding partners. It is noticed that the symmetric binary fragmentation along with the fixed third fragment for 242Pu and 236U is also favored at T =1 MeV.

  10. Temperature-dependent ordering phenomena in single crystals of germanium antimony tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Philipp [Faculty of Chemistry and Mineralogy, Leipzig University, Scharnhorststr. 20, 04275 Leipzig (Germany); Schneider, Matthias N. [Department of Chemistry, LMU Munich, Butenandtstr. 5-13 (D), 81377 Munich (Germany); Oeckler, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.oeckler@gmx.de [Faculty of Chemistry and Mineralogy, Leipzig University, Scharnhorststr. 20, 04275 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The temperature-dependent behavior of quenched single-crystalline (GeTe){sub n}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (n~2.8, n~5 and n~11) was investigated by semiquantitative modeling of diffuse X-ray scattering. The structure at room temperature exhibits trigonal twin domains, each comprising a stacking-disordered sequence of distorted rocksalt-type slabs with variable thicknesses. Ge and Sb share the cation position and vacancies are partially ordered in defect layers (van der Waals gaps) between the slabs. The average structure determined with resonant diffraction data corresponds to a rocksalt-type structure whose cation position is split along the stacking direction. Upon heating, cation ordering leads to a metastable superstructure of the rocksalt type at ~400 °C, which transforms to a rocksalt-type high-temperature phase with randomly distributed cations and vacancies at ~500 °C; this structure was also refined using resonant diffraction. Cooling at high or intermediate rates does not yield the long-range ordered phase, but directly leads to the twinned disordered phase. - Graphical abstract: Development of the diffraction patterns of (GeTe){sub ~11}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} upon heating; the insets symbolically sketch the real structure at the corresponding temperatures. - Highlights: • The structure of disordered (GeTe){sub n}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is described as a function of temperature. • Structural changes are tracked by modeling diffuse X-ray scattering. • Quenched crystals exhibit distorted NaCl-type slabs with different thicknesses. • Vacancy ordering upon heating leads to a metastable superstructure of the NaCl type. • Further heating leads to an undistorted disordered NaCl-type high-temperature phase.

  11. Temperature-dependent 29Si incorporation during deposition of highly enriched 28Si films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, K. J.; Kim, H. S.; Simons, D. S.; Pomeroy, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we examine the mechanisms leading to 29Si incorporation into highly enriched 28Si films deposited by hyperthermal ion beams at elevated temperatures in the dilute presence of natural abundance silane (SiH4) gas. Enriched 28Si is a critical material in the development of quantum information devices because 28Si is free of nuclear spins that cause decoherence in a quantum system. We deposit epitaxial thin films of 28Si enriched in situ beyond 99.999 98% 28Si onto Si(100) using an ion-beam deposition system and seek to develop the ability to systematically vary the enrichment and measure the impact on quantum coherence. We use secondary ion mass spectrometry to measure the residual 29Si isotope fraction in enriched samples deposited from ≈250 ∘C up to 800 °C. The 29Si isotope fraction is found to increase from 4 ×10-6 at around 800 °C. From these data, we estimate the temperature dependence of the incorporation fraction s of SiH4, which increases sharply from about 2.9 ×10-4 at 500 °C to 2.3 ×10-2 at 800 °C. We determine an activation energy of 1.00(8) eV associated with the abrupt increase in incorporation and conclude that below 500 °C, a temperature-independent mechanism such as activation from ion collisions with adsorbed SiH4 molecules is the primary incorporation mechanism. Direct incorporation from the adsorbed state is found to be minimal.

  12. Infrared cross-sections and integrated band intensities of propylene: Temperature-dependent studies

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2014-01-01

    Propylene, a by-product of biomass burning, thermal cracking of hydrocarbons and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, is a ubiquitous molecule found in the environment and atmosphere. Accurate infrared (IR) cross-sections and integrated band intensities of propylene are essential for quantitative measurements and atmospheric modeling. We measured absolute IR cross-sections of propylene using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy over the wavenumber range of 400-6500cm-1 and at gas temperatures between 296 and 460K. We recorded these spectra at spectral resolutions ranging from 0.08 to 0.5cm-1 and measured the integrated band intensities for a number of vibrational bands in certain spectral regions. We then compared the integrated band intensities measured at room temperature with values derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) databases. Our results agreed well with the results reported in the two databases with a maximum deviation of about 4%. The peak cross-sections for the primary bands decreased by about 20-54% when the temperature increased from 296 to 460K. Moreover, we determined the integrated band intensities as a function of temperature for certain features in various spectral regions; we found no significant temperature dependence over the range of temperatures considered here. We also studied the effect of temperature on absorption cross-section using a Difference Frequency Generation (DFG) laser system. We compared the DFG results with those obtained from the FTIR study at certain wavenumbers over the 2850-2975cm-1 range and found a reasonable agreement with less than 10% discrepancy. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Lamellar thickness and stretching temperature dependency of cavitation in semicrystalline polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaotao Wang

    Full Text Available Polybutene-1 (PB-1, a typical semicrystalline polymer, in its stable form I shows a peculiar temperature dependent strain-whitening behavior when being stretched at temperatures in between room temperature and melting temperature of the crystallites where the extent of strain-whitening weakens with the increasing of stretching temperature reaching a minima value followed by an increase at higher stretching temperatures. Correspondingly, a stronger strain-hardening phenomenon was observed at higher temperatures. The strain-whitening phenomenon in semicrystalline polymers has its origin of cavitation process during stretching. In this work, the effect of crystalline lamellar thickness and stretching temperature on the cavitation process in PB-1 has been investigated by means of combined synchrotron ultrasmall-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques. Three modes of cavitation during the stretching process can be identified, namely "no cavitation" for the quenched sample with the thinnest lamellae where only shear yielding occurred, "cavitation with reorientation" for the samples stretched at lower temperatures and samples with thicker lamellae, and "cavitation without reorientation" for samples with thinner lamellae stretched at higher temperatures. The mode "cavitation with reorientation" occurs before yield point where the plate-like cavities start to be generated within the lamellar stacks with normal perpendicular to the stretching direction due to the blocky substructure of the crystalline lamellae and reorient gradually to the stretching direction after strain-hardening. The mode of "cavitation without reorientation" appears after yield point where ellipsoidal shaped cavities are generated in those lamellae stacks with normal parallel to the stretching direction followed by an improvement of their orientation at larger strains. X-ray diffraction results reveal a much improved crystalline orientation for samples with thinner lamellae

  14. Lamellar thickness and stretching temperature dependency of cavitation in semicrystalline polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaotao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Fu, Lianlian; Lu, Ying; Men, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    Polybutene-1 (PB-1), a typical semicrystalline polymer, in its stable form I shows a peculiar temperature dependent strain-whitening behavior when being stretched at temperatures in between room temperature and melting temperature of the crystallites where the extent of strain-whitening weakens with the increasing of stretching temperature reaching a minima value followed by an increase at higher stretching temperatures. Correspondingly, a stronger strain-hardening phenomenon was observed at higher temperatures. The strain-whitening phenomenon in semicrystalline polymers has its origin of cavitation process during stretching. In this work, the effect of crystalline lamellar thickness and stretching temperature on the cavitation process in PB-1 has been investigated by means of combined synchrotron ultrasmall-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques. Three modes of cavitation during the stretching process can be identified, namely "no cavitation" for the quenched sample with the thinnest lamellae where only shear yielding occurred, "cavitation with reorientation" for the samples stretched at lower temperatures and samples with thicker lamellae, and "cavitation without reorientation" for samples with thinner lamellae stretched at higher temperatures. The mode "cavitation with reorientation" occurs before yield point where the plate-like cavities start to be generated within the lamellar stacks with normal perpendicular to the stretching direction due to the blocky substructure of the crystalline lamellae and reorient gradually to the stretching direction after strain-hardening. The mode of "cavitation without reorientation" appears after yield point where ellipsoidal shaped cavities are generated in those lamellae stacks with normal parallel to the stretching direction followed by an improvement of their orientation at larger strains. X-ray diffraction results reveal a much improved crystalline orientation for samples with thinner lamellae stretched at higher

  15. Temperature-dependent mid-IR absorption spectra of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingbeil, Adam E.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2007-10-01

    Quantitative mid-IR absorption spectra (2500 3400 cm-1) for 12 pure hydrocarbon compounds are measured at temperatures ranging from 25 to 500 °C using an FTIR spectrometer. The hydrocarbons studied are n-pentane, n-heptane, n-dodecane, 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane (iso-octane), 2-methyl-butane, 2-methyl-pentane, 2,4,4-trimethyl-1-pentene, 2-methyl-2-butene, propene, toluene, m-xylene, and ethylbenzene. Room-temperature measurements of neat hydrocarbon vapor were made with an instrument resolution of both 0.1 and 1 cm-1 (FWHM) to confirm that the high-resolution setting was required only to resolve the propene absorption spectrum while the spectra of the other hydrocarbons could be resolved with 1 cm-1 resolution. High-resolution (0.1 cm-1), room-temperature measurements of neat hydrocarbons were made at low pressure (˜1 Torr, 133 Pa) and compared to measurements of hydrocarbon/N2 mixtures at atmospheric pressure to verify that no pressure broadening could be observed over this pressure range. The temperature was varied between 25 and 500 °C for atmospheric-pressure measurements of hydrocarbon/N2 mixtures (Xhydrocarbon˜0.06 1.5%) and it was found that the absorption cross section shows simple temperature-dependent behavior for a fixed wavelength over this temperature range. Comparisons with previous FTIR data over a limited temperature range and with high-resolution laser absorption data over a wide temperature range show good agreement.

  16. Temperature dependence of the activity of polyphenol peroxidases and polyphenol oxidases in modern and buried soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushev, A. V.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Blagodatskaya, E. V.; Blagodatsky, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Under conditions of the global climate warming, the changes in the reserves of soil humus depend on the temperature sensitivities of polyphenol peroxidases (PPPOs) and polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). They play an important role in lignin decomposition, mineralization, and humus formation. The temperature dependence of the potential enzyme activity in modern and buried soils has been studied during incubation at 10 or 20°C. The experimental results indicate that it depends on the availability of the substrate and the presence of oxygen. The activity of PPOs during incubation in the absence of oxygen for two months decreases by 2-2.5 times, which is balanced by an increase in the activity of PPPOs by 2-3 times. The increase in the incubation temperature to 20°C and the addition of glucose accelerates this transition due to the more abrupt decrease in the activity of PPOs. The preincubation of the soil with glucose doubles the activity of PPPOs but has no significant effect on the activity of PPOs. The different effects of temperature on two groups of the studied oxidases and the possibility of substituting enzymes by those of another type under changing aeration conditions should be taken into consideration in predicting the effect of the climate warming on the mineralization of the soil organic matter. The absence of statistically significant differences in the enzymatic activity between the buried and modern soil horizons indicates the retention by the buried soil of some of its properties (soil memory) and the rapid restoration of high enzymatic activity during the preincubation.

  17. Temperature dependence of protein solubility-determination, application to crystallization, and growth kinetics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1993-01-01

    A scintillation method was developed for determinations of the temperature dependence of the solubility, and of nucleation induction times of proteins, in 50-100 mu(l) volumes of solution. Solubility data for lysozyme and horse serum albumin were obtained for various combinations of pH and precipitant concentrations. These data and the nucleation induction information were used for dynamic crystallization control, that is, for the controlled separation of nucleation and growth stages. Individual lysozyme and horse serum albumin crystals were grown in 15-20 mu(l) solution volumes contained in x-ray capillaries. The morphology and kinetics of the growth and dissolution of lysozyme in aqueous solutions with 2.5 percent NaCl and at pH = 4.5 was studied in situ with a depth resolution of 300 A (4 unit cells) by high resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing. The bulk super- or under saturation, sigma, of the solution inside a closed growth cell was controlled by temperature. The growth habit was bound by (110) and (101) faces that grew through layer spreading, although with different growth rate dependencies on supersaturation/temperature. At sigma less than 10 (obtained at higher temperatures) growth was purely kinetic ally controlled, with impurity effects (macrostep formation and kinetic hindrance) becoming significant for sigma less than 2. At sigma greater than 10 (lower temperatures), anisotropies in the interfacial kinetics were more pronounced, with interfacial kinetics and bulk transport becoming equally important to the growth morphology. Growth rates were growth history dependent. The formation of striations (layers of irregularly incorporated solution) was unambiguously correlated with growth temperature variations. Etching exposed dislocations and various high-index faces whose growth morphologies were studied during return to the steady state growth form. Growth steps were observed to originate from two-dimensional nuclei or from outcrops

  18. Segregating variation for temperature-dependent sex determination in a lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhen, T; Schroeder, A; Sakata, J T; Huang, V; Crews, D

    2011-04-01

    Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) was first reported in 1966 in an African lizard. It has since been shown that TSD occurs in some fish, several lizards, tuataras, numerous turtles and all crocodilians. Extreme temperatures can also cause sex reversal in several amphibians and lizards with genotypic sex determination. Research in TSD species indicates that estrogen signaling is important for ovary development and that orthologs of mammalian genes have a function in gonad differentiation. Nevertheless, the mechanism that actually transduces temperature into a biological signal for ovary versus testis development is not known in any species. Classical genetics could be used to identify the loci underlying TSD, but only if there is segregating variation for TSD. Here, we use the 'animal model' to analyze inheritance of sexual phenotype in a 13-generation pedigree of captive leopard geckos, Eublepharis macularius, a TSD reptile. We directly show genetic variance and genotype-by-temperature interactions for sex determination. Additive genetic variation was significant at a temperature that produces a female-biased sex ratio (30°C), but not at a temperature that produces a male-biased sex ratio (32.5°C). Conversely, dominance variance was significant at the male-biased temperature (32.5°C), but not at the female-biased temperature (30°C). Non-genetic maternal effects on sex determination were negligible in comparison with additive genetic variance, dominance variance and the primary effect of temperature. These data show for the first time that there is segregating variation for TSD in a reptile and consequently that a quantitative trait locus analysis would be practicable for identifying the genes underlying TSD.

  19. Temperature dependence measurements and structural characterization of trimethyl ammonium ionic liquids with a highly polar solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru; Hofman, T

    2011-08-25

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of an ammonium ionic liquids (ILs) containing acetate, dihydrogen phosphate, and hydrogen sulfate anions with a common cation. To characterize the thermophysical properties of these newly synthesized ILs with the highly polar solvent N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), precise measurements such as densities (ρ) and ultrasonic sound velocities (u) over the whole composition range have been performed at atmospheric pressure and over wide temperature ranges (25-50 °C). The excess molar volume (V(E)) and the deviation in isentropic compressibilities (Δκ(s)) were predicted using these temperature dependence properties as a function of the concentration of ILs. The Redlich-Kister polynomial was used to correlate the results. The ILs investigated in the present study included trimethylammonium acetate [(CH(3))(3)NH][CH(3)COO] (TMAA), trimethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate [(CH(3))(3)NH][H(2)PO(4)] (TMAP), and trimethylammonium hydrogen sulfate [(CH(3))(3)NH][HSO(4)] (TMAS). The intermolecular interactions and structural effects were analyzed on the basis of the measured and the derived properties. In addition, the hydrogen bonding between ILs and DMF has been demonstrated using semiempirical calculations with help of Hyperchem 7. A qualitative analysis of the results is discussed in terms of the ion-dipole, ion-pair interactions, and hydrogen bonding between ILs and DMF molecules and their structural factors. The influence of the anion of the protic IL, namely, acetate (CH(3)COO), dihydrogen phosphate (H(2)PO(4)), and hydrogen sulfate (HSO(4)), on the thermophysical properties is also provided. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Age Spreads and the Temperature Dependence of Age Estimates in Upper Sco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Qiliang; Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yiheyuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, 100871 Beijing (China); Rizzuto, Aaron [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    Past estimates for the age of the Upper Sco Association are typically 11–13 Myr for intermediate-mass stars and 4–5 Myr for low-mass stars. In this study, we simulate populations of young stars to investigate whether this apparent dependence of estimated age on spectral type may be explained by the star formation history of the association. Solar and intermediate mass stars begin their pre-main sequence evolution on the Hayashi track, with fully convective interiors and cool photospheres. Intermediate-mass stars quickly heat up and transition onto the radiative Henyey track. As a consequence, for clusters in which star formation occurs on a timescale similar to that of the transition from a convective to a radiative interior, discrepancies in ages will arise when ages are calculated as a function of temperature instead of mass. Simple simulations of a cluster with constant star formation over several Myr may explain about half of the difference in inferred ages versus photospheric temperature; speculative constructions that consist of a constant star formation followed by a large supernova-driven burst could fully explain the differences, including those between F and G stars where evolutionary tracks may be more accurate. The age spreads of low-mass stars predicted from these prescriptions for star formation are consistent with the observed luminosity spread of Upper Sco. The conclusion that a lengthy star formation history will yield a temperature dependence in ages is expected from the basic physics of pre-main sequence evolution, and is qualitatively robust to the large uncertainties in pre-main sequence evolutionary models.