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Sample records for strongly reducing conditions

  1. Reducing Weak to Strong Bisimilarity in CCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Aristizábal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent constraint programming (ccp is a well-established model for concurrency that singles out the fundamental aspects of asynchronous systems whose agents (or processes evolve by posting and querying (partial information in a global medium. Bisimilarity is a standard behavioural equivalence in concurrency theory. However, only recently a well-behaved notion of bisimilarity for ccp, and a ccp partition refinement algorithm for deciding the strong version of this equivalence have been proposed. Weak bisimiliarity is a central behavioural equivalence in process calculi and it is obtained from the strong case by taking into account only the actions that are observable in the system. Typically, the standard partition refinement can also be used for deciding weak bisimilarity simply by using Milner's reduction from weak to strong bisimilarity; a technique referred to as saturation. In this paper we demonstrate that, because of its involved labeled transitions, the above-mentioned saturation technique does not work for ccp. We give an alternative reduction from weak ccp bisimilarity to the strong one that allows us to use the ccp partition refinement algorithm for deciding this equivalence.

  2. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of rapid development in Drosophila melanogaster. M. Rajamani N. Raghavendra ... Keywords. life-history evolution; development time; larval feeding rate; competition; tradeoffs; Drosophila melanogaster.

  3. Strong Consistency of Reduced K-means Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Reduced k-means clustering is a method for clustering objects in a low-dimensional subspace. The advantage of this method is that both clustering of objects and low-dimensional subspace reflecting the cluster structure are simultaneously obtained. In this paper, the relationship between conventional k-means clustering and reduced k-means clustering is discussed. Conditions ensuring almost sure convergence of the estimator of reduced k-means clustering as unboundedly increasing sample size hav...

  4. Strong Duality and Optimality Conditions for Generalized Equilibrium Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a generalized equilibrium problem involving DC functions. By using the properties of the epigraph of the conjugate functions, some sufficient and/or necessary conditions for the weak and strong duality results and optimality conditions for generalized equilibrium problems are provided.

  5. A proof of fulfillment of the strong bootstrap condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadin, V.S.; Papa, A.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the kernel of the BFKL equation for the octet color state of two Reggeized gluons satisfies the strong bootstrap condition in the next-to-leading order. This condition is much more restrictive than the one obtained from the requirement of the Reggeized form for the elastic scattering amplitudes in the next-to-leading approximation. It is necessary, however, for self-consistency of the assumption of the Reggeized form of the production amplitudes in multi-Regge kinematics, which are used in the derivation of the BFKL equation. The fulfillment of the strong bootstrap condition for the kernel opens the way to a rigorous proof of the BFKL equation in the next-to-leading approximation. (author)

  6. Sensitivity analysis of uranium solubility under strongly oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions in the repository on the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions, a mathematical model has been developed to determine the solubility, by utilizing a set of nonlinear algebraic equations to describe the chemical equilibria in the groundwater environment. The model takes into account the predominant precipitation-dissolution reactions, hydrolysis reactions and complexation reactions that may occur under strongly oxidizing conditions. The model also includes the solubility-limiting solids induced by the presence of carbonate, phosphate, silicate, calcium, and sodium in the groundwater. The thermodynamic equilibrium constants used in the solubility calculations are essentially taken from the NEA Thermochemical Data Base of Uranium, with some modification and some uranium minerals added, such as soddyite, rutherfordite, uranophane, uranyl orthophosphate, and becquerelite. By applying this model, the sensitivities of uranium solubility to variations in the concentrations of various groundwater component species are systematically investigated. The results show that the total analytical concentrations of carbonate, phosphate, silicate, and calcium in deep groundwater play the most important role in determining the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions

  7. Prejudice and Racism, Year 2008--Still Going Strong: Research on Reducing Prejudice with Recommended Methodological Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsey, Shawn O.; Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Porter, Jerlym S.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the origins, mechanisms, and expressions of prejudice. A selective review of research finds strong support for the validity of G. W. Allport's (1954) contact hypothesis conditions in reducing prejudice. Methodological advances in the study of prejudice are reviewed, and implications of research findings for counselors are…

  8. Do conditional benefits reduce equilibrium unemployment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, F.

    2006-01-01

    Although unconditional unemployment benefits destroy jobs in competitive and noncompetitive labor markets, conditional benefits can spur job growth in noncompetitive labor markets. Unconditional benefits reduce the penalty of shirking and misconduct, while conditional benefits increase this penalty.

  9. Strongly-Interacting Fermi Gases in Reduced Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    superconductivity), nuclear physics (nuclear matter), high - energy physics (effective theories of the strong interactions ), astrophysics (compact stellar objects...strongly- interacting Fermi gases confined in a standing- wave CO2 laser trap. This trap produces a periodic quasi-two-dimensional pancake geometry...predictions of the phase diagram and high temperature superfluidity. Our recent measurements reveal that pairing energy and cloud profiles can be

  10. Operation Design of Wind Turbines in Strong Wind Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Montes, Melissa Barroso; Odgaard, Peter Fogh

    2012-01-01

    optimally. In order to reduce the possible increased loading, fatigue due to the wind gusts, control strategies have been considered for both constant sped and variable speed pitch regulated wind turbines. The control study shows that the designed controllers can reduce the standard deviations efficiently...

  11. Distinguishing iron-reducing from sulfate-reducing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Thomas, M.A.; McMahon, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground water systems dominated by iron- or sulfate-reducing conditions may be distinguished by observing concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe2+) and sulfide (sum of H2S, HS-, and S= species and denoted here as "H2S"). This approach is based on the observation that concentrations of Fe2+ and H2S in ground water systems tend to be inversely related according to a hyperbolic function. That is, when Fe2+ concentrations are high, H2S concentrations tend to be low and vice versa. This relation partly reflects the rapid reaction kinetics of Fe2+ with H2S to produce relatively insoluble ferrous sulfides (FeS). This relation also reflects competition for organic substrates between the iron- and the sulfate-reducing microorganisms that catalyze the production of Fe2+ and H 2S. These solubility and microbial constraints operate in tandem, resulting in the observed hyperbolic relation between Fe2+ and H 2S concentrations. Concentrations of redox indicators, including dissolved hydrogen (H2) measured in a shallow aquifer in Hanahan, South Carolina, suggest that if the Fe2+/H2S mass ratio (units of mg/L) exceeded 10, the screened interval being tapped was consistently iron reducing (H2 ???0.2 to 0.8 nM). Conversely, if the Fe 2+/H2S ratio was less than 0.30, consistent sulfate-reducing (H2 ???1 to 5 nM) conditions were observed over time. Concomitantly high Fe2+ and H2S concentrations were associated with H2 concentrations that varied between 0.2 and 5.0 nM over time, suggesting mixing of water from adjacent iron- and sulfate-reducing zones or concomitant iron and sulfate reduction under nonelectron donor-limited conditions. These observations suggest that Fe2+/H2S mass ratios may provide useful information concerning the occurrence and distribution of iron and sulfate reduction in ground water systems. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  12. Operating wind turbines in strong wind conditions by using feedforward-feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Ju; Sheng, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of wind energy into power systems, it becomes critical to reduce the impact of wind energy on the stability and reliability of the overall power system. In precedent works, Shen and his co-workers developed a re-designed operation schema to run wind turbines in strong wind conditions based on optimization method and standard PI feedback control, which can prevent the typical shutdowns of wind turbines when reaching the cut-out wind speed. In this paper, a new control strategy combing the standard PI feedback control with feedforward controls using the optimization results is investigated for the operation of variable-speed pitch-regulated wind turbines in strong wind conditions. It is shown that the developed control strategy is capable of smoothening the power output of wind turbine and avoiding its sudden showdown at high wind speeds without worsening the loads on rotor and blades

  13. Reoxidation of Bioreduced Uranium Under Reducing Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Brodie, Eoin; Wang, Zheming; Zheng, Zuoping; Herman, Don; Hazen, Terry C.; Firestone, Mary K.; Sutton, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium mining and processing for nuclear weapons and fuel have left thousands of sites with toxic levels of this actinide in soil and ground water. An emerging strategy for remediating such environments involves using organic carbon to promote microbially-mediated reduction and precipitation of insoluble U(IV) minerals. Although previous U bioreduction studies have shown promising results, they were of short duration (up to a few months). Our longer-term (20 months) laboratory study using historically contaminated sediment has alarmingly shown that microbial reduction of U was transient even under reducing (methanogenic) conditions. Uranium was reductively immobilized during the first 100 days, but later (150 to 600 days) reoxidized and mobilized, although a microbial community capable of reducing U(VI) remained through the end of the experiment. The formation of Ca2UO2(CO3)3 complexes (caused by the elevated carbonate concentration from microbial respiration and presence of calcium) drove the U(IV)/U(VI) reduction potential to much more reducing conditions. Fe(III) and Mn(IV) were found to be likely terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for U reoxidation. Thus, U remediation by organic carbon based reductive precipitation is not sustainable in calcareous, neutral to alkaline soils and ground waters

  14. Erectile dysfunction among men with diabetes is strongly associated with premature ejaculation and reduced libido.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavige, Lasantha S; Jayaratne, Shanthilal D; Kathriarachchi, Samudra T; Sivayogan, Sivagurunathan; Fernando, Devaka J; Levy, Jonathan C

    2008-09-01

    = 3.3, CI = 1.2-8.8). ED was strongly associated with PE and reduced libido. Diabetic patients presenting with one of these three conditions should be screened for the other two.

  15. A strong conditional mutualism limits and enhances seed dispersal and germination of a tropical palm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, R.; Rejmanek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Seed predation and seed dispersal can have strong effects on early life history stages of plants. These processes have often been studied as individual effects, but the degree to which their relative importance co-varies with seed predator abundance and how this influences seed germination rates is poorly understood. Therefore, we used a combination of observations and field experiments to determine the degree to which germination rates of the palm Astrocaryum mexicanum varied with abundance of a small mammal seed predator/disperser, Heteromysdesmarestianus, in a lowland tropical forest. Patterns of abundance of the two species were strongly related; density of H. desmarestianus was low in sites with low density of A. mexicanum and vice versa. Rates of predation and dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds depended on abundance of H. desmarestianus; sites with high densities of H. desmarestianus had the highest rates of seed predation and lowest rates of seed germination, but a greater total number of seeds were dispersed and there was greater density of seedlings, saplings, and adults of A. mexicanum in these sites. When abundance of H. desmarestianus was experimentally reduced, rates of seed predation decreased, but so did dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds. Critically, rates of germination of dispersed seeds were 5 times greater than undispersed seeds. The results suggest that the relationship between A. mexicanum and H. desmarestianus is a conditional mutualism that results in a strong local effect on the abundance of each species. However, the magnitude and direction of these effects are determined by the relative strength of opposing, but related, mechanisms. A. mexicanum nuts provide H. desmarestianus with a critical food resource, and while seed predation on A. mexicanum nuts by H. desmarestianus is very intense, A. mexicanum ultimately benefits because of the relatively high germination rates of its seeds that are dispersed by H. desmarestianus. ?? The Author(s) 2010.

  16. Benzene oxidation under sulfate-reducing conditions in columns simulating in situ conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Gödeke, Stefan; Treutler, Hanns-Christian; Weiss, Holger; Schirmer, Mario; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2007-10-01

    The oxidation of benzene under sulfate-reducing conditions was examined in column and batch experiments under close to in situ conditions. Mass balances and degradation rates for benzene oxidation were determined in four sand and four lava granules filled columns percolated with groundwater from an anoxic benzene-contaminated aquifer. The stoichiometry of oxidized benzene, produced hydrogen carbonate and reduced sulfate correlated well with the theoretical equation for mineralization of benzene with sulfate as electron acceptor. Mean retention times of water in four columns were determined using radon ((222)Rn) as tracer. The retention times were used to calculate average benzene oxidation rates of 8-36 microM benzene day(-1). Benzene-degrading, sulfide-producing microcosms were successfully established from sand material of all sand filled columns, strongly indicating that the columns were colonized by anoxic benzene-degrading microorganisms. In general, these data indicate a high potential for Natural Attenuation of benzene under sulfate-reducing conditions at the field site Zeitz. In spite of this existing potential to degrade benzene with sulfate as electron acceptor, the benzene plume at the field site is much longer than expected if benzene would be degraded at the rates observed in the column experiment, indicating that benzene oxidation under sulfate-reducing conditions is limited in situ.

  17. Exceptionally strong sorption of infochemicals to activated carbon reduces their bioavailability to fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Michiel T O; van Mourik, Louise

    2014-01-01

    The addition of activated carbon (AC) to sediments is a relatively new approach to remediate contaminated sites. Activated carbon strongly sorbs hydrophobic organic contaminants, thereby reducing their bioavailability and uptake in organisms. Because of its high sorption capacity, AC might, however,

  18. Technetium Sorption by Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Estes, Shanna L. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Powell, Brian A. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    2012-09-28

    The objective of this study was to measure technetium ({sup 99}Tc) sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. {sup 99}Tc(VII) batch sorption experiments were conducted for 319 days in an inert glovebag with a variety of cementitious materials (aged cement, Vault 2, TR545, and TR547) containing varying amounts of blast furnace slag. Between 154 and 319 days, the {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations tended to remain constant and samples amended with different initial {sup 99}Tc concentrations, tended to merge at about 10{sup -9} M for Vault 2 (17% slag) and TR545 (90% slag) and 10{sup -8} M for TR547 (45% slag). This data provided strong evidence that solubility, and not adsorption (K{sub d} values), was controlling aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations. Laboratory data superimposed over thermodynamic speciation diagrams further supported the conclusion that solubility, and not adsorption controlled {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations. The oxidation state of the aqueous {sup 99}Tc at the end of the sorption experiment was determined by solvent extraction to be almost entirely {sup 99}Tc(VII). The pH of the present system was ~11.8. Previously proposed solubility controlling phases including Tc-sulfides may be present, but do not appear to control solubility. After the 319 day sorption period, the suspensions were removed from the glovebag and a desorption step under oxic conditions was conducted for 20 days by adding oxic, pH-buffered solutions to the suspensions. {sup 99}Tc aqueous concentrations increased by more than an order of magnitude and Eh increased by several hundred millivolts within 24 hours after the introduction of the oxic solutions. These desorption results are consistent with re-oxidation and dissolution/desorption of {sup 99}Tc(IV) phases possibly present in the cementitious materials after the anoxic sorption step of the experiment. Aqueous {sup 99}Tc concentrations continued to increase

  19. Transitional dispersive scenarios driven by mesoscale flows on complex terrain under strong dry convective conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Palau

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available By experimentation and modelling, this paper analyses the atmospheric dispersion of the SO2 emissions from a power plant on complex terrain under strong convective conditions, describing the main dispersion features as an ensemble of "stationary dispersive scenarios" and reformulating some "classical" dispersive concepts to deal with the systematically monitored summer dispersive scenarios in inland Spain. The results and discussions presented arise from a statistically representative study of the physical processes associated with the multimodal distribution of pollutants aloft and around a 343-m-tall chimney under strong dry convective conditions in the Iberian Peninsula. This paper analyses the importance of the identification and physical implications of transitional periods for air quality applications. The indetermination of a transversal plume to the preferred transport direction during these transitional periods implies a small (or null physical significance of the classical definition of horizontal standard deviation of the concentration distribution.

  20. Research on Condition Assessment Method of Transmission Tower Under the Action of Strong Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ren-mou; An, Li-qiang; Zhang, Rong-lun; Wu, Jiong; Liang, Ya-feng

    2018-03-01

    Transmission towers are often subjected to the external damage of severe weather like strong wind and so on, which may cause the collapse due to the yield and fracture of the tower material. Aiming this issue, an assessment method was proposed in this paper to assess the operation condition of transmission towers under strong wind. With a reasonable assess index system established firstly, then the internal force of the tower material was solved and its stability was determined through the mechanical analysis of the transmission tower finite element model. Meanwhile, the condition risk level of the tower was finally determined by considering the difference among the influences of other factors like corrosion and loose of members, slope on the transmission tower through the analytic hierarchy process. The assessment method was applied to assess the wind-induced collapse of towers in 110kV Bao Yi II line in Wenchang City, Hainan Province, of which the result proves the method can assess the condition of transmission tower under strong wind and of guiding significance for improving the windproof capability of transmission towers.

  1. Sufficient optimality conditions and duality for nonsmooth multiobjective optimization problems via higher order strong convexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyay Balendu B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we define some new generalizations of strongly convex functions of order m for locally Lipschitz functions using Clarke subdifferential. Suitable examples illustrating the non emptiness of the newly defined classes of functions and their relationships with classical notions of pseudoconvexity and quasiconvexity are provided. These generalizations are then employed to establish sufficient optimality conditions for a nonsmooth multiobjective optimization problem involving support functions of compact convex sets. Furthermore, we formulate a mixed type dual model for the primal problem and establish weak and strong duality theorems using the notion of strict efficiency of order m. The results presented in this paper extend and unify several known results from the literature to a more general class of functions as well as optimization problems.

  2. Renormalization-Group Transformations Under Strong Mixing Conditions: Gibbsianness and Convergence of Renormalized Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Lorenzo; Cirillo, Emilio N. M.; Olivieri, Enzo

    1999-12-01

    In this paper we study a renormalization-group map: the block averaging transformation applied to Gibbs measures relative to a class of finite-range lattice gases, when suitable strong mixing conditions are satisfied. Using a block decimation procedure, cluster expansion, and detailed comparison between statistical ensembles, we are able to prove Gibbsianness and convergence to a trivial (i.e., Gaussian and product) fixed point. Our results apply to the 2D standard Ising model at any temperature above the critical one and arbitrary magnetic field.

  3. Hall effect in a strong magnetic field: Direct comparisons of compressible magnetohydrodynamics and the reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Gomez, D. O.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we numerically test a model of Hall magnetohydrodynamics in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field: the reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic model (RHMHD) derived by [Gomez et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 102303 (2008)] with the addition of weak compressible effects. The main advantage of this model lies in the reduction of computational cost. Nevertheless, up until now the degree of agreement with the original Hall MHD system and the range of validity in a regime of turbulence were not established. In this work direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional Hall MHD turbulence in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field are compared with simulations of the weak compressible RHMHD model. The results show that the degree of agreement is very high (when the different assumptions of RHMHD, such as spectral anisotropy, are satisfied). Nevertheless, when the initial conditions are isotropic but the mean magnetic field is maintained strong, the results differ at the beginning but asymptotically reach a good agreement at relatively short times. We also found evidence that the compressibility still plays a role in the dynamics of these systems, and the weak compressible RHMHD model is able to capture these effects. In conclusion the weak compressible RHMHD model is a valid approximation of the Hall MHD turbulence in the relevant physical context.

  4. Scaling of the velocity profile in strongly drag reduced turbulent flows over an oscillating wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skote, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Scaling analysis is used to derive a log-law for drag reduced flow. • The slope of the log layer is directly linked to the drag reduction. • The result is only valid for wall manipulated flows – not fluid altering methods. • Extensive comparison with data found in the literature is made. - Abstract: Scaling analysis of the velocity profiles in strongly drag reduced flows reveals that the slope of the logarithmic part depends on the amount of drag reduction (DR). Unlike DR due to polymeric fluids, the slope changes gradually and can be predicted by the analysis. Furthermore, the intercept of the profiles is found to vary linearly with the DR. Two velocity scales are utilized: the reference (undisturbed) and the actual friction velocity. The theory is based on the assumption that the near-wall linear region is only governed by the actual friction velocity, while the outer part is governed by the reference friction velocity. As a result, logarithmic part is influenced by both velocity scales and the slope of the velocity profile is directly linked to the DR. The theoretically obtained results are verified by data from six previously performed direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of boundary layers over spatial and temporal wall oscillations, with a wide range of resulting DR. The theory is further supported by data from numerous investigations (DNSs as well as experiments) of wall-bounded flows forced by various forms of oscillating wall-motion. The assumption that the outer part is unaffected by the actual friction velocity limits the validity of the proposed log-law to flows not fully adapted to the imposed wall forcing, hence the theory provides a measure of the level of adjustment. In addition, a fundamental difference in the applicability of the theory to spatially developing boundary flow and infinite channel flow is discussed

  5. A boundary condition to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation for modeling strongly focused nonlinear ultrasound fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosnitskiy, P., E-mail: pavrosni@yandex.ru; Yuldashev, P., E-mail: petr@acs366.phys.msu.ru; Khokhlova, V., E-mail: vera@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    An equivalent source model was proposed as a boundary condition to the nonlinear parabolic Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya (KZ) equation to simulate high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields generated by medical ultrasound transducers with the shape of a spherical shell. The boundary condition was set in the initial plane; the aperture, the focal distance, and the initial pressure of the source were chosen based on the best match of the axial pressure amplitude and phase distributions in the Rayleigh integral analytic solution for a spherical transducer and the linear parabolic approximation solution for the equivalent source. Analytic expressions for the equivalent source parameters were derived. It was shown that the proposed approach allowed us to transfer the boundary condition from the spherical surface to the plane and to achieve a very good match between the linear field solutions of the parabolic and full diffraction models even for highly focused sources with F-number less than unity. The proposed method can be further used to expand the capabilities of the KZ nonlinear parabolic equation for efficient modeling of HIFU fields generated by strongly focused sources.

  6. Transformations of griseofulvin in strong acidic conditions--crystal structures of 2'-demethylgriseofulvin and dimerized griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewska, Barbara; Jebors, Said; Coleman, Anthony W; Suwińska, Kinga

    2012-03-01

    The structure of griseofulvic acid, C16H15ClO6, at 100 K has orthorhombic (P2(1)2(1)2) symmetry. It is of interest with respect to biological activity. The structure displays intermolecular O-H...O, C-H...O hydrogen bonding as well as week C-H...pi and pi...pi interactions. In strong acidic conditions the griseofulvin undergoes dimerization. The structure of dimerized griseofulvin, C34H32C12O12 x C2H6O x H2O, at 100 K has monoclinic (P2(1)) symmetry. The molecule crystallized as a solvate with one ethanol and one water molecule. The dimeric molecules form intermolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds to solvents molecules only but they interact via week C-H...O, C-H...pi, C-Cl...pi and pi...pi interactions with other dimerized molecules.

  7. Strong induction of AIM2 expression in human epidermis in acute and chronic inflammatory skin conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Heleen D; Bergboer, Judith G M; van den Bogaard, Ellen H; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M J J; Rodijk-Olthuis, Diana; Simon, Anna; Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2012-12-01

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is a double-stranded DNA receptor, and its activation initiates an interleukin-1 beta processing inflammasome. AIM2 is implicated in host defense against several pathogens, but could hypothetically also contribute to autoinflammatory or autoimmune diseases, such as is the case for NLRP3. Using thoroughly characterised antibodies, we analysed AIM2 expression in human tissues and primary cells. A strong epidermal upregulation of AIM2 protein expression was observed in several acute and chronic inflammatory skin disorders, such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, venous ulcera, contact dermatitis, and experimental wounds. We also found AIM2 induction by interferon-gamma in submerged and three-dimensional in vitro models of human epidermis. Our data highlight the dynamics of epidermal AIM2 expression, showing Langerhans cell and melanocyte-restricted expression in normal epidermis but a pronounced induction in subpopulations of epidermal keratinocytes under inflammatory conditions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. A Boundary Condition Relaxation Algorithm for Strongly Coupled, Ablating Flows Including Shape Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2011-01-01

    Implementations of a model for equilibrium, steady-state ablation boundary conditions are tested for the purpose of providing strong coupling with a hypersonic flow solver. The objective is to remove correction factors or film cooling approximations that are usually applied in coupled implementations of the flow solver and the ablation response. Three test cases are considered - the IRV-2, the Galileo probe, and a notional slender, blunted cone launched at 10 km/s from the Earth's surface. A successive substitution is employed and the order of succession is varied as a function of surface temperature to obtain converged solutions. The implementation is tested on a specified trajectory for the IRV-2 to compute shape change under the approximation of steady-state ablation. Issues associated with stability of the shape change algorithm caused by explicit time step limits are also discussed.

  9. Reducing automatically activated racial prejudice through implicit evaluative conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael A; Fazio, Russell H

    2006-04-01

    The authors report a set of experiments that use an implicit evaluative conditioning procedure to reduce automatically activated racial prejudice in White participants in a short period and with relatively few trials. Experiment 1 demonstrated that participants were unaware of the repeated conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US) pairings of Black-good and White-bad. In Experiment 2, the procedure was found to be effective in reducing prejudice as indicated by an evaluative priming measure of automatically activated racial attitudes. In Experiment 3, this reduction in prejudice was found to persist throughout a 2-day separation between the conditioning procedure and the administration of the dependent measure. The implications of the present findings for the persistence of automatically activated racial prejudice are discussed.

  10. Photoprotection, photosynthesis and growth of tropical tree seedlings under near-ambient and strongly reduced solar ultraviolet-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, G Heinrich; Jahns, Peter; Virgo, Aurelio; García, Milton; Aranda, Jorge; Wellmann, Eckard; Winter, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    Seedlings of two late-successional tropical rainforest tree species, Tetragastris panamensis (Engler) O. Kuntze and Calophyllum longifolium (Willd.), were field grown for 3-4 months at an open site near Panama City (9 degrees N), Panama, under plastic films that either transmitted or excluded most solar UV-B radiation. Experiments were designed to test whether leaves developing under bright sunlight with strongly reduced UV-B are capable of acclimating to near-ambient UV-B conditions. Leaves of T. panamensis that developed under near-ambient UV-B contained higher amounts of UV-absorbing substances than leaves of seedlings grown under reduced UV-B. Photosynthetic pigment composition, content of alpha-tocopherol, CO(2) assimilation, potential photosystem II (PSII) efficiency (evaluated by F(v)/F(m) ratios) and growth of T. panamensis and C. longifolium did not differ between seedlings developed under near-ambient and reduced solar UV-B. When seedlings were transferred from the reduced UV-B treatment to the near-ambient UV-B treatment, a pronounced inhibition of photosynthetic capacity was observed initially in both species. UV-B-mediated inhibition of photosynthetic capacity nearly fully recovered within 1 week of the transfer in C. longifolium, whereas in T. panamensis an about 35% reduced capacity of CO(2) uptake was maintained. A marked increase in UV-absorbing substances was observed in foliage of transferred T. panamensis seedlings. Both species exhibited enhanced mid-day photoinhibition of PSII immediately after being transferred from the reduced UV-B to the near-ambient UV-B treatment. This effect was fully reversible within 1d in T. panamensis and within a few days in C. longifolium. The data show that leaves of these tropical tree seedlings, when developing in full-spectrum sunlight, are effectively protected against high solar UV-B radiation. In contrast, leaves developing under conditions of low UV-B lacked sufficient UV protection. They experienced a

  11. TECHNETIUM SORPTION BY CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS UNDER REDUCING CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Estes, S.; Arai, Y.; Powell, B.

    2012-01-31

    The objective of this study was to measure Tc sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. Earlier studies were conducted and the experimental conditions were found not to simulate those of the facility. Through a five month subcontract with Clemson University, sorption of {sup 99}Tc to four cementitious materials was examined within an anaerobic glovebag targeting a 0.1% H2(g)/ 99.9% N{sub 2}(g) atmosphere. Early experiments based on Tc sorption and Eh indicated that 0.1% H{sub 2}(g) (a reductant) was necessary to preclude experimental impacts from O{sub 2}(g) diffusion into the glovebag. Preliminary data to date (up to 56 days) indicates that sorption of {sup 99}Tc to cementitious materials increased with increasing slag content for simulated saltstone samples. This is consistent with the conceptual model that redox active sulfide groups within the reducing slag facilitate reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). These experiments differ from previous experiments where a 2% H{sub 2}(g) atmosphere was maintained (Kaplan et al., 2011 (SRNL-STI-2010-00668)). The impact of the 2% H{sub 2}(g) reducing atmosphere on this data was examined and determined to cause the reduction of Tc in experimental samples without slag. In the present ongoing study, after 56 days, Tc sorption by the 50-year old cement samples (no slag) was undetectable, whereas Tc sorption in the cementitious materials containing slag continues to increase with contact time (measured after 1, 4, 8, 19 and 56 days). Sorption was not consistent with spike concentrations and steady state has not been demonstrated after 56 days. The average conditional K{sub d} value for the Vault 2 cementitious material was 6,362 mL/g (17% slag), for the TR547 Saltstone (45% slag) the conditional K{sub d} was 1258 mL/g, and for TR545 (90% slag) the conditional K{sub d} was 12,112 mL/g. It is anticipated that additional samples will be collected until steady state

  12. Numerical simulation of wave-current interaction under strong wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Marco; Osuna, Pedro; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier

    2017-04-01

    Although ocean surface waves are known to play an important role in the momentum and other scalar transfer between the atmosphere and the ocean, most operational numerical models do not explicitly include the terms of wave-current interaction. In this work, a numerical analysis about the relative importance of the processes associated with the wave-current interaction under strong off-shore wind conditions in Gulf of Tehuantepec (the southern Mexican Pacific) was carried out. The numerical system includes the spectral wave model WAM and the 3D hydrodynamic model POLCOMS, with the vertical turbulent mixing parametrized by the kappa-epsilon closure model. The coupling methodology is based on the vortex-force formalism. The hydrodynamic model was forced at the open boundaries using the HYCOM database and the wave model was forced at the open boundaries by remote waves from the southern Pacific. The atmospheric forcing for both models was provided by a local implementation of the WRF model, forced at the open boundaries using the CFSR database. The preliminary analysis of the model results indicates an effect of currents on the propagation of the swell throughout the study area. The Stokes-Coriolis term have an impact on the transient Ekman transport by modifying the Ekman spiral, while the Stokes drift has an effect on the momentum advection and the production of TKE, where the later induces a deepening of the mixing layer. This study is carried out in the framework of the project CONACYT CB-2015-01 255377 and RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793).

  13. Strong sexual selection in males against a mutation load that reduces offspring production in seed beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshop, K; Stångberg, J; Martinossi-Allibert, I; Arnqvist, G; Berger, D

    2016-06-01

    Theory predicts that sexual reproduction can increase population viability relative to asexual reproduction by allowing sexual selection in males to remove deleterious mutations from the population without large demographic costs. This requires that selection acts more strongly in males than females and that mutations affecting male reproductive success have pleiotropic effects on population productivity, but empirical support for these assumptions is mixed. We used the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus to implement a three-generation breeding design where we induced mutations via ionizing radiation (IR) in the F0 generation and measured mutational effects (relative to nonirradiated controls) on an estimate of population productivity in the F1 and effects on sex-specific competitive lifetime reproductive success (LRS) in the F2 . Regardless of whether mutations were induced via F0 males or females, they had strong negative effects on male LRS, but a nonsignificant influence on female LRS, suggesting that selection is more efficient in removing deleterious alleles in males. Moreover, mutations had seemingly shared effects on population productivity and competitive LRS in both sexes. Thus, our results lend support to the hypothesis that strong sexual selection on males can act to remove the mutation load on population viability, thereby offering a benefit to sexual reproduction. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Technetium Sorption By Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Estes, Shanna L. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Arai, Yuji [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences; Powell, Brian A. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences

    2013-07-18

    The objective of this study was to measure Tc sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. Earlier studies were conducted and the experimental conditions were found not to simulate those of the facility. Through a five month subcontract with Clemson University, sorption of {sup 99}Tc to four cementitious materials was examined within an anaerobic glovebag targeting a 0.1% H{sub 2}(g)/ 99.9% N{sub 2}(g) atmosphere. Early experiments based on Tc sorption and Eh indicated that 0.1% H{sub 2}(g) (a reductant) was necessary to preclude experimental impacts from O{sub 2}(g) diffusion into the glovebag. Preliminary data to date (up to 56 days) indicates that sorption of {sup 99}Tc to cementitious materials increased with increasing slag content for simulated saltstone samples. This is consistent with the conceptual model that redox active sulfide groups within the reducing slag facilitate reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). These experiments differ from previous experiments where a 2% H{sub 2}(g) atmosphere was maintained (Kaplan et al., 2011 (SRNL-STI-2010-00668)). The impact of the 2% H{sub 2}(g) reducing atmosphere on this data was examined and determined to cause the reduction of Tc in experimental samples without slag. In the present ongoing study, after 56 days, Tc sorption by the 50-year old cement samples (no slag) was undetectable, whereas Tc sorption in the cementitious materials containing slag continues to increase with contact time (measured after 1, 4, 8, 19 and 56 days). Sorption was not consistent with spike concentrations and steady state has not been demonstrated after 56 days. The average conditional K{sub d} value for the Vault 2 cementitious material was 873 mL/g (17% slag), for the TR547 Saltstone (45% slag) the conditional K{sub d} was 168 mL/g, and for TR545 (90% slag) the conditional K{sub d} was 1,619 mL/g. It is anticipated that additional samples will be collected until steady state

  15. Regular exercise is strongly associated with anticipated success for reducing health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Regular exercise is a healthy behavior associated with desirable benefits. Regular exercise also makes manifest 2 fundamental behaviors-a choice and the discipline to continuously act on that choice. This cross-sectional analysis of more than 10 000 adults examines the association of regular exercise with unhealthy behaviors. Compared with people who are more regularly exercising, nonexercisers are less likely to choose to change an unhealthy habit. Nonexercisers are also much less likely to be confident of their success when they do choose a habit to change. Regular exercise seems to be a gateway behavior for reducing other unhealthy habits.

  16. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4 levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is predicted to significantly decrease hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations, while moderately increasing ozone (O3. These changes lead to a 70 % increase in the atmospheric lifetime of methane, and an 18 % decrease in global mean cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC. The CDNC change causes a radiative forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the longwave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect" of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O3 and CH4-OH-aerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously large temperature changes associated with historic methane releases.

  17. Reduced bleed air extraction for DC-10 cabin air conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a significant fuel savings can be achieved by reducing bleed air used for cabin air conditioning. Air in the cabin can be recirculated to maintain comfortable ventilation rates but the quality of the air tends to decrease due to entrainment of smoke and odors. Attention is given to a development system designed and fabricated under the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program to define the recirculation limit for the DC-10. It is shown that with the system, a wide range of bleed air reductions and recirculation rates is possible. A goal of 0.8% fuel savings has been achieved which results from a 50% reduction in bleed extraction from the engine.

  18. Strongly nonlinear nonhomogeneous elliptic unilateral problems with L^1 data and no sign conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhoussine Azroul

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we prove the existence of solutions to unilateral problems involving nonlinear operators of the form: $$ Au+H(x,u,abla u=f $$ where $A$ is a Leray Lions operator from $W_0^{1,p(x}(Omega$ into its dual $W^{-1,p'(x}(Omega$ and $H(x,s,xi$ is the nonlinear term satisfying some growth condition but no sign condition. The right hand side $f$ belong to $L^1(Omega$.

  19. An automated sawtooth detection algorithm for strongly varying plasma conditions and crash characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, A.; Maraschek, M.; Kardaun, O.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-09-01

    A sawtooth crash algorithm that can automatically detect irregular sawteeth with strongly varying crash characteristics, including inverted crashes with central signal increase, has been developed. Such sawtooth behaviour is observed in ASDEX Upgrade with its tungsten wall, especially in phases with central ECRH. This application of ECRH for preventing impurity accumulation is envisaged also for ITER. The detection consists of three steps: a sensitive edge detection, a multichannel combination to increase detection performance, and a profile analysis that tests generic sawtooth crash features. The effect of detection parameters on the edge detection results has been investigated using synthetic signals and tested in an application to ASDEX Upgrade soft x-ray data.

  20. Operating wind turbines in strong wind conditions by using feedforward-feedback control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of wind energy into power systems, it becomes critical to reduce the impact of wind energy on the stability and reliability of the overall power system. In precedent works, Shen and his co-workers developed a re-designed operation schema to run wind turbines...

  1. The measurement of interplanetary scintillations in conditions of strong radio interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffett-Smith, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of interplanetary scintillations (IPS) are often severely limited by interference from man-made transmissions within the receiver pass-band. A new method of measuring IPS is described which can give useful data even in conditions of bad interference. (author)

  2. Conditional analysis near strong shear layers in DNS of isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kaneda, Yukio; Hunt, Julian C R

    2011-01-01

    Data analysis of high resolution DNS of isotropic turbulence with the Taylor scale Reynolds number R λ = 1131 shows that there are thin shear layers consisting of a cluster of strong vortex tubes with typical diameter of order 10η, where η is the Kolmogorov length scale. The widths of the layers are of the order of the Taylor micro length scale. According to the analysis of one of the layers, coarse grained vorticity in the layer are aligned approximately in the plane of the layer so that there is a net mean shear across the layer with a mean velocity jump of the order of the root-mean-square of the fluctuating velocity, and energy dissipation averaged over the layer is larger than ten times the average over the whole flow. The mean and the standard deviation of the energy transfer T(x, κ) from scales larger than 1/κ to scales smaller than 1/κ at position x are largest within the layers (where the most intense vortices and dissipation occur), but are also large just outside the layers (where viscous stresses are weak), by comparison with the average values of T over the whole region. The DNS data are consistent with exterior fluctuation being damped/filtered at the interface of the layer and then selectively amplified within the layer.

  3. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camley, Brian A. [Center for Theoretical Biological Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Lerner, Michael G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana 47374 (United States); Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Pastor, Richard W. [Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Brown, Frank L. H. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  4. Osteoclast formation is strongly reduced both in vivo and in vitro in the absence of CD47/SIRPα-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, Pernilla; Koskinen, Cecilia; Baldock, Paul A.; Loethgren, Hanna; Stenberg, Asa; Lerner, Ulf H.; Oldenborg, Per-Arne

    2007-01-01

    Physical interaction between the cell surface receptors CD47 and signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) was reported to regulate cell migration, phagocytosis, cytokine production, and macrophage fusion. However, it is unclear if the CD47/SIRPα-interaction can also regulate macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated formation of osteoclasts. Here, we show that functional blocking antibodies to either CD47 or SIRPα strongly reduced formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) + osteoclasts in cultures of murine hematopoietic cells, stimulated in vitro by M-CSF and RANKL. In addition, the numbers of osteoclasts formed in M-CSF/RANKL-stimulated bone marrow macrophage cultures from CD47 -/- mice were strongly reduced, and bones of CD47 -/- mice exhibited significantly reduced osteoclast numbers, as compared with wild-type controls. We conclude that the CD47/SIRPα interaction is important for M-CSF/RANKL-stimulated osteoclast formation both in vivo and in vitro, and that absence of CD47 results in decreased numbers of osteoclasts in CD47 -/- mice

  5. Degradation of 4-n-nonylphenol under nitrate reducing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, de J.P.A.; Vinas, M.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.; Langenhoff, A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an endocrine disruptor present as a pollutant in river sediment. Biodegradation of NP can reduce its toxicological risk. As sediments are mainly anaerobic, degradation of linear (4-n-NP) and branched nonylphenol (tNP) was studied under methanogenic, sulphate reducing and

  6. Metabolic and functional phenotypic profiling of Drosophila melanogaster reveals reduced sex differentiation under stressful environmental conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Michael; Malmendal, Anders; Muñoz, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    Strong sexual dimorphism is commonly observed across species and e.g. trade-offs between reproduction and maintenance are thought to explain this dimorphism. Here we test how the metabolic and functional phenotypic responses to varying types of environmental stress differ in male and female...... rearing regimes were investigated using NMR metabolomics and assessed for body mass and viability. Our results showed that environmental stress leads to reduced sexual dimorphism in both metabolic composition and body mass compared to the level of dimorphism observed at benign conditions. This reduced...... Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae), and how this impacts the magnitude of sexual dimorphism. Experimental stressors that we exposed flies to during development were heat stress, poor nutrition, high acidity, high levels of ammonia and ethanol. Emerged male and female flies from the different...

  7. Global existence of strong solutions to the three- dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with special boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Douglas A.

    We study the three-dimensional incompressible Navier- Stokes equations in a domain of the form W'×(0,e) . First, we assume W' is a C3 bounded domain and impose no-slip boundary conditions on 6W'×(0,e ) , and periodic conditions on W'×0,e . Physically, this models fluid flow through a pipe with cross-section W' where the inlet and outlet conditions are assumed periodic. Secondly, we assume W'=(0,l4) ×(0,l5) and impose periodic boundary conditions. This problem is of interest mathematically, and has been more widely considered than the pipe flow problem. For both sets of boundary conditions, we show that a strong solution exists for all time with conditions on the initial data and forcing. We start by recalling that if the forcing function and initial condition do not depend on x3, then a global strong solution exists which also does not depend on x3. Here (x1,x2,x3) ∈W≡W'×( 0,e) . With this observation as motivation, and using an additive decomposition introduced by Raugel and Sell, we split the initial data and forcing into a portion independent of x3 and a remainder. In our first result, we impose a smallness condition on the remainder and assume the forcing function is square- integrable in time as a function into L2(W) . With these assumptions, we prove a global existence theorem that does not require a smallness condition on e or on the portion of the initial condition and forcing independent of x3. However, these quantities do affect the allowable size of the remainder. For our second result, we assume the forcing is only bounded in time as a function into L2(W) . In this case, we need a smallness condition on the initial data, the forcing, and e to obtain global existence. The interesting observation is that the allowable sizes for the initial data and forcing grow as e-->0 . Thus, we obtain a `thin-domain' result as originally obtained by Raugel and Sell. In fact, our results allow the portion of the initial data and forcing independent of x3 to

  8. HbA1c as the diagnostic criterion for diabetes reduces incidence and prevalence of DM2 by 25% but strongly depending on analytical quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandslund, Ivan; Nielsen, Aneta Aleksandra; Hyldtoft Petersen, Per

    HbA1c as the diagnostic criterion for diabetes reduces incidence and prevalence of DM2 by 25% but strongly depending on analytical quality......HbA1c as the diagnostic criterion for diabetes reduces incidence and prevalence of DM2 by 25% but strongly depending on analytical quality...

  9. Reducing biases on H0 measurements using strong lensing and galaxy dynamics: results from the EAGLE simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagore, Amitpal S.; Barnes, David J.; Jackson, Neal; Kay, Scott T.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2018-03-01

    Cosmological parameter constraints from observations of time-delay lenses are becoming increasingly precise. However, there may be significant bias and scatter in these measurements due to, among other things, the so-called mass-sheet degeneracy. To estimate these uncertainties, we analyse strong lenses from the largest EAGLE hydrodynamical simulation. We apply a mass-sheet transformation to the radial density profiles of lenses, and by selecting lenses near isothermality, we find that the bias on H0 can be reduced to 5 per cent with an intrinsic scatter of 10 per cent, confirming previous results performed on a different simulation data set. We further investigate whether combining lensing observables with kinematic constraints helps to minimize this bias. We do not detect any significant dependence of the bias on lens model parameters or observational properties of the galaxy, but depending on the source-lens configuration, a bias may still exist. Cross lenses provide an accurate estimate of the Hubble constant, while fold (double) lenses tend to be biased low (high). With kinematic constraints, double lenses show bias and intrinsic scatter of 6 per cent and 10 per cent, respectively, while quad lenses show bias and intrinsic scatter of 0.5 per cent and 10 per cent, respectively. For lenses with a reduced χ2 > 1, a power-law dependence of the χ2 on the lens environment (number of nearby galaxies) is seen. Lastly, we model, in greater detail, the cases of two double lenses that are significantly biased. We are able to remove the bias, suggesting that the remaining biases could also be reduced by carefully taking into account additional sources of systematic uncertainty.

  10. Enhanced summer warming reduces fungal decomposer diversity and litter mass loss more strongly in dry than in wet tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Casper T; Haugwitz, Merian S; Priemé, Anders; Nielsen, Cecilie S; Elberling, Bo; Michelsen, Anders; Grogan, Paul; Blok, Daan

    2017-01-01

    Many Arctic regions are currently experiencing substantial summer and winter climate changes. Litter decomposition is a fundamental component of ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycles, with fungi being among the primary decomposers. To assess the impacts of seasonal climatic changes on litter fungal communities and their functioning, Betula glandulosa leaf litter was surface-incubated in two adjacent low Arctic sites with contrasting soil moisture regimes: dry shrub heath and wet sedge tundra at Disko Island, Greenland. At both sites, we investigated the impacts of factorial combinations of enhanced summer warming (using open-top chambers; OTCs) and deepened snow (using snow fences) on surface litter mass loss, chemistry and fungal decomposer communities after approximately 1 year. Enhanced summer warming significantly restricted litter mass loss by 32% in the dry and 17% in the wet site. Litter moisture content was significantly reduced by summer warming in the dry, but not in the wet site. Likewise, fungal total abundance and diversity were reduced by OTC warming at the dry site, while comparatively modest warming effects were observed in the wet site. These results suggest that increased evapotranspiration in the OTC plots lowered litter moisture content to the point where fungal decomposition activities became inhibited. In contrast, snow addition enhanced fungal abundance in both sites but did not significantly affect litter mass loss rates. Across sites, control plots only shared 15% of their fungal phylotypes, suggesting strong local controls on fungal decomposer community composition. Nevertheless, fungal community functioning (litter decomposition) was negatively affected by warming in both sites. We conclude that although buried soil organic matter decomposition is widely expected to increase with future summer warming, surface litter decay and nutrient turnover rates in both xeric and relatively moist tundra are likely to be significantly restricted by

  11. Reducing conditions are the key for efficient production of active ribonuclease inhibitor in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eukaryotic RNase ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitors (RI are a protein group distinguished by a unique structure - they are composed of hydrophobic leucine-rich repeat motifs (LRR and contain a high amount of reduced cysteine residues. The members of this group are difficult to produce in E. coli and other recombinant hosts due to their high aggregation tendency. Results In this work dithiothreitol (DTT was successfully applied for improving the yield of correctly folded ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor in E. coli K12 periplasmic and cytoplasmic compartments. The feasibility of the in vivo folding concepts for cytoplasmic and periplasmic production were demonstrated at batch and fed-batch cultivation modes in shake flasks and at the bioreactor scale. Firstly, the best secretion conditions of RI in the periplasmic space were evaluated by using a high throughput multifactorial screening approach of a vector library, directly with the Enbase fed-batch production mode in 96-well plates. Secondly, the effect of the redox environment was evaluated in isogenic dsbA+ and dsbA- strains at the various cultivation conditions with reducing agents in the cultivation medium. Despite the fusion to the signal peptide, highest activities were found in the cytoplasmic fraction. Thus by removing the signal peptide the positive effect of the reducing agent DTT was clearly proven also for the cytoplasmic compartment. Finally, optimal periplasmic and cytoplasmic RI fed-batch production processes involving externally added DTT were developed in shake flasks and scaled up to the bioreactor scale. Conclusions DTT highly improved both, periplasmic and cytoplasmic accumulation and activity of RI at low synthesis rate, i.e. in constructs harbouring weak recombinant synthesis rate stipulating genetic elements together with cultivation at low temperature. In a stirred bioreactor environment RI folding was strongly improved by repeated pulse addition

  12. Dietary geraniol by oral or enema administration strongly reduces dysbiosis and systemic inflammation in dextran sulphate sodium-treated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigia eDe Fazio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available (Trans-3,7-Dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol, commonly called geraniol (Ge-OH, is an acyclic monoterpene alcohol with well-known anti-inflammatory, antitumoral and antimicrobial properties. It is widely used as a preservative in the food industry and as an antimicrobial agent in animal farming. The present study investigated the role of Ge-OH as an anti-inflammatory and anti-dysbiotic agent in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS-induced colitis mouse model. Ge-OH was orally administered to C57BL/6 mice at daily doses of 30 and 120mg kg(-1 body weight, starting six days before DSS treatment and ending the day after DSS removal. Furthermore, Ge-OH 120 mg kg(-1 dose body weight was administered via enema during the acute phase of colitis to facilitate its on-site action. The results show that orally or enema-administered Ge-OH is a powerful antimicrobial agent able to prevent colitis-associated dysbiosis and decrease the inflammatory systemic profile of colitic mice. As a whole, Ge-OH strongly improved the clinical signs of colitis and significantly reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression in colonocytes and in the gut wall. Ge-OH could be a powerful drug for the treatment of intestinal inflammation and dysbiosis.

  13. Men without a sense of smell exhibit a strongly reduced number of sexual relationships, women exhibit reduced partnership security - a reanalysis of previously published data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Ilona; Bojanowski, Viola; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Olfactory function influences social behavior. For instance, olfaction seems to play a key role in mate choice and helps detecting emotions in other people. In a previous study, we showed that people who were born without a sense of smell exhibit enhanced social insecurity. Based on the comments to this article we decided to have a closer look to whether the absence of the sense of smell affects men and women differently. Under this focus questionnaire data of 32 patients, diagnosed with isolated congenital anosmia (10 men, 22 women) and 36 age-matched healthy controls (15 men, 21 women) was reanalyzed. In result, men and women without a sense of smell reported enhanced social insecurity, but with different consequences: Men who were born without a sense of smell exhibit a strongly reduced number of sexual relationships and women are affected such that they feel less secure about their partner. This emphasizes the importance of the sense of smell for intimate relationships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of the rapid dissolution of plutonium dioxide in acidic media under oxidizing or reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Berger, P.; Machuron-Mandard, X.

    1990-01-01

    Until recently plutonium dioxide was known to be among the metallic oxides most difficult to dissolve. This property is understandable given the free energy of the dissolution reaction (ΔG 0 ) in acidic noncomplexing media (ΔG 0 = 32.04 kJ/mol). Thermodynamic calculations predict that PuO 2 will dissolve under oxidizing or reducing conditions. The oxidizing dissolution, leading to Pu(VI) ion in solution, is easy to perform with a strong oxidant like Ag(II). The mechanism of the oxidizing dissolution of PuO 2 was investigated by using carbon paste electrochemistry (CPE) and 18 O labeling. PuO 2 can also be dissolved in acidic solution if the redox potential of the mixture is low (e.g., Cr 2+ , V 2+ , or U 3+ as reducing agents). The kinetics of the heterogeneous reducing dissolution of PuO 2 with Cr 2+ were investigated and the reaction mechanism was determined by 18 O labeling. All the results will be presented and discussed in the context of minimizing the amount of plutonium-contaminated solid wastes in the nuclear fuel cycle. 9 figs., 17 refs

  15. Coordinated activation of PTA-ACS and TCA cycles strongly reduces overflow metabolism of acetate in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebo, Karl; Valgepea, Kaspar; Nahku, Ranno; Riis, Gethe; Oun, Mikk; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-06-01

    Elimination of acetate overflow in aerobic cultivation of Escherichia coli would improve many bioprocesses as acetate accumulation in the growth environment leads to numerous negative effects, e.g. loss of carbon, inhibition of growth, target product synthesis, etc. Despite many years of studies, the mechanism and regulation of acetate overflow are still not completely understood. Therefore, we studied the growth of E. coli K-12 BW25113 and several of its mutant strains affecting acetate-related pathways using the continuous culture method accelerostat (A-stat) at various specific glucose consumption rates with the aim of diminishing acetate overflow. Absolute quantitative exo-metabolome and proteome analyses coupled to metabolic flux analysis enabled us to demonstrate that onset of acetate overflow can be postponed and acetate excretion strongly reduced in E. coli by coordinated activation of phosphotransacetylase-acetyl-CoA synthetase (PTA-ACS) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles. Fourfold reduction of acetate excretion (2 vs. 8 % from total carbon) at fastest growth compared to wild type was achieved by deleting the genes responsible for inactivation of acetyl-CoA synthetase protein (pka) and TCA cycle regulator arcA. The Δpka ΔarcA strain did not accumulate any other detrimental by-product besides acetate and showed identical μ max and only ~5 % lower biomass yield compared to wild type. We conclude that a fine-tuned coordination between increasing the recycling capabilities of acetate in the PTA-ACS node through a higher concentration of active acetate scavenging Acs protein and downstream metabolism throughput in the TCA cycle is necessary for diminishing overflow metabolism of acetate in E. coli and achieving higher target product production in bioprocesses.

  16. Analysis of the vibrations of the low power ORC turbines operating under conditions of strongly developed hydrodynamic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiciński, Jan

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the analysis of the dynamic performance of the rotor being a component of the ORC turbine set with the net electrical output of 100 kW and the nominal speed of 9000 rpm. The research was conducted using tools capable of performing the necessary simulation of the system operating under highly unstable conditions, i.e., in a strongly nonlinear regime. In this regard, the author of the paper followed the subsequent phases of whirl/whip formation manifested in the fluid film. Constructional solutions within the scope of the bearing were examined with non-conventional lubricating mediums (low boiling mediums). On the basis of those scientific studies, the decision to build a working prototype of the machine was taken. Such a prototype has already been manufactured, having regard to the outcome of the conducted analyses. The research presented herein produced interesting results showing that, under the conditions of hydrodynamic instability, the phenomena taking place inside the lubricating gap of the slide bearing are not recurrent for each individual rotor revolution, notwithstanding the fact that the external excitation forces acting on the system are fully repeatable. The research tools were presented that allow a detailed qualitative and quantitative description of such phenomena.

  17. The bean rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RZ9 strongly reduces Fusarium culmorum growth and infectiveness of plant roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Haddoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A faba bean rhizospheric Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate RZ9 was used for studying its antifungal activity and protecting effects of faba bean and common bean against the root pathogen Fusarium culmorum strain MZB47. The dual culture tests showed that RZ9 inhibits MZB47 in vitro growth by 56%. When mixing RZ9 cell suspension with MZB47 macroconidia at equal proportion, the macroconidia viability was reduced with 70%. Pathogenicity tests conducted in sterile conditions showed that MZB47 caused an intense root rotting in faba bean ‘Aquadulce’ plantlets and a slight level in common bean ‘Coco blanc’. This was associated to significant decreases in plant growth only in ‘Aquadulce’, reducing shoot dry weight (DW by 82% and root DW by 70%. In soil samples, MZB47 caused severe root rotting and induced significant decreases in shoot DW (up to 51% and root DW (up to 60% for both beans. It was associated to a decrease in nodule number by 73% and 52% for faba bean and common bean, respectively. Biocontrol assays revealed that the inoculation of RZ9 to MZB47-treated plantlets enhanced shoot DWs (25% and 110% and root DWs (29% and 67%, in faba bean and common bean, respectively. Moreover, root rotting levels decreased and nodule number increased in treated compared to untreated plantlets. Collected data highlighted the disease severity of F. culmorum and demonstrated the potential of using RZ9 in controlling Fusaria root diseases in beans. Thereby, the current study represents the first report on the biocontrol effectiveness of P. aeruginosa against F. culmorum in beans.

  18. A model of the plasma flow and current in Saturn's polar ionosphere under conditions of strong Dungey cycle driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Jackman

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple model of the flow and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere. This model is motivated by theoretical reasoning, and guided quantitatively by in situ field and flow data from space missions, ground-based IR Doppler measurements, and Hubble Space Telescope images. The flow pattern consists of components which represent (1 plasma sub-corotation in the middle magnetosphere region resulting from plasma pick-up and radial transport from internal sources; (2 the Vasyliunas-cycle of internal plasma mass-loss down the magnetospheric tail at higher latitudes; and (3 the polar Dungey-cycle flow driven by the solar wind interaction. Upstream measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF indicate the occurrence of both extended low-field rarefaction intervals with essentially negligible Dungey-cycle flow, and few-day high-field compression regions in which the Dungey-cycle voltage peaks at a few hundred kV. Here we model the latter conditions when the Dungey-cycle is active, advancing on previous axi-symmetric models which may be more directly applicable to quiet conditions. For theoretical convenience the overall flow pattern is constructed by adding together two components - a purely rotational flow similar to previous axi-symmetric models, and a sun-aligned twin vortex representing the dawn-dusk asymmetry effects associated with the Vasyliunas-and Dungey-cycle flows. We calculate the horizontal ionospheric current associated with the flow and the field-aligned current from its divergence. These calculations show that a sheet of upward-directed field-aligned current flows at the boundary of open field lines which is strongly modulated in local-time by the Dungey-cycle flows. We then consider implications of the field-aligned current for magnetospheric electron acceleration and aurorae using two plasma source populations (hot outer magnetospheric electrons and cool dense magnetosheath electrons. Both sources display a strong dawn

  19. New reduced-dimensionality models for efficient quantum-mechanical description of ultrafast strong-field phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silaev, A.A.; Ryabikin, M.Yu.; Vvedenskii, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The development of theoretical approaches to the description of strong-field phenomena caused by ultrashort laser pulses is optical for studying the interaction of atoms and molecules with intense laser fields. In this work, we address two phenomena which attract much attention and can be observed under similar experimental conditions, namely, when a gas is ionized by ultrashort laser pulse. The first phenomenon is the excitation of high-order harmonics of the driving field frequency in the electron current, which leads to the generation of vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray radiation, as well as the attosecond pulse production. The second phenomenon is the excitation of a quasi-dc residual current in the laser-produced plasma, which results in the generation of radiation having a frequency below the laser one, e.g., terahertz waves. We present new one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) quantum-mechanical models for the description of such phenomena for the case a hydrogen (H) atom, and the generalization of these models to the case of various noble-gas atoms. The shape of the electrostatic potential produced by an atomic ion is shown to influence significantly the rates of the processes in the dynamics of atomic electron, and even more, the rates of the tunneling and above-barrier ionization, which is of utmost importance for the considered phenomena. The results of solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation with the 1D and 2D potentials, which we propose, are compared with the results of the ab initio three-dimensional calculations for the H atom. We find the regions of laser pulse parameters, where the results obtained with proposed models have much better accuracy than the results provided by the models used earlier. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Presidential Council on Grants of the Russian Federation, the Ministry of Education and Science of the

  20. EDF - 2015 full-year results: all targets reached, Strong operating performance in adverse market conditions, 2018 ambition reiterated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    A key player in energy transition, the EDF Group is an integrated electricity company, active in all areas of the business: generation, transmission, distribution, energy supply and trading, energy services. A global leader in low-carbon energies, the Group has developed a diversified generation mix based on nuclear power, hydropower, new renewable energies and thermal energy. The Group is involved in supplying energy and services to approximately 37.6 million customers, of which 27.8 million in France. The Group generated consolidated sales of Euro 75 billion in 2015, of which 47.2% outside of France. EDF is listed on the Paris Stock exchange. EDF achieved all its targets in 2015. The year was marked by strong operational performance, reflecting the significant efforts the teams made. With the end of the regulated Yellow and Green Tariffs, most clients turned to EDF. Nuclear output reached its highest level, since 2011 in France, and since 2005 in the United Kingdom. EDF is also continuing its significant development in renewable energy, with an additional 1 GW of net installed capacity. The transformation of EDF Group is essential in the unfavourable market conditions. EDF has embarked on this transformation, and is accelerating innovation to serve the energy transition

  1. Conditional deletion of ferritin h in mice reduces B and T lymphocyte populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Vanoaica

    Full Text Available The immune system and iron availability are intimately linked as appropriate iron supply is needed for cell proliferation, while excess iron, as observed in hemochromatosis, may reduce subsets of lymphocytes. We have tested the effects of a ferritin H gene deletion on lymphocytes. Mx-Cre mediated conditional deletion of ferritin H in bone marrow reduced the number of mature B cells and peripheral T cells in all lymphoid organs. FACS analysis showed an increase in the labile iron pool, enhanced reactive oxygen species formation and mitochondrial depolarization. The findings were confirmed by a B-cell specific deletion using Fth(lox/lox ; CD19-Cre mice. Mature B cells were strongly under-represented in bone marrow and spleen of the deleted mice, whereas pre-B and immature B cells were not affected. Bone marrow B cells showed increased proliferation as judged by the number of cells in S and G2/M phase as well as BrdU incorporation. Upon in vitro culture with B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF, ferritin H-deleted spleen B cells showed lower survival rates than wild type cells. This was partially reversed with iron-chelator deferiprone. The loss of T cells was also confirmed by a T cell-specific deletion in Fth(lox/lox ;CD4-Cre mice. Our data show that ferritin H is required for B and T cell survival by actively reducing the labile iron pool. They further suggest that natural B and T cell maturation is influenced by intracellular iron levels and possibly deregulated in iron excess or deprivation.

  2. Opportunities to Reduce Air-Conditioning Loads Through Lower Cabin Soak Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrington, R.; Cuddy, M.; Keyser, M.; Rugh, J.

    1999-01-01

    Air-conditioning loads can significantly reduce electric vehicle (EV) range and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) fuel economy. In addition, a new U. S. emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the United States. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. If the size of the air-conditioning system is reduced, the cabin soak temperature must also be reduced, with no penalty in terms of passenger thermal comfort. This paper presents the impact of air-conditioning on EV range and HEV fuel economy, and compares the effectiveness of advanced glazing and cabin ventilation. Experimental and modeled results are presented

  3. Reducing Recidivism and Symptoms in Emerging Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions and Justice System Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Maryann; Sheidow, Ashli J.; McCart, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The peak years of offending in the general population and among those with serious mental health conditions (SMHC) are during emerging adulthood. There currently are no evidence-based interventions for reducing offending behavior among 18–21 year olds, with or without SMHC. This open trial examined outcomes from an adaptation of Multisystemic Therapy (MST), an effective juvenile recidivism reduction intervention, modified for use with emerging adults with SMHC and recent justice system involvement. MST for emerging adults (MST-EA) targets MH symptoms, recidivism, problem substance use, and young adult functional capacities. All study participants (n=41) were aged 17–20 and had a MH diagnosis and recent arrest or incarceration. Implementation outcomes indicated that MST-EA was delivered with strong fidelity, client satisfaction was high, and the majority of participants successfully completed the intervention. Research retention rates also were high. Pre-post analyses revealed significant reductions in participants’ MH symptoms, justice-system involvement, and associations with antisocial peers. PMID:25023764

  4. Effects of hydrogen and acetate on benzene mineralisation under sulphate-reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Schleinitz, Kathleen M; Müller, Nicolai; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten

    2011-08-01

    Syntrophic mineralisation of benzene, as recently proposed for a sulphate-reducing enrichment culture, was tested in product inhibition experiments with acetate and hydrogen, both putative intermediates of anaerobic benzene fermentation. Using [(13)C(6)]-benzene enabled tracking the inhibition of benzene mineralisation sensitively by analysis of (13)CO(2). In noninhibited cultures, hydrogen was detected at partial pressures of 2.4 × 10(-6) ± 1.5 × 10(-6) atm. Acetate was detected at concentrations of 17 ± 2 μM. Spiking with 0.1 atm hydrogen produced a transient inhibitory effect on (13)CO(2) formation. In cultures spiked with higher amounts of hydrogen, benzene mineralisation did not restart after hydrogen consumption, possibly due to the toxic effects of the sulphide produced. An inhibitory effect was also observed when acetate was added to the cultures (0.3, 3.5 and 30 mM). Benzene mineralisation resumed after acetate was degraded to concentrations found in noninhibited cultures, indicating that acetate is another key intermediate in anaerobic benzene mineralisation. Although benzene mineralisation by a single sulphate reducer cannot be ruled out, our results strongly point to an involvement of syntrophic interactions in the process. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that, under in situ conditions, benzene fermentation to hydrogen and acetate yielded a free energy change of ΔG'=-83.1 ± 5.6 kJ mol(-1). Benzene mineralisation ceased when ΔG' values declined below -61.3 ± 5.3 kJ mol(-1) in the presence of acetate, indicating that ATP-consuming reactions are involved in the pathway. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental investigation of effect of surface gravity waves and spray on heat and momentum flux at strong wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The most important characteristics that determine the interaction between atmosphere and ocean are fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture. For their parameterization the dimensionless exchange coefficients (the surface drag coefficient CD and the heat transfer coefficient or the Stanton number CT) are used. Numerous field and laboratory experiments show that CD increases with increasing wind speed at moderate and strong wind, and as it was shows recently CD decreases at hurricane wind speed. Waves are known to increase the sea surface resistance due to enhanced form drag, the sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the 'drag reduction' at hurricane conditions. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient CD on the wind speed is not so certain and the role of the mechanism associated with the wave disturbances in the mass transfer is not completely understood. Observations and laboratory data show that this dependence is weaker than for the CD, and there are differences in the character of the dependence in different data sets. The purpose of this paper is investigation of the effect of surface waves on the turbulent exchange of momentum and heat within the laboratory experiment, when wind and wave parameters are maintained and controlled. The effect of spray on turbulent exchange at strong winds is also estimated. A series of experiments to study the processes of turbulent exchange of momentum and heat in a stably stratified temperature turbulent boundary layer air flow over waved water surface were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS, the peculiarity of this experiment was the option to change the surface wave parameters regardless of the speed of the wind flow in the channel. For this purpose a polyethylene net with the variable depth (0.25 mm thick and a cell of 1.6 mm × 1.6mm) has been stretched along the channel. The waves were absent when the net was located at the level of the undisturbed water surface, and had maximum

  6. Sulphate chemistry under pressurized oxidizing, reducing and fluctuating conditions; Sulfatkemi under trycksatta oxiderande, reducerande och fluktuerande foerhaallanden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Yrjas, P.; Backman, P. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-10-01

    In the literature it has been reported that sulfur capture with limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) under atmospheric fluidized bed combustion conditions reaches a maximum at about 850 deg C. Previously, the maximum has been attributed to the sintering of sorbent particles which decreases the reactive surface area. Lately, also another explanation has been reported. In this case the sulfur capture decrease at higher temperatures was concluded to be due to fluctuating oxidizing/reducing conditions in the atmospheric combustor. In this work the influence of alternating oxidizing/reducing conditions on SO{sub 2} capture at atmospheric and elevated pressure (15 bar) has been studied. In the pressurized case, the CO{sub 2} partial pressure was kept high enough to prevent CaCO{sub 3} from calcining and therefore the CaSO{sub 4} would not form CaO but CaCO{sub 3} under reducing conditions. The experiments were done with a pressurized TGA by periodically changing the gas environment between oxidizing (O{sub 2}. SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and slightly reducing (CO, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) gas mixtures at different temperatures. The results from the experiments showed that under normal pressure and slightly reducing conditions CaO formation from CaSO{sub 4} increased with temperature as expected. However, no significant amounts of CaCO{sub 3} were formed from CaSO{sub 4} at elevated pressure. It was also concluded that since the formation of CaO from CaSO{sub 4} was relatively slow it could not explain the sharp sulfur capture maximum at about 850 deg C. Therefore, it was assumed that the strongly reducing zones, where CaS thermodynamically is the stable compound, play a more important role concerning the sulfur capture in fluidized bed combustors. (orig.)

  7. Reduced ratings of physical and relational aggression for youths with a strong cultural identity: evidence from the Naskapi people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Tara; Iarocci, Grace; D'Arrisso, Alexandra; Mandour, Tarek; Tootoosis, Curtis; Robinson, Sandy; Burack, Jacob A

    2011-08-01

    Minority youth in general, and Aboriginal youth in particular, are at increased statistical risk for being perpetrators or victims of aggression. We examined the potential protective aspect of cultural identity in relation to peer ratings of physical and relational aggression and factors typically associated with each among almost the entire cohort of Naskapi youths from Kawawachikamach, Québec. Hierarchical multiple regressions revealed that a strong identity with their own Native culture predicted less perceived physical and social aggression by their peers. These findings are discussed in the context of the role of a positive affiliation with ancestral culture for the diminishment of adolescent aggression and for general adaptive development and well-being. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spermine oxidase maintains basal skeletal muscle gene expression and fiber size and is strongly repressed by conditions that cause skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Kale S.; Fox, Daniel K.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Stebounova, Larissa V.; Murry, Daryl J.; Pufall, Miles A.; Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. To better understand the mechanisms of muscle atrophy, we used mouse models to search for a skeletal muscle protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and is specifically lost during muscle atrophy. We discovered that diverse causes of muscle atrophy (limb immobilization, fasting, muscle denervation, and aging) strongly reduced expression of the enzyme spermine oxidase. Importantly, a reduction in spermine oxidase was sufficient to induce muscle fiber atrophy. Conversely, forced expression of spermine oxidase increased muscle fiber size in multiple models of muscle atrophy (immobilization, fasting, and denervation). Interestingly, the reduction of spermine oxidase during muscle atrophy was mediated by p21, a protein that is highly induced during muscle atrophy and actively promotes muscle atrophy. In addition, we found that spermine oxidase decreased skeletal muscle mRNAs that promote muscle atrophy (e.g., myogenin) and increased mRNAs that help to maintain muscle mass (e.g., mitofusin-2). Thus, in healthy skeletal muscle, a relatively low level of p21 permits expression of spermine oxidase, which helps to maintain basal muscle gene expression and fiber size; conversely, during conditions that cause muscle atrophy, p21 expression rises, leading to reduced spermine oxidase expression, disruption of basal muscle gene expression, and muscle fiber atrophy. Collectively, these results identify spermine oxidase as an important positive regulator of muscle gene expression and fiber size, and elucidate p21-mediated repression of spermine oxidase as a key step in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:25406264

  9. Living in a country with a strong primary care system is beneficial to people with chronic conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, J.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing pressure that multiple chronic diseases place on health care systems, we investigated whether strong primary care was associated with improved health outcomes for the chronically ill. We did this by combining country- and individual-level data for the twenty-seven countries

  10. Living In A Country With A Strong Primary Care System Is Beneficial To People With Chronic Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Johan; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Boerma, Wienke G. W.; Kringos, Dionne S.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing pressure that multiple chronic diseases place on health care systems, we investigated whether strong primary care was associated with improved health outcomes for the chronically ill. We did this by combining country- and individual-level data for the twenty-seven countries

  11. Living in a country with a strong primary care system is beneficial to people with chronic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Johan; Groenewegen, Peter P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071985409; Boerma, Wienke G W; Kringos, Dionne S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/352077131

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing pressure that multiple chronic diseases place on health care systems, we investigated whether strong primary care was associated with improved health outcomes for the chronically ill. We did this by combining country- and individual-level data for the twenty-seven countries

  12. A New Technique for Reducing Size of a WPT System Using Two-Loop Strongly-Resonant Inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaz Rozman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mid-range resonant coupling-based high efficient wireless power transfer (WPT techniques have gained substantial research interest due to the number of potential applications in many industries. This paper presents a novel design of a resonant two-loop WPT technique including the design, fabrication and preliminary results of this proposal. This new design employs a compensation inductor which is combined with the transmitter and receiver loops in order to significantly scale down the size of the transmitter and receiver coils. This can improve the portability of the WPT transmitters in practical systems. Moreover, the benefits of the system enhancement are not only limited to the lessened magnitude of the T X & R X , simultaneously both the weight and the bill of materials are also minimised. The proposed system also demonstrates compatibility with the conventional electronic components such as capacitors hence the development of the T X & R X is simplified. The proposed system performance has been validated using the similarities between the experimental and simulation results. The power efficiency of the prototype circuit is found to be 93%, which is close to the efficiency reached by the conventional design. However, the weight of the transmitter and receiver inductors is now reduced by 78%, while the length of these inductors is reduced by 80%.

  13. The yield condition strongly influences the formation of Dugdale plastic strips ahead of crack tips under tensile plane stress loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, David J.

    2012-11-01

    A finite element analysis indicates a good correlation between the Dugdale plastic strip model and a linear elastic/perfectly plastic material under plane stress loading conditions for a flow theory of plasticity based on the Tresca yield condition. A similar analysis under the von Mises yield condition reveals no plastic strip formation.

  14. Experimental investigation of activities and tolerance of denitrifying bacteria under alkaline and reducing condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Tatsuya; Mihara, Morihiro; Ooi, Takao

    2000-07-01

    In the geological disposal system of TRU wastes, nitrogen generation by denitrifying bacteria could provide significant impact on the assessment of this system, because nitrate contained in process concentrated liquid waste might be electron acceptor for denitrifying bacteria. In this study, the activities and tolerance of denitrifying under disposal condition were investigated. Pseudomonas denitrificans as denitrifying bacteria was used. The results showed that Pseudomonas denitrificans had activity under reducing condition, but under high pH condition (pH>9.5), the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans was not detected. It is possible that the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans would be low under disposal condition. (author)

  15. Increased expression of CD133 and reduced dystroglycan expression are strong predictors of poor outcome in colon cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coco Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression levels of CD133, a cancer stem cell marker, and of the α-subunit of the dystroglycan (α-DG complex, have been previously reported to be altered in colorectal cancers. Methods Expression levels of CD133 and α-DG were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a series of colon cancers and their prognostic significance was evaluated. Results Scattered cells positive for CD133 were rarely detected at the bases of the crypts in normal colonic mucosa while in cancer cells the median percentage of positive cells was 5% (range 0–80. A significant correlation was observed with pT parameter and tumor stage but not with tumor grade and N status. Recurrence and death from disease were significantly more frequent in CD133-high expressing tumors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significant separation between high vs low expressor groups for both disease-free (p = 0.002 and overall (p = 0.008 survival. Expression of α-DG was reduced in a significant fraction of tumors but low α-DG staining did not correlate with any of the classical clinical-pathological parameters. Recurrence and death from the disease were significantly more frequent in α-DG-low expressing tumors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significant separation between high vs low expressor tumors for both disease-free (p = 0.02 and overall (p = 0.02 survival. Increased expression of CD133, but not loss of α-DG, confirmed to be an independent prognostic parameters at a multivariate analysis associated with an increased risk of recurrence (RR = 2.4; p = 0.002 and death (RR = 2.3; p = 0.003. Conclusions Loss of α-DG and increased CD133 expression are frequent events in human colon cancer and evaluation of CD133 expression could help to identify high-risk colon cancer patients.

  16. Biodegradation of oil- and creosote-related aromatic compounds under nitrate-reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flyvbjerg, J.; Arvin, E.; Jensen, B.K.; Olsen, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Oil- and creosote-contaminated groundwater typically contains a complex mixture of phenolic compounds, aromatic hydrocarbons with one to three rings, and nitrogen, sulphur, and oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds. It is well established that most of these chemicals are easily biodegraded in the presence of oxygen, but comparatively little is known about their biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. However, the past 10 years have seen an increasing interest in the potential of nitrate- reducing bacteria for pollutant destruction. This is because nitrate-reducing redox conditions often exist between the aerobic and strictly anaerobic zones in polluted aquifers, and because the addition of nitrate to contaminated sites would be a feasibly in situ technique due to the low cost and high solubility of this electron acceptor. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential for biodegradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons in creosote-contaminated groundwater during nitrate-reducing conditions

  17. Control of variable speed pitch-regulated wind turbines in strong wind conditions using a combined feedforward and feedback technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of wind energy into power systems, it becomes critical to reduce the impact of wind energy on the stability and reliability of the overall power system. In precedent works, Shen and his co-workers developed a re-designed operation schema to run wind turbines...

  18. Maintaining reduced noise levels in a resource-constrained neonatal intensive care unit by operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A; Denzil, S B; Linda, R; Josephine, P K; Nagapoornima, M; Suman Rao, P N; Swarna Rekha, A

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of operant conditioning in sustaining reduced noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Quasi-experimental study on quality of care. Level III NICU of a teaching hospital in south India. 26 staff employed in the NICU. (7 Doctors, 13 Nursing staff and 6 Nursing assistants). Operant conditioning of staff activity for 6 months. This method involves positive and negative reinforcement to condition the staff to modify noise generating activities. Comparing noise levels in decibel: A weighted [dB (A)] before conditioning with levels at 18 and 24 months after conditioning. Decibel: A weighted accounts for noise that is audible to human ears. Operant conditioning for 6 months sustains the reduced noise levels to within 62 dB in ventilator room 95% CI: 60.4 - 62.2 and isolation room (95% CI: 55.8 - 61.5). In the preterm room, noise can be maintained within 52 dB (95% CI: 50.8 - 52.6). This effect is statistically significant in all the rooms at 18 months (P = 0.001). At 24 months post conditioning there is a significant rebound of noise levels by 8.6, 6.7 and 9.9 dB in the ventilator, isolation and preterm room, respectively (P =0.001). Operant conditioning for 6 months was effective in sustaining reduced noise levels. At 18 months post conditioning, the noise levels were maintained within 62 dB (A), 60 dB (A) and 52 dB (A) in the ventilator, isolation and pre-term room, respectively. Conditioning needs to be repeated at 12 months in the ventilator room and at 18 months in the other rooms.

  19. Anaerobic Biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under sulfate-reducing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and ...

  20. Strong sunward propagating flow bursts in the night sector during quiet solar wind conditions: SuperDARN and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Senior

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available High-time resolution data from the two Iceland SuperDARN HF radars show very strong nightside convection activity during a prolonged period of low geomagnetic activity and northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. Flows bursts with velocities ranging from 0.8 to 1.7 km/s are observed to propagate in the sunward direction with phase velocities up to 1.5 km/s. These bursts occur over several hours of MLT in the 20:00–01:00 MLT sector, in the evening-side sunward convection. Data from a simultaneous DMSP pass and POLAR UVI images show a very contracted polar cap and extended regions of auroral particle precipitation from the magnetospheric boundaries. A DMSP pass over the Iceland-West field-of-view while one of these sporadic bursts of enhanced flow is observed, indicates that the flow bursts appear within the plasma sheet and at its outward edge, which excludes Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the magnetopause boundary as the generation mechanism. In the nightside region, the precipitation is more spot-like and the convection organizes itself as clockwise U-shaped structures. We interpret these flow bursts as the convective transport following plasma injection events from the tail into the night-side ionosphere. We show that during this period, where the IMF clock angle is around 70°, the dayside magnetosphere is not completely closed.Key words. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere; Ionospheremagnetosphere interactions; Particle precipitation

  1. Straw mulching reduces the harmful effects of extreme hydrological and temperature conditions in citrus orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jing; Liu, Dongbi; Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guoshi; Tao, Yong; Xie, Juan; Pan, Junfeng; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Extreme weather conditions with negative impacts can strongly affect agricultural production. In the Danjiangkou reservoir area, citrus yields were greatly influenced by cold weather conditions and drought stress in 2011. Soil straw mulching (SM) practices have a major effect on soil water and thermal regimes. A two-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate whether the SM practices can help achieve favorable citrus fruit yields. Results showed that the annual total runoff was significantly (Pmulch probably acted as an insulator, resulting in smaller fluctuations in soil temperature in the SM than in the CK treatment. The results suggested that the small effects on soil water and temperature changes created by surface mulch had limited impact on citrus fruit yield in a normal year (e.g., in 2010). However, SM practices can positively impact citrus fruit yield in extreme weather conditions.

  2. Adaptability of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts to wine fermentation conditions relies on their strong ability to consume nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Claire; Cubillos, Francisco A; Dequin, Sylvie; Camarasa, Carole; Martínez, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are genetically diverse, largely as a result of human efforts to develop strains specifically adapted to various fermentation processes. These adaptive pressures from various ecological niches have generated behavioral differences among these strains, particularly in terms of their nitrogen consumption capacities. In this work, we characterize this phenotype by the specific quantity of nitrogen consumed under oenological fermentation conditions using a new approach. Indeed, unlike previous studies, our experiments were conducted in an environment containing excess nitrogen, eliminating the nitrogen limitation/starvation factor that is generally observed in fermentation processes. Using these conditions, we evaluated differences in the nitrogen consumption capacities for a set of five strains from diverse origins. The strains presented extremely different phenotypes and variations in their capacities to take up nitrogen from a wine fermentation environment. These variations reflect the differences in the nitrogen uptake capacities between wine and non-wine strains. Finally, the strains differed in their ability to adapt to the nitrogen composition of the environment, leading to variations in the cellular stress states, fermentation performances and the activity of the nitrogen sensing signaling pathway.

  3. Chronic health conditions and depressive symptoms strongly predict persistent food insecurity among rural low-income families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Karla L; Olson, Christine M

    2012-08-01

    Longitudinal studies of food insecurity have not considered the unique circumstances of rural families. This study identified factors predictive of discontinuous and persistent food insecurity over three years among low-income families with children in rural counties in 13 U.S. states. Respondents reported substantial knowledge of community resources, food and finance skills, and use of formal public food assistance, yet 24% had persistent food insecurity, and another 41% were food insecure for one or two years. Multivariate multinomial regression models tested relationships between human capital, social support, financial resources, expenses, and food insecurity. Enduring chronic health conditions increased the risk of both discontinuous and persistent food insecurity. Lasting risk for depression predicted only persistent food insecurity. Education beyond high school was the only factor found protective against persistent food insecurity. Access to quality physical and mental health care services are essential to ameliorate persistent food insecurity among rural, low-income families.

  4. Modification of heparanase gene expression in response to conditioning and LPS treatment: strong correlation to rs4693608 SNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Olga; Shimoni, Avichai; Baryakh, Polina; Morgulis, Yan; Mayorov, Margarita; Beider, Katia; Shteingauz, Anna; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-04-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves the saccharide chains of HSPGs, important structural and functional components of the ECM. Cleavage of HS leads to loss of the structural integrity of the ECM and release of HS-bound cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive angiogenic- and growth-promoting factors. Our previous study revealed a highly significant correlation of HPSE gene SNPs rs4693608 and rs4364254 and their combination with the risk of developing GVHD. We now demonstrate that HPSE is up-regulated in response to pretransplantation conditioning, followed by a gradual decrease thereafter. Expression of heparanase correlated with the rs4693608 HPSE SNP before and after conditioning. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between recipient and donor rs4693608 SNP discrepancy and the time of neutrophil and platelet recovery. Similarly, the discrepancy in rs4693608 HPSE SNP between recipients and donors was found to be a more significant factor for the risk of aGVHD than patient genotype. The rs4693608 SNP also affected HPSE gene expression in LPS-treated MNCs from PB and CB. Possessors of the AA genotype exhibited up-regulation of heparanase with a high ratio in the LPS-treated MNCs, whereas individuals with genotype GG showed down-regulation or no effect on HPSE gene expression. HPSE up-regulation was mediated by TLR4. The study emphasizes the importance of rs4693608 SNP for HPSE gene expression in activated MNCs, indicating a role in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including postconditioning, engraftment, and GVHD.

  5. Returns to Scale and Damages to Scale with Strong Complementary Slackness Conditions in DEA Assessment: Japanese Corporate Effort on Environment Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueyoshi, Toshiyuki; Goto, Mika

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a use of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) for environmental assessment. All organizations in private and public sectors produce not only desirable (good) but also undesirable (bad) outputs as a result of their economic activities. The proposed use of DEA determines the level of unified (operational and environmental) efficiency of all the organizations. A contribution of this study is that it explores how to measure not only RTS (Returns to Scale) on desirable outputs but also a new concept regarding “DTS: Damages to Scale” (corresponding to RTS for undesirable outputs). This study discusses how to measure RTS under natural disposability and DTS under managerial disposability by DEA. The measurement of RTS and DTS is formulated by incorporating “Strong Complementary Slackness Conditions (SCSCs)”. As a result, this study can handle an occurrence of multiple reference sets and multiple projections in the RTS/DTS measurement. The incorporation of SCSCs makes it possible both to restrict DEA multipliers in a specific range without any prior information and to identify all possible efficient organizations as a reference set. Using the unique capabilities of SCSCs, this study discusses the use of DEA environmental assessment by exploring how to classify the type of RTS/DTS with SCSCs. Such analytical capabilities are essential, but not previously explored in DEA environmental assessment for energy industries. As an illustrative example, this study applies the proposed approach for the performance evaluation of Japanese manufacturing industries. This study finds that these firms need to introduce technology innovation to reduce an amount of greenhouse gases and wastes. The empirical result confirms the importance of measuring RTS/DTS in DEA environmental assessment.

  6. More homogeneous wind conditions under strong climate change decrease the potential for inter-state balancing of electricity in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wohland

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Limiting anthropogenic climate change requires the fast decarbonization of the electricity system. Renewable electricity generation is determined by the weather and is hence subject to climate change. We simulate the operation of a coarse-scale fully renewable European electricity system based on downscaled high-resolution climate data from EURO-CORDEX. Following a high-emission pathway (RCP8.5, we find a robust but modest increase (up to 7 % of backup energy in Europe through the end of the 21st century. The absolute increase in the backup energy is almost independent of potential grid expansion, leading to the paradoxical effect that relative impacts of climate change increase in a highly interconnected European system. The increase is rooted in more homogeneous wind conditions over Europe resulting in intensified simultaneous generation shortfalls. Individual country contributions to European generation shortfall increase by up to 9 TWh yr−1, reflecting an increase of up to 4 %. Our results are strengthened by comparison with a large CMIP5 ensemble using an approach based on circulation weather types.

  7. More homogeneous wind conditions under strong climate change decrease the potential for inter-state balancing of electricity in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohland, Jan; Reyers, Mark; Weber, Juliane; Witthaut, Dirk

    2017-11-01

    Limiting anthropogenic climate change requires the fast decarbonization of the electricity system. Renewable electricity generation is determined by the weather and is hence subject to climate change. We simulate the operation of a coarse-scale fully renewable European electricity system based on downscaled high-resolution climate data from EURO-CORDEX. Following a high-emission pathway (RCP8.5), we find a robust but modest increase (up to 7 %) of backup energy in Europe through the end of the 21st century. The absolute increase in the backup energy is almost independent of potential grid expansion, leading to the paradoxical effect that relative impacts of climate change increase in a highly interconnected European system. The increase is rooted in more homogeneous wind conditions over Europe resulting in intensified simultaneous generation shortfalls. Individual country contributions to European generation shortfall increase by up to 9 TWh yr-1, reflecting an increase of up to 4 %. Our results are strengthened by comparison with a large CMIP5 ensemble using an approach based on circulation weather types.

  8. Pharmacological depletion of serotonin in the basolateral amygdala complex reduces anxiety and disrupts fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip L; Molosh, Andrei; Fitz, Stephanie D; Arendt, Dave; Deehan, Gerald A; Federici, Lauren M; Bernabe, Cristian; Engleman, Eric A; Rodd, Zachary A; Lowry, Christopher A; Shekhar, Anantha

    2015-11-01

    The basolateral and lateral amygdala nuclei complex (BLC) is implicated in a number of emotional responses including conditioned fear and social anxiety. Based on previous studies demonstrating that enhanced serotonin release in the BLC leads to increased anxiety and fear responses, we hypothesized that pharmacologically depleting serotonin in the BLC using 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) injections would lead to diminished anxiety and disrupted fear conditioning. To test this hypothesis, 5,7-DHT(a serotonin-depleting agent) was bilaterally injected into the BLC. Desipramine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) was systemically administered to prevent non-selective effects on norepinephrine. After 5days, 5-7-DHT-treated rats showed increases in the duration of social interaction (SI) time, suggestive of reduced anxiety-like behavior. We then used a cue-induced fear conditioning protocol with shock as the unconditioned stimulus and tone as the conditioned stimulus for rats pretreated with bilateral 5,7-DHT, or vehicle, injections into the BLC. Compared to vehicle-treated rats, 5,7-DHT rats had reduced acquisition of fear during conditioning (measured by freezing time during tone), also had reduced fear retrieval/recall on subsequent testing days. Ex vivo analyses revealed that 5,7-DHT reduced local 5-HT concentrations in the BLC by ~40% without altering local norepinephrine or dopamine concentrations. These data provide additional support for 5-HT playing a critical role in modulating anxiety-like behavior and fear-associated memories through its actions within the BLC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Solubility measurement of iron-selenium compounds under reducing conditions. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Shibata, Masahiro

    2003-03-01

    Chemical behavior of selenium (Se), which was one of the important elements for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, was investigated under reducing and iron-containing conditions. A washing method for an iron diselenide (FeSe 2 (cr)) reagent with acidic and basic solutions (0.1 and 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH) was carried out for the purification of FeSe 2 reagent, which was considered to be a solubility limiting solid for Se under the geological disposal conditions. Furthermore, solubility of FeSe 2 (cr) was measured in alkaline solution (pH: 11 - 13) under reducing conditions (E h vs SHE: -0.4 - 0 V), and thermodynamic data on equilibrium reactions between Se in solution and Se precipitate were obtained. The dependencies of solubility values on pH and redox potential (E h : vs. standard hydrogen electrode) were best interpreted that the solubility limiting solid was not FeSe 2 (cr) but Se(cr) and the aqueous species was SeO 3 2- in the present experimental conditions. The equilibrium constant between Se(cr) and SeO 3 2- at zero ionic strength was determined and compared with literature values. The chemical behavior of Se under geological disposal conditions was discussed. (author)

  10. Reduced ability to detect surface-related biofilm bacteria after antibiotic exposure under in vitro conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Christen; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Bétrisey, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Antibiotic treatment of patients before specimen collection reduces the ability to detect organisms by culture. We investigated the suppressive effect of antibiotics on the growth of non-adherent, planktonic, and surface-related biofilm bacteria in vitro by using sonication......-dependent drugs (i.e. daptomycin and ciprofloxacin) had a strong suppressive effect on bacterial growth and reduced the ability to detect planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Exposure to rifampin rapidly caused emergence of resistance. Our findings indicate that preoperative administration of antibiotics may have......, daptomycin, rifampin, flucloxacillin, or ciprofloxacin. The beads were then sonicated to dislodge biofilm, followed by culture and measurement of growth-related heat flow by microcalorimetry of the resulting sonication fluid. Results - Vancomycin did not inhibit the heat flow of staphylococci and P. acnes...

  11. Distribution of ultraphytoplankton in the western part of the North Pacific subtropical gyre during a strong La Niña condition: relationship with the hydrological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Girault

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of ultraphytoplankton was investigated in the western North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG during La Niña, a cold phase of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO. Observations were conducted in a north-south transect (33.6–13.25° N along the 141.5° E meridian in order to study the ultraplankton assemblages in various oligotrophic conditions. Analyses were performed at the single cell level by analytical flow cytometry. Five ultraphytoplankton groups (Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, picoeukaryotes, nanoeukaryotes and nanocyanobacteria-like defined by their optical properties were enumerated in three different areas visited during the cruise: the Kuroshio region, the subtropical Pacific gyre and a transition zone between the subtropical Pacific gyre and the Warm pool. Prochlorococcus outnumbered the other photoautotrophs in all the investigated areas. However, in terms of carbon biomass, an increase in the relative contribution of Synechococcus, picoeukaryotes and nanoeukaryotes was observed from the centre of the subtropical gyre to the Kuroshio area. In the Kuroshio region, a peak of abundance of nanoeukaryotes observed at the surface suggested an increase in nutrients likely due to the vicinity of a cold cyclonic eddy. In contrast, in the salinity front along the isohaline 35 and anticyclonic eddy located around 22.83° N, the mainly constant distribution of Prochlorococcus from the surface down to 150 m characterised the dominance by these microorganisms in high salinity and temperature zone. Results suggested that the distribution of nanocyanobacteria-like is also closely linked to the salinity front rather than low phosphate concentration. The maximum abundance of ultraphytoplankton was located above the SubTropical Counter Current (STCC at depths > 100 m where higher nutrient concentrations were measured. Finally, comparison of the ultraphytoplankton concentrations during El Niño (from the literature and La Niña (this

  12. Uraninite and its alternation at Palmottu - A possible natural analogue for spent fuel under reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskeeniemi, T.; Blomqvist, R.; Ahonen, L.

    1994-01-01

    Uraninite is the major uraniferous mineral in the Precambrian U-Th rich pegmatites at Palmottu. Most euhedral uraninite grains were partially altered by silica-rich hydrothermal solutions during the late stage pegmatitic crystallization. The dominant secondary mineral is uranium silicate, with a chemical composition similar to that of coffinite (USiO 4 * Nh 2 O). The simultaneous formation of galena and other sulfides with the uranium silicate indicates that the alteration took place under reducing conditions. Hence, uranium occurs predominantly in the uranous (U 4+ ) state. Preliminary mass balance calculations imply that significant amounts of U, Th, and Pb were released during the replacement process. As the Palmottu U-Th deposit extends from ground level to distinctly reduced parts of the bedrock, it affords the opportinity of studying the stability and alteration of uraninite as an analogue for spent nuclear fuel under various redox conditions. (orig.) (28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.)

  13. Reduced intensity conditioning is superior to nonmyeloablative conditioning for older chronic myelogenous leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant during the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warlick, Erica; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Pedersen, Tanya L

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC)/nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) have changed the therapeutic strategy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. We analyzed post-HCT outcomes of 306 CML patients reported to...

  14. A study on reduced chemical mechanisms of ammonia/methane combustion under gas turbine conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Hua; Howard, Michael; Valera Medina, Agustin; Dooley, Stephen; Bowen, Philip John

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative fuel and hydrogen carrier, ammonia is believed to have good potential for future power generation. To explore the feasibility of co-firing ammonia with methane, studies involving robust numerical analyses with detailed chemistry are required to progress towards industrial implementation. Therefore, the objective of this study is to determine a reduced mechanism for simulation studies of ammonia/methane combustion in practical gas turbine combustor conditions. Firstly, five d...

  15. Childhood interventions to reduce stigma towards peers with disabilities and chronic health conditions: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hennessy, Eilis; Silke, C.; Stokes, Diarmuid; Heary, Caroline; Swords, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Stigma is a problem for children with a wide range of disabilities and chronic health conditions including epilepsy, HIV/AIDS, and mental health problems (e.g. ADHD). When stigma occurs, it has particular significance for a child¿s psychological wellbeing and development.  Evidence that stigmatizing attitudes develop early in life make it imperative that interventions for school-age children are developed to prevent or reduce stigma.  While several interventions exist,...

  16. Retrofitting Inefficient Rooftop Air-Conditioning Units Reduces U.S. Navy Energy Use (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-04-01

    As part of the U.S. Navy's overall energy strategy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) to demonstrate market-ready energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration. One such technology - retrofitting rooftop air-conditioning units with an advanced rooftop control system - was identified as a promising source for reducing energy use and costs, and can contribute to increasing energy security.

  17. Ghrelin knockout mice show decreased voluntary alcohol consumption and reduced ethanol-induced conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, Amine; Tolle, Virginie; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Brunel, Luc; Martinez, Jean; Tomasetto, Catherine-Laure; Karam, Sherif M

    2013-05-01

    Recent work suggests that stomach-derived hormone ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonism may reduce motivational aspects of ethanol intake. In the current study we hypothesized that the endogenous GHS-R1A agonist ghrelin modulates alcohol reward mechanisms. For this purpose ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation and voluntary ethanol consumption in a two-bottle choice drinking paradigm were examined under conditions where ghrelin and its receptor were blocked, either using ghrelin knockout (KO) mice or the specific ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist "JMV2959". We showed that ghrelin KO mice displayed lower ethanol-induced CPP than their wild-type (WT) littermates. Consistently, when injected during CPP-acquisition, JMV2959 reduced CPP-expression in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation was lower in ghrelin KO mice. Moreover, GHS-R1A blockade, using JMV2959, reduced alcohol-stimulated locomotion only in WT but not in ghrelin KO mice. When alcohol consumption and preference were assessed using the two-bottle choice test, both genetic deletion of ghrelin and pharmacological antagonism of the GHS-R1A (JMV2959) reduced voluntary alcohol consumption and preference. Finally, JMV2959-induced reduction of alcohol intake was only observed in WT but not in ghrelin KO mice. Taken together, these results suggest that ghrelin neurotransmission is necessary for the stimulatory effect of ethanol to occur, whereas lack of ghrelin leads to changes that reduce the voluntary intake as well as conditioned reward by ethanol. Our findings reveal a major, novel role for ghrelin in mediating ethanol behavior, and add to growing evidence that ghrelin is a key mediator of the effects of multiple abused drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Suggestion of the manual exposure condition guideline for reducing patient dose in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Ae [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The conditions after exposure to digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis were analyzed. The examinations for the ACR phantom were done using manual exposure, not auto exposure, to examine image discrimination and patient dose. As a result, the following results were derived: In the CC exposure , the kVp was 2kVp higher while mAs decreased to 58.6% for the 3D tomography. Such result showed an approximate decrease of 60mAs. At that time, the patients Average Glandular Dose (AGD) was 1.65mGy in 2D and 1.87mGy in 3D; thus, AGD of 3D was shown to have about 1.13 times higher. The result of the manual exposure revealed a reduced mAs of up to 80%; there was no effect in the assessment standard in terms of image discrimination, resulting in more than 10 points. When mAs was reduced to 80% in the manual exposure for ACR phantom, AGD was decreased to 0.66mGy. The diagnostic values of images were maintained and patients dose was reduced in the manual exposure in the AEC condition for 3D. Since the use of 3D has recently increased, using the manual exposure has been recommended in this study to improve the diagnostic value, while, simultaneously reducing patients dose.

  19. Physiological responses to ocean acidification and warming synergistically reduce condition of the common cockle Cerastoderma edule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, E Z; Briffa, M; Moens, T; Van Colen, C

    2017-09-01

    The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming on the common cockle Cerastoderma edule was investigated in a fully crossed laboratory experiment. Survival of the examined adult organisms remained high and was not affected by elevated temperature (+3 °C) or lowered pH (-0.3 units). However, the morphometric condition index of the cockles incubated under high pCO 2 conditions (i.e. combined warming and acidification) was significantly reduced after six weeks of incubation. Respiration rates increased significantly under low pH, with highest rates measured under combined warm and low pH conditions. Calcification decreased significantly under low pH while clearance rates increased significantly under warm conditions and were generally lower in low pH treatments. The observed physiological responses suggest that the reduced food intake under hypercapnia is insufficient to support the higher energy requirements to compensate for the higher costs for basal maintenance and growth in future high pCO 2 waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing the Behavior of Typically Lithophile Elements Under Highly Reducing Conditions Relevant to the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Rick, II; Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Danielson, Lisa R.

    2017-01-01

    With the data returned from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, there are now numerous constraints on the physical and chemical properties of Mercury, including its surface composition (e.g., Evans et al. 2012; Nittler et al. 201 l; Peplowski et al. 2012; Weider et al. 2012). The high Sand low FeO contents observed from MESSENGER on the planet's surface suggests a low oxygen fugacity of the present planetary materials. Estimates of the oxygen fugacity for Mercurian magmas are approximately 3- 7 log units below the Iron-Wiistite (Fe-FeO) oxygen buffer (McCubbin et al. 2012; Zolotov et al. 2013), several orders of magnitude more reducing than other terrestrial bodies we have data from such as the Earth, Moon, or Mars (Herd 2008; Sharp, McCubbin, and Shearer 2013; Wadhwa 2008). Most of our understanding of elemental partitioning behavior comes from observations made on terrestrial rocks, but Mercury's oxygen fugacity is far outside the conditions of those samples. With limited oxygen available, lithophile elements may instead exhibit chalcophile, halophile, or siderophile behaviors. Furthermore, very few natural samples of rocks that formed under reducing conditions are available in our collections (e.g., enstatite chondrites, achondrites, aubrites). The goal of this study is to conduct experiments at high pressure and temperature conditions to determine the elemental partitioning behavior of typically lithophile elements as a function of decreasing oxygen fugacity.

  1. Photosynthesis, Light Use Efficiency, and Yield of Reduced-Chlorophyll Soybean Mutants in Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Rebecca A.; VanLoocke, Andy; Bernacchi, Carl J.; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Ort, Donald R.

    2017-01-01

    Reducing chlorophyll (chl) content may improve the conversion efficiency of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation into biomass and therefore yield in dense monoculture crops by improving light penetration and distribution within the canopy. The effects of reduced chl on leaf and canopy photosynthesis and photosynthetic efficiency were studied in two reportedly robust reduced-chl soybean mutants, Y11y11 and y9y9, in comparison to the wild-type (WT) “Clark” cultivar. Both mutants were characterized during the 2012 growing season whereas only the Y11y11 mutant was characterized during the 2013 growing season. Chl deficiency led to greater rates of leaf-level photosynthesis per absorbed photon early in the growing season when mutant chl content was ∼35% of the WT, but there was no effect on photosynthesis later in the season when mutant leaf chl approached 50% of the WT. Transient benefits of reduced chl at the leaf level did not translate to improvements in canopy-level processes. Reduced pigmentation in these mutants was linked to lower water use efficiency, which may have dampened any photosynthetic benefits of reduced chl, especially since both growing seasons experienced significant drought conditions. These results, while not confirming our hypothesis or an earlier published study in which the Y11y11 mutant significantly outyielded the WT, do demonstrate that soybean significantly overinvests in chl. Despite a >50% chl reduction, there was little negative impact on biomass accumulation or yield, and the small negative effects present were likely due to pleiotropic effects of the mutation. This outcome points to an opportunity to reinvest nitrogen and energy resources that would otherwise be used in pigment-proteins into increasing biochemical photosynthetic capacity, thereby improving canopy photosynthesis and biomass production. PMID:28458677

  2. Control of discharge conditions to reduce hydrogen content in low Z films produced with DC glow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsir, M.; Sagara, A.; Tsuzuki, K.; Tsuchiya, B.; Hasegawa, Y.; Motojima, O.

    1995-09-01

    Boronization at near room temperature has been performed in plasma processing teststand (PPT) by using a 5 % diborane gases B{sub 2}H{sub 6} in He on electrically floating or unfloating Al samples under various conditions on DC glow discharge power or total gas pressure. The hydrogen concentration was analyzed by using elastic recoil detection method (ERD) and a new modified normalizing technique with Rutherford back scattering (RBS). Results showed that a high growth rate of film formation and floating surface were effective in reducing hydrogen concentration in B films. This result was in good agreement with earlier measurements of H with flash filament (FF) desorption method. In particular the H/B ratio was reduced by decreasing ions but increasing radicals for B film formation. (author).

  3. Etoposide-containing conditioning regimen reduces the occurrence of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis after SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, R; Tanaka, J; Hashino, S; Ota, S; Torimoto, Y; Kakinoki, Y; Yamamoto, S; Kurosawa, M; Hatakeyama, N; Haseyama, Y; Sakai, H; Sato, K; Fukuhara, T

    2014-02-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease of severe hyperinflammation caused by uncontrolled proliferation of activated lymphocytes and macrophages that secrete high amounts of inflammatory cytokines. HLH occurring after SCT is difficult to diagnose. It is characterized by severe clinical manifestations and high mortality. Despite current therapeutic approaches, outcomes remain poor. We analyzed the incidence and risk factors of HLH after SCT and the response to treatment and prognosis of 554 patients with HLH after SCT. The cumulative incidence of HLH after SCT was 4.3% (24/554). Use of etoposide in the conditioning regimen was only factor that reduced HLH after SCT (P=0.027). All patients who received autologous transplantation were successfully treated. Patients with liver dysfunction (for example, high total bilirubin level, prolonged prothrombin time and high level of fibrinogen degradation products) had a poor response to treatment for HLH. Physicians should be cautious of HLH, while not using etoposide for conditioning regimen.

  4. Nonmyeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Seth M; O'Connor, Thomas P; Hashash, Jana; Tabbara, Imad A

    2009-12-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation provides many patients, with hematological and malignant diseases, hope of remission and in some cases cure. Because the toxicities of this approach are severe, its use has been limited to younger healthier patients. Nonmyeloablative and reduced intensity conditioning regimens depend more on donor cellular immune effects and less on the cytotoxic effects of the conditioning regimen to eradicate the underlying disease. This approach is based on the induction of host tolerance to donor cells followed by the administration of scheduled donor T-lymphocytes infusions. Accumulated clinical data have been encouraging, and prospective studies are underway to compare this approach to conventional myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation with regard to outcome, durability of responses, effects on the immune system, and the consequences of late complications such as chronic graft-versus-host disease.

  5. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mature lymphoid malignancies after reduced-intensity conditioning regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Celso Arrais; Rocha, Vanderson; Dreger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    an allogeneic unrelated donor transplant using umbilical cord blood (n=104) or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (n=541) after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Unrelated cord blood recipients had more refractory disease. Median follow-up time was 30 months. Neutrophil engraftment (81% vs. 97...... sources except for a higher risk of neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio=2.12; Pumbilical cord blood...... and matched unrelated donor transplant. Umbilical cord blood is a valuable alternative for patients with lymphoid malignancies lacking an HLA-matched donor, being associated with lower risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease....

  6. Assessing the Behavior of Typically Lithophile Elements Under Highly Reducing Conditions Relevant to the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Rick, II; Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Danielson, Lisa R.

    2017-01-01

    With the data returned from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, there are now numerous constraints on the physical and chemical properties of Mercury, including its surface composition. The high Sand low FeO contents observed from MESSENGER suggest a low oxygen fugacity of the present materials on the planet's surface. Most of our understanding of elemental partitioning behavior comes from observations made on terrestrial rocks, but Mercury's oxygen fugacity is far outside the conditions of those samples, estimated at approximately 3-7 log units below the Iron-Wtistite (lW) oxygen buffer, several orders of magnitude more reducing than other terrestrial bodies we have data from. With limited oxygen available, lithophile elements may instead exhibit chalcophile, halophile, or siderophile behaviors. Furthermore, very few natural samples of rocks that formed under reducing conditions (e.g., enstatite chondrites, achondrites, aubrites) are available in our collections for examination of this change in geochemical affinity. Our goal is to determine the elemental partitioning behavior of typically lithophile elements at lower oxygen fugacity as a function of temperature and pressure. Experiments were conducted at I GPa in a 13 mm QUICKpress piston cylinder and at 4 GPa in an 880-ton multianvil press, at temperatures up to 1850degC. The composition of starting materials for the experiments were designed so the final run products contained metal, silicate melt, and sulfide melt phases. Oxygen fugacity was controlled in the experiments by adding silicon metal to the samples, in order to utilize the Si-Si02 buffer, which is approximately 5 log units more reducing than the IW buffer at our temperatures of interest. The target silicate melt composition was diopside (CaMgSi206) because measured surface compositions indicate partial melting of a pyroxene-rich mantle. The results of our experiments will aid in our understanding of

  7. Synthesis of Ti Oxides at Reducing Conditions: Implications for Beamline Standards and Cosmochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. A.; Butterworth, A. L.; Gainsforth, Z.; Jilly-Rehak, C. E.; Westphal, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    These initial experiments demonstrate the great potential for synthesizing customized compounds for use as standards, or in buffering experiments at reducing conditions. We are also investigating Cr and V oxides, as well as compounds containing these elements such as FeV2O4 and FeCr2O4. Oxygen fugacity exerts a major control on mineral major element chemistry and elemental valence of minerals in any plane-tary compositional system [1]. For Earth, Fe is multivalent ranging from nearly Fe0 at low fO2 in the deep mantle to Fe2+ to Fe3+ at high low fO2. For solar nebular and meteoritic materials fO2 ranges from near IW to 10 log fO2 units below the IW buffer [1]. Phases in CAIs, for example, contain no Fe2+, but may contain Ti4+, Ti3+, or Ti2+, and Cr3+ or Cr2+, and V3+ or V2+ [1,2,3]. De-tailed study of inclusions may reveal important differences in fO2 thus reflecting different environments in the solar nebula [4]. XANES, FEG-SEM, and TEM can reveal such variations in micro and nano samples such as Stardust and cosmic dust particles [5], but successful application to reduced conditions depends upon the availability of well characterized standards. Acquiring appropriate standards for reduced phases that contain Ti3+ or Ti2+, Cr3+ or Cr2+, and V3+ or V2+ can be a challenge. Here we report our preliminary results at synthesizing reduced Ti bearing standards, and focus on the preliminary characterization.

  8. Disrupting astrocyte–neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine

    KAUST Repository

    Boury-Jamot, B

    2015-10-27

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte–neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine.

  9. Strong correlation in acene sheets from the active-space variational two-electron reduced density matrix method: effects of symmetry and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Kenley; Greenman, Loren; Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2011-06-09

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of organic molecules with importance in several branches of science, including medicine, combustion chemistry, and materials science. The delocalized π-orbital systems in PAHs require highly accurate electronic structure methods to capture strong electron correlation. Treating correlation in PAHs has been challenging because (i) traditional wave function methods for strong correlation have not been applicable since they scale exponentially in the number of strongly correlated orbitals, and (ii) alternative methods such as the density-matrix renormalization group and variational two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) methods have not been applied beyond linear acene chains. In this paper we extend the earlier results from active-space variational 2-RDM theory [Gidofalvi, G.; Mazziotti, D. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 134108] to the more general two-dimensional arrangement of rings--acene sheets--to study the relationship between geometry and electron correlation in PAHs. The acene-sheet calculations, if performed with conventional wave function methods, would require wave function expansions with as many as 1.5 × 10(17) configuration state functions. To measure electron correlation, we employ several RDM-based metrics: (i) natural-orbital occupation numbers, (ii) the 1-RDM von Neumann entropy, (iii) the correlation energy per carbon atom, and (iv) the squared Frobenius norm of the cumulant 2-RDM. The results confirm a trend of increasing polyradical character with increasing molecular size previously observed in linear PAHs and reveal a corresponding trend in two-dimensional (arch-shaped) PAHs. Furthermore, in PAHs of similar size they show significant variations in correlation with geometry. PAHs with the strictly linear geometry (chains) exhibit more electron correlation than PAHs with nonlinear geometries (sheets).

  10. Strongly Nonlinear Dependence of Energy Transfer Rate on sp(2) Carbon Content in Reduced Graphene Oxide-Quantum Dot Hybrid Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yitong; Son, Dong Hee

    2015-01-02

    The dependence of the energy transfer rate on the content of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms in the hybrid structures of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and Mn-doped quantum dot (QD(Mn)) was investigated. Taking advantage of the sensitivity of QD(Mn)'s dopant luminescence lifetime only to the energy transfer process without interference from the charge transfer process, the correlation between the sp(2) carbon content in RGO and the rate of energy transfer from QD(Mn) to RGO was obtained. The rate of energy transfer showed a strongly superlinear increase with increasing sp(2) carbon content in RGO, suggesting the possible cooperative behavior of sp(2) carbon domains in the energy transfer process as the sp(2) carbon content increases.

  11. Di-, tri-, tetranuclear clusters and polymeric cadmium compounds: Syntheses, structures and fluorescent properties with various linking fashions and high stability of orotates under the condition of strong bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xing; Bing Yue; Zha Meiqin; Wang Dongjie; Han Lei; Cao Rong

    2011-01-01

    Assembly reactions of orotic acid (H 3 dtpc ) and CdCl 2 .2.5H 2 O or CdSO 4 .8H 2 O yielded four new cadmium compounds {[Cd(H 2 dtpc)(phen)(H 2 O) 2 ].(H 2 dtpc).4H 2 O} 2 (1: solution reaction, pH=4-5, in addition of phen), [Cd 3 (dtpc) 2 (phen) 5 ].13H 2 O (2: hydrothermal reaction, initial pH=14, final pH=7.5), [Cd(Hdtpc)(H 2 O) 3 ] 4 (3: solution reaction, initial pH=6.5, final pH=6.0), {[Cd(Hdtpc)(phen)(H 2 O)].H 2 O} n (4: hydrothermal reaction, initial pH=8; final pH=6.5), respectively. Compounds 1-4 have been characterized by IR, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), photoluminescence analyses, single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Compound 1 is a binuclear, 2 is a trinuclear, 3 is a tetranuclear structure, and 4 possesses one-dimensional chain framework, respectively, in which the orotate ligands show seven different linking fashions in 1-4. The orotate ligands as trivalence anions are observed in the formation of orotate-compounds, in which the orotates show high stability under the extreme condition of strong basic solution, high temperature and pressure. - Graphical abstract: Assembly of orotic acid and Cd(II) salts result in four new compounds under different reaction conditions, the compounds possess strong photoluminescence emissions and high thermal stability. Highlights: → Four Cd-compounds were prepared from orotic acid under different crystallization systems. → The orotates as trivalence anions displayed high stability under extremely conditions. → The orotates displayed various connection modes in the compounds. → The strong photoluminescence emissions have been observed in the compounds.

  12. Analysis of the Contribution of Wind Drift Factor to Oil Slick Movement under Strong Tidal Condition: Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Case

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Yang, Chan-Su; Oh, Jeong-Hwan; Ouchi, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the wind drift factor under strong tidal conditions in the western coastal area of Korea on the movement of oil slicks caused by the Hebei Spirit oil spill accident in 2007. The movement of oil slicks was computed using a simple simulation model based on the empirical formula as a function of surface current, wind speed, and the wind drift factor. For the simulation, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) model and Automatic Wea...

  13. Reduced ability to detect surface-related biofilm bacteria after antibiotic exposure under in vitro conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Christen; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Bétrisey, Bertrand; Overgaard, Søren; Trampuz, Andrej

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Antibiotic treatment of patients before specimen collection reduces the ability to detect organisms by culture. We investigated the suppressive effect of antibiotics on the growth of non-adherent, planktonic, and surface-related biofilm bacteria in vitro by using sonication and microcalorimetry methods. Patients and methods - Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Propionibacterium acnes were formed on porous glass beads and exposed for 24 h to antibiotic concentrations from 1 to 1,024 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin, daptomycin, rifampin, flucloxacillin, or ciprofloxacin. The beads were then sonicated to dislodge biofilm, followed by culture and measurement of growth-related heat flow by microcalorimetry of the resulting sonication fluid. Results - Vancomycin did not inhibit the heat flow of staphylococci and P. acnes at concentrations ≤1,024 μg/mL, whereas flucloxacillin at >128 μg/mL inhibited S. aureus. Daptomycin inhibited heat flow of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and P. acnes at lower concentrations (32-128 times MIC, p antibiotics (i.e. vancomycin and flucloxacillin) showed only weak growth suppression, concentration-dependent drugs (i.e. daptomycin and ciprofloxacin) had a strong suppressive effect on bacterial growth and reduced the ability to detect planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Exposure to rifampin rapidly caused emergence of resistance. Our findings indicate that preoperative administration of antibiotics may have heterogeneous effects on the ability to detect biofilm bacteria.

  14. Conditional economic incentives for reducing HIV risk behaviors: integration of psychology and behavioral economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operario, Don; Kuo, Caroline; Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G; Gálarraga, Omar

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews psychology and behavioral economic approaches to HIV prevention, and examines the integration and application of these approaches in conditional economic incentive (CEI) programs for reducing HIV risk behavior. We discuss the history of HIV prevention approaches, highlighting the important insights and limitations of psychological theories. We provide an overview of the theoretical tenets of behavioral economics that are relevant to HIV prevention, and utilize CEIs as an illustrative example of how traditional psychological theories and behavioral economics can be combined into new approaches for HIV prevention. Behavioral economic interventions can complement psychological frameworks for reducing HIV risk by introducing unique theoretical understandings about the conditions under which risky decisions are amenable to intervention. Findings from illustrative CEI programs show mixed but generally promising effects of economic interventions on HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence, HIV testing, HIV medication adherence, and drug use. CEI programs can complement psychological interventions for HIV prevention and behavioral risk reduction. To maximize program effectiveness, CEI programs must be designed according to contextual and population-specific factors that may determine intervention applicability and success. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Conditional Economic Incentives for Reducing HIV Risk Behaviors: Integration of Psychology and Behavioral Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operario, Don; Kuo, Caroline C.; Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G.; Gálarraga, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Objective This paper reviews psychology and behavioral economic approaches to HIV prevention, and examines the integration and application of these approaches in conditional economic incentive (CEI) programs for reducing HIV risk behavior. Methods We discuss the history of HIV prevention approaches, highlighting the important insights and limitations of psychological theories. We provide an overview of the theoretical tenets of behavioral economics that are relevant to HIV prevention, and utilize CEIs as an illustrative example of how traditional psychological theories end behavioral economics can be combined into new approaches for HIV prevention. Results Behavioral economic interventions can complement psychological frameworks for reducing HIV risk by introducing unique theoretical understandings about the conditions under which risky decisions are amenable to intervention. Findings from illustrative CEI programs show mixed but generally promising effects of economic interventions on HIV and STI prevalence, HIV testing, HIV medication adherence, and drug use. Conclusion CEI programs can complement psychological interventions for HIV prevention and behavioral risk reduction. To maximize program effectiveness, CEI programs must be designed according to contextual and population-specific factors that may determine intervention applicability and success. PMID:24001243

  16. Acute immobilization stress following contextual fear conditioning reduces fear memory: timing is essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwaya, Akemi; Lee, Hyunjin; Park, Jonghyuk; Lee, Hosung; Muto, Junko; Nakajima, Sanae; Ohta, Shigeo; Mikami, Toshio

    2016-02-24

    Histone acetylation is regulated in response to stress and plays an important role in learning and memory. Chronic stress is known to deteriorate cognition, whereas acute stress facilitates memory formation. However, whether acute stress facilitates memory formation when it is applied after fear stimulation is not yet known. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of acute stress applied after fear training on memory formation, mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), epigenetic regulation of BDNF expression, and corticosterone level in mice in vivo. Mice were subjected to acute immobilization stress for 30 min at 60 or 90 min after contextual fear conditioning training, and acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 14 (H3K14) and level of corticosterone were measured using western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. A freezing behavior test was performed 24 h after training, and mRNA expression of BDNF was measured using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Different groups of mice were used for each test. Freezing behavior significantly decreased with the down-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression caused by acute immobilization stress at 60 min after fear conditioning training owing to the reduction of H3K14 acetylation. However, BDNF mRNA expression and H3K14 acetylation were not reduced in animals subjected to immobilization stress at 90 min after the training. Further, the corticosterone level was significantly high in mice subjected to immobilization stress at 60 min after the training. Acute immobilization stress for 30 min at 60 min after fear conditioning training impaired memory formation and reduced BDNF mRNA expression and H3K14 acetylation in the hippocampus of mice owing to the high level of corticosterone.

  17. Evaluation of engraftment and immunological tolerance after reduced intensity conditioning in a rhesus hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, N; Weitzel, R P; Evans, M E; Green, R; Bonifacino, A C; Krouse, A E; Metzger, M E; Hsieh, M M; Donahue, R E; Tisdale, J F

    2014-02-01

    Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) is desirable for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) targeted gene therapy; however, RIC may be insufficient for efficient engraftment and inducing immunological tolerance to transgenes. We previously established long-term gene marking in our rhesus macaque autologous HSC transplantation model following 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). In this study, we evaluated RIC transplantation with 4 Gy TBI in two rhesus macaques that received equal parts of CD34(+) cells transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing lentiviral vector and empty vector not expressing transgenes. In both animals, equivalently low gene marking between GFP and empty vectors was observed 6 months post-transplantation, even with efficient transduction of CD34(+) cells in vitro. Autologous lymphocyte infusion with GFP marking resulted in an increase of gene marking in lymphocytes in a control animal with GFP tolerance, but not in the two RIC-transplanted animals. In vitro assays revealed strong cellular and humoral immune responses to GFP protein in the two RIC-transplanted animals, but this was not observed in controls. In summary, 4 Gy TBI is insufficient to permit engraftment of genetically modified HSCs and induce immunological tolerance to transgenes. Our findings should help in the design of conditioning regimens in gene therapy trials.

  18. Expression of DIAPH1 is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and its down-regulation strongly reduces the metastatic capacity of colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Na; Izbicki, Jakob R; König, Alexandra; Habermann, Jens K; Blechner, Christine; Lange, Tobias; Schumacher, Udo; Windhorst, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    In most cases, metastatic colorectal cancer is not curable, thus new approaches are necessary to identify novel targets for colorectal cancer therapy. Actin-binding-proteins (ABPs) directly regulate motility of metastasising tumor cells, and for cortactin an association with colon cancer metastasis has been already shown. However, as its depletion only incompletely inhibits metastasis, additional, more suitable cellular targets have to be identified. Here we analyzed expression of the ABPs, DIAPH1, VASP, N-WASP, and fascin in comparison with cortactin and found that, besides cortactin, DIAPH1 was expressed with the highest frequency (63%) in colorectal cancer. As well as cortactin, DIAPH1 was not detectable in normal colon tissue and expression of both proteins was positively correlated with metastasis of colorectal cancer. To analyse the mechanistic role of DIAPH1 for metastasis of colon carcinoma cells in comparison with cortactin, expression of the proteins was stably down-regulated in the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29, HROC-24 and HCT-116. Analysis of metastasis of colon carcinoma cells in SCID mice revealed that depletion of DIAPH1 reduced metastasis 60-fold and depletion of cortactin 16-fold as compared with control cells. Most likely the stronger effect of DIAPH1 depletion on colon cancer metastasis is due to the fact that in vitro knock down of DIAPH1 impaired all steps of metastasis; adhesion, invasion and migration while down-regulation of cortactin only reduced adhesion and invasion. This very strong reducing effect of DIAPH1 depletion on colon carcinoma cell metastasis makes the protein a promising therapeutic target for individualized colorectal cancer therapy. © 2013 UICC.

  19. Post-training glucocorticoid receptor activation during Pavlovian conditioning reduces Pavlovian-instrumental transfer in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielock, Steffi M; Sommer, Susanne; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that glucocorticoid receptor activation can enhance memory consolidation in Pavlovian learning tasks. For instance, post-training injections of the synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone increased conditioned responding to reward-predictive Pavlovian stimuli. Here we explored whether post-training dexamethasone injections can enhance appetitive Pavlovian learning and amplify the ability of Pavlovian stimuli to invigorate instrumental behaviour, a phenomenon termed Pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT). Animals were given 8 training days with two sessions per day, an instrumental training session in the morning and a Pavlovian training session in the afternoon. Dexamethasone or vehicle injections were administered daily immediately after Pavlovian training sessions. In a subsequent transfer test, we measured the general PIT effect, i.e. the enhancement of lever pressing for expected reward during presentation of an appetitive Pavlovian stimulus predictive for the same reward. Repeated high-dose (1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) dexamethasone injections elicited pronounced body weight loss, markedly reduced instrumental performance and left Pavlovian learning unaltered, whereas repeated low-dose (3 μg/kg, i.p.) dexamethasone injections inhibited body weight gain, slightly reduced instrumental performance and left Pavlovian learning unaltered during training. Importantly, in rats subjected to high- and low-dose dexamethasone injections, the overall response rates and the PIT effect were reduced in the transfer test. Thus, dexamethasone given after Pavlovian training was not able to amplify the invigorating effects of Pavlovian stimuli on instrumental action. Considerable evidence suggests that body weight changes after repeated low- and high-dose dexamethasone treatment as observed here are associated with muscle atrophy that could impair response capabilities. However, our data suggest that impaired response capabilities are not a

  20. Assessing the Behavior of Typically Lithophile Elements Under Highly Reducing Conditions Relevant to the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, R. L., II; Vander Kaaden, K. E.; McCubbin, F. M.; Danielson, L. R.

    2017-12-01

    With the data returned from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, there are now numerous constraints on the physical and chemical properties of Mercury, including its surface composition. The high S and low FeO contents observed from MESSENGER suggest a low oxygen fugacity of the present materials on the planet's surface. Most of our understanding of elemental partitioning behavior comes from observations made on terrestrial rocks, but Mercury's oxygen fugacity is far outside the conditions of those samples, estimated at approximately 3-7 log units below the Iron-Wüstite (IW) oxygen buffer, several orders of magnitude more reducing than other terrestrial bodies we have data from. With limited oxygen available, lithophile elements may instead exhibit chalcophile, halophile, or siderophile behaviors. Furthermore, very few natural samples of rocks that formed under reducing conditions (e.g., enstatite chondrites, achondrites, aubrites) are available in our collections for examination of this change in geochemical affinity. Our goal is to determine the elemental partitioning behavior of typically lithophile elements at lower oxygen fugacity as a function of temperature and pressure. Experiments were conducted at 1 GPa in a 13 mm QUICKpress piston cylinder and at 4 GPa in an 880-ton multi-anvil press, at temperatures up to 1850°C. The composition of starting materials for the experiments were designed so the final run products contained metal, silicate melt, and sulfide melt phases. Oxygen fugacity was controlled in the experiments by adding silicon metal to the samples, in order to utilize the Si-SiO2 buffer, which is 5 log units more reducing than the IW buffer at our temperatures of interest. The target silicate melt composition was diopside (CaMgSi2O6) because measured surface compositions indicate partial melting of a pyroxene-rich mantle. The results of our experiments will aid in our understanding of the fate of

  1. A new system to reduce formaldehyde levels improves safety conditions during gross veterinary anatomy learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacher, Víctor; Llombart, Cristina; Carretero, Ana; Navarro, Marc; Ysern, Pere; Calero, Sebastián; Fígols, Enric; Ruberte, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Dissection is a very useful method of learning veterinary anatomy. However, formaldehyde, which is widely used to preserve cadavers, is an irritant, and it has recently been classified as a carcinogen. In 1997, the Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo [National Institute of Workplace Security and Hygiene] found that the levels of formaldehyde in our dissection room were above the threshold limit values. Unfortunately, no optimal substitute for formaldehyde is currently available. Therefore, we designed a new ventilation system that combines slow propulsion of fresh air from above the dissection table and rapid aspiration of polluted air from the perimeter. Formaldehyde measurements performed in 2004, after the introduction of this new system into our dissection laboratory, showed a dramatic reduction (about tenfold, or 0.03 ppm). A suitable propelling/aspirating air system successfully reduces the concentration of formaldehyde in the dissection room, significantly improving safety conditions for students, instructors, and technical staff during gross anatomy learning.

  2. Anaerobic degradation of naphthalene by the mixed bacteria under nitrate reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Junfeng; Liu Xiang; Ding Aizhong

    2009-01-01

    Mixed bacteria were enriched from soil samples contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The anaerobic degradation characteristics by the enriched bacteria with different initial naphthalene concentrations were investigated under nitrate reducing conditions. The results showed that the mixed bacteria could degrade nearly all the naphthalene over the incubations of 25 days when the initial naphthalene concentration was below 30 mg/L. The degradation rates of naphthalene increased with increasing initial concentrations. A high naphthalene concentration of 30 mg/L did not inhibit neither on the bacterial growth nor on the naphthalene degradation ability. The accumulation of nitrite was occurred during the reduction of nitrate, and a nitrite concentration of 50 mg/L had no inhibition effect on the degradation of naphthalene. The calculation of electron balances revealed that most of the naphthalene was oxidized whereas a small proportion was used for cell synthesis.

  3. Ozone oxidative post-conditioning reduces oxidative protein damage in patients with disc hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Fernández, Olga Sonia; Pantoja, Marelis; Díaz Soto, María Teresa; Dranguet, Jaqueline; García Insua, Martina; Viebhan-Hánsler, Renata; Menéndez Cepero, Silvia; Calunga Fernández, José L

    2012-01-01

    Although inflammation in disc hernia (DH) has been recognized and it is a well-known process mediated by loss of the cellular redox balance, only a few studies about the impact of chronic oxidative stress on this neurological disorder have been made. Ozone therapy has been widely used with clinical efficacy in DH. This work aimed at characterizing the systemic redox status of patients with low back pain and neck pain as well as studying if ozone oxidative post-conditioning modified the pathological oxidative stress and protected against oxidative protein damage and if there is any relationship between oxidative changes and pain in both DH. Redox status of 33 patients with diagnosis of DH by computerized axial tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and clinical evaluations was studied. Ozone was administered by paravertebral way. After ozone treatment, plasmatic levels of antioxidant/pro-oxidant markers, pain, and life quality disability parameters were evaluated. One hundred percent of patients showed a severe oxidative stress. Major changes in superoxide dismutase activity, total hydroperoxides, advanced oxidation protein products, fructolysine content, and malondialdehyde were observed. After ozone oxidative post-conditioning, there was a re-establishment of patients' cellular redox balance as well as a decrease in pain in both DH. A relationship between indicators of oxidative protein damage and pain was demonstrated. Ozone therapy protected against oxidation of proteins and reduced the pain. Relationship between markers of oxidative protein damage, disability parameters, and pain suggests the role of oxidative stress in the pathological processes involved in DH.

  4. Ethylene reduces gas exchange and growth of lettuce plants under hypobaric and normal atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuanjiu; Davies, Fred T; Lacey, Ronald E

    2009-03-01

    Elevated levels of ethylene occur in controlled environment agriculture and in spaceflight environments, leading to adverse plant growth and sterility. The objectives of this research were to characterize the influence of ethylene on carbon dioxide (CO(2)) assimilation (C(A)), dark period respiration (DPR) and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Buttercrunch) under ambient and low total pressure conditions. Lettuce plants were grown under variable total gas pressures of 25 kPa (hypobaric) and 101 kPa (ambient) pressure. Endogenously produced ethylene accumulated and reduced C(A), DPR and plant growth of ambient and hypobaric plants. There was a negative linear correlation between increasing ethylene concentrations [from 0 to around 1000 nmol mol(-1) (ppb)] on C(A), DPR and growth of ambient and hypobaric plants. Declines in C(A) and DPR occurred with both exogenous and endogenous ethylene treatments. C(A) was more sensitive to increasing ethylene concentration than DPR. There was a direct, negative effect of increasing ethylene concentration reducing gas exchange as well as an indirect ethylene effect on leaf epinasty, which reduced light capture and C(A). While the C(A) was comparable, there was a lower DPR in hypobaric than ambient pressure plants - independent of ethylene and under non-limiting CO(2) levels (100 Pa pCO(2), nearly three-fold that in normal air). This research shows that lettuce can be grown under hypobaria ( congruent with25% of normal earth ambient total pressure); however, hypobaria caused no significant reduction of endogenous ethylene production.

  5. The ecophysiology of sulfur isotope fractionation by sulfate reducing bacteria in response to variable environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, W.; Bradley, A. S.; Johnston, D. T.; Pereira, I. A. C.; Venceslau, S.; Wallace, C.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reducers (MSR) drive the Earth's biogeochemical sulfur cycle. At the heart of this energy metabolism is a cascade of redox transformations coupling organic carbon and/or hydrogen oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate to sulfide. The sulfide produced is depleted in the heavier isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. The magnitude of discrimination (fractionation) depends on: i) the cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (csSRR, Kaplan & Rittenberg (1964) Can. J. Microbio.; Chambers et al. (1975) Can. J. Microbio; Sim et al. (2011) GCA; Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS), ii) the ambient sulfate concentration (Harrison & Thode (1958) Research; Habicht et al. (2002) Science; Bradley et al. in review), iii) both sulfate and electron donor availability, or iv) an intrinsic physiological limitation (e.g. cellular division rate). When neither sulfate nor electron donor limits csSRR a more complex function relates the magnitude of isotope fractionation to cell physiology and environmental conditions. In recent and on-going work we have examined the importance of enzyme-specific fractionation factors, as well as the influence of electron donor or electron acceptor availability under carefully controlled culture conditions (e.g. Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS). In light of recent advances in MSR genetics and biochemistry we utilize well-characterized mutant strains, along with a continuous-culture methodology (Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS) to further probe the fractionation capacity of this metabolism under controlled physiological conditions. We present our latest findings on the magnitude of S and D/H isotope fractionation in both wild type and mutant strains. We will discuss these in light of recent theoretical advances (Wing & Halevy (2014) PNAS), examining the mode and relevance of MSR isotope fractionation in the laboratory to modern and ancient environmental settings, particularly anoxic marine sediments.

  6. Does mercury contamination reduce body condition of endangered California clapper rails?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Overton, Cory T.; Casazza, Michael L.; Takekawa, John Y.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Keister, Robin A.; Herzog, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    We examined mercury exposure in 133 endangered California clapper rails (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) within tidal marsh habitats of San Francisco Bay, California from 2006 to 2010. Mean total mercury concentrations were 0.56 μg/g ww in blood (range: 0.15–1.43), 9.87 μg/g fw in head feathers (3.37–22.0), 9.04 μg/g fw in breast feathers (3.68–20.2), and 0.57 μg/g fww in abandoned eggs (0.15–2.70). We recaptured 21 clapper rails and most had low within-individual variation in mercury. Differences in mercury concentrations were largely attributed to tidal marsh site, with some evidence for year and quadratic date effects. Mercury concentrations in feathers were correlated with blood, and slopes differed between sexes (R 2 = 0.58–0.76). Body condition was negatively related to mercury concentrations. Model averaged estimates indicated a potential decrease in body mass of 20–22 g (5–7%) over the observed range of mercury concentrations. Our results indicate the potential for detrimental effects of mercury contamination on endangered California clapper rails in tidal marsh habitats. - Highlights: ► We examined mercury in endangered California clapper rails within tidal marshes. ► Differences in mercury concentrations were largely attributed to tidal marsh site. ► Mercury concentrations in blood, feathers, and eggs were considered elevated. ► Body condition was negatively related to mercury concentrations. ► Results indicate detrimental effects of mercury on endangered clapper rails. - Mercury contamination in endangered California clapper rails was influenced by tidal marsh site and increased mercury resulted in reduced bird body condition.

  7. The intOA Experiment: A Study of Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions Under Moderate to Strong Offshore Winds and Opposing Swell Conditions in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, F. J.; García-Nava, H.; Durazo, R.; Osuna, P.; Díaz Méndez, G. M.; Graber, H. C.

    2011-03-01

    The Gulf of Tehuantepec air-sea interaction experiment ( intOA) took place from February to April 2005, under the Programme for the Study of the Gulf of Tehuantepec (PEGoT, Spanish acronym for Programa para el Estudio del Golfo de Tehuantepec). PEGoT is underway aiming for better knowledge of the effect of strong and persistent offshore winds on coastal waters and their natural resources, as well as performing advanced numerical modelling of the wave and surface current fields. One of the goals of the intOA experiment is to improve our knowledge on air-sea interaction processes with particular emphasis on the effect of surface waves on the momentum flux for the characteristic and unique conditions that occur when strong Tehuano winds blow offshore against the Pacific Ocean long period swell. For the field campaign, an air-sea interaction spar (ASIS) buoy was deployed in the Gulf of Tehuantepec to measure surface waves and the momentum flux between the ocean and the atmosphere. High frequency radar systems (phase array type) were in operation from two coastal sites and three acoustic Doppler current profilers were deployed near-shore. Synthetic aperture radar images were also acquired as part of the remote sensing component of the experiment. The present paper provides the main results on the wave and wind fields, addressing the direct calculation of the momentum flux and the drag coefficient, and gives an overview of the intOA experiment. Although the effect of swell has been described in recent studies, this is the first time for the very specific conditions encountered, such as swell persistently opposing offshore winds and locally generated waves, to show a clear evidence of the influence on the wind stress of the significant steepness of swell waves.

  8. Hydrocarbon activation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions proceeds by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Ian; Gray, Neil; Aitken, Caroline; Sherry, Angela; Jones, Martin; Larter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Microbial degradation of alkanes typically involves their conversion to fatty acids which are then catabolised by beta-oxidation. The critical step in this process is activation of the hydrocarbon. Under oxic conditions this is catalyzed by monooxygenase enzymes with the formation of long chain alcohols. In the absence of oxygen alternative alkane activation mechanisms have been observed or proposed. Fumarate addition to alkanes to form alkyl succinates is considered a central process in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. Comparative studies of crude oil degradation under sulphate-reducing and methanogenic conditions revealed distinctive patterns of compound class removal and metabolite formation. Alkyl succinates derived from C7 to C26 n-alkanes and branched chain alkanes were found in abundance in sulfate-reducing systems but these were not detected during methanogenic crude oil degradation. Only one other mechanism of alkane activation has been elucidated to date. This involves addition of carbon derived from bicarbonate/CO2 to C-3 of an alkane chain to form a 2-ethylalkane with subsequent removal of the ethyl group leading to the formation of a fatty acid 1 carbon shorter than the original alkane. 2-ethylalkanes have never been detected as metabolites of anaerobic alkane degradation and were not detected in crude oil-degrading methanogenic systems. Due to the range of alkanes present in crude oil it was not possible to infer the generation of C-odd acids from C-even alkanes which is characteristic of the C-3 carboxylation mechanism. Furthermore genes homologous to alkysuccinate synthetases were not detected in the methanogenic hydrocarbon degrading community by pyrosequencing of total DNA extracted from methanogenic enrichments cultures. beta-oxidation genes were detected and intriguingly, alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase genes were present. This offers the possibility that alkane activation in the methanogenic system does not proceed via acid metabolites

  9. Conditional Stochastic Models in Reduced Space: Towards Efficient Simulation of Tropical Cyclone Precipitation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodov, B.

    2017-12-01

    Stochastic simulation of realistic and statistically robust patterns of Tropical Cyclone (TC) induced precipitation is a challenging task. It is even more challenging in a catastrophe modeling context, where tens of thousands of typhoon seasons need to be simulated in order to provide a complete view of flood risk. Ultimately, one could run a coupled global climate model and regional Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model, but this approach is not feasible in the catastrophe modeling context and, most importantly, may not provide TC track patterns consistent with observations. Rather, we propose to leverage NWP output for the observed TC precipitation patterns (in terms of downscaled reanalysis 1979-2015) collected on a Lagrangian frame along the historical TC tracks and reduced to the leading spatial principal components of the data. The reduced data from all TCs is then grouped according to timing, storm evolution stage (developing, mature, dissipating, ETC transitioning) and central pressure and used to build a dictionary of stationary (within a group) and non-stationary (for transitions between groups) covariance models. Provided that the stochastic storm tracks with all the parameters describing the TC evolution are already simulated, a sequence of conditional samples from the covariance models chosen according to the TC characteristics at a given moment in time are concatenated, producing a continuous non-stationary precipitation pattern in a Lagrangian framework. The simulated precipitation for each event is finally distributed along the stochastic TC track and blended with a non-TC background precipitation using a data assimilation technique. The proposed framework provides means of efficient simulation (10000 seasons simulated in a couple of days) and robust typhoon precipitation patterns consistent with observed regional climate and visually undistinguishable from high resolution NWP output. The framework is used to simulate a catalog of 10000 typhoon

  10. A model of the plasma flow and current in Saturn's polar ionosphere under conditions of strong Dungey cycle driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Jackman

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple model of the flow and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere. This model is motivated by theoretical reasoning, and guided quantitatively by in situ field and flow data from space missions, ground-based IR Doppler measurements, and Hubble Space Telescope images. The flow pattern consists of components which represent (1 plasma sub-corotation in the middle magnetosphere region resulting from plasma pick-up and radial transport from internal sources; (2 the Vasyliunas-cycle of internal plasma mass-loss down the magnetospheric tail at higher latitudes; and (3 the polar Dungey-cycle flow driven by the solar wind interaction. Upstream measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF indicate the occurrence of both extended low-field rarefaction intervals with essentially negligible Dungey-cycle flow, and few-day high-field compression regions in which the Dungey-cycle voltage peaks at a few hundred kV. Here we model the latter conditions when the Dungey-cycle is active, advancing on previous axi-symmetric models which may be more directly applicable to quiet conditions. For theoretical convenience the overall flow pattern is constructed by adding together two components - a purely rotational flow similar to previous axi-symmetric models, and a sun-aligned twin vortex representing the dawn-dusk asymmetry effects associated with the Vasyliunas-and Dungey-cycle flows. We calculate the horizontal ionospheric current associated with the flow and the field-aligned current from its divergence. These calculations show that a sheet of upward-directed field-aligned current flows at the boundary of open field lines which is strongly modulated in local-time by the Dungey-cycle flows. We then consider implications of the field-aligned current for magnetospheric electron acceleration and aurorae using two plasma source populations (hot outer magnetospheric electrons and cool dense magnetosheath electrons. Both sources display a

  11. Odor tracking in sharks is reduced under future ocean acidification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Danielle L; Jennings, Ashley R; Atema, Jelle; Munday, Philip L

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies show that ocean acidification impairs sensory functions and alters the behavior of teleost fishes. If sharks and other elasmobranchs are similarly affected, this could have significant consequences for marine ecosystems globally. Here, we show that projected future CO2 levels impair odor tracking behavior of the smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis). Adult M. canis were held for 5 days in a current-day control (405 ± 26 μatm) and mid (741 ± 22 μatm) or high CO2 (1064 ± 17 μatm) treatments consistent with the projections for the year 2100 on a 'business as usual' scenario. Both control and mid CO2 -treated individuals maintained normal odor tracking behavior, whereas high CO2 -treated sharks significantly avoided the odor cues indicative of food. Control sharks spent >60% of their time in the water stream containing the food stimulus, but this value fell below 15% in high CO2 -treated sharks. In addition, sharks treated under mid and high CO2 conditions reduced attack behavior compared to the control individuals. Our findings show that shark feeding could be affected by changes in seawater chemistry projected for the end of this century. Understanding the effects of ocean acidification on critical behaviors, such as prey tracking in large predators, can help determine the potential impacts of future ocean acidification on ecosystem function. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Incubation of ethanol reinstatement depends on test conditions and how ethanol consumption is reduced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Brett C.; Lamb, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    In reinstatement studies (a common preclinical procedure for studying relapse), incubation occurs (longer abstinence periods result in more responding). This finding is discordant with the clinical literature. Identifying determinants of incubation could aid in interpreting reinstatement and identifying processes involved in relapse. Reinstated responding was examined in rats trained to respond for ethanol and food under a multiple concurrent schedule (Component 1: ethanol FR5, food FR150; Component 2: ethanol FR5, food FR5–alternating across the 30-min session). Ethanol consumption was then reduced for 1 or 16 sessions either by suspending training (rats remained in home cage) or by providing alternative reinforcement (only Component 2 stimuli and contingencies were presented throughout the session). In the next session, stimuli associated with Component 1 were presented and responses recorded but ethanol and food were never delivered. Two test conditions were studied: fixed-ratio completion either produced ethanol- or food-associated stimuli (signaled) or had no programmed consequence (unsignaled). Incubation of ethanol responding was observed only after suspended training during signaled test sessions. Incubation of food responding was also observed after suspended training. These results are most consistent with incubation resulting from a degradation of feedback functions limiting extinction responding, rather than an increased motivation. PMID:25595114

  13. Sonification of in-vehicle interface reduces gaze movements under dual-task condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, Julien; Misdariis, Nicolas; Langlois, Sabine; Gaillard, Pascal; Lemercier, Céline

    2015-09-01

    In-car infotainment systems (ICIS) often degrade driving performances since they divert the driver's gaze from the driving scene. Sonification of hierarchical menus (such as those found in most ICIS) is examined in this paper as one possible solution to reduce gaze movements towards the visual display. In a dual-task experiment in the laboratory, 46 participants were requested to prioritize a primary task (a continuous target detection task) and to simultaneously navigate in a realistic mock-up of an ICIS, either sonified or not. Results indicated that sonification significantly increased the time spent looking at the primary task, and significantly decreased the number and the duration of gaze saccades towards the ICIS. In other words, the sonified ICIS could be used nearly exclusively by ear. On the other hand, the reaction times in the primary task were increased in both silent and sonified conditions. This study suggests that sonification of secondary tasks while driving could improve the driver's visual attention of the driving scene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  14. The behaviour of a floating water bridge under reduced gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Elmar C.; Agostinho, Luewton L. F.; Wexler, Adam; Wagterveld, R. Martijn; Tuinstra, Jan; Woisetschläger, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    When high voltage is applied to pure water filled into two beakers close to each other, a connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge (Armstrong 1893 The Electrical Engineer pp 154-45, Uhlig W 2005 personal communication, Fuchs et al 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 6112-4, Fuchs et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 185502, Fuchs et al 2009 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 065502, Fuchs et al 2010 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 43 105502, Woisetschläger et al 2010 Exp. Fluids 48 121-31, Nishiumi and Honda 2009 Res. Lett. Phys. Chem. 2009 371650). This phenomenon is of special interest, since it comprises a number of phenomena currently tackled in modern water science. In this work, the behaviour of this phenomenon under reduced gravity conditions during a parabolic flight is presented by the means of high speed imaging with fringe projection. An analysis of the behaviour is presented and compared with theoretical considerations.

  15. The behaviour of a floating water bridge under reduced gravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Elmar C; Agostinho, Luewton L F; Wexler, Adam; Wagterveld, R Martijn; Tuinstra, Jan; Woisetschlaeger, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    When high voltage is applied to pure water filled into two beakers close to each other, a connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge (Armstrong 1893 The Electrical Engineer pp 154-45, Uhlig W 2005 personal communication, Fuchs et al 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 6112-4, Fuchs et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 185502, Fuchs et al 2009 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 065502, Fuchs et al 2010 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 43 105502, Woisetschlaeger et al 2010 Exp. Fluids 48 121-31, Nishiumi and Honda 2009 Res. Lett. Phys. Chem. 2009 371650). This phenomenon is of special interest, since it comprises a number of phenomena currently tackled in modern water science. In this work, the behaviour of this phenomenon under reduced gravity conditions during a parabolic flight is presented by the means of high speed imaging with fringe projection. An analysis of the behaviour is presented and compared with theoretical considerations.

  16. Biofuel blending reduces particle emissions from aircraft engines at cruise conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard H; Thornhill, Kenneth L; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Sauer, Daniel; D'Ascoli, Eugenio; Kim, Jin; Lichtenstern, Michael; Scheibe, Monika; Beaton, Brian; Beyersdorf, Andreas J; Barrick, John; Bulzan, Dan; Corr, Chelsea A; Crosbie, Ewan; Jurkat, Tina; Martin, Robert; Riddick, Dean; Shook, Michael; Slover, Gregory; Voigt, Christiane; White, Robert; Winstead, Edward; Yasky, Richard; Ziemba, Luke D; Brown, Anthony; Schlager, Hans; Anderson, Bruce E

    2017-03-15

    Aviation-related aerosol emissions contribute to the formation of contrail cirrus clouds that can alter upper tropospheric radiation and water budgets, and therefore climate. The magnitude of air-traffic-related aerosol-cloud interactions and the ways in which these interactions might change in the future remain uncertain. Modelling studies of the present and future effects of aviation on climate require detailed information about the number of aerosol particles emitted per kilogram of fuel burned and the microphysical properties of those aerosols that are relevant for cloud formation. However, previous observational data at cruise altitudes are sparse for engines burning conventional fuels, and no data have previously been reported for biofuel use in-flight. Here we report observations from research aircraft that sampled the exhaust of engines onboard a NASA DC-8 aircraft as they burned conventional Jet A fuel and a 50:50 (by volume) blend of Jet A fuel and a biofuel derived from Camelina oil. We show that, compared to using conventional fuels, biofuel blending reduces particle number and mass emissions immediately behind the aircraft by 50 to 70 per cent. Our observations quantify the impact of biofuel blending on aerosol emissions at cruise conditions and provide key microphysical parameters, which will be useful to assess the potential of biofuel use in aviation as a viable strategy to mitigate climate change.

  17. Biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer under aerobic conditions and mixed nitrate and iron reducing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Arvin, Erik

    2000-01-01

    Ammonia liquor with very high concentrations of phenol and alkylated phenols is known to have leaked into the subsurface at a former coal carbonization plant in the UK, giving high concentrations of ammonium in the groundwater. In spite of this, no significant concentrations of phenols were found...... to 5 mg 1(-1): high: similar to 60 mg 1(-1), and very high: similar to 600 mg 1(-1)) and in the presence of other organic coal-tar compounds (mono- and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs and PAHs) and heterocyclic compounds (NSOs)) and ammonia liquor. Sandstone cores and groundwater for the microcosms...... degradation of phenols in unamended microcosms. The effect of other organic coal-tar compounds (BTEXs, PAWs, NSOs) on the degradation of the phenols under unamended conditions was limited to slightly longer lag-phases fur some of the phenols. Other constituents of the ammonia liquor did not appear...

  18. Photosynthesis, light use efficiency, and yield of reduced-chlorophyll soybean mutants in field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing chlorophyll (chl) content may improve the conversion efficiency of absorbed radiation into biomass (ec) and therefore yield in dense monoculture crops by improving light penetration and distribution within the canopy. Modeling suggests that reducing chl content may also reduce leaf temperat...

  19. Reduced Volume of the Arcuate Fasciculus in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Correia, Marta M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Shtyrov, Yury; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Mohr, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Atypical language is a fundamental feature of autism spectrum conditions (ASC), but few studies have examined the structural integrity of the arcuate fasciculus, the major white matter tract connecting frontal and temporal language regions, which is usually implicated as the main transfer route used in processing linguistic information by the brain. Abnormalities in the arcuate have been reported in young children with ASC, mostly in low-functioning or non-verbal individuals, but little is known regarding the structural properties of the arcuate in adults with ASC or, in particular, in individuals with ASC who have intact language, such as those with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome. We used probabilistic tractography of diffusion-weighted imaging to isolate and scrutinize the arcuate in a mixed-gender sample of 18 high-functioning adults with ASC (17 Asperger syndrome) and 14 age- and IQ-matched typically developing controls. Arcuate volume was significantly reduced bilaterally with clearest differences in the right hemisphere. This finding remained significant in an analysis of all male participants alone. Volumetric reduction in the arcuate was significantly correlated with the severity of autistic symptoms as measured by the Autism-Spectrum Quotient. These data reveal that structural differences are present even in high-functioning adults with ASC, who presented with no clinically manifest language deficits and had no reported developmental language delay. Arcuate structural integrity may be useful as an index of ASC severity and thus as a predictor and biomarker for ASC. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27242478

  20. Impact of KIR and HLA Genotypes on Outcomes after Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobecks, Ronald M; Wang, Tao; Askar, Medhat; Gallagher, Meighan M; Haagenson, Michael; Spellman, Stephen; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Müller, Carlheinz; Battiwalla, Minoo; Gajewski, James; Verneris, Michael R; Ringdén, Olle; Marino, Susana; Davies, Stella; Dehn, Jason; Bornhäuser, Martin; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Woolfrey, Ann; Shaw, Peter; Pollack, Marilyn; Weisdorf, Daniel; Milller, Jeffrey; Hurley, Carolyn; Lee, Stephanie J; Hsu, Katharine

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer cells are regulated by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) interactions with HLA class I ligands. Several models of natural killer cell reactivity have been associated with improved outcomes after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but this issue has not been rigorously addressed in reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) unrelated donor (URD) HCT. We studied 909 patients undergoing RIC-URD HCT. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 612) lacking ≥ 1 KIR ligands experienced higher grade III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.16 to 2.28; P = .005) compared to those with all ligands present. Absence of HLA-C2 for donor KIR2DL1 was associated with higher grade II to IV (HR, 1.4; P = .002) and III to IV acute GVHD (HR, 1.5; P = .01) compared with HLA-C2(+) patients. AML patients with KIR2DS1(+), HLA-C2 homozygous donors had greater treatment-related mortality compared with others (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.2; P = .002) but did not experience lower relapse. There were no significant associations with outcomes for AML when assessing donor-activating KIRs or centromeric KIR content or for any donor-recipient KIR-HLA assessments in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 297). KIR-HLA combinations in RIC-URD HCT recapitulate some but not all KIR-HLA effects observed in myeloablative HCT. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Does dual-tasking neutralize emotional memory and reduce conditioned responses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, I.M.; Krypotos, A.M.; Leer, A.; van Dis, E.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    This experiment tested whether dual-tasking (i.e., recalling the emotional memory while performing a visuospatial dual-task) neutralizes emotional memory, thereby decreasing conditioned responses. Undergraduates completed a differential conditioning paradigm with pictures of food items as

  2. The First in situ Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at High-Latitude Magnetopause during Strongly Dawnward Interplanetary Magnetic Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Vinas, A. F.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first in situ observation of high-latitude magnetopause (near the northern duskward cusp) Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (KHW) by Cluster on January 12, 2003, under strongly dawnward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The fluctuations unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are found to propagate mostly tailward, i.e., along the direction almost 90 deg. to both the magnetosheath and geomagnetic fields, which lowers the threshold of the KHI. The magnetic configuration across the boundary layer near the northern duskward cusp region during dawnward IMF is similar to that in the low-latitude boundary layer under northward IMF, in that (1) both magnetosheath and magnetospheric fields across the local boundary layer constitute the lowest magnetic shear and (2) the tailward propagation of the KHW is perpendicular to both fields. Approximately 3-hour-long periods of the KHW during dawnward IMF are followed by the rapid expansion of the dayside magnetosphere associated with the passage of an IMF discontinuity that characterizes an abrupt change in IMF cone angle, Phi = acos (B(sub x) / absolute value of Beta), from approx. 90 to approx. 10. Cluster, which was on its outbound trajectory, continued observing the boundary waves at the northern evening-side magnetopause during sunward IMF conditions following the passage of the IMF discontinuity. By comparing the signatures of boundary fluctuations before and after the IMF discontinuity, we report that the frequencies of the most unstable KH modes increased after the discontinuity passed. This result demonstrates that differences in IMF orientations (especially in f) are associated with the properties of KHW at the high-latitude magnetopause due to variations in thickness of the boundary layer, and/or width of the KH-unstable band on the surface of the dayside magnetopause.

  3. Analysis of the Contribution of Wind Drift Factor to Oil Slick Movement under Strong Tidal Condition: Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Yang, Chan-Su; Oh, Jeong-Hwan; Ouchi, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the wind drift factor under strong tidal conditions in the western coastal area of Korea on the movement of oil slicks caused by the Hebei Spirit oil spill accident in 2007. The movement of oil slicks was computed using a simple simulation model based on the empirical formula as a function of surface current, wind speed, and the wind drift factor. For the simulation, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) model and Automatic Weather System (AWS) were used to generate tidal and wind fields respectively. Simulation results were then compared with 5 sets of spaceborne optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. From the present study, it was found that highest matching rate between the simulation results and satellite imagery was obtained with different values of the wind drift factor, and to first order, this factor was linearly proportional to the wind speed. Based on the results, a new modified empirical formula was proposed for forecasting the movement of oil slicks on the coastal area. PMID:24498094

  4. Analysis of the contribution of wind drift factor to oil slick movement under strong tidal condition: Hebei Spirit oil spill case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Ho Kim

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the wind drift factor under strong tidal conditions in the western coastal area of Korea on the movement of oil slicks caused by the Hebei Spirit oil spill accident in 2007. The movement of oil slicks was computed using a simple simulation model based on the empirical formula as a function of surface current, wind speed, and the wind drift factor. For the simulation, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC model and Automatic Weather System (AWS were used to generate tidal and wind fields respectively. Simulation results were then compared with 5 sets of spaceborne optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR data. From the present study, it was found that highest matching rate between the simulation results and satellite imagery was obtained with different values of the wind drift factor, and to first order, this factor was linearly proportional to the wind speed. Based on the results, a new modified empirical formula was proposed for forecasting the movement of oil slicks on the coastal area.

  5. Nuclear power can reduce emissions and maintain a strong economy: Rating Australia’s optimal future electricity-generation mix by technologies and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sanghyun; Bradshaw, Corey J.A.; Brook, Barry W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear power is essential for reducing greenhouse-gas emissions at lower cost. • Physical and economic limits of renewables at high penetrations hamper their growth. • Large-scale fossil fuels are required if nuclear power is not permitted in Australia. • Well-balanced information is a prerequisite for defining an optimal future mix. - Abstract: Legal barriers currently prohibit nuclear power for electricity generation in Australia. For this reason, published future electricity scenarios aimed at policy makers for this country have not seriously considered a full mix of energy options. Here we addressed this deficiency by comparing the life-cycle sustainability of published scenarios using multi-criteria decision-making analysis, and modeling the optimized future electricity mix using a genetic algorithm. The published ‘CSIRO e-future’ scenario under its default condition (excluding nuclear) has the largest aggregate negative environmental and economic outcomes (score = 4.51 out of 8), followed by the Australian Energy Market Operator’s 100% renewable energy scenario (4.16) and the Greenpeace scenario (3.97). The e-future projection with maximum nuclear-power penetration allowed yields the lowest negative impacts (1.46). After modeling possible future electricity mixes including or excluding nuclear power, the weighted criteria recommended an optimized scenario mix where nuclear power generated >40% of total electricity. The life-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions of the optimization scenarios including nuclear power were <27 kg CO 2 -e MW h −1 in 2050, which achieves the IPCC’s target of 50–150 kg CO 2 -e MW h −1 . Our analyses demonstrate clearly that nuclear power is an effective and logical option for the environmental and economic sustainability of a future electricity network in Australia

  6. Improving Chemical EOR Simulations and Reducing the Subsurface Uncertainty Using Downscaling Conditioned to Tracer Data

    KAUST Repository

    Torrealba, Victor A.

    2017-10-02

    Recovery mechanisms are more likely to be influenced by grid-block size and reservoir heterogeneity in Chemical EOR (CEOR) than in conventional Water Flood (WF) simulations. Grid upscaling based on single-phase flow is a common practice in WF simulation models, where simulation grids are coarsened to perform history matching and sensitivity analyses within affordable computational times. This coarse grid resolution (typically about 100 ft.) could be sufficient in WF, however, it usually fails to capture key physical mechanisms in CEOR. In addition to increased numerical dispersion in coarse models, these models tend to artificially increase the level of mixing between the fluids and may not have enough resolution to capture different length scales of geological features to which EOR processes can be highly sensitive. As a result of which, coarse models usually overestimate the sweep efficiency, and underestimate the displacement efficiency. Grid refinement (simple downscaling) can resolve artificial mixing but appropriately re-creating the fine-scale heterogeneity, without degrading the history-match conducted on the coarse-scale, remains a challenge. Because of the difference in recovery mechanisms involved in CEOR, such as miscibility and thermodynamic phase split, the impact of grid downscaling on CEOR simulations is not well understood. In this work, we introduce a geostatistical downscaling method conditioned to tracer data to refine a coarse history-matched WF model. This downscaling process is necessary for CEOR simulations when the original (fine) earth model is not available or when major disconnects occur between the original earth model and the history-matched coarse WF model. The proposed downscaling method is a process of refining the coarse grid, and populating the relevant properties in the newly created finer grid cells. The method considers the values of rock properties in the coarse grid as hard data, and the corresponding variograms and property

  7. Reducing condition number by appropriate current decomposition on a multiplet of several wires

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, AA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a numerical investigation in connection with the dependency of the condition number of the impedance matrix on the decomposition of current on a junction with several attached wires (multiplet). It is shown that the condition...

  8. Fear conditioning following a unilateral anterior temporal lobectomy: reduced autonomic responding and stimulus contingency knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Evelien; van Paesschen, Wim; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vansteenwegen, Debora

    2010-03-01

    Animal research demonstrated that during fear conditioning the amygdala plays a central role in forming an association between the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US). Lesion studies conducted in patients who underwent a unilateral anterior temporal lobe resection, however; yielded contradictory findings. To date, it remains unclear whether amygdala damage only affects fear-conditioned startle responding or impairs both the latter and fear-conditioned skin conductance responding (SCR). Moreover inconsistency exists regarding the preservation of contingency knowledge in amygdala-damaged patients. In the current study, a differential fear conditioning task was presented to a unilaterally amygdala-damaged patient group and a healthy control group, recording fear-potentiated startle responses along with SCRs. Retrospectively, the valence of the CSs and contingency awareness was assessed. Unlike the control group, unilaterally amygdala-damaged patients showed neither in their SCRs nor in their valence ratings an effect of fear conditioning. The startle data, however, yielded in none of the two test groups fear-conditioned responding. Finally, considerably fewer patients (37.5%) than controls (95%) acquired correct memory of the presented contingency. Based on these findings we concluded that the fear conditioning impairment in amygdala-damaged patients was not restricted to SCRs, but also affected valence ratings and memory of the presented contingency. A broader theory of the amygdala as relevance detector is proposed in order to account for the diverse neurological findings obtained so far.

  9. Particulate matter from both heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel shipping emissions show strong biological effects on human lung cells at realistic and comparable in vitro exposure conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Oeder

    Full Text Available Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling.To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols.Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses.The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon ("soot". Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification.Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the use of HFO and DF we recommend a

  10. Particulate Matter from Both Heavy Fuel Oil and Diesel Fuel Shipping Emissions Show Strong Biological Effects on Human Lung Cells at Realistic and Comparable In Vitro Exposure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Marco; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Torvela, Tiina; Jokiniemi, Jorma K.; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; BéruBé, Kelly A.; Wlodarczyk, Anna J.; Prytherch, Zoë; Michalke, Bernhard; Krebs, Tobias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kelbg, Michael; Tiggesbäumker, Josef; Karg, Erwin; Jakobi, Gert; Scholtes, Sorana; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Lintelmann, Jutta; Matuschek, Georg; Sklorz, Martin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Orasche, Jürgen; Richthammer, Patrick; Müller, Laarnie; Elsasser, Michael; Reda, Ahmed; Gröger, Thomas; Weggler, Benedikt; Schwemer, Theo; Czech, Hendryk; Rüger, Christopher P.; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Radischat, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buters, Jeroen T. M.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling. Objectives To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols. Methods Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO) or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF). Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses. Results The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon (“soot”). Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification. Conclusions Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the

  11. Reduced prokaryotic heterotrophic production at in situ pressure conditions in the dark ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano-Sato, Chie; Sintes, Eva; Reinthaler, Thomas; Utsumi, Motoo; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2017-04-01

    Prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) is a key process in the ocean's biological carbon cycle. About 50% of the oceanic PHP takes place in the dark ocean characterized by low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure, which increases by 1 MPa (10 atm) every 100 m depth. However, rate measurements of PHP are usually performed under atmospheric pressure conditions. Yet, the difference in pressure conditions and the handling of the samples on board may introduce biases in the PHP measurements. To determine PHP at in situ conditions, we developed an in situ microbial incubator (ISMI) designed to autonomously sample and incubate seawater down to a depth of 4000 m. Natural prokaryotic communities from the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans were incubated in the ISMI with 5 nM 3H-leucine at different depths ranging between 10 and 3200 m. For comparison, atmospheric pressure incubations at in situ temperature were also conducted. PHP and single cell activity assessed by microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (MICRO-CARD-FISH) were determined. PHP obtained under in situ pressure conditions was generally lower than under atmospheric pressure conditions, suggesting that incubation under atmospheric pressure on board stimulates activity of dark ocean prokaryotes. The ratio between the bulk PHP obtained under in situ and under atmospheric pressure conditions decreased with depth. Moreover, MICRO-CARD-FISH revealed that some specific prokaryotic groups are apparently more affected by the hydrostatic pressure condition than others. Our results suggest that PHP in the dark ocean might be lower than assumed based on measurements under surface pressure conditions.

  12. Characterization of esterase activity in the Bianchetta trevigiana grape variety under reducing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomolino G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Giovanna Lomolino, Anna LanteDepartment of Agronomy Food Natural Resources Animals and Environment, Agripolis, Università di Padova Viale dell'Università, Padova, ItalyBackground and methods: While extensive research has been carried out on the enzymes responsible for ester synthesis and hydrolysis by wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, grape esterase activity is limited. In this study, the autochthonous grape variety, Bianchetta trevigiana, widespread in the Prosecco wine production area of Treviso, Conegliano, and Asolo, Italy, was characterized according to its esterase activity. Because grape skin is very rich in compounds which impart qualitative characteristics to wine, the study of esterase was carried out on this part of the fruit.Results: During enzyme extraction from grape skin, the presence of the reducing agent, β-mercaptoethanol, allowed a better protein yield but reduced esterase activity. Further addition of increasing doses of reducing agents to grape skin protein extract, such as of K2S2O5 (used in winemaking and DTT, reduced or inhibited esterase activity. Even though the zymographic profiles of the extracts obtained with and without β-mercaptoethanol were qualitatively equal, the intensity of enzymatic bands, measured by densitometry, was different.Conclusion: The presence of reducing agents affected the activity of grape skin esterase, and given that this enzyme is involved in the hydrolysis and synthesis of esters, which are important compounds responsible for the flavor of wine, addition of reducing agents could affect the aromatic profile of wine.Keywords: esterase, grape, reducing agent, wine

  13. MYB and bHLH transcription factor transgenes increase anthocyanin pigmentation in petunia and lisianthus plants, and the petunia phenotypes are strongly enhanced under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy E Schwinn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Petunia line Mitchell [MP, Petunia axillaris × (P. axillaris × P. hybrida] and Eustoma grandiflorum (lisianthus plants were produced containing a transgene for over-expression of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor (ROSEA1 that up-regulates flavonoid biosynthesis in Antirrhinum majus. The petunia lines were also crossed with previously produced MP lines containing a Zea mays flavonoid-related bHLH transcription factor transgene (LEAF COLOR, LC, which induces strong vegetative pigmentation when these 35S:LC plants are exposed to high light levels. 35S:ROS1 lisianthus transgenics had limited changes in anthocyanin pigmentation, specifically, precocious pigmentation of flower petals and increased pigmentation of sepals. RNA transcript levels for two anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, chalcone synthase and anthocyanidin synthase, were increased in the 35S:ROS1 lisianthus petals compared to those of control lines. With MP, the 35S:ROS1 calli showed novel red pigmentation in culture, but this was generally not seen in tissue culture plantlets regenerated from the calli or young plants transferred to soil in the greenhouse. Anthocyanin pigmentation was enhanced in the stems of mature 35S:ROS1 MP plants, but the MP white-flower phenotype was not complemented. Progeny from a 35S:ROS1×35S:LC cross had novel pigmentation phenotypes that were not present in either parental line or MP. In particular, there was increased pigment accumulation in the petal throat region, and the anthers changed from yellow to purple colour. An outdoor field trial was conducted with the 35S:ROS1, 35S:LC, 35S:ROS1×35S:LC and control MP lines. Field conditions rapidly induced intense foliage pigmentation in 35S:LC plants, a phenotype not observed in control MP or equivalent 35S:LC plants maintained in a greenhouse. No difference in plant stature, seed germination, or plant survival was observed between transgenic and control plants.

  14. Treatment, risk factors, and outcome of adults with relapsed AML after reduced intensity conditioning for allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Schmid (Christoph); M. Labopin (Myriam); A. Nagler (Arnon); D. Niederwieser (Dietger); L. Castagna (Luca); R. Tabrizi (Reza); M. Stadler (Michael); J. Kuball (Jürgen); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); J. Vorlicek (Jiri); G. Socié (Gerard); M. Falda (M.); L. Vindelov (Lars); P. Ljungman (Per); G. Jackson (Graham); N. Kröger (Nicolaus); A. Rank (Andreas); E. Polge (Emmanuelle); V. Rocha (Vanderson); M. Mohty (Mohamad)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBecause information on management and outcome of AML relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) is scarce, a retrospective registry study was performed by the Acute LeukemiaWorking Party of EBMT. Among 2815 RIC

  15. Treatment, risk factors, and outcome of adults with relapsed AML after reduced intensity conditioning for allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Christoph; Labopin, Myriam; Nagler, Arnon

    2012-01-01

    Since information on management and outcome of adults with AML relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC HSCT) is scarce, a retrospective registry study was performed by the Acute Leukemia Working Party of EBMT. Among 2815 RIC tran...

  16. Reduced-order modeling of piezoelectric energy harvesters with nonlinear circuits under complex conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Hong-Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Shi, Zhi-Fei; Li, Hong

    2018-04-01

    A fully coupled modeling approach is developed for piezoelectric energy harvesters in this work based on the use of available robust finite element packages and efficient reducing order modeling techniques. At first, the harvester is modeled using finite element packages. The dynamic equilibrium equations of harvesters are rebuilt by extracting system matrices from the finite element model using built-in commands without any additional tools. A Krylov subspace-based scheme is then applied to obtain a reduced-order model for improving simulation efficiency but preserving the key features of harvesters. Co-simulation of the reduced-order model with nonlinear energy harvesting circuits is achieved in a system level. Several examples in both cases of harmonic response and transient response analysis are conducted to validate the present approach. The proposed approach allows to improve the simulation efficiency by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, the parameters used in the equivalent circuit model can be conveniently obtained by the proposed eigenvector-based model order reduction technique. More importantly, this work establishes a methodology for modeling of piezoelectric energy harvesters with any complicated mechanical geometries and nonlinear circuits. The input load may be more complex also. The method can be employed by harvester designers to optimal mechanical structures or by circuit designers to develop novel energy harvesting circuits.

  17. Glycerol and urea can be used to increase skin permeability in reduced hydration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Sebastian; Engblom, Johan; Thuresson, Krister; Sparr, Emma

    2013-12-18

    The natural moisturizing factor (NMF) is a group of hygroscopic molecules that is naturally present in skin and protects from severe drying. Glycerol and urea are two examples of NMF components that are also used in skin care applications. In the present study, we investigate the influence of glycerol and urea on the permeability of a model drug (metronidazole, Mz) across excised pig skin membranes at different hydrating conditions. The degree of skin hydration is regulated by the gradient in water activity across the membrane, which in turn depends on the water activity of the formulation in contact with the skin membrane. Here, we determine the water activity of all formulations employed using an isothermal calorimetric method. Thus, the gradient in water activity is controlled by a novel experimental set-up with well-defined boundary conditions on both sides of the skin membrane. The results demonstrate that glycerol and urea can retain high steady state flux of Mz across skin membranes at dehydrating conditions, which otherwise would decrease the permeability due to dehydration. X-ray diffraction measurements are performed to give insight into the effects of glycerol and urea on SC molecular organization. The novel steady state flux results can be related to the observation that water, glycerol, and urea all affect the structural features of the SC molecular components in a similar manner. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Better fear conditioning is associated with reduced symptom severity in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Mikle; Larson, Michael J; White, Sarah E; Dana, Julianne; Crowley, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies suggest that atypical amygdala function plays a critical role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The handful of psychophysiological studies examining amygdala function in ASD using classical fear conditioning paradigms have yielded discordant results. We recorded skin conductance response (SCR) during a simple discrimination conditioning task in 30 children and adolescents (ages 8-18) diagnosed with high-functioning ASD and 30 age- and IQ-matched, typically developing controls. SCR response in the ASD group was uniquely and positively associated with social anxiety; and negatively correlated with autism symptom severity, in particular with social functioning. Fear conditioning studies have tremendous potential to aid understanding regarding the amygdale's role in the varied symptom profile of ASD. Our data demonstrate that such studies require careful attention to task-specific factors, including task complexity; and also to contributions of dimensional, within-group factors that contribute to ASD heterogeneity. Copyright © 2011, International Society for Autism Research, Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Morphological and physiological responses of two varieties of a highland species (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) growing under near-ambient and strongly reduced solar UV-B in a lowland location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan A; Rosa, Mariana; Parrado, María F; Hilal, Mirna; Prado, Fernando E

    2009-08-03

    Morphological and physiological responses of seedlings to different solar UV-B irradiances were evaluated in two varieties of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), a crop species from Andean region of South America. Cristalina and Chucapaca varieties were grown at 1965m a.s.l in a glasshouse under natural light conditions for 18 days, and then transferred to outdoors under near-ambient (+UV-B) and strongly reduced (-UV-B) solar UV-B radiation. Exposition to -UV-B increased cotyledon area and seedling height in Cristalina variety whereas leaf number decreased compared to +UV-B. By contrast Chucapaca variety was not affected by UV-B treatments. Seedling fresh weight (FW), root length and leaf thickness did not show significant differences between +UV-B and -UV-B treatments. Mesophyll tissue was slightly affected by solar UV-B reduction. Chlorophyll content was differentially affected by UV-B treatments. Under +UV-B the highest value was observed in Cristalina variety, while in Chucapaca it was observed under -UV-B treatment. Chlorophyll content was slightly higher in leaves than in cotyledons, but there was no difference in the distribution pattern. Chlorophyll a/b ratio and carotenoid content did not show significant differences between UV-B treatments. Leaf UVB-absorbing compounds showed significant differences between UV-B treatments in Chucapaca only, while there were no significant differences in Cristalina variety. UVB-absorbing compounds of cotyledons did not show significant differences between +UV-B and -UV-B treatments. Sucrose, glucose and fructose showed different distribution patterns in cotyledons and leaves of the two varieties under near-ambient and strongly reduced UV-B. Results demonstrated that varieties of quinoa exhibit different morphological and physiological responses to changes in solar UV-B irradiance, but these responses cannot be used to predict the sensitivity to solar UV-B during a short-term exposition. Also, this study can be useful to

  20. Chronic endurance exercise training: a condition of inadequate blood pressure regulation and reduced tolerance to LBNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, P B; Pawelczyk, J A

    1993-06-01

    We review the hypotheses presented to account for the anecdotal and literature-based reports that chronic endurance exercise training reduces orthostatic tolerance. The findings from cross-sectional investigations of unfit subjects and endurance athletes are examined, as well as limited data from recent investigations of the changes in orthostatic tolerance and blood pressure regulation that occur after 8 d to 8 months of endurance exercise training. Statistical models have not found wide variations in maximal aerobic power (VO2max) to contribute to the prediction of orthostatic responses. However, research data are generally consistent that the orthostatic tolerance of athletes whose VO2max exceeds 65 ml.kg-1.min-1 is lower than that of sedentary control subjects. These two findings suggest that it is exercise training, rather than VO2max, that reduces orthostatic tolerance. Findings from a recent longitudinal investigation corroborate this theory. We conclude that at least four factors associated with exercise training contribute to the development of orthostatic intolerance. These include: a) increased limb compliance (although its effect is likely to be trivial), b) eccentric ventricular hypertrophy, and c) increases in total blood volume, which may attenuate cardiopulmonary baroreflex responsiveness, shift ventricular function to a steeper portion of the ventricular compliance curve, and increase the inhibitory effect of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors on carotid baroreflex responsiveness; and d) an independent effect that reduces carotid and aortic baroreflex responsiveness. These mechanisms mimic changes observed in pathological states such as heart failure and hypertension. Our conclusions are best summarized by Greenleaf et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 51:298-305, 1981): "Trained men can run, but they cannot stand.''

  1. Mackinawite (FeS) reduces mercury(II) under sulfidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Sharon E; Bargar, John R; Sposito, Garrison

    2014-09-16

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxicant of global concern that accumulates in organisms as methyl Hg. The production of methyl Hg by anaerobic bacteria may be limited in anoxic sediments by the sequestration of divalent Hg [Hg(II)] into a solid phase or by the formation of elemental Hg [Hg(0)]. We tested the hypothesis that nanocrystalline mackinawite (tetragonal FeS), which is abundant in sediments where Hg is methylated, both sorbs and reduces Hg(II). Mackinawite suspensions were equilibrated with dissolved Hg(II) in batch reactors. Examination of the solid phase using Hg LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy showed that Hg(II) was indeed reduced in FeS suspensions. Measurement of purgeable Hg using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS) from FeS suspensions and control solutions corroborated the production of Hg(0) that was observed spectroscopically. However, a fraction of the Hg(II) initially added to the suspensions remained in the divalent state, likely in the form of β-HgS-like clusters associated with the FeS surface or as a mixture of β-HgS and surface-associated species. Complexation by dissolved S(-II) in anoxic sediments hinders Hg(0) formation, but, by contrast, Hg(II)-S(-II) species are reduced in the presence of mackinawite, producing Hg(0) after only 1 h of reaction time. The results of our work support the idea that Hg(0) accounts for a significant fraction of the total Hg in wetland and estuarine sediments.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and fruits supplement in reduced nitrite salts condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujadinović Dragan P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the growing negative perception of consumers related to the use of meat products produced by conventional curing methods, organic and natural products are increasingly accepted by consumers. Such products contain a large number of natural products derived from plants, spices, as well as their derivatives in form of essential oils, extracts, concentrates, and so on. These derivatives contain large number of active substances which are known to inhibit the metabolic processes of bacteria, yeasts and molds. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to investigate the synergistic antimicrobial activity of the models with a reduced presence of nitrite salt in aqueous solution, emulsions of essential oils in varying concentrations in vivo via antibiogram tests on pathogenic microorganisms. The effect of the six model groups was analyzed. Two groups were fruit powder solutions in concentrations of 0.2% to 1.2% (Acerola powder and fruit powder mix, while the other four groups were models of aqueous emulsion of essential oil in concentrations ranging from 0.05% to 1.2% (tea tree, clove, oregano, and cinnamon essential oils. In all models reduced amount of the sodium salt of 1.80%, 0.0075% nitrite salt and the liquid derivative as a natural source of the nitrate salt of 3% were used. Antibiogram tests were performed on five pathogenic bacteria (C. perfringens, E. coli, S. enterica, L. monocytogenes, and S. aureus. All antibiogram tests were performed according to Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion protocol. Results of antibiograms showed that without the presence of additional antimicrobial agents, in model systems with reduced content of salts, inhibition zones were not detected. Additionally, models with essential oils of tea tree oil and oregano had the widest inhibition zone diameters, ranging from 17.76±0.48mm for E. coli up to 42.50±0.13mm for S. aureus.

  3. Electric Current Activated Combustion Synthesis and Chemical Ovens Under Terrestrial and Reduced Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unuvar, C.; Fredrick, D.; Anselmi-Tamburini, U.; Manerbino, A.; Guigne, J. Y.; Munir, Z. A.; Shaw, B. D.

    2004-01-01

    Combustion synthesis (CS) generally involves mixing reactants together (e.g., metal powders) and igniting the mixture. Typically, a reaction wave will pass through the sample. In field activated combustion synthesis (FACS), the addition of an electric field has a marked effect on the dynamics of wave propagation and on the nature, composition, and homogeneity of the product as well as capillary flow, mass-transport in porous media, and Marangoni flows, which are influenced by gravity. The objective is to understand the role of an electric field in CS reactions under conditions where gravity-related effects are suppressed or altered. The systems being studied are Ti+Al and Ti+3Al. Two different ignition orientations have been used to observe effects of gravity when one of the reactants becomes molten. This consequentially influences the position and concentration of the electric current, which in turn influences the entire process. Experiments have also been performed in microgravity conditions. This process has been named Microgravity Field Activated Combustion Synthesis (MFACS). Effects of gravity have been demonstrated, where the reaction wave temperature and velocity demonstrate considerable differences besides the changes of combustion mechanisms with the different high currents applied. Also the threshold for the formation of a stable reaction wave is increased under zero gravity conditions. Electric current was also utilized with a chemical oven technique, where inserts of aluminum with minute amounts of tungsten and tantalum were used to allow observation of effects of settling of the higher density solid particles in liquid aluminum at the present temperature profile and wave velocity of the reaction.

  4. Adhesion of food-borne bacteria to stainless steel is reduced by food conditioning films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yin; Jorgensen, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    also decreases adhesion of other food-relevant bacteria. The manipulation of adhesion was not attributable to growth inhibitory effects. Chemical analysis revealed that the stainless steels were covered by homogenous layers of adsorbed proteins. The presence of tropomyocin was indicated by appearance......Preconditioning of stainless steel with aqueous cod muscle extract significantly impedes subsequent bacterial adhesion most likely due to repelling effects of fish tropomyosin. The purpose of this study was to determine if other food conditioning films decrease or enhance bacterial adhesion...

  5. Long-term microplastic retention causes reduced body condition in the langoustine, Nephrops norvegicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welden, Natalie A C; Cowie, Phillip R

    2016-11-01

    Microplastic represents a rising proportion of marine litter and is widely distributed throughout a range of marine habitats. Correspondingly, the number of reports of species containing microplastics increases annually. Nephrops norvegicus in the Firth of Clyde have previously been shown to retain large aggregations of microplastic fibres. The potential for N. norvegicus to retain plastic over an extended time period increases the likelihood of any associated negative impacts to the individual. This study represents the longest observation of the impacts of microplastic retention in invertebrates. We exposed N. norvegicus to plastic over eight months to determine the impacts of extended exposure. Over this period we compared the feeding rate, body mass, and nutritional state of plastic-fed N. norvegicus to that of fed and starved control groups. Following the experimental period, the plastic-fed langoustine contained microplastic aggregations comparable to those of small individuals from the Clyde Sea Area. Comparisons between fed, unfed and plastic-fed individuals indicated a reduction in feeding rate, body mass, and metabolic rate as well as catabolism of stored lipids in plastic contaminated animals. We conclude that N. norvegicus exposed to high levels of environmental microplastic pollution may experience reduced nutrient availability. This can result in reduced population stability and may affect the viability of local fisheries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducibility of ceria-lanthana mixed oxides under temperature programmed hydrogen and inert gas flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, S.; Blanco, G.; Cifredo, G.; Perez-Omil, J.A.; Pintado, J.M.; Rodriguez-Izquierdo, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper deals with the preparation and characterization of La/Ce mixed oxides, with La molar contents of 20, 36 and 57%. We carry out the study of the structural, textural and redox properties of the mixed oxides, comparing our results with those for pure ceria. For this aim we use temperature programmed reduction (TPR), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), nitrogen physisorption at 77 K, X-ray diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy. The mixed oxides are more easy to reduce in a flow of hydrogen than ceria. Moreover, in an inert gas flow they release oxygen in higher amounts and at lower temperatures than pure CeO 2 . The textural stability of the mixed oxides is also improved by incorporation of lanthana. All these properties make the ceria-lanthana mixed oxides interesting alternative candidates to substitute ceria in three-way catalyst formulations. (orig.)

  7. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Meyer, Jakob Abild Stengaard; Petersen, Søren Vermehren

    2014-01-01

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially...... increase due to 2D variable-range hopping conduction through small graphene domains in an RGO sheet containing defect regions of residual sp3carbon clusters bonded to oxygen groups, whereas RGO sheets prepared in a closed container under moderate pressure showed linear I-V characteristics...... with a conductivity of 267.2-537.5S/m. It was found that the chemical reduction under pressure results in larger graphene domains (sp2networks) in the RGO sheets when compared to that prepared under atmospheric pressure, indicating that the present reduction of GO sheets under the pressure is one of the effective...

  8. Systemic Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Following Isometric Exercise Reduces Conditioned Pain Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsouhibani, Ali; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Hoeger Bement, Marie

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Physically active individuals show greater conditioned pain modulation (CPM) compared with less active individuals. Understanding the effects of acute exercise on CPM may allow for a more targeted use of exercise in the management of pain. This study investigated the effects of acute...... isometric exercise on CPM. In addition, the between-session and within-session reliability of CPM was investigated. Design: Experimental, randomized crossover study. Setting: Laboratory at Marquette University. Subjects: Thirty healthy adults (19.3±1.5 years, 15 males). Methods: Subjects underwent CPM....... Results: PPTs increased during ice water immersion (i.e., CPM), and quadriceps PPT increased after exercise (P CPM decreased similarly following exercise and quiet rest (P > 0.05). CPM within-session reliability was fair to good (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0...

  9. Shellfish Fishery Severely Reduces Condition and Survival of Oystercatchers Despite Creation of Large Marine Protected Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Verhulst

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Fisheries and other human activities pose a global threat to the marine environment. Marine protected areas (MPAs are an emerging tool to cope with such threats. In the Dutch Wadden Sea, large MPAs (covering 31% of all intertidal flats have been created to protect shellfish-eating birds and allow recovery of important habitats. Even though shellfish fishing is prohibited in these areas, populations of shellfish-eating birds in the Wadden Sea have declined sharply. The role of shellfish fisheries in these declines is hotly debated, therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of MPAs for protecting oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus populations. Shellfish stocks (cockles, Cerastoderma edule were substantially higher in the MPAs, but surprisingly this has not resulted in a redistribution of wintering oystercatchers. Oystercatchers in unprotected areas had less shellfish in their diet and lower condition (a combined measure of mass and haematological parameters, and their estimated mortality was 43% higher. It is likely, therefore, that shellfish fishing explains at least part of the 40% decline in oystercatcher numbers in recent years. Condition and mortality effects were strongest in males, and the population sex ratio was female biased, in agreement with the fact that males rely more on shellfish. The unprotected areas apparently function as an "ecological trap," because oystercatchers did not respond as anticipated to the artificial spatial heterogeneity in food supply. Consequently, the MPAs are effective on a local scale, but not on a global scale. Similar problems are likely to exist in terrestrial ecosystems, and distribution strategies of target species need to be considered when designing terrestrial and marine protected areas if they are to be effective.

  10. Sustainable Development and Technological Impact on CO2 Reducing Conditions in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian-Ionel Cioca

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is a reality all over the world, and its complexity is increasing. Therefore, sustainability has become a national and international concern, ingrained in many organizational processes. The ability of organizations to respond to sustainability concerns is sometimes hindered by the complexity of integrating sustainability into business models and by the need to rethink their strategic directions. In Romania, sustainable development has become a priority for businesses, but even though companies are showing some concern, there are yet to demonstrate any full commitment (they are mainly concerned with areas such as society and the environment. This paper assesses Romania’s involvement in the adoption of actions directed toward the reduction of pollutants and greenhouse gases, namely actions focused on reducing the main causes of pollution. This analysis compares the situation in Romania with that of the European Union. The main concerns can be categorized according to four sectors, which produce the highest quantity of carbon dioxide emissions in the world: the energy sector, the transport sector, the waste sector and the industry sector. The last section of this paper deals with the carbon footprint of Romania and its implications.

  11. DEFICIT IRRIGATION TECHNIQUE FOR REDUCING WATER USE OF TOMATO UNDER POLYTUNNEL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladjana SAVIC

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of paper was to asses the use of regulated deficit irrigation (RDI for production of two tomato cultivars (Cedrico and Abellus in polytunnels in Serbia. RDI plants received 60% of the water that was applied to FI plants and significant saving of water for irrigation and increased in irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE were achieved. Yield data for Cedrico cultivar showed no differences between RDI and FI, while due to the bigger sensitivity to drought, yield of Abellus was reduced under RDI. In general, fruit quality (soluble solids, titrable acidity was sustained or improved in both cultivars under RDI. Economic analyses showed that due to the current low prices of water and electricity in Serbia, the profit increase of Cedrico, similarly to the previously trialed cultivar Amati, was not high under RDI comparing to FI. Reduction of yield and consequent profit for Abellus, indicated that for future commercial growing of tomato under RDI should be used drought resistant cultivars.

  12. Hydrogeological Conditions of a Crystalline Aquifer: Simulation of Optimal Abstraction Rates under Scenarios of Reduced Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynn, Obed Fiifi; Chegbeleh, Larry Pax; Nude, Prosper M.; Asiedu, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    A steady state numerical groundwater flow model has been calibrated to characterize the spatial distribution of a key hydraulic parameter in a crystalline aquifer in southwestern Ghana. This was to provide an initial basis for characterizing the hydrogeology of the terrain with a view to assisting in the large scale development of groundwater resources for various uses. The results suggest that the structural entities that control groundwater occurrence in the area are quite heterogeneous in their nature and orientation, ascribing hydraulic conductivity values in the range of 4.5 m/d to over 70 m/d to the simulated aquifer. Aquifer heterogeneities, coupled possibly with topographical trends, have led to the development of five prominent groundwater flowpaths in the area. Estimated groundwater recharge at calibration ranges between 0.25% and 9.13% of the total annual rainfall and appears to hold significant promise for large-scale groundwater development to support irrigation schemes. However, the model suggests that with reduced recharge by up to 30% of the current rates, the system can only sustain increased groundwater abstraction by up to 150% of the current abstraction rates. Prudent management of the resource will require a much more detailed hydrogeological study that identifies all the aquifers in the basin for the assessment of sustainable basin yield. PMID:24453882

  13. Influence of sulphate-reducing bacteria on environmental parameters and marine corrosion behavior of Q235 steel in aerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Yi; Zhang Dun; Liu Huaiqun; Li Yongjuan; Hou Baorong

    2010-01-01

    The growth cycle of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio caledoniensis, and the effect of SRB on the environmental parameters and corrosion behavior of Q235 steel during a growth cycle in aerobic (air- and O 2 -saturated culture solutions) and anaerobic (N 2 - saturated culture solutions) conditions were investigated. Oxygen dissolved in the culture solutions induced slow growth and fast decay of SRB. The growth process of SRB under anaerobic and aerobic conditions influenced sulphide anion concentration (C s 2- ), pH, and conductivity (κ). The values of C s 2- and κ under aerobic conditions were lower than those under anaerobic conditions, and the pH values increased from O 2 - to air- to N 2 -saturated culture solutions. Aerobic conditions induced the open circuit potential (E OC ) to shift in the positive direction after the stationary phase of SRB growth. The charge transfer resistance (R ct ) increased quickly during the exponential growth phase, almost maintained stability during the stationary phase, and decreased after the stationary phase in all three conditions, and the impedance magnitude decreased from O 2 - to air- to N 2 -saturated culture solutions. The biofilms induced by SRB were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was performed in abiotic and SRB-containing systems to distinguish the corrosion products. The reasons for the effects of SRB on the environmental parameters and corrosion behavior of carbon steel are discussed.

  14. Cerebellar dentate nuclei lesions reduce motivation in appetitive operant conditioning and open field exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, David J; Kerr, Abigail L; Swain, Rodney A

    2011-02-01

    Recently identified pathways from the dentate nuclei of the cerebellum to the rostral cerebral cortex via the thalamus suggest a cerebellar role in frontal and prefrontal non-motor functioning. Disturbance of cerebellar morphology and connectivity, particularly involving these cerebellothalamocortical (CTC) projections, has been implicated in motivational and cognitive deficits. The current study explored the effects of CTC disruption on motivation in male Long Evans rats. The results of two experiments demonstrate that electrolytic lesions of the cerebellar dentate nuclei lower breaking points on an operant conditioning progressive ratio schedule and decrease open field exploration compared to sham controls. Changes occurred in the absence of motor impairment, assessed via lever pressing frequency and rotarod performance. Similar elevated plus maze performances between lesioned and sham animals indicated that anxiety did not influence task performance. Our results demonstrate hedonic and purposive motivational reduction and suggest a CTC role in global motivational processes. These implications are discussed in terms of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism, in which cerebellar damage and motivational deficits often present concomitantly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical specialists' views on the impact of reducing alcohol consumption on prognosis of, and risk of, hospital admission due to specific medical conditions: results from a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdege, Noreen D; Raistrick, Duncan; Johnson, Graham

    2014-02-01

    To find consensus, or lack thereof, on the impact of reducing alcohol consumption on prognosis and the risk of hospital admissions for a number of alcohol-attributable disorders. A modified two-round Delphi survey utilizing web-based questionnaires to collect quantitative and qualitative data was used. Alcohol treatment experts from cardiology, emergency medicine, gastroenterology and oncology in the United Kingdom were invited to participate. The main outcomes were median impact ratings (on a scale of 1-9) and consensus (unanimous, strong, moderate, weak or no consensus). Of 192 experts invited to participate, 59 completed first questionnaires. The overall retention rate to the second questionnaires was about 51% (30/59). There was strong support that reducing alcohol consumption could result in improvement in prognosis for gastroenterology and emergency medicine patients; but uncertainty on the benefits for cardiology and oncology patients. Overall, the responses from the expert panel did not reflect the assumption that reducing alcohol consumption would result in benefits on hospital admissions for any of the specialties. The specialists viewed the severity of disorders as important when considering the impact of reducing alcohol consumption. The highest impact of treatment for problem drinking in hospitals is considered to be for alcohol-related disorders associated with gastroenterology and emergency medicine. At policy level, if targeted screening for alcohol problems by presenting disease or condition is the strategy of choice, it would be logical to implement screening and easily accessible interventions or addiction specialists within these areas where alcohol treatment is considered as having a high impact. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Rates of BTEX Biodegradation under Nitrate Reducing Conditions in Wetland Sediments Impacted by Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, L. K.; McGuire, J. T.; Cozzarelli, I.; Smith, E. W.; Kneeshaw, T.

    2010-12-01

    Biodegradation rates are often controlled by dynamic interactions that occur at mixing interfaces between water masses of differing redox state. This study seeks to understand the controls on rates of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m,p,o-xylenes) degradation at a mixing interface by using in-situ experiments to simulate contaminated aquifer water containing nitrate discharging to a methanogenic wetland. BTEX biodegradation was evaluated during “dry” conditions (2009) and “wet” conditions (2010) in a shallow wetland near Bemidji, MN using innovative in-situ microcosms (ISMs) to measure rates of change over 8 weeks (2009) and 9 weeks (2010). ISM samplers contained an inner chamber filled with wetland sediments that were allowed to incubate for 2 weeks. This chamber was then closed to the surrounding environment and amended with test solution composed of contaminated groundwater augmented with tracer (bromide), nitrate and BTEX spike. Analysis of ISM sediments suggests that nitrate reduction and biodegradation rates are a function of both mineralogical and microbiological controls. Loss of nitrate, interpreted as nitrate reduction, was observed in both the dry and wet years with reduction slightly faster in the dry year (2.21mg/L/day versus 1.59 mg/L/day). Nitrate reduction was likely coupled to oxidation of various electron donors present in the system, including not only BTEX but also naturally occurring labile organic matter (ex. acetate) and inorganic electron donors (ex. Fe2+). BTEX degradation rates were considerably higher during the “wet” year than the “dry” year, with the fastest rates occurring immediately following test solution additions. For example, in the first 2 days of the “wet” ISM experiments degradation rates were 57.97ug/L/day for Benzene, 73.24ug/L/day for Toluene, 12.37ug/L/day for Ethyl Benzene and 85.61ug/L/day for Xylene compared to an ISM from the dry year which had slower degradation rates of 2.83ug/L/day for

  17. Potassium application reduces bareness in different maize hybrids under crowding stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhsh, M.A.A.H.A.; Ahmad, R.; Ishaque, M.

    2011-01-01

    Higher yield in different maize hybrids is obtained simply by increasing the plant density, but it is not so simple that by increasing plant density would multiply the grain yield through many folds. There is a certain limit where increase in plant density tends to stabilize the grain and biological yield and it tends to decline. For this purpose, an experiment was conducted on a sandy clay loam soil and designed in randomized complete block design with split plot arrangement with four replications, randomizing maize hybrids in main plots (H1= Pioneer-3012, H/sub 2/= Pioneer-3062, H3= Pioneer - 30D55) and plant density levels P1 = 15 cm x 70 cm (95238 plants ha/sup -1/), P2 = 25 cm x 70 cm (57142 plants ha/sup 1/), and P3 = 35 cm x 70 cm (40816 plants ha/sup -1/) with K application (K0=0, K1=100, K/sub 2/=150, K/sub 3/=200 and K4=250 Kg ha/sup -1/) . It was observed that plant bareness tends to increase with the increase in plant density with widening of period between tasseling and silking time, which resulted in less number of grains, grain rows cob/sup -1/ and produced less grain weight cob-1 and vice versa. Pioneer-30D55 was the most resistant hybrid to plant bareness as compared to Pioneer-3062 and Pioneer-3012. Potassium application definitely reduced plant bareness among all three hybrids. Pioneer-30D55 was the most responsive hybrid as compared to Pioneer-3062 and Pioneer-3012. Potassium application increased fertilization by adjusting the period between tasseling and silking which resulted in more number of grain rows, grain cob/sup -1/ and produced higher grain weight cob/sup -1/, when crop was fertilized from 100 to 200 Kg ha/sup -1/, and then it tended to decline. It is therefore suggested that Pioneer-30D55 should be preferably grown at plant density of 95238 plants ha/sup -1/ to explore maximum production potential with K application 200 Kg ha/sup -1/ to avoid plant bareness due to crowding stress. (author)

  18. Effectiveness of oxytetracycline in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish (Labeo rohita, Hamilton) under laboratory culture condition

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Ariful Haque; Md. Shaheed Reza; Md. Rajib Sharker; Md. Mokhlasur Rahman; Md. Ariful Islam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effectiveness of most widely used antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC) in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish under artificial culture condition in the laboratory. Methods: The experiment was conducted in the Faculty Fisheries, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202. The fish were reared in 8 aquaria where fish in 5 aquaria were used for replication of the treatment (experimental group) and fish in remaining 3 aquaria were considered...

  19. Mechanisms of Chromium and Uranium Toxicity in Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2 Grown under Anaerobic Nitrate-Reducing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgersen, Michael P; Lancaster, W Andrew; Ge, Xiaoxuan; Zane, Grant M; Wetmore, Kelly M; Vaccaro, Brian J; Poole, Farris L; Younkin, Adam D; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-01-01

    Chromium and uranium are highly toxic metals that contaminate many natural environments. We investigated their mechanisms of toxicity under anaerobic conditions using nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2, which was originally isolated from a chromium-contaminated aquifer. A random barcode transposon site sequencing library of RCH2 was grown in the presence of the chromate oxyanion (Cr[VI][Formula: see text]) or uranyl oxycation (U[VI][Formula: see text]). Strains lacking genes required for a functional nitrate reductase had decreased fitness as both metals interacted with heme-containing enzymes required for the later steps in the denitrification pathway after nitrate is reduced to nitrite. Cr[VI]-resistance also required genes in the homologous recombination and nucleotide excision DNA repair pathways, showing that DNA is a target of Cr[VI] even under anaerobic conditions. The reduced thiol pool was also identified as a target of Cr[VI] toxicity and psest_2088 , a gene of previously unknown function, was shown to have a role in the reduction of sulfite to sulfide. U[VI] resistance mechanisms involved exopolysaccharide synthesis and the universal stress protein UspA. As the first genome-wide fitness analysis of Cr[VI] and U[VI] toxicity under anaerobic conditions, this study provides new insight into the impact of Cr[VI] and U[VI] on an environmental isolate from a chromium contaminated site, as well as into the role of a ubiquitous protein, Psest_2088.

  20. Mechanisms of Chromium and Uranium Toxicity in Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2 Grown under Anaerobic Nitrate-Reducing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Thorgersen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium and uranium are highly toxic metals that contaminate many natural environments. We investigated their mechanisms of toxicity under anaerobic conditions using nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2, which was originally isolated from a chromium-contaminated aquifer. A random barcode transposon site sequencing library of RCH2 was grown in the presence of the chromate oxyanion (Cr[VI]O42− or uranyl oxycation (U[VI]O22+. Strains lacking genes required for a functional nitrate reductase had decreased fitness as both metals interacted with heme-containing enzymes required for the later steps in the denitrification pathway after nitrate is reduced to nitrite. Cr[VI]-resistance also required genes in the homologous recombination and nucleotide excision DNA repair pathways, showing that DNA is a target of Cr[VI] even under anaerobic conditions. The reduced thiol pool was also identified as a target of Cr[VI] toxicity and psest_2088, a gene of previously unknown function, was shown to have a role in the reduction of sulfite to sulfide. U[VI] resistance mechanisms involved exopolysaccharide synthesis and the universal stress protein UspA. As the first genome-wide fitness analysis of Cr[VI] and U[VI] toxicity under anaerobic conditions, this study provides new insight into the impact of Cr[VI] and U[VI] on an environmental isolate from a chromium contaminated site, as well as into the role of a ubiquitous protein, Psest_2088.

  1. Model predictions of the results of interferometric observations for stars under conditions of strong gravitational scattering by black holes and wormholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatskiy, A. A.; Kovalev, Yu. Yu.; Novikov, I. D.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic and distinctive features of the visibility amplitude of interferometric observations for compact objects like stars in the immediate vicinity of the central black hole in our Galaxy are considered. These features are associated with the specifics of strong gravitational scattering of point sources by black holes, wormholes, or black-white holes. The revealed features will help to determine the most important topological characteristics of the central object in our Galaxy: whether this object possesses the properties of only a black hole or also has characteristics unique to wormholes or black-white holes. These studies can be used to interpret the results of optical, infrared, and radio interferometric observations

  2. Model predictions of the results of interferometric observations for stars under conditions of strong gravitational scattering by black holes and wormholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatskiy, A. A., E-mail: shatskiy@asc.rssi.ru; Kovalev, Yu. Yu.; Novikov, I. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Astro Space Center, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    The characteristic and distinctive features of the visibility amplitude of interferometric observations for compact objects like stars in the immediate vicinity of the central black hole in our Galaxy are considered. These features are associated with the specifics of strong gravitational scattering of point sources by black holes, wormholes, or black-white holes. The revealed features will help to determine the most important topological characteristics of the central object in our Galaxy: whether this object possesses the properties of only a black hole or also has characteristics unique to wormholes or black-white holes. These studies can be used to interpret the results of optical, infrared, and radio interferometric observations.

  3. Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions: Environmental Factors Characterization and Process Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Ruiz, Melany; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) has been reported by several investigators and is referred to as Feammox. Feammox is a biological reaction, where Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+ is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. An Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium named A6, a previously unreported species in the Acidimicrobiaceae family, has been identified as being responsible for the Feammox process(1, 2) Feammox process was noted in riparian wetland soils in New Jersey(1,3), in tropical rainforest soils in Puerto Rico (4) and in paddy soils in China (5). In addition to these published locations, Feammox process was also found in samples collected from a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments in New Jersey, river sediments from South Carolina, and forested soils near an acid mine drainage (Dabaoshan, Guangdong province) in China. Using primers acm342f - 439r (2), Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected in samples where Feammox was observed, after strictly anaerobic incubations. According to a canonical correspondence analysis with environmental characteristics and soil microbial communities, the species-environment relationship indicated that pH and Fe oxides content were the primary factors controlling Feammox process. Anaerobic incubations of Feammox enrichment cultures adjusted to different pH, revealed that the optimal pH for Feammox is 4 ~ 5, and the reaction does not proceed when pH > 7. No correlation was found between the distributions of Feammox bacteria and other NH4+ oxidation bacteria. Pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain was isolated in an autotrophic medium, from an active Feammox membrane reactor (A6 was enriched to 65.8% of the total bacteria). A 13C labeled CO2 amendment was conducted, and the 13C in cells of A6 increased from 1.80% to 10.3% after 14 days incubation. In a separate

  4. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatter, Purva D; Gupta, Pooja D; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity.

  5. Quantification of groundwater-stream water interactions based on temperature depth profiles under strong upwelling conditions in a sand-bed stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, Jaime; Lewandowski, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The quantification of groundwater-surface water interactions is not only required for budgets but also for an understanding of the complex relations between hyporheic exchange flows (HEF) and the associated chemical and biological processes that take place in hyporheic zones (HZ). Thus, there is a strong need to improve methods for flux estimation.The present study aims to quantify the vertical fluxes across the riverbed from data of temperature depth profiles recorded at the River Schlaube in East Brandenburg, Germany. In order to test the capabilities and limitations of existing methods, fluxes were calculated with an analytical (VFLUX, based on the amplitude attenuation and phase shift analysis) and a numerical (1DTempPro, parametrization based on observed values) approach for heat conduction. We conclude that the strong limitations of the flux estimates are caused by thermal and hydraulic heterogeneities of the sediment properties. Consequently, upscaling of fluxes must include other thermal techniques able to portray the spatial variability of thermal patterns, along with further developments of methods to link thermal depth profiles, thermal patterns of the surface of the streambed and all the other factors involved. Considering time and costs of temperature depth profiles of riverbeds, and the need for multiple devices to cover larger areas, it is additionally tested whether vertical fluxes can be infered from the uppermost temperature sensors of a data set. That would ease hyporheic investigations at larger scales.

  6. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  7. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction by a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium under non-growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truex, M.J.; Peyton, B.M.; Valentine, N.B.; Gorby, Y.A.

    1997-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms may be useful in processes designed for selective removal of uranium from aqueous streams. These bacteria can use U(VI) as an electron acceptor and thereby reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). While significant research has been devoted to demonstrating and describing the mechanism of dissimilatory metal reduction, the reaction kinetics necessary to apply this for remediation processes have not been adequately defined. In this study, pure culture Shewanella alga strain BrY reduced U(VI) under non-growth conditions in the presence of excess lactate as the electron donor. Initial U(VI) concentrations ranged from 13 to 1,680microM. A maximum specific U(VI) reduction rate of 2.37 micromole-U(VI)/(mg-biomass h) and Monod half-saturation coefficient of 132 microM-U(VI) were calculated from measured U(VI) reduction rates. U(VI) reduction activity was sustained at 60% of this rate for at least 80 h. The initial presence of oxygen at a concentration equal to atmospheric saturation at 22 C delays but does not prevent U(VI) reduction. The rate of U(VI) reduction by BrY is comparable or better than rates reported for other metal reducing species. BrY reduces U(VI) at a rate that is 30% of its Fe(III) reduction rate

  8. On robustness of a strong solution to the Navier–Stokes equations with Navier's boundary conditions in the L3-norm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, P.; Neustupa, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2017), s. 1564-1583 ISSN 0951-7715 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equations * slip boundary conditions * regularity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aa6166/meta

  9. On robustness of a strong solution to the Navier–Stokes equations with Navier's boundary conditions in the L3-norm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, P.; Neustupa, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2017), s. 1564-1583 ISSN 0951-7715 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier - Stokes equations * slip boundary conditions * regularity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aa6166/meta

  10. 5-HT1A receptor antagonists reduce food intake and body weight by reducing total meals with no conditioned taste aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, M Joelle; Shaw, Janice; Cramer, Jeff; Sindelar, Dana K

    2013-11-01

    Serotonin acts through receptors controlling several physiological functions, including energy homeostasis regulation and food intake. Recent experiments demonstrated that 5-HT1A receptor antagonists reduce food intake. We sought to examine the microstructure of feeding with 5-HT1A receptor antagonists using a food intake monitoring system. We also examined the relationship between food intake, inhibition of binding and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of the antagonists. Ex vivo binding revealed that, at doses used in this study to reduce food intake, inhibition of binding of a 5-HT1A agonist by ~40% was reached in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice with a trend for higher binding in DIO vs. lean animals. Additionally, PK analysis detected levels from 2 to 24h post-compound administration. Male DIO mice were administered 5-HT1A receptor antagonists LY439934 (10 or 30 mg/kg, p.o.), WAY100635 (3 or 10mg/kg, s.c.), SRA-333 (10 or 30 mg/kg, p.o.), or NAD-299 (3 or 10mg/kg, s.c.) for 3 days and meal patterns were measured. Analyses revealed that for each antagonist, 24-h food intake was reduced through a specific decrease in the total number of meals. Compared to controls, meal number was decreased 14-35% in the high dose. Average meal size was not changed by any of the compounds. The reduction in food intake reduced body weight 1-4% compared to Vehicle controls. Subsequently, a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) assay was used to determine whether the feeding decrease might be an indicator of aversion, nausea, or visceral illness caused by the antagonists. Using a two bottle preference test, it was found that none of the compounds produced a CTA. The decrease in food intake does not appear to be a response to nausea or malaise. These results indicate that 5-HT1A receptor antagonist suppresses feeding, specifically by decreasing the number of meals, and induce weight loss without an aversive side effect. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of oxytetracycline in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish (Labeo rohita, Hamilton under laboratory culture condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ariful Haque

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effectiveness of most widely used antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish under artificial culture condition in the laboratory. Methods: The experiment was conducted in the Faculty Fisheries, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202. The fish were reared in 8 aquaria where fish in 5 aquaria were used for replication of the treatment (experimental group and fish in remaining 3 aquaria were considered as a control (Control group. OTC was fed to the fish in the experimental aquarium at the rate of 2 g/kg through diet twice daily whereas fish reared under control condition was given feed without antibiotic for 20 d and bacterial content in the aquarium water, gills, skin and intestine of fish were estimated at every alternative day after onset of the experiment. Results: Rearing the fish with OTC treated feed resulted in gradual decrease of bacterial load in the aquarium water, gills, intestine and skin of the fish whereas the content remain unchanged or little increased in the control group. Water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH and total hardness were within the suitable range in the experimental aquarium but not in control aquaria throughout the experimental period. Conclusions: These results suggest that OTC could be a potential antibiotic to reduce the bacterial load in fish and can be used commercially for maintaining the fish health in aquarium conditions.

  12. Microbial Degradation of Phenols and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Creosote-contaminated Groundwater Under Nitrate-reducing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, John; Arvin, Erik; Jensen, Bjørn K.

    1993-01-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the biodegradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons under anaerobic, nitrate-reducing conditions in groundwater from a creosote-contaminated site at Fredensborg, Denmark. The bacteria in the creosote-contaminated groundwater degraded a mixture...... of toluene, phenol, the cresols (o-, m- and p-cresol) and the dimethylphenols 2,4-DMP and 3,4-DMP at both 10° and 20°C. Benzene, the xylenes, napthalene, 2,3-DMP, 2,5-DMP, 2,6-DMP and 3,5-DMP were resistant to biodegradation during 7–12 months of incubation. It was demonstrated that the degradation...... that in addition to the phenols are toluene other carbon sources present in the groundwater contributed to the consumption of nitrate. If the groundwater was incubated under anaerobic conditions without nitrate, sulphate-reducing conditions evolved after ∼ 1 month at 20°C and ∼2 months at 10°C. In the sulphate...

  13. Diagnostics of bearings in presence of strong operating conditions non-stationarity—A procedure of load-dependent features processing with application to wind turbine bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimroz, Radoslaw; Bartelmus, Walter; Barszcz, Tomasz; Urbanek, Jacek

    2014-05-01

    Condition monitoring of bearings used in Wind Turbines (WT) is an important issue. In general, bearings diagnostics is a well recognized field of research; however, it is not the case for machines operating under non-stationary load. In the case of varying load/speed, vibration signal generated by rolling element bearings is affected by operation factors, and makes the diagnosis relatively difficult. These difficulties come from the variation of vibration-based diagnostic features caused mostly by load/speed variation (operation factors), low energy of sought-after features, and low signal-to-noise levels. Analysis of the signal from the main bearing is even more difficult due to a very low rotational speed of the main shaft. In the paper, a novel diagnostic approach is proposed for bearings used in wind turbines. As an input data we use parameters obtained from commercial diagnostic system (peak-to-peak and root mean square (RMS) of vibration acceleration, and generator power that is related to the operating conditions). The received data cover the period of several months.

  14. Reduced Antivation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Eurofer 97 as Possible Structural Material for Fusion Devices. Metallurgical Characterization on As-Received Condition and after Simulated Services Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2004-07-01

    Metallurgical Characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97, on as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatment in the temperature range from 400 degree centigree to 600 degree centigree for periods up to 10.000 h, was carried out. The microstructure of the steel remained stable (tempered martensite with M{sub 2}3 C{sub 6} and MX precipitates) after the thermal ageing treatments studied in this work. In general, this stability was also observed in the mechanical properties. The Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of hardness, ultimate tensile stress, 0,2% proof stress, USE and T{sub 0}3 regardless of the investigated material condition. However, ageing at 600 degree centigree for 10.000 ha caused a slight increase in the DBTT, of approximately 23. In terms of creep properties, the steel shows in general adequate creep rupture strength levels for short rupture times. However, the results obtained up to now for long time creep rupture tests at 500 degree centigree suggests a change in the deformation mechanisms. (Author) 62 refs.

  15. Sequential regimen of clofarabine, cytosine arabinoside and reduced-intensity conditioned transplantation for primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohty, Mohamad; Malard, Florent; Blaise, Didier; Milpied, Noel; Socié, Gérard; Huynh, Anne; Reman, Oumédaly; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Furst, Sabine; Guillaume, Thierry; Tabrizi, Resa; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Peterlin, Pierre; El-Cheikh, Jean; Moreau, Philippe; Labopin, Myriam; Chevallier, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in whom primary treatment fails remains very poor. In order to improve such patients’ outcome, we conducted a phase 2, prospective, multicenter trial to test the feasibility of a new sequential regimen, combining a short course of intensive chemotherapy and a reduced intensity-conditioning regimen, before allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Twenty-four patients (median age, 47 years) with acute myeloid leukemia in primary treatment failure were included. Cytogenetic risk was poor in 15 patients (62%) and intermediate in nine (38%). The sequential regimen consisted of clofarabine (30 mg/m2/day) and cytosine arabinoside (1 g/m2/day) for 5 days, followed, after a 3-day rest, by reduced-intensity conditioning and allogeneic stem-cell transplantation combining cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg), intravenous busulfan (3.2 mg/kg/day) for 2 days and anti-thymocyte globulin (2.5 mg/kg/day) for 2 days. Patients in complete remission at day +120 received prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusion. Eighteen patients (75%) achieved complete remission. With a median follow-up of 24.6 months, the Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival was 54% (95% CI: 33–71) at 1 year and 38% (95% CI: 18–46) at 2 years. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of leukemia-free survival was 46% (95% CI: 26–64) at 1 year and 29% (95% CI: 13–48) at 2 years. The cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality was 8% (95% CI: 1–24) at 1 year and 12% (95% CI: 3–19) at 2 years. Results from this phase 2 prospective multicenter trial endorsed the safety and efficacy of a clofarabine-based sequential reduced-toxicity conditioning regimen, which warrants further investigation. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier number: NCT01188174. PMID:27561720

  16. <strong>Neuroeconomics and Health Economicsstrong>/>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2009-01-01

      Objective: Neuroeconomics integrates economics, psychology and neuroscience. Recently, this line of research is summarized in a neuroeconomic model (NeM) which addresses the rehabilitation of important chronic conditions from a new angle as surveyed in this study. Data and Method: Firstly, Ne...... with de-stressing benefits as reduced anxiety, less use of stimulants and a reduction of blood pressure which in all increase life-expectancy. Conclusion: Neuroeconomics helps economists to identify dominant health economic interventions that may be overlooked by traditional discipålines   [i] This part...

  17. A scenario analysis of effects of reduced nitrogen input on oxygen conditions in the Kattegat and the Belt Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, I.S.; Ærtebjerg, G.; Richardson, K.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical tool has been developed for analyzing the potential effects of reduced nitrogen loading to the Kattegat and the Belt Sea. The analyzed effects relate to general trends in the occurrence of hypoxia and anoxia in the water below the pycnocline during the summer and autumn. Nitrogen...... is assumed to be the nutrient controlling production in these waters. The tool is a dynamic numerical model which includes the dominant hydrodynamic processes of the study area as well as the nitrogen cycle and is linked to oxygen conditions. The model has been calibrated based on the average intraannual...... at that time. Using this model, scenarios of oxygen conditions after implementation of several different reduction plans for nitrogen loading to the area have been carried out. With the help of these scenarios, it is possible to compare different nitrogen load situations and their effect on the mass balance...

  18. Impact of graft-versus-host disease after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, F; Labopin, M; Niederwieser, D

    2012-01-01

    This report investigated the impact of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on transplantation outcomes in 1859 acute myeloid leukemia patients given allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC allo-SCT). Grade I acute GVHD was associated with a lower risk of rela...... of relapse (hazards ratio (HR)=0.7, P=0.02) translating into a trend for better overall survival (OS; HR=1.3; P=0.07). Grade II acute GVHD had no net impact on OS, while grade III-IV acute GVHD was associated with a worse OS (HR=0.4, P...

  19. Strong reducing of the laser focal volume

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Godin, T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Many applications of lasers seek nowadays for focal spots whose corresponding volume is getting smaller and smaller in order to ensure high spatial resolution. This problem, studied by many research groups around the world, is the core...

  20. Embryonic Methamphetamine Exposure Inhibits Methamphetamine Cue Conditioning and Reduces Dopamine Concentrations in Adult N2 C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katner, S.N.; Neal-Beliveau, B.S.; Engleman, E.A.

    2016-01-01

    increased the preference for that ion (CS+) in worms that were not pre-exposed to MAP. However, worms embryonically exposed to MAP did not exhibit significant drug cue conditioning. The inability of MAP exposed worms to condition to MAP was not associated with deficits in food conditioning, as MAP exposed worms exhibited a significant cue preference associated with food. Furthermore, our results found that embryonic MAP exposure reduced DA levels in adult C. elegans, which could be a key mechanism contributing to the long-term effects of embryonic MAP exposure. It is possible that embryonic MAP exposure may be impairing the ability for C. elegans to learn associations between MAP and the CS+ or inhibiting the reinforcing properties of MAP, however, our food conditioning data suggest that MAP exposed animals can form associations between cues and food. The depletion of DA levels during embryonic exposure to MAP could be responsible for driving either of these processes during adulthood. PMID:27233671

  1. Embryonic Methamphetamine Exposure Inhibits Methamphetamine Cue Conditioning and Reduces Dopamine Concentrations in Adult N2 Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katner, Simon N; Neal-Beliveau, Bethany S; Engleman, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    for that ion (CS+) in worms that were not pre-exposed to MAP. However, worms embryonically exposed to MAP did not exhibit significant drug cue conditioning. The inability of MAP-exposed worms to condition to MAP was not associated with deficits in food conditioning, as MAP-exposed worms exhibited a significant cue preference associated with food. Furthermore, our results found that embryonic MAP exposure reduced DA levels in adult C. elegans, which could be a key mechanism contributing to the long-term effects of embryonic MAP exposure. It is possible that embryonic MAP exposure may be impairing the ability of C. elegans to learn associations between MAP and the CS+ or inhibiting the reinforcing properties of MAP. However, our food conditioning data suggest that MAP-exposed animals can form associations between cues and food. The depletion of DA levels during embryonic exposure to MAP could be responsible for driving either of these processes during adulthood. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Experiencing El Niño conditions during early life reduces recruiting probabilities but not adult survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Cristina; Drummond, Hugh

    2018-01-01

    In wild long-lived animals, analysis of impacts of stressful natal conditions on adult performance has rarely embraced the entire age span, and the possibility that costs are expressed late in life has seldom been examined. Using 26 years of data from 8541 fledglings and 1310 adults of the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii), a marine bird that can live up to 23 years, we tested whether experiencing the warm waters and food scarcity associated with El Niño in the natal year reduces recruitment or survival over the adult lifetime. Warm water in the natal year reduced the probability of recruiting; each additional degree (°C) of water temperature meant a reduction of roughly 50% in fledglings' probability of returning to the natal colony as breeders. Warm water in the current year impacted adult survival, with greater effect at the oldest ages than during early adulthood. However, warm water in the natal year did not affect survival at any age over the adult lifespan. A previous study showed that early recruitment and widely spaced breeding allow boobies that experience warm waters in the natal year to achieve normal fledgling production over the first 10 years; our results now show that this reproductive effort incurs no survival penalty, not even late in life. This pattern is additional evidence of buffering against stressful natal conditions via life-history adjustments. PMID:29410788

  3. A case study employing operant conditioning to reduce stress of capture for red-bellied tamarins (Saguinus labiatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Yvonne; Amory, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Traditional techniques used to capture New World monkeys, such as net capture, can induce high levels of acute stress detrimental to welfare. Alternatively, training nonhuman animals via operant conditioning to voluntarily participate in husbandry and/or veterinary practices is accepted as a humane process that can reduce stress and improve welfare. This study details the use of operant conditioning using positive reinforcement training (PRT) and target training to train a family of 5 captive red-bellied tamarins (Saguinus labiatus) in a wildlife park to voluntarily enter a transportation box and remain calm for 1 min after 54 training sessions. Observations of 2 unrelated net-capture processes provided measures of locomotion and vocalizations as indicators of stress behavior that were compared with those of the trained tamarins. Net-captured monkeys exhibited rapid erratic locomotion and emitted long, high-frequency vocalizations during capture whereas the trained tamarins exhibited minimal locomotion and emitted only 4 brief vocalizations (root mean square 35 dB) during capture. This indicates that the use of PRT considerably reduced potential for stress and improved welfare during the capture and containment of the tamarins. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  4. An investigation of multi-rate sound decay under strongly non-diffuse conditions: The crypt of the Cathedral of Cadiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellotta, Francesco; Álvarez-Morales, Lidia; Girón, Sara; Zamarreño, Teófilo

    2018-05-01

    Multi-rate sound decays are often found and studied in complex systems of coupled volumes where diffuse field conditions generally apply, although the openings connecting different sub-spaces are by themselves potential causes of non-diffuse behaviour. However, in presence of spaces in which curved surfaces clearly prevent diffuse field behaviour from being established, things become more complex and require more sophisticated tools (or, better, combinations of them) to be fully understood. As an example of such complexity, the crypt of the Cathedral of Cadiz is a relatively small space characterised by a central vaulted rotunda, with five radial galleries with flat and low ceiling. In addition, the crypt is connected to the main cathedral volume by means of several small openings. Acoustic measurements carried out in the crypt pointed out the existence of at least two decay processes combined, in some points, with flutter echoes. Application of conventional methods of analysis pointed out the existence of significant differences between early decay time and reverberation time, but was inconclusive in explaining the origin of the observed phenomena. The use of more robust Bayesian analysis permitted the conclusion that the late decay appearing in the crypt had a different rate than that observed in the cathedral, thus excluding the explanation based on acoustic coupling of different volumes. Finally, processing impulse responses collected by means of a B-format microphone to obtain directional intensity maps demonstrated that the late decay was originated from the rotunda where a repetitive reflection pattern appeared between the floor and the dome causing both flutter echoes and a longer reverberation time.

  5. Dual direction blower system powered by solar energy to reduce car cabin temperature in open parking condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, N. S.; Radzi, M. F. M.; Damanhuri, A. A. M.; Mokhtar, S. N.

    2017-10-01

    El-nino phenomenon that strikes Malaysia with temperature recorded more than 35°C can lead to extreme temperature rise in car cabin up to 80°C. Various problems will arise due to this extreme rising of temperature such as the occupant are vulnerable to heat stroke, emission of benzene gas that can cause cancer due to reaction of high temperature with interior compartments, and damage of compartments in the car. The current solution available to reduce car cabin temperature including tinted of window and portable heat rejection device that are available in the market. As an alternative to reduce car cabin temperature, this project modifies the car’s air conditioning blower motor into dual direction powered by solar energy and identifies its influence to temperature inside the car, parked under scorching sun. By reducing the car cabin temperature up to 10°C which equal to 14% of reduction in the car cabin temperature, this simple proposed system aims to provide comfort to users due to its capability in improving the quality of air and moisture in the car cabin.

  6. Chronic Vortioxetine Treatment Reduces Exaggerated Expression of Conditioned Fear Memory and Restores Active Coping Behavior in Chronically Stressed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatherall, Lauren; Sánchez, Connie; Morilak, David A

    2017-04-01

    Stress is a risk factor for depression and anxiety disorders, disrupting neuronal processes leading to exaggerated fear and compromised coping behaviors. Current antidepressants are only partially effective. Vortioxetine, a novel multimodal antidepressant, is a serotonin transporter inhibitor; 5-HT3, 5-HT7, and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist; 5-HT1B partial agonist; and 5-HT1A agonist. We have shown that chronic dietary vortioxetine administration reversed stress-induced deficits in cognitive flexibility. In the present studies, we investigated the generality of vortioxetine's effects on other stress-related behavioral changes after different types of chronic stress. In experiment 1, rats were fear-conditioned by pairing a tone with footshock, then exposed to chronic plus acute prolonged stress. In experiment 2, rats were exposed to chronic unpredictable stress. In both experiments, beginning on day 4 of chronic stress, vortioxetine was given in the diet (24 mg/kg/d). In experiment 1, effects of vortioxetine were tested on stress-induced changes in retention and extinction of cue-conditioned fear, and in experiment 2, on coping behavior on the shock probe defensive burying test after chronic stress. Chronic stress exaggerated the expression of conditioned fear memory. Vortioxetine restored fear memory to control levels and rendered extinction in stressed rats comparable with that in controls. In experiment 2, chronic unpredictable stress caused a shift from active to passive coping behavior, and vortioxetine restored active coping. Vortioxetine reduced exaggerated expression of conditioned fear and restored adaptive coping behavior following 2 different types of chronic stress, adding to the evidence of its therapeutic potential in the management of depression and anxiety disorders.

  7. The corrosion rate and the hydrogen absorption behavior of titanium under reducing condition-III. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Taniguchi, N.; Kawakami, S.

    2005-03-01

    Titanium is one of the candidate materials for overpacks as a high corrosion resistance metal. At the initial stage of repository, oxidizing condition will be given around the overpack because oxygen will be brought from the ground. The oxygen will be consumed by the reaction with impurities in buffer material or corrosion of overpack, and reducing condition will be achieved around the overpack. With the changing of redox condition, the water reduction becomes to dominate the cathodic reaction accompanying hydrogen generation. Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are main causes of the damage of long term integrity of titanium overpack. However, it is not known about the corrosion resistance and hydrogen absorption behavior of titanium under reduction condition. In this study, the completely sealed ampoule test and the immersion test of titanium in aqueous solution and bentonite was carried out. In order to obtain reliable data about the hydrogen generation rate and the ratio of hydrogen absorption in titanium. From the result of 3 years immersion tests, corrosion rate of titanium were estimated to be in the order of 10 -2 ∼10 -1 μm/y in the aqueous solution, and 10 -3 ∼10 -2 μm/y in bentonite. This value is almost the same as the last report. Almost all the hydrogen generated by corrosion was absorbed in titanium in the immersion tests in completely sealed ampoule. In the examination that changed each parameter, it was suggested that the amount of the hydrogen absorption become 2∼3 times in 1M HCO 3- and pH13. (author)

  8. Aqueous hydrodechlorination of 4-chlorophenol over an Rh/reduced graphene oxide synthesized by a facile one-pot solvothermal process under mild conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yanlin [Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Industry, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637002 (China); Fan, Guangyin, E-mail: fanguangyin@cwnu.edu.cn [Chemical Synthesis and Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Industry, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637002 (China); Wang, Chenyu [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Graphical abstract: The Rh nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (Rh NPs/RGO) nanocatalyst synthesized by a solvothermal technique showed high activity and stability for the hydrodechlorination of 4-chlorophenol under mild conditions. - Highlights: • Rh/RGO was synthesized through a one-pot polyol reduction of GO and RhCl{sub 3}. • Complete HDC of 4-chlorophenol was obtained in aqueous phase without any additive. • The Rh/RGO exhibited an excellent catalytic performance for HDC reaction. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) supported rhodium nanoparticles (Rh-NPs/RGO) was synthesized through one-pot polyol co-reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and rhodium chloride. The catalytic property of Rh-NPs/RGO was investigated for the aqueous phase hydrodechlorination (HDC) of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). A complete conversion of 4-CP into high valued products of cyclohexanone (selectivity: 23.2%) and cyclohexanol (selectivity: 76.8%) was successfully achieved at 303 K and balloon hydrogen pressure in a short reaction time of 50 min when 1.5 g/L of 4-CP was introduced. By comparing with Rh-NPs deposited on the other supports, Rh-NPs/RGO delivered the highest initial rate (111.4 mmol/g{sub Rh} min) for 4-CP HDC reaction under the identical conditions. The substantial catalytic activity of Rh-NPs/RGO can be ascribed to the small and uniform particle size of Rh (average particle size was 1.7 ± 0.14 nm) on the surface of the RGO sheets and an electron-deficient state of Rh in the catalyst as a result of the strong interaction between the active sites and the surface function groups of RGO.

  9. <strong>OPTIMIZATION OF IMMOBILIZED METAL strong>>ION AFFINITYstrong>> strong>>CHROMATOGRAPHY strong>>FOR strong>>PHOSPHOPEPTIDE ENRICHMENT  PRIOR TO strong>>MASS SPECTROMETRYstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Xumin; Young, Clifford

    simple procedures.     Methods Tryptic digests of standard phosphoproteins (bovine α,β- casein) and 3 non-phosphoproteins (bovine serum albumin, bovine β-lactoglobulin, and bovine carbonic anhydrase) with different ratios (1:50, 1:200, 1:500, 1:1000) were used for Fe(III)-IMAC (Qiagen Ni-NTA) enrichment.......   Results Fe(III)-IMAC using NTA-silica from Qiagen  showed a better performance than two other commercially available resins under the testing conditions. Increase of the acetonitrile content to 60% in loading and washing buffer significantly improved the specificity of IMAC enrichment. It was demonstrated...

  10. Pomegranate ellagitannins inhibit α-glucosidase activity in vitro and reduce starch digestibility under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellesia, Andrea; Verzelloni, Elena; Tagliazucchi, Davide

    2015-02-01

    Pomegranate extract was tested for its ability to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. Pomegranate extract strongly inhibited rat intestinal α-glucosidase in vitro whereas it was a weak inhibitor of porcine α-amylase. The inhibitory activity was recovered in an ellagitannins-enriched fraction and punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid were identified as α-glucosidase inhibitors (IC(50) of 140.2, 191.4, and 380.9 μmol/L, respectively). Kinetic analysis suggested that the pomegranate extract and ellagitannins inhibited α-glucosidase activity in a mixed mode. The inhibitory activity was demonstrated using an in vitro digestion system, mimicking the physiological gastro-intestinal condition, and potatoes as food rich in starch. Pre-incubation between ellagitannins and α-glucosidase increased the inhibitory activity, suggesting that they acted by binding to α-glucosidase. During digestion punicalin and punicalagin concentration decreased. Despite this loss, the pomegranate extract retained high inhibitory activity. This study suggests that pomegranate ellagitannins may inhibit α-glucosidase activity in vitro possibly affecting in vivo starch digestion.

  11. Neuropeptide S reduces fear and avoidance of con-specifics induced by social fear conditioning and social defeat, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoicas, Iulia; Menon, Rohit; Neumann, Inga D

    2016-09-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) has anxiolytic effects and facilitates extinction of cued fear in rodents. Here, we investigated whether NPS reverses social fear and social avoidance induced by social fear conditioning (SFC) and acute social defeat (SD), respectively, in male CD1 mice. Our results revealed that intracerebroventricular NPS (icv; 10 and 50 nmol/2 μl) reversed fear of unknown con-specifics induced by SFC and dose-dependently reduced avoidance of known aggressive con-specifics induced by SD. While 50 nmol of NPS completely reversed social avoidance and reinstated social preference, 10 nmol of NPS reduced social avoidance, but did not completely reinstate social preference in socially-defeated mice. Further, a lower dose (1 nmol/2 μl) of NPS facilitated the within-session extinction of cued fear, while a higher dose (10 nmol/2 μl) reduced the expression of cued fear. We could also confirm the anxiolytic effects of NPS (1, 10 and 50 nmol/2 μl) on the elevated plus-maze (EPM), which were not accompanied by alterations in locomotor activity either on the EPM or in the home cage. Finally, we could show that icv infusion of the NPS receptor 1 antagonist D-Cys((t)Bu)(5)-NPS (10 nmol/2 μl) did not alter SFC-induced social fear, general anxiety and locomotor activity. Taken together, our study extends the potent anxiolytic profile of NPS to a social context by demonstrating the reduction of social fear and social avoidance, thus providing the framework for studies investigating the involvement of the NPS system in the regulation of different types of social behaviour. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Appraising options to reduce shallow groundwater tables and enhance flow conditions over regional scales in an irrigated alluvial aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morway, Eric D.; Gates, Timothy K.; Niswonger, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the world’s key agricultural production systems face big challenges to both water quantity and quality due to shallow groundwater that results from long-term intensive irrigation, namely waterlogging and salinity, water losses, and environmental problems. This paper focuses on water quantity issues, presenting finite-difference groundwater models developed to describe shallow water table levels, non-beneficial groundwater consumptive use, and return flows to streams across two regions within an irrigated alluvial river valley in southeastern Colorado, USA. The models are calibrated and applied to simulate current baseline conditions in the alluvial aquifer system and to examine actions for potentially improving these conditions. The models provide a detailed description of regional-scale subsurface unsaturated and saturated flow processes, thereby enabling detailed spatiotemporal description of groundwater levels, recharge to infiltration ratios, partitioning of ET originating from the unsaturated and saturated zones, and groundwater flows, among other variables. Hybrid automated and manual calibration of the models is achieved using extensive observations of groundwater hydraulic head, groundwater return flow to streams, aquifer stratigraphy, canal seepage, total evapotranspiration, the portion of evapotranspiration supplied by upflux from the shallow water table, and irrigation flows. Baseline results from the two regional-scale models are compared to model predictions under variations of four alternative management schemes: (1) reduced seepage from earthen canals, (2) reduced irrigation applications, (3) rotational lease fallowing (irrigation water leased to municipalities, resulting in temporary dry-up of fields), and (4) combinations of these. The potential for increasing the average water table depth by up to 1.1 and 0.7 m in the two respective modeled regions, thereby reducing the threat of waterlogging and lowering non-beneficial consumptive use

  13. Task Performance, Attention and Classroom Behavior of Seriously Disturbed, Communication-Impaired, "Autistic"-Type Children under Conditions of Reduced Auditory Input. Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassler, Joan; Bryant, N. Dale

    This study investigated attention and performance on simple tasks as well as classroom attention of seriously disturbed, communication-impaired, autistic-type children under conditions of reduced auditory input (using ear protectors) and under conditions of normal auditory input (using a placebo device). Under ear protector conditions, there was a…

  14. Final Report - Phase II - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Brent; Sani, Rajesh

    2006-09-28

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Past research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. The project reported on here was an extension ($20,575) of the prior (much larger) project. This report is focused only on the work completed during the extension period. Further information on the larger impacts of our research, including 28 publications, can be found in the final report for the following projects: 1) Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study Grant # DE-FG03-01ER63270, and 2) Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions Grant # DE-FG03-98ER62630/A001 In this Phase II project, the toxic effects of uranium(VI) were studied using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in a medium containing bicarbonate or 1, 4-piperazinediethane sulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (PIPES) buffer (each at 30 mM, pH 7). The toxicity of uranium(VI) was dependent on the medium buffer and was observed in terms of longer lag times and in some cases, no measurable growth. The minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) was 140 M U(VI) in PIPES buffered medium. This is 36 times lower than previously reported for D. desulfuricans. These results suggest that U(VI) toxicity and the detoxification mechanisms of G20 depend greatly on the

  15. Mice with conditional NeuroD1 knockout display reduced aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis but no change in epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulet, Rebecca; Zhu, Jingfei; Aktar, Mahafuza; Hsieh, Jenny; Cho, Kyung-Ok

    2017-07-01

    Adult neurogenesis is significantly increased in the hippocampus of rodent models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). These adult-generated neurons have recently been shown to play a contributing role in the development of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). In order to eventually target pro-epileptic adult neurogenesis in the clinical setting, it will be important to identify molecular players involved in the control of aberrant neurogenesis after seizures. Here, we focused on NeuroD1 (ND1), a member of the bHLH family of transcription factors previously shown to play an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of adult-generated neurons in the hippocampus. Wild-type mice treated with pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus (SE) showed a significant up-regulation of NeuroD1+ immature neuroblasts located in both the granule cell layer (GCL), and ectopically localized to the hilar region of the hippocampus. As expected, conditional knockout (cKO) of NeuroD1 in Nestin-expressing stem/progenitors and their progeny led to a reduction in the number of NeuroD1+ adult-generated neurons after pilocarpine treatment compared to WT littermates. Surprisingly, there was no change in SRS in NeuroD1 cKO mice, suggesting that NeuroD1 cKO fails to reduce aberrant neurogenesis below the threshold needed to impact SRS. Consistent with this conclusion, the total number of adult-generated neurons in the pilocarpine model, especially the total number of Prox1+ hilar ectopic granule cells were unchanged after NeuroD1 cKO, suggesting strategies to reduce SRS will need to achieve a greater removal of aberrant adult-generated neurons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Reduced intensity conditioning, combined transplantation of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells in patients with severe aplastic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Li

    Full Text Available We examined if transplantation of combined haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC affected graft failure and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA. Patients with SAA-I (N = 17 received haploidentical HSCT plus MSC infusion. Stem cell grafts used a combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF-primed bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells of haploidentical donors and the culture-expanded third-party donor-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs, respectively. Reduced intensity conditioning consisted of fludarabine (30 mg/m2·d+cyclosphamide (500 mg/m2·d+anti-human thymocyte IgG. Transplant recipients also received cyclosporin A, mycophenolatemofetil, and CD25 monoclonal antibody. A total of 16 patients achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. The median mononuclear cell and CD34 count was 9.3×10(8/kg and 4.5×10(6/kg. Median time to ANC was >0.5×10(9/L and PLT count >20×10(9/L were 12 and 14 days, respectively. Grade III-IV acute GVHD was seen in 23.5% of the cases, while moderate and severe chronic GVHD were seen in 14.2% of the cases. The 3-month and 6-month survival rates for all patients were 88.2% and 76.5%, respectively; mean survival time was 56.5 months. Combined transplantation of haploidentical HSCs and MSCs on SAA without an HLA-identical sibling donor was safe, effectively reduced the incidence of severe GVHD, and improved patient survival.

  17. Aryldithioethyloxycarbonyl (Ardec): a new family of amine protecting groups removable under mild reducing conditions and their applications to peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeyre, Milaine; Leprince, Jérôme; Massonneau, Marc; Oulyadi, Hassan; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony; Turcatti, Gerardo; Vaudry, Hubert

    2006-04-24

    The development of phenyldithioethyloxycarbonyl (Phdec) and 2-pyridyldithioethyloxycarbonyl (Pydec) protecting groups, which are thiol-labile urethanes, is described. These new disulfide-based protecting groups were introduced onto the epsilon-amino group of L-lysine; the resulting amino acid derivatives were easily converted into N alpha-Fmoc building blocks suitable for both solid- and solution-phase peptide synthesis. Model dipeptide(Ardec)s were prepared by using classical peptide couplings followed by standard deprotection protocols. They were used to optimize the conditions for complete thiolytic removal of the Ardec groups both in aqueous and organic media. Phdec and Pydec were found to be cleaved within 15 to 30 min under mild reducing conditions: i) by treatment with dithiothreitol or beta-mercaptoethanol in Tris.HCl buffer (pH 8.5-9.0) for deprotection in water and ii) by treatment with beta-mercaptoethanol and 1,8-diazobicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) in N-methylpyrrolidinone for deprotection in an organic medium. Successful solid-phase synthesis of hexapeptides Ac-Lys-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-Lys(Ardec)-NH2 has clearly demonstrated the full orthogonality of these new amino protecting groups with Fmoc and Boc protections. The utility of the Ardec orthogonal deprotection strategy for site-specific chemical modification of peptides bearing several amino groups was illustrated firstly by the preparation of a fluorogenic substrate for caspase-3 protease containing the cyanine dyes Cy 3.0 and Cy 5.0 as FRET donor/acceptor pair, and by solid-phase synthesis of an hexapeptide bearing a single biotin reporter group.

  18. Incidence and Outcomes of Central Nervous System Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Relapse after Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounder, Dana T; Khandelwal, Pooja; Chandra, Sharat; Jordan, Michael B; Kumar, Ashish R; Grimley, Michael S; Davies, Stella M; Bleesing, Jack J; Marsh, Rebecca A

    2017-05-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an immune regulatory disorder that commonly presents with central nervous system (CNS) involvement. The only cure for genetic HLH is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), typically treated with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. We sought to estimate the incidence of CNS relapse after RIC HSCT, determine risk factors, and evaluate outcomes. We performed a retrospective chart review of 94 consecutive children and young adults with primary HLH who received RIC HSCT. CNS relapse within 1 year after transplantation was diagnosed by review of clinical symptoms, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and radiologic findings. Four (4.25%) patients developed symptoms of possible CNS HLH after HSCT and 3 patients were diagnosed. Eight patients underwent screening lumbar puncture because of history of active CNS disease at the onset of the conditioning regimen and 4 had evidence of continued disease. The overall incidence of CNS relapse and continued CNS disease after RIC HSCT was 8%. All patients with CNS disease after HSCT responded to CNS-directed therapy. Whole blood donor chimerism at the time of CNS relapse was low at 1% to 34%, but it remained high at 88% to 100% for patients with continued CNS disease. Overall survival for patients with CNS relapse was 50%, compared with 75% for patients without CNS disease (P = .079). Our data suggest that a low level of donor chimerism or active CNS disease at the time of transplantation increase the risk of CNS HLH after HSCT. Surveillance CSF evaluation after allogeneic RIC HSCT should be considered in patients with risk factors and CNS-directed treatment should be initiated if appropriate. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Partial Root-Zone Drying of Olive (Olea europaea var. 'Chetoui') Induces Reduced Yield under Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbara, Soumaya; Haworth, Matthew; Emiliani, Giovani; Ben Mimoun, Mehdi; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The productivity of olive trees in arid and semi-arid environments is closely linked to irrigation. It is necessary to improve the efficiency of irrigation techniques to optimise the amount of olive fruit produced in relation to the volume of water used. Partial root-zone drying (PRD) is a water saving irrigation technique that theoretically allows the production of a root-to-shoot signal that modifies the physiology of the above-ground parts of the plant; specifically reducing stomatal conductance (gs) and improving water use efficiency (WUE). Partial root-zone drying has been successfully applied under field conditions to woody and non-woody crops; yet the few previous trials with olive trees have produced contrasting results. Thirty year-old olive trees (Olea europaea 'var. Chetoui') in a Tunisian grove were exposed to four treatments from May to October for three-years: 'control' plants received 100% of the potential evapotranspirative demand (ETc) applied to the whole root-zone; 'PRD100' were supplied with an identical volume of water to the control plants alternated between halves of the root-zone every ten-days; 'PRD50' were given 50% of ETc to half of the root-system, and; 'rain-fed' plants received no supplementary irrigation. Allowing part of the root-zone to dry resulted in reduced vegetative growth and lower yield: PRD100 decreased yield by ~47% during productive years. During the less productive years of the alternate bearing cycle, irrigation had no effect on yield; this suggests that withholding of water during 'off-years' may enhance the effectiveness of irrigation over a two-year cycle. The amount and quality of oil within the olive fruit was unaffected by the irrigation treatment. Photosynthesis declined in the PRD50 and rain-fed trees due to greater diffusive limitations and reduced biochemical uptake of CO2. Stomatal conductance and the foliar concentration of abscisic acid (ABA) were not altered by PRD100 irrigation, which may indicate the

  20. Partial Root-Zone Drying of Olive (Olea europaea var. 'Chetoui' Induces Reduced Yield under Field Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Dbara

    Full Text Available The productivity of olive trees in arid and semi-arid environments is closely linked to irrigation. It is necessary to improve the efficiency of irrigation techniques to optimise the amount of olive fruit produced in relation to the volume of water used. Partial root-zone drying (PRD is a water saving irrigation technique that theoretically allows the production of a root-to-shoot signal that modifies the physiology of the above-ground parts of the plant; specifically reducing stomatal conductance (gs and improving water use efficiency (WUE. Partial root-zone drying has been successfully applied under field conditions to woody and non-woody crops; yet the few previous trials with olive trees have produced contrasting results. Thirty year-old olive trees (Olea europaea 'var. Chetoui' in a Tunisian grove were exposed to four treatments from May to October for three-years: 'control' plants received 100% of the potential evapotranspirative demand (ETc applied to the whole root-zone; 'PRD100' were supplied with an identical volume of water to the control plants alternated between halves of the root-zone every ten-days; 'PRD50' were given 50% of ETc to half of the root-system, and; 'rain-fed' plants received no supplementary irrigation. Allowing part of the root-zone to dry resulted in reduced vegetative growth and lower yield: PRD100 decreased yield by ~47% during productive years. During the less productive years of the alternate bearing cycle, irrigation had no effect on yield; this suggests that withholding of water during 'off-years' may enhance the effectiveness of irrigation over a two-year cycle. The amount and quality of oil within the olive fruit was unaffected by the irrigation treatment. Photosynthesis declined in the PRD50 and rain-fed trees due to greater diffusive limitations and reduced biochemical uptake of CO2. Stomatal conductance and the foliar concentration of abscisic acid (ABA were not altered by PRD100 irrigation, which may

  1. Strong interaction and QFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, T.

    1981-01-01

    With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ΔI = 1/2 rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) x U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the rho-meson transforms as a triplet under SU(2)sub(w), and this is the origin of the rho-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons. (orig.)

  2. Leaching and accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge under concomitant thermophilic and low pH conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela

    2012-12-01

    The leaching and/or accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge systems was investigated. Two thermophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at pH 5 were fed with sucrose (4gCODl reactor -1d -1) and sulfate at different COD/SO 4 2- ratios. During the start-up of such acidogenic systems, an initial leaching of trace elements from the inoculum sludge occurred regardless of trace elements supplementation in the reactor influent. The granular sludge maintained the physical structure despite high Fe leaching. After start-up and nonetheless the acidic conditions, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo and Se were retained or accumulated by the sludge when added. Particularly, Ni and Co accumulated in the carbonates and exchangeable fractions ensuring potential bioavailability. Otherwise, the initial stock in the inoculum sludge sufficed to operate the process for nearly 1year without supplementation of trace elements and no significant sludge wash-out occurred. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The influence of benefit microorganisms on yield and quality of soybean grains under conditions of reduced nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Kristek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility to reduce the application of mineral nitrogen fertilizers through the application of beneficial microorganisms (genus Bradyrhizobium, Azotobacter, bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus spp., etc.. Research was conducted during 2013 and 2014 on Eutric brown soil. The experiment was set up in a split-block scheme with 12 different variants in 4 repetitions: two soybean cultivars were used; two different treatments of nitrogen fertilizers and three different treatments of microbiological preparation were applied. Analysed parameters were soybean grain yield (kg/ha based on 13% moisture, protein content (%, oil content (% and hectolitre mass (kg. Given that the climatic conditions in the second year of research were more favourable than in the first year of research, all the elements of research, including control variants, achieved better results in the second year of research. All variants treated with microbiological preparations, either by application in soil or by application in soil combined with foliar treatments, also achieved statistically significant differences compared to the control variants.

  4. Insertional inactivation of hblC encoding the L2 component of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 haemolysin BL strongly reduces enterotoxigenic activity, but not the haemolytic activity against human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbäck, T; Okstad, O A; Rishovd, A L; Kolstø, A B

    1999-11-01

    Haemolysin BL (HBL) is a Bacillus cereus toxin composed of a binding component, B, and two lytic components, L1 and L2. HBL is also the enterotoxin responsible for the diarrhoeal food poisoning syndrome caused by several strains of B. cereus. The three genes encoding the HBL components constitute an operon and are transcribed from a promoter 608 bp upstream of the hblC translational start site. The first gene of the hbl operon, hblC, in the B. cereus type strain, ATCC 14579, was inactivated in this study. Inactivation of hblC strongly reduced both the enterotoxigenic activity of B. cereus ATCC 14579 and the haemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes, while maintaining full haemolytic activity against human erythrocytes.

  5. The Role of Carbon in Core Formation Under Highly Reducing Conditions With Implications for the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E..; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Draper, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Results from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have shown elevated abundances of carbon on the surface of Mercury. Furthermore, the X-Ray Spectrometer on board MESSENGER measured elevated abundances of sulfur and low abundances of iron, suggesting the planet's oxygen fugacity (fO2) is several log10 units below the Iron-Wüstite (IW) buffer. Similar to the role of other volatiles (e.g. sulfur) on highly reducing planetary bodies, carbon is expected to behave differently than it would under higher fO2. As discussed by Nittler et al. and Hauck et al., under such highly reducing conditions, the majority of the iron partitions into the core. On Mercury, this resulted in a relatively large core and a thin mantle. Using a composition similar to the largest volcanic field on the planet (the northern volcanic plains), Vander Kaaden and McCubbin conducted sink-float experiments to determine the density of melts and minerals on Mercury. They showed that graphite would be the only buoyant mineral in a mercurian magma ocean. Therefore, Vander Kaaden and McCubbin proposed a possible primary flotation crust on the planet composed of graphite. Concurrently, Peplowski et al. used GRS data from MESSENGER to show an average northern hemisphere abundance of C on the planet of 1.4 +/- 0.9 wt%. However, as this result was only at the one-sigma detection limit, possible carbon abundances at the three-sigma detection limit for Mercury range from 0 to 4.1 wt% carbon. Additionally, Murchie et al. investigated the possible darkening agent on Mercury and concluded that coarse-grained graphite could darken high reflectance plains to the low reflectance material. To further test the possibility of elevated abundances of carbon in Mercury's crust, Peplowski et al. used the low-altitude MESSENGER data to show that carbon is the only material consistent with both the visible to near-infrared spectra and the neutron measurements of low

  6. Emergence dynamics of barnyardgrass and jimsonweed from two depths when switching from conventional to reduced and no-till conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios P. Vasileiadis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A cylinder experiment was conducted in northern Greece during 2005 and 2006 to assess emergence dynamics of barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L. Beauv. and jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L. in the case of a switch from conventional to conservation tillage systems (CT. Emergence was surveyed from two burial depths (5 and 10 cm and with simulation of reduced tillage (i.e. by soil disturbance and no-till conditions. Barnyardgrass emergence was significantly affected by burial depth, having greater emergence from 5 cm depth (96% although even 78% of seedlings emerged from 10 cm depth after the two years of study. Emergence of barnyardgrass was stable across years from the different depths and tillage regimes. Jimsonweed seeds showed lower germination than barnyardgrass during the study period, whereas its emergence was significantly affected by soil disturbance having 41% compared to 28% without disturbance. A burial depth x soil disturbance interaction was also determined, which showed higher emergence from 10 cm depth with soil disturbance. Jimsonweed was found to have significantly higher emergence from 10 cm depth with soil disturbance in Year 2. Seasonal emergence timing of barnyardgrass did not vary between the different burial depth and soil disturbance regimes, as it started in April and lasted until end of May in both years. Jimsonweed showed a bimodal pattern, with first emergence starting end of April until mid-May and the second ranging from mid-June to mid-August from 10 cm burial depth and from mid-July to mid-August from 5 cm depth, irrespective of soil disturbance in both cases.

  7. Prevalence of pathological conditions causing skin damage and consequently reducing its market value in domestic ruminants of Punjab, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar I. Chaudhry

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Data regarding the prevalence of skin diseases reducing the market value of skins and hides and ultimately refined leather were not available in Pakistan. The current study was conducted in the hide/skin markets and abattoirs of Lahore and Faisalabad and tanneries of Sheikhupura, Kasur and Sialkot. The record of various skin diseases and conditions damaging the skin/hide of cattle, goat and sheep was made. Lesions, extent and type of damage were recorded. A total of 21,671 skins / hides were examined out of which 3918 of skins and 600 hides were examined at the abattoirs of Lahore and Faisalabad, 6784 Skins and 1399 hides at hide markets and 8091 skins and 879 hides at tanneries. Out of total 21,671 skins / hides, 66.12% were normal and 33.88% were having some sort of damage. The data were gathered on questionnaire sheets. The prevalence of skin diseases was assessed through Strata V.9 software program. The correlation of the disease and area was analyzed by the chi-square. The prevalence of various diseases and damages due to mal-management in sheep, goats and cattle has been discussed in detail. The damages in goat skins were significantly less as compared with cattle and sheep. However, the type of defects and severity varied amongst various ruminants studied. The most common damages observed, overall in all species studied were atrophy of skin (Thin skin 6.38%, followed in descending order observed was lesions of wounds 4.94%, old lesions of pox 4.82%, flaying cuts 3.17%, tick infestation 3.08%, lesions caused by mites infestation 2.45%, scratches 2.33%, lesions caused by warble fly larvae 1.47%, decomposition 1.32%, charr (fibrosis 1.28%, ringworm infection 1.10%, extensive soiling by dung 0.84%, chronic abscesses 0.46%, and Lice infestation 0.17%.

  8. Emergence dynamics of barnyardgrass and jimsonweed from two depths when switching from conventional to reduced and no-till conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasileiadis, V.; Froud-Williams, R.J.; Loddo, D.; Eleftherohorinos, I.G.

    2016-11-01

    A cylinder experiment was conducted in northern Greece during 2005 and 2006 to assess emergence dynamics of barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv.) and jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L.) in the case of a switch from conventional to conservation tillage systems (CT). Emergence was surveyed from two burial depths (5 and 10 cm) and with simulation of reduced tillage (i.e. by soil disturbance) and no-till conditions. Barnyardgrass emergence was significantly affected by burial depth, having greater emergence from 5 cm depth (96%) although even 78% of seedlings emerged from 10 cm depth after the two years of study. Emergence of barnyardgrass was stable across years from the different depths and tillage regimes. Jimsonweed seeds showed lower germination than barnyardgrass during the study period, whereas its emergence was significantly affected by soil disturbance having 41% compared to 28% without disturbance. A burial depth x soil disturbance interaction was also determined, which showed higher emergence from 10 cm depth with soil disturbance. Jimsonweed was found to have significantly higher emergence from 10 cm depth with soil disturbance in Year 2. Seasonal emergence timing of barnyardgrass did not vary between the different burial depth and soil disturbance regimes, as it started in April and lasted until end of May in both years. Jimsonweed showed a bimodal pattern, with first emergence starting end of April until mid-May and the second ranging from mid-June to mid-August from 10 cm burial depth and from mid-July to mid-August from 5 cm depth, irrespective of soil disturbance in both cases. (Author)

  9. Explicit Disassociation of a Conditioned Stimulus and Unconditioned Stimulus during Extinction Training Reduces Both Time to Asymptotic Extinction and Spontaneous Recovery of a Conditioned Taste Aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, G. Andrew; DiSorbo, Anthony; Wilson, Gina N.; Huffman, Jennifer; Bacik, Stephanie; Hoxha, Zana; Biada, Jaclyn M.; Kim, Ye-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversions (CTAs) may be acquired when an animal consumes a novel taste (CS) and then experiences the symptoms of poisoning (US). This aversion may be extinguished by repeated exposure to the CS alone. However, following a latency period in which the CS is not presented, the CTA will spontaneously recover (SR). In the current…

  10. Final Report Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.W. Fields; J.D. Wall; J. Keasling; J. Zhou

    2008-05-15

    We continue to utilize the oligonucleotide microarrays that were constructed through funding with this project to characterize growth responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris relevant to metal-reducing conditions. To effectively immobilize heavy metals and radionuclides via sulfate-reduction, it is important to understand the cellular responses to adverse factors observed at contaminated subsurface environments (e.g., nutrients, pH, contaminants, growth requirements and products). One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. First, in order to experimentally establish the criteria for designing gene-specific oligonucleotide probes, an oligonucleotide array was constructed that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes (50mers and 70mers) based upon 4 genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were examined. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of <85% for both 50mer and 70mer probes. 33 to 48% of the PM signal intensities were detected at a probe-target identity of 94% for 50mer oligonucleotides, and 43 to 55% for 70mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96%. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15 bases) contributed an additional 9% of the PM signal intensity compared to a non-stretch probe (< 15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70mer probes had approximately 55% of the PM signal. Mismatches should be as close to the middle position of an oligonucleotide probe as possible to minimize cross-hybridization. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than -30 kcal/mol for 50mer probes or -40 kcal/mol for 70mer probes. Based on the

  11. Impact of Human Leukocyte Antigen Allele Mismatch in Unrelated Bone Marrow Transplantation with Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hisayuki; Kanda, Junya; Fuji, Shigeo; Kim, Sung-Won; Fukuda, Takahiro; Najima, Yuho; Ohno, Hitoshi; Uchida, Naoyuki; Ueda, Yasunori; Eto, Tetsuya; Iwato, Koji; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Kondo, Tadakazu; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2017-02-01

    The impact of HLA mismatch in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) has not been fully examined. We analyzed a total of 1130 cases to examine the effects of HLA allele mismatch in unrelated bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with RIC in the Japan Marrow Donor Program registry cohort. Compared with HLA 8/8-allele match (n = 720, 8/8 match), both 1 (n = 295, 7/8 match) and 2 allele mismatches (n = 115, 6/8 match) were associated with significant reduction of overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR],  1.34; P = .0024 and HR, 1.33; P = .035 for 7/8 and 6/8 match, respectively). The incidence of grades 2 to 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) increased with increasing number of mismatched alleles (HR, 1.36 and HR, 2.08 for 7/8 and 6/8 match, respectively). Nonrelapse mortality showed a similar tendency to aGVHD (HR, 1.35 for 7/8 and HR, 1.63 for 6/8). One-allele mismatches at the HLA-A or -B and HLA-C loci were significantly associated with inferior OS compared with 8/8 match (HR, 1.64 for A or B mismatch and HR, 1.41 for C mismatch), whereas HLA-DRB1 allele mismatch was not (HR, 1.16; P = .30). However, the effect of HLA-A or -B and -C mismatch on OS was not observed in those who received RIC BMT since 2010, in contrast to recipients before 2010. These results suggested that in unrelated RIC BMT, 1-allele mismatch is associated with poorer outcome, and the impact of HLA mismatch may differ depending on the HLA locus, although these HLA mismatch effects may be different in recent cases. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced Electrodermal Fear Conditioning from Ages 3 to 8 Years Is Associated with Aggressive Behavior at Age 8 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Venables, Peter H.; Dawson, Michael E.; Mednick, Sarnoff A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Poor fear conditioning characterizes adult psychopathy and criminality, but it is not known whether it is related to aggressive/antisocial behavior in early childhood. Methods: Using a differential, partial reinforcement conditioning paradigm, electrodermal activity was recorded from 200 male and female children at ages 3, 4, 5, 6, and…

  13. The Semi-Synthetic Peptide Lin-SB056-1 in Combination with EDTA Exerts Strong Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Conditions Mimicking Cystic Fibrosis Sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Grassi, Lucia; Esin, Semih; Serra, Ilaria; Scorciapino, Mariano A; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Batoni, Giovanna

    2017-09-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The ability of the bacterium to form biofilms and the presence of a thick and stagnant mucus in the airways of CF patients largely contribute to antibiotic therapy failure and demand for new antimicrobial agents able to act in the CF environment. The present study investigated the anti- P. aeruginosa activity of lin-SB056-1, a recently described semi-synthetic antimicrobial peptide, used alone and in combination with the cation chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Bactericidal assays were carried out in standard culture conditions and in an artificial sputum medium (ASM) closely resembling the CF environment. Peptide's structure and interaction with large unilamellar vesicles in media with different ionic strengths were also investigated through infrared spectroscopy. Lin-SB056-1 demonstrated fast and strong bactericidal activity against both mucoid and non-mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa in planktonic form and, in combination with EDTA, caused significant reduction of the biomass of P. aeruginosa mature biofilms. In ASM, the peptide/EDTA combination exerted a strong bactericidal effect and inhibited the formation of biofilm-like structures of P. aeruginosa . Overall, the results obtained highlight the potential of the lin-SB056-1/EDTA combination for the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections in CF patients.

  14. Gasoline reformulation to reduce exhaust emissions in Finnish conditions. Influence of sulphur and benzene contents of gasoline on exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kytoe, M.; Aakko, P.; Lappi, M.

    1994-01-01

    At earlier stages of the study it was found that the exhaust emissions from cars are reduced when using fuels with no more than 4 wt% of oxygen. At this stage of the study the work focused on impacts of the sulphur and benzene content of gasoline on exhaust emissions in Finland. Sulphur in gasoline retards the operation of the catalyst, and consequently the exhaust emissions of catalyst cars increase if the sulphur content of the fuel increases. In the present study, evaporation during refuelling were measured for fuels with varying vapour pressures and benzene contents of gasoline. The total hydrocarbon evaporation was reduced by 22 % (10 g) when the vapour pressure of gasoline was reduced from 85 kPa to 65 kPa. Correspondingly, benzene evaporation during refuelling was reduced to a third when the benzene content of the fuel was reduced from the level of 3 wt% to 1 wt%. The reduction of the sulphur content of gasoline from 500 ppm to 100 ppm affected regulated exhaust emissions from the catalyst car at +22 deg C as follows: CO emission was reduced on average by 14 % (0.175 g/km), CH emission by 7 % (0.010 g/km) and NO x emission by 9 % (0.011 g/km). At-7 deg C the percentual changes were smaller. When the benzene content of the fuel was reduced from 3 wt% to 1 wt%, the benzene emission from the catalyst cars was reduced by 20-30 % and from the non-catalyst cars on average by 30 % both at +22 deg C and -7 deg C. The benzene emission ranged 3-22 mg/km for the catalyst cars and 40-90 mg/km for the non-catalyst cars at +22 deg C in the FTP test

  15. Numerical strategies to reduce the effect of ill-conditioned correlation matrices and underflow errors in Kriging

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Haarhoff, LJ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kriging is used extensively as a metamodel in multidisciplinary design optimization. The correlation matrix used in Kriging metamodeling frequently becomes ill-conditioned. Therefore different numerical methods used to solve the Kriging equations...

  16. Investigating Methods to Reduce Black Bear (Ursus americanus) Visitation to Anthropogenic Food Sources: Conditioned Taste Aversion and Food Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Signor, Kari D.

    2009-01-01

    Conflicts between humans and black bears (Ursus americanus) jeopardize the safety of both humans and bears, especially when bears become food-conditioned to anthropogenic food sources in areas such as campgrounds. Interest in using non-lethal techniques, such as aversive conditioning, to manage such conflicts is growing. I conducted a captive experiment at The Wildlife Science Center in Minnesota and two field experiments in the La Sal Mountains, Utah, to investigate the effects of taste av...

  17. SIRT6 reduces macrophage foam cell formation by inducing autophagy and cholesterol efflux under ox-LDL condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangping; Zhang, Guangya; Pang, Qi; Yu, Cong; Xiong, Jie; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Fengling

    2017-05-01

    SIRT6 is a pivotal regulator of lipid metabolism. It is also closely connected to cardiovascular diseases, which are the main cause of death in diabetic patients. We observed a decrease in the expression of SIRT6 and key autophagy effectors (ATG5, LC3B, and LAMP1) in ox-LDL-induced foam cells, a special form of lipid-laden macrophages. In these cells, SIRT6 WT but not SIRT6 H133Y overexpression markedly reduced foam cell formation, as shown by Oil Red O staining, while inducing autophagy flux, as determined by both mRFP-GFP-LC3 labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Silencing the key autophagy initiation gene ATG5, reversed the autophagy-promoting effect of SIRT6 in ox-LDL-treated THP1 cells, as evidenced by an increase in foam cells. Cholesterol efflux assays indicated that SIRT6 overexpression in foam cells promoted cholesterol efflux, increased the levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1, and reduced miR-33 levels. By transfecting miR-33 into cells overexpressing SIRT6, we observed that reduced foam cell formation and autophagy flux induction were largely reversed. These data imply that SIRT6 plays an essential role in protecting against atherosclerosis by reducing foam cell formation through an autophagy-dependent pathway. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Changing Hearts and Minds: The Importance of Formal Education in Reducing Stigma Associated with Mental Health Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Margaret E.; Watt, Bruce D.; Hicks, Richard E.; Bode, Andrew; Hampson, Elizabeth J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The expansion of user-friendly mental health services for young people is an important goal of mental health reform in Australia; however, stigma and discrimination associated with mental health conditions constitute major deterrents to help-seeking among young people. Objective: This paper reports on a qualitative study conducted in…

  19. Fear conditioning and shock intensity : the choice between minimizing the stress induced and reducing the number of animals used

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietersen, CY; Bosker, FJ; Posterna, F; den Boer, JA

    Many fear conditioning studies use electric shock as the aversive stimulus. The intensity of shocks varies throughout the literature. In this study, shock intensities ranging from 0 to 1.5 mA were used, and the effects on the rats assessed by both behavioural and biochemical stress parameters.

  20. Effects of stigma-reducing conditions on intention to seek psychological help among Korean college students with anxious-ambivalent attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Suk Kyung; Choi, Seong In; Lee, Sang Min

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to examine whether stigma-reducing conditions (i.e., random assignment of participants to hypothetical scenarios with varying levels of stigma) effectively increase intention to seek help for Korean college students with anxious-ambivalent attachment style, depending on previous counseling experience. Three hundred thirty Korean college students participated and were randomly assigned to either a low or a high stigma-reducing manipulative condition group. Each group was provided with three possible strategies to reduce stigma: the location of a counseling center, contact with a mental health patient, and the media portrayal of mental illness. In the high-stigma group, the strategies were described in a way that was highly stigmatizing. In the other group, the 3 strategies were created in a way that was not as stigmatizing. In order to examine the effect of stigma-reducing scenarios through the conditions, participants were also instructed to remember a previous or current stressful situation before responding to the questionnaire. The results of multivariate analysis of variance showed a 3-way interaction effect (i.e., level of stigma based on stigma manipulative condition, level of attachment anxiety, and previous counseling experience) on the intentions score when the "contact" and the "media" strategies were applied. The results indicated that individuals who have a higher level of attachment anxiety and a previous experience of counseling were more sensitive to the stigma-reducing manipulative condition. These results highlight the importance of the "contact" and "media" strategies in reducing stigma of seeking counseling for mental health services. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Old males reduce melanin-pigmented traits and increase reproductive outcome under worse environmental conditions in common kestrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Idiaquez, David; Vergara, Pablo; Fargallo, Juan Antonio; Martinez-Padilla, Jesús

    2016-02-01

    Secondary sexual traits displayed by males and females may have evolved as a signal of individual quality. However, both individual quality and investment on producing or maintaining enhanced sexual traits change as individuals age. At the same time, the costs associated to produce sexual traits might be attenuated or increased if environmental conditions are benign or worse respectively. Accordingly, environmental conditions are expected to shape the association between the expression of sexual traits and their reproductive outcome as individuals age. Nonetheless, little is known about the environmental influence on the co-variation between sexual traits and reproductive outcome throughout the life of individuals. We studied the age-dependency of the number and size of back spots, a melanin-based and sexual trait in adults of common kestrels (Falco tinnunculus). We analysed the age-dependence of reproductive traits and the environmental influence, defined as vole abundance, using a 10-year individual-based dataset. We broke down age-related changes of reproductive traits into within- and between-individual variation to assess their contribution to population-level patterns. Our results showed a within-individual decrease in the number, but not the size, of back spots in males. The size of back spots was positively correlated with food availability in males. Reproductive performance of males increased as they aged, in agreement with the life-history theory but depending of vole abundance. Remarkably, we found that having fewer back spots was positively associated with clutch size only for old individuals under low-food conditions. We suggest that environmental variation may shape the association between the expression of a sexual signal and reproductive outcome. We speculate that the reliability of sexual traits is higher when environmental conditions are poor only for old individuals. Within an evolutionary context, we suggest that the expression of sexual traits

  2. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  3. Quantum strongly secure ramp secret sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Paul; Matsumoto, Rytaro Yamashita

    2015-01-01

    Quantum secret sharing is a scheme for encoding a quantum state (the secret) into multiple shares and distributing them among several participants. If a sufficient number of shares are put together, then the secret can be fully reconstructed. If an insufficient number of shares are put together...... however, no information about the secret can be revealed. In quantum ramp secret sharing, partial information about the secret is allowed to leak to a set of participants, called an unqualified set, that cannot fully reconstruct the secret. By allowing this, the size of a share can be drastically reduced....... This paper introduces a quantum analog of classical strong security in ramp secret sharing schemes. While the ramp secret sharing scheme still leaks partial information about the secret to unqualified sets of participants, the strong security condition ensures that qudits with critical information can...

  4. Appetitive to aversive counter-conditioning as intervention to reduce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior: the role of the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, Peter; Almacellas-Barbanoj, Amanda; Prijn, Jeffrey; Kaag, Anne-Marije; Reneman, Liesbeth; Verheij, Michel M M; Homberg, Judith R

    2018-01-02

    Counter-conditioning can be a valid strategy to reduce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior. However, this has not been tested in laboratory animals with extended cocaine-taking backgrounds nor is it well understood, which individual differences may contribute to its effects. Here, we set out to investigate the influence of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) genotype on the effectiveness of counter-conditioning after extended access to cocaine self-administration. To this end, 5-HTT +/+ and 5-HTT -/- rats underwent a touch screen-based approach to test if reward-induced reinstatement of responding to a previously counter-conditioned cue is reduced, compared with a non-counter-conditioned cue, in a within-subject manner. We observed an overall extinction deficit of cocaine-seeking behavior in 5-HTT -/- rats and a resistance to punishment during the counter-conditioning session. Furthermore, we observed a significant decrease in reinstatement to cocaine and sucrose associated cues after counter-conditioning but only in 5-HTT +/+ rats. In short, we conclude that the paradigm we used was able to produce effects of counter-conditioning of sucrose seeking behavior in line with what is described in literature, and we demonstrate that it can be effective even after long-term exposure to cocaine, in a genotype-dependent manner. © 2018 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. FINAL REPORT - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions:An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study and Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Peyton; James Amonette; Haluk Beyenal; Gill Geesey; Zbigniew Lewandowski; Rajesh Sani

    2005-10-07

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. In situ coupons with a variety of mineral phases were placed in monitoring wells at the NABIR FRC. These coupons showed that the mineral phase composition significantly affected the resulting attached phase microbial community. Our comparative use of both batch and open flow reactors (more representative of field conditions) indicates that hydrodynamics and continual influx of substrate and contaminants can also yield significantly different results than those obtained with closed serum bottles. To this end, the following overall experimental hypothesis tested was the following: On a mineral surface under anaerobic conditions, accumulations of secondary inorganic precipitates are controlled by a) the bacteria associated with the mineral surface, b) the electron acceptors available for anaerobic bacterial respiration, and c) local hydrodynamics and pH buffers govern micro- and meso-scale interaction of U in the presence of electron donors and acceptors, and nutrients.

  6. Release of Extracellular Polymeric Substance and Disintegration of Anaerobic Granular Sludge under Reduced Sulfur Compounds-Rich Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuro Kobayashi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of reduced form of sulfur compounds on granular sludge was investigated. Significant release of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS from the granular sludge occurred in the presence of sulfide and methanethiol according to various concentrations. Granular sludge also showed a rapid increase in turbidity and decrease in diameter in accordance with sulfide concentration during the long-term shaking, suggesting that the strength of the granules was reduced with high-concentration sulfide. A continuous experiment of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors with different concentrations of sulfide (10, 200, 500 mg-S/L influence demonstrated that the reactor fed with higher concentration of sulfide allowed more washout of small particle-suspended solid (SS content and soluble carbohydrate and protein, which were considered as EPS released from biofilm. Finally, the presence of sulfide negatively affected methane production, chemical oxygen demand removal and sludge retention in operational performance.

  7. On being the right size: increased body size is associated with reduced telomere length under natural conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ringsby, Thor Harald; Jensen, Henrik; Pärn, Henrik; Kvalnes, Thomas; Boner, Winnie; Gillespie, Robert; Holand, Håkon; Hagen, Ingerid Julie; Rønning, Bernt; Sæther, Bernt-Erik; Monaghan, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of body size is likely to involve trade-offs between body size, growth rate and longevity. Within species, larger body size is associated with faster growth and ageing, and reduced longevity, but the cellular processes driving these relationships are poorly understood. One mechanism that might play a key role in determining optimal body size is the relationship between body size and telomere dynamics. However, we know little about how telomere length is affected when selection for l...

  8. Long-term follow-up of a retrospective comparison of reduced-intensity conditioning and conventional high-dose conditioning for allogeneic transplantation from matched related donors in myelodysplastic syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martino, R.; Henseler, A.; Lint, M. van; Schaap, N.P.; Finke, J.; Beelen, D.; Vigouroux, S.; Alessandrino, E.P.; Mufti, G.J.; Veelken, J.H.; Bruno, B.; Yakoub-Agha, I.; Volin, L.; Maertens, J.; Or, R.; Leblond, V.; Rovira, M.; Kalhs, P.; Alvarez, A.F.; Vitek, A.; Sierra, J.; Wagner, E.; Robin, M.; Witte, T.J. de; Kroger, N.

    2017-01-01

    This study shows the long-term updated outcomes of a multicenter retrospective study which analyzed 843 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who underwent transplantation with an HLA-identical sibling donor with either reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) in 213 patients, or standard

  9. Reduced intensity-conditioned allogeneic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma relapsing or progressing after autologous transplantation: a study by the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auner, H.W.; Szydlo, R.; Biezen, A. van; Iacobelli, S.; Gahrton, G.; Milpied, N.; Volin, L.; Janssen, J.; Nguyen Quoc, S.; Michallet, M.; Schoemans, H.; Cheikh, J. El; Petersen, E.; Guilhot, F.; Schonland, S.; Ahlberg, L.; Morris, C.; Garderet, L.; Witte, T.J. de; Kroger, N.

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes and prognostic factors of reduced intensity-conditioned allo-SCT (RIC allo-SCT) for multiple myeloma (MM) relapsing or progressing after prior autologous (auto)-SCT are not well defined. We performed an analysis of 413 MM patients who received a related or unrelated RIC allo-SCT for the

  10. Appetitive to aversive counter-conditioning as intervention to reduce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior: the role of the serotonin transporter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karel, Peter; Almacellas-Barbanoj, Amanda; Prijn, Jeffrey; Kaag, Anne-Marije; Reneman, Liesbeth; Verheij, Michel M. M.; Homberg, Judith R.

    2018-01-01

    Counter-conditioning can be a valid strategy to reduce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior. However, this has not been tested in laboratory animals with extended cocaine-taking backgrounds nor is it well understood, which individual differences may contribute to its effects. Here, we set out to

  11. Organic carbon and reducing conditions lead to cadmium immobilization by secondary Fe mineral formation in a pH-neutral soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Adaktylou, Irini J; Obst, Martin; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Behrens, Sebastian; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is of environmental relevance as it enters soils via Cd-containing phosphate fertilizers and endangers human health when taken up by crops. Cd is known to associate with Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in pH-neutral to slightly acidic soils, though it is not well understood how the interrelation of Fe and Cd changes under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Therefore, we investigated how the mobility of Cd changes when a Cd-bearing soil is faced with organic carbon input and reducing conditions. Using fatty acid profiles and quantitative PCR, we found that both fermenting and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were stimulated by organic carbon-rich conditions, leading to significant Fe(III) reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) minerals was accompanied by increasing soil pH, increasing dissolved inorganic carbon, and decreasing Cd mobility. SEM-EDX mapping of soil particles showed that a minor fraction of Cd was transferred to Ca- and S-bearing minerals, probably carbonates and sulfides. Most of the Cd, however, correlated with a secondary iron mineral phase that was formed during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction and contained mostly Fe, suggesting an iron oxide mineral such as magnetite (Fe3O4). Our data thus provide evidence that secondary Fe(II) and Fe(II)/Fe(III) mixed minerals could be a sink for Cd in soils under reducing conditions, thus decreasing the mobility of Cd in the soil.

  12. Uranium Immobilization in an Iron-Rich Rhizosphere of a Native Wetland Plant from the Savannah River Site under Reducing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaque formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted usin...

  13. BCR-ABL transcripts are early predictors for hematological relapse in chronic myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation with reduced intensity conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, T; Deininger, M; Brand, R; Hegenbart, U; Al-Ali, H; Krahl, R; Poenisch, W; Uharek, L; Leiblein, S; Gentilini, C; Petersdorf, E; Storb, RF; Niederwieser, D

    Kinetics of BCR-ABL transcript elimination and its prognostic implications on relapse were analyzed in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) after reduced intensity hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In all, 19 CML patients were conditioned with 2Gy total-body irradiation in

  14. Assessing the impacts of future climate conditions on the effectiveness of winter cover crops in reducing nitrate loads into the Chesapeake Bay Watersheds using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter cover crops (WCCs) have been widely implemented in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW) due to their high effectiveness at reducing nitrate loads. However, future climate conditions (FCCs) are expected to exacerbate water quality degradation in the CBW by increasing nitrat...

  15. Pharmacokinetic targeting of intravenous busulfan reduces conditioning regimen related toxicity following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishihori Taiga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Optimal conditioning therapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML remains undefined. We retrospectively compared outcomes of a consecutive series of 51 AML patients treated with oral busulfan (1 mg/kg every 6 hours for 4 days and cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg IV × 2 days - (Bu/Cy with 100 consecutive AML patients treated with pharmacokinetic targeted IV busulfan (AUC

  16. Effects of Developmental Stages and Reduced UVB and Low UV Conditions on Plant Secondary Metabolite Profiles in Pak Choi (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Mandy; Hanschen, Franziska S; Wiesner-Reinhold, Melanie; Baldermann, Susanne; Gräfe, Jan; Schreiner, Monika; Neugart, Susanne

    2018-02-21

    Pak choi (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis) is rich in secondary metabolites and contains numerous antioxidants, including flavonoids; hydroxycinnamic acids; carotenoids; chlorophylls; and glucosinolates, which can be hydrolyzed to epithionitriles, nitriles, or isothiocyanates. Here, we investigate the effect of reduced exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) and UV (UVA and UVB) light at four different developmental stages of pak choi. We found that both the plant morphology and secondary metabolite profiles were affected by reduced exposure to UVB and UV, depending on the plant's developmental stage. In detail, mature 15- and 30-leaf plants had higher concentrations of flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, carotenoids, and chlorophylls, whereas sprouts contained high concentrations of glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products. Dry weights and leaf areas increased as a result of reduced UVB and low UV. For the flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acids in 30-leaf plants, less complex compounds were favored, for example, sinapic acid acylated kaempferol triglycoside instead of the corresponding tetraglycoside. Moreover, also in 30-leaf plants, zeaxanthin, a carotenoid linked to protection during photosynthesis, was increased under low UV conditions. Interestingly, most glucosinolates were not affected by reduced UVB and low UV conditions. However, this study underlines the importance of 4-(methylsulfinyl)butyl glucosinolate in response to UVA and UVB exposure. Further, reduced UVB and low UV conditions resulted in higher concentrations of glucosinolate-derived nitriles. In conclusion, exposure to low doses of UVB and UV from the early to late developmental stages did not result in overall lower concentrations of plant secondary metabolites.

  17. No evidence that environmental enrichment during rearing protects against cocaine behavioral effects but as an intervention reduces an already established cocaine conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaj, E; Shukur, A; Manuszak, M; Newman, K; Ranaldi, R

    2017-05-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) produces differential effects on psychostimulant-related behaviors. Therefore, we investigated whether the timing of EE exposure - during rearing and before cocaine exposure versus in adulthood and after cocaine exposure might be a determining factor. In Experiment 1, rats reared with EE or not (non-EE) were conditioned with cocaine (5, 10 or 20mg/kg) in one compartment of a CPP apparatus and saline in the other, and later tested for cocaine CPP. In Experiment 2, locomotor activity in response to repeated injections of saline or cocaine was measured in rats raised with EE or non-EE. In Experiment 3 we measured the effects of EE or non-EE during rearing on food-based conditioned approach learning. In Experiment 4, rats were exposed to cocaine CPP conditioning then underwent 60days of EE or non-EE treatment after which they were tested for cocaine CPP. Our results show that rearing in EE did not reduce cocaine CPP or cocaine-induced locomotor activity (Experiments 1 and 2) but significantly facilitated conditioned approach learning (Experiment 3). On the other hand, EE treatment introduced after cocaine conditioning significantly reduced the expression of cocaine CPP (Experiment 4). These findings suggest that EE does not protect against cocaine's rewarding and stimulant effects but can reduce already established cocaine effects, suggesting that EE might be an effective treatment for cocaine addiction-related behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. <strong>Neuroeconomics and Health Economicsstrong>/>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    activation of Amygdala - a key center in our emotional arousal (limbic system) - as shaped in the elder stone-age with many acute threats. II. In general, the Hawthorne-effect of management is explained as the result of supportive job-relations reinforcing the homeostatic properties of the limbic system...... with de-stressing benefits as reduced anxiety, less use of stimulants and a reduction of blood pressure which in all increase life-expectancy. Conclusion: Neuroeconomics helps economists to identify dominant health economic interventions that may be overlooked by traditional discipålines   [i] This part...

  19. New concept for condition management of plants as a result of the KUNTO project. New operations approach reduces costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNiven, U.; Tamminen, L.

    1998-07-01

    IVO Generation Services Ltd. has carried out a project at the IVO Naantali power plant to develop the plants condition management. The project defines critical and monitored components for each system. In addition, recommendations for further action, investment proposals and suggestions for changes in maintenance and operations practices were supplied for the various systems in the plant. The systematic approach which was the result of the projects integrated into maintenance and operations practices where data collection and analysis is part of the routine. Up-to-date data is utilized in focusing maintenance and investments, in planning and reporting functions

  20. Strong Decomposition of Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jørgensen, Jørgen; Kagan, Abram M.; Pitt, Loren D.

    2007-01-01

    A random variable X is stongly decomposable if X=Y+Z where Y=Φ(X) and Z=X-Φ(X) are independent non-degenerated random variables (called the components). It is shown that at least one of the components is singular, and we derive a necessary and sufficient condition for strong decomposability...

  1. Exploring the potential of a conditional cash transfer intervention to reduce HIV risk among young women in Iringa, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Caitlin E; Brahmbhatt, Heena; Likindikoki, Samuel; Beckham, Sarah W; Mbwambo, Jessie K; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    Cash transfer programs seek to alter structural determinants of HIV risk such as poverty and gender inequality. We sought to explore the feasibility and potential effectiveness of a cash transfer intervention for young women as part of combination HIV prevention in Iringa, Tanzania. Qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted with 116 stakeholders and residents from the region, including key informants, service delivery users, and members of key populations. Most respondents felt a cash transfer program would assist young women in Iringa to have more control over sexual decision-making and reduce poverty-driven transactional sex. Respondents were divided on who should receive funds: young women themselves, their parents/guardians, or community leaders. Cash amounts and suggested target groups varied, and several respondents suggested providing microcredit or small business capital instead of cash. Potential concerns included jealousy, dependency, and corruption. However, most respondents felt that some intervention was needed to address underlying poverty driving some sexual risk behavior. A cash transfer program could fill this role, ultimately reducing HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancies. As increased attention is given to economic and structural interventions for HIV prevention, local input and knowledge should be considered in a program design.

  2. A nightly conditioning method to reduce parasitic power consumption in molten-salt central-receiver solar-power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    A method to reduce nightly parasitic power consumption in a molten salt central receiver is discussed where salt is drained from the piping and heat tracing is turned off to allow the piping to cool to ambient overnight, then in the morning the pipes are filled while they are cold. Since the piping and areas of the receiver in a molten-nitrate salt central-receiver solar power plant must be electrically heated to maintain their temperatures above the nitrate salt freezing point (430{degrees}F, 221{degrees}C), considerable energy could be used to maintain such temperatures during nightly shut down and bad weather. Experiments and analyses have been conducted to investigate cold filling receiver panels and piping as a way of reducing parasitic electrical power consumption and increasing the availability of the plant. The two major concerns with cold filling are: (1) how far can the molten salt penetrate cold piping before freezing closed and (2) what thermal stresses develop during the associated thermal shock. Experiments and analysis are discussed.

  3. Reduced Consolidation, Reinstatement, and Renewal of Conditioned Fear Memory by Repetitive Treatment of Radix Polygalae in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Won Shin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic goal for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is to promote extinction and to prevent the relapse of fearful memories. Research has identified pharmacological treatments that may regulate the formation and extinction of fear memories, but not many reagents that block the relapse of extinguished fear are known. Radix Polygalae (RP is an Asian herb used for sedation, and its ingredients have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. As various neurological effects have been identified, we tested whether RP affects the relapse of fear. Freezing in response to a conditioned context and cues was used to measure the effects of RP in mice. In cohort 1 (n = 30, consolidation, extinction, and reinstatement were tested during the course of 18 days of treatment. In cohort 2 (n = 30, consolidation, extinction, and renewal were tested during 10 days of treatment. The consolidation, extinction, reinstatement, and possibly the renewal of context-induced freezing were inhibited due to the administration of RP in animal subjects. However, the effects of RP on the freezing responses of subjects elicited by conditioned auditory cues were less obvious. Because it effectively suppresses the consolidation of fear memories, RP may be used for primary and secondary prevention of symptoms in PTSD patients. Additionally, because it effectively suppresses the reinstatement and renewal of fear memories, RP may be applied for the prevention of fear relapse in PTSD patients who have undergone exposure therapy.

  4. <strong>Neuroeconomics and behavioral health economicsstrong>/>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    - a key center in our emotional arousal (limbic system) - as shaped in the elder stone-age with many acute threats. II. In general, the Hawthorne-effect of human-relations management is explained as the result of supportive job-relations relaxing Amygdala for better emotional integration...... some are rooted in the religious tradition while other aim to be post-religious. Medical meditation across settings combines savings on health care costs with de-stressing benefits as reduced anxiety, less use of stimulants and a reduction of blood pressure which in all increase life...... is met by a meso-strategy aiming the formation of an international, multidisciplinary network which might organize regional workshops for representatives for all involved parties in order to prepare local implementation projects.   Regarding de-stressing by medical meditation a relatively fast...

  5. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Jae Kwon

    Full Text Available Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown. The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface

  6. Potential impact of inorganic nanoparticles on macronutrient digestion: titanium dioxide nanoparticles slightly reduce lipid digestion under simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Ti; Liu, Chengmei; DeLoid, Glen; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Demokritou, Philip; Zhang, Ruojie; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) particles are used in some food products to alter their optical properties, such as whiteness or brightness. These additives typically contain a population of TiO 2 nanoparticles (d < 100 nm), which has led to concern about their potential toxicity. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of TiO 2 particles on the gastrointestinal fate of oil-in-water emulsions using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) that includes mouth, stomach, and small intestine phases. Theoretical predictions suggested that TiO 2 nanoparticles might inhibit lipid digestion through two physicochemical mechanisms: (i) a fraction of the lipase adsorbs to TiO 2 particle surfaces, thereby reducing the amount available to hydrolyze lipid droplets; (ii) some TiO 2 particles adsorb to the surfaces of lipid droplets, thereby reducing the lipid surface area exposed to lipase. The importance of these mechanisms was tested by passing protein-coated lipid droplets (2%, w/w) through the simulated GIT in the absence and presence of TiO 2 (0.5%, w/w) nanoparticles (18 nm) and fine particles (167 nm). Changes in particle characteristics (size, organization, and charge) and lipid digestion were then measured. Both TiO 2 nanoparticles and fine particles had little impact on the aggregation state and charge of the lipid droplets in the different GIT regions, as well as on the rate and extent of lipid digestion. This suggests that the theoretically predicted impact of particle size on lipid digestion was not seen in practice.

  7. The role of meteorological conditions and pollution control strategies in reducing air pollution in Beijing during APEC 2014 and Victory Parade 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pengfei; Zhu, Tong; Fang, Yanhua; Li, Yingruo; Han, Yiqun; Wu, Yusheng; Hu, Min; Wang, Junxia

    2017-11-01

    To control severe air pollution in China, comprehensive pollution control strategies have been implemented throughout the country in recent years. To evaluate the effectiveness of these strategies, the influence of meteorological conditions on levels of air pollution needs to be determined. Using the intensive air pollution control strategies implemented during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum in 2014 (APEC 2014) and the 2015 China Victory Day Parade (Victory Parade 2015) as examples, we estimated the role of meteorological conditions and pollution control strategies in reducing air pollution levels in Beijing. Atmospheric particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 µm (PM2.5) samples were collected and gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO, NOx, and O3) were measured online at a site in Peking University (PKU). To determine the influence of meteorological conditions on the levels of air pollution, we first compared the air pollutant concentrations during days with stable meteorological conditions. However, there were few days with stable meteorological conditions during the Victory Parade. As such, we were unable to estimate the level of emission reduction efforts during this period. Finally, a generalized linear regression model (GLM) based only on meteorological parameters was built to predict air pollutant concentrations, which could explain more than 70 % of the variation in air pollutant concentration levels, after incorporating the nonlinear relationships between certain meteorological parameters and the concentrations of air pollutants. Evaluation of the GLM performance revealed that the GLM, even based only on meteorological parameters, could be satisfactory to estimate the contribution of meteorological conditions in reducing air pollution and, hence, the contribution of control strategies in reducing air pollution. Using the GLM, we found that the meteorological conditions and pollution control strategies contributed 30 and 28 % to the reduction

  8. Loss of autocrine endothelial-derived VEGF significantly reduces hemangiosarcoma development in conditional p53-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhang Ghahremani, Morvarid; Radaelli, Enrico; Haigh, Katharina; Bartunkova, Sonia; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Goossens, Steven; Haigh, Jody J

    2014-01-01

    Malignant transformation of the endothelium is rare, and hemangiosarcomas comprise only 1% of all sarcomas. For this reason and due to the lack of appropriate mouse models, the genetic mechanisms of malignant endothelial transformation are poorly understood. Here, we describe a hemangiosarcoma mouse model generated by deleting p53 specifically in the endothelial and hematopoietic lineages. This strategy led to a high incidence of hemangiosarcoma, with an average latency of 25 weeks. To study the in vivo roles of autocrine or endothelial cell autonomous VEGF signaling in the initiation and/or progression of hemangiosarcomas, we genetically deleted autocrine endothelial sources of VEGF in this mouse model. We found that loss of even a single conditional VEGF allele results in substantial rescue from endothelial cell transformation. These findings highlight the important role of threshold levels of autocrine VEGF signaling in endothelial malignancies and suggest a new approach for hemangiosarcoma treatment using targeted autocrine VEGF inhibition.

  9. The B-domain of factor VIII reduces cell membrane attachement to host cells in serum free conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Mille Petersen; Nørby, Peder Lisby; Flintegaard, Thomas Veje

    2010-01-01

    binding of rFVIII to the cell membrane could be a factor diminishing the production yield. We studied the contribution of the rFVIII B-domain to membrane attachment by transfecting several constructs containing increasing lengths of the B-domain into cells under serum free conditions. We found that 90......Factor VIII (FVIII) is an important protein in the blood coagulation cascade and dysfunction or deficiency of FVIII causes haemophilia A. Replacement therapy with exogenous recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) works as a substitute for the missing or non-functioning FVIII. The rFVIII protein has been...... engineered extensively throughout the years to increase the low production yields that initially were obtained from mammalian cell cultures. The scope of this work was to investigate the interaction of rFVIII with the cell membrane surface of the producing cells in serum free medium. We wondered whether...

  10. The soil sulphate effect and maize plant (Zea mays L.) growth of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) inoculation in acid sulfate soils with the different soil water condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmarlaili, S.; Rauf, A.; Hanafiah, D. S.; Sudarno, Y.; Abdi, P.

    2018-02-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the potential application of sulphate reducing bacteria on acid sulfate soil with different water content in the green house. The research was carried out in the Laboratory and Green House, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Sumatera Utara. This research used Randomized Block Design with two treatments factors, ie sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) isolate (control, LK4, LK6, TSM4, TSM3, AP4, AP3, LK4 + TSM3, LK4 + AP4, LK4 + AP3, LK6 + TSM3, LK6 + AP4, LK6 + AP3, TSM4 + TSM3, TSM4 + AP4, TSM4 + AP3) and water condition (100% field capacity and 110% field capacity). The results showed that application of isolate LK4 + AP4 with water condition 110% field capacity decreased the soil sulphate content (27.38 ppm) significantly after 6 weeks. Application of isolate LK4 + AP3 with water condition 110% field capacity increased soil pH (5.58) after-week efficacy 6. Application of isolate LK4 with water condition 110% field capacity increased plant growth (140 cm; 25.74 g) significantly after week 6. The best treatment was application isolate LK4 with water condition 110% field Capacity (SRB population 2.5x108; soil sulphate content 29.10ppm; soil acidity 4.78; plant height 140cm; plant weight 25.74g).

  11. Efficiency and limitation of periodic sample multiplication to reduce computational load in Monte Carlo simulations of electron swarms in gas under attachment-dominated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Hirotake

    2018-03-01

    In Monte Carlo simulations of electron swarms, sample electrons were copied periodically so that a sufficient number of samples are obtained in equilibrium after relaxation even under a severe attachment-dominated condition where most electrons vanish during the relaxation. The final sampling results were equivalent to those sampled by a conventional method, and the computational time conventionally wasted for the tracking of vanishing electrons was reduced drastically. The time saved can be utilized for tracking more samples to reduce statistical fluctuation. The efficiency of this technique and its limitation are discussed quantitatively together with details on its implementation.

  12. Effectiveness of eHealth interventions for reducing mental health conditions in employees: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Elizabeth; Lampit, Amit; Choi, Isabella; Calvo, Rafael A; Harvey, Samuel B; Glozier, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    .69, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.33) in targeted groups, but no effect in unselected groups. There is reasonable evidence that eHealth interventions delivered to employees may reduce mental health and stress symptoms post intervention and still have a benefit, although reduced at follow-up. Despite the enthusiasm in the corporate world for such approaches, employers and other organisations should be aware not all such interventions are equal, many lack evidence, and achieving the best outcomes depends upon providing the right type of intervention to the correct population.

  13. Effectiveness of eHealth interventions for reducing mental health conditions in employees: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Stratton

    -up (g = 0.69, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.33 in targeted groups, but no effect in unselected groups.There is reasonable evidence that eHealth interventions delivered to employees may reduce mental health and stress symptoms post intervention and still have a benefit, although reduced at follow-up. Despite the enthusiasm in the corporate world for such approaches, employers and other organisations should be aware not all such interventions are equal, many lack evidence, and achieving the best outcomes depends upon providing the right type of intervention to the correct population.

  14. Hyperglycemic condition during puberty increases collagen fibers deposition in the prostatic stroma and reduces MMP-2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sérgio Alexandre Alcantara Dos; Porto Amorim, Elaine Manoela; Ribeiro, Larissa Mayume; Rinaldi, Jaqueline Carvalho; Delella, Flávia Karina; Justulin, Luis Antonio; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis

    2017-12-02

    Puberty is an important period for the growth and maturation of the male reproductive system, and is also a critical window for endocrine or environmental interference. The physiological levels of circulating insulin and hyperglycemic control are important factors for a normal prostate growth. Hyperglycemia during puberty is reported to retard the growth of the prostate gland, with remarkable effects on the epithelial compartment. Here, we investigated the impact of hyperglycemia along with a simultaneous or late insulin replacement on the ventral prostate growth in rats during puberty, paying special attention to the deposition of collagen fibers and activities of gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and -9 (MMP-9). Hyperglycemia was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) administration in 40-day-old male Wistar rats. A subset of hyperglycemic rats underwent an early insulin replacement (three days after the STZ administration), and another subset underwent a late insulin replacement (twenty days after the STZ administration). Animals were euthanized at 60 and/or 80 days of age. The ventral prostatic lobe was processed for picrosirius red staining, type I and III collagen immunohistochemistry, and gelatin zymography. Hyperglycemic animals showed an increased area of collagen fibers in the prostate, which was composed both types of collagens. MMP-2 activity was significantly reduced in the hyperglycemic animals, while MMP-9 activity was very low and showed no alteration. The simultaneous and late insulin administration restored collagen content and MMP-2 activity. In conclusion, puberty is a critical window for prostate maturation and type-1 diabetes-induced hyperglycemia affects the ratio of the prostatic parenchymal and stromal growth, leading to fibrotic tissues by also MMP-2 down regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimising yield and resource utilisation of summer maize under the conditions of increasing density and reducing nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shanshan; Wang, Xiangyu; Zhu, Qicen; Jiang, Dong; Dong, Shuting

    2017-12-01

    The inefficient use of resources always poses risks of maize ( Zea mays L.) yield reduction in China. We performed this research to monitor the effects of increasing plant density and reducing nitrogen (N) rate on radiation-use efficiency (RUE), N efficiency traits, grain yield (GY) and their inter-relationships. Besides, whether GY and resource-use efficiency can both be maximized was examined. Hence, a 2-year field experiment was conducted using a widely grown variety "Denghai 618" in Shandong, China. Treatments contained two different plant densities [67,500 (D1) and 97,500 (D2) plant ha-1] and three N levels [0 (N-2), 180 (N-1), 360 (Nck) kg ha-1], set D1Nck as control. Significant increases in grain yield, biomass, RUE, above-ground N uptake (AGN) and N efficiency were observed when density increased from D1 to D2. Declining N application was accompanied by reductions in yield, RUE and AGN especially under high density, yet an obvious improvement in N recovery efficiency (NRE), agronomic N efficiency and N partial factor productivity. The increased GY was positive related with population biomass ( r = 0.895**), RUE ( r = 0.769**) and AGN ( r = 0.923**), whereas it has no significant correlation with N efficiency. In this study, D2Nck obtained 18.8, 17.9, 24.8 and 29.7% higher grain yield, RUE, AGN and NRE respectively, compared to control, optimizing both yield and the efficiencies of radiation and N use. Furthermore, higher yield and RUE with more desirable N efficiency may be possible via optimizing density and N rate combination.

  16. Health monitoring of Japanese payload specialist: Autonomic nervous and cardiovascular responses under reduced gravity condition (L-0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Chiharu

    1993-01-01

    In addition to health monitoring of the Japanese Payload Specialists (PS) during the flight, this investigation also focuses on the changes of cardiovascular hemodynamics during flight which will be conducted under the science collaboration with the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) Experiment of NASA. For the Japanese, this is an opportunity to examine firsthand the effects of microgravity of human physiology. We are particularly interested in the adaption process and how it relates to space motion sickness and cardiovascular deconditioning. By comparing data from our own experiment to data collected by others, we hope to understand the processes involved and find ways to avoid these problems for future Japanese astronauts onboard Space Station Freedom and other Japanese space ventures. The primary objective of this experiment is to monitor the health condition of Japanese Payload Specialists to maintain a good health status during and after space flight. The second purpose is to investigate the autonomic nervous system's response to space motion sickness. To achieve this, the function of the autonomic nervous system will be monitored using non-invasive techniques. Data obtained will be employed to evaluate the role of autonomic nervous system in space motion sickness and to predict susceptibility to space motion sickness. The third objective is evaluation of the adaption process of the cardiovascular system to microgravity. By observation of the hemodynamics using an echocardiogram we will gain insight on cardiovascular deconditioning. The last objective is to create a data base for use in the health care of Japanese astronauts by obtaining control data in experiment L-O in the SL-J mission.

  17. Reduced intensity conditioning HLA identical sibling donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients with follicular lymphoma: long-term follow-up from two prospective multicenter trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñana, José Luis; Martino, Rodrigo; Gayoso, Jorge; Sureda, Anna; de la Serna, Javier; Díez-Martín, Jose Luis; Vazquez, Lourdes; Arranz, Reyes; Tomás, José Francisco; Sampol, Antonia; Solano, Carlos; Delgado, Julio; Sierra, Jorge; Caballero, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with poor risk lymphoma, at least in part because of the graft-versus-lymphoma effect. Over the past decade, reduced intensity conditioning regimens have been shown to offer results similar to those of conventional high-dose conditioning regimens but with lower toxicity early after transplantation, especially in patients with chemosensitive disease at transplant. Design and Methods The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term outcome of patients with follicular lymphoma who received an HLA identical sibling allogeneic stem cell transplant with a reduced intensity conditioning regimen within prospective trials. The prospective multicenter studies considered included 37 patients with follicular lymphoma who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation between 1998 and 2007 with a fludarabine plus melphalan-based reduced intensity conditioning regimen. Results The median age of the patients was 50 years (range, 34–62 years) and the median follow-up was 52 months (range, 0.6 to 113 months). Most patients (77%) had stage III-IV at diagnosis, and patients had received a median of three lines of therapy before the reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation. At the time of transplantation, 14 patients were in complete remission, 16 in partial remission and 7 had refractory or progressive disease after salvage chemotherapy. The 4-year overall survival rates for patients in complete remission, partial remission, or with refractory or progressive disease were 71%, 48% and 29%, respectively (P=0.09), whereas the 4-year cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality were 26% (95% CI, 11–61), 33% (95% CI, 16–68) and 71% (95% CI, 44–100), respectively. The incidence of relapse for the whole group was only 8% (95% CI, 2–23). Conclusions We conclude that this strategy of reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation

  18. Noise of a model counterrotation propeller with reduced aft rotor diameter at simulated takeoff/approach conditions (F7/A3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Gordon, Eliott B.

    1988-01-01

    A model high-speed advanced counterrotation propeller, F7/A3, was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 9 by 15 foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel at simulated takeoff/approach conditions of 0.2 Mach number. Acoustic measurements were taken with an axially translating microphone probe, and with a polar microphone probe which was fixed to the propeller nacelle and could take both sideline and circumferential acoustic surveys. Aerodynamic measurements were also made to establish propeller operating conditions. The propeller was run at two setting angles (front angle/rear angle) of 36.4/43.5 and 41.1/46.4 degrees, forward rotor tip speeds from 165 to 259 m/sec, rotor spacings from 8.48 to 14.99 cm based on pitch change axis separation, and angles of attack to 16 degrees. The aft rotor diameter was 85 percent of the forward rotor diameter to reduce tip vortex-aft rotor interaction as a major interaction noise source. Results are compared with equal diameter F7/A7 data which was previously obtained under similar operating conditions. The aft rotor-alone tone was 7 dB lower for the reduced diameter aft rotor, due to reduced tip speed at constant rpm. Interaction tone levels for the F7/A3 propeller were higher at minimum row spacing and lower at maximum spacing.

  19. The effects of a reduced balanced protein diet on litter moisture, pododermatitis and feather condition of female broiler breeders over three generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Lesuisse, J; Schallier, S; Clímaco, W; Wang, Y; Bautil, A; Everaert, N; Buyse, J

    2017-11-02

    Protein content reduction in broiler breeder diets has been increasingly investigated. However, broiler breeders reared on low protein diets are characterized by a deterioration of the feather condition. Furthermore, polydipsia induced by controlled feed intake increases litter moisture and as a consequence pododermatitis. This project aimed to study the litter moisture, pododermatitis and feather condition of breeders fed with a 25% reduced balanced protein (RP) diet during the rearing and laying period over three successive generations. The experiment started with two treatments for the F0 generation: control (C) group fed with standard C diets and RP group fed with RP diets. The female F0-progeny of each treatment was divided into the two dietary treatments as well, resulting in four treatments for the F1 generation: C/C, C/RP, RP/C and RP/RP (breeder feed in F0/F1 generation). The RP diet fed breeders received on average 10% more feed than C diet fed breeders to achieve the same target BW. The female F1-progeny of each treatment were all fed with C diets which resulted in four treatments for the F2 generation: C/C/C, C/RP/C, RP/C/C and RP/RP/C (breeder feed in F0/F1/F2 generation). Litter moisture, footpad and hock dermatitis were recorded at regular intervals throughout the experimental period in all three generations. For the F0 and F1 generation, the pens of breeders receiving C diets had significantly higher litter moisture than the RP diets fed groups (Pdiets had poorer feather condition than those receiving the C diets (Pdiets to broiler breeders improved litter condition and hence reduced FDO whereas impaired feather condition. Furthermore, positive transgenerational effects of the maternal RP diets on the feather condition may be inferred, hence potentially altering the welfare status.

  20. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  1. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-01-01

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination

  3. The beneficial effect of chronic graft-versus-host disease on the clinical outcome of transplantation with fludarabine/busulfan-based reduced-intensity conditioning for patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byung-Sik; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Sung-Yong; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Hee-Je; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Kim, Chun-Choo

    2007-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) has enabled the treatment of older or medically infirm patients with myeloid malignancies; however, determining the value of RIST outcomes for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is difficult because of the heterogeneity of the diseases included in most trials. To define the role of RIST in MDS, we performed RIST for 22 consecutive patients who had de novo MDS as classified by World Health Organization (WHO) criteria and who received an allograft with fludarabine/busulfan (Busulfex) or fludarabine/Busulfex/antithymocyte globulin (ATG) conditioning. Nineteen patients (86.4%) achieved engraftment. At a median follow-up of 18.9 months (range, 13.1-24.8 months), the estimated 2-year rates of overall survival, event-free survival (EFS), transplantation-related mortality, and relapse were 78.7%, 67.7%, 12.6%, and 22.5%, respectively. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) greater than grade II developed in 3 patients (15.8%). Chronic GVHD developed in 10 patients (55.6%), none of whom received ATG as a conditioning regimen. Variables influencing EFS were chronic GVHD, marrow blasts before transplantation, and the WHO criteria. The present study clarifies the benefits of the fludarabine/Busulfex-based conditioning regimen for de novo MDS diagnosed according to the WHO criteria and shows that chronic GVHD appears to have a beneficial effect on survival rates, which are strongly associated with graft-versus-tumor effects.

  4. New selenium solution speciation method by ion chromatography + gamma counting and its application to FeS2-controlled reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, C.; Vancluysen, J.; Maes, A.

    2002-01-01

    Selenium is a redox sensitive element. In reducing conditions its solubility is controlled by the formation of metallic Se and in the presence of Fe 2+ also by the precipitation of FeSe or FeSe 2 . However very few data concerning this species in geochemical reducing environments is found in literature, particularly due to insufficient measuring methods. The assessment to what extent 79 Se is a critical radionuclide for the geological disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste, depends on its actual speciation in storage conditions. Therefore a new method based on ion chromatography of radiolabelled 75 Se solutions followed by gamma-ray counting was developed to accurately measure selenium species with different degrees of oxidation (selenate (SeO 4 2- ) and selenite (SeO 3 2- )) in solution. This method was then tested in laboratory conditions which mimic the reducing environment in Boom Clay. Different amounts of ground pyrite ( -2 M NaHCO 3 ) and spiked with different amounts of 75 SeO 3 2- and SeO 4 2- . The batches were allowed to equilibrate over different time periods (up to two months) before analysing. The experiments were carried out in an oxygen-depleted glove box (99.6% N 2 , 0.4% CO 2 ). The kinetics of the redox reactions in the pyrite systems prevented the complete reduction of selenite (SeO 3 2- ) and especially selenate (SeO 4 2- ) on a limited time scale, probably due to the limited redox capacity of the studied systems. (orig.)

  5. Preliminary investigation of microbiological effect for radioactive waste disposal system. 1. Experimental investigation of tolerance of some bacterias under alkaline and reducing condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yui, Mikazu; Mihara, Morihiro; Fukunaga, Sakae; Asano, Hidekazu.

    1995-01-01

    Activities and tolerance of some bacteria were investigated under alkaline and reducing conditions for geological disposal. A fermenter was used to control pH and Eh with a liquid culture inoculated with sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-producing bacteria (MPB) and sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). Growth of SRB was obtained at maximum pH 8.6 (Eh -340 mV) or maximum Eh -100 mV (pH 7). Ranges of Eh for the growth of MPB and SOB were estimated to be less than -210 mV at pH8, and more than +240 mV at pH 7.5, respectively. Activity for SOB was not observed in the pH range more than 8. (author)

  6. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  7. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  8. Managing of gas sensing characteristic of a reduced graphene oxide based gas sensor by the change in synthesis condition: A new approach for electronic nose design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Taher, E-mail: talizadeh@ut.ac.ir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamedsoltani, Leyla [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Natural graphite was oxidized and exfoliated via two different methods, leading to two types of graphene oxide (GO) materials. The obtained materials were reduced by three different reducing agents including: hydrazine hydrate, ascorbic acid and sodium borohydride, giving thus six kinds of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) materials. The obtained materials were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The RGOs were then used to fabricate different gas sensors and their electrical resistances were recorded upon exposing to various volatile organic compounds vapors (VOCs). Gas sensing selectivity of each RGO was significantly affected by the synthesis condition. The RGO-based sensor array was fabricated and its capability for discrimination of seven kinds of VOCs was evaluated, utilizing principal component analysis and cluster analysis methods. Loading plot indicated that the presence of five RGO-based sensors could effectively discriminate the aimed vapors. The electronic nose, containing five kinds of RGOs, was used for the classification of seven kinds of VOCs at their different concentrations. - Highlights: • Two oxidation procedures and three reducing agents were utilized to produce six kinds of RGOs. • The synthesized different RGOs exhibited significantly different sensing behaviors. • Seven kinds of organic vapors were chosen for the evaluation of discrimination power of EN. • Using PCA, it was found that seven of six RFGOs were appropriate number to use in final EN. • The developed EN was capable of properly discrimination of tested vapors.

  9. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  10. Metal Catalysis with Nanostructured Metals Supported Inside Strongly Acidic Cross-linked Polymer Frameworks: Influence of Reduction Conditions of AuIII-containing Resins on Metal Nanoclusters Formation in Macroreticular and Gel-Type Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Calore, L.; Cavinato, g.; Canton, P.; Peruzzo, L.; Banavali, R.; Jeřábek, Karel; Corain, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 391, AUG 30 (2012), s. 114-120 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : strongly acidic cross-linked polymer * frameworks * gold(0) nanoclusters Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.687, year: 2012

  11. Gas chromatography for in situ analysis of a cometary nucleus V. Study of capillary columns' robustness submitted to long-term reduced environmental pressure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, C; Sternberg, R; Coscia, D; Goesmann, F; Gomes, R; Legrand, S; Jerome, M; Meierhenrich, U J; Raulin, F

    2014-11-14

    With the European Space Agency's Rosetta space mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a gas chromatograph, part of the COmetary Sampling And Composition (COSAC) experiment, travelled for about 10 years in the interplanetary medium before operating at the surface of the cometary nucleus in November 2014. During its journey in space, the instrument was exposed to the constraining conditions of the interplanetary medium, including reduced environmental pressures. In order to estimate the potential influence of this severe condition on the chromatographic capillary columns, their stationary phase and the subsequent separation capability, a set of flight spare columns were kept under reduced environmental pressure in the laboratory for the same duration as the probe sent to the comet. The columns' analytical performances were evaluated recently and compared to the original ones obtained just before the launch of the Rosetta probe. The results presented here show that the chromatographic performances of the spare chromatographic columns were not altered in time. From this result, it can be expected that the flight instrument will perform nominally for the analysis of the first cometary nucleus sample to be collected ever, and that the preparation of the interpretation of the data to be taken at the cometary surface nucleus can be done through calibration of these spare columns, and other spare components of the instrument. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  13. An evaluation of the effectiveness of psychological therapy in reducing general psychological distress for adults with autism spectrum conditions and comorbid mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blainey, Sarah H; Rumball, Freya; Mercer, Louise; Evans, Lauren Jayne; Beck, Alison

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of psychological therapy in reducing psychological distress for adults with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) and co-morbid mental health conditions in routine clinical practice. To explore the effect of individual characteristics and service factors on change in general distress. In a specialist psychological therapies service for adults with ASC, the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) self-report questionnaire of psychological distress is completed by clients at start and end of therapy. Change over time and reliable and clinical change was assessed for 81 of a total of 122 clients (66.4%). Factors which may influence change over time were explored using available clinical information. Overall, there was a significant reduction in CORE-OM score during therapy with a small effect size. Most clients showed an improvement in psychological distress over therapy (75.4% improved, with 36.9% of these showing reliable changes). Significant and comparable reductions from pre-therapy to post-therapy were seen across the sample, showing that individual differences did not mediate therapy effectiveness. CORE-OM scores mediate the association between age of ASD diagnosis and hours of therapeutic input required, with greater age at diagnosis and higher distress associated with longer therapy duration. Our preliminary findings suggest that psychological therapy may be effective in reducing general distress for clients with ASC and co-morbid mental health conditions and should be routinely offered. Individuals who are diagnosed with ASD in adulthood are likely to require a longer course of therapy when their general distress scores are high. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  15. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  16. Time consumption and productivity of skidding Silver fir (Abies alba Mill. round wood in reduced accessibility conditions: a case study in windthrow salvage logging form Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Alexandru Borz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural calamities (especially windthrows may generate difficult work conditions in timber harvesting operations. When associated with the reduced accessibility conditions, the work conditions become even harder. This study investigates the time consumptions on specific work elements in timber skidding, develops time prediction models for timber skidding work elements and assesses the production rates for timber skidding in reduced accessibility stands where windthrow salvage cuttings were applied. Following a time study done for two skidders (TAF 690 OP and TAF 657 operating simultaneously in the same felling area, it has been found that, in average, in a delay free skidding cycle time, lateral winching accounted for a share of 26-33%, on-trail skidding accounted for a share of 64-71% and landing operations accounted for a share of 3%.Total delays accounted for 51% and 43% of the total work time in the case of TAF 690 OP skidder and TAF 657skidder respectively. Regression models for lateral winching (both skidders revealed that the winching distance and the number of logs were the relevant predictors for the time consumption estimation (p<0.01, whereas in the case of on-trail skidding only the skidding distance was relevant (p<0.01. For the overall skidding operation (excluding landing operations winching and skidding distances were found as relevant predictors (p<0.01 in case of TAF 690 OP, whereas the number of logs became an additional relevant predictor in case of TAF 657.In conditions of an average winching distance of 19.90 m and an average on-trail skidding distance of 980.32 m, the time study yielded a net production rate of 7.70 m3h-1 and a gross production rate of 3.75 m3h-1 in the case of TAF 690 OP skidder. By comparison, in the case of TAF 657 skidder, for an average winching distance of 22.86 m and an average on-trail skidding distance of 871.00 m, the net and gross production rates were of 5.61 m3h-1 and 3.20 m3h-1 respectively.

  17. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  18. An investigation of side-stick-controller/stability and control-augmentation system requirements for helicopter terrain flight under reduced visibility conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, K. H.; Glusman, S. I.; Aiken, E. W.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    Simulation of the reduced visibility tasks is effected by providing the pilot with a visually coupled, helmet-mounted display of flight-control symbols superimposed upon terrain-board imagery. Forward-flight, low-speed, and precision-hover control modes are implemented, and a method is developed for the blending of control laws between each control mode. An investigation is made of the variations in the level of integration of primary control functions on a single side-stick controller. For most of the flight tasks investigated, separated controller configurations are preferred to a single, fully integrated side-stick device. Satisfactory handling qualities over all controller configurations are attained only for a precision-hover task conducted with a high level of stability and control augmentation. For most tasks flown with the helmet-mounted display significant degradation in handling qualities occurs relative to the identical tasks flown under visual flight conditions.

  19. Mobilized peripheral blood stem cells compared with bone marrow from HLA-identical siblings for reduced-intensity conditioning transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Shimoni, Avichai

    2012-01-01

    -IV) and chronic GVHD did not differ between the groups. leukemia-free survival (LFS), relapse, and non-relapsed mortality (NRM) were 51 ± 2%, 32 ± 1%, and 17 ± 1% vs. 50 ± 6%, 38 ± 6%, and 12 ± 3% for the PBSC and BM groups, respectively. Our results indicate faster engraftment, but no difference in GVHD, LFS......Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC)-alloSCT is increasingly used for acute myelogenous leukemia. Limited data are available for the comparison of peripheral blood stem cells with bone marrow for RIC-alloSCT. We used the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) ALWP data...... to compare the outcome of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) (n = 1430) vs. bone marrow (BM) (n = 107) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients with complete remission that underwent RIC-alloSCT from compatible sibling donors. The leukemia features, the disease status, and the time from...

  20. Modification of MCF-10A Cells with Pioglitazone and Serum-Rich Growth Medium Increases Soluble Factors in the Conditioned Medium, Likely Reducing BT-474 Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpanah Nadarajan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to preincubate MCF-10A cells with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media and to determine adhesive and non-adhesive interactions of the preincubated MCF-10A cells with BT-474 cells. For this purpose, the MCF-10A cells were preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media, at appropriate concentrations, for 1 week. The MCF-10A cells preincubated with pioglitazone and/or serum-rich growth media were then co-cultured adhesively and non-adhesively with BT-474 cells for another week. Co-culture of BT-474 cells with the preincubated MCF-10A cells, both adhesively and non-adhesively, reduced the growth of the cancer cells. The inhibitory effect of the preincubated MCF-10A cells against the growth of BT-474 cells was likely produced by increasing levels of soluble factors secreted by the preincubated MCF-10A cells into the conditioned medium, as immunoassayed by ELISA. However, only an elevated level of a soluble factor distinguished the conditioned medium collected from the MCF-10A cells preincubated with pioglitazone and serum-rich growth medium than that with pioglitazone alone. This finding was further confirmed by the induction of the soluble factor transcript expression in the preincubated MCF-10A cells, as determined using real-time PCR, for the above phenomenon. Furthermore, modification of the MCF-10A cells through preincubation did not change the morphology of the cells, indicating that the preincubated cells may potentially be injected into mammary fat pads to reduce cancer growth in patients or to be used for others cell-mediated therapy.

  1. Phytoplankton communities from San Francisco Bay Delta respond differently to oxidized and reduced nitrogen substrates - even under conditions that would otherwise suggest nitrogen sufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Glibert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of equivalent additions of nitrogen (N, 30-40 μM-N in different forms (ammonium, NH4+, and nitrate, NO3- under conditions of different light exposure on phytoplankton community composition was studied in a series of four, 5-day enclosure experiments on water collected from the nutrient-rich San Francisco Bay Delta over two years. Overall, proportionately more chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin (generally indicative of diatoms was produced per unit N taken up in enclosures enriched with NO3- and incubated at reduced (~15% of ambient light intensity than in treatments with NO3- with high (~60% of ambient light exposure or with NH4+ under either light condition. In contrast, proportionately more chlorophyll b (generally indicative of chlorophytes and zeaxanthin (generally indicative of cyanobacteria was produced in enclosures enriched with NH4+ and incubated under high light intensity than in treatments with low light or with added NO3- at either light level. Rates of maximal velocities (Vmax of uptake of N substrates, measured using 15N tracer techniques, in all enclosures enriched with NO3- were higher than those enriched with NH4+. Directionality of trends in enclosures were similar to phytoplankton community shifts observed in transects of the Sacramento River to Suisun Bay, a region in which large changes in total N quantity and form occur. These data substantiate the growing body of experimental evidence that dichotomous microbial communities develop when enriched with the same absolute concentration of oxidized vs. reduced N forms, even when sufficient N nutrient was available to the community prior to the N inoculations.

  2. Reducing vibration damage claims: Field application of strong public relations and one method of using commonly available seismograph and video taping equipment to document blast vibration regression at the nearest structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzen, M.R.; Fritzen, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    Anytime that blasting operations will be conducted near existing inhabited structures, vibration damage claims are a major concern of the blasting contractor. It has been the authors' experience that even when vibration and airblast levels generated from a blast are well below accepted damage thresholds, damage claims can still arise. The single greatest source of damage claims is the element of surprise associated with not knowing that blasting operations are being conducted nearby. The second greatest source of damage claims arise form the inability to produce accurate and detailed records of all blasting activity which provides evidence that vibration and air blast levels from each blast had been taken by seismic recording equipment. Using a two part plan consisting of extensive public relations followed by a detailed and accurate monitoring and recording of blasting operations has resulted in no substantiated claims of damage since its' incorporation. The authors experience shows that by using this two part process when conducting blasting operations near inhabited structures, unsubstantiated blast vibration damage claims may be significantly reduced

  3. Reducing vibration damage claims: Field application of strong public relations and one method of using commonly available seismograph and video taping equipment to document blast vibration regression at the nearest structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzen, M.R.; Fritzen, T.A. [Blasting Technology, Inc., Maui, HI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Anytime that blasting operations will be conducted near existing inhabited structures, vibration damage claims are a major concern of the blasting contractor. It has been the authors` experience that even when vibration and airblast levels generated from a blast are well below accepted damage thresholds, damage claims can still arise. The single greatest source of damage claims is the element of surprise associated with not knowing that blasting operations are being conducted nearby. The second greatest source of damage claims arise form the inability to produce accurate and detailed records of all blasting activity which provides evidence that vibration and air blast levels from each blast had been taken by seismic recording equipment. Using a two part plan consisting of extensive public relations followed by a detailed and accurate monitoring and recording of blasting operations has resulted in no substantiated claims of damage since its` incorporation. The authors experience shows that by using this two part process when conducting blasting operations near inhabited structures, unsubstantiated blast vibration damage claims may be significantly reduced.

  4. Selected Aspects of the Copenhagen Economics Study on Reduced VAT Rates in the Current Conditions of the Moravian-Silesian Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Randová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a long-debated issue of the application of value added tax rates to labour-intensive services. The level of value added tax rates has a dominant influence on the tax liability of suppliers of these services and subsequently on the amount of available funds that they could use for development of their business. The aim of this paper is a presentation of results of the student grant Quantification of Impacts of Application of Reduced Value Added Tax Rate to Locally Supplied Services on the Suppliers of these Services”, which is focused on selected aspects of the “Study on reduced VAT applied to goods and services in the Member States of the European Union” in the conditions of the providers of these services from the Moravian-Silesian Region. For this paper the methods of regression analysis and analysis of variance – ANOVA were used. The deductive method and method of analysis have also been used.

  5. Bacteriorhodopsin crystal growth in reduced gravity - Results under the conditions, given in CPCF on board of a space shuttle, versus the conditions, given in DCAM on board of the Space Station Mir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zörb, Ch.; Weisert, A.; Stapelmann, J.; Smolik, G.; Carter, D. C.; Wright, B. S.; Brunner-Joos, K. D.; Wagner, G.

    2002-09-01

    For the purpose of bio-electronics, bacteriorhodopsin was crystallized into two habits through liquid-liquid-diffusion, namely individual needles of up to 1.9 mm in length and needle bunch-like clusters of up to 4.9 mm in total length. In both the reduced gravity experiments performed, the morphology of the individual needles (crystal form A) had improved in terms of sharp needle edges and compact needle packing, compared to the parallel ground controls. For the long duration wide range low gravity condition in the "Diffusion-controlled Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (DCAM)" on Mir (STS-89 up), needle bunches on average were longer there than on the ground, while the compactness of the clusters, i.e. the average ratio of clustered length to clustered width was the reverse. Some exceptionally large individual needles were grown in DCAM. For the "Commercial Protein Crystallization Facility (CPCF)" in short duration high definition microgravity condition during a science mission of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95), size and shape of the individual needles were homogeneous and superior to those of both the parallel ground controls and the results in DCAM. In CPCF, the average volume of the individual needles in suspension was increased by 50 % in microgravity compared to those in the ground control.

  6. Bacteriorhodopsin crystal growth in reduced gravity--results under the conditions, given in CPCF on board of a Space Shuttle, versus the conditions, given in DCAM on board of the Space Station Mir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorb, Ch; Weisert, A; Stapelmann, J; Smolik, G; Carter, D C; Wright, B S; Brunner-Joos, K D; Wagner, G

    2002-01-01

    For the purpose of bio-electronics, bacteriorhodopsin was crystallized into two habits through liquid-liquid-diffusion, namely individual needles of up to 1.9 mm in length and needle bunch-like clusters of up 4.9 mm in total length. In both the reduced gravity experiments performed, the morphology of the individual needles (crystal form A) had improved in terms of sharp needle edges and compact needle packing, compared to the parallel ground controls. For the long duration wide range low gravity condition in the "Diffusion-controlled Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (DCAM)" on Mir (STS-89 up), needle bunches on average were longer there than on the ground, while the compactness of the clusters, i.e. the average ratio of clustered length to clustered width was the reverse. Some exceptionally large individuals needles were grown in DCAM. For the "Commercial Protein Crystallization Facility (CPCF)" in short duration high definition microgravity conditions during a science mission of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95), size and shape of the individual needles were homogeneous and superior to those of both the parallel ground controls and the results in DCAM. In CPCF, the average volume of the individual needles in suspension was increased by 50% in microgravity compared to those in the ground control.

  7. Expansion of donor-reactive host T cells in primary graft failure after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT following reduced-intensity conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, M; Hashimoto, D; Nagafuji, K; Eto, T; Ohno, Y; Aoyama, K; Iwasaki, H; Miyamoto, T; Hill, G R; Akashi, K; Teshima, T

    2014-01-01

    Graft rejection remains a major obstacle in allogeneic hematopoietic SCT following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC-SCT), particularly after cord blood transplantation (CBT). In a murine MHC-mismatched model of RIC-SCT, primary graft rejection was associated with activation and expansion of donor-reactive host T cells in peripheral blood and BM early after SCT. Donor-derived dendritic cells are at least partly involved in host T-cell activation. We then evaluated if such an expansion of host T cells could be associated with graft rejection after RIC-CBT. Expansion of residual host lymphocytes was observed in 4/7 patients with graft rejection at 3 weeks after CBT, but in none of the 17 patients who achieved engraftment. These results suggest the crucial role of residual host T cells after RIC-SCT in graft rejection and expansion of host T cells could be a marker of graft rejection. Development of more efficient T cell-suppressive conditioning regimens may be necessary in the context of RIC-SCT.

  8. Reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin's disease: low transplant-related mortality and impact of intensity of conditioning regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderlini, P; Saliba, R; Acholonu, S; Okoroji, G-J; Donato, M; Giralt, S; Andersson, B; Ueno, N T; Khouri, I; De Lima, M; Hosing, C; Cohen, A; Ippoliti, C; Romaguera, J; Rodriguez, M A; Pro, B; Fayad, L; Goy, A; Younes, A; Champlin, R E

    2005-05-01

    A total of 40 patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD) underwent reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) from an HLA-identical sibling (n=20) or a matched unrelated donor (n=20). The median age was 31 years (range 18-58). Disease status at allo-SCT was refractory relapse (n=14) or sensitive relapse (n=26). The conditioning regimens were fludarabine-cyclophosphamide+/-antithymocyte globulin (n=14), a less intensive regimen, and fludarabine-melphalan (FM) (n=26), a more intensive one. The two groups had similar prognostic factors. The median time to neutrophil recovery (ie absolute neutrophil count >/=500/microl) was 12 days (range 10-24). The median time to platelet recovery (ie platelet count >/=20 000/microl) was 17 days (range 7-132). Day 100 and cumulative (18-month) transplant-related mortalities (TRMs) were 5 and 22%. Twenty-four patients (60%) are alive (14 in complete remission or complete remission, unconfirmed/uncertain) with a median follow-up of 13 months (4-78). In all, 16 patients expired (TRM n=8, disease progression n=8). FM patients had better overall survival (73 vs 39% at 18 months; P=0.03), and a trend towards better progression-free survival (37 vs 21% at 18 months; P=0.2). RIC allo-SCT is feasible in relapsed/refractory HD patients with a low TRM. The intensity of the preparative regimen affects survival.

  9. Characterization of toluene and ethylbenzene biodegradation under nitrate-, iron(III)- and manganese(IV)-reducing conditions by compound-specific isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorer, Conrad; Vogt, Carsten; Neu, Thomas R.; Stryhanyuk, Hryhoriy; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Ethylbenzene and toluene degradation under nitrate-, Mn(IV)-, or Fe(III)-reducing conditions was investigated by compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) using three model cultures (Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1, Georgfuchsia toluolica G5G6, and a Azoarcus-dominated mixed culture). Systematically lower isotope enrichment factors for carbon and hydrogen were observed for particulate Mn(IV). The increasing diffusion distances of toluene or ethylbenzene to the solid Mn(IV) most likely caused limited bioavailability and hence resulted in the observed masking effect. The data suggests further ethylbenzene hydroxylation by ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EBDH) and toluene activation by benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS) as initial activation steps. Notably, significantly different values in dual isotope analysis were detected for toluene degradation by G. toluolica under the three studied redox conditions, suggesting variations in the enzymatic transition state depending on the available TEA. The results indicate that two-dimensional CSIA has significant potential to assess anaerobic biodegradation of ethylbenzene and toluene at contaminated sites. - Highlights: • Toluene/ethylbenzene isotope effects were studied in 3 cultures with varying TEAs. • BTEX biodegradation under solid Mn(IV) was investigated by CSIA for the first time. • Solid Mn(IV) as TEA always caused significant lower C and H isotope enrichment. • Always similar correlation of C–H-isotopes upon ethylbenzene activation was shown. • Subtypes of benzylsuccinate synthase may cause varying correlation of C–H-isotopes.

  10. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Plant Growth-Promoting Pseudomonads Increases Anthocyanin Concentration in Strawberry Fruits (Fragaria x ananassa var. Selva in Conditions of Reduced Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Gamalero

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are a group of common phenolic compounds in plants. They are mainly detected in flowers and fruits, are believed to play different important roles such as in the attraction of animals and seed dispersal, and also in the increase of the antioxidant response in tissues directly or indirectly affected by biotic or abiotic stress factors. As a major group of secondary metabolites in plants commonly consumed as food, they are of importance in both the food industry and human nutrition. It is known that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi can influence the plant secondary metabolic pathways such as the synthesis of essential oils in aromatic plants, of secondary metabolites in roots, and increase flavonoid concentration. Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria (PGPB are able to increase plant growth, improving plant nutrition and supporting plant development under natural or stressed conditions. Various studies confirmed that a number of bacterial species living on and inside the root system are beneficial for plant growth, yield and crop quality. In this work it is shown that inoculation with AM fungi and/or with selected and tested Pseudomonas strains, under conditions of reduced fertilization, increases anthocyanin concentration in the fruits of strawberry.

  11. Attraction and mortality of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) to STATIC Spinosad ME weathered under operational conditions in California and Florida: a reduced-risk male annihilation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Souder, Steven K; Hoffman, Kevin; Mercogliano, Juan; Smith, Trevor R; Hammond, Jack; Davis, Bobbie J; Brodie, Matt; Dripps, James E

    2014-08-01

    Studies were conducted in 2013-2014 to quantify attraction, feeding, and mortality of male oriental fruit flies, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), to STATIC Spinosad ME a reduced-risk male annihilation treatment (MAT) formulation consisting of an amorphous polymer matrix in combination with methyl eugenol (ME) and spinosad compared with the standard treatment of Min-U-Gel mixed with ME and naled (Dibrom). Our approach used a behavioral methodology for evaluation of slow-acting reduced-risk insecticides. ME treatments were weathered for 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 d under operational conditions in California and Florida and shipped to Hawaii for bioassays. In field tests using bucket traps to attract and capture wild males, and in toxicity studies conducted in 1-m(3) cages using released males of controlled ages, STATIC Spinosad ME performed equally as well to the standard formulation of Min-U-Gel ME with naled for material aged up to 28 d in both California and Florida. In laboratory feeding tests in which individual males were exposed for 5 min to the different ME treatments, mortality induced by STATIC Spinosad ME recorded at 24 h did not differ from mortality caused by Min-U-Gel ME with naled at 1, 7, 14, and 21 d in California and was equal to or higher for all weathered time periods in Florida during two trials. Spinosad has low contact toxicity, and when mixed with an attractant and slow release matrix, offers a reduced-risk alternative for eradication of B. dorsalis and related ME attracted species, without many of the potential negative effects to humans and nontargets associated with broad-spectrum contact insecticides such as naled.

  12. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  13. Knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha reduces proliferation, induces apoptosis and attenuates the aggressive phenotype of retinoblastoma WERI-Rb-1 cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Cheng, Hao; Zhu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) plays a critical role in tumor cell adaption to hypoxia by inducing the transcription of numerous genes. The role of HIF-1α in malignant retinoblastoma remains unclear. We analyzed the role of HIF-1α in WERI-Rb-1 retinoblastoma cells under hypoxic conditions. CoCl2 (125 mmol/L) was added to the culture media to mimic hypoxia. HIF-1α was silenced using siRNA. Gene and protein expression were measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion were assayed using MTT, Transwell invasion, and cell adhesion assays respectively. Hypoxia significantly upregulated HIF-1α protein expression and the HIF-1α target genes VEGF, GLUT1, and Survivin mRNA. HIF-1α mRNA expression was not affected by hypoxia. Transfection of the siRNA expression plasmid pRNAT-CMV3.2/Neo-HIF-1α silenced HIF-1α by approximately 80% in hypoxic WERI-Rb-1 cells. The knockdown of HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions downregulated VEGF, GLUT1, and Survivin mRNA. It also inhibited proliferation, promoted apoptosis, induced the G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest, and reduced the adhesion and invasion of WERI-Rb-1 cells. HIF-1α plays a major role in the survival and aggressive phenotype of retinoblastoma cells under hypoxic conditions. Targeting HIF-1α may be a promising therapeutic strategy for human malignant retinoblastoma.

  14. Analysis of copper corrosion in compacted bentonite clay as a function of clay density and growth conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, K

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the relationships between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), growth conditions, bentonite densities and copper sulfide generation under circumstances relevant to underground, high-level radioactive waste repositories. Experiments took place 450 m underground, connected under in situ pressure to groundwater containing SRB. The microbial reduction of sulfate to sulfide and subsequent corrosion of copper test plates buried in compacted bentonite were analysed using radioactive sulfur (35SO4(2-)) as tracer. Mass distribution of copper sulfide on the plates indicated a diffusive process. The relationship between average diffusion coefficients (Ds) and tested density (rho) was linear. Ds (m2 s(-1))=-0.004xrho (kg m(-3))+8.2, decreasing by 0.2 Ds units per 50 kg m(-3) increase in density, from 1.2x10(-11) m2 s(-1) at 1750 kg m(-3) to 0.2x10(-11) m2 s(-1) at 2000 kg m(-3). It is possible that sulfide corrosion of waste canisters in future radioactive waste repositories depends mainly on sulfide concentration at the boundary between groundwater and the buffer, which in turn depends on SRB growth conditions (e.g., sulfate accessibility, carbon availability and electron donors) and geochemical parameters (e.g., presence of ferrous iron, which immobilizes sulfide). Maintaining high bentonite density is also important in mitigating canister corrosion. The sulfide diffusion coefficients can be used in safety calculations regarding waste canister corrosion. The work supports findings that microbial activity in compacted bentonite will be restricted. The study emphasizes the importance of growth conditions for sulfate reduction at the groundwater boundary of the bentonite buffer and linked sulfide production.

  15. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikell, John L., E-mail: jmikell@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Waller, Edmund K. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Langston, Amelia A. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khoury, H. Jean [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  16. Speciation and fate of trace metals in estuarine sediments under reduced and oxidized conditions, Seaplane Lagoon, Alameda Naval Air Station (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esser Brad

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available We have identified important chemical reactions that control the fate of metal-contaminated estuarine sediments if they are left undisturbed (in situ or if they are dredged. We combined information on the molecular bonding of metals in solids from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS with thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces obtained from dissolved metal concentrations to deduce the dominant reactions under reduced and oxidized conditions. We evaluated the in situ geochemistry of metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, manganese and zinc as a function of sediment depth (to 100 cm from a 60 year record of contamination at the Alameda Naval Air Station, California. Results from XAS and thermodynamic modeling of porewaters show that cadmium and most of the zinc form stable sulfide phases, and that lead and chromium are associated with stable carbonate, phosphate, phyllosilicate, or oxide minerals. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the release of these trace metals from the deeper sediments contaminated prior to the Clean Water Act (1975 as long as reducing conditions are maintained. Increased concentrations of dissolved metals with depth were indicative of the formation of metal HS- complexes. The sediments also contain zinc, chromium, and manganese associated with detrital iron-rich phyllosilicates and/or oxides. These phases are recalcitrant at near-neutral pH and do not undergo reductive dissolution within the 60 year depositional history of sediments at this site. The fate of these metals during dredging was evaluated by comparing in situ geochemistry with that of sediments oxidized by seawater in laboratory experiments. Cadmium and zinc pose the greatest hazard from dredging because their sulfides were highly reactive in seawater. However, their dissolved concentrations under oxic conditions were limited eventually by sorption to or co-precipitation with an iron (oxyhydroxide. About 50% of the reacted CdS and 80% of the reacted

  17. <strong>Entropy>: a consolidation manager for clustersstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermenier, Fabien; Lorca, Xavier; Menaud, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    as their computational requirements change, both to reduce the number of nodes that need to be active and to eliminate temporary overload situations. Previous dynamic consolidation strategies have relied on task placement heuristics that use only local optimization and typically do not take migration overhead......Clusters provide powerful computing environments, but in practice much of this power goes to waste, due to the static allocation of tasks to nodes, regardless of their changing computational requirements. Dynamic consolidation is an approach that migrates tasks within a cluster...... in the number of nodes. Because migration overhead is taken into account, Entropy chooses migrations that can be implemented efficiently, incurring a low performance overhead....

  18. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  19. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  20. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  1. Modification of working conditions based on ergo THK reducing workload, muscle tension, and fatigue of rice milling workers in J village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruliati, L. P.; Adiputra, N.; Sutjana, I. D. P.; Sutajaya, I. M.

    2017-11-01

    Rice mill is one of the businesses in informal sector. From the rice milling process, ergonomic problems arise when employees work with bent position that done repeatedly to lift grain sacks to be transferred to peeler machine. This situation will affect the comfort of work, thus increasing the workload, muscle tension, and fatigue. The consequence will certainly affect the health and productivity of workers. In this study introduces ergo Tri Hita Karana (ergo THK) as an ergonomics intervention model which solves ergonomics problems of the cultural aspects of THK. The study aim is to determine the modification of working conditions based Ergo THK to reduce workload, muscle tension and fatigue. This research uses Randomized Pretest and Posttest Control Group Design experimental design. The subjects were 30 male rice mill workers with an age range of 16 until 56 years, and then divided into 15 subjects in the control group and 15 subjects in the treatment group. The results showed that the average posttest workloads in the control group are 136.950 more less 0.297 and in the treatment group are 107.60 more less 0.396. Significance analysis showed that after the two groups done their activities, the average workload significantly different p less than 0.005. The amount of reduction in the workload between the two groups was 21.43 percent. In muscle tension posttest showed that the mean score of the muscle tension in the control group was 62.67 more less 7.31 and the treatment group was 20.96 more less 2.96. Significance analysis showed that both groups mean muscle-tension results were significantly different p less than 0.005. The amount of reduction in tension between the control group and the treatment group while working was 66.55 percent. At fatigue posttest showed that the mean score of fatigue in the control group was 76.40 more less 13.51 and the treatment group was 55.53 more less 9.51. Significant analysis showed that the mean fatigue of both groups

  2. Final Report - Phase II - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study ($20,575 extension)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brent Peyton; Rajesh Sani

    2006-01-01

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Past research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. The project reported on here was an extension ($20,575) of the prior (much larger) project. This report is focused only on the work completed during the extension period. Further information on the larger impacts of our research, including 28 publications, can be found in the final report for the following projects: (1) Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions: An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study Grant DE-FG03-01ER63270, and (2) Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions Grant DE-FG03-98ER62630/A001 In this Phase II project, the toxic effects of uranium(VI) were studied using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in a medium containing bicarbonate or 1, 4-piperazinediethane sulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (PIPES) buffer (each at 30 mM, pH 7). The toxicity of uranium(VI) was dependent on the medium buffer and was observed in terms of longer lag times and in some cases, no measurable growth. The minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) was 140 (micro)M U(VI) in PIPES buffered medium. This is 36 times lower than previously reported for D. desulfuricans. These results suggest that U(VI) toxicity and the detoxification mechanisms of G20 depend greatly

  3. Assessing the impacts of future climate conditions on the effectiveness of winter cover crops in reducing nitrate loads into the Chesapeake Bay Watershed using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Yeo, In-Young; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, W. Dean

    2017-01-01

    Winter cover crops (WCCs) have been widely implemented in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW) due to their high effectiveness at reducing nitrate loads. However, future climate conditions (FCCs) are expected to exacerbate water quality degradation in the CBW by increasing nitrate loads from agriculture. Accordingly, the question remains whether WCCs are sufficient to mitigate increased nutrient loads caused by FCCs. In this study, we assessed the impacts of FCCs on WCC nitrate reduction efficiency on the Coastal Plain of the CBW using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Three FCC scenarios (2085 – 2098) were prepared using General Circulation Models (GCMs), considering three Intergovernmnental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) greenhouse gas emission scenarios. We also developed six representative WCC implementation scenarios based on the most commonly used planting dates and species of WCCs in this region. Simulation results showed that WCC biomass increased by ~ 58 % under FCC scenarios, due to climate conditions conducive to the WCC growth. Prior to implementing WCCs, annual nitrate loads increased by ~ 43 % under FCC scenarios compared to the baseline scenario (2001 – 2014). When WCCs were planted, annual nitrate loads were substantially reduced by ~ 48 % and WCC nitrate reduction efficiency water ~ 5 % higher under FCC scenarios relative to the baseline. The increase rate of WCC nitrate reduction efficiency varied by FCC scenarios and WCC planting methods. As CO2 concentration was higher and winters were warmer under FCC scenarios, WCCs had greater biomass and therefore showed higher nitrate reduction efficiency. In response to FCC scenarios, the performance of less effective WCC practices (e.g., barley, wheat, and late planting) under the baseline indicated ~ 14 % higher increase rate of nitrate reduction efficiency compared to ones with better effectiveness under the baseline (e

  4. Brief training of psychoneuroendocrinoimmunology-based meditation (PNEIMED) reduces stress symptom ratings and improves control on salivary cortisol secretion under basal and stimulated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottaccioli, Francesco; Carosella, Antonia; Cardone, Raffaella; Mambelli, Monica; Cemin, Marisa; D'Errico, Marcello M; Ponzio, Elisa; Bottaccioli, Anna Giulia; Minelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Meditation is proposed as an anti-stress practice lowering allostatic load and promoting well-being, with brief formats providing some of the benefits of longer interventions. PsychoNeuroEndocrinoImmunology-based meditation (PNEIMED) combines the teaching of philosophy and practice of Buddhist meditation with a grounding in human physiology from a systemic and integrative perspective. We evaluated the effects of four-day PNEIMED training (30 h) on subjective and objective indices of stress in healthy adults. A non-randomized, controlled, before-and-after study was conducted. Participants (n = 125, mostly health practitioners) answered a questionnaire rating stress symptom before (T0) and after (Tf) a PNEIMED course. In an additional sample (n = 40; smokers, overweight persons, women taking contraceptives, and subjects with oral pathologies were excluded), divided into PNEIMED-attending (intervention, n = 21) and non-meditating (control, n = 19) groups, salivary cortisol was measured upon awakening and during a challenging mental task. Self-rated distress scores were highly reduced after the PNEIMED course. In the intervention group, improvement of psychological well-being was accompanied by decrease in cortisol levels at awakening. No T0-vs-Tf changes in distress scores and morning cortisol were found in controls. Based on baseline-to-peak increment of cortisol response at T0, 26 subjects (n = 13 for each group) were classified as task-responders. The amplitude and duration of the cortisol response decreased after PNEIMED, whereas no effects were found in controls. Brief PNEIMED training yields immediate benefits, reducing distress symptoms and adrenocortical activity under basal and stimulated conditions. PNEIMED may represent an effective practice to manage stress and anxiety, particularly among subjects facing a multitude of job-related stressors, such as healthcare workers. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Probability densities in strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhot, Victor

    2006-03-01

    In this work we, using Mellin’s transform combined with the Gaussian large-scale boundary condition, calculate probability densities (PDFs) of velocity increments P(δu,r), velocity derivatives P(u,r) and the PDF of the fluctuating dissipation scales Q(η,Re), where Re is the large-scale Reynolds number. The resulting expressions strongly deviate from the Log-normal PDF P(δu,r) often quoted in the literature. It is shown that the probability density of the small-scale velocity fluctuations includes information about the large (integral) scale dynamics which is responsible for the deviation of P(δu,r) from P(δu,r). An expression for the function D(h) of the multifractal theory, free from spurious logarithms recently discussed in [U. Frisch, M. Martins Afonso, A. Mazzino, V. Yakhot, J. Fluid Mech. 542 (2005) 97] is also obtained.

  6. Stable long-term pulmonary function after fludarabine, antithymocyte globulin and i.v. BU for reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirou, S; Malard, F; Chambellan, A; Chevallier, P; Germaud, P; Guillaume, T; Delaunay, J; Moreau, P; Delasalle, B; Lemarchand, P; Mohty, M

    2014-05-01

    Lung function decline is a well-recognized complication following allogeneic SCT (allo-SCT). Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and in vivo T-cell depletion by administration of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) may have a protective role in the occurrence of late pulmonary complications. This retrospective study reported the evolution of lung function parameters within the first 2 years after allo-SCT in a population receiving the same RIC regimen that included fludarabine and i.v. BU in combination with low-dose ATG. The median follow-up was 35.2 months. With a median age of 59 years at the time of transplant, at 2 years, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality was as low as 9.7%. The cumulative incidence of relapse was 33%. At 2 years, the cumulative incidences of extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) and of pulmonary cGVHD were 23.1% and 1.9%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of airflow obstruction and restrictive pattern were 3.8% and 9.6%, respectively. Moreover, forced expiratory volume (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC ratio remained stable from baseline up to 2 years post transplantation (P=0.26, P=0.27 and P=0.07, respectively). These results correspond favorably with the results obtained with other RIC regimens not incorporating ATG, and suggest that ATG may have a protective pulmonary role after allo-SCT.

  7. Characteristics of oleuropeinolytic strains of Lactobacillus plantarum group and influence on phenolic compounds in table olives elaborated under reduced salt conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsa, A; Papaliaga, D; Papaioannou, E; Kotzekidou, P

    2015-06-01

    The technological characteristics of five oleuropeinolytic strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum group selected within 135 isolates from table olives were investigated. The metabolism of phenolic compounds during elaboration of green (cv. Chalkidikis) and black (cv. Kalamata) olives under reduced salt conditions was evaluated. Olives of both cultivars were fermented in two different kinds of brine (Brine A containing 2.3% NaCl, 32.3 mM Ca-acetate and 33.9 mM Ca-lactate and Brine B containing 4% NaCl, pH 5.0 in both brines) by five selected strains of L. plantarum group. After 60 days of fermentation, the analysis of phenolic compounds was performed by HPLC and nine compounds were identified and quantified: oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and vanillin and the phenolic acids protocatechuic, caffeic, p-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic and p-coumaric acid. The study can lead to the development of starter culture potentially active in biological debittering of olives during fermentation in order to unify the debittering and fermentation process during elaboration of table olives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of H2S/HS- on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X100 Pipeline Steel Under Simulated Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Metabolite Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Li, Z.; Liu, Z. Y.; Li, X. G.; Wang, S. Q.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of H2S/HS-, which simulates the main metabolites of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), on the electrochemical and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of X100 steel was investigated in a near-neutral solution. The results showed that different H2S/HS- contents mainly affected the cathodic process of X100 electrochemical corrosion. As the concentration of H2S/HS- increased, the corrosion potential was shifted negatively, the corrosion current density was considerably increased, and the corrosion rate was linearly increased. Different rust layers with shifting structures were formed under different conditions and had different effects on electrochemical behaviors. However, sulfide mainly promoted local corrosion processes. With the synergistic effects of stress and H2S/HS-, SCC susceptibility was considerably enhanced. The accelerated process of hydrogen evolution by sulfide was crucial in enhancing SCC processes. In brief, the trace H2S/HS- generated by SRB metabolites played a positive role in promoting SCC.

  9. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New Delhi 110 054, India; Evolutionary Biology Laboratory, Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India; Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada; Department of Environmental Biology, ...

  10. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To answer the question, are preadult development time and larval feeding rate ... Keywords. life-history evolution; development time; larval feeding rate; competition; tradeoffs; Drosophila melanogaster. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 85, No ..... financial assistance in the form of a senior research fellowship. N.A. thanks Jawaharlal ...

  11. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001) was an arte- fact of extreme directional selection for rapid development that led to changes in the correlational structure of develop- ment time, larval feeding rate, dry weight at eclosion, and preadult survivorship. A positive genetic correlation between larval feeding rate and development time in the control pop-.

  12. Intrinsic and enhanced biodegradation of benzene in strongly reduced aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiningen, W.N.M. van; Rijnaarts, H.H.M; Langenhoff, A.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory microcosm studies were performed to examine intrinsic and enhanced benzene bioremediation using five different sediment and groundwater samples from three deeply anaerobic aquifers sited in northern Netherlands. The influence of addition of nitrate, sulfate, limited amounts of oxygen, and

  13. Emerging signs of strong reciprocity in human ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin eRobbins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Strong reciprocity is considered here as the propensity to sacrifice resources to be kind or to punish in response to prior acts, a behavior not simply reducible to self-interest and a likely force behind human cooperation and sociality. The aim was to capture emerging signs of strong reciprocity in human ontogeny. Three- and five-year-old middle class American children (N=162 were tested in a simple, multiple round, three-way sharing game involving the child, a generous puppet, and a stingy puppet. At the end of the game, the child was offered an opportunity to sacrifice some of her personal gains to punish one of the puppets. By three years, American children demonstrate a willingness to engage in costly punishment. However, only five-year-olds show some evidence of strong reciprocity by orienting their punishment systematically toward the stingy puppet. Further analyses and 3 additional control conditions demonstrate that such propensity is not simply reducible to a straight imitation, or b inequity aversion. To assess the relative universality of such development, a group of five- to six-year-old children from rural Samoa (N=14 were tested and compared to age and gender matched American children. Samoan children did not manifest the same propensity toward strong reciprocity. The results are interpreted as pointing to 1 the developmental emergence of an ethical stance between three and five years of age, and 2 that the expression of such stance by young children could depend on culture.

  14. Assay for applying super absorbent polymer in a low input corn (Zea mays L. production system aimed to reduce drought stress under Mashhad conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of super absorbent polymer application on reduction of drought stress to corn, a split plot arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications was conducted at Research Field of Agriculture Faculty of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during growing season of 2010-11. The main plot treatments were 1 application of 40 kg.ha-1 super absorbent, 2 application of 80 kg.ha-1 super absorbent and 3 no application of super absorbent polymer. Three irrigation intervals (7, 10 and 14 days assigned to sub plots. The results showed that super absorbent application affected plant height (H, and dry matter production (DM as the highest of these traits resulted from level 2 of super absorbent application (140.5 cm, and 144.5 g.m-2, respectively. H, DM, canopy temperature (CT, cob number (N, fresh yield (FY, economic yield (EY and 100-seed weight affected by irrigation intervals. There was no significant difference between 10 and 14 days irrigation interval as H, DM, CT, harvest Index (HI and 100-seed weight, these results could be important concerning to reduce used water to irrigate corn. As experimental treatments did not have any effect on Leaf Area Index (LAI, and HI, it seems the positive effects of treatments revealed due to improved soil water holding capacity, soil physical properties improvement and reduction of drought stress. Interaction between super absorbent and irrigation intervals indicates that by level 2 super absorbent applications there are no significant differences between 14 and 10 days irrigation intervals, considering all traits. The same interaction just as before happened for 7 and 14 days irrigation intervals, except of EY and DM. In the other hand, by increasing application of super absorbent it could be possible to increase corn irrigation intervals from 7 to 14 days in Mashhad conditions without any reduction in yield and yield components. In general, these results

  15. Artificial oxygen carrier with pharmacologic actions of adenosine-5'-triphosphate, adenosine, and reduced glutathione formulated to treat an array of medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Jan; Simoni, Grace; Moeller, John F; Feola, Mario; Wesson, Donald E

    2014-08-01

    Effective artificial oxygen carriers may offer a solution to tackling current transfusion medicine challenges such as blood shortages, red blood cell storage lesions, and transmission of emerging pathogens. These products, could provide additional therapeutic benefits besides oxygen delivery for an array of medical conditions. To meet these needs, we developed a hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carrier, HemoTech, which utilizes the concept of pharmacologic cross-linking. It consists of purified bovine Hb cross-linked intramolecularly with open ring adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and intermolecularly with open ring adenosine, and conjugated with reduced glutathione (GSH). In this composition, ATP prevents Hb dimerization, and adenosine promotes formation of Hb polymers as well as counteracts the vasoconstrictive and pro-inflammatory properties of Hb via stimulation of adenosine receptors. ATP also serves as a regulator of vascular tone through activation of purinergic receptors. GSH blocks Hb's extravasation and glomerular filtration by lowering the isoelectric point, as well as shields heme from nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. HemoTech and its manufacturing technology have been broadly tested, including viral and prion clearance validation studies and various nonclinical pharmacology, toxicology, genotoxicity, and efficacy tests. The clinical proof-of-concept was carried out in sickle cell anemia subjects. The preclinical and clinical studies indicate that HemoTech works as a physiologic oxygen carrier and has efficacy in treating: (i) acute blood loss anemia by providing a temporary oxygen bridge while stimulating an endogenous erythropoietic response; (ii) sickle cell disease by counteracting vaso-occlusive/inflammatory episodes and anemia; and (iii) ischemic vascular diseases particularly thrombotic and restenotic events. The pharmacologic cross-linking of Hb with ATP, adenosine, and GSH showed usefulness in designing an artificial oxygen carrier for

  16. Efficacy of Lactic Acid, Lactic Acid-Acetic Acid Blends, and Peracetic Acid To Reduce Salmonella on Chicken Parts under Simulated Commercial Processing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirex-Hernandez, Alejandra; Brashears, Mindy M; Sanchez-Plata, Marcos X

    2018-01-01

    The poultry processing industry has been undergoing a series of changes as it modifies processing practices to comply with new performance standards for chicken parts and comminuted poultry products. The regulatory approach encourages the use of intervention strategies to prevent and control foodborne pathogens in poultry products and thus improve food safety and protect human health. The present studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial interventions for reducing Salmonella on inoculated chicken parts under simulated commercial processing conditions. Chicken pieces were inoculated by immersion in a five-strain Salmonella cocktail at 6 log CFU/mL and then treated with organic acids and oxidizing agents on a commercial rinsing conveyor belt. The efficacy of spraying with six different treatments (sterile water, lactic acid, acetic acid, buffered lactic acid, acetic acid in combination with lactic acid, and peracetic acid) at two concentrations was evaluated on skin-on and skin-off chicken thighs at three application temperatures. Skinless chicken breasts were used to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of lactic acid and peracetic acid. The color stability of treated and untreated chicken parts was assessed after the acid interventions. The lactic acid and buffered lactic acid treatments produced the greatest reductions in Salmonella counts. Significant differences between the control and water treatments were identified for 5.11% lactic acid and 5.85% buffered lactic acid in both skin-on and skin-off chicken thighs. No significant effect of treatment temperature for skin-on chicken thighs was found. Lactic acid and peracetic acid were effective agents for eluting Salmonella cells attached to chicken breasts.

  17. Conditioned Medium from Placental Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Oxidative Stress during the Cryopreservation of Ex Vivo Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadekar, Darshana; Rangole, Sonal; Kale, Vaijayanti; Limaye, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    The limited cell dose in umbilical cord blood (UCB) necessitates ex vivo expansion of UCB. Further, the effective cryopreservation of these expanded cells is important in widening their use in the clinics. During cryopreservation, cells experience oxidative stress due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs-CM) has been shown to alleviate the oxidative stress during wound healing, Alzheimer's disease and ischemic disease. This premise prompted us to investigate the influence of MSCs-CM during cryopreservation of expanded UCB cells. CM-was collected from cord/placental MSCs(C-MSCs-CM, P-MSC-CM). UCB CD34+cells were expanded as suspension cultures in serum free medium containing cytokines for 10 days. Cells were frozen with/without C-MSCs-CM and or P-MSCs-CM in the conventional freezing medium containing 20%FCS +10%DMSO using a programmable freezer and stored in liquid nitrogen. Upon revival, cells frozen with MSCs-CM were found to be superior to cells frozen in conventional medium in terms of viability, CD34+content and clonogenecity. Priming of revived cells for 48 hrs with MSCs-CM further improved their transplantation ability, as compared to those cultured without MSCs-CM. P-MSCs-CM radically reduced the oxidative stress in cryopreserved cells, resulting in better post thaw functionality of CD34+ cells than with C-MSCs-CM. The observed cryoprotective effect of MSCs-CM was primarily due to anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties of the MSCs-CM and not because of the exosomes secreted by them. Our data suggest that MSCs-CM can serve as a valuable additive to the freezing or the priming medium for expanded UCB cells, which would increase their clinical applicability.

  18. Conditioned Medium from Placental Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Oxidative Stress during the Cryopreservation of Ex Vivo Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana Kadekar

    Full Text Available The limited cell dose in umbilical cord blood (UCB necessitates ex vivo expansion of UCB. Further, the effective cryopreservation of these expanded cells is important in widening their use in the clinics. During cryopreservation, cells experience oxidative stress due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs-CM has been shown to alleviate the oxidative stress during wound healing, Alzheimer's disease and ischemic disease. This premise prompted us to investigate the influence of MSCs-CM during cryopreservation of expanded UCB cells.CM-was collected from cord/placental MSCs(C-MSCs-CM, P-MSC-CM. UCB CD34+cells were expanded as suspension cultures in serum free medium containing cytokines for 10 days. Cells were frozen with/without C-MSCs-CM and or P-MSCs-CM in the conventional freezing medium containing 20%FCS +10%DMSO using a programmable freezer and stored in liquid nitrogen. Upon revival, cells frozen with MSCs-CM were found to be superior to cells frozen in conventional medium in terms of viability, CD34+content and clonogenecity. Priming of revived cells for 48 hrs with MSCs-CM further improved their transplantation ability, as compared to those cultured without MSCs-CM. P-MSCs-CM radically reduced the oxidative stress in cryopreserved cells, resulting in better post thaw functionality of CD34+ cells than with C-MSCs-CM. The observed cryoprotective effect of MSCs-CM was primarily due to anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties of the MSCs-CM and not because of the exosomes secreted by them.Our data suggest that MSCs-CM can serve as a valuable additive to the freezing or the priming medium for expanded UCB cells, which would increase their clinical applicability.

  19. Reducing the Salt Added to Takeaway Food: Within-Subjects Comparison of Salt Delivered by Five and 17 Holed Salt Shakers in Controlled Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Goffe

    Full Text Available To determine if the amount of salt delivered by standard salt shakers commonly used in English independent takeaways varies between those with five and 17 holes; and to determine if any differences are robust to variations in: the amount of salt in the shaker, the length of time spent shaking, and the person serving.Four laboratory experiments comparing the amount of salt delivered by shakers. Independent variables considered were: type of shaker used (five or 17 holes, amount of salt in the shaker before shaking commences (shaker full, half full or nearly empty, time spent shaking (3s, 5s or 10s, and individual serving.Controlled, laboratory, conditions.A quota-based convenience sample of 10 participants (five women aged 18-59 years.Amount of salt delivered by salt shakers.Across all trials, the 17 holed shaker delivered a mean (SD of 7.86g (4.54 per trial, whilst the five holed shaker delivered 2.65g (1.22. The five holed shaker delivered a mean of 33.7% of the salt of the 17 holed shaker. There was a significant difference in salt delivered between the five and 17 holed salt shakers when time spent shaking, amount of salt in the shaker and participant were all kept constant (p<0.001. This difference was robust to variations in the starting weight of shakers, time spent shaking and participant shaking (psreduce the salt content of takeaway food, and particularly food from Fish & Chip shops, where these shakers are particularly used. Further research will be required to determine the effects of this intervention on customers' salt intake with takeaway food and on total dietary salt intake.

  20. The lambda sigma calculus and strong normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack-Nielsen, Anders; Schürmann, Carsten

    Explicit substitution calculi can be classified into several dis- tinct categories depending on whether they are confluent, meta-confluent, strong normalization preserving, strongly normalizing, simulating, fully compositional, and/or local. In this paper we present a variant of the λσ-calculus......, which satisfies all seven conditions. In particular, we show how to circumvent Mellies counter-example to strong normalization by a slight restriction of the congruence rules. The calculus is implemented as the core data structure of the Celf logical framework. All meta-theoretic aspects of this work...

  1. Wave Breaking Phenomenon for DGH Equation with Strong Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengguang Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is mainly concerned with the Dullin-Gottwald-Holm (DGH equation with strong dissipative term. We establish some sufficient conditions to guarantee finite time blow-up of strong solutions.

  2. Characterization of XR-RV3 GafChromic{sup ®} films in standard laboratory and in clinical conditions and means to evaluate uncertainties and reduce errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J., E-mail: jad.farah@irsn.fr; Clairand, I.; Huet, C. [External Dosimetry Department, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), BP-17, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Trianni, A. [Medical Physics Department, Udine University Hospital S. Maria della Misericordia (AOUD), p.le S. Maria della Misericordia, 15, 33100 Udine (Italy); Ciraj-Bjelac, O. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences (VINCA), P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); De Angelis, C. [Department of Technology and Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Delle Canne, S. [Fatebenefratelli San Giovanni Calibita Hospital (FBF), UOC Medical Physics - Isola Tiberina, 00186 Rome (Italy); Hadid, L.; Waryn, M. J. [Radiology Department, Hôpital Jean Verdier (HJV), Avenue du 14 Juillet, 93140 Bondy Cedex (France); Jarvinen, H.; Siiskonen, T. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), P.O. Box 14, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Negri, A. [Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV), Via Gattamelata 64, 35124 Padova (Italy); Novák, L. [National Radiation Protection Institute (NRPI), Bartoškova 28, 140 00 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Pinto, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (ENEA-INMRI), C.R. Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, I-00123 Santa Maria di Galeria (RM) (Italy); Knežević, Ž. [Ruđer Bošković Institute (RBI), Bijenička c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the optimal use of XR-RV3 GafChromic{sup ®} films to assess patient skin dose in interventional radiology while addressing the means to reduce uncertainties in dose assessment. Methods: XR-Type R GafChromic films have been shown to represent the most efficient and suitable solution to determine patient skin dose in interventional procedures. As film dosimetry can be associated with high uncertainty, this paper presents the EURADOS WG 12 initiative to carry out a comprehensive study of film characteristics with a multisite approach. The considered sources of uncertainties include scanner, film, and fitting-related errors. The work focused on studying film behavior with clinical high-dose-rate pulsed beams (previously unavailable in the literature) together with reference standard laboratory beams. Results: First, the performance analysis of six different scanner models has shown that scan uniformity perpendicular to the lamp motion axis and that long term stability are the main sources of scanner-related uncertainties. These could induce errors of up to 7% on the film readings unless regularly checked and corrected. Typically, scan uniformity correction matrices and reading normalization to the scanner-specific and daily background reading should be done. In addition, the analysis on multiple film batches has shown that XR-RV3 films have generally good uniformity within one batch (<1.5%), require 24 h to stabilize after the irradiation and their response is roughly independent of dose rate (<5%). However, XR-RV3 films showed large variations (up to 15%) with radiation quality both in standard laboratory and in clinical conditions. As such, and prior to conducting patient skin dose measurements, it is mandatory to choose the appropriate calibration beam quality depending on the characteristics of the x-ray systems that will be used clinically. In addition, yellow side film irradiations should be preferentially used since they showed a lower

  3. IMPACT OF PRETRANSPLANT DONOR AND RECIPIENT CYTOMEGALOVIRUS SEROSTATUS ON OUTCOME FOR MULTIPLE MYELOMA PATIENTS UNDERGOING REDUCED INTENSITY CONDITIONING ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Elcheikh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the impact of pre-transplant CMV serostatus of donor or recipient on outcome of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-SCT for Multiple Myeloma (MM. To our knowledge no data are available in the literature about this issue. We retrospectively followed 99 consecutive patients who underwent reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC Allo-SCT for MM in our cancer centre at Marseille between January 2000 and January 2012. Based upon CMV serostatus, patients were classified as low risk (donor [D]-/recipient [R]- 17 patients (17.1%, intermediate risk (D+/R 14 patients (14.1%, or high risk – either (D-/R+ 31 patients (31.3% or (D+/R+, 37 patients (37.3%. Cumulative incidence of CMV reactivation was 39% with a median time of 61 days (26–318. Three patients (3% developed CMV disease. Two factors were associated with CMV reactivation: CMV serostatus group (low: 0% vs intermediate: 29% vs high: 50%; p=0.001 and the presence of grade II–IV acute GvHD (Hazard Ratio: HR=2.1 [1.1–3.9]. Thirty-six of the 39 patients (92% with CMV reactivation did not present positive detection of CMV after a 21-day median duration preemptive treatment with ganciclovir. Cumulative incidence of day 100 grade II–IV acute GvHD, 1-year chronic GvHD and day 100 transplantation related mortality (TRM were 37%, 36% and 9%, respectively. CMV reactivation and serostatus were not associated with increased GvHD and TRM or short survival. Only the presence of acute GvHD as a time dependent variable was significantly associated with increased TRM (p=0.005. Two-year overall and progression free survival were 56% and 34%, respectively. Donor and recipient CMV serostatus and acute GvHD are independent factors for increased CMV reactivation in high-risk MM patients undergoing RIC Allo-SCT. However, we did not find any influence of CMV reactivation on post transplantation outcome. CMV monitoring and pre-emptive treatment strategy could in

  4. Impact of pretransplant donor and recipient cytomegalovirus serostatus on outcome for multiple myeloma patients undergoing reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Devillier, Raynier; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Fürst, Sabine; Calmels, Boris; Faucher, Catherine; Stoppa, Anne Marie; Granata, Angela; Castagna, Luca; Ladaique, Patrick; Lemarie, Claude; Bouabdallah, Reda; Zandotti, Christine; Merlin, Michele; Berger, Pierre; Chabannon, Christian; Blaise, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Scope of the study was to investigate the impact of pre-transplant CMV serostatus of the donor and/or recipient on the outcome of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-SCT) for Multiple Myeloma (MM). To our knowledge no data are available in the literature about this issue. We retrospectively followed 99 consecutive patients who underwent reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) Allo-SCT for MM in our cancer center at Marseille between January 2000 and January 2012. Based upon CMV serostatus, patients were classified as low risk (donor [D]-/recipient [R] -) 17 patients (17.1%), intermediate risk (D+/R) 14 patients (14.1%), or high risk - either (D-/R+) 31 patients (31.3%) or (D+/R+), 37 patients (37.3%). Cumulative incidence of CMV reactivation was 39% with a median time of 61 days (26-318). Three patients (3%) developed CMV disease. Two factors were associated with CMV reactivation: CMV serostatus group (low: 0% vs. intermediate: 29% vs. high: 50%; p=0.001) and the presence of grade II-IV acute GvHD (Hazard Ratio: HR=2.1 [1.1-3.9]). Thirty-six of the 39 patients (92%) with CMV reactivation did not present positive detection of CMV after a 21-day median duration preemptive treatment with ganciclovir. Cumulative incidence of day 100 grade II-IV acute GvHD, 1-year chronic GvHD and day 100 transplantation related mortality (TRM) were 37%, 36% and 9%, respectively. CMV reactivation and serostatus were not associated with increased GvHD and TRM or short survival. Only the presence of acute GvHD as a time dependent variable was significantly associated with increased TRM (p=0.005). Two-year overall and progression free survival were 56% and 34%, respectively. Donor and recipient CMV serostatus and acute GvHD are independent factors for increased CMV reactivation in high-risk MM patients undergoing RIC Allo-SCT. However, we did not find any influence of CMV reactivation on post transplantation outcome. CMV monitoring and pre

  5. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for X-linked agammaglobulinemia using reduced intensity conditioning as a model of the reconstitution of humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Imai, Kohsuke; Yamashita, Motoi; Hoshino, Akihiro; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Morio, Tomohiro; Kaida, Katsuji; Inoue, Takayuki; Soma, Toshihiro; Tamaki, Hiroya; Okada, Masaya; Ogawa, Hiroyasu

    2016-02-13

    We herein report the first case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) that underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). We chronologically observed the reconstitution of humoral immunity in this case. The patient was a 28-year-old Japanese male with XLA who previously had life-threatening infectious episodes and was referred for the possible indication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. After a thorough discussion within specialists from different backgrounds, we decided to perform allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation from his HLA-identical elder brother. Due to the non-malignant nature of XLA, we selected RIC consisting of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, anti-thymocyte globulin, and 3 Gy of total body irradiation. Neutrophil engraftment was achieved on day 11 with complete donor chimerism. No major complications, except for stage 1 skin graft-versus-host disease, were observed. The patient was discharged on day 75 and has been followed as an outpatient without any infectious episodes for more than 500 days. Regarding immune reconstitution, CD19(+) cells, IgA, and IgM, which were undetectable before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), started to increase in number 10 days after allo-SCT and continued to increase for more than 1 year. Anti-B antibodies appeared as early as day 10. Total IgG levels decreased after the discontinuation of IgG replacement and spontaneously recovered after day 350. However, most anti-viral IgG titers, except EB virus-virus capsid antigen IgG, disappeared after the discontinuation of IgG replacement. A seasonal vaccination to influenza was performed on day 148, with neither anti-influenza type A nor type B being positive after the vaccination. The transient transfer of allergic immunity to orchard grass was observed. Similar Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) expression levels in monocytes and B-cells were observed between the patient and healthy control. B-cells in the

  6. Operation Design of Wind Turbines in Strong Wind Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Montes, Melissa Barroso; Odgaard, Peter Fogh

    2012-01-01

    and variable speed pitch regulated wind turbines. The variable speed design is more suitable for wind turbines to run at very high wind speeds which can help the turbine braking system to stop the turbine at the new "cut-out" wind speed. Reference power, rotational speed and pitch angle have been designed...

  7. The strong situation: a potential impediment to studying the psychobiology and pharmacology of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissek, Shmuel; Pine, Daniel S; Grillon, Christian

    2006-06-01

    The strong situation, as formulated by social psychologists, refers to an experimental condition offering unambiguous stimuli predicting or constituting hedonically strong events that uniformly guide response sets across individuals. In relation to fear and anxiety, the strong situation results from the unambiguous threat of an imminent and dangerous stimulus that evokes the adaptive fear response among anxiety patients and healthy controls alike. The current paper describes evidence that weakening the experimental situation through reducing the certainty, temporal proximity, and/or potency of the aversive stimulus may facilitate the emergence of patient-control differences in psychobiological measures of anxious arousal. Additionally, weak situations may be useful for testing the clinical utility of anxiolytic agents, given that pharmacological treatments of anxiety disorders are not intended to reduce the adaptive, normative response likely evoked by strong threat situations.

  8. Remnants of strong tidal interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcglynn, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the properties of stellar systems that have recently undergone a strong tidal shock, i.e., a shock which removes a significant fraction of the particles in the system, and where the shocked system has a much smaller mass than the producer of the tidal field. N-body calculations of King models shocked in a variety of ways are performed, and the consequences of the shocks are investigated. The results confirm the prediction of Jaffe for shocked systems. Several models are also run where the tidal forces on the system are constant, simulating a circular orbit around a primary, and the development of tidal radii under these static conditions appears to be a mild process which does not dramatically affect material that is not stripped. The tidal radii are about twice as large as classical formulas would predict. Remnant density profiles are compared with a sample of elliptical galaxies, and the implications of the results for the development of stellar populations and galaxies are considered. 38 refs

  9. Strong Coupling Corrections in Quantum Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perarnau-Llobet, M.; Wilming, H.; Riera, A.; Gallego, R.; Eisert, J.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum systems strongly coupled to many-body systems equilibrate to the reduced state of a global thermal state, deviating from the local thermal state of the system as it occurs in the weak-coupling limit. Taking this insight as a starting point, we study the thermodynamics of systems strongly coupled to thermal baths. First, we provide strong-coupling corrections to the second law applicable to general systems in three of its different readings: As a statement of maximal extractable work, on heat dissipation, and bound to the Carnot efficiency. These corrections become relevant for small quantum systems and vanish in first order in the interaction strength. We then move to the question of power of heat engines, obtaining a bound on the power enhancement due to strong coupling. Our results are exemplified on the paradigmatic non-Markovian quantum Brownian motion.

  10. Strong industrial base vital for economic revival

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At the inauguration of a 2-day conference on nuclear technology in Islamabad, the chairman of PAEC said that Pakistan needs to develop a strong industrial base and capability to export equipment to improve the economic condition of the country. He descibed how Pakistan has already had a breakthrough with the export of equipment to CERN, Geneva (1 page).

  11. Morphological modelling of strongly curved islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelvink, D.; Den Heijer, C.; Van Thiel De Vries, J.S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Land reclamations and island coasts often involve strongly curved shorelines, which are challenging to be properly modeled by numerical morphological models. Evaluation of the long term development of these types of coasts as well as their response to storm conditions requires proper representation

  12. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for X-linked agammaglobulinemia using reduced intensity conditioning as a model of the reconstitution of humoral immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ikegame

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We herein report the first case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA that underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC. We chronologically observed the reconstitution of humoral immunity in this case. Case presentation The patient was a 28-year-old Japanese male with XLA who previously had life-threatening infectious episodes and was referred for the possible indication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. After a thorough discussion within specialists from different backgrounds, we decided to perform allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation from his HLA-identical elder brother. Due to the non-malignant nature of XLA, we selected RIC consisting of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, anti-thymocyte globulin, and 3 Gy of total body irradiation. Neutrophil engraftment was achieved on day 11 with complete donor chimerism. No major complications, except for stage 1 skin graft-versus-host disease, were observed. The patient was discharged on day 75 and has been followed as an outpatient without any infectious episodes for more than 500 days. Conclusions Regarding immune reconstitution, CD19+ cells, IgA, and IgM, which were undetectable before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT, started to increase in number 10 days after allo-SCT and continued to increase for more than 1 year. Anti-B antibodies appeared as early as day 10. Total IgG levels decreased after the discontinuation of IgG replacement and spontaneously recovered after day 350. However, most anti-viral IgG titers, except EB virus-virus capsid antigen IgG, disappeared after the discontinuation of IgG replacement. A seasonal vaccination to influenza was performed on day 148, with neither anti-influenza type A nor type B being positive after the vaccination. The transient transfer of allergic immunity to orchard grass was observed. Similar Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK expression levels in monocytes and B

  13. Short-Term Total Sleep-Deprivation Impairs Contextual Fear Memory, and Contextual Fear-Conditioning Reduces REM Sleep in Moderately Anxious Swiss Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Munazah F; Jha, Sushil K

    2017-01-01

    The conditioning tasks have been widely used to model fear and anxiety and to study their association with sleep. Many reports suggest that sleep plays a vital role in the consolidation of fear memory. Studies have also demonstrated that fear-conditioning influences sleep differently in mice strains having a low or high anxiety level. It is, therefore, necessary to know, how sleep influences fear-conditioning and how fear-conditioning induces changes in sleep architecture in moderate anxious strains. We have used Swiss mice, a moderate anxious strain, to study the effects of: (i) sleep deprivation on contextual fear conditioned memory, and also (ii) contextual fear conditioning on sleep architecture. Animals were divided into three groups: (a) non-sleep deprived (NSD); (b) stress control (SC); and (c) sleep-deprived (SD) groups. The SD animals were SD for 5 h soon after training. We found that the NSD and SC animals showed 60.57% and 58.12% freezing on the testing day, while SD animals showed significantly less freezing (17.13% only; p sleep. REM sleep, however, significantly decreased in NSD and SC animals on the training and testing days. Interestingly, REM sleep did not decrease in the SD animals on the testing day. Our results suggest that short-term sleep deprivation impairs fear memory in moderate anxious mice. It also suggests that NREM sleep, but not REM sleep, may have an obligatory role in memory consolidation.

  14. Short-Term Total Sleep-Deprivation Impairs Contextual Fear Memory, and Contextual Fear-Conditioning Reduces REM Sleep in Moderately Anxious Swiss Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Munazah F.; Jha, Sushil K.

    2017-01-01

    The conditioning tasks have been widely used to model fear and anxiety and to study their association with sleep. Many reports suggest that sleep plays a vital role in the consolidation of fear memory. Studies have also demonstrated that fear-conditioning influences sleep differently in mice strains having a low or high anxiety level. It is, therefore, necessary to know, how sleep influences fear-conditioning and how fear-conditioning induces changes in sleep architecture in moderate anxious strains. We have used Swiss mice, a moderate anxious strain, to study the effects of: (i) sleep deprivation on contextual fear conditioned memory, and also (ii) contextual fear conditioning on sleep architecture. Animals were divided into three groups: (a) non-sleep deprived (NSD); (b) stress control (SC); and (c) sleep-deprived (SD) groups. The SD animals were SD for 5 h soon after training. We found that the NSD and SC animals showed 60.57% and 58.12% freezing on the testing day, while SD animals showed significantly less freezing (17.13% only; p sleep. REM sleep, however, significantly decreased in NSD and SC animals on the training and testing days. Interestingly, REM sleep did not decrease in the SD animals on the testing day. Our results suggest that short-term sleep deprivation impairs fear memory in moderate anxious mice. It also suggests that NREM sleep, but not REM sleep, may have an obligatory role in memory consolidation. PMID:29238297

  15. Quantum electrodynamics of strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields provides a broad survey of the theoretical and experimental work accomplished, presenting papers by a group of international researchers who have made significant contributions to this developing area. Exploring the quantum theory of strong fields, the volume focuses on the phase transition to a charged vacuum in strong electric fields. The contributors also discuss such related topics as QED at short distances, precision tests of QED, nonperturbative QCD and confinement, pion condensation, and strong gravitational fields In addition, the volume features a historical paper on the roots of quantum field theory in the history of quantum physics by noted researcher Friedrich Hund

  16. Short-Term Total Sleep-Deprivation Impairs Contextual Fear Memory, and Contextual Fear-Conditioning Reduces REM Sleep in Moderately Anxious Swiss Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munazah F. Qureshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The conditioning tasks have been widely used to model fear and anxiety and to study their association with sleep. Many reports suggest that sleep plays a vital role in the consolidation of fear memory. Studies have also demonstrated that fear-conditioning influences sleep differently in mice strains having a low or high anxiety level. It is, therefore, necessary to know, how sleep influences fear-conditioning and how fear-conditioning induces changes in sleep architecture in moderate anxious strains. We have used Swiss mice, a moderate anxious strain, to study the effects of: (i sleep deprivation on contextual fear conditioned memory, and also (ii contextual fear conditioning on sleep architecture. Animals were divided into three groups: (a non-sleep deprived (NSD; (b stress control (SC; and (c sleep-deprived (SD groups. The SD animals were SD for 5 h soon after training. We found that the NSD and SC animals showed 60.57% and 58.12% freezing on the testing day, while SD animals showed significantly less freezing (17.13% only; p < 0.001 on the testing day. Further, we observed that contextual fear-conditioning did not alter the total amount of wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. REM sleep, however, significantly decreased in NSD and SC animals on the training and testing days. Interestingly, REM sleep did not decrease in the SD animals on the testing day. Our results suggest that short-term sleep deprivation impairs fear memory in moderate anxious mice. It also suggests that NREM sleep, but not REM sleep, may have an obligatory role in memory consolidation.

  17. Promoting Strong Written Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reason that an improvement in the quality of technical writing is still needed in the classroom is due to the fact that universities are facing challenging problems not only on the technological front but also on the socio-economic front. The universities are actively responding to the changes that are taking place in the global consumer marketplace. Obviously, there are numerous benefits of promoting strong written communication skills. They can be summarized into the following six categories. First, and perhaps the most important: The University achieves learner satisfaction. The learner has documented verbally, that the necessary knowledge has been successfully acquired. This results in learner loyalty that in turn will attract more qualified learners.Second, quality communication lowers the cost per pupil, consequently resulting in increased productivity backed by a stronger economic structure and forecast. Third, quality communications help to improve the cash flow and cash reserves of the university. Fourth, having high quality communication enables the university to justify the need for high costs of tuition and fees. Fifth, better quality in written communication skills result in attracting top-quality learners. This will lead to happier and satisfied learners, not to mention greater prosperity for the university as a whole. Sixth, quality written communication skills result in reduced complaints, thus meaning fewer hours spent on answering or correcting the situation. The University faculty and staff are thus able to devote more time on scholarly activities, meaningful research and productive community service. References Boyer, Ernest L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate.Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Hawkins, P., & Winter, J. (1997). Mastering change: Learning the lessons of the enterprise.London: Department for Education and Employment. Buzzel, Robert D., and Bradley T. Gale. (1987

  18. Strong WW Interaction at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, Jose R

    1998-12-14

    We present a brief pedagogical introduction to the Effective Electroweak Chiral Lagrangians, which provide a model independent description of the WW interactions in the strong regime. When it is complemented with some unitarization or a dispersive approach, this formalism allows the study of the general strong scenario expected at the LHC, including resonances.

  19. The emergence of the activity reduces conflict related strain (ARCAS) model: A test of a conditional mediation model of workplace conflict and employee strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, M.T.M.; Beersma, B.; Cornelissen, R. A. W. M.

    2012-01-01

    To test and extend the emerging Activity Reduces Conflict-Associated Strain (ARCAS) model, we predicted that the relationship between task conflict and employee strain would be weakened to the extent that people experience high organization-based self-esteem (OBSE). A survey among Dutch employees

  20. The emergence of the Activity Reduces Conflict Associated Strain (ARCAS) model: a test of a conditional mediation model of workplace conflict and employee strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, M.T.M.; Beersma, B.; Cornelissen, R.A.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    To test and extend the emerging Activity Reduces Conflict-Associated Strain (ARCAS) model, we predicted that the relationship between task conflict and employee strain would be weakened to the extent that people experience high organization-based self-esteem (OBSE). A survey among Dutch employees

  1. Attraction and mortality of Bactrocera dorsalis to STATIC Spinosad ME weathered under operational conditions in California and Florida: A reduced-risk male annihilation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted in 2013 in Hawaii, USA, to quantify attraction, feeding, and mortality of male oriental fruit flies, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), to a reduced risk male annihilation treatment(MAT)formulation consisting of an amorphous polymer matrix in combination with...

  2. Gluon scattering amplitudes at strong coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alday, Luis F. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Maldacena, Juan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2007-06-15

    We describe how to compute planar gluon scattering amplitudes at strong coupling in N = 4 super Yang Mills by using the gauge/string duality. The computation boils down to finding a certain classical string configuration whose boundary conditions are determined by the gluon momenta. The results are infrared divergent. We introduce the gravity version of dimensional regularization to define finite quantities. The leading and subleading IR divergencies are characterized by two functions of the coupling that we compute at strong coupling. We compute also the full finite form for the four point amplitude and we find agreement with a recent ansatz by Bern, Dixon and Smirnov.

  3. Strong-back safety latch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch

  4. Strong-back safety latch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-03-06

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch.

  5. Emerging Signs of Strong Reciprocity in Human Ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Erin; Rochat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Strong reciprocity is considered here as the propensity to sacrifice resources to be kind or to punish in response to prior acts, a behavior not simply reducible to self-interest and a likely force behind human cooperation and sociality. The aim was to capture emerging signs of strong reciprocity in human ontogeny and across highly contrasted cultures. Three- and 5-year-old middle class American children (N = 162) were tested in a simple, multiple round, three-way sharing game involving the child, a generous puppet, and a stingy puppet. At the end of the game, the child was offered an opportunity to sacrifice some of her personal gains to punish one of the puppets. By 3 years, American children demonstrate a willingness to engage in costly punishment. However, only 5-year-olds show some evidence of strong reciprocity by orienting their punishment systematically toward the stingy puppet. Further analyses and three additional control conditions demonstrate that such propensity is not simply reducible to (a) straight imitation, or (b) inequity aversion. To assess the relative universality of such development, a group of 5- to 6-year-old children from rural Samoa (N = 14) were tested and compared to age and gender-matched American children. Samoan children did not manifest the same propensity toward strong reciprocity. The results are interpreted as pointing to (1) the developmental emergence of an ethical stance between 3 and 5 years of age, and (2) that the expression of such stance by young children could depend on culture. PMID:22194730

  6. SOD isoforms play no role in lifespan in ad lib or dietary restricted conditions, but mutational inactivation of SOD-1 reduces life extension by cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Kelvin; Patel, Harshil B; Lublin, Alex L; Mobbs, Charles V

    2009-03-01

    The free radical theory of aging is one of the most prominent theories of aging and senescence, but has yet to be definitively proven. If free radicals are the cause of senescence, then the cellular anti-oxidant system should play a large role in lifespan determination. Because superoxide dismutase (SOD) plays a central role in detoxifying superoxide radicals, we have examined the effects of mutational inactivation of each isoform of sod on normal lifespan and lifespan extension by dietary restriction (DR) or cold-/hypothermic-induced longevity (CHIL). We find no significant decrease in lifespan for control worms or worms undergoing DR when sod isoforms are knocked-out even though sod mutational inactivation produces hypersensitivity to paraquat. In contrast, sod-1 inactivation significantly reduces lifespan extension by CHIL, suggesting that CHIL requires a specific genetic program beyond simple reduction in metabolic rate. Furthermore, CHIL paradoxically increases lifespan while reducing resistance to oxidative stress, further disassociating oxidative stress resistance and lifespan.

  7. Trace-element deposition in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela Shelf, under sulfate-reducing conditions: a history of the local hydrography and global climate, 20 ka to the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, David Z.; Dean, Walter E.

    2002-01-01

    the last 20 kyr. The accumulation rate of the marine fraction of Mo increased abruptly at about 14.8 ka (calendar years), from less than 0.5 µg cm-2 yr-1 to greater than 4 µg cm-2 yr-1. Its accumulation rate remained high but variable until 8.6 ka, when it decreased sharply to 1 µg cm-2 yr-1. It continued to decrease to 4.0 ka, to its lowest value for the past 15 kyr, before gradually increasing to the present. Between 14.8 ka and 8.6 ka, its accumulation rate exhibited strong maxima at 14.4, 13.0, and 9.9 ka. The oldest maximum corresponds to melt-water pulse IA into the Gulf of Mexico. A relative minimum, centered at about 11.1 ka, corresponds to melt-water pulse IB; a strong maximum occurs in the immediately overlying sediment. The maximum at 13.0 ka corresponds to onset of the Younger Dryas cold event. This pattern to the accumulation rate of Mo (and V) can be interpreted in terms of its deposition from bottom water of the basin, the hydrogenous fraction, under SO42- -reducing conditions, during times of intense bottom-water advection 14.8 ka to 11.1 ka and significantly less intense bottom-water advection 11 ka to the present. The accumulation rate of Cd shows a pattern that is only slightly different from that of Mo, although its deposition was determined largely by the rain rate of organic matter into the bottom water, a biogenic fraction whose deposition was driven by upwelling of nutrient-enriched water into the photic zone. Its accumulation exhibits only moderately high rates, on average, during both melt-water pulses. Its highest rate, and that of upwelling, occurred during the Younger Dryas, and again following melt-water pulse IB. The marine fractions of Cu, Ni, and Zn also have a strong biogenic signal. The siliciclastic terrigenous debris, however, represents the dominant source, and host, of Cu, Ni, and Zn. All four trace elements have a consid-erably weaker hydrogenous signal than biogenic signal. Accumulation rates of the terrigenous fraction, as

  8. Optimization of heat and relative humidity conditions to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination and maximize the germination of radish seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, M K; Kim, H W; Rhee, M S

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that a combination of heat and relative humidity (RH) had a marked bactericidal effect on Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds. Here, response surface methodology with a Box-Behnken design was used to build a model to predict reductions in E. coli O157:H7 populations based on three independent variables: heating temperature (55 °C, 60 °C, or 65 °C), RH (40%, 60%, and 80%), and holding time (8, 15, or 22 h). Optimum treatment conditions were selected using a desirability function. The predictive model for microbial reduction had a high regression coefficient (R(2) = 0.97), and the accuracy of the model was verified using validation data (R(2) = 0.95). Among the three variables examined, heating temperature (P < 0.0001) and RH (P = 0.004) were the most significant in terms of bacterial reduction and seed germination, respectively. The optimum conditions for microbial reduction (6.6 log reduction) determined by ridge analysis were as follows: 64.5 °C and 63.2% RH for 17.7 h. However, when both microbial reduction and germination rate were taken into consideration, the desirability function yielded optimal conditions of 65 °C and 40% RH for 8 h (6.6 log reduction in the bacterial population; 94.4% of seeds germinated). This study provides comprehensive data that improve our understanding of the effects of heating temperature, RH, and holding time on the E. coli O157:H7 population on radish seeds. Radish seeds can be exposed to these conditions before sprouting, which greatly increases the microbiological safety of the products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  10. Chitin-supplemented foliar application of chitinolytic Bacillus cereus reduces severity of Botrytis gray mold disease in chickpea under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, G K; Pande, S

    2007-01-01

    To identify and evaluate chitinolytic bacteria for control of Botrytis gray mold (BGM), a devastating disease in chickpea. Two antifungal bacterial isolates, chitinolytic Bacillus cereus CRS 7 and nonchitinolytic Pseudomonas fluorescens CRS 31, from the rhizosphere of chickpea, were applied as a prophylactic foliar spray and evaluated for control of BGM. In a controlled environment, the two isolates reduced the severity of BGM on the susceptible cv. JG 62 to 6.0 and 5.6, respectively, compared with 9.0 in the control, measured on a 1-9 rating scale. Supplementation of the foliar application of CRS 7 with 0.5% and 1.0% colloidal chitin reduced BGM severity to 4.4 and 4.1 respectively, while chitin-supplemented application of CRS 31 was similar to CRS 31 applied alone. Partially purified 47-kDa chitinase from the cell-free culture filtrate of CRS 7 at 20 and 40 mug protein ml(-1) (enzyme activity 3.1 units ml(-1)) inhibited the germination and lysed the conidia of Botrytis cinerea, and as a prophylactic foliar spray reduced BGM severity to 5.4 and 4.8, respectively. Chitin supplementation improved the biocontrol of the foliar disease BGM by chitinolytic bacterium. Disease control with partially purified chitinase of CRS 7 supported the major role of chitinolysis in improved control of BGM. Enhanced control of BGM by chitin-supplemented application of CRS 7 is of significant in view of the frequent inconsistency in biocontrol of foliar diseases. This study supports further attempts on chitinolysis-based biocontrol methods for foliar disease biocontrol.

  11. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments

  12. Waves in strong centrifugal fields: dissipationless gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Linear waves are investigated in a rotating gas under the condition of strong centrifugal acceleration of the order 106 g realized in gas centrifuges for separation of uranium isotopes. Sound waves split into three families of the waves under these conditions. Dispersion equations are obtained. The characteristics of the waves strongly differ from the conventional sound waves on polarization, velocity of propagation and distribution of energy of the waves in space for two families having frequencies above and below the frequency of the conventional sound waves. The energy of these waves is localized in rarefied region of the gas. The waves of the third family were not specified before. They propagate exactly along the rotational axis with the conventional sound velocity. These waves are polarized only along the rotational axis. Radial and azimuthal motions are not excited. Energy of the waves is concentrated near the wall of the rotor where the density of the gas is largest.

  13. The selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist, SR 21502, reduces cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and heroin conditioned place preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaj, Ewa; Manuszak, Monica; Babic, Sandra; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Ranaldi, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Because the role of dopamine (DA) D3 receptors has been investigated primarily in relation to cocaine-related behaviors little is known of the role of these receptors in heroin seeking. To investigate the effect of the selective DA D3 receptor antagonist, SR 21502, on cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and heroin conditioned place preference (CPP). In experiment 1, rats were trained to self-administer intravenous heroin for 15 days followed by extinction. Following extinction animals were treated with one of several SR 21502 doses (0, 7.5, 10 or 15mg/kg) and a cue-induced reinstatement test was conducted. In experiment 2, animals were conditioned to experience heroin in one compartment of a CPP apparatus and saline in the other. On the test day animals were treated with 0, 3.75, 7.5, 10 or 15mg/kg of SR 21502 and tested for their CPP. The results from experiment 1 showed a significant dose-related reduction in cue-induced reinstatement of active lever pressing in the 7.5 and 10mg groups and an absence of the reinstatement effect in the 15mg group. In experiment 2, animals treated with vehicle or 3.75mg of SR 21502 showed significant heroin place preferences but those treated with the higher doses showed no CPP. Our findings suggest that DA D3 receptors play a significant role in heroin approach behaviors driven by conditioned stimuli. As such, we propose that SR 21502 holds potential as an effective pharmacotherapeutic agent for relapse prevention and should be studied further. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic properties of strongly asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, M.; Wojcik, W.

    1988-01-01

    We investigate stability of neutron matter containing a small proton admixture with respect to spin fluctuations. We establish conditions under which strongly asymmetric nuclear matter could acquire a permanent magnetization. It is shown that if the protons are localized, the system becomes unstable to spin fluctuations for arbitrarily weak proton-neutron spin interactions. For non-localized protons there exists a threshold value of the spin interaction above which the system can develop a spontaneous polarization. 12 refs., 2 figs. (author)

  15. Performance of new generation TWC catalytic systems working under different conditions in order to reduce the emission of a global warming gas: N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac-Beath, I.; Castillo, S.; Camposeco, R.; Moran-Pineda, M. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Programa de Ingenieria Molecular

    2010-07-01

    In this work, three-way catalytic systems (TWC-K, TWC-M and TWC-P) were prepared and tested experimentally in order to analyze N{sub 2}O emissions. Various types and quantities of precious metals (Pt-Pd-Rh), and different mixed oxides (CexBayLazMgwO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to prepare the supports were used. The catalytic tests were carried out by using common exhaust gases from a gasoline engine under different oxidizing conditions. The TWC catalytic compositions were based on catalytic converters used in retrofitting programs in the Metropolitan Area in Mexico City. Fresh and aged TWC catalytic samples were tested; in both conditions, the catalytic compositions were characterized by BET, TEM-EDS and XRD in order to analyze the efficiency of the catalytic behavior. Due to the fact that the 4{sup th} TWC generation (Pd-Only TWC) has Pd as main active metal, the tested TWC catalytic samples were synthesized by having Pd in a higher proportion with regard to Pt and Rh used as complements with some differences in support composition. (orig.)

  16. Nuclides migration tests under deep geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T.T.

    1991-01-01

    Migration behaviour of technetium and iodine under deep geological conditions was investigated by performing column tests under in-situ conditions at the 240 m level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) constructed in a granitic batholith near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. 131 I was injected with tritiated water into the column. Tritium and 131 I were eluted simultaneously. Almost 100 % of injected 131 I was recovered in the tritium breakthrough region, indicating that iodine moved through the column almost without retardation under experimental conditions. On the other hand, the injected technetium with tritium was strongly retarded in the column even though the groundwater was mildly reducing. Only about 7 % of injected 95m Tc was recovered in the tritium breakthrough region and the remaining fraction was strongly sorbed on the dark mafic minerals of column materials. This strong sorption of technetium on the column materials had not been expected from the results obtained from batch experiments carried out under anaerobic conditions. (author)

  17. Load-bearing capacity of various CAD/CAM monolithic molar crowns under recommended occlusal thickness and reduced occlusal thickness conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sulki; Yoon, Hyung-In; Park, Eun-Jin

    2017-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistances of various monolithic crowns fabricated by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) with different thickness. Test dies were fabricated as mandibular molar forms with occlusal reductions using CAD/CAM. With different occlusal thickness (1.0 or 1.5 mm), a polymer-infiltrated ceramic network (Enamic, EN), and zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (Suprinity, SU and Celtra-Duo, CD) were used to fabricate molar crowns. Lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, EM) crowns (occlusal: 1.5 mm) were fabricated as control. Seventy crowns (n=10 per group) were bonded to abutments and stored in water for 24 hours. A universal testing machine was used to apply load to crown until fracture. The fractured specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscopy. The type of ceramics and the occlusal thickness showed a significant interaction. With a recommended thickness (1.5 mm), the SU revealed the mean load similar to the EM, higher compared with those of the EN and CD. The fracture loads in a reduced thickness (1.0 mm) were similar among the SU, CD, and EN. The mean fracture load of the SU and CD enhanced significantly when the occlusal thickness increased, whereas that of the EN did not. The fracture loads of monolithic crowns were differently influenced by the changes in occlusal thickness, depending on the type of ceramics. Within the limitations of this study, all the tested crowns withstood the physiological masticatory loads both at the recommended and reduced occlusal thickness.

  18. The reduced folate carrier (RFC) is cytotoxic to cells under conditions of severe folate deprivation. RFC as a double edged sword in folate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Ilan; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2008-07-25

    The reduced folate carrier (RFC), a bidirectional anion transporter, is the major uptake route of reduced folates essential for a spectrum of biochemical reactions and thus cellular proliferation. However, here we show that ectopic overexpression of the RFC, but not of folate receptor alpha, a high affinity unidirectional folate uptake route serving here as a negative control, resulted in an approximately 15-fold decline in cellular viability in medium lacking folates but not in folate-containing medium. Moreover to explore possible mechanisms of adaptation to folate deficiency in various cell lines that express the endogenous RFC, we first determined the gene expression status of the following genes: (a) RFC, (b) ATP-driven folate exporters (i.e. MRP1, MRP5, and breast cancer resistance protein), and (c) folylpoly-gamma-glutamate synthetase and gamma-glutamate hydrolase (GGH), enzymes catalyzing folate polyglutamylation and hydrolysis, respectively. Upon 3-7 days of folate deprivation, semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed a specific approximately 2.5-fold decrease in RFC mRNA levels in both breast cancer and T-cell leukemia cell lines that was accompanied by a consistent fall in methotrexate influx, serving here as an RFC transport activity assay. Likewise a 2.4-fold decrease in GGH mRNA levels and approximately 19% decreased GGH activity was documented for folate-deprived breast cancer cells. These results along with those of a novel mathematical biomodeling devised here suggest that upon severe short term (i.e. up to 7 days) folate deprivation RFC transport activity becomes detrimental as RFC, but not ATP-driven folate exporters, efficiently extrudes folate monoglutamates out of cells. Hence down-regulation of RFC and GGH may serve as a novel adaptive response to severe folate deficiency.

  19. The attrition condition: use of a preparatory course to reduce EMT course attrition and improve performance on North Carolina certification exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkiewicz, Ginny K; Hubble, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    A growing concern in emergency medical services (EMS) education is student attrition. Perchance, there is a population of nonmatriculate students lacking prerequisite academic skills or who are otherwise ill prepared for the unique requirements of the EMS profession. Consequently, addressing these issues could promote academic and occupational preparedness, thereby reducing emergency medical technician (EMT) course attrition. To measure the impact of a preparatory course designed to address academic and psychosocial skills affecting EMT course completion. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a 24-hour preparatory course using a before-and-after nonexperimental design. The course included the EMT preparatory curriculum, program orientation, work-force-preparedness skills, and an academic skills assessment. All students who were enrolled in an EMT course at a single study site between July 2008 and December 2011 were included. Chi-square analysis was performed on attrition categories defined by CoAEMSP (Academic, Disciplinary, Attendance, Health, Financial, Personal, Never Attended) and state exam categories (Airway, Medical, Trauma, Operations, Pediatrics, Preparatory, Assessment). A logistic regression model calculated the odds ratio (OR) of course completion as a function of preparatory course completion while controlling for demography. The historical control group consisted of 117 (58.5%) students enrolled prior to implementation of the preparatory course, while the remaining 83 (41.5%) students in the intervention group completed the course. Overall attrition was 115 (57.5%) students, with lower rates observed in the intervention group (32.5 vs. 75.2%, p Academic (4.8 vs. 39.3%, p Attended (1.2 vs. 14.5%, p perform higher on most portions of the state exam; and the proportion of students that enrolled but never attended an EMT course was reduced. Unlike prior studies, we did not observe a paradoxical increase in other attrition categories after

  20. Database for earthquake strong motion studies in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scasserra, G.; Stewart, J.P.; Kayen, R.E.; Lanzo, G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an Italian database of strong ground motion recordings and databanks delineating conditions at the instrument sites and characteristics of the seismic sources. The strong motion database consists of 247 corrected recordings from 89 earthquakes and 101 recording stations. Uncorrected recordings were drawn from public web sites and processed on a record-by-record basis using a procedure utilized in the Next-Generation Attenuation (NGA) project to remove instrument resonances, minimize noise effects through low- and high-pass filtering, and baseline correction. The number of available uncorrected recordings was reduced by 52% (mostly because of s-triggers) to arrive at the 247 recordings in the database. The site databank includes for every recording site the surface geology, a measurement or estimate of average shear wave velocity in the upper 30 m (Vs30), and information on instrument housing. Of the 89 sites, 39 have on-site velocity measurements (17 of which were performed as part of this study using SASW techniques). For remaining sites, we estimate Vs30 based on measurements on similar geologic conditions where available. Where no local velocity measurements are available, correlations with surface geology are used. Source parameters are drawn from databanks maintained (and recently updated) by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and include hypocenter location and magnitude for small events (M< ??? 5.5) and finite source parameters for larger events. ?? 2009 A.S. Elnashai & N.N. Ambraseys.

  1. Fe(II)/Cu(II) interaction on goethite stimulated by an iron-reducing bacteria Aeromonas Hydrophila HS01 under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Liang; Zhu, Zhen-Ke; Li, Fang-Bai; Wang, Shan-Li

    2017-11-01

    Copper is a trace element essential for living creatures, but copper content in soil should be controlled, as it is toxic. The physical-chemical-biological features of Cu in soil have a significant correlation with the Fe(II)/Cu(II) interaction in soil. Of significant interest to the current study is the effect of Fe(II)/Cu(II) interaction conducted on goethite under anaerobic conditions stimulated by HS01 (a dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) microbial). The following four treatments were designed: HS01 with α-FeOOH and Cu(II) (T1), HS01 with α-FeOOH (T2), HS01 with Cu(II) (T3), and α-FeOOH with Cu(II) (T4). HS01 presents a negligible impact on copper species transformation (T3), whereas the presence of α-FeOOH significantly enhanced copper aging contributing to the DIR effect (T1). Moreover, the violent reaction between adsorbed Fe(II) and Cu(II) leads to the decreased concentration of the active Fe(II) species (T1), further inhibiting reactions between Fe(II) and iron (hydr)oxides and decelerating the phase transformation of iron (hydr)oxides (T1). From this study, the effects of the Fe(II)/Cu(II) interaction on goethite under anaerobic conditions by HS01 are presented in three aspects: (1) the accelerating effect of copper aging, (2) the reductive transformation of copper, and (3) the inhibition effect of the phase transformation of iron (hydr)oxides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduced-intensity conditioning regimen using low-dose total body irradiation before allogeneic transplant for hematologic malignancies: Experience from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Labopin, Myriam; Hennequin, Christophe; Hoffstetter, Sylvette; Mungai, Raffaello; Wygoda, Marc; Lundell, Marie; Finke, Jurgen; Aktinson, Chris; Lorchel, Frederic; Durdux, Catherine; Basara, Nadezda

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The high rate of toxicity is the limitation of myelobalative regimens before allogeneic transplantation. A reduced intensity regimen can allow engraftment of stem cells and subsequent transfer of immune cells for the induction of a graft-vs.-tumor reaction. Methods and Materials: The data from 130 patients (80 males and 50 females) treated between 1998 and 2003 for various hematologic malignancies were analyzed. The median patient age was 50 years (range, 3-72 years). Allogeneic transplantation using peripheral blood or bone marrow, or both, was performed in 104 (82%), 22 (17%), and 4 (3%) patients, respectively, from HLA identical sibling donors (n = 93, 72%), matched unrelated donors (n = 23, 18%), mismatched related donors (4%), or mismatched unrelated donors (6%). Total body irradiation (TBI) at a dose of 2 Gy delivered in one fraction was given to 101 patients (78%), and a total dose of 4-6 Gy was given in 29 (22%) patients. The median dose rate was 14.3 cGy/min (range, 6-16.4). Results: After a median follow-up period of 20 months (range, 1-62 months), engraftment was obtained in 122 patients (94%). Acute graft-vs.-host disease of Grade 2 or worse was observed in 37% of patients. Multivariate analysis showed three favorable independent factors for event-free survival: HLA identical sibling donor (p < 0.0001; relative risk [RR], 0.15), complete remission (p < 0.0001; RR, 3.08), and female donor to male patient (p = 0.006; RR 2.43). For relapse, the two favorable prognostic factors were complete remission (p < 0.0001, RR 0.11) and HLA identical sibling donor (p = 0.0007; RR 3.59). Conclusions: In this multicenter study, we confirmed high rates of engraftment and chimerism after the reduced intensity regimen. Our results are comparable to those previously reported. Radiation parameters seem to have no impact on outcome. However, the lack of a statistically significant difference in terms of dose rate may have been due, in part, to the small population

  3. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  4. Strong coupling phase in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Ken-ichi

    1988-01-01

    Existence of a strong coupling phase in QED has been suggested in solutions of the Schwinger-Dyson equation and in Monte Carlo simulation of lattice QED. In this article we recapitulate the previous arguments, and formulate the problem in the modern framework of the renormalization theory, Wilsonian renormalization. This scheme of renormalization gives the best understanding of the basic structure of a field theory especially when it has a multi-phase structure. We resolve some misleading arguments in the previous literature. Then we set up a strategy to attack the strong phase, if any. We describe a trial; a coupled Schwinger-Dyson equation. Possible picture of the strong coupling phase QED is presented. (author)

  5. Construction test modules to reduce the air conditioning consumption; Modulos de prueba de edificaciones para reducir el consumo de aire acondicionado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acoltzi, Higinio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, (Mexico); Alvarez, Gabriela [CENIDET (Mexico)

    2002-09-01

    In this work a mathematical model of the energy behavior of test modules to scale and its experimental verification is presented. The model determines the electrical energy consumption history, necessary to maintain the comfort conditions in the interior of the modules, with respect to the variation of the materials of the ceilings and windows, to establish the application criteria of these materials in the construction industry. Also are presented the measured results of energy consumption accumulated for the modules with ceilings, of monolithic slab as well as of joist and small arches, with wooden window frames and reflectasol filtrasol and clear glasses. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta un modelo matematico del comportamiento energetico de modulos de prueba a escala y su verificacion experimental. El modelo determina la historia del consumo de energia electrica, necesario para mantener las condiciones de confort al interior de los modulos, con respecto a la variacion de los materiales de los techos y ventanas, para establecer criterios de aplicacion de dichos materiales en la industria de la construccion. Tambien se presenta los resultados medidos del consumo de energia acumulada para los modulos con techos, tanto de losa monolitica como de vigueta y bovedilla, con ventanas de marco de madera y vidrios reflectasol, filtrasol y claro.

  6. Progressive tool flank wear and surface roughness when turning AISI 1017 mild steel using reduced thickness inserts in finishing cutting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Saiful Anwar Che; Zakaria, Mohd Hafizu; Harun, Wan Sharuzi Wan; Ghazalli, Zakri

    2017-12-01

    Tool wear is a major aspect in metal cutting, especially during steel machining. This studies the capability of 1 mm thick uncoated tungsten carbide insert during the turning of AISI 1017 mild steel. The reduction of insert thickness will lead to a more economical and efficient use of material and energy during fabrication, operation, and disposal of the cutting insert. Axial machining trials have been performed using the finishing cutting conditions. Tool flank wear and workpiece surface roughness were analysed using an optical microscope and contact perthometer device, respectively. The data of flank wear and surface roughness achieved were used to analyse the capability of replacing 4 mm thick cutting inserts with 1 mm thick cutting inserts. The results showed that the flank wear and the surface roughness of conventional inserts performed better as compared to the 1 mm thick insert with a significant difference of 5.74 % and 1.57 %. Thus, the experimental study shows that the 1 mm thick insert performed as good as a conventional cutting insert in terms of tool life and surface roughness quality.

  7. Referral for psychological therapy of people with long term conditions improves adherence to antidepressants and reduces emergency department attendance: Controlled before and after study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Chan, Tom; Tejerina Arreal, Maria C.; Parry, Glenys; Dent-Brown, Kim; Kendrick, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Background Referral to psychological therapies is recommended for people with common mental health problems (CMHP) however its impact on healthcare utilisation in people with long term conditions (LTCs) is not known. Method Routinely collected primary care, psychological therapy clinic and hospital data were extracted for the registered population of 20 practices (N = 121199). These data were linked using the SAPREL (Secure and Private Record Linkage) method. We linked the 1118 people referred to psychological therapies with 6711 controls, matched for age, gender and practice. We compared utilisation of healthcare resources by people with LTCs, 6 months before and after referral, and conducted a controlled before and after study to compare health utilisation with controls. We made the assumption that collection of a greater number of repeat prescriptions for antidepressants was associated with greater adherence. Results Overall 21.8% of people with an LTC had CMHP vs. 18.8% without (p test p < 0.001). Cases with LTCs showed referral to the psychological therapies clinic was associated with increased antidepressant medication prescribing (mean differences 0.62, p < 0.001) and less use of emergency department than controls (mean difference −0.21, p = 0.003). Conclusions Referral to improved access to psychological therapies (IAPT) services appears of value to people with LTC. It is associated with the issue of a greater number of prescriptions for anti-depressant medicines and less use of emergency services. Further studies are needed to explore bed occupancy and outpatient attendance. PMID:23639304

  8. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules ...

  9. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-08-02

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

  10. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders

  11. Strong motion duration and earthquake magnitude relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, M.W.; Short, S.A.; Kennedy, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    Earthquake duration is the total time of ground shaking from the arrival of seismic waves until the return to ambient conditions. Much of this time is at relatively low shaking levels which have little effect on seismic structural response and on earthquake damage potential. As a result, a parameter termed ''strong motion duration'' has been defined by a number of investigators to be used for the purpose of evaluating seismic response and assessing the potential for structural damage due to earthquakes. This report presents methods for determining strong motion duration and a time history envelope function appropriate for various evaluation purposes, for earthquake magnitude and distance, and for site soil properties. There are numerous definitions of strong motion duration. For most of these definitions, empirical studies have been completed which relate duration to earthquake magnitude and distance and to site soil properties. Each of these definitions recognizes that only the portion of an earthquake record which has sufficiently high acceleration amplitude, energy content, or some other parameters significantly affects seismic response. Studies have been performed which indicate that the portion of an earthquake record in which the power (average rate of energy input) is maximum correlates most closely with potential damage to stiff nuclear power plant structures. Hence, this report will concentrate on energy based strong motion duration definitions

  12. Strong motion duration and earthquake magnitude relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, M.W.; Short, S.A. [EQE International, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Kennedy, R.P. [RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting, Yorba Linda, CA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Earthquake duration is the total time of ground shaking from the arrival of seismic waves until the return to ambient conditions. Much of this time is at relatively low shaking levels which have little effect on seismic structural response and on earthquake damage potential. As a result, a parameter termed ``strong motion duration`` has been defined by a number of investigators to be used for the purpose of evaluating seismic response and assessing the potential for structural damage due to earthquakes. This report presents methods for determining strong motion duration and a time history envelope function appropriate for various evaluation purposes, for earthquake magnitude and distance, and for site soil properties. There are numerous definitions of strong motion duration. For most of these definitions, empirical studies have been completed which relate duration to earthquake magnitude and distance and to site soil properties. Each of these definitions recognizes that only the portion of an earthquake record which has sufficiently high acceleration amplitude, energy content, or some other parameters significantly affects seismic response. Studies have been performed which indicate that the portion of an earthquake record in which the power (average rate of energy input) is maximum correlates most closely with potential damage to stiff nuclear power plant structures. Hence, this report will concentrate on energy based strong motion duration definitions.

  13. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  14. Quantum Transport in Strongly Correlated Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Dan

    2007-01-01

    the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We present two DMRG setups for calculating the linear conductance of strongly correlated nanostructures in the infinitesimal source-drain voltage regime. The first setup describes the leads by modified real-space tight-binding chains, whereas the second...... screening plays a much less significant role than in bulk systems due to the reduced size of the objects, therefore making it necessary to consider the importance of correlations between electrons. The work presented in this thesis deals with quantum transport through strongly correlated systems using....... Thus both coherence and correlation effects are important in this model, and the methods applied should be able to handle both these effects rigorously. We present the DMRG setup for this model and benchmark against existing Greens function results for the model. Then we present initial DMRG results...

  15. Strong sum distance in fuzzy graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Mini; Sunitha, Muraleedharan Shetty

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the idea of strong sum distance which is a metric, in a fuzzy graph is introduced. Based on this metric the concepts of eccentricity, radius, diameter, center and self centered fuzzy graphs are studied. Some properties of eccentric nodes, peripheral nodes and central nodes are obtained. A characterisation of self centered complete fuzzy graph is obtained and conditions under which a fuzzy cycle is self centered are established. We have proved that based on this metric, an eccentric node of a fuzzy tree G is a fuzzy end node of G and a node is an eccentric node of a fuzzy tree if and only if it is a peripheral node of G and the center of a fuzzy tree consists of either one or two neighboring nodes. The concepts of boundary nodes and interior nodes in a fuzzy graph based on strong sum distance are introduced. Some properties of boundary nodes, interior nodes and complete nodes are studied.

  16. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  17. Strongly Correlated Systems Theoretical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Avella, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern theoretical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciates consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as po...

  18. Strongly correlated systems numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern numerical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and material science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciate consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as possi...

  19. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  20. Flavour Democracy in Strong Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Abel, Steven; King, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of "strong unification". Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  1. Dynamic Heat Transfer Model of Refrigerated Foodstuff<strong> strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Junping; Risum, Jørgen; Thybo, Claus

    2006-01-01

    condition. The influence of different factors such as air velocity, type of food, size of food, or food package are investigated, the question such as what kind of food are more sensitive to the surrounding temperature change is answered. This model can serve as a prerequisite for modelling of food quality...

  2. Atoms in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Huillier, A.

    2002-01-01

    When a high-power laser focuses into a gas of atoms, the electromagnetic field becomes of the same magnitude as the Coulomb field which binds a 1s electron in a hydrogen atom. 3 highly non-linear phenomena can happen: 1) ATI (above threshold ionization): electrons initially in the ground state absorb a large number of photons, many more than the minimum number required for ionization; 2) multiple ionization: many electrons can be emitted one at a time, in a sequential process, or simultaneously in a mechanism called direct or non-sequential; and 3) high order harmonic generation (HHG): efficient photon emission in the extreme ultraviolet range, in the form of high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser field can occur. The theoretical problem consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) that describes the interaction of a many-electron atom with a laser field. A number of methods have been proposed to solve this problem in the case of a hydrogen atom or a single-active electron atom in a strong laser field. A large effort is presently being devoted to go beyond the single-active approximation. The understanding of the physics of the interaction between atoms and strong laser fields has been provided by a very simple model called ''simple man's theory''. A unified view of HHG, ATI, and non-sequential ionization, originating from the simple man's model and the strong field approximation, expressed in terms of electrons trajectories or quantum paths is slowly emerging. (A.C.)

  3. Reducing a solar-assisted air-conditioning system’s energy consumption by applying real-time occupancy sensors and chilled water storage tanks throughout the summer: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiek, S.; Batlles, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We present an innovative occupancy and chilled water storage-based operation mode. • This mode was implemented to the solar-assisted air-conditioning system. • It permits to save 42% of total electrical energy during one cooling period. • It allows storing the excess cooling capacity of the absorption chiller. • It prevents the sudden start/stop (on/off cycles) of the absorption chiller. - Abstract: This study describes an innovative occupancy and chilled-water storage-based operation sequence implemented in a solar-assisted air-conditioning system. The core purpose of this solar-assisted air-conditioning system is to handle the cooling and heating load of the Solar Energy Research Centre (CIESOL), thus minimising its environmental impact. In this study, the cooling mode was investigated with special attention focused on the chilled-water storage circuit. The critical concern is that the solar-assisted air-conditioning system should always operate considering the actual load conditions, not using an abstract maximum load that is predetermined during the system’s design process, which can lead to energy waste during periods of low occupancy. Thus, the fundamental problem is to identify the optimum operation sequence for the solar-assisted air-conditioning system that provides the best energy performance. The significance of this work lies in the demonstration of a new operation strategy that utilises real-time occupancy monitoring and chilled-water storage tanks to improve the efficiency of solar-assisted air-conditioning systems, thereby reducing their electricity consumption. Adopting this strategy resulted in a large energy-saving potential. The results demonstrate that during one cooling period, it is possible to conserve approximately 42% of the total electrical energy consumed by the system prior to the adoption of this operation strategy

  4. Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bruggisser, Francesco Riva, Alfredo Urbano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM can appear weakly coupled at small energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  5. Strongly interacting light dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Riva, Francesco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small-energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini) are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  6. Rydberg atoms in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Tsimmerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical achievements in studying Rydberg atoms in external fields are considered. Only static (or quasistatic) fields and ''one-electron'' atoms, i.e. atoms that are well described by one-electron states, are discussed. Mainly behaviour of alkali metal atoms in electric field is considered. The state of theoretical investigations for hydrogen atom in magnetic field is described, but experimental data for atoms of alkali metals are presented as an illustration. Results of the latest experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of Rydberg atoms in strong fields are presented

  7. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  8. Strong Plate, Weak Slab Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R. I.; Stegman, D. R.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Models of mantle convection on Earth produce styles of convection that are not observed on Earth.Moreover non-Earth-like modes, such as two-sided downwellings, are the de facto mode of convection in such models.To recreate Earth style subduction, i.e. one-sided asymmetric recycling of the lithosphere, proper treatment of the plates and plate interface are required. Previous work has identified several model features that promote subduction. A free surface or pseudo-free surface and a layer of material with a relatively low strength material (weak crust) allow downgoing plates to bend and slide past overriding without creating undue stress at the plate interface. (Crameri, et al. 2012, GRL)A low viscosity mantle wedge, possibly a result of slab dehydration, decouples the plates in the system. (Gerya et al. 2007, Geo)Plates must be composed of material which, in the case of the overriding plate, are is strong enough to resist bending stresses imposed by the subducting plate and yet, as in the case of the subducting plate, be weak enough to bend and subduct when pulled by the already subducted slab. (Petersen et al. 2015, PEPI) Though strong surface plates are required for subduction such plates may present a problem when they encounter the lower mantle.As the subducting slab approaches the higher viscosity, lower mantle stresses are imposed on the tip.Strong slabs transmit this stress to the surface.There the stress field at the plate interface is modified and potentially modifies the style of convection. In addition to modifying the stress at the plate interface, the strength of the slab affects the morphology of the slab at the base of the upper mantle. (Stegman, et al 2010, Tectonophysics)Slabs that maintain a sufficient portion of their strength after being bent require high stresses to unbend or otherwise change their shape.On the other hand slabs that are weakened though the bending process are more amenable to changes in morphology. We present the results of

  9. inverse correction of fourier transforms for one-dimensional strongly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hsin Ying-Fei

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... As it is widely used in periodic lattice design theory and is particularly useful in aperiodic lattice design [12,13], the accuracy of the FT algorithm under strong scattering conditions is the focus of this paper. We propose an inverse correction approach for the inaccurate FT algorithm in strongly scattering ...

  10. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  11. Imaginary-time formulation of strongly correlated nonequilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heary, Ryan Joseph

    Strongly correlated nanostructures and lattices of electrons are studied when these systems reside in a steady-state nonequilibrium. Much of the work done to date has made use of the nonequilibrium real-time Keldysh Green function technique. These methods include: the Keldysh Green function perturbation theory, time-dependent numerical renormalization group, density matrix renormalization group, and diagrammatic quantum Monte Carlo. In the special case of steady-state nonequilibrium we construct an imaginary-time theory. The motivation to do this is simple: there exist an abundant number of well-established strongly correlated computational solvers for imaginary-time theory and perturbation theory on the imaginary-time contour is much more straightforward than that of the real-time contour. The first model system we focus on is a strongly interacting quantum dot situated between source and drain electron reservoirs. The steady-state nonequilibrium boundary condition is established by applying a voltage bias phi across the reservoirs, in turn modifying the chemical potentials of the leads. For a symmetric voltage drop we have mu source = phi/2 and mudrain = -phi/2. The dynamics of the electrons are governed by the Hamiltonian Ĥ which is inherently independent of the imbalance in the source and drain chemical potentials. The statistics though are determined by the operator Ĥ-Ŷ , where Ŷ imposes the nonequilibrium boundary condition. We show that it is possible to construct a single effective Hamiltonian K̂ able to describe both the dynamics and statistics of the system. Upon formulating the theory we explicitly show that it is consistent with the real-time Keldysh theory both formally and through an example using perturbation theory. In these systems there exists a strong interplay between the interactions and nonequilibrium leading to novel nonperturbative phenomena. Therefore, we combine our theory with the Hirsch-Fye quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to study

  12. Physics of Strongly Coupled Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich [Universitat Rostock (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Strongly coupled plasmas (or non-ideal plasmas) are multi-component charged many-particle systems, in which the mean value of the potential energy of the system is of the same order as or even higher than the mean value of the kinetic energy. The constituents are electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. Dusty (or complex) plasmas contain still mesoscopic (multiply charged) particles. In such systems, the effects of strong coupling (non-ideality) lead to considerable deviations of physical properties from the corresponding properties of ideal plasmas, i.e., of plasmas in which the mean kinetic energy is essentially larger than the mean potential energy. For instance, bound state energies become density dependent and vanish at higher densities (Mott effect) due to the interaction of the pair with the surrounding particles. Non-ideal plasmas are of interest both for general scientific reasons (including, for example, astrophysical questions), and for technical applications such as inertially confined fusion. In spite of great efforts both experimentally and theoretically, satisfactory information on the physical properties of strongly coupled plasmas is not at hand for any temperature and density. For example, the theoretical description of non-ideal plasmas is possible only at low densities/high temperatures and at extremely high densities (high degeneracy). For intermediate degeneracy, however, numerical experiments have to fill the gap. Experiments are difficult in the region of 'warm dense matter'. The monograph tries to present the state of the art concerning both theoretical and experimental attempts. It mainly includes results of the work performed in famous Russian laboratories in recent decades. After outlining basic concepts (chapter 1), the generation of plasmas is considered (chapter 2, chapter 3). Questions of partial (chapter 4) and full ionization (chapter 5) are discussed including Mott transition and Wigner crystallization. Electrical and

  13. Precision determination of the strong interaction shift and width in pionic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, D.F.; Covita, D.D.S.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Veloso, J.F.C.A.; Fuhrmann, H.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Ishiwatari, T.; Marton, J.; Schmid, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Gotta, D.; Hennebach, M.; Nekipelov, M.; Indelicato, P.; Jensen, T.; Bigot, E.O. Le; Trassinelli, M.; Simons, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    The new pionic hydrogen experiment at PSI aims at an improvement in the determination of the strong interaction ground state shift and width of the pionic hydrogen atom. High precision x-ray crystal spectroscopy is used to extract isospin separated scattering lengths with accuracies on the percent level. Compared to previous efforts, the energy resolution and statistics could be improved considerably and the background is much reduced. The response function of the Johann-type crystal spectrometer has been determined with a novel method with unprecedented accuracy. The inherent difficulties of the exotic atom's method result, from the fact that the formation of a sufficient amount of pionic hydrogen atoms requires a hydrogen target pressure of several bar at least. For the extraction of a strong interaction shift, an extrapolation method to vacuum conditions proved to be successful. This contribution mostly discusses the strategy to extract a result for the strong interaction width from the data.(author)

  14. <strong>Implementation of integrated homecare in EUstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    HTA Core Model for interventions focusing 9 domains is applied. Further, a SWOT-analysis of IHC determines a strategy for implementation of IHC in EU. Preliminary results 1. The efficacy of IHC for rehabilitation of frequent chronic conditions as stroke, COPD and heart failure (HF) has a common......-country-specific survey on financial and organizational barriers to IHC due to a fragmented administrative organization 3. The SWOT-analysis indicates in accordance with an empirical study that a feasible strategy of implementation is a meso-strategy combining the advantages of the goal-directedness of a centralized...

  15. Strongly coupled dust coulomb clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Wentau; Lai Yingju; Chen Mingheng; I Lin

    1999-01-01

    The structures and motions of quasi-2-dimensional strongly coupled dust Coulomb clusters with particle number N from few to hundreds in a cylindrical rf plasma trap are studied and compared with the results from the molecular dynamic simulation using more ideal models. Shell structures with periodic packing in different shells and intershell rotational motion dominated excitations are observed at small N. As N increases, the boundary has less effect, the system recovers to the triangular lattice with isotropic vortex type cooperative excitations similar to an infinite N system except the outer shell region. The above generic behaviors are mainly determined by the system symmetry and agree with the simulation results. The detailed interaction form causes minor effect such as the fine structure of packing

  16. Dissipative Strong-Field Electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    A dissipative Lorentz-covariant Ohm's law which uses only the electromagnetic degrees of freedom is proposed. For large conductivity, Maxwell equations equipped with this Ohm's law reduce to the equations of Force-Free Electrodynamics (FFE) with small dissipative corrections, but only in the regions where the ideal FFE 4-current is space-like. This might indicate that the pulsar emission comes primarily from the magnetic separartrix.

  17. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willatzen, M.; Pors, A.; Gravesen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schrödinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear-in-curvature contribution originates from parity symmetry breaking of eigenstates in circular-sector tori and hence vanishes in a torus with a complete circular cross section. The same strong curvature effect is not present in waveguides subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions where curvature contributions contribute to second-order in the curvature only. We demonstrate this finding by considering wave propagation in a circular-sector torus corresponding to Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, respectively. Results for relative eigenfrequency shifts and modes are determined and compared with three-dimensional finite element method results. Good agreement is found between the present analytical method using a combination of differential geometry with perturbation theory and finite element results for a large range of curvature ratios.

  18. Strong Ideal Convergence in Probabilistic Metric Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  19. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  20. Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarization and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modeling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  1. John Strong - 1941-2006

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on 31 July, a few days before his 65th birthday. John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers. He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such h...

  2. Strong seismic ground motion propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seale, S.; Archuleta, R.; Pecker, A.; Bouchon, M.; Mohammadioun, G.; Murphy, A.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1988-10-01

    At the McGee Creek, California, site, 3-component strong-motion accelerometers are located at depths of 166 m, 35 m and 0 m. The surface material is glacial moraine, to a depth of 30.5 m, overlying homfels. Accelerations were recorded from two California earthquakes: Round Valley, M L 5.8, November 23, 1984, 18:08 UTC and Chalfant Valley, M L 6.4, July 21, 1986, 14:42 UTC. By separating out the SH components of acceleration, we were able to determine the orientations of the downhole instruments. By separating out the SV component of acceleration, we were able to determine the approximate angle of incidence of the signal at 166 m. A constant phase velocity Haskell-Thomson model was applied to generate synthetic SH seismograms at the surface using the accelerations recorded at 166 m. In the frequency band 0.0 - 10.0 Hz, we compared the filtered synthetic records to the filtered surface data. The onset of the SH pulse is clearly seen, as are the reflections from the interface at 30.5 m. The synthetic record closely matches the data in amplitude and phase. The fit between the synthetic accelerogram and the data shows that the seismic amplification at the surface is a result of the contrast of the impedances (shear stiffnesses) of the near surface materials

  3. Strongly interacting photons and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alge, W.

    1999-05-01

    This thesis contains the main results of the research topics I have pursued during the my PhD studies at the University of Innsbruck and partly in collaboration with the Institut d' Optique in Orsay, France. It is divided into three parts. The first and largest part discusses the possibility of using strong standing waves as a tool to cool and trap neutral atoms in optical cavities. This is very important in the field of nonlinear optics where several successful experiments with cold atoms in cavities have been performed recently. A discussion of the optical parametric oscillator in a regime where the nonlinearity dominates the evolution is the topic of the second part. We investigated mainly the statistical properties of the cavity output of the three interactive cavity modes. Very recently a system has been proposed which promises fantastic properties. It should exhibit a giant Kerr nonlinearity with negligible absorption thus leading to a photonic turnstile device based on cold atoms in cavity. We have shown that this model suffers from overly simplistic assumptions and developed several more comprehensive approaches to study the behavior of this system. Apart from the division into three parts of different contents the thesis is divided into publications, supplements and invisible stuff. The intention of the supplements is to reach researchers which work in related areas and provide them with more detailed information about the concepts and the numerical tools we used. It is written especially for diploma and PhD students to give them a chance to use the third part of our work which is actually the largest one. They consist of a large number of computer programs we wrote to investigate the behavior of the systems in parameter regions where no hope exists to solve the equations analytically. (author)

  4. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoric, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis discusses certain aspects of the turbulence of a fully ionised non-isothermal plasma dominated by the Langmuir mode. Some of the basic properties of strongly turbulent plasmas are reviewed. In particular, interest is focused on the state of Langmuir turbulence, that is the turbulence of a simple externally unmagnetized plasma. The problem of the existence and dynamics of Langmuir collapse is discussed, often met as a non-linear stage of the modulational instability in the framework of the Zakharov equations (i.e. simple time-averaged dynamical equations). Possible macroscopic consequences of such dynamical turbulent models are investigated. In order to study highly non-linear collapse dynamics in its advanced stage, a set of generalized Zakharov equations are derived. Going beyond the original approximation, the author includes the effects of higher electron non-linearities and a breakdown of slow-timescale quasi-neutrality. He investigates how these corrections may influence the collapse stabilisation. Recently, it has been realised that the modulational instability in a Langmuir plasma will be accompanied by the collisionless-generation of a slow-timescale magnetic field. Accordingly, a novel physical situation has emerged which is investigated in detail. The stability of monochromatic Langmuir waves in a self-magnetized Langmuir plasma, is discussed, and the existence of a novel magneto-modulational instability shown. The wave collapse dynamics is investigated and a physical interpretation of the basic results is given. A problem of the transient analysis of an interaction of time-dependent electromagnetic pulses with linear cold plasma media is investigated. (Auth.)

  5. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju

    2010-01-01

    find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal7, 8, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation...... plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium’s ideal strength9, 10. We develop a ‘stimulated slip’ model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning....... The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 relevant for applications....

  6. Weak and strong typicality in quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lea F; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Rigol, Marcos

    2012-07-01

    We study the properties of mixed states obtained from eigenstates of many-body lattice Hamiltonians after tracing out part of the lattice. Two scenarios emerge for generic systems: (i) The diagonal entropy becomes equivalent to the thermodynamic entropy when a few sites are traced out (weak typicality); and (ii) the von Neumann (entanglement) entropy becomes equivalent to the thermodynamic entropy when a large fraction of the lattice is traced out (strong typicality). Remarkably, the results for few-body observables obtained with the reduced, diagonal, and canonical density matrices are very similar to each other, no matter which fraction of the lattice is traced out. Hence, for all physical quantities studied here, the results in the diagonal ensemble match the thermal predictions.

  7. Thomson scattering in strong external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varró, S.; Ehlotzky, F.

    1992-09-01

    In the present paper we shall investigate relativistic Thomson scattering in two external fields. A free classical electron will be embedded in a strong, constant and homogeneous magnetic field and in a powerful electromagnetic field. Both fields will be considered in the Redmond configuration, in which case the electromagnetic wave is circularly polarized and propagates in the direction of the homogeneous magnetic field. The electron will be allowed to have arbitrary initial conditions and the electromagnetic wave will be switched on either suddenly or adiabatically. We shall present the exact solution of the Lorentz equation of motion in the above external field configuration and we shall evaluate the spectrum and cross sections of the scattered radiation. In particular, we shall consider scattering close to resonance and we shall compare our results with the findings of earlier work.

  8. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Pors, A.; Gravesen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schro¨dinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz...... equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important...... to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear...

  9. The Athens Acropolis Strong Motion Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeras, I. S.; Evangelidis, C. P.; Melis, N. S.; Boukouras, K.

    2012-04-01

    During the last decades, extensive restoration works through a dedicated "Acropolis Restoration Service" (YSMA) take place in the Acropolis, the greatest sanctuary of ancient Athens. Since 2008, a permanent strong motion array was deployed by the Institute of Geodynamics, National Observatory of Athens (NOA-IG) in collaboration with YSMA. Free field installations were decided at sites showing various characteristics, aiming to investigate differences in geotechnical properties as well as the structure response of Parthenon itself. The installation phase is presented, with the techniques used to overcome difficulties (i.e. extreme weather conditions, power and communication limitations, restoration works and visitors) and the special care taken for the specific archaeological site. Furthermore, indicative examples of seismic events recorded by the array are analyzed and the complexity of the hill and the monument is made apparent. Among them, the long distance events of Tohoku, Japan 2010 and Van, Turkey 2011, some regional moderate earthquakes in Greece and some weak earthquakes from the vicinity. Continuous ambient noise monitoring using PQLX software gives some first indicative results, showing a variety of characteristics at installation sites. Finally, further developments and future steps are presented such as: the extension of the array, the integration of seismic data within the GIS platform of YSMA at the site and the use of strong motion records, in conjunction with data from other monitoring systems operating in Acropolis for the study of specific monuments.

  10. Landsat: building a strong future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Thomas R.; Dwyer, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Conceived in the 1960s, the Landsat program has experienced six successful missions that have contributed to an unprecedented 39-year record of Earth Observations that capture global land conditions and dynamics. Incremental improvements in imaging capabilities continue to improve the quality of Landsat science data, while ensuring continuity over the full instrument record. Landsats 5 and 7 are still collecting imagery. The planned launch of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission in December 2012 potentially extends the Landsat record to nearly 50 years. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landsat archive contains nearly three million Landsat images. All USGS Landsat data are available at no cost via the Internet. The USGS is committed to improving the content of the historical Landsat archive though the consolidation of Landsat data held in international archives. In addition, the USGS is working on a strategy to develop higher-level Landsat geo- and biophysical datasets. Finally, Federal efforts are underway to transition Landsat into a sustained operational program within the Department of the Interior and to authorize the development of the next two satellites — Landsats 9 and 10.

  11. Reduced-intensity versus reduced-toxicity myeloablative fludarabine/busulfan-based conditioning regimens for allografted non-Hodgkin lymphoma adult patients: a retrospective study on behalf of the Société Francophone de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourgeois, A; Labopin, M; Blaise, D; Ceballos, P; Vigouroux, S; Peffault de Latour, R; Marçais, A; Bulabois, C E; Bay, J O; Chantepie, S; Deconinck, E; Daguindau, E; Contentin, N; Yakoub-Agha, I; Cornillon, J; Mercier, M; Turlure, P; Charbonnier, A; Rorhlich, P S; N'Guyen, S; Maillard, N; Marchand, T; Mohty, M; Chevallier, P

    2017-09-01

    Fludarabine/busulfan-based conditioning regimens are widely used to perform allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (allo-SCT) in high-risk non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients. The impact of the dose intensity of busulfan on outcomes has not been reported yet. This was a retrospective with the aim to compare the outcomes of NHL patients who received before allo-SCT a fludarabine/busulfan conditioning regimen, either of reduced intensity (FB2, 2 days of busulfan at 4 mg/kg/day oral or 3.2 mg/kg/day i.v.) (n = 277) or at a myeloablative reduced-toxicity dose (FB3/FB4, 3 or 4 days of busulfan at 4 mg/kg/day oral or 3.2 mg/kg/day i.v.) (n = 101). In univariate analysis, the 2-year overall survival (FB2 66.5% versus 60.3%, P = 0.33), lymphoma-free survival (FB2 57.9% versus 49.8%, P = 0.26), and non-relapse mortality (FB2 19% versus 21.1%, P = 0.91) were similar between both groups. Cumulative incidence of grade III-IV acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) (FB2 11.2% versus 18%, P = 0.08), extensive chronic GVHD (FB2: 17.3% versus 10.7%, P = 0.18) and 2-year GVHD free-relapse free survival (FB2: 44.4% versus 42.8%, P = 0.38) were also comparable. In multivariate analysis there was a trend for a worse outcome using FB3/FB4 regimens (overall survival: HR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.96-2.24, P = 0.08; lymphoma-free survival: HR: 1.43, 95% CI: 0.99-2.06, P = 0.05; relapse incidence: HR 1.54; 95% CI: 0.96-2.48, P = 0.07). These results were confirmed using a propensity score-matching strategy. We conclude that reduced toxicity myeloablative conditioning with fludarabine/busulfan does not improve the outcomes compared with reduced-intensity conditioning in adults receiving allo-SCT for NHL. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Rearing conditions and behaviour in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Schouten, W.G.P.

    1985-01-01

    During the last three decades the housing conditions of our livestock have been changed drastically (chapter 1). Amongst others, reduced floor space per animal and the monotony of the environment are the most striking changes.

    As in other animals, the actual situation strongly influences the behaviour of pigs. However, the effects of early experience on later behaviour in pigs are still not well documented. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate these effects....

  13. Direct variational determination of the two-electron reduced density matrix for doubly occupied-configuration-interaction wave functions: The influence of three-index N-representability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E.; Oña, Ofelia B.; Honoré, Eduardo M.; Poelmans, Ward; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick; De Baerdemacker, Stijn

    2018-01-01

    This work proposes the variational determination of two-electron reduced density matrices corresponding to the ground state of N-electron systems within the doubly occupied-configuration-interaction methodology. The P, Q, and G two-index N-representability conditions have been extended to the T1 and T2 (T2') three-index ones and the resulting optimization problem has been addressed using a standard semidefinite program. We report results obtained from the doubly occupied-configuration-interaction method, from the two-index constraint variational procedure and from the two- and three-index constraint variational treatment. The discussion of these results along with a study of the computational cost demanded shows the usefulness of our proposal.

  14. CONDITIONED PUNISHMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAKE, D F; AZRIN, N H

    1965-09-01

    Responses of pigeons were maintained by a VI schedule of food reinforcement. Conditioned punishment was programmed by having these responses concurrently produce an originally neutral stimulus. The effectiveness of this response-contingent stimulus was maintained by infrequent and prearranged stimulus-shock pairings delivered independently of responses. This conditioned punishment procedure reduced the overall response rate as long as the procedure was in effect. The extent and durability of the reduction was a function of the intensity of the shock that was paired with the stimulus. Analysis of the reduction in the overall response rate revealed: (1) a reduction of responses occurring in the absence of the response-contingent stimulus, which was designated as a "punishing" effect, and (2) a reduction of responses during the response-contingent stimulus, which was designated as a "suppressive" effect.

  15. Overexpression of the Rice SUMO E3 Ligase Gene OsSIZ1 in Cotton Enhances Drought and Heat Tolerance, and Substantially Improves Fiber Yields in the Field under Reduced Irrigation and Rainfed Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Neelam; Sun, Li; Zhu, Xunlu; Smith, Jennifer; Prakash Srivastava, Anurag; Yang, Xiaojie; Pehlivan, Necla; Esmaeili, Nardana; Luo, Hong; Shen, Guoxin; Jones, Don; Auld, Dick; Burke, John

    2017-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SUMO E3 ligase gene AtSIZ1 plays important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses as loss of function in AtSIZ1 leads to increased sensitivity to drought, heat and salt stresses. Overexpression of the AtSIZ1 rice homolog, OsSIZ1, leads to increased heat and drought tolerance in bentgrass, suggesting that the function of the E3 ligase SIZ1 is highly conserved in plants and it plays a critical role in abiotic stress responses. To test the possibility that the SUMO E3 ligase could be used to engineer drought- and heat-tolerant crops, the rice gene OsSIZ1 was overexpressed in cotton. We report here that overexpression of OsSIZ1 in cotton results in higher net photosynthesis and better growth than wild-type cotton under drought and thermal stresses in growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Additionally, this tolerance to abiotic stresses was correlated with higher fiber yield in both controlled-environment and field trials carried out under reduced irrigation and rainfed conditions. These results suggest that OsSIZ1 is a viable candidate gene to improve crop yields under water-limited and rainfed agricultural production systems. PMID:28340002

  16. Cognitive bias modification for interpretation with and without prior repetitive negative thinking to reduce worry and rumination in generalised anxiety disorder and depression: protocol for a multisession experimental study with an active control condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahé, Charlotte; Mathews, Andrew; Whyte, Jessica; Hirsch, Colette R

    2016-12-16

    Worry and rumination are two forms of repetitive thinking characterised by their negative content and apparently uncontrollable nature. Although worry and rumination share common features and have been conceptualised as part of a transdiagnostic repetitive negative thinking (RNT) process, it remains unclear whether they share the same underlying cognitive mechanisms. This multisession experimental study investigates the tendency to make negative interpretations regarding ambiguous information as a cognitive mechanism underlying RNT. We compare multisession cognitive bias modification for interpretations (CBM-I) with an active control condition to examine whether repeatedly training positive interpretations reduces worry and rumination in individuals with generalised anxiety disorder or depression, respectively. Further, we examine the potential modulatory effects of engaging in RNT immediately prior to CBM-I. A community sample of individuals meeting diagnostic criteria for either generalised anxiety disorder (n=60) or current major depressive episode (n=60) will be randomly allocated to CBM-I with prior RNT, CBM-I without prior RNT (ie, standard CBM-I), or an active control (no resolution of ambiguity) condition. All conditions receive a 3-week internet-based intervention consisting of one initial session at the first study visit and nine home-based sessions of CBM-I training (or active control). We will assess and compare the effects of CBM-I with and without prior RNT on 'near-transfer' measures of interpretation bias closely related to the training as well as 'far-transfer' outcomes related to RNT and emotional distress. Impact on questionnaire measures will additionally be assessed at 1-month follow-up. Multigroup analyses will be conducted to assess the impact of CBM-I on near-transfer and far-transfer outcome measures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Electrodynamics of a hydrogenlike atom in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarskij, V.A.; Perel'man, N.F.

    1974-01-01

    The quasienergy spectrum of the hydrogen atom in strong electromagnetic radiation is studied, the luminescence of the atom under these conditions is considered. It is shown that in a strong field the atom, being even in the ground state, radiates a spectrum of frequencies corresponding to transitions from the ground state into excited states, the strong field photons being involved. The intensity of such a luminescence is basically a non-linear function of the strong field. The exposure of the atom to two strong electromagnetic fields Ω and ω (Ω>>ω) is considered, the Ω coinciding with one of the natural frquencies of the atom. The effct of modulation of the resonance shift for an atomic level by the ω-field strength is predicted. The dependence of Ω-absorption in the ω-field on the statistic properties of the latter is investigated. (author)

  18. Characterization of the flowing afterglows of an N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reduced-pressure discharge: setting the operating conditions to achieve a dominant late afterglow and correlating the NO{sub {beta}} UV intensity variation with the N and O atom densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudam, M K [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Saoudi, B [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Moisan, M [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Ricard, A [Centre de Physique Atomique de Toulouse (CPAT), 118, route de Narbonne, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062-Toulouse (France)

    2007-03-21

    The flowing afterglow of an N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} discharge in the 0.6-10 Torr range is examined in the perspective of achieving sterilization of medical devices (MDs) under conditions ensuring maximum UV intensity with minimum damage to polymer-based MDs. The early afterglow is shown to be responsible for creating strong erosion damage, requiring that the sterilizer be operated in a dominant late-afterglow mode. These two types of afterglow can be characterized by optical emission spectroscopy: the early afterglow is distinguished by an intense emission from the N{sub 2}{sup +} 1st negative system (band head at 391.4 nm) while the late afterglow yields an overpopulation of the v' = 11 ro-vibrational level of the N{sub 2}(B) state, indicating a reduced contribution from the early afterglow N{sub 2} metastable species. We have studied the influence of operating conditions (pressure, O{sub 2} content in the N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} mixture, distance of the discharge from the entrance to the afterglow (sterilizer) chamber) in order to achieve a dominant late afterglow that also ensures maximum and almost uniform UV intensity in the sterilization chamber. As far as operating conditions are concerned, moving the plasma source sufficiently far from the chamber entrance is shown to be a practical means for significantly reducing the density of the characteristic species of the early afterglow. Using the NO titration method, we obtain the (absolute) densities of N and O atoms in the afterglow at the NO injection inlet, a few cm before the chamber entrance: the N atom density goes through a maximum at approximately 0.3-0.5% O{sub 2} and then decreases, while the O atom density increases regularly with the O{sub 2} percentage. The spatial variation of the N atom (relative) density in the chamber is obtained by recording the emission intensity from the 1st positive system at 580 nm: in the 2-5 Torr range, this density is quite uniform everywhere in the chamber. The (relative

  19. Inhomogeneities in a strongly correlated d-wave superconductors in the limit of strong disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debmalya; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Ghosal, Amit

    2015-03-01

    The complex interplay of the strong correlations and impurities in a high temperature superconductor is analyzed within a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory, augmented with Gutzwiller approximation for taking care of the strong electronic repulsion. The inclusion of such correlations is found to play a crucial role in reducing inhomogeneities in both qualitative and quantitative manner. This difference is comprehended by investigating the underlying one-particle ``normal states'' that includes the order parameters in the Hartree and Fock channels in the absence of superconductivity. This amounts to the renormalization of disorder both on the lattice sites and also on links. These two components of disorder turn out to be spatially anti-correlated through self-consistency. Interestingly, a simple pairing theory in terms of these normal states is found to describe the complex behaviors of dirty cuprates with reasonable accuracy. However, this framework needs modifications in the limit where disorder strengths are comparable to the band width. We will discuss appropriate updates in the formalism to describe physics of inhomogeneities with strong disorder.

  20. Adsorbate-mediated strong metal-support interactions in oxide-supported Rh catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubu, John C; Zhang, Shuyi; DeRita, Leo; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S; Chen, Jingguang G; Graham, George W; Pan, Xiaoqing; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-02-01

    The optimization of supported metal catalysts predominantly focuses on engineering the metal site, for which physical insights based on extensive theoretical and experimental contributions have enabled the rational design of active sites. Although it is well known that supports can influence the catalytic properties of metals, insights into how metal-support interactions can be exploited to optimize metal active-site properties are lacking. Here we utilize in situ spectroscopy and microscopy to identify and characterize a support effect in oxide-supported heterogeneous Rh catalysts. This effect is characterized by strongly bound adsorbates (HCO x ) on reducible oxide supports (TiO 2 and Nb 2 O 5 ) that induce oxygen-vacancy formation in the support and cause HCO x -functionalized encapsulation of Rh nanoparticles by the support. The encapsulation layer is permeable to reactants, stable under the reaction conditions and strongly influences the catalytic properties of Rh, which enables rational and dynamic tuning of CO 2 -reduction selectivity.

  1. Fludarabine-melphalan as a preparative regimen for reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma: the updated M.D. Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderlini, Paolo; Saliba, Rima; Acholonu, Sandra; Giralt, Sergio A; Andersson, Borje; Ueno, Naoto T; Hosing, Chitra; Khouri, Issa F; Couriel, Daniel; de Lima, Marcos; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Pro, Barbara; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Hagemeister, Frederick; Younes, Anas; Munsell, Mark F; Champlin, Richard E

    2008-02-01

    The role of reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma remains poorly defined. We here present an update of our single-center experience with fludarabine-melphalan as a preparative regimen. Fifty-eight patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent RIC and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a matched related donor (MRD; n=25) or a matched unrelated donor (MUD; n=33). Forty-eight (83%) had undergone prior autologous stem cell transplantation. Disease status at transplant was refractory relapse (n=28) or sensitive relapse (n=30). Cumulative day 100 and 2-year transplant-related mortality rates were 7% and 15%, respectively (day 100 transplant-related mortality MRD vs. MUD 8% vs. 6%, p=ns; 2-year MRD vs. MUD 13% vs. 16%, p=ns). The cumulative incidence of acute (grade II-IV) graft-versus-host disease in the first 100 days was 28% (MRD vs. MUD 12% vs. 39%, p=0.04). The cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease at any time was 73% (MRD vs. MUD 57% vs. 85%, p=0.006). Projected 2-year overall and progression-free survival rates are 64% (49-76%) and 32% (20-45%), with 2-year disease progression/relapse at 55% (43-70%). There was no statistically significant differences in overall survival progression-free survival, and disease progression/relapse between MRD and MUD transplants. There was a trend for the response status pretransplant to have a favorable impact on progression-free survival (p=0.07) and disease progression/relapse (p=0.049), but not on overall survival (p=0.4) Fludarabine-melphalan as a preparative regimen for reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation in progression-free survival Hodgkin's lymphoma is associated with a significant reduction in transplant-related mortality, with comparable results in MRD and MUD allografts. Optimizing pretransplant response status may improve patients' outcome.

  2. Allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation using reduced-intensity conditioning in an outpatient setting in ABO-incompatible patients: are survival and graft-versus-host disease different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Cesar Homero; Gómez-De-León, Andrés; Alatorre-Ricardo, Julio; Cantú-Rodríguez, Olga Graciela; González-Llano, Oscar; Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Mancías-Guerra, Consuelo; Flores-Jiménez, Juan Antonio; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2014-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major cause of morbimortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Minor ABO incompatibility has been associated with an increased risk of GVHD. We analyzed the impact of ABO matching on patient outcome after peripheral blood, reduced-intensity allo-HSCT in an outpatient setting, and its relationship with GVHD. Data of 121 patients were included. All patients received allo-HSCT from HLA-identical siblings as outpatients using a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Influence of ABO matching as a risk factor for the development of GVHD and survival was analyzed using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression, respectively. Median age was 36 years (range, 1-71 years); 88 patients were ABO identical: 13 presented major mismatch and 20 minor mismatch, with an ABO incompatibility rate of 27.3%. The median follow-up period was 54 months (range, 0.3-120 months). Minor ABO incompatibility patients presented the highest rate of acute GVHD (aGVHD; 25%), in comparison with ABO-identical (20.5%) and major ABO incompatibility patients (15.4%; p = 0.79). The highest incidence of chronic GVHD (cGVHD) occurred in the context of minor ABO incompatibility (35%), in contrast to ABO-identical (30.8%) and major ABO incompatibility (15.4%). Survival was higher for patients in the minor ABO mismatch group; however, there was no significant correlation between ABO matching status and survival (p = 0.45). Using this type of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, minor ABO-mismatched allo-HSCT was associated with a higher incidence of aGVHD and cGVHD and with increased survival, albeit with no significance. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Dose-Reduced Versus Standard Conditioning Followed by Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Prospective Randomized Phase III Study of the EBMT (RICMAC Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Nicolaus; Iacobelli, Simona; Franke, Georg-Nikolaus; Platzbecker, Uwe; Uddin, Ruzena; Hübel, Kai; Scheid, Christof; Weber, Thomas; Robin, Marie; Stelljes, Matthias; Afanasyev, Boris; Heim, Dominik; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi; Onida, Francesco; Dreger, Peter; Pini, Massimo; Guidi, Stefano; Volin, Liisa; Günther, Andreas; Bethge, Wolfgang; Poiré, Xavier; Kobbe, Guido; van Os, Marleen; Brand, Ronald; de Witte, Theo

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To compare a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) with a myeloablative conditioning regimen (MAC) before allogeneic transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) within a randomized trial. Patients and Methods Within the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, we conducted a prospective, multicenter, open-label, randomized phase III trial that compared a busulfan-based RIC with MAC in patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia. A total of 129 patients were enrolled from 18 centers. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio and were stratified according to donor, age, and blast count. Results Engraftment was comparable between both groups. The CI of acute graft-versus-host disease II to IV was 32.3% after RIC and 37.5% after MAC ( P = .35). The CI of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 61.6% after RIC and 64.7% after MAC ( P = .76). The CI of nonrelapse mortality after 1 year was 17% (95% CI, 8% to 26%) after RIC and 25% (95% CI, 15% to 36%) after MAC ( P = .29). The CI of relapse at 2 years was 17% (95% CI, 8% to 26%) after RIC and 15% (95% CI, 6% to 24%) after MAC ( P = .6), which resulted in a 2-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 62% (95% CI, 50% to 74%) and 76% (95% CI, 66% to 87%), respectively, after RIC, and 58% (95% CI, 46% to 71%) and 63% (95% CI, 51% to 75%), respectively, after MAC ( P = .58 and P = .08, respectively). Conclusion This prospective, randomized trial of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation provides evidence that RIC resulted in at least a 2-year relapse-free survival and overall survival similar to MAC in patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia.

  4. Energy conditions and spacetime singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipler, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, a number of theorems are proven which collectively show that singularities will occur in spacetime under weaker energy conditions than the strong energy condition. In particular, the Penrose theorem, which uses only the weak energy condition but which applies only to open universes, is extended to all closed universes which have a Cauchy surface whose universal covering manifold is not a three-sphere. Furthermore, it is shown that the strong energy condition in the Hawking-Penrose theorem can be replaced by the weak energy condition and the assumption that the strong energy condition holds only on the average. In addition, it is demonstrated that if the Universe is closed, then the existence of singularities follows from the averaged strong energy condition alone. It is argued that any globally hyperbolic spacetime which satisfies the weak energy condition and which contains a black hole must be null geodesically incomplete

  5. Atoms and clusters in strong laser fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchenko, T.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical studies on the interaction of strong infrared laser fields with atoms and atomic clusters. Part I provides an overview of the main strong-field phenomena in atoms, molecules and clusters and describes the state-of-the-art in strong-field science.

  6. Strong Bisimilarity of Simple Process Algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jirí

    2003-01-01

    We study bisimilarity and regularity problems of simple process algebras. In particular, we show PSPACE-hardness of the following problems: (i) strong bisimilarity of Basic Parallel Processes (BPP), (ii) strong bisimilarity of Basic Process Algebra (BPA), (iii) strong regularity of BPP, and (iv) ...

  7. 78 FR 15710 - Strong Sensitizer Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... definition of ``strong sensitizer'' found at 16 CFR 1500.3(c)(5). The Commission is proposing to revise the supplemental definition of ``strong sensitizer'' due to advancements in the science of sensitization that have... document is intended to clarify the ``strong sensitizer'' definition, assist manufacturers in understanding...

  8. Consideration to the early warning rainfall criteria of landslides after strong earthquake in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, T.

    2012-04-01

    1. Objective The research on the warning rainfall criteria of landslides after strong earthquakes is conducted associated with the great earthquake in Eastern Japan (M=9.0). After this kind of strong earthquake, soil strength of the slopes in the region that were exposed to the strong seismic forces are generally reduced by seismic shaking (vibration) or disturbance by certain slope deformation. In this situation, the revised rainfall criteria for landslides are required. On this point of view, we are intrigued to elucidate the response of landslide to rainfall under this weaken soil condition. Hence, the impact of rainfall events on the specific landslide slopes that experienced the strong seismic shaking is analyzed using numerical simulation method i.e. finite element method (FEM) in order to evaluate the critical rainfall for landslide occurrence. 2. Method and target areas Field investigation, field survey and geotechnical test with the samples from the landslide slopes are conducted to obtain the basic data for FEM analysis such as topographical, geological, geotechnical features including hydraulic conductivity "k" and soil shear strength at the slopes that experienced strong earthquake. Then, FEM analysis which consists of seepage analysis and slope stability analysis combined with the rain data at nearest meteorological observatory are conducted under the earthquake impact i.e. the slope condition with cracks which are located near the top of the slope and have high "k" or reduced soil strength. Comparing the FEM results with ones without earthquake impact, the influence of the earthquake shaking to the landslide slopes is estimated. 3. Result and consideration In the result of FEM analysis, the cracks induced by the earthquake are effective to increase the seepage and render the slopes instable. Also, reduced soil strength such as 4% decrease in internal friction angle caused instability of the slope. The slope deterioration mentioned above due to the

  9. Kinetic theory for strongly coupled Coulomb systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufty, James; Wrighton, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    The calculation of dynamical properties for matter under extreme conditions is a challenging task. The popular Kubo-Greenwood model exploits elements from equilibrium density-functional theory (DFT) that allow a detailed treatment of electron correlations, but its origin is largely phenomenological; traditional kinetic theories have a more secure foundation but are limited to weak ion-electron interactions. The objective here is to show how a combination of the two evolves naturally from the short-time limit for the generator of the effective single-electron dynamics governing time correlation functions without such limitations. This provides a theoretical context for the current DFT-related approach, the Kubo-Greenwood model, while showing the nature of its corrections. The method is to calculate the short-time dynamics in the single-electron subspace for a given configuration of the ions. This differs from the usual kinetic theory approach in which an average over the ions is performed as well. In this way the effective ion-electron interaction includes strong Coulomb coupling and is shown to be determined from DFT. The correlation functions have the form of the random-phase approximation for an inhomogeneous system but with renormalized ion-electron and electron-electron potentials. The dynamic structure function, density response function, and electrical conductivity are calculated as examples. The static local field corrections in the dielectric function are identified in this way. The current analysis is limited to semiclassical electrons (quantum statistical potentials), so important quantum conditions are excluded. However, a quantization of the kinetic theory is identified for broader application while awaiting its detailed derivation.

  10. Strong reinforcing selection in a Texas wildflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Robin; Guerrero, Rafael F; Rausher, Mark D; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2014-09-08

    Reinforcement, the process of increased reproductive isolation due to selection against hybrids, is an important mechanism by which natural selection contributes to speciation [1]. Empirical studies suggest that reinforcement has generated reproductive isolation in many taxa (reviewed in [2-4]), and theoretical work shows it can act under broad selective conditions [5-11]. However, the strength of selection driving reinforcement has never been measured in nature. Here, we quantify the strength of reinforcing selection in the Texas wildflower Phlox drummondii using a strategy that weds a population genetic model with field data. Reinforcement in this system is caused by variation in two loci that affect flower color [12]. We quantify sharp clines in flower color where this species comes into contact with its congener, Phlox cuspidata. We develop a spatially explicit population genetic model for these clines based on the known genetics of flower color. We fit our model to the data using likelihood, and we searched parameter space using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We find that selection on flower color genes generated by reinforcement is exceptionally strong. Our findings demonstrate that natural selection can play a decisive role in the evolution of reproductive isolation through the process of reinforcement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Towards Integrated Marmara Strong Motion Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durukal, E.; Erdik, M.; Safak, E.; Ansal, A.; Ozel, O.; Alcik, H.; Mert, A.; Kafadar, N.; Korkmaz, A.; Kurtulus, A.

    2009-04-01

    Array (72 ch. dense accelerometric array to be installed in 2010) - Gemlik Array (a dense basin array of 8 stations, to be installed in 2010) The objectives of these systems and networks are: (1) to produce rapid earthquake intensity, damage and loss assessment information after an earthquake (in the case of IERREWS), (2) to monitor conditions of structural systems, (3) to develop real-time data processing, analysis, and damage detection and location tools (in the case of structural networks) after an extreme event, (4) to assess spatial properties of strong ground motion and ground strain, and to characterise basin response (in the case of special arrays), (5) to investigate site response and wave propagation (in the case of vertical array). Ground motion data obtained from these strong motion networks have and are being used for investigations of attenuation, spatial variation (coherence), simulation benchmarking, source modeling, site response, seismic microzonation, system identification and structural model verification and structural health control. In addition to the systems and networks outlined above there are two temporary networks: KIMNET - a dense urban noise and microtremor network consisting of 50 broadband stations expected to be operational in mid 2009, and SOSEWIN - a 20-station, self-organizing structural integrated array at Ataköy in Istanbul.

  12. Theory of Spin Waves in Strongly Anisotropic Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Cooke, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    A new infinite-order perturbation approach to the theory of spin waves in strongly anisotropic magnets is introduced. The system is transformed into one with effective two-ion anisotropy and considerably reduced ground-state corrections. A general expression for the spin-wave energy, valid to any...

  13. Application of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kikuo

    1977-01-01

    Not only inorganic and organic compounds but also natural substrances, such as accumulations in soil, are completely decomposed and distilled by heating with strong phosphoric acid for 30 to 50 minutes. As applications of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry, determination of uranium and boron by use of solubilization effect of this substance, titration of uranyl ion by use of sulfuric iron (II) contained in this substance, application to tracer experiment, and determination of radioactive ruthenium in environmental samples are reviewed. Strong phosphoric acid is also applied to activation analysis, for example, determination of N in pyrographite with iodate potassium-strong phosphoric acid method, separation of Os and Ru with sulfuric cerium (IV) - strong phosphoric acid method or potassium dechromate-strong phosphoric acid method, analysis of Se, As and Sb rocks and accumulations with ammonium bromide, sodium chloride and sodium bromide-strong phosphoric acid method. (Kanao, N.)

  14. Endangerment of cultural heritage sites by strong rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Thomas; Fischer, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Due to climate change extreme weather conditions become more and more frequent in the last years. Especially in Germany nearly every year a large flood event happens. Most of these events are caused by strong rain. There are at most two causes for these floodings: The first is locally strong rain in the area of damage, the second happens at damage sites located near confluxes and strong rain in the upper stream areas of the joining rivers. The amount of damage is often strongly correlated with unreasonable designation of new construction in such endangered regions. Our presented study is based on an earlier project together with a German insurance company. In this project we analyzed correlations of geographical settings with the insurance data of flood damages over ten years. The result of this study was a strong relation of the terrain with the amount and the probability of damages. Further investigations allow us to derive a system for estimating potential endangerment due to strong rain just from suitable digital terrain models (DTMs). In the presented study we apply this method to different types of cultural heritage (CH) sites in Germany and other parts of the world to detect which type of CH sites were build with potential endangerment of strong rain events in mind and which ones are prone to such events.

  15. Strongly correlating liquids and their isomorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Gnan, Nicoletta; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schröder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the properties of strongly correlating liquids, i.e., liquids with strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations at constant volume. We proceed to focus on the experimental predictions for strongly correlating glass-forming liquids. These predictions include i) density scaling, ii) isochronal superposition, iii) that there is a single function from which all frequency-dependent viscoelastic response functions may be calculated, iv) that...

  16. Atom collisions in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.S.; Chaplik, A.V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the long-range part of interatomic interaction is considerably altered in a strong electromagnetic field. Instead of the van der Waals law the potential asymptote can best be described by a dipole-dipole R -3 law. Impact broadening and the line shift in a strong nonresonant field are calculated. The possibility of bound states of two atoms being formed in a strong light field is discussed

  17. Upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation after reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: a study by the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaj, Gandhi; Mohty, Mohammad; Robin, Marie; Michallet, Mauricette; Chevallier, Patrice; Beguin, Yves; Nguyen, Stephanie; Bories, Pierre; Blaise, Didier; Maillard, Natacha; Rubio, Marie Therese; Fegueux, Nathalie; Cornillon, Jerome; Clavert, Aline; Huynh, Anne; Adès, Lionel; Thiébaut-Bertrand, Anne; Hermine, Olivier; Vigouroux, Stephane; Fenaux, Pierre; Duhamel, Alain; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2014-09-01

    Cytoreduction before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes remains a debatable issue. After excluding patients who had received preconditioning induction chemotherapy, we analyzed 128 consecutive patients with myelodysplastic syndrome who received reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMA) allo-SCT. Among them, 40 received azacitidine (AZA) before transplant (AZA group) and 88 were transplanted up front (best supportive care [BSC] group). At diagnosis, 55 patients had intermediate 2 or high-risk scores per the International Prognostic Scoring System and 33 had a high cytogenetic risk score. Progression to a more advanced disease before allo-SCT was recorded in 22 patients. Source of stem cells were blood (n = 112) or marrow (n = 16) from sibling (n = 78) or HLA-matched unrelated (n = 50) donors. With a median follow-up of 60 months, 3-year overall survival, relapse-free survival, cumulative incidence of relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were, respectively, 53% versus 53% (P = .69), 37% versus 42% (P = .78), 35% versus 36% (P = .99), and 20% versus 23% (P = .74), for the AZA group and BSC group, respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed the absence of statistical differences in outcome between the AZA and BSC groups, after adjusting for potential confounders using the propensity score approach. The absence of cytoreduction before RIC/NMA allo-SCT did not seem to alter the outcome. However, our results emphasize the need to perform prospective protocols to delineate the role of debulking strategy and to identify subsets of patients who may benefit from this approach. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Strong ground motion spectra for layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askar, A.; Cakmak, A.S.; Engin, H.

    1977-01-01

    This article presents an analytic method and calculations of strong motion spectra for the energy, displacement, velocity and acceleration based on the physical and geometric ground properties at a site. Although earthquakes occur with large deformations and high stress intensities which necessarily lead to nonlinear phenomena, most analytical efforts to date have been based on linear analyses in engineering seismology and soil dynamics. There are, however, a wealth of problems such as the shifts in frequency, dispersion due to the amplitude, the generation of harmonics, removal of resonance infinities, which cannot be accounted for by a linear theory. In the study, the stress-strain law for soil is taken as tau=G 0 γ+G 1 γ 3 +etaγ where tau is the stress, γ is the strain, G 0 and G 1 are the elasticity coefficients and eta is the damping and are different in each layer. The above stress-strain law describes soils with hysterisis where the hysterisis loops for various amplitudes of the strain are no longer concentric ellipses as for linear relations but are oval shapes rotated with respect to each other similar to the materials with the Osgood-Ramberg law. It is observed that even slight nonlinearities may drastically alter the various response spectra from that given by linear analysis. In fact, primary waves cause resonance conditions such that secondary waves are generated. As a result, a weak energy transfer from the primary to the secondary waves takes place, thus altering the wave spectrum. The mathematical technique that is utilized for the solution of the nonlinear equation is a special perturbation method as an extension of Poincare's procedure. The method considers shifts in the frequencies which are determined by the boundedness of the energy

  19. Strongly-correlated ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Tung-Lam

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the theoretical study of strongly correlated quantum states of ultra-cold fermionic atoms trapped in optical lattices. This field has grown considerably in recent years, following the experimental progress made in cooling and controlling atomic gases, which has led to the observation of the first Bose-Einstein condensation (in 1995). The trapping of these gases in optical lattices has opened a new field of research at the interface between atomic physics and condensed matter physics. The observation of the transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator for bosonic atoms paved the way for the study of strongly correlated phases and quantum phase transitions in these systems. Very recently, the investigation of the Mott insulator state of fermionic atoms provides additional motivation to conduct such theoretical studies. This thesis can be divided broadly into two types of work: - On the one hand, we have proposed a new type of spectroscopy to measure single-particle correlators and associated physical observables in these strongly correlated states. - On the other hand, we have studied the ground state of the fermionic Hubbard model under different conditions (mass imbalance, population imbalance) by using analytical techniques and numerical simulations. In a collaboration with J. Dalibard and C. Salomon (LKB at the ENS Paris) and I. Carusotto (Trento, Italy), we have proposed and studied a novel spectroscopic method for the measurement and characterization of single particle excitations (in particular, the low energy excitations, namely the quasiparticles) in systems of cold fermionic atoms, with energy and momentum resolution. This type of spectroscopy is an analogue of angular-resolved photoemission in solid state physics (ARPES). We have shown, via simple models, that this method of measurement can characterize quasiparticles not only in the 'conventional' phases such as the weakly interacting gas in the lattice or in Fermi

  20. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and ... also important applications in nonlinear analysis [2]. The theory was brought to ..... for each t > 0 since each set on the right-hand side of the relation (3.1) belongs to I. Thus, by Definition 2.11 and the ...

  1. Large N baryons, strong coupling theory, quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakita, B.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that in QCD the large N limit is the same as the static strong coupling limit. By using the static strong coupling techniques some of the results of large N baryons are derived. The results are consistent with the large N SU(6) static quark model. (author)

  2. Optimization of strong and weak coordinates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new scheme for the geometry optimization of equilibrium and transition state structures that can be used for both strong and weak coordinates. We use a screening function that depends on atom-pair distances to differentiate strong coordinates from weak coordinates. This differentiation

  3. Strong decays of nucleon and delta resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the strong couplings of the nucleon and delta resonances in a collective model. In the ensuing algebraic treatment we derive closed expressions for decay widths which are used to analyze the experimental data for strong decays into the pion and eta channels. (Author)

  4. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, D. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Strongly correlated fermions are investigated. An understanding of strongly correlated fermions underpins a diverse range of phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions, high-temperature superconductivity, magnetic impurity problems and the properties of heavy-fermion systems, in all of which local moments play an important role. (author).

  5. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  6. REDUCED PROTECTIVE CLOTHING DETERMINATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    This technical basis document defines conditions where reduced protective clothing can be allowed, defines reduced protective clothing, and documents the regulatory review that determines the process is compliant with the Tank Farm Radiological Control Manual (TFRCM) and Title 10, Part 835, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR835). The criteria, standards, and requirements contained in this document apply only to Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) facilities

  7. Strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Shneerson, German A; Krivosheev, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    Strong pulsed magnetic fields are important for several fields in physics and engineering, such as power generation and accelerator facilities. Basic aspects of the generation of strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields technique are given, including the physics and hydrodynamics of the conductors interacting with the field as well as an account of the significant progress in generation of strong magnetic fields using the magnetic accumulation technique. Results of computer simulations as well as a survey of available field technology are completing the volume.

  8. Impurity screening in strongly coupled plasma systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrkos, S

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of the problem of screening of an impurity in a strongly coupled one-component plasma within the framework of the linear response (LR) theory. We consider 3D, 2D and quasi-2D layered systems. For a strongly coupled plasma the LR can be determined by way of the known S(k) structure functions. In general, an oscillating screening potential with local overscreening and antiscreening regions emerges. In the case of the bilayer, this phenomenon becomes global, as overscreening develops in the layer of the impurity and antiscreening in the adjacent layer. We comment on the limitations of the LR theory in the strong coupling situation.

  9. Near-field strong coupling of single quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Heiko; Hamm, Joachim M; Tufarelli, Tommaso; Hess, Ortwin; Hecht, Bert

    2018-03-01

    Strong coupling and the resultant mixing of light and matter states is an important asset for future quantum technologies. We demonstrate deterministic room temperature strong coupling of a mesoscopic colloidal quantum dot to a plasmonic nanoresonator at the apex of a scanning probe. Enormous Rabi splittings of up to 110 meV are accomplished by nanometer-precise positioning of the quantum dot with respect to the nanoresonator probe. We find that, in addition to a small mode volume of the nanoresonator, collective coherent coupling of quantum dot band-edge states and near-field proximity interaction are vital ingredients for the realization of near-field strong coupling of mesoscopic quantum dots. The broadband nature of the interaction paves the road toward ultrafast coherent manipulation of the coupled quantum dot-plasmon system under ambient conditions.

  10. Ishikawa iteration process for nonlinear Lipschitz strongly accretive mappings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidume, C.E.; Osilike, M.O.

    1994-05-01

    Let E=L p , p≥2 and let T:E→ E be a Lipschitzian and strongly accretive mapping. Let S:E → E be defined by Sx=f-Tx+x. It is proved that under suitable conditions on the real sequences {α n } ∞ n=0 and {β n } ∞ n=0 , the iteration process, x 0 is an element of E, x n+1 =(1-α n ) x n +α n S[(1-β n ) x n +β n Sx n ], n≥0, converges strongly to the unique solution of Tx=f. A related result deals with the iterative approximation of fixed points for Lipschitz strongly pseudocontractive mappings in E. A consequence of our results gives an affirmative answer to a problem posed by one of the authors in 1990. (J. Math. Anal. Appl. 151, 2 (1990) p. 460). (author). 36 refs

  11. Finding quantum effects in strong classical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Labun, Lance; Labun, Ou Z.

    2017-06-01

    The long-standing challenge to describing charged particle dynamics in strong classical electromagnetic fields is how to incorporate classical radiation, classical radiation reaction and quantized photon emission into a consistent unified framework. The current, semiclassical methods to describe the dynamics of quantum particles in strong classical fields also provide the theoretical framework for fundamental questions in gravity and hadron-hadron collisions, including Hawking radiation, cosmological particle production and thermalization of particles created in heavy-ion collisions. However, as we show, these methods break down for highly relativistic particles propagating in strong fields. They must therefore be improved and adapted for the description of laser-plasma experiments that typically involve the acceleration of electrons. Theory developed from quantum electrodynamics, together with dedicated experimental efforts, offer the best controllable context to establish a robust, experimentally validated foundation for the fundamental theory of quantum effects in strong classical potentials.

  12. The Charm and Beauty of Strong Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bennich, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    We briefly review common features and overlapping issues in hadron and flavor physics focussing on continuum QCD approaches to heavy bound states, their mass spectrum and weak decay constants in different strong interaction models.

  13. Atomica ionization by strong coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandi, H.S.; Davidovich, L.

    1979-07-01

    The relation among the three most frequently used non-perturbative methods proposed to study the ionization of atoms by strong electromagnetic fields is established. Their range of validity is also determined. (Author) [pt

  14. Perturbation of an exact strong gravity solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, S.A.

    1982-10-01

    Perturbations of an exact strong gravity solution are investigated. It is shown, by using the new multipole expansions previously presented, that this exact and static spherically symmetric solution is stable under odd parity perturbations. (author)

  15. Strong-force theorists scoop Noble Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Durrani, Matin

    2004-01-01

    Three US theorists have shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". Their theoretical work explains why quarks behave almost as free particles at high energies (½ page)

  16. Calculating hadronic properties in strong QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    This talk gives a brief review of the progress that has been made in calculating the properties of hadrons in strong QCD. In keeping with this meeting I will concentrate on those properties that can be studied with electromagnetic probes. Though perturbative QCD is highly successful, it only applies in a limited kinematic regime, where hard scattering occur, and the quarks move in the interaction region as if they are free, pointlike objects. However, the bulk of strong interactions are governed by the long distance regime, where the strong interaction is strong. It is this regime of length scales of the order of a Fermi, that determines the spectrum of light hadrons and their properties. The calculation of these properties requires an understanding of non-perturbative QCD, of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking. (author)

  17. Building strong brands – does it matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Aure, Kristin Gaaseide; Nervik, Kristine Dybvik

    2014-01-01

    Brand equity has proven, through several decades of research, to be a primary source of competitive advantage and future earnings (Yoo & Donthu, 2001). Building strong brands has therefore become a priority for many organizations, with the presumption that building strong brands yields these advantages (Yasin et al., 2007). A quantitative survey was conducted at Sunnmøre in Norway in order to answer the two developed research questions. - Does the brand equity dimensions; brand...

  18. Algebra of strong and electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolokhov, S.V.; Vladimirov, Yu.S.

    2004-01-01

    The algebraic approach to describing the electroweak and strong interactions is considered within the frames of the binary geometrophysics, based on the principles of the Fokker-Feynman direct interparticle interaction theories of the Kaluza-Klein multidimensional geometrical models and the physical structures theory. It is shown that in this approach the electroweak and strong elementary particles interaction through the intermediate vector bosons, are characterized by the subtypes of the algebraic classification of the complex 3 x 3-matrices [ru

  19. Manipulating light with strongly modulated photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notomi, Masaya

    2010-01-01

    Recently, strongly modulated photonic crystals, fabricated by the state-of-the-art semiconductor nanofabrication process, have realized various novel optical properties. This paper describes the way in which they differ from other optical media, and clarifies what they can do. In particular, three important issues are considered: light confinement, frequency dispersion and spatial dispersion. First, I describe the latest status and impact of ultra-strong light confinement in a wavelength-cubic volume achieved in photonic crystals. Second, the extreme reduction in the speed of light is reported, which was achieved as a result of frequency dispersion management. Third, strange negative refraction in photonic crystals is introduced, which results from their unique spatial dispersion, and it is clarified how this leads to perfect imaging. The last two sections are devoted to applications of these novel properties. First, I report the fact that strong light confinement and huge light-matter interaction enhancement make strongly modulated photonic crystals promising for on-chip all-optical processing, and present several examples including all-optical switches/memories and optical logics. As a second application, it is shown that the strong light confinement and slow light in strongly modulated photonic crystals enable the adiabatic tuning of light, which leads to various novel ways of controlling light, such as adiabatic frequency conversion, efficient optomechanics systems, photon memories and photons pinning.

  20. Strong tracking adaptive Kalman filters for underwater vehicle dead reckoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kun; Fang, Shao-Ji; Pang, Yong-Jie

    2007-06-01

    To impove underwater vehicle dead reckoning, a developed strong tracking adaptive kalman filter is proposed. The filter is improved with an additional adaptive factor and an estimator of measurement noise covariance. Since the magnitude of fading factor is changed adaptively, the tracking ability of the filter is still enhanced in low velocity condition of underwater vehicles. The results of simulation tests prove the presented filter effective.

  1. Analog quantum simulation of the Rabi model in the ultra-strong coupling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braumüller, Jochen; Marthaler, Michael; Schneider, Andre; Stehli, Alexander; Rotzinger, Hannes; Weides, Martin; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2017-10-03

    The quantum Rabi model describes the fundamental mechanism of light-matter interaction. It consists of a two-level atom or qubit coupled to a quantized harmonic mode via a transversal interaction. In the weak coupling regime, it reduces to the well-known Jaynes-Cummings model by applying a rotating wave approximation. The rotating wave approximation breaks down in the ultra-strong coupling regime, where the effective coupling strength g is comparable to the energy ω of the bosonic mode, and remarkable features in the system dynamics are revealed. Here we demonstrate an analog quantum simulation of an effective quantum Rabi model in the ultra-strong coupling regime, achieving a relative coupling ratio of g/ω ~ 0.6. The quantum hardware of the simulator is a superconducting circuit embedded in a cQED setup. We observe fast and periodic quantum state collapses and revivals of the initial qubit state, being the most distinct signature of the synthesized model.An analog quantum simulation scheme has been explored with a quantum hardware based on a superconducting circuit. Here the authors investigate the time evolution of the quantum Rabi model at ultra-strong coupling conditions, which is synthesized by slowing down the system dynamics in an effective frame.

  2. Strong Motion Earthquake Data Values of Digitized Strong-Motion Accelerograms, 1933-1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Strong Motion Earthquake Data Values of Digitized Strong-Motion Accelerograms is a database of over 15,000 digitized and processed accelerograph records from...

  3. Gravity as a Strong Prior: Implications for Perception and Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan López-Moliner

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the future, humans are likely to be exposed to environments with altered gravity conditions, be it only visually (Virtual and Augmented Reality, or visually and bodily (space travel. As visually and bodily perceived gravity as well as an interiorized representation of earth gravity are involved in a series of tasks, such as catching, grasping, body orientation estimation and spatial inferences, humans will need to adapt to these new gravity conditions. Performance under earth gravity discrepant conditions has been shown to be relatively poor, and few studies conducted in gravity adaptation are rather discouraging. Especially in VR on earth, conflicts between bodily and visual gravity cues seem to make a full adaptation to visually perceived earth-discrepant gravities nearly impossible, and even in space, when visual and bodily cues are congruent, adaptation is extremely slow. We invoke a Bayesian framework for gravity related perceptual processes, in which earth gravity holds the status of a so called “strong prior”. As other strong priors, the gravity prior has developed through years and years of experience in an earth gravity environment. For this reason, the reliability of this representation is extremely high and overrules any sensory information to its contrary. While also other factors such as the multisensory nature of gravity perception need to be taken into account, we present the strong prior account as a unifying explanation for empirical results in gravity perception and adaptation to earth-discrepant gravities.

  4. Isolation of a strong Arabidopsis guard cell promoter and its potential as a research tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegel Robert S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common limitation in guard cell signaling research is that it is difficult to obtain consistent high expression of transgenes of interest in Arabidopsis guard cells using known guard cell promoters or the constitutive 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. An additional drawback of the 35S promoter is that ectopically expressing a gene throughout the organism could cause pleiotropic effects. To improve available methods for targeted gene expression in guard cells, we isolated strong guard cell promoter candidates based on new guard cell-specific microarray analyses of 23,000 genes that are made available together with this report. Results A promoter, pGC1(At1g22690, drove strong and relatively specific reporter gene expression in guard cells including GUS (beta-glucuronidase and yellow cameleon YC3.60 (GFP-based calcium FRET reporter. Reporter gene expression was weaker in immature guard cells. The expression of YC3.60 was sufficiently strong to image intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in guard cells of intact plants and resolved spontaneous calcium transients in guard cells. The GC1 promoter also mediated strong reporter expression in clustered stomata in the stomatal development mutant too-many-mouths (tmm. Furthermore, the same promoter::reporter constructs also drove guard cell specific reporter expression in tobacco, illustrating the potential of this promoter as a method for high level expression in guard cells. A serial deletion of the promoter defined a guard cell expression promoter region. In addition, anti-sense repression using pGC1 was powerful for reducing specific GFP gene expression in guard cells while expression in leaf epidermal cells was not repressed, demonstrating strong cell-type preferential gene repression. Conclusion The pGC1 promoter described here drives strong reporter expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. It provides a potent research tool for targeted guard cell expression or

  5. The extended reciprocity: Strong belief outperforms persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Shun

    2017-05-21

    The existence of cooperation is a mysterious phenomenon and demands explanation, and direct reciprocity is one key potential explanation for the evolution of cooperation. Direct reciprocity allows cooperation to evolve for cooperators who switch their behavior on the basis of information about the opponent's behavior. Here, relevant to direct reciprocity is information deficiency. When the opponent's last move is unknown, how should players behave? One possibility is to choose cooperation with some default probability without using any further information. In fact, our previous paper (Kurokawa, 2016a) examined this strategy. However, there might be beneficial information other than the opponent's last move. A subsequent study of ours (Kurokawa, 2017) examined the strategy which uses the own last move when the opponent's last move is unknown, and revealed that referring to the own move and trying to imitate it when information is absent is beneficial. Is there any other beneficial information else? How about strong belief (i.e., have infinite memory and believe that the opponent's behavior is unchanged)? Here, we examine the evolution of strategies with strong belief. Analyzing the repeated prisoner's dilemma game and using evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) analysis against an invasion by unconditional defectors, we find the strategy with strong belief is more likely to evolve than the strategy which does not use information other than the opponent player's last move and more likely to evolve than the strategy which uses not only the opponent player's last move but also the own last move. Strong belief produces the extended reciprocity and facilitates the evolution of cooperation. Additionally, we consider the two strategies game between strategies with strong belief and any strategy, and we consider the four strategies game in which unconditional cooperators, unconditional defectors, pessimistic reciprocators with strong belief, and optimistic reciprocators with

  6. Evaporation under vacuum condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuta, Satoshi; Shibata, Yuki; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Toda, Saburo; Takase, Kazuyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear fusion reactor design, an event of water coolant ingress into its vacuum vessel is now being considered as one of the most probable accidents. In this report, the evaporation under vacuum condition is evaluated by using the evaporation model we have developed. The results show that shock-wave by the evaporation occurs whose behavior strongly depends on the initial conditions of vacuum. And in the case of lower initial pressure and temperature, the surface temp finally becomes higher than other conditions. (author)

  7. Reducing Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Johanna

    care may influence decisions on antibiotic use. Based on video-and audio recordings of physician-patient consultations it is investigated how treatment recommendations are presented, can be changed, are forecast and explained, and finally, how they seemingly meet resistance and how this resistance......Antibiotic resistance is a growing public health problem both nationally and internationally, and efficient strategies are needed to reduce unnecessary use. This dissertation presents four research studies, which examine how communication between general practitioners and patients in Danish primary...... is responded to.The first study in the dissertation suggests that treatment recommendations on antibiotics are often done in a way that encourages patient acceptance. In extension of this, the second study of the dissertation examines a case, where acceptance of such a recommendation is changed into a shared...

  8. Reducing sedentarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Wendy; Andersen, Lars Bo; Sigmund, Anderssen

    being a health risk will be briefly considered. Second, a review of the evidence on the health effects of sitting will be presented. This will include results from observational cohort studies on the relationships between sitting and diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancers, depression, obesity...... include sitting during leisure time, at work, and during commuting. Sedentary behaviors such as TV viewing, using a computer or driving a car typically demands low levels of energy expenditure. Youth and adults spend most of their waking time sitting or doing light activities, and most of them do little......, type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal diseases, and psychological disorders. In addition, low level of energy expenditure is one of the key determinants of the current epidemic of overweight and obesity in Europe. In order to both reduce sitting time and to increase the level of physical activity...

  9. Divergent responses of tropical cyclone genesis factors to strong volcanic eruptions at different latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qing; Zhang, Zhongshi; Wang, Huijun

    2018-03-01

    To understand the behaviors of tropical cyclones (TCs), it is very important to explore how TCs respond to anthropogenic greenhouse gases and natural forcings. Volcanic eruptions are a major natural forcing mechanism because they inject sulphate aerosols into the stratosphere, which modulate the global climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation. The number of Atlantic hurricanes is thought to be reduced following strong tropical eruptions, but whether the response of TCs varies with the locations of the volcanoes and the different ocean basins remains unknown. Here, we use the Community Earth System Model-Last Millennium Ensemble to investigate the response of the large-scale environmental factors that spawn TCs to strong volcanic eruptions at different latitudes. A composite analysis indicates that tropical and northern hemisphere volcanic eruptions lead to significantly unfavorable conditions for TC genesis over the whole Pacific basin and the North Atlantic during the 3 years post-eruption, relative to the preceding 3 years. Southern hemisphere volcanic eruptions result in obviously unfavorable conditions for TC formation over the southwestern Pacific, but more favorable conditions over the North Atlantic. The mean response over the Indian Ocean is generally muted and insignificant. It should be noted that volcanic eruptions impact on environmental conditions through both the direct effect (i.e. on radiative forcing) and the indirect effect (i.e. on El Niño-Southern Oscillation), which is not differentiated in this study. In addition, the spread of the TC genesis response is considerably large for each category of eruptions over each ocean basin, which is also seen in the observational/proxy-based records. This large spread is attributed to the differences in stratospheric aerosol distributions, initial states and eruption intensities, and makes the short-term forecast of TC activity following the next large eruption challenging.

  10. A strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuryak, Edward [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University at Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Successful description of robust collective flow phenomena at RHIC by ideal hydrodynamics, recent observations of bound c-barc,q-barq states on the lattice, and other theoretical developments indicate that QGP produced at RHIC, and probably in a wider temperature region T{sub c} < T < 4T{sub c}, is not a weakly coupled quasiparticle gas as believed previously. We discuss how strong the interaction is and why it seems to generate hundreds of binary channels with bound states, surviving well inside the QGP phase. We in particular discuss their effect on pressure and viscosity. We conclude by reviewing the similar phenomena for other 'strongly coupled systems', such as (i) strongly coupled supersymmetric theories studied via Maldacena duality; (ii) trapped ultra-cold atoms with very large scattering length, tuned to Feschbach resonances.

  11. Strong Coupling between Plasmons and Organic Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Bellessa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the properties of organic material in strong coupling with plasmon, mainly based on our work in this field of research. The strong coupling modifies the optical transitions of the structure, and occurs when the interaction between molecules and plasmon prevails on the damping of the system. We describe the dispersion relation of different plasmonic systems, delocalized and localized plasmon, coupled to aggregated dyes and the typical properties of these systems in strong coupling. The modification of the dye emission is also studied. In the second part, the effect of the microscopic structure of the organics, which can be seen as a disordered film, is described. As the different molecules couple to the same plasmon mode, an extended coherent state on several microns is observed.

  12. A theory of the strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The most promising candidate for a fundamental microscopic theory of the strong interactions is a gauge theory of colored quarks-Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). There are many excellent reasons for believing in this theory. It embodies the broken symmetries, SU(3) and chiral SU(3)xSU(3), of the strong interactions and reflects the success of (albeit crude) quark models in explaining the spectrum of the observed hadrons. The hidden quantum number of color, necessary to account for the quantum numbers of the low lying hadrons, plays a fundamental role in this theory as the SU(3) color gauge vector 'gluons' are the mediators of the strong interactions. The absence of physical quark states can be 'explained' by the hypothesis of color confinement i.e. that hadrons are permanently bound in color singlet bound states. Finally this theory is unique in being asymptotically free, thus accounting for the almost free field theory behvior of quarks observed at short distances. (Auth.)

  13. Electromagnetic processes in strong crystalline fields

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    We propose a number of new investigations on aspects of radiation from high energy electron and positron beams (10-300 GeV) in single crystals and amorphous targets. The common heading is radiation emission by electrons and positrons in strong electromagnetic fields, but as the setup is quite versatile, other related phenomena in radiation emission can be studied as well. The intent is to clarify the role of a number of important aspects of radiation in strong fields as e.g. observed in crystals. We propose to measure trident 'Klein-like' production in strong crystalline fields, 'crystalline undulator' radiation, 'sandwich' target phenomena, LPM suppression of pair production as well as axial and planar effects in contributions of spin to the radiation.

  14. Patterns of Strong Coupling for LHC Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Da; Rattazzi, Riccardo; Riva, Francesco

    2016-11-23

    Even though the Standard Model (SM) is weakly coupled at the Fermi scale, a new strong dynamics involving its degrees of freedom may conceivably lurk at slightly higher energies, in the multi TeV range. Approximate symmetries provide a structurally robust context where, within the low energy description, the dimensionless SM couplings are weak, while the new strong dynamics manifests itself exclusively through higher-derivative interactions. We present an exhaustive classification of such scenarios in the form of effective field theories, paying special attention to new classes of models where the strong dynamics involves, along with the Higgs boson, the SM gauge bosons and/or the fermions. The IR softness of the new dynamics suppresses its effects at LEP energies, but deviations are in principle detectable at the LHC, even at energies below the threshold for production of new states. Our construction provides the so far unique structurally robust context where to motivate several searches in Higgs physics, d...

  15. Electronic Structure of Strongly Correlated Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structure and physical properties of strongly correlated materials containing elements with partially filled 3d, 4d, 4f and 5f electronic shells is analyzed by Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). DMFT is the most universal and effective tool used for the theoretical investigation of electronic states with strong correlation effects. In the present book the basics of the method are given and its application to various material classes is shown. The book is aimed at a broad readership: theoretical physicists and experimentalists studying strongly correlated systems. It also serves as a handbook for students and all those who want to be acquainted with fast developing filed of condensed matter physics.

  16. Aperture averaging in strong oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Muhsin Caner; Baykal, Yahya

    2018-04-01

    Receiver aperture averaging technique is employed in underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) systems to mitigate the effects of oceanic turbulence, thus to improve the system performance. The irradiance flux variance is a measure of the intensity fluctuations on a lens of the receiver aperture. Using the modified Rytov theory which uses the small-scale and large-scale spatial filters, and our previously presented expression that shows the atmospheric structure constant in terms of oceanic turbulence parameters, we evaluate the irradiance flux variance and the aperture averaging factor of a spherical wave in strong oceanic turbulence. Irradiance flux variance variations are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters and the receiver aperture diameter are examined in strong oceanic turbulence. Also, the effect of the receiver aperture diameter on the aperture averaging factor is presented in strong oceanic turbulence.

  17. Electromagnetic Processes in strong Crystalline Fields

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    We propose a number of new investigations on aspects of radiation from high energy electron and positron beams (10-300 GeV) in single crystals and amorphous targets. The common heading is radiation emission by electrons and positrons in strong electromagnetic fields, but as the setup is quite versatile, other related phenomena in radiation emission can be studied as well. The intent is to clarify the role of a number of important aspects of radiation in strong fields as e.g. observed in crystals. We propose to measure trident 'Klein-like' production in strong crystalline fields, 'crystalline undulator' radiation, 'sandwich' target phenomena, LPM suppression of pair production as well as axial and planar effects in contributions of spin to the radiation.

  18. Comparison of the conditioning of High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Giner Navarro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MV/m, at very low breakdown rates, have been successfully achieved in numerous CLIC prototype accelerating structures. The conditioning and operational histories of several structures, tested at KEK and CERN, have been compared and there is clear evidence that the conditioning progresses with the number of RF pulses and not the number of breakdowns. This observation opens the possibility that the optimum conditioning strategy, which minimizes the total number of breakdowns the structure is subject to without increasing conditioning time, may be to never exceed the breakdown rate target for operation. The result is also likely to have a strong impact on efforts to understand the physical mechanism underlying conditioning and may lead to preparation procedures which reduce conditioning time.

  19. Dissolution of UO2 in redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Pablo de, J.; Rovira, M.

    1998-01-01

    The performance assessment of the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel in geological formations is strongly dependent on the spent fuel matrix dissolution. Unirradiated uranium (IV) dioxide has shown to be very useful for such purposes. The stability of UO 2 is very dependent on vault redox conditions. At reducing conditions, which are expected in deep groundwaters, the dissolution of the UO 2 -matrix can be explained in terms of solubility, while under oxidizing conditions, the UO 2 is thermodynamically unstable and the dissolution is kinetically controlled. In this report the parameters which affect the uranium solubility under reducing conditions, basically pH and redox potential are discussed. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution rate equations as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and oxidant concentration are reported. Dissolution experiments performed with spent fuel are also reviewed. The experimental equations presented in this work, have been used to model independent dissolution experiments performed with both unirradiated and irradiated UO 2 . (Author)

  20. Experimental investigation of strong field trident production

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, J; Knudsen, H; Thomsen, H D; Uggerhøj, E; Uggerhøj, U I; Sona, P; Mangiarotti, A; Ketel, T J; Dizdar, A; Dalton, M M; Ballestrero, S; Connell, S H

    2010-01-01

    We show by experiment that an electron impinging on an electric field that is of critical magnitude in its rest frame, may produce an electron-positron pair. Our measurements address higher-order QED, using the strong electric fields obtainable along particular crystallographic directions in single crystals. For the amorphous material our data are in good agreement with theory, whereas a discrepancy with theory on the magnitude of the trident enhancement is found in the precisely aligned case where the strong electric field acts.