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Sample records for strongly layered rocks

  1. Strong ground motion spectra for layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askar, A.; Cakmak, A.S.; Engin, H.

    1977-01-01

    This article presents an analytic method and calculations of strong motion spectra for the energy, displacement, velocity and acceleration based on the physical and geometric ground properties at a site. Although earthquakes occur with large deformations and high stress intensities which necessarily lead to nonlinear phenomena, most analytical efforts to date have been based on linear analyses in engineering seismology and soil dynamics. There are, however, a wealth of problems such as the shifts in frequency, dispersion due to the amplitude, the generation of harmonics, removal of resonance infinities, which cannot be accounted for by a linear theory. In the study, the stress-strain law for soil is taken as tau=G 0 γ+G 1 γ 3 +etaγ where tau is the stress, γ is the strain, G 0 and G 1 are the elasticity coefficients and eta is the damping and are different in each layer. The above stress-strain law describes soils with hysterisis where the hysterisis loops for various amplitudes of the strain are no longer concentric ellipses as for linear relations but are oval shapes rotated with respect to each other similar to the materials with the Osgood-Ramberg law. It is observed that even slight nonlinearities may drastically alter the various response spectra from that given by linear analysis. In fact, primary waves cause resonance conditions such that secondary waves are generated. As a result, a weak energy transfer from the primary to the secondary waves takes place, thus altering the wave spectrum. The mathematical technique that is utilized for the solution of the nonlinear equation is a special perturbation method as an extension of Poincare's procedure. The method considers shifts in the frequencies which are determined by the boundedness of the energy

  2. Strong double layer in the downward current region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Newman, D.; McFadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.

    2001-12-01

    A direct observation of a strong double layer has been recorded in detail by the FAST satellite in the downward current region of the aurora. This presentation concentrates on a particular compelling example in which both the electric field and particle measurements clearly illustrate the detail characteristics of the double layer. Electrons with initial energies of about 50 eV are observed to be accelerated through the double layer into a beam of more than 750 eV. This beam is rapidly plateaued by intense wave turbulence into a extended power law distribution. This process forms accelerated `flat-top' electron distributions, which are represented of energized distributions in the downward current region. Ions are also observed to be accelerated by the double layer in the opposite direction of the electron beam. Ion conics on the low potential side of the double layer are trapped between the double layer and their mirror points. The double layer is observed to move up the magnetic field line, in the direction of the electron beam. In front of it, an ion population moves with the speed of the double layer suggesting an overshoot in the potential ramp. The intense wave turbulence on the high potential side is seen to transform into electron phase-space holes far away from the double layer.

  3. Towards a geomechanics classification of folded layered rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliardi, Federico; Zanchi, Andrea; Bianchi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    Several schemes have been proposed in the last decades to account for the effects of structure and alteration of rock masses on their geo-mechanical properties. Among these, the Geological Strength Index (GSI) turned out as the most effective to account for complex geological conditions, including heavily fractured, heterogeneous (e.g. flysch-like) or tectonically disturbed rock masses. It is well known that folding has a direct impact on the type and degree of fracturing. Nevertheless, no classification scheme has been developed to introduce explicitly the effects of folding and associated fracturing on rock mass strength and deformability. In this perspective, we carried out an exploratory study aimed at establishing relationships between outcrop-scale folding and GSI in layered carbonate rock masses, exceptionally well exposed in a quarry near Bergamo (Lombardia, Southern Alps). A N-S trending, 350m long and 115m high benched rock face exposes a complete cross section of a sub-horizontal inclined fold involving Lower Jurassic cherty mudstones (Moltrasio Lms.) and marly limestones successions (Domaro Lms.). The main fold has an axial surface moderately dipping to the north and is characterised by polyharmonic folds at scales of metres to tens of metres. The site was documented by producing a digital outcrop through a high-resolution terrestrial photogrammetric survey from distances ranging from 70 to 130 m (18 camera stations, 395 pictures), using RTK GNSS measurements for camera station geo-referencing. Data processing by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) techniques resulted in detailed point clouds covering the entire slope with a cm-scale accuracy. In order to establish relationships between lithology, folding styles, and geomechanical properties of folded rock masses we performed a detailed structural analysis at 25 survey stations spread over all the different fold sectors. These surveys include: lithology, bedding attitude and thickness, brittle structures (e

  4. Responses of boundary layers to strong external disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Masahito

    1990-10-01

    The transition from laminar flow to turbulent flow of the boundary layer is an important phenomenon for various problems in astronautical engineering. When the turbulence in the flow is weak, the boundary layer transition starts from the spatial amplification of a viscous T-S (Tollmien Schlichting) wave. The initial wave starts as a two dimensional wave and grows rapidly to a three dimensional wave with amplification. Finally, it corrupts to small scale hairpin eddies. The transitions starting from these wave amplifications are studied, and instability mechanisms are analyzed. In order to analyze the mechanism, the strength of turbulence (eddies) in the air flow that develops a transitional structure in the boundary layer and leads to a turbulent flow transition is analyzed. The responses of the boundary layers to the strong external disturbances are studied experimentally by introducing sonic wave which simulates hairpin eddies in the lower part of the front edge of a flat plate.

  5. Hillslope evolution in landscapes dominated by layered rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, R.; Anderson, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Geologic structure and lithology can exert fundamental control over hillslope evolution. Landforms common across the western US, such as mesas, hogbacks, flatirons, and symmetric ridges bounding dikes, develop in the face of differential weathering of layered rocks in a horizontal, tilted, or vertical structural orientation. These features exhibit a characteristic form distinct from that of homogeneous, soil-mantled hillslopes; linear-to-concave up slopes developed on soft underlying rock typically display a thin, non-uniform layer of mobile regolith and are armored by debris derived from the resistant layers. Feedbacks between weathering and transport of both easily eroded rock and embedded resistant material can explain this general form where debris is dominated by large resistant blocks. In the more general case, however, relationships between the size distribution of the resistant material, relative weathering rates, and boundary condition history are not well-understood. Here we use a 1-D numerical model to explore the evolution of two end-member landforms: a hogback associated with a tilted sandstone bed, and a symmetrical ridge associated with a vertical basalt dike, both bounded by shale bedrock. The first, modeled after the Dakota Hogback near Boulder, Colorado, produces large sandstone blocks that both armor the underlying slope from weathering and stall regolith motion. The vertical dike, modeled after Shiprock, New Mexico, produces both large blocks and small basalt chips that armor the bounding slopes. We show that in both settings, feedbacks between armor and soft rock lead to autogenic processes that modulate base level signals, alter hillslope form, and increase relief over time when compared to a control case with no armor. We explore a variety of boundary conditions in which the presence of these feedbacks leads to a quasi-steady state hillslope form that differs both quantitatively and qualitatively from that expected of a traditional parabolic

  6. Application of Confined Blasting in Water-Filled Deep Holes to Control Strong Rock Pressure in Hard Rock Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxuan Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In extra-thick coal seams, mining operations can lead to large-scale disturbances, complex overburden structures, and frequent and strong strata behavior in the stope, which are serious threats to mine safety. This study analyzed the overburden structure and strata behavior and proposed the technique of confined blasting in water-filled deep holes as a measure to prevent strong rock pressure. It found that there are two primary reasons for the high effectiveness of the proposed technique in presplitting hard coal and rock. First, the fracture water enables much more efficient transfer of dynamic load due to its incompressibility. Second, the subsequent expansion of water can further split the rock by compression. A mechanical model was used to reveal how the process of confined blasting in water-filled deep holes presplit roof. Moreover, practical implementation of this technique was found to improve the structure of hard, thick roof and prevent strong rock pressure, demonstrating its effectiveness in roof control.

  7. Large linear magnetoresistivity in strongly inhomogeneous planar and layered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgadaev, S.A.; Kusmartsev, F.V.

    2005-01-01

    Explicit expressions for magnetoresistance R of planar and layered strongly inhomogeneous two-phase systems are obtained, using exact dual transformation, connecting effective conductivities of in-plane isotropic two-phase systems with and without magnetic field. These expressions allow to describe the magnetoresistance of various inhomogeneous media at arbitrary concentrations x and magnetic fields H. All expressions show large linear magnetoresistance effect with different dependencies on the phase concentrations. The corresponding plots of the x- and H-dependencies of R(x,H) are represented for various values, respectively, of magnetic field and concentrations at some values of inhomogeneity parameter. The obtained results show a remarkable similarity with the existing experimental data on linear magnetoresistance in silver chalcogenides Ag 2+δ Se. A possible physical explanation of this similarity is proposed. It is shown that the random, stripe type, structures of inhomogeneities are the most suitable for a fabrication of magnetic sensors and a storage of information at room temperatures

  8. Field Guide to Layered Rocks. Earth Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Tom

    Presented is the study of sequences of rock layers as the basis for historical geology. Also considered is the influence of rock layers on the appearance of the landscape. Specific relevant laws of geology are presented. Preparation for a field trip is discussed. An example field trip is discussed and field techniques and projects are reviewed.…

  9. Pitfalls in velocity analysis for strongly contrasting, layered media - Example from the Chalk Group, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Mahboubeh; Uldall, Anette; Moreau, Julien; Nielsen, Lars

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about the velocity structure of the subsurface is critical in key seismic processing sequences, for instance, migration, depth conversion, and construction of initial P- and S-wave velocity models for full-waveform inversion. Therefore, the quality of subsurface imaging is highly dependent upon the quality of the seismic velocity analysis. Based on a case study from the Danish part of the North Sea, we show how interference caused by multiples, converted waves, and thin-layer effects may lead to incorrect velocity estimation, if such effects are not accounted for. Seismic wave propagation inside finely layered reservoir rocks dominated by chalk is described by two-dimensional finite-difference wave field simulation. The rock physical properties used for the modeling are based on an exploration well from the Halfdan field in the Danish sector of the North Sea. The modeling results are compared to seismic data from the study area. The modeling shows that interference of primaries with multiples, converted waves and thin-bed effects can give rise to strong anomalies in standard velocity analysis plots. Consequently, root-mean-square (RMS) velocity profiles may be erroneously picked. In our study area, such mis-picking can introduce errors in, for example, the thickness estimation of the layers near the base of the studied sedimentary strata by 11% to 26%. Tests show that front muting and bandpass filtering cannot significantly improve the quality of velocity analysis in our study. However, we notice that spiking deconvolution applied before velocity analysis may to some extent reduce the impact of interference and, therefore, reduce the risk of erroneous picking of the velocity function.

  10. Prediction of strong earthquake motions on rock surface using evolutionary process models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, H.; Sugito, M.

    1984-01-01

    Stochastic process models are developed for prediction of strong earthquake motions for engineering design purposes. Earthquake motions with nonstationary frequency content are modeled by using the concept of evolutionary processes. Discussion is focused on the earthquake motions on bed rocks which are important for construction of nuclear power plants in seismic regions. On this basis, two earthquake motion prediction models are developed, one (EMP-IB Model) for prediction with given magnitude and epicentral distance, and the other (EMP-IIB Model) to account for the successive fault ruptures and the site location relative to the fault of great earthquakes. (Author) [pt

  11. Strain localisation in mechanically layered rocks beneath detachment zones: insights from numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Le Pourhiet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We have designed a series of fully dynamic numerical simulations aimed at assessing how the orientation of mechanical layering in rocks controls the orientation of shear bands and the depth of penetration of strain in the footwall of detachment zones. Two parametric studies are presented. In the first one, the influence of stratification orientation on the occurrence and mode of strain localisation is tested by varying initial dip of inherited layering in the footwall with regard to the orientation of simple shear applied at the rigid boundary simulating a rigid hanging wall, all scaling and rheological parameter kept constant. It appears that when Mohr–Coulomb plasticity is being used, shear bands are found to localise only when the layering is being stretched. This corresponds to early deformational stages for inital layering dipping in the same direction as the shear is applied, and to later stages for intial layering dipping towards the opposite direction of shear. In all the cases, localisation of the strain after only γ=1 requires plastic yielding to be activated in the strong layer. The second parametric study shows that results are length-scale independent and that orientation of shear bands is not sensitive to the viscosity contrast or the strain rate. However, decreasing or increasing strain rate is shown to reduce the capacity of the shear zone to localise strain. In the later case, the strain pattern resembles a mylonitic band but the rheology is shown to be effectively linear. Based on the results, a conceptual model for strain localisation under detachment faults is presented. In the early stages, strain localisation occurs at slow rates by viscous shear instabilities but as the layered media is exhumed, the temperature drops and the strong layers start yielding plastically, forming shear bands and localising strain at the top of the shear zone. Once strain localisation has occured, the deformation in the shear band becomes

  12. Frictional sliding in layered rock: laboratory-scale experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.; Perry, K.E. Jr.; Epstein, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    The work is part of the rock mechanics effort for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program. The laboratory-scale experiments are intended to provide high quality data on the mechanical behavior of jointed structures that can be used to validate complex numerical models for rock-mass behavior. Frictional sliding between simulated rock joints was studied using phase shifting moire interferometry. A model, constructed from stacks of machined and sandblasted granite plates, contained a central hole bore normal to the place so that frictional slip would be induced between the plates near the hole under compressive loading. Results show a clear evolution of slip with increasing load. Since the rock was not cycled through loading- unloading, the quantitative differences between the three data sets are probably due to a ''wearing-in'' effect. The highly variable spatial frequency of the data is probably due to the large grain size of the granite and the stochastic frictional processes. An unusual feature of the evolution of slip with increasing load is that as the load gets larger, some plates seem to return to a null position. Figs, 6 refs

  13. Extraordinary Photoluminescence and Strong Temperature/Angle-Dependent Raman Responses in Few-Layer Phosphorene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (2 to 5 layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us ...

  14. Strong Effect of Azodye Layer Thickness on RM-Stabilized Photoalignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-21

    Strong Effect of Azodye Layer Thickness on RM-Stabilized Photoalignment Colin McGinty*, Valerie Finnemeyer**, Robert Reich**, Harry Clark...vertical alignment on these substrates. For the thinner BY layers, we do not see this strong evidence of out of plane reorientation. The out of...In this report we show the surprising effect that thin azodye layers demonstrate improved stability over those that are thicker. Figure 6

  15. Model of Vertical Resistivity Distribution of Rock Layers in Jeneberang Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Altin Massinai, Muhammad; Syamsuddin, Syamsuddin; Makhrani, Makhrani

    2010-01-01

    Daerah Aliran Sungai (DAS) or Watershed is the accumulation of material from Jeneberang debris avalanche of Mount Bawakaraeng. The Resistivity material from several types of rock settling needs to be identified by using the geoelectric geophysical studies. Geoelectrical resistivity method used in this study aims to map the vertical layers of rock in the upstream and downstream of Jeneberang watershed. The results shows that resistivity values in the upstream of Jeneberang water...

  16. Hydrodynamic thickness of petroleum oil adsorbed layers in the pores of reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkafeef, Saad F; Algharaib, Meshal K; Alajmi, Abdullah F

    2006-06-01

    The hydrodynamic thickness delta of adsorbed petroleum (crude) oil layers into the pores of sandstone rocks, through which the liquid flows, has been studied by Poiseuille's flow law and the evolution of (electrical) streaming current. The adsorption of petroleum oil is accompanied by a numerical reduction in the (negative) surface potential of the pore walls, eventually stabilizing at a small positive potential, attributed to the oil macromolecules themselves. After increasing to around 30% of the pore radius, the adsorbed layer thickness delta stopped growing either with time or with concentrations of asphaltene in the flowing liquid. The adsorption thickness is confirmed with the blockage value of the rock pores' area determined by the combination of streaming current and streaming potential measurements. This behavior is attributed to the effect on the disjoining pressure across the adsorbed layer, as described by Derjaguin and Churaev, of which the polymolecular adsorption films lose their stability long before their thickness has approached the radius of the rock pore.

  17. A strong angular dependence of magnetic properties of magnetosome chains: Implications for rock magnetism and paleomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Kunpeng; Pan, Yongxin; Williams, Wyn; Liu, Qingsong; Qin, Huafeng

    2013-10-01

    Single-domain magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria (magnetosomes) and aligned in chains are of great interest in the biosciences and geosciences. Here, we investigated angular variation of magnetic properties of aligned Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, each of which contains one single fragmental chain of magnetosomes. With measurements at increasing angles from the chain direction, we observed that (i) the hysteresis loop gradually changes from nearly rectangular to a ramp-like shape (e.g., Bc and remanence decrease), (ii) the acquisition and demagnetization curves of IRM shift toward higher fields (e.g., Bcr increases), and (iii) the FORC diagram shifts toward higher coercivity fields (e.g., Bc,FORC increases). For low-temperature results, compared to unoriented samples, the samples containing aligned chains have a much lower remanence loss of field-cooled (δFC) and zero-field-cooled (δZFC) remanence upon warming through the Verwey transition, higher δ-ratio (δ = δFC/δZFC) for the measurement parallel to the chain direction, and lower δ-ratio, larger δFC and δZFC values for the perpendicular measurement. Micromagnetic simulations confirm the experimental observations and reveal that the magnetization reversal of magnetosome chain appears to be noncoherent at low angles and coherent at high angles. The simulations also demonstrate that the angular dependence of magnetic properties is related to the dispersion degree of individual chains, indicating that effects of anisotropy need to be accounted for when using rock magnetism to identify magnetosomes or magnetofossils once they have been preserved in aligned chains. Additionally, this study experimentally demonstrates an empirical correspondence of the parameter Bc,FORC to Bcr rather than Bc, at least for magnetite chains with strong shape anisotropy. This suggests FORC analysis is a good discriminant of magnetofossils in sediments and rocks.

  18. Extraordinary photoluminescence and strong temperature/angle-dependent Raman responses in few-layer phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-09-23

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (two to five layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us to use an optical method to quickly determine the crystalline orientation without tunneling electron microscopy or scanning tunneling microscopy. Our results provide much needed experimental information about the band structures and exciton nature in few-layer phosphorene.

  19. Strong modification of the reflection from birefringent layers of semiconductor nanowires by nanoshells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diedenhofen, S.L.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Gómez Rivas, J.

    2011-01-01

    The propagation of light in layers of vertically aligned nanowires is determined by their unique and extreme optical properties. Depending on the nanowire filling fraction and their diameter, layers of nanowires form strongly birefringent media. This large birefringence gives rise to sharp angle

  20. Steady state, erosional continuity, and the topography of landscapes developed in layered rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perne, Matija; Covington, Matthew D.; Thaler, Evan A.; Myre, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of topographic steady state has substantially informed our understanding of the relationships between landscapes, tectonics, climate, and lithology. In topographic steady state, erosion rates are equal everywhere, and steepness adjusts to enable equal erosion rates in rocks of different strengths. This conceptual model makes an implicit assumption of vertical contacts between different rock types. Here we hypothesize that landscapes in layered rocks will be driven toward a state of erosional continuity, where retreat rates on either side of a contact are equal in a direction parallel to the contact rather than in the vertical direction. For vertical contacts, erosional continuity is the same as topographic steady state, whereas for horizontal contacts it is equivalent to equal rates of horizontal retreat on either side of a rock contact. Using analytical solutions and numerical simulations, we show that erosional continuity predicts the form of flux steady-state landscapes that develop in simulations with horizontally layered rocks. For stream power erosion, the nature of continuity steady state depends on the exponent, n, in the erosion model. For n = 1, the landscape cannot maintain continuity. For cases where n ≠ 1, continuity is maintained, and steepness is a function of erodibility that is predicted by the theory. The landscape in continuity steady state can be quite different from that predicted by topographic steady state. For n stream power erosion model, continuity steady state provides a general mathematical tool that may also be useful to understand landscapes that develop by other erosion processes.

  1. Conditional analysis near strong shear layers in DNS of isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kaneda, Yukio; Hunt, Julian C R

    2011-01-01

    Data analysis of high resolution DNS of isotropic turbulence with the Taylor scale Reynolds number R λ = 1131 shows that there are thin shear layers consisting of a cluster of strong vortex tubes with typical diameter of order 10η, where η is the Kolmogorov length scale. The widths of the layers are of the order of the Taylor micro length scale. According to the analysis of one of the layers, coarse grained vorticity in the layer are aligned approximately in the plane of the layer so that there is a net mean shear across the layer with a mean velocity jump of the order of the root-mean-square of the fluctuating velocity, and energy dissipation averaged over the layer is larger than ten times the average over the whole flow. The mean and the standard deviation of the energy transfer T(x, κ) from scales larger than 1/κ to scales smaller than 1/κ at position x are largest within the layers (where the most intense vortices and dissipation occur), but are also large just outside the layers (where viscous stresses are weak), by comparison with the average values of T over the whole region. The DNS data are consistent with exterior fluctuation being damped/filtered at the interface of the layer and then selectively amplified within the layer.

  2. Solid-Gas Coupling Model for Coal-Rock Mass Deformation and Pressure Relief Gas Flow in Protection Layer Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zhuohui; Feng, Tao; Yuan, Zhigang; Xie, Donghai; Chen, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The solid-gas coupling model for mining coal-rock mass deformation and pressure relief gas flow in protection layer mining is the key to determine deformation of coal-rock mass and migration law of pressure relief gas of protection layer mining in outburst coal seams. Based on the physical coupling process between coal-rock mass deformation and pressure-relief gas migration, the coupling variable of mining coal-rock mass, a part of governing equations of gas seepage field and deformation fiel...

  3. Modeling of X-ray rocking curves for layers after two-stage ion-implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Liubchenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we consider the approach for simulation of X-ray rocking curves inherent to InSb(111 crystals implanted with Be+ ions with various energies and doses. The method is based on the semi-kinematical theory of X-ray diffraction in the case of Bragg geometry. A fitting procedure that relies on the Hooke–Jeeves direct search algorithm was developed to determine the depth profiles of strain and structural disorders in the ion-modified layers. The thickness and maximum value of strain of ion-modified InSb(111 layers were determined. For implantation energies 66 and 80 keV, doses 25 and 50 µC, the thickness of the strained layer is about 500 nm with the maximum value of strain close to 0.1%. Additionally, an amorphous layer with significant thickness was found in the implantation region.

  4. Solute transport through fractured rock: Radial diffusion into the rock matrix with several geological layers for an arbitrary length decay chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Batoul; Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a model development to derive a semi-analytical solution to describe reactive solute transport through a single channel in a fracture with cylindrical geometry. The model accounts for advection through the channel, radial diffusion into the adjacent heterogeneous rock matrix comprising different geological layers, adsorption on both the channel surface, and the geological layers of the rock matrix and radioactive decay chain. Not only an arbitrary-length decay chain, but also as many number of the rock matrix layers with different properties as observed in the field can be handled. The solution, which is analytical in the Laplace domain, is transformed back to the time domain numerically e.g. by use of de Hoog algorithm. The solution is verified against experimental data and analytical solutions of limiting cases of solute transport through porous media. More importantly, the relative importance and contribution of different processes on solute transport retardation in fractured rocks are investigated by simulating several cases of varying complexity. The simulation results are compared with those obtained from rectangular model with linear matrix diffusion. It is found that the impact of channel geometry on breakthrough curves increases markedly as the transport distance along the flow channel and away into the rock matrix increase. The effect of geometry is more pronounced for transport of a decay chain when the rock matrix consists of a porous altered layer.

  5. Experimental observations of strong double layers. [in triple plasma device for lower magnetospheric simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, P.; Hershkowitz, N.; Hubbard, R.; Joyce, G.

    1978-01-01

    A computer simulation is applied to the production of strong electric potential double layers (DL) in a triple plasma device. The simulation is intended to represent DL in the low magnetosphere above the auroral zones. The DL are described as standing electrostatic shocks with different energy coefficients in their strong and weak forms. The strong DL was generally found to be unstable, but stability could be imparted if a population of trapped electrons was presented. Stability increased with the length of the system. A schematic for the system is presented, and a phase-space plot of electrons (indicating system stability) is graphed.

  6. Dynamic Fracturing Behavior of Layered Rock with Different Inclination Angles in SHPB Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiadong Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fracturing behavior of layered rocks is usually influenced by bedding planes. In this paper, five groups of bedded sandstones with different bedding inclination angles θ are used to carry out impact compression tests by split Hopkinson pressure bar. A high-speed camera is used to capture the fracturing process of specimens. Based on testing results, three failure patterns are identified and classified, including (A splitting along bedding planes; (B sliding failure along bedding planes; (C fracturing across bedding planes. The failure pattern (C can be further classified into three subcategories: (C1 fracturing oblique to loading direction; (C2 fracturing parallel to loading direction; (C3 mixed fracturing across bedding planes. Meanwhile, a numerical model of layered rock and SHPB system are established by particle flow code (PFC. The numerical results show that the shear stress is the main reason for inducing the damage along bedding plane at θ = 0°~75°. Both tensile stress and shear stress on bedding planes contribute to the splitting failure along bedding planes when the inclination angle is 90°. Besides, tensile stress is the main reason that leads to the damage in rock matrixes at θ = 0°~90°.

  7. Rock-Salt Growth-Induced (003) Cracking in a Layered Positive Electrode for Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanlei [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast; Omenya, Fredrick [NorthEast; Yan, Pengfei [Environmental; Luo, Langli [Environmental; Whittingham, M. Stanley [NorthEast; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental; Zhou, Guangwen [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast

    2017-10-20

    For the first time, the (003) cracking is observed and determined to be the major cracking mechanism for the primary particles of Ni-rich layered dioxides as the positive electrode for Li-ion batteries. Using transmission electron microscopy techniques, here we show that the propagation and fracturing of platelet-like rock-salt phase along the (003) plane of the layered oxide are the leading cause for the cracking of primary particles. The fracturing of the rock-salt platelet is induced by the stress discontinuity between the parent layered oxide and the rock-salt phase. The high nickel content is considered to be the key factor for the formation of the rock-salt platelet and thus the (003) cracking. The (003)-type cracking can be a major factor for the structural degradation and associated capacity fade of the layered positive electrode.

  8. The thermodynamic spin magnetization of strongly correlated 2d electrons in a silicon inversion layer

    OpenAIRE

    Prus, O.; Yaish, Y.; Reznikov, M.; Sivan, U.; Pudalov, V.

    2002-01-01

    A novel method invented to measure the minute thermodynamic spin magnetization of dilute two dimensional fermions is applied to electrons in a silicon inversion layer. Interplay between the ferromagnetic interaction and disorder enhances the low temperature susceptibility up to 7.5 folds compared with the Pauli susceptibility of non-interacting electrons. The magnetization peaks in the vicinity of the density where transition to strong localization takes place. At the same density, the suscep...

  9. Polyaxial stress-dependent permeability of a three-dimensional fractured rock layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qinghua; Wang, Xiaoguang; Xiang, Jiansheng; Latham, John-Paul

    2017-12-01

    A study about the influence of polyaxial (true-triaxial) stresses on the permeability of a three-dimensional (3D) fractured rock layer is presented. The 3D fracture system is constructed by extruding a two-dimensional (2D) outcrop pattern of a limestone bed that exhibits a ladder structure consisting of a "through-going" joint set abutted by later-stage short fractures. Geomechanical behaviour of the 3D fractured rock in response to in-situ stresses is modelled by the finite-discrete element method, which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, variation of stress fields, reactivation of pre-existing rough fractures and propagation of new cracks. A series of numerical simulations is designed to load the fractured rock using various polyaxial in-situ stresses and the stress-dependent flow properties are further calculated. The fractured layer tends to exhibit stronger flow localisation and higher equivalent permeability as the far-field stress ratio is increased and the stress field is rotated such that fractures are preferentially oriented for shearing. The shear dilation of pre-existing fractures has dominant effects on flow localisation in the system, while the propagation of new fractures has minor impacts. The role of the overburden stress suggests that the conventional 2D analysis that neglects the effect of the out-of-plane stress (perpendicular to the bedding interface) may provide indicative approximations but not fully capture the polyaxial stress-dependent fracture network behaviour. The results of this study have important implications for understanding the heterogeneous flow of geological fluids (e.g. groundwater, petroleum) in subsurface and upscaling permeability for large-scale assessments.

  10. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data.

  11. In situ determination of the dynamic properties of thinly-layered rock to evaluate rock-structure interaction at a nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, William J.; Rizzo, Paul C.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of layers of weak sedimentary rock in a column of otherwise competent rock can significantly affect the seismic response of nuclear power plant structures due to rock-structure interaction effects. The determination of the dynamic properties of thinly-layered rock is, however, difficult. When borings are placed close enough to allow for a characterization of refracted waves, other potential problems such as the identification of clear P- and S-wave arrivals, extremely short duration of records, near-field waves, instrumental stability, and overall record resolution become magnified. Other problems such as cultural noise and signal amplitude can become critical when high resolution is required. Conventional storage oscilloscopes and seismographs are inadequate under these conditions, but modern digital recording systems with the application of stringent calibration and recording procedures can yield successful results. A case history of a high-precision cross-hole survey to a depth of 150 meters in thinly-bedded sedimentary rock at a nuclear power plant site is presented in order to illustrate the systems and procedures necessary to obtain successful results under adverse conditions. (author)

  12. Strong composite films with layered structures prepared by casting silk fibroin-graphene oxide hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Li, Chun; Yuan, Wenjing; Shi, Gaoquan

    2013-04-01

    Composite films of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and silk fibroin (SF) with layered structures have been prepared by facile solution casting of SF-GO hydrogels. The as-prepared composite film containing 15% (by weight, wt%) of SF shows a high tensile strength of 221 +/- 16 MPa and a failure strain of 1.8 +/- 0.4%, which partially surpass those of natural nacre. Particularly, this composite film also has a high modulus of 17.2 +/- 1.9 GPa. The high mechanical properties of this composite film can be attributed to its high content of GO (85 wt%), compact layered structure and the strong hydrogen bonding interaction between SF chains and GO sheets.Composite films of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and silk fibroin (SF) with layered structures have been prepared by facile solution casting of SF-GO hydrogels. The as-prepared composite film containing 15% (by weight, wt%) of SF shows a high tensile strength of 221 +/- 16 MPa and a failure strain of 1.8 +/- 0.4%, which partially surpass those of natural nacre. Particularly, this composite film also has a high modulus of 17.2 +/- 1.9 GPa. The high mechanical properties of this composite film can be attributed to its high content of GO (85 wt%), compact layered structure and the strong hydrogen bonding interaction between SF chains and GO sheets. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XPS spectrum of the SF-GO hybrid film, SEM images of lyophilized GO dispersion and the failure surface of GO film. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00196b

  13. Unexpected strong magnetism of Cu doped single-layer MoS₂ and its origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J D

    2014-05-21

    The magnetism of the 3d transition-metal (TM) doped single-layer (1L) MoS2, where the Mo atom is partially replaced by the 3d TM atom, is investigated using the first-principles density functional calculations. In a series of 3d TM doped 1L-MoS2's, the induced spin polarizations are negligible for Sc, Ti, and Cr dopings, while the induced spin polarizations are confirmed for V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn dopings and the systems become magnetic. Especially, the Cu doped system shows unexpectedly strong magnetism although Cu is nonmagnetic in its bulk state. The driving force is found to be a strong hybridization between Cu 3d states and 3p states of neighboring S, which results in an extreme unbalanced spin-population in the spin-split impurity bands near the Fermi level. Finally, we also discuss further issues of the Cu induced magnetism of 1L-MoS2 such as investigation of additional charge states, the Cu doping at the S site instead of the Mo site, and the Cu adatom on the layer (i.e., 1L-MoS2).

  14. On the problem of studying physical properties of rock collectors under conditions modelling layer ones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkevich, G.I.

    1972-01-01

    A review is given of the state in studying physical properties of rock collectors under conditions modelling the layer ones. From the theoretical point of view, this direction is determined as petrophysics of multiphase systems and from the practical, as oil field petrophysics. The following aspects of the problem are considered: models of porous media, thermodynamic conditions of deformation process, parameters of stressed state of porous deformed media, and analysis of experimental data. To describe collector behavior under thermodynamic conditions of natural occurrence, it is necessary to construct the model of the porous deformed medium. In connection with heterogeneity and multiphase character of rock collectors, they may be considered as differential-elastic media, and to characterize the stressed state such indices as coefficients of compressibility of skeleton, solid and liquid phase, as well as coefficients of pore compressibility, relaxation, structural parameter, etc. may be used. It is emphasized that only reversable (elastic) parameter changes are studied under laboratory conditions. The results of laboratory measurements of collector parameters are summarized on the basis of different researcher data. (54 refs.)

  15. Solute transport in a single fracture involving an arbitrary length decay chain with rock matrix comprising different geological layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Batoul; Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2014-08-01

    A model is developed to describe solute transport and retention in fractured rocks. It accounts for advection along the fracture, molecular diffusion from the fracture to the rock matrix composed of several geological layers, adsorption on the fracture surface, adsorption in the rock matrix layers and radioactive decay-chains. The analytical solution, obtained for the Laplace-transformed concentration at the outlet of the flowing channel, can conveniently be transformed back to the time domain by the use of the de Hoog algorithm. This allows one to readily include it into a fracture network model or a channel network model to predict nuclide transport through channels in heterogeneous fractured media consisting of an arbitrary number of rock units with piecewise constant properties. More importantly, the simulations made in this study recommend that it is necessary to account for decay-chains and also rock matrix comprising at least two different geological layers, if justified, in safety and performance assessment of the repositories for spent nuclear fuel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolution of the lower planetary boundary layer over strongly contrasting surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, R.L.; Gao, W.; Martin, T.J.; Shannon, J.D.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    In a multilaboratory field study held near Boardman in northeastern Oregon in June 1991, various properties of the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer over heavily irrigated cropland and adjacent desert steppe were investigated in the initial campaign of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The locale was selected because its disparate characteristics over various spatial scales stress the ability of general circulation models (GCMS) to describe lower boundary conditions, particularly across the discontinuity between desert (in which turbulent flux of heat must be primarily as sensible heat) and large irrigated tracts (in which turbulent flux of latent heat should be the larger term). This campaign of ARM seeks to increase knowledge in three critical areas: (1) determination of the relationships between surface heat fluxes measured over multiple scales and the controlling surface parameters within each scale, (2) integration of local and nearly local heat flux estimates to produce estimates appropriate for GCM grid cells of 100-200 km horizontal dimension, and (3) characterization of the growth and development of the atmospheric boundary layer near transitions between surfaces with strongly contrasting moisture availabilities

  17. Antireflection Coatings for Strongly Curved Glass Lenses by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Pfeiffer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antireflection (AR coatings are indispensable in numerous optical applications and are increasingly demanded on highly curved optical components. In this work, optical thin films of SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2 and Ta2O5 were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD, which is based on self-limiting surface reactions leading to a uniform film thickness on arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Al2O3/TiO2/SiO2 and Al2O3/Ta2O5/SiO2 AR coatings were successfully applied in the 400–750 nm and 400–700 nm spectral range, respectively. Less than 0.6% reflectance with an average of 0.3% has been measured on a fused silica hemispherical (half-ball lens with 4 mm diameter along the entire lens surface at 0° angle of incidence. The reflectance on a large B270 aspherical lens with height of 25 mm and diameter of 50 mm decreased to less than 1% with an average reflectance < 0.3%. The results demonstrate that ALD is a promising technology for deposition of uniform optical layers on strongly curved lenses without complex in situ thickness monitoring.

  18. High Hole-Mobility Molecular Layer Made from Strong Electron Acceptor Molecules with Metal Adatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2017-11-02

    The electronic structure of 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-TCNQ (F 4 TCNQ) monolayers on Au(111) has been investigated by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with synchrotron radiation. In contrast to the physisorbed TCNQ/Au(111) interface, the high-resolution core-level photoemission spectra and the low-energy electron diffraction at the F 4 TCNQ/Au(111) interface show evidence for the strong charge transfer (CT) from Au to F 4 TCNQ and for the Au atom segregation from the underlying Au(111) surface, suggesting a possible origin of the spontaneous formation of the two-dimensional F 4 TCNQ-Au network. The ARPES experiment reveals a low hole-injection barrier and large band dispersion in the CT-induced topmost valence level of the F 4 TCNQ-Au network with 260 meV bandwidth due to the adatom-mediated intermolecular interaction. These results indicate that strong electron acceptor molecules with metal adatoms can form high hole-mobility molecular layers by controlling the molecule-metal ordered structure and their CT interaction.

  19. Relationship between the Layered Series and the overlying evolved rocks in the Bjerkreim-Sokndal Intrusion, southern Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, James Richard; Overgaard, Gitte

    2005-01-01

    The Bjerkreim-Sokndal layered intrusion (BKSK) consists of a >7000 m-thick Layered Series comprising anorthosites, leuconorites, troctolites, norites, gabbronorites and jotunites (hypersthene monzodiorites), overlain by an unknown thickness of massive, evolved rocks: mangerites (hypersthene...... are essentially constant in the upper part of the MG-unit and in the QMG (An21-13; Fo6-4; Mg#opx17-13; Mg#cpx25-20). The amount of interstitial quartz and the amount of normative orthoclase, however, both increase systematically upwards through the QMG-unit, implying that these rocks are cumulates....... There is no evidence of a compositional break in the MG-QMG sequence that could reflect influx of relatively primitive magma. Two types of QMG/CH are known in the uppermost part of BKSK. Olivine-bearing types are comagmatic with the underlying Layered Series; the studied stratigraphic sequence belongs to this suite...

  20. Numerical Study on Dynamic Response of a Horizontal Layered-Structure Rock Slope under a Normally Incident Sv Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifa Zhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Several post-earthquake investigations have indicated that the slope structure plays a leading role in the stability of rock slopes under dynamic loads. In this paper, the dynamic response of a horizontal layered-structure rock slope under harmonic Sv wave is studied by making use of the Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua method (FLAC. The suitability of FLAC for studying wave transmission across rock joints is validated through comparison with analytical solutions. After parametric studies on Sv wave transmission across the horizontal layered-structure rock slope, it is found that the acceleration amplification coefficient η, which is defined as the ratio of the acceleration at the monitoring point to the value at the toe, wavily increases with an increase of the height along the slope surface. Meanwhile, the fluctuation weakens with normalized joint stiffness K increasing and enhances with normalized joint spacing ξ increasing. The acceleration amplification coefficient of the slope crest ηcrest does not monotonously increase with the increase of ξ, but decreases with the increase of K. Additionally, ηcrest is more sensitive to ξ compared to K. From the contour figures, it can also be found that the contour figures of η take on rhythm, and the effects of ξ on the acceleration amplification coefficient are more obvious compared to the effects on K.

  1. Complex boron redistribution kinetics in strongly doped polycrystalline-silicon/nitrogen-doped-silicon thin bi-layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadli, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University Aout 1955, Skikda, 21000 (Algeria); LEMEAMED, Department of Electronics, University Mentouri, Constantine, 25000 (Algeria); Mansour, F. [LEMEAMED, Department of Electronics, University Mentouri, Constantine, 25000 (Algeria); Pereira, E. Bedel [CNRS-LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, 31077 Toulouse (France)

    2012-10-15

    We have investigated the complex behaviour of boron (B) redistribution process via silicon thin bi-layers interface. It concerns the instantaneous kinetics of B transfer, trapping, clustering and segregation during the thermal B activation annealing. The used silicon bi-layers have been obtained by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) method at 480 C, by using in-situ nitrogen-doped-silicon (NiDoS) layer and strongly B doped polycrystalline-silicon (P{sup +}) layer. To avoid long-range B redistributions, thermal annealing was carried out at relatively low-temperatures (600 C and 700 C) for various times ranging between 30 min and 2 h. To investigate the experimental secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) doping profiles, a redistribution model well adapted to the particular structure of two thin layers and to the effects of strong-concentrations has been established. The good adjustment of the simulated profiles with the experimental SIMS profiles allowed a fundamental understanding about the instantaneous physical phenomena giving and disturbing the complex B redistribution profiles-shoulders. The increasing kinetics of the B peak concentration near the bi-layers interface is well reproduced by the established model. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Recreating Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R

    2008-01-01

    Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers.......Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers....

  3. Strong interaction between graphene layer and Fano resonance in terahertz metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuyuan; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Yan, Xicheng; Cheng, Le; Wang, Boyun; Xu, Chen

    2017-05-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising building block in modern optics and optoelectronics due to its novel optical and electrical properties. In the mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) regime, graphene behaves like metals and supports surface plasmon resonances (SPRs). Moreover, the continuously tunable conductivity of graphene enables active SPRs and gives rise to a range of active applications. However, the interaction between graphene and metal-based resonant metamaterials has not been fully understood. In this work, a simulation investigation on the interaction between the graphene layer and THz resonances supported by the two-gap split ring metamaterials is systematically conducted. The simulation results show that the graphene layer can substantially reduce the Fano resonance and even switch it off, while leaving the dipole resonance nearly unaffected, which is well explained with the high conductivity of graphene. With the manipulation of graphene conductivity via altering its Fermi energy or layer number, the amplitude of the Fano resonance can be modulated. The tunable Fano resonance here together with the underlying physical mechanism can be strategically important in designing active metal-graphene hybrid metamaterials. In addition, the ‘sensitivity’ to the graphene layer of the Fano resonance is also highly appreciated in the field of ultrasensitive sensing, where the novel physical mechanism can be employed in sensing other graphene-like two-dimensional materials or biomolecules with the high conductivity.

  4. Strong piezoelectricity in single-layer graphene deposited on SiO2 grating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Zelenovskiy, Pavel; Romanyuk, Konstantin; Luchkin, Sergey; Kopelevich, Yakov; Kholkin, Andrei

    2015-06-25

    Electromechanical response of materials is a key property for various applications ranging from actuators to sophisticated nanoelectromechanical systems. Here electromechanical properties of the single-layer graphene transferred onto SiO2 calibration grating substrates is studied via piezoresponse force microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy. The correlation of mechanical strains in graphene layer with the substrate morphology is established via Raman mapping. Apparent vertical piezoresponse from the single-layer graphene supported by underlying SiO2 structure is observed by piezoresponse force microscopy. The calculated vertical piezocoefficient is about 1.4 nm V(-1), that is, much higher than that of the conventional piezoelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate and comparable to that of relaxor single crystals. The observed piezoresponse and achieved strain in graphene are associated with the chemical interaction of graphene's carbon atoms with the oxygen from underlying SiO2. The results provide a basis for future applications of graphene layers for sensing, actuating and energy harvesting.

  5. Frictional sliding in layered rock model: Preliminary experiments. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, K.E. Jr.; Buescher, B.J.; Anderson, D.; Epstein, J.S.

    1995-09-01

    An important aspect of determining the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a possible nuclear waste repository requires understanding the mechanical behavior of jointed rock-masses. To this end we have studied the frictional sliding between simulated rock joints in the laboratory using the technique of phase shifting moire interferometry. The models were made from stacks of Lexan plates and contained a central hole to induce slip between the plates when the models were loaded in compression. These preliminary results confirm the feasibility of the approach and show a clear evolution of slip as function of load

  6. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Tunable photonic crystal for THz radiation in layered superconductors: Strong magnetic-field dependence of the transmission coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Nori, Franco

    2006-01-01

    Josephson plasma waves are scattered by the Josephson vortex lattice. This scattering results in a strong dependence, on the in-plane magnetic-field H ab , of the reflection and transmission of THz radiation propagating in layered superconductors. In particular, a tunable band-gap structure (THz photonic crystal) occurs in such a medium. These effects can be used, by varying H ab , for the selective frequency-filtering of THz radiation

  8. Strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at FeCoB/MgO interface with an ultrathin HfOx insertion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yongxi; Ralph, Daniel; Buhrman, Robert

    The realization of robust perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in heavy metal(HM)/FeCoB/MgO thin-film heterostructures has enabled a pathway for the implementation of high density memory elements based on perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junctions, and also provides a platform for the study and control of domain walls and of novel magnetic chiral structures such as skyrmions in nanowire structures. Here we report on the achievement of more robust PMA in Ta/FeCoB/MgO heterostructures by the insertion of an ultrathin HfOx passivation layer at the FeCoB/MgO interface. This is accomplished by depositing one to two atomic layers of Hf onto the FeCoB before the subsequent rf sputter deposition of the MgO layer, which fully oxidizes the Hf layer as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The result is a strong interfacial perpendicular anisotropy energy density as large as 1.7 erg/cm-2 without any post-fabrication annealing treatment. Similar results have been achieved with the use of W and Pt HM base layers. This work broadens the class and enhances the capabilities of PMA HM/FM heterostructures for spintronics research and applications.

  9. SOURCES OF QUATERNARY POTASSIC VOLCANIC ROCKS FROM WUDALIANCHI, CHINA: CONTROL BY TRANSTENSION AT THE LITHOSPHERE–ASTHENOSPHERE BOUNDARY LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Rasskazov

    2016-01-01

    (Laoheishan. In rocks that differ from the background ones, Rb concentrations increase from the second to the fourth volcano and decrease in its final edifice. In rocks, close to the background ones, Zr concentrations decrease from the first to the second volcano and increase to the third volcano. In rocks, distinguished from background ones, relatively low concentrations of Zr at the first volcano change to elevated concentrations at the third and fourth volcanoes with relative decrease at the final Huoshaoshan edifice.Discussion. Sub-lithospheric continuum of components under East Asia comprises a material from convective mantle domain with subducted slab (paleoslab fragments of oceanic (paleooceanic crust as well as delaminated lithospheric blocks of orogens. Volcanic rocks from the Wudalianchi field show a sub-lithospheric end-member, which belongs to this continuum. Lithospheric components of these rocks, however, have no connection with other sub-lithospheric components. We refer the Wudalianchi rocks to a sub-lithospheric–lithospheric cluster of components from the boundary between the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric convective mantle (Fig. 17. From the comparative analysis of K2O, other major oxides, and trace elements in rocks of early and late eruption phases in the Central group of volcanoes, we infer that rocks were compositionally almost similar to the background ones in edifices of the first volcano (Wohushan, partially close to the background rocks and partly differed from them in edifices of the second and third volcanoes (Bijiashan, Laoheishan, and significantly different from the background rocks in the cone of the fourth volcano (Huoshaoshan (Figs 18, 19. We suggest that magma generation under the Wudalianchi volcanic field was controlled by developing transtension of a layer at the base of the lithosphere that divided and shielded sources of the underlying homogeneous sub-lithospheric convective mantle and the overlying enriched heterogeneous

  10. A Novel Layered Sedimentary Rocks Structure of the Oxygen-Enriched Carbon for Ultrahigh-Rate-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Li, Huan-Huan; Shi, Yan-Hong; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wu, Xing-Long; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, gelatin as a natural biomass was selected to successfully prepare an oxygen-enriched carbon with layered sedimentary rocks structure, which exhibited ultrahigh-rate performance and excellent cycling stability as supercapacitors. The specific capacitance reached 272.6 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and still retained 197.0 F g(-1) even at 100 A g(-1) (with high capacitance retention of 72.3%). The outstanding electrochemical performance resulted from the special layered structure with large surface area (827.8 m(2) g(-1)) and high content of oxygen (16.215 wt %), which effectively realized the synergistic effects of the electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. Moreover, it delivered an energy density of 25.3 Wh kg(-1) even with a high power density of 34.7 kW kg(-1) and ultralong cycling stability (with no capacitance decay even over 10,000 cycles at 2 A g(-1)) in a symmetric supercapacitor, which are highly desirable for their practical application in energy storage devices and conversion.

  11. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10-5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g-1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g-1) had a negative rise potential (-31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to -6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  12. Preconcentration of rare earth elements from rocks by thin-layer chromatography and their neutron-activation determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabukhin, V.A.; Volynets, M.P.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions were studied for separation of rare earths and accompanying elements in rocks on Fixion 50x8 thin-layer plates using solutions of oxalic acid and ammonium chloride in ammonia medium. A simple technique was developed for TLC proconcentration of rare earths followed by gamma spectrometric analysis of the irradiated fractions that enabled to determine 8-10 elements in samples with a mass of up to 30 mg. The limits of detection (μg/g) were 0.05 (Eu), 0.1 (Sm), 0.2 (Tb), 0.3 (Yb), 0.4 (La), 1.0 (Tu), 2.0 (Ce), 10 (Nd). The relative standard deviation was 0.05-0.20 at element levels 5-10 times as high as the detection limits

  13. A PHYSICAL MODEL OF THE EFFECT OF A SHALLOW WEAK LAYER ON STRONG GROUND MOTION FOR STRIKE-SLIP RUPTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JAMES N. BRUNE AND ABDOLRASOOL ANOOSHEHPOOR

    1998-02-23

    We report results of foam-rubber modeling of the effect of a shallow weak layer on ground motion from strike-slip ruptures. Computer modeling of strong ground motion from strike-slip earthquakes has involved somewhat arbitrary assumptions about the nature of slip along the shallow part of the fault (e.g., fixing the slip to be zero along the upper 2 kilometers of the fault plane) in order to match certain strong motion accelerograms. Most modeling studies of earthquake strong ground motion have used what is termed kinematic dislocation modeling. In kinematic modeling the time function for slip on the fault is prescribed, and the response of the layered medium is calculated. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that the model and the prescribed slip are physically reasonable unless the true nature of the medium and its motions are known ahead of time. There is good reason to believe that in many cases faults are weak along the upper few kilometers of the fault zone and may not be able to maintain high levels of shear strain required for high dynamic energy release during earthquakes. Physical models of faulting, as distinct from numerical or mathematical models, are guaranteed to obey static and dynamic mechanical laws. Foam-rubber modeling studies have been reported in a number of publications. The object of this paper is to present results of physical modeling using a shallow weak layer, in order to verify the physical basis for assuming a long rise time and a reduced high frequency pulse for the slip on the shallow part of faults. It appears a 2-kilometer deep, weak zone along strike-slip faults could indeed reduce the high frequency energy radiated from shallow slip, and that this effect can best be represented by superimposing a small amplitude, short rise-time pulse at the onset of a much longer rise-time slip. A weak zone was modeled by inserting weak plastic layers of a few inches in thickness into the foam rubber model. For the 15 cm weak zone the average

  14. Phase manipulation of Goos–Hänchen shifts in a single-layer of graphene nanostructure under strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solookinejad, Gh; Jabbari, M.; Panahi, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we discuss the phase management of Goos–Hänchen (GH) shifts of a probe light through a cavity with a single-layer graphene nanostructure under a strong magnetic field. By using the quantum mechanical density matrix formalism we study the GH shifts of reflected and transmitted light beams. It is realized that negative or positive GH shifts can be achieved simultaneously by tuning some controllable parameters such as relative phase and the Rabi frequency of the applied fields. Moreover, the thickness effect of the cavity structure is considered as an effective parameter for adjusting the GH shifts of reflected and transmitted light beams. We find that by choosing suitable parameters, a maximum negative shift of 4.5 mm and positive shift of 5.4 mm are possible for GH shifts in reflected and transmitted light. Our proposed model may be useful for developing all-optical devices in the infrared region.

  15. Lithological Controls on 3D Fold Geometry in Mechanically Layered Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, M. A.; Jones, R. R.; Rock, G.

    2010-12-01

    Folding and thrusting are key processes in accommodating shortening in evolving orogens. In the outer parts of mountain belts, the combination of tectonism and sedimentation often leads to viable petroleum systems where folds trap migrating hydrocarbons. A key aspect of the success of these traps is the 3D fold geometry, which must prevent up-plunge hydrocarbon escape. Fold shapes in a multilayered system are governed by the fold mechanism, and the rheology of the layers. In sedimentary environments where laterally heterogeneous thicknesses of interbedded carbonates, clastics, and evaporates may be present, predicting the sub-surface geometry of structures is challenging. We present field data combined with satellite and seismic interpretation from the Zagros fold and thrust belt of SE Turkey where Neogene shortening has affected an Ordovician to Miocene aged sedimentary pile comprising shales, sandstones, carbonates and minor evaporites. Miocene carbonates capping the sequence allow 3D fold geometries to be ascertained at surface with a high degree of confidence, whilst the underlying ~1km of shales and mudstones allows folds to develop that depart substantially from standard “text-book” geometries. Beneath these incompetent units a further 1.7km of carbonates and clastics overlie Ordovician shales up to 1.5km thick. In relatively low strain sections asymmetric, angular, kink-like folds form long wavelength structures and thrust faults rarely reach the surface. With increasing strain, the wavelength/amplitude ratio decreases and thrusts cut through the fold limbs. Folds are interpreted to detach above a thick sequence of Ordovician shales. They originate by buckling of the competent units within the two weaker horizons, with initial perturbations probably provided by sedimentary heterogeneities. As the folds amplify, thrusts form in the more competent units above the shale. These then propagate upwards with fold amplification dominated by fault-tip

  16. Pore-scale analysis of electrical properties in thinly bedded rock using digital rock physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jianmeng; Zhao, Jianpeng; Liu, Xuefeng; Chen, Hui; Jiang, LiMing; Zhang, JinYan

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the electrical properties of laminated rock consist of macro-porous layers and micro-porous layers based on digital rock technology. Due to the bedding effect and anisotropy, traditional Archie equations cannot well describe the electrical behavior of laminated rock. The RI-Sw curve of laminated rock shows a nonlinear relationship. The RI-Sw curve can be divided into two linear segments with different saturation exponent. Laminated sand-shale sequences and laminated sands of different porosity or grain size will yield macroscopic electrical anisotropy. Numerical simulation and theoretical analysis lead to the conclusion that electrical anisotropy coefficient of laminated rock is a strong function of water saturation. The function curve can be divided into three segments by the turning point. Therefore, the electrical behavior of laminated rock should be considered in oil exploration and development. (paper)

  17. Synergistic effect between strongly coupled CoAl layered double hydroxides and graphene for the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yinling; Wang, Zhangcui; Wu, Xiaoqin; Liu, Xiaowang; Li, Maoguo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CoAl-LDHs were synthesized on the surface of graphene oxide in situ. • The oxygen reduction reaction activity of the catalyst was investigated. • The synergistic effect between CoAl-LDHs and rGO is discussed in detail. • The roles of Co 2+ in the LDHs were clarified. - Abstract: Precious metal-free electrocatalysts with high efficiency and durability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are strongly desired in the field of energy technology. Herein, the CoAl layered double hydroxides (CoAl-LDHs)/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composites were successfully prepared by growing CoAl-LDHs on the surface of GO in situ via coprecipitation and subsequently hydrothermal treatment. The structure, composition, morphology and ORR catalytic activity of the CoAl-LDHs/rGO composites were investigated as a function of mass ratios of CoAl-LDHs and GO. The results show that there is an optimum mass ratio of CoAl-LDHs and GO (w CoAl-LDHs :w GO = 1:5) for the ORR catalytic activity, where the electron transfer number for ORR at the CoAl-LDHs/rGO composites reaches to 3.5, closing to the full four-electron process. The synergistic effect between CoAl-LDHs and rGO is discussed in detail and the discussion is instructive for the construction of the better transition metal oxides/carbon composite-based ORR catalysts.

  18. From Near-Neutral to Strongly Stratified: Adequately Modelling the Clear-Sky Nocturnal Boundary Layer at Cabauw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, P.; van de Wiel, B. J. H.; van der Linden, S. J. A.; Bosveld, F. C.

    2018-02-01

    The performance of an atmospheric single-column model (SCM) is studied systematically for stably-stratified conditions. To this end, 11 years (2005-2015) of daily SCM simulations were compared to observations from the Cabauw observatory, The Netherlands. Each individual clear-sky night was classified in terms of the ambient geostrophic wind speed with a 1 m s^{-1} bin-width. Nights with overcast conditions were filtered out by selecting only those nights with an average net radiation of less than - 30 W m^{-2}. A similar procedure was applied to the observational dataset. A comparison of observed and modelled ensemble-averaged profiles of wind speed and potential temperature and time series of turbulent fluxes showed that the model represents the dynamics of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) at Cabauw very well for a broad range of mechanical forcing conditions. No obvious difference in model performance was found between near-neutral and strongly-stratified conditions. Furthermore, observed NBL regime transitions are represented in a natural way. The reference model version performs much better than a model version that applies excessive vertical mixing as is done in several (global) operational models. Model sensitivity runs showed that for weak-wind conditions the inversion strength depends much more on details of the land-atmosphere coupling than on the turbulent mixing. The presented results indicate that in principle the physical parametrizations of large-scale atmospheric models are sufficiently equipped for modelling stably-stratified conditions for a wide range of forcing conditions.

  19. Anodic etching of GaN based film with a strong phase-separated InGaN/GaN layer: Mechanism and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Qingxue; Liu, Rong; Xiao, Hongdi; Cao, Dezhong; Liu, Jianqiang; Ma, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • GaN film with a strong phase-separated InGaN/GaN layer was etched by electrochemical etching. • Vertically aligned nanopores in n-GaN films were buried underneath the InGaN/GaN structures. • The relaxation of compressive stress in the MQW structure was found by PL and Raman spectra. - Abstract: A strong phase-separated InGaN/GaN layer, which consists of multiple quantum wells (MQW) and superlattices (SL) layers and can produce a blue wavelength spectrum, has been grown on n-GaN thin film, and then fabricated into nanoporous structures by electrochemical etching method in oxalic acid. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique reveals that the etching voltage of 8 V leads to a vertically aligned nanoporous structure, whereas the films etched at 15 V show branching pores within the n-GaN layer. Due to the low doping concentration of barriers (GaN layers) in the InGaN/GaN layer, we observed a record-low rate of etching (<100 nm/min) and nanopores which are mainly originated from the V-pits in the phase-separated layer. In addition, there exists a horizontal nanoporous structure at the interface between the phase-separated layer and the n-GaN layer, presumably resulting from the high transition of electrons between the barrier and the well (InGaN layer) at the interface. As compared to the as-grown MQW structure, the etched MQW structure exhibits a photoluminescence (PL) enhancement with a partial relaxation of compressive stress due to the increased light-extracting surface area and light-guiding effect. Such a compressive stress relaxation can be further confirmed by Raman spectra.

  20. Anodic etching of GaN based film with a strong phase-separated InGaN/GaN layer: Mechanism and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Qingxue [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Liu, Rong [Department of Fundamental Theories, Shandong Institute of Physical Education and Sports, Jinan 250063 (China); Xiao, Hongdi, E-mail: hdxiao@sdu.edu.cn [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China); Cao, Dezhong; Liu, Jianqiang; Ma, Jin [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • GaN film with a strong phase-separated InGaN/GaN layer was etched by electrochemical etching. • Vertically aligned nanopores in n-GaN films were buried underneath the InGaN/GaN structures. • The relaxation of compressive stress in the MQW structure was found by PL and Raman spectra. - Abstract: A strong phase-separated InGaN/GaN layer, which consists of multiple quantum wells (MQW) and superlattices (SL) layers and can produce a blue wavelength spectrum, has been grown on n-GaN thin film, and then fabricated into nanoporous structures by electrochemical etching method in oxalic acid. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique reveals that the etching voltage of 8 V leads to a vertically aligned nanoporous structure, whereas the films etched at 15 V show branching pores within the n-GaN layer. Due to the low doping concentration of barriers (GaN layers) in the InGaN/GaN layer, we observed a record-low rate of etching (<100 nm/min) and nanopores which are mainly originated from the V-pits in the phase-separated layer. In addition, there exists a horizontal nanoporous structure at the interface between the phase-separated layer and the n-GaN layer, presumably resulting from the high transition of electrons between the barrier and the well (InGaN layer) at the interface. As compared to the as-grown MQW structure, the etched MQW structure exhibits a photoluminescence (PL) enhancement with a partial relaxation of compressive stress due to the increased light-extracting surface area and light-guiding effect. Such a compressive stress relaxation can be further confirmed by Raman spectra.

  1. Self-Assembled Layered Supercell Structure of Bi2AlMnO6 with Strong Room-Temperature Multiferroic Properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Leigang; Boullay, Philippe; Lu, Ping; Perez, Olivier; Steciuk, Gwladys; Wang, Xuejing; Jian, Jie; Huang, Jijie; Gao, Xingyao; Zhang, Wenrui; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-02-01

    Room-temperature (RT) multiferroics, possessing ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism simultaneously at RT, hold great promise in miniaturized devices including sensors, actuators, transducers, and multi-state memories. In this work, we report a novel 2D layered RT multiferroic system with self-assembled layered supercell structure consisting of two mismatch-layered sub-lattices of [Bi3O3+δ] and [MO2]1.84 (M=Al/Mn, simply named as BAMO), i.e., alternative layered stacking of two mutually incommensurate sublattices made of a three-layer-thick Bi-O slab and a one-layer-thick Al/Mn-O octahedra slab along the out-of-plane direction. Strong room-temperature multiferroic responses, e.g., ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties, have been demonstrated and attributed to the highly anisotropic 2D nature of the non-ferromagnetic and ferromagnetic sublattices which are highly mismatched. The work demonstrates an alternative design approach for new 2D layered oxide materials that hold promises as single-phase multiferroics, 2D oxides with tunable bandgaps, and beyond.

  2. Rock mass response to strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events and blasting observed at the surface of the excavations in deep level gold mines in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Alexander; Durrheim, Ray; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to extreme ground motion and derive the attenuation factors in near field. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of the ground motion was found to be proportional to the distance from the source following R^-1.1 & R^-1.7 for compact rock and R^-3.1 & R^-3.4 for more fractured rock close to the surface of the tunnel. In addition the ground motion was compared to the quasi-static deformations taking place around the underground excavations. The quasi-static deformations were measured by means of strain, tilt and closure. A good correspondence

  3. Evolution of deformation heterogeneity at multiple length scales in a strongly textured zinc layer on galvanized steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A; Gurao, N P

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of heterogeneity of plastic deformation in a zinc layer has been probed at multiple length scales using a battery of characterization tools like X-ray diffraction, electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and digital image correlation. The experimental results indicate that plastic deformation is heterogeneous at different length scales and the value of micro, meso and macro strain by different characterization techniques shows a different value. The value of strain determined at the meso and micro length scale from EBSD and X-ray diffraction was negligible, however, the macro-strain as determined from X-ray peak shift was significant. EBSD results showed evidence of profuse {101-bar2} <101-bar1> contraction twinning in the zinc layer with higher intragranular misorientation in the twin compared to the matrix. It is therefore, inferred that the evolution of higher intergranular (between matrix and twin) strain due to prolific contraction twinning contributes to the failure of zinc layer on galvanized steel. (paper)

  4. Strong doping of the n-optical confinement layer for increasing output power of high- power pulsed laser diodes in the eye safe wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Boris S.; Avrutin, Eugene A.; Kostamovaara, Juha T.

    2017-12-01

    An analytical model for internal optical losses at high power in a 1.5 μm laser diode with strong n-doping in the n-side of the optical confinement layer is created. The model includes intervalence band absorption by holes supplied by both current flow and two-photon absorption (TPA), as well as the direct TPA effect. The resulting losses are compared with those in an identical structure with a weakly doped waveguide, and shown to be substantially lower, resulting in a significant improvement in the output power and efficiency in the structure with a strongly doped waveguide.

  5. Elastic anisotropy of layered rocks: Ultrasonic measurements of plagioclase-biotite-muscovite (sillimanite) gneiss versus texture-based theoretical predictions (effective media modeling)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankina, T. I.; Zel, I. Yu.; Lokajicek, T.; Kern, H.; Lobanov, K. V.; Zharikov, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental and theoretical studies on a highly anisotropic layered rock sample characterized by alternating layers of biotite and muscovite (retrogressed from sillimanite) and plagioclase and quartz, respectively. We applied two different experimental methods to determine seismic anisotropy at pressures up to 400 MPa: (1) measurement of P- and S-wave phase velocities on a cube in three foliation-related orthogonal directions and (2) measurement of P-wave group velocities on a sphere in 132 directions The combination of the spatial distribution of P-wave velocities on the sphere (converted to phase velocities) with S-wave velocities of three orthogonal structural directions on the cube made it possible to calculate the bulk elastic moduli of the anisotropic rock sample. On the basis of the crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) of major minerals obtained by time-of-flight neutron diffraction, effective media modeling was performed using different inclusion methods and averaging procedures. The implementation of a nonlinear approximation of the P-wave velocity-pressure relation was applied to estimate the mineral matrix properties and the orientation distribution of microcracks. Comparison of theoretical calculations of elastic properties of the mineral matrix with those derived from the nonlinear approximation showed discrepancies in elastic moduli and P-wave velocities of about 10%. The observed discrepancies between the effective media modeling and ultrasonic velocity data are a consequence of the inhomogeneous structure of the sample and inability to perform long-wave approximation. Furthermore, small differences between elastic moduli predicted by the different theoretical models, including specific fabric characteristics such as crystallographic texture, grain shape and layering were observed. It is shown that the bulk elastic anisotropy of the sample is basically controlled by the CPO of biotite and muscovite and their volume

  6. Hypersonic boundary layer in the vicinity of a point of inflection of leading edge on a flat wing in the regime of strong viscous interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, G. N.; Ledovskiy, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    The flow in a spatial hypersonic laminar boundary layer on a planar wing with a point of inflection in the leading edge is considered in the regime of strong viscous-inviscid interaction. The boundary problems are formulated for two cases: self-similar flow near the point of inflection of the leading edge and full three-dimensional (3D) boundary layer on a wing with variable sweep angle. The numerical solution is obtained using the finite-difference method. The results of parametric calculations of influence of a wing shape and the temperature factor on flow characteristics in the boundary layer are presented. The possibility of formation of local regions with high shear stress and heat flux is shown.

  7. Theory of the axi-symmetric extrusion process of multi-layer materials with a strong plastic nonhomogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    J. Piwnik; A. Patejuk

    2008-01-01

    A novel simplified r hcorctical solution is found lor thc strcss starcs accompanying thc proccss of cxt ri~siono f ma![ i-laycr matcrialsunder rhc conditions af axial symmetry. Thc solution i~ bawd nn ~ h mc n dcl of pcrfcct plastic material satisfying thc Trcsca yicld condition.thc Haar-Karman conditions bcing sntisficd in each layer. Thc laycrs arc chnnctcrizcd by difrercnt yicld limits and stmng plasticnonhomogeneity. In thc ncighhoi~rhoorol f thc interfaces conrinuous variation of rhc yic...

  8. Theory of the axi-symmetric extrusion process of multi-layer materials with a strong plastic nonhomogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piwnik

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel simplified r hcorctical solution is found lor thc strcss starcs accompanying thc proccss of cxt ri~siono f ma![ i-laycr matcrialsunder rhc conditions af axial symmetry. Thc solution i~ bawd nn ~ h mc n dcl of pcrfcct plastic material satisfying thc Trcsca yicld condition.thc Haar-Karman conditions bcing sntisficd in each layer. Thc laycrs arc chnnctcrizcd by difrercnt yicld limits and stmng plasticnonhomogeneity. In thc ncighhoi~rhoorol f thc interfaces conrinuous variation of rhc yicld limit i s a~sunicdZ. hc form of thc plastic zonc nndpsitions or the contact surfi~ccss eparating rhc laycrs nrc assumcd. Shcaring strcsscs and mcan prcssurc in a longitudinal scclion o f t hccxrruded rod arc cxprcsscd in tcrms of filnctions of the axial coordinatc z. Unknown fttnctions of thc singlc coordinatc z arc dctcrmincdFrom thc yicld conditions writtcn for thc contour of thc die. Accitratc analytical relations arc dcrivcd For tllc normal strcss distribution atthc surface of contact bctwccn thc dic and thc matcrial cxlrudcd, Using thc known normal and shcar stress dislrihutions (due to Iriclion,accuratc valuc of thc lower cstimate of thc cxtrusion forcc is dctcrrnincd. Thc sotution may hc applicd lo ~ h cca scs of arbitrary numhcr oflaycrs and arbitrary h rm oithc dic. I t may bc used to a rational analysis o f ~ h pcro ccss of cxirnsiol~o f multi-lnycr cylindrical rods.

  9. How Irreversible Heat Transport Processes Drive Earth's Interdependent Thermal, Structural, and Chemical Evolution Providing a Strongly Heterogeneous, Layered Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Because magmatism conveys radioactive isotopes plus latent heat rapidly upwards while advecting heat, this process links and controls the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth. We present evidence that the lower mantle-upper mantle boundary is a profound chemical discontinuity, leading to observed heterogeneities in the outermost layers that can be directly sampled, and construct an alternative view of Earth's internal workings. Earth's beginning involved cooling via explosive outgassing of substantial ice (mainly CO) buried with dust during accretion. High carbon content is expected from Solar abundances and ice in comets. Reaction of CO with metal provided a carbide-rich core while converting MgSiO3 to olivine via oxidizing reactions. Because thermodynamic law (and buoyancy of hot particles) indicates that primordial heat from gravitational segregation is neither large nor carried downwards, whereas differentiation forced radioactive elements upwards, formation of the core and lower mantle greatly cooled the Earth. Reference conductive geotherms, calculated using accurate and new thermal diffusivity data, require that heat-producing elements are sequestered above 670 km which limits convection to the upper mantle. These irreversible beginnings limit secular cooling to radioactive wind-down, permiting deduction of Earth's inventory of heat-producing elements from today's heat flux. Coupling our estimate for heat producing elements with meteoritic data indicates that Earth's oxide content has been underestimated. Density sorting segregated a Si-rich, peridotitic upper mantle from a refractory, oxide lower mantle with high Ca, Al and Ti contents, consistent with diamond inclusion mineralogy. Early and rapid differentiation means that internal temperatures have long been buffered by freezing of the inner core, allowing survival of crust as old as ca.4 Ga. Magmatism remains important. Melt escaping though stress-induced fractures in the rigid lithosphere imparts a

  10. Observation by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy of strongly inverted surface layers at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, O. A.; Alvarez, J.; Gushina, E. V.; Favre, W.; Gueunier-Farret, M. E.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Terukov, E. I.; Kleider, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Heterojunctions made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) are examined by conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Conductive channels at both (n )a-Si:H/(p)c-Si and (p)a-Si:H/(n)c-Si interfaces are clearly revealed. These are attributed to two-dimension electron and hole gases due to strong inversion layers at the c-Si surface in agreement with previous planar conductance measurements. The presence of a hole gas in (p )a-Si:H/(n)c-Si structures implies a quite large valence band offset (EVc-Si-EVa-Si:H>0.25 eV).

  11. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples. Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  12. Performance assessment of a single-layer moisture store-and-release cover system at a mine waste rock pile in a seasonally humid region (Nova Scotia, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Christopher; Ramasamy, Murugan; Mkandawire, Martin

    2018-03-03

    Cover systems are commonly applied to mine waste rock piles (WRPs) to control acid mine drainage (AMD). Single-layer covers utilize the moisture "store-and-release" concept to first store and then release moisture back to the atmosphere via evapotranspiration. Although more commonly used in semi-arid and arid climates, store-and-release covers remain an attractive option in humid climates due to the low cost and relative simplicity of installation. However, knowledge of their performance in these climates is limited. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of moisture store-and-release covers at full-scale WRPs located in humid climates. This cover type was installed at a WRP in Nova Scotia, Canada, alongside state-of-the-art monitoring instrumentation. Field monitoring was conducted over 5 years to assess key components such as meteorological conditions, cover material water dynamics, net percolation, surface runoff, pore-gas, environmental receptor water quality, landform stability and vegetation. Water balances indicate small reductions in water influx to the waste rock (i.e., 34 to 28% of precipitation) with the diminished AMD release also apparent by small improvements in groundwater quality (increase in pH, decrease in sulfate/metals). Surface water quality analysis and field observations of vegetative/aquatic life demonstrate significant improvements in the surface water receptor. The WRP landform is stable and the vegetative cover is thriving. This study has shown that while a simple store-and-release cover may not be a highly effective barrier to water infiltration in humid climates, it can be used to (i) eliminate contaminated surface water runoff, (ii) minimize AMD impacts to surface water receptor(s), (iii) maintain a stable landform, and (iv) provide a sustainable vegetative canopy.

  13. Ultradispersed and Single-Layered MoS2 Nanoflakes Strongly Coupled with Graphene: An Optimized Structure with High Kinetics for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haoliang; Huang, Junying; Liu, Weipeng; Fang, Yueping; Liu, Yingju

    2017-11-15

    As one of the most promising Pt alternatives for cost-effective hydrogen production, molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ), although has been studied extensively to improve its electrocatalytic activity, suffers from scarce active sites, low conductivity, and lack of interaction with substrates. To this end, we anchor ultradispersed and single-layered MoS 2 nanoflakes on graphene sheets via a hybrid intermediate (MoO x -cysteine-graphene oxide), which not only confines the subsequent growth of MoS 2 on the graphene surface but also ensures the intimate interaction between Mo species and graphene at the initial stage. Mo-O-C bond and a possible residual MoO 3-x layer are proposed to comprise the interface bridging the two inherent incompatible phases, MoS 2 and graphene. This strongly coupled structure together with the highly exposed MoS 2 morphology accelerates the electron injection from graphene to the active sites of MoS 2 , and thus the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) can achieve an overpotential of ∼275 mV at ∼-740 mA cm -2 , and a Pt-like Tafel slope of ∼35 mV dec -1 . Our results shed light on the indispensable role of interfacial interaction within semiconducting material-nanocarbon composites and provide a new insight into the actual activity of MoS 2 toward the HER.

  14. A modified version of the combined in-diffusion/abrasive peeling technique for measuring diffusion of strongly sorbing radionuclides in argillaceous rocks: a test study on the diffusion of caesium in Opalinus Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loon, Luc R; Müller, Werner

    2014-08-01

    A filter free diffusion set-up was developed for measuring the diffusion of strongly sorbing radionuclides in indurated argillaceous rocks such as Opalinus Clay (OPA) that normally disintegrate when contacted with a solution. Small bore cores drilled parallel to the bedding plane and embedded in epoxy resin were found to be stable and could be used for performing in-diffusion measurements. The method was tested with the diffusion of caesium, spiked with caesium-134, in Opalinus Clay. The profile of Cs in the clay sample was determined with a modified version of the abrasive peeling technique. The diffusion parameters obtained for caesium were in fair agreement with those determined earlier using the classical through-diffusion technique where stainless steel filters were used to confine the samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthetic Rock Analogue for Permeability Studies of Rock Salt with Mudstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwu Yin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the permeability of surrounding rock (salt rock and mudstone interlayer is an important topic, which acts as a key parameter to characterize the tightness of gas storage. The goal of experiments that test the permeability of gas storage facilities in rock salt is to develop a synthetic analogue to use as a permeability model. To address the permeability of a mudstone/salt layered and mixed rock mass in Jintan, Jiangsu Province, synthetic mixed and layered specimens using the mudstone and the salt were fabricated for permeability testing. Because of the gas “slippage effect”, test results are corrected by the Klinkenberg method, and the permeability of specimens is obtained by regression fitting. The results show that the permeability of synthetic pure rock salt is 6.9 × 10−20 m2, and its porosity is 3.8%. The permeability of synthetic mudstone rock is 2.97 × 10−18 m2, with a porosity 17.8%. These results are close to those obtained from intact natural specimens. We also find that with the same mudstone content, the permeability of mixed specimens is about 40% higher than for the layered specimens, and with an increase in the mudstone content, the Klinkenberg permeability increases for both types of specimens. The permeability and mudstone content have a strong exponential relationship. When the mudstone content is below 40%, the permeability increases only slightly with mudstone content, whereas above this threshold, the permeability increases rapidly with mudstone content. The results of the study are of use in the assessment of the tightness of natural gas storage facilities in mudstone-rich rock salt formations in China.

  16. Rock fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S.; Green, S.J.; Hakala, W.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Maurer, W.C. (eds.)

    1976-01-01

    Experts in rock mechanics, mining, excavation, drilling, tunneling and use of underground space met to discuss the relative merits of a wide variety of rock fragmentation schemes. Information is presented on novel rock fracturing techniques; tunneling using electron beams, thermocorer, electric spark drills, water jets, and diamond drills; and rock fracturing research needs for mining and underground construction. (LCL)

  17. Study on the deterioration mechanism of layered rock-salt electrodes using epitaxial thin films - Li(Ni, Co, Mn)O2 and their Zr-O surface modified electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Machiko; Iba, Hideaki; Suzuki, Kota; Minamishima, Hiroaki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Tamura, Kazuhisa; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Saito, Tomohiro; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Kanno, Ryoji

    2017-03-01

    Deterioration mechanism of Li(Ni, Co, Mn)O2 and Zr-O surface modified electrodes has been elucidated using epitaxial thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition. The electrodes comprise a mixture of layered rock-salt and spinel phases. The deterioration mechanism is analyzed using cyclic voltammetry, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements, and in situ neutron reflectometry. The spinel phase in the electrodes has low electrochemical activity and is not involved in Li insertion/extraction. The amount of Li participating in the charge-discharge reactions in the layered rock-salt phase increases with cycling, inducing a phase change at the electrode surface, lowering the reversibility. In contrast, in the Zr-O surface modified electrode, the spinel phase does not increase on charging/discharging. Thus, the Zr-O modification stabilizes the surface of layered rock-salt structure, thereby improving the cycling characteristics. Also, after the Zr-O modification, the Li concentration in the liquid electrolyte near the electrode/electrolyte interface increases during charging/discharging. The Zr-O surface modification not only stabilizes the electrode surface but also causes changes on the electrolyte side. Using the mixed model electrodes, we elucidate the mechanism of electrode deterioration and the origin of the improvement in cycling characteristics occurring on surface modification.

  18. Strong visible and near infrared photoluminescence from ZnO nanorods/nanowires grown on single layer graphene studied using sub-band gap excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biroju, Ravi K.; Giri, P. K.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication and optoelectronic applications of graphene based hybrid 2D-1D semiconductor nanostructures have gained tremendous research interest in recent times. Herein, we present a systematic study on the origin and evolution of strong broad band visible and near infrared (NIR) photoluminescence (PL) from vertical ZnO nanorods (NRs) and nanowires (NWs) grown on single layer graphene using both above band gap and sub-band gap optical excitations. High resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies are carried out to reveal the morphology and crystalline quality of as-grown and annealed ZnO NRs/NWs on graphene. Room temperature PL studies reveal that besides the UV and visible PL bands, a new near-infrared (NIR) PL emission band appears in the range between 815 nm and 886 nm (1.40-1.52 eV). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed excess oxygen content and unreacted metallic Zn in the as-grown ZnO nanostructures, owing to the low temperature growth by a physical vapor deposition method. Post-growth annealing at 700 °C in the Ar gas ambient results in the enhanced intensity of both visible and NIR PL bands. On the other hand, subsequent high vacuum annealing at 700 °C results in a drastic reduction in the visible PL band and complete suppression of the NIR PL band. PL decay dynamics of green emission in Ar annealed samples show tri-exponential decay on the nanosecond timescale including a very slow decay component (time constant ˜604.5 ns). Based on these results, the NIR PL band comprising two peaks centered at ˜820 nm and ˜860 nm is tentatively assigned to neutral and negatively charged oxygen interstitial (Oi) defects in ZnO, detected experimentally for the first time. The evidence for oxygen induced trap states on the ZnO NW surface is further substantiated by the slow photocurrent response of graphene-ZnO NRs/NWs. These results are important for tunable light emission, photodetection, and other cutting edge

  19. Lithology, microstructures, fluid inclusions, and geochemistry of rock salt and of the cap-rock contact in Oakwood Dome, East Texas: significance for nuclear waste storage. Report of investigations No. 120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dix, O.R.; Jackson, M.P.A.

    1982-01-01

    Oakwood salt dome in Leon and Freestone Counties, Texas, has a core composed of a diapiric salt stock at a depth of 355 m. A vertical borehole in the center of the salt stock yielded 57.3 m of continuous rock-salt core overlain by 137 m of anhydrite-calcite cap rock. The lower 55.3 m of rock salt exhibits a strong, penetrative schistosity and parallel cleavage dipping at 30 to 40 0 and more than 60 variably dipping layers of disseminated anhydrite. Anhydrite constitutes 1.3 +- 0.7 percent of the rock-salt core. The upper 2 m of rock salt is unfoliated, comprising a lower 1.4-m interval of medium-grained granoblastic rock salt and an upper 0.6-m interval of coarse-grained granoblastic rock salt. An abrupt, cavity-free contact separates rock salt from laminated cap rock consisting of granoblastic-polygonal anhydrite virtually devoid of halite or pore space. Microstructures and concentration gradients of fluid inclusions suggest that the unfoliated rock salt at the crest of the salt stock was once strongly foliated, but that this fabric was destroyed by solid-state recrystallization. Downward movement of brine from the rock-salt - cap-rock contact was apparently accompanied by two recrystallization fronts. Dissolution of halite at the contact released disseminated anhydrite that presumably accumulated as sand on the floor of the dissolution cavity. Renewed rise of the salt stock closed the cavity, and the anhydrite sand was accreted against the base of the cap rock. Much, if not all, of the lamination in the 80 m of anhydrite cap rock may result from cycles of dissolution, recrystallization, and upward movement in the salt stock, followed by accretion of anhydrite residuum as laminae against the base of the cap rock. These processes, which are strongly influenced by fluids, act both to breach waste repositories and to geologically isolate them

  20. Science Rocks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?"…

  1. Rock in Rio: forever young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ferreira Freitas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of Rock in Rio: The Musical, as herald of megafestival Rock in Rio. Driven by the success that musicals have reached in Brazil, we believe that the design of this spectacle of music, dance and staging renews the brand of the rock festival, once it adds the force of young and healthy bodies to its concept. Moreover, the musical provides Rock in Rio with some distance from the controversal trilogy of sex, drugs and rock and roll, a strong mark of past festivals around the world. Thus, the musical expands the possibilities of growth for the brand.

  2. SISGR: Improved Electrical Energy Storage with Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitance Based on Novel Carbon Electrodes, New Electrolytes, and Thorough Development of a Strong Science Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. [PI; Alam, Todd M. [co-PI; Bielawski, Christopher W. [co-PI; Chabal, Yves [co-PI; Hwang, Gyeong [co-PI; Ishii, Yoshitaka [co-PI; Rogers, Robin [co-PI

    2014-07-23

    The broad objective of the SISGR program is to advance the fundamental scientific understanding of electrochemical double layer capacitance (EDLC) and thus of ultracapacitor systems composed of a new type of electrode based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) and (primarily) with ionic liquids (ILs) as the electrolyte. Our team has studied the interplay between graphene-based and graphene-derived carbons as the electrode materials in electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC) systems on the one hand, and electrolytes including novel ionic liquids (ILs), on the other, based on prior work on the subject.

  3. Non-zero Δ33S preserved in rocks from the Basal Ultramafic Sequence indicate crustal contamination in the most primitive magma of the Rustenburg Layered Suite (Bushveld Complex, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, N.; Wilson, A.; Penniston-Dorland, S.; Farquhar, J.

    2017-12-01

    The sulfur isotope composition of the Rustenburg Layered Suite (RLS) of the Bushveld Complex is different than expected from a magma sourced from the mantle (Δ33S=0), as measurements indicate the presence of an Archean surface-derived sulfur component. The Basal Ultramafic Sequence (BUS) is thought to be the most primitive magma of the RLS, as it is the lowest in the stratigraphy, has the highest Mg# (>0.92) for primary phases (olivine and orthopyroxene), and is in direct contact with the Magaliesberg quartzite of the Pretoria Group.We have measured the composition of sulfides in rocks from the Lower Zone, Marginal Zone, and the BUS, which were sampled in a 2300m drill core from the Clapham area, in the eastern Bushveld Complex. While the rocks of the Lower Zone have a relatively homogeneous non-zero Δ33S of 0.065‰, comparable to previous findings, there is an abrupt increase in the value of Δ33S (up to +0.301‰) in the Marginal Zone, which may be consistent with the observation in hand sample of assimilation of country rocks. The BUS also shows a surface-derived signal (average of 0.040‰), which is the lowest measured for any zone of the RLS.The non-zero Δ33S found in the Basal Ultramafic Sequence is evidence of the contamination of the magma with surface-derived material. In the upper parts of the intrusion, the Δ33S signature relates to whole-rock Sr and Nd isotopes, and their relationship suggests multiple sources of contamination. However, the relationship between sulfur and in-situ strontium isotope compositions (plagioclase) in this section of the RLS is not as clear as it is further up in the stratigraphy. This might reflect small-scale processes during the magmatic chamber stage, different compositions of local wall rock compared to deeper contaminants, or the presence of decoupled behavior between the isotope systems.These differences in the sulfur isotope composition between the different stratigraphic layers have been preserved regardless of

  4. Compositional differences between roof and floor rocks of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmonsen, Lars Peter; Tegner, Christian; Barfod, Gry

    2014-01-01

    by gravity. Here, we present new bulk rock (major and trace elements, Sr and Nd isotopes), mineralogical and petrographic data for the Upper Border Series. The Upper Border Series mainly diverge from equivalent Layered Series rocks by relatively higher concentrations of incompatible elements, lack of igneous...... incompatible elements and Sr-Nd isotopic ratios. Secondly, magma stratification as a consequence of compositional convection has been invoked. However, by combining petrography and whole rock compositions we show that the crystallization sequence in the Upper Border Series is identical to the Layered Series...... increase strongly in the roof relative to the floor rocks. We interpret this as a consequence of efficient segregation of immiscible silicate liquids at least during the late stages of differentiation....

  5. Effect of confining pressure on the diffusion of HTO, 36Cl- and 125I- in a layered argillaceous rock (Opalinus Clay): diffusion perpendicular to the fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Loon, L.R.; Soler, J.M.; Jakob, A.; Bradbury, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    The through- and out-diffusion of HTO, 36 Cl - and 125 I - in Opalinus Clay, an argillaceous rock from the northern part of Switzerland, was studied under different confining pressures between 4 and 15 MPa. The direction of diffusion and the confining pressure were perpendicular to the bedding. Confining pressure had only a small effect on diffusion. An increase in pressure from 4 to 15 MPa resulted in a decrease of the effective diffusion coefficient of ∼20%. Diffusion accessible porosities were not measurably affected. The values of the effective diffusion coefficients, D e , ranged between (5.6±0.4)x10 -12 and (6.7±0.4)x10 -12 m 2 s -1 for HTO, (7.1±0.5)x10 -13 and (9.1±0.6)x10 -13 m 2 s -1 for 36 Cl - and (4.5±0.3)x10 -13 and (6.6±0.4)x10 -13 m 2 s -1 for 125 I - . The rock capacity factors, α, measured were circa 0.14 for HTO, 0.040 for 36 Cl - and 0.080 for 125 I - . Because of anion exclusion effects, anions diffuse slower and exhibit smaller diffusion accessible porosities than the uncharged HTO. Unlike 36 Cl - , 125 I - sorbs weakly on Opalinus Clay resulting in a larger rock capacity factor. The sorption coefficient, K d , for 125 I - is of the order of 1-2x10 -5 m 3 kg -1 . The effective diffusion coefficient for HTO is in good agreement with values measured in other sedimentary rocks and can be related to the porosity using Archie's Law with exponent m=2.5

  6. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Ashraf, A.; Dwyer, D.; Kisslinger, K.; Zhang, L.; Pang, Y.; Efstathiadis, H.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5 × 1012 e/cm2 or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene’s properties. Here we demonstrate strong (1.33 × 1013 e/cm2), robust, and spontaneous graphene n-doping on a soda-lime-glass substrate via surface-transfer doping from Na without any external chemical, high-temperature, or vacuum processes. Remarkably, the n-doping reaches 2.11 × 1013 e/cm2 when graphene is transferred onto a p-type copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) semiconductor that itself has been deposited onto soda-lime-glass, via surface-transfer doping from Na atoms that diffuse to the CIGS surface. Using this effect, we demonstrate an n-graphene/p-semiconductor Schottky junction with ideality factor of 1.21 and strong photo-response. The ability to achieve strong and persistent graphene n-doping on low-cost, industry-standard materials paves the way toward an entirely new class of graphene-based devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaics, sensors, batteries, and supercapacitors. PMID:26867673

  7. Basic rocks in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piirainen, T.; Gehoer, S.; Iljina, M.; Kaerki, A.; Paakkola, J.; Vuollo, J.

    1992-10-01

    Basic igneous rocks, containing less than 52% SiO 2 , constitute an important part of the Finnish Archaean and Proterozoic crust. In the Archaean crust exist two units which contain the majority of the basic rocks. The Arcaean basic rocks are metavolcanics and situated in the Greenstone Belts of Eastern Finland. They are divided into two units. The greenstones of the lower one are tholeiites, komatiites and basaltic komatiites. The upper consists of bimodal series of volcanics and the basic rocks of which are Fe-tholeiites, basaltic komatiites and komatiites. Proterozoic basic rocks are divided into seven groups according to their ages. The Proterozoic igneous activity started by the volominous basic magmatism 2.44 Ga ago. During this stage formed the layered intrusions and related dykes in the Northern Finland. 2.2 Ga old basic rocks are situated at the margins of Karelian formations. 2.1 Ga aged Fe-tholeiitic magmatic activity is widespread in Eastern and Northern Finland. The basic rocks of 1.97 Ga age group are met within the Karelian Schist Belts as obducted ophiolite complexes but they occur also as tholeiitic diabase dykes cutting the Karelian schists and Archean basement. The intrusions and the volcanics of the 1.9 Ga old basic igneous activity are mostly encountered around the Granitoid Complex of Central Finland. Subjotnian, 1.6 Ga aged tholeiitic diabases are situated around the Rapakivi massifs of Southern Finland, and postjotnian, 1.2 Ga diabases in Western Finland where they form dykes cutting Svecofennian rocks

  8. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Ashraf, A.; Dwyer, D.; Kisslinger, K.; Zhang, L.; Pang, Y.; Efstathiadis, H.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5???1012 e/cm2 or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene?s properties. Here we demonstrate stro...

  9. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  10. Rock Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Rock physics is the discipline linking petrophysical properties as derived from borehole data to surface based geophysical exploration data. It can involve interpretation of both elastic wave propagation and electrical conductivity, but in this chapter focus is on elasticity. Rock physics is based...... on continuum mechanics, and the theory of elasticity developed for statics becomes the key to petrophysical interpretation of velocity of elastic waves. In practice, rock physics involves interpretation of well logs including vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and analysis of core samples. The results...

  11. Characterization of abrasion surfaces in rock shore environments of NW Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feal-Pérez, Alejandra; Blanco-Chao, Ramón

    2013-04-01

    Despite the recent upsurge in rock coast research, many aspects of abrasion and their relationships to other processes remain poorly understood. In this paper, mechanisms subsumed under the general term abrasion were investigated at the beaches of Oia and Sartaña along the Galician coast of NW Spain, in particular at the micro- to meso-scale (mm-cm). Relationships between abrasion and mechanical rock strength served to explore feedbacks between weathering and abrasion on rock coasts, based on measurements of rock surface strength by means of the Equotip (Proceq) method, and stereomicroscope analyses of rock surfaces undergoing varying degrees of abrasion. The results suggest that (1) abrasion along near-vertical rock surfaces leads to a decrease in rock strength with elevation above the top of the basal sediment layer, (2) abrasion processes encompass two different modes, namely, the wave-induced sweeping and dragging of sand and gravel, and the projection of clasts against rock surfaces, each mode depending predominantly on the grain size of the abrasive agent, and (3) the two abrasion modes produce different rock surfaces whose roughness is strongly influenced by the properties of diverse minerals, in particular fracture and cleavage.

  12. Rock Foundations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1994-01-01

    .... Chapter 4 provides guidance on rock mass characterization and classification schemes. Chapters 5 and 6 provide guidance on related topic areas of foundation deformation and settlement and foundation bearing capacity, respectively...

  13. Elastic anisotropy of layered rocks: Ultrasonic measurements of plagioclase-biotite-muscovite (sillimanite) gneiss versus texture-based theoretical predictions (effective media modeling)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivankina, T. I.; Zel, I. Yu.; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Kern, H.; Lobanov, K. V.; Zharikov, A. V.

    712/713, 21 August (2017), s. 82-94 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13102 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : compositional layering * crystallographic texture * effective elastic properties calculation * neutron diffraction * plagioclase-biotite-muscovite (sillimanite) gneiss * velocity measurements Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 2.693, year: 2016

  14. Understanding the electric field control of the electronic and optical properties of strongly-coupled multi-layered quantum dot molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-10-21

    Strongly-coupled quantum dot molecules (QDMs) are widely employed in the design of a variety of optoelectronic, photovoltaic, and quantum information devices. An efficient and optimized performance of these devices demands engineering of the electronic and optical properties of the underlying QDMs. The application of electric fields offers a way to realise such a control over the QDM characteristics for a desired device operation. We performed multi-million-atom atomistic tight-binding calculations to study the influence of electric fields on the electron and hole wave function confinements and symmetries, the ground-state transition energies, the band-gap wavelengths, and the optical transition modes. Electrical fields parallel (Ep) and anti-parallel (Ea) to the growth direction were investigated to provide a comprehensive guide for understanding the electric field effects. The strain-induced asymmetry of the hybridized electron states is found to be weak and can be balanced by applying a small Ea electric field, of the order of 1 kV cm(-1). The strong interdot couplings completely break down at large electric fields, leading to single QD states confined at the opposite edges of the QDM. This mimics a transformation from a type-I band structure to a type-II band structure for the QDMs, which is a critical requirement for the design of intermediate-band solar cells (IBSCs). The analysis of the field-dependent ground-state transition energies reveals that the QDM can be operated both as a high dipole moment device by applying large electric fields and as a high polarizability device under the application of small electric field magnitudes. The quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) red shifts the band-gap wavelength to 1.3 μm at the 15 kV cm(-1) electric field; however the reduced electron-hole wave function overlaps lead to a decrease in the interband optical transition strengths by roughly three orders of magnitude. The study of the polarisation-resolved optical

  15. Source rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakr F. Makky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available West Beni Suef Concession is located at the western part of Beni Suef Basin which is a relatively under-explored basin and lies about 150 km south of Cairo. The major goal of this study is to evaluate the source rock by using different techniques as Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro, and well log data of some Cretaceous sequences including Abu Roash (E, F and G members, Kharita and Betty formations. The BasinMod 1D program is used in this study to construct the burial history and calculate the levels of thermal maturity of the Fayoum-1X well based on calibration of measured %Ro and Tmax against calculated %Ro model. The calculated Total Organic Carbon (TOC content from well log data compared with the measured TOC from the Rock-Eval pyrolysis in Fayoum-1X well is shown to match against the shale source rock but gives high values against the limestone source rock. For that, a new model is derived from well log data to calculate accurately the TOC content against the limestone source rock in the study area. The organic matter existing in Abu Roash (F member is fair to excellent and capable of generating a significant amount of hydrocarbons (oil prone produced from (mixed type I/II kerogen. The generation potential of kerogen in Abu Roash (E and G members and Betty formations is ranging from poor to fair, and generating hydrocarbons of oil and gas prone (mixed type II/III kerogen. Eventually, kerogen (type III of Kharita Formation has poor to very good generation potential and mainly produces gas. Thermal maturation of the measured %Ro, calculated %Ro model, Tmax and Production index (PI indicates that Abu Roash (F member exciting in the onset of oil generation, whereas Abu Roash (E and G members, Kharita and Betty formations entered the peak of oil generation.

  16. Rocking pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, Ger T; Rodriguez Gomez, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ever since Chuck Berry coined the term "rocking pneumonia" in his 1956 song "Roll over Beethoven", pneumonia has been mentioned frequently in modern blues and rock songs. We analyzed the lyrics of these songs to examine how various elements of pneumonia have been represented in popular music, specifically the cause of pneumonia, the risk groups, comorbidity (such as the boogie woogie flu), the clinical symptoms, and treatment and outcome. Up to this day, songwriters suggest that pneumonia is caused mainly by the cold and rain and that treatment is hardly possible, aside from a shot of rhythm and blues.

  17. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrášik, Martin; Kopecký, Miloslav

    2014-03-01

    even when the temperature decreases to -20 ºC, and the second group F in which the pore water freezes. It has been found that the rocks from group N contain critical portion of adsorbed water in pores which prevents freezing of the pore water. The presence of adsorbed water enables thermodynamic processes related to osmosis which are dominantly responsible for deterioration of rocks from group N. A high correlation (R = 0.81) between content of adsorbed water and freeze-thaw loss was proved and can be used as durability estimator of rocks from group N. The rock deterioration of group F is caused not only by osmosis, but also by some other processes and influences, such as hydraulic pressure, permeability, grain size, rock and mineral tensile strength, degree of saturation, etc., and the deterioration cannot be predicted yet without the freeze-thaw test. Since the contents of absorbed water and ratio between adsorbed and bulk water (of which the absorbed water consists) is controlled by the porosity and pore structure, it can be concluded that the deterioration of some rocks is strongly related to rock pore structure.

  18. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  19. Igneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Bruce R.

    “Igneous Rocks was written for undergraduate geology majors who have had a year of college-level chemistry and a course in mineralogy … and for beginning graduate students. Geologists working in industry, government, or academia should find this text useful as a guide to the technical literature up to 1981 and as an overview of topics with which they have not worked but which may have unanticipated pertinence to their own projects.” So starts the preface to this textbook.As one who works part time in research on igneous rocks, especially as they relate to mineral deposits, I have been looking for such a book with this avowed purpose in a field that has a choking richness of evolving terminology and a bewildering volume of interdisciplinary literature. In addition to the standard topics of igneous petrology, the book contains a chapter on the role of igneous activity in the genesis of mineral deposits, its value to geothermal energy, and the potential of igneous rocks as an environment for nuclear waste disposal. These topics are presented rather apologetically in the preface, but the author is to be applauded for including this chapter. The apology shows just how new these interests are to petrology. Recognition is finally coming that, for example, mineral deposits are not “sports of nature,” a view held even by many economic geologists as recently as the early 1960's; instead they are perfectly ordinary geochemical features formed by perfectly ordinary geologic processes. In fact, the mineral deposits and their attendant alteration zones probably have as much to tell us about igneous rocks as the igneous rocks have to tell us about mineral deposits.

  20. Statistical analysis of high order moments is a turbulent boundary layer with strong density differences; Analyse statistique des moments d'ordre eleve dans une couche limite turbulente en presence de differences de densite importantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudani, A. [Batna Univ., Dept. de Physique, Faculte des Sciences (Algeria); Bessaih, R. [Mentouri-Constantine Univ., Dept. de Genie Mecanique, Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur (Algeria)

    2004-12-01

    The study of turbulent boundary layer with strong differences of density is important for the understanding of practical situations occurring for example in the cooling of turbine blades through the tangential injection of a different gas or in combustion. In order to study the fine structure of wall turbulence in the presence of significant variations of density, a statistical analysis of the experimental data, obtained in a wind tunnel, is carried out. The results show that the relaxation of the skewness factor of u'(S{sub u'}) is carried out more quickly in the external layer than close to the wall, as well for the air injection as for the helium injection. S{sub u'} grows close to the injection slot in an appreciable way and this increase is accentuated for the air injection than for the helium injection. This growth of the skewness factor close to the injection slot can be explained by the increase in the longitudinal convective flux of turbulent energy in this zone. The results show for the distribution of the flatness factor F{sub u'} that there is no significant effect of the density gradient on the intermittent structure of the instantaneous longitudinal velocity in the developed zone, x/{delta} {>=} 5. The statistical analysis carried out in this study shows that the helium injection in the boundary layer generates more violent ejections than in the case of air injection. This result is confirmed by the significant contribution of the ejections to turbulent mass flux.

  1. Atomically Thin Mesoporous Co3O4Layers Strongly Coupled with N-rGO Nanosheets as High-Performance Bifunctional Catalysts for 1D Knittable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingbo; Zhong, Cheng; Liu, Jie; Zeng, Xiaoqiao; Qu, Shengxiang; Han, Xiaopeng; Deng, Yida; Hu, Wenbin; Lu, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Under development for next-generation wearable electronics are flexible, knittable, and wearable energy-storage devices with high energy density that can be integrated into textiles. Herein, knittable fiber-shaped zinc-air batteries with high volumetric energy density (36.1 mWh cm -3 ) are fabricated via a facile and continuous method with low-cost materials. Furthermore, a high-yield method is developed to prepare the key component of the fiber-shaped zinc-air battery, i.e., a bifunctional catalyst composed of atomically thin layer-by-layer mesoporous Co 3 O 4 /nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO) nanosheets. Benefiting from the high surface area, mesoporous structure, and strong synergetic effect between the Co 3 O 4 and N-rGO nanosheets, the bifunctional catalyst exhibits high activity and superior durability for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. Compared to a fiber-shaped zinc-air battery using state-of-the-art Pt/C + RuO 2 catalysts, the battery based on these Co 3 O 4 /N-rGO nanosheets demonstrates enhanced and stable electrochemical performance, even under severe deformation. Such batteries, for the first time, can be successfully knitted into clothes without short circuits under external forces and can power various electronic devices and even charge a cellphone. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Thermal Waters in Maguarichi, Chihuahua, Mexico: Influence on Volcanic Rocks Alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascote, C. R.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.

    2013-05-01

    Piedras de Lumbre, Maguarichi, is located 294 km. to the SW of Chihuahua city, in northern Mexico, in the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO). The study area is composed of a set of igneous volcanic rocks affected by hydrothermal flows, which apparently run along a fault. Outcrops of hot springs, going out with high pressure, are active all over the year and have no seasonal flow changes. The hydrothermal flows, approximately 20, that reach the surface area at Piedras de Lumbre, are altering the volcanic rocks that surround the hot springs. The study area is highly altered, and evidenced by a variety range of colors in the rock surfaces. The rock samples collected at the region show a crystal growth due to the influence of the salts from the thermal water. The rocks closest to the water openings have a change in its mineralogy, with the mafic minerals, present in andesites, been replaced by carbonates and sulfates, leaving only the clear mineral pseudomorphs. On the crust of the rocks a white layer of material (salts), product of the thermal waters has precipitated. The alteration is perceived only about 5 m. or less around the hot springs. The water, which has high contents of arsenic and sulfates has exerted a strong alteration in rhyolitic and andesitic rocks.

  3. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Chemical buffering capacity of clay rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaucaire, C.; Pearson, F.J.; Gautschi, A.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term performance of a nuclear waste repository is strongly dependent on the chemical properties of the host rock. The host rock establishes the chemical environment that determines such important performance attributes as radionuclide solubilities from the waste and the transport rates from the repository to the accessible environment. Clay-rich rocks are especially favourable host rocks because they provide a strong buffering capacity to resist chemical changes prompted either internally, by reactions of the waste itself and emplacement materials, or externally, by changes in the hydrologic systems surrounding the host rock. This paper will focus on three aspects of the stability of clay-rich host rocks: their ability to provide pCO 2 and redox buffering, and to resist chemical changes imposed by changes in regional hydrology and hydro-chemistry. (authors)

  5. Numerical simulation for the coupled thermo-mechanical performance of a lined rock cavern for underground compressed air energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu-Wei; Xia, Cai-Chu; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Mei, Song-Hua; Zhou, Yu

    2017-12-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) is a technology that uses compressed air to store surplus electricity generated from low power consumption time for use at peak times. This paper presents a thermo-mechanical modeling for the thermodynamic and mechanical responses of a lined rock cavern used for CAES. The simulation was accomplished in COMSOL Multiphysics and comparisons of the numerical simulation and some analytical solutions validated the thermo-mechanical modeling. Air pressure and temperatures in the sealing layer and concrete lining exhibited a similar trend of ‘up-down-down-up’ in one cycle. Significant temperature fluctuation occurred only in the concrete lining and sealing layer, and no strong fluctuation was observed in the host rock. In the case of steel sealing, principal stresses in the sealing layer were larger than those in the concrete and host rock. The maximum compressive stresses of the three layers and the displacement on the cavern surface increased with the increase of cycle number. However, the maximum tensile stresses exhibited the opposite trend. Polymer sealing achieved a relatively larger air temperature and pressure compared with steel and air-tight concrete sealing. For concrete layer thicknesses of 0 and 0.1 m and an initial air pressure of 4.5 MPa, the maximum rock temperature could reach 135 °C and 123 °C respectively in a 30 day simulation.

  6. Craters and Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    11 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some typical relations between impact craters and light-toned, layered rock on Mars. The larger circular feature at the north (top) end of the image marks the location of a filled, buried crater on intermountain terrain north of Hellas Planitia. The larger crater at the southeast (lower right) corner formed by meteor impact into the layered material in which the buried crater is encased. The layered rock, in this case, has a light tone similar to the sedimentary rocks being explored by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, thousands of kilometers away in Sinus Meridiani. Location near: 24.9oS, 299.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  7. CERN Rocks

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  8. Vesuvianite–wollastonite–grossular-bearing calc-silicate rock near ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The enclave contains phlogopite-absent and phlogopite-bearing calc-silicate rocks, the latter being much more abundant than the former. The above assemblage occurs in the phlogopite-absent rock. Phlogopite-bearing rock contains the assemblage phlogopite + salite + microcline + plagioclase + quartz. A strong ...

  9. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  10. Thermal expansion of granite rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.

    1978-04-01

    The thermal expansion of rocks is strongly controlled by the thermal expansion of the minerals. The theoretical thermal expansion of the Stripa Granite is gound to be 21 . 10 -6 [deg C] -1 at 25 deg C and 38 . 10 -6 [deg C] -1 at 400 deg C. The difference in expansion for the rock forming minerals causes micro cracking at heating. The expansion due to micro cracks is found to be of the same order as the mineral expansion. Most of the micro cracks will close at pressures of the order of 10 - 20 MPa. The thermal expansion of a rock mass including the effect of joints is determined in the pilot heater test in the Stripa Mine

  11. Thermally induced rock stress increment and rock reinforcement response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakala, M.; Stroem, J.; Nujiten, G.; Uotinen, L.; Siren, T.; Suikkanen, J.

    2014-07-01

    This report describes a detailed study of the effect of thermal heating by the spent nuclear fuel containers on the in situ rock stress, any potential rock failure, and associated rock reinforcement strategies for the Olkiluoto underground repository. The modelling approach and input data are presented together repository layout diagrams. The numerical codes used to establish the effects of heating on the in situ stress field are outlined, together with the rock mass parameters, in situ stress values, radiogenic temperatures and reinforcement structures. This is followed by a study of the temperature and stress evolution during the repository's operational period and the effect of the heating on the reinforcement structures. It is found that, during excavation, the maximum principal stress is concentrated at the transition areas where the profile changes and that, due to the heating from the deposition of spent nuclear fuel, the maximum principal stress rises significantly in the tunnel arch area of NW/SW oriented central tunnels. However, it is predicted that the rock's crack damage (CD, short term strength) value of 99 MPa will not be exceeded anywhere within the model. Loads onto the reinforcement structures will come from damaged and loosened rock which is assumed in the modelling as a free rock wedge - but this is very much a worst case scenario because there is no guarantee that rock cracking would form a free rock block. The structural capacity of the reinforcement structures is described and it is predicted that the current quantity of the rock reinforcement is strong enough to provide a stable tunnel opening during the peak of the long term stress state, with damage predicted on the sprayed concrete liner. However, the long term stability and safety can be improved through the implementation of the principles of the Observational Method. The effect of ventilation is also considered and an additional study of the radiogenic heating effect on the brittle

  12. Rocks Can Wow? Yes, Rocks Can Wow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Sally; Luke, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Rocks and fossils appear in the National Curriculum of England science programmes of study for children in year 3 (ages 7-8). A frequently asked question is "How do you make the classification of rocks engaging?" In response to this request from a school, a set of interactive activities was designed and organised by tutors and students…

  13. Nagra technical report 14-02, Geological basics - Dossier VI - Barrier properties of proposed host rock sediments and neighbouring rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautschi, A.; Deplazes, G.; Traber, D.; Marschall, P.; Mazurek, M.; Gimmi, T.; Maeder, U.

    2014-01-01

    This dossier is the sixth of a series of eight reports concerning the safety and technical aspects of locations for the disposal of radioactive wastes in Switzerland. It discusses the barrier properties of the proposed host rock sediments and neighbouring rock layers. The mineralogical composition of the host rocks are discussed as are their pore densities and hydrological properties. Diffusion aspects are discussed. The aquifer systems in the proposed depository areas and their classification are looked at. The barrier properties of the host rocks and those of neighbouring sediments are discussed. Finally, modelling concepts and parameters for the transport of radionuclides in the rocks are discussed

  14. Analytical solutions for recession analyses of sloping aquifers - applicability on relict rock glaciers in alpine catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauritsch, Marcus; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan; Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Winkler, Gerfried

    2014-05-01

    Rock glaciers as aquifer systems in alpine catchments may strongly influence the hydrological characteristics of these catchments. Thus, they have a high impact on the ecosystem and potential natural hazards such as for example debris flow. Therefore, knowledge of the hydrodynamic processes, internal structure and properties of these aquifers is important for resource management and risk assessment. The investigation of such aquifers often turns out to be expensive and technically complicated because of their strongly limited accessibility. Analytical solutions of discharge recession provide a quick and easy way to estimate aquifer parameters. However, due to simplifying assumptions the validity of the interpretation is often questionable. In this study we compared results of an analytical solution of discharge recessions with results based on a numerical model. This was done in order to analyse the range of uncertainties and the applicability of the analytical method in alpine catchment areas. The research area is a 0.76 km² large catchment in the Seckauer Tauern Range, Austria. The dominant aquifer in this catchment is a rock glacier, namely the Schöneben Rock Glacier. This relict rock glacier (i.e. containing no permafrost at present) covers an area of 0.11 km² and is drained by one spring at the rock glacier front. The rock glacier consists predominantly of gneissic sediments (mainly coarse-grained, blocky at the surface) and extends from 1720 to 1905 m a.s.l.. Discharge of the rock glacier spring is automatically measured since 2002. Electric conductivity and water temperature is monitored since 2008. An automatic weather station was installed in 2011 in the central part of the catchment. Additionally data of geophysical surveys (refraction seismic and ground penetrating radar) have been used to analyse the base slope and inner structure of the rock glacier. The measured data are incorporated into a numerical model implemented in MODFLOW. The numerical

  15. A survey of lunar rock types and comparison of the crusts of earth and moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The principal known types of lunar rocks are briefly reviewed, and their chemical relationships discussed. In the suite of low-KREEP highland rocks, Fe/(Fe + Mg) in the normative mafic minerals increases and the albite content of normative plagio-clase decreases as the total amount of normative plagioclase increases, the opposite of the trend predicted by the Bowen reaction principle. The distribution of compositions of rocks from terrestrial layered mafic intrusives is substantially different: here the analyses fall in several discrete clusters (anorthositic rocks, norites, granophyres and ferrogabbros, ultramafics), and the chemical trends noted above are not reproduced. It is suggested that the observed trends in lunar highland rocks could be produced by crystal fractionation in a deep global surface magma system if (1) plagiociase tended to float, upon crystallization, and (2) the magma was kept agitated and well mixed (probably by thermal convection) until crystallization was far advanced and relatively little residual liquid was left. After the crustal system solidified, but before extensive cooling had developed a thick, strong lithosphere, mantle convection was able to draw portions of the lunar anorthositic crust down into the mantle.

  16. Rock Slope Design Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Based on the stratigraphy and the type of slope stability problems, the flat lying, Paleozoic age, sedimentary : rocks of Ohio were divided into three design units: 1) competent rock design unit consisting of sandstones, limestones, : and siltstones ...

  17. Rocks in Our Pockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Donna; Kuhlman, Wilma

    2005-01-01

    To introduce students to rocks and their characteristics, teacher can begin rock units with the activities described in this article. Students need the ability to make simple observations using their senses and simple tools.

  18. Rock slope design guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This Manual is intended to provide guidance for the design of rock cut slopes, rockfall catchment, and : rockfall controls. Recommendations presented in this manual are based on research presented in Shakoor : and Admassu (2010) entitled Rock Slop...

  19. Preliminary Characterization of a Microbial Community of Rock Varnish from Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; LaDuc, M. T.; Kuhlman, G. M.; Anderson, R. C.; Newcombe, D. A.; Fusco, W.; Steucker, T.; Allenbach, L.; Ball, C.; Crawford, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Rock varnish (also referred to as desert varnish in the literature because it is particularly noticeable in desert environments) is a dark, thin (typically 50-500 m thick), layered veneer composed of clay minerals cemented together by oxides and hydroxides of manganese and iron. Some scientists suggest that varnish may provide a historical record of environmental processes such as global warming and long-term climate change. However, despite more than 30 years of study using modern microanalytical and microbial culturing techniques, the nucleation and growth mechanisms of rock varnish remain a mystery. Rock varnish is of interest to the Mars science community because a varnish-like sheen has been reported on the rocks at the Viking Lander sites. It therefore important for us to understand the formation mechanisms of terrestrial varnish abiotic, biotic, or a combination of the two -- as this understanding may give us clues concerning the chemical and physical processes occurring on the surface of Mars. It is strongly believed by some in the biogeochemistry community that microbes have a role in forming rock varnish, and iron- and manganese-oxidation by microbes isolated from varnish has been extensively investigated. Only two of these studies have investigated the microbial genetics of varnish. These studies examined the morphological, physiological and molecular characteristics of microbes that had previously been cultured from various rock varnishes and identified the cultivars using 16S rDNA sequencing techniques. However, it is well known that most of organisms existing in nature are refractory to cultivation, so many important organisms would have been missed. The currently described work investigates the genetics of rock varnish microbial community from a site in the Whipple Mtns., south of Death Valley, CA, near Parker, Arizona. We employed both cultural and molecular techniques to characterize the microorganisms found within the varnish and surrounding soil

  20. Impurity screening in strongly coupled plasma systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrkos, S

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of the problem of screening of an impurity in a strongly coupled one-component plasma within the framework of the linear response (LR) theory. We consider 3D, 2D and quasi-2D layered systems. For a strongly coupled plasma the LR can be determined by way of the known S(k) structure functions. In general, an oscillating screening potential with local overscreening and antiscreening regions emerges. In the case of the bilayer, this phenomenon becomes global, as overscreening develops in the layer of the impurity and antiscreening in the adjacent layer. We comment on the limitations of the LR theory in the strong coupling situation.

  1. Rock species formation due to deep-mantle melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Ilya; Tackley, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Melting and melting migration are processes leading to chemically distinct rock species from a homogeneous substrate in the Earth mantle. Iron-rich melts and corresponding rock species are proposed to result from magma ocean progressive crystallization [Labrosse et al., 2007], and modern geophysical models of ULVZ (e.g. [Beuchert & Schmeling, 2013]) discuss their presence at around the CMB today. We perform long-term (tens of millions of years) numerical simulations of the Earth's mantle for a plausible range of CMB temperatures to understands the possibility of melting and it's consequences. Our model of melting is based on experimental data and ab initio simulations. Physical properties (liquid-solid density differences) are adjusted with data of [de Koker et al., 2013; Mosenfelder et al., 2007; Stixrude & Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2011; Thomas & Asimow, 2013]. This model is included in StagYY numerical code (e.g. [Tackley, 2008]) to simulate mass and thermal fluxes within the Earth mantle. Melt segregation (rocks' permeability and velocities) is considered using equations listed in [Abe, 1995; Solomatov, Stevenson, 1993; Martin & Nokes, 1989]. Thermal effects (adiabatic heating and viscous dissipation) are considered. Viscous dissipation term includes Darcy flux term, but omits highly non-linear Brinkman contribution [Nield, 2007]. Modeling predicts formation of melt if temperature at CMB exceeds 4000-4050K. It's segregation and reequilibration results in sufficient volumes of slightly iron-enriched melt lighter than solid counterpart and moving upward. However, it's propagation is strongly controlled by temperature. Partial melting atop the molten layer results in formation of refractory iron-poor restite which delaminates and sink down, so that a layer of iron-depleted material forms underneath the molten layer. Our model applied to homogeneous pyrolitic mantle results in formation of layers of iron-depleted material with average FeO around 4.6 mol.% and iron

  2. Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    of the open questions which exist for scattering from these types of surfaces and include increasing our basic understanding of: (1) geoacoustic...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Office of Naval Research 875 North Randolph Street ...ideal mean seafloor could be mapped to the local SCATTERING FROM ROCKS 5 Figure 4. (color online) SAS images of the calibration rock outcrop. Boxes

  3. Application of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kikuo

    1977-01-01

    Not only inorganic and organic compounds but also natural substrances, such as accumulations in soil, are completely decomposed and distilled by heating with strong phosphoric acid for 30 to 50 minutes. As applications of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry, determination of uranium and boron by use of solubilization effect of this substance, titration of uranyl ion by use of sulfuric iron (II) contained in this substance, application to tracer experiment, and determination of radioactive ruthenium in environmental samples are reviewed. Strong phosphoric acid is also applied to activation analysis, for example, determination of N in pyrographite with iodate potassium-strong phosphoric acid method, separation of Os and Ru with sulfuric cerium (IV) - strong phosphoric acid method or potassium dechromate-strong phosphoric acid method, analysis of Se, As and Sb rocks and accumulations with ammonium bromide, sodium chloride and sodium bromide-strong phosphoric acid method. (Kanao, N.)

  4. Formation of Ocean Sedimentary Rocks as Active Planets and Life-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Wet shocked rocks are discarded globally and enriched elements in ocean-sedimentary rocks, which is strong indicator of ocean water of other planets. Ocean-sedimentary rocks are strong indicator of water planets and possible exo-life on planet Mars.

  5. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. The author briefly discusses the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Auth.)

  6. The role of rock moisture on regulating hydrologic and solute fluxes in the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, D. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Hahm, W. J.; Wang, J.; Murphy, C.; Cargill, S.; Dietrich, W. E.; Tune, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    In environments where the vadose zone extends below the soil layer into underlying weathered bedrock, the water held in the weathering -generated pores can be an important source of moisture to vegetation. The heterogeneous distribution of pore space in weathered bedrock, furthermore, controls the subsurface water flowpaths that dictate how water is partitioned in the critical zone (CZ) and evolves geochemically. Here, we present the results of direct monitoring of the fluxes of water and solutes through the deep CZ using a novel vadose zone monitoring system (VMS) as well as geophysical logging and sampling in a network of deep wells across a steep hillslope in Northern California. At our study site (Eel River CZO), multi-year monitoring reveals that a significant fraction of incoming rainfall (up to 30%) is seasonally stored in the fractures and matrix of the upper 12 m of weathered bedrock as rock moisture. Intensive geochemical and geophysical observations distributed from the surface to the depth of unweathered bedrock indicate that the seasonal addition and depletion of rock moisture has key implications for hydrologic and geochemical processes. First, rock moisture storage provides an annually consistent water storage reservoir for use by vegetation during the summer, which buffers transpiration fluxes against variability in seasonal precipitation. Second, because the timing and magnitude of groundwater recharge and streamflow are controlled by the annual filling and drainage of the rock moisture, rock moisture regulates the partitioning of hydrologic fluxes. Third, we find that rock moisture dynamics—which influence the myriad geochemical and microbial processes that weather bedrock—strongly correspond with the observed vertical weathering profile. As a result of the coupling between chemical weathering reactions and hydrologic fluxes, the geochemical composition of groundwater and streamflow is influenced by the temporal dynamics of rock moisture. Our

  7. Rolling Stones: Studying Aquatic Invertebrates on Hard Rock Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, S.; Cooper, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    Rock is an important habitat for aquatic insects and other invertebrates, but studying invertebrates on this substrate poses many potential problems to the ecologist. Rock is a common stream bed control material. Thus, land managers, for stream rehabilitation and erosion control/channel stability, are introducing rock to large numbers of streams, including many that previously did not contain this substrate. Two key impediments to study of rock-inhabiting invertebrates include accurate measurement of individual rock surface areas and calculating total available surface area for stream regions with overlapping layers of rock. We present an overview of concepts and methods used for study of rock-inhabiting invertebrates and provide information on new methods that enhance our ability to make easier realistic estimates. These new methods, especially one for calculating rock surface area based on weight or water displacement measurements of rocks, provide an accurate and efficient means for estimating invertebrate density. By combining recent methods to extrapolate invertebrate densities from individual rocks to estimates of total bottom densities of aquatic invertebrates for a reach or region of stream bottom area, we obtain much greater accuracy and precision in quantifying densities and estimating secondary production of rock-dwelling communities.

  8. Prolonged KREEP magmatism on the Moon indicated by the youngest dated lunar igneous rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Lars E; Shearer, Charles K; Asmerom, Yemane; Papike, James J

    2004-11-11

    Primordial solidification of the Moon (or its uppermost layer) resulted in the formation of a variety of rock types that subsequently melted and mixed to produce the compositional diversity observed in the lunar sample suite. The initial rocks to crystallize from this Moon-wide molten layer (the magma ocean) contained olivine and pyroxene and were compositionally less evolved than the plagioclase-rich rocks that followed. The last stage of crystallization, representing the last few per cent of the magma ocean, produced materials that are strongly enriched in incompatible elements including potassium (K), the rare earth elements (REE) and phosphorus (P)--termed KREEP. The decay of radioactive elements in KREEP, such as uranium and thorium, is generally thought to provide the thermal energy necessary for more recent lunar magmatism. The ages of KREEP-rich samples are, however, confined to the earliest periods of lunar magmatism between 3.8 and 4.6 billion years (Gyr) ago, providing no physical evidence that KREEP is directly involved in more recent lunar magmatism. But here we present evidence that KREEP magmatism extended for an additional 1 Gyr, based on analyses of the youngest dated lunar sample.

  9. Investigation of Rock Failure Pattern in Creep by Digital Speckle Correlation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunliang Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanical characteristics from creep deformation to failure of rock, the tests of uniaxial compression and pushing steel-plate anchored in rock were performed, by using RLJW-2000 servo test synchronizing with Digital Speckle Correlation Method (DSCM. The investigations showed that for a uniaxial compressive specimen, when load arrived at 0.5σc, displacement clusters orderly formed, which was ahead of the macrocreep strain occurring in a slight jump mode when load arrived at 0.7σc. When the load level arrived at 0.8σc, displacement clusters gathered to be a narrow band. After that, the specimen abruptly fractured in a shear mode. In the creep pushing steel-plate test, when pushing force arrived at 25 kN, crack began to occur, the horizontal displacement field as well as shear strain field concentrated continuously along the interface between steel-plate and rock, and a new narrow concentrating band gathered in the upper layer. When pushing force arrived at 27.5 kN, another new narrow shear deformation band formed in the lower layer. Then, the steel-plate was pushed out quickly accompanying strong creep deformation.

  10. Redox mechanisms and superconductivity in layered copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveau, B.; Michel, C.; Hervieu, M.; Provost, J.

    1992-01-01

    Redox reactions in high T c superconductors cuprates are complex and play an important role in superconductivity: oxygen non-stoichiometry is influencing the critical temperature, and rock salt layers interact with copper layers. 25 refs., 7 figs

  11. GRAPHITIZATION OF METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE WESTERN KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic-Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in the study area are metacarbonate, metachert, metapelite, metasandstone and metaconglomerate. Graphite layers are 1cm to 2m thick, extend laterally for tens of meters and are intercalated with metasedimentary rocks. Generally, the graphite is black in color, with a well developed cleavage which is concordant with the cleavage of the host rocks. In addition, the crystal and flake graphites formed in metasedimentary rocks are mostly aligned parallel to the cleavage planes. These metamorphic rocks are subjected to shearing and granulation providing structural control for the development of graphite. It was probably this phenomenon that first led to emphasize the relationship between graphite and metasedimentary rocks. Graphite mineralization has been controlled by bedding, microfractures and granulations. Briefly, the metamorphism has converted carbonaceous matter into graphite .

  12. What Happens Where the Water and the Rock Touch in Small Space Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, P. K.; Regensburger, P. V.; Klimczak, C.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Dombard, A. J.; Hauck, S. A., II

    2017-12-01

    There are several small space bodies that go around bigger worlds that might have a layer of water under a layer of ice. Lots of study has been done to understand the outside ice layer of these small space bodies, because the ice can tells us important things about the big water layer under it. Some of these small space bodies are very interesting because the right things for life—water, hot rock, and food—might be at the bottom of the water layer, where it touches the top of the next layer down, which is made of rock. But it is very hard to understand what this rock at the bottom of the water is like, because we can't see it. So, we are imagining what this rock is like by thinking about what the rock is like under the water layer on our own world. If hot rock comes out of the rock layer through cracks under the water, the cold of the water makes the hot rock go very cold very fast, and it makes funny rolls as it does so. This might happen on some small space bodies that are hot enough on the inside to make hot rock. We know that on our own world the rock layer under the water is wet to as far down as cracks can go, so it makes sense that this is true for small space bodies, too. We did some thinking about numbers and found out that the cracks can go a few ten hundred steps into the rock layer on small space bodies, but for bigger (well, not quite so small) space bodies, the cracks can go at least tens of ten hundred steps into the rock layer. This means that water goes into the rock layer this much, too. But get this: some small bodies are not really that small—one of them is bigger than the first world from the Sun! And on a few of these big (small) bodies, the layer of water is so heavy that the bottom of that water is pushed together from all sides and turns into a type of hot ice. This means that, for these big (small) worlds, the water can't get into the rock layer through cracks (since there is a layer of hot ice in the way), and so these bodies are

  13. The role of major forest fires on rock physical decay in a Mediterranean environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtober-Zisu, Nurit; Tessler, Naama; Tsatskin, Alexander; Greenbaum, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Massive destruction of carbonate rocks occurred on the slopes of Mt. Carmel (Israel), during a severe forest fire in 2010. The bedrock surfaces exhibited extensive exfoliation into flakes and spalls covering up to 80%-100% of the exposed rocks; detached boulders were totally fractured or disintegrated. The fire affected six carbonate units—various types of chalk, limestone, and dolomite. The burned flakes show a consistent tendency towards flatness, in all lithologies, as 85%-95% of the flakes were detached in the form of blades, plates, and slabs. The extent of the physical disruption depends on rock composition: the most severe response was found in the chalk formations which are covered by calcrete (Nari crusts). These rocks reacted by extreme exfoliation, at an average depth of 7.7 to 9.6 cm and a maximum depth of 20 cm. Scorched and blackened faces under the upper layer of spalls provide strong evidence that chalk breakdown took place at an early stage of the fire. The extreme response of the chalks can be explained by the laminar structure of the Nari, which served as planes of weakness for the rock destruction. Three years after the fire, the rocks continue to exfoliate and break down internally. As the harder surface of the Nari was removed, the more brittle underlying chalk is exposed to erosion. These flakes seem to play an important role in reforming the soil after the fire, especially by increasing the coarse particles percentage. These, in spite of the absence of vegetation cover, improve soil infiltration and percolation rates and cause long-term changes to the hydrological regime. It is difficult to estimate the frequency of high-intensity fires in the Carmel region over the past 2-3 million years, as well as the extension and density of the vegetation. It is even harder to assess the frequency of fires (and the destruction) of a single rock outcrop. Our findings show that rock outcrop may lose even 20 cm of its thickness in a single fire. This

  14. Stress–strain state of adjacent rock mass under slice mining of steeply dipping ore bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, VD; Gakhova, LN

    2018-03-01

    Under analysis is the stress state of rock mass surrounding stopes in the initial cutting layer displaced in plan relative to the above-lying extracted layer in the overcut rock mass. The authors determine the boundaries of the post-limiting deformation zones during stoping advance using the Mohr–Coulomb criterion. The sequence of stoping to ensure better support conditions is proposed.

  15. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  16. Space Weathering of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  17. Rock kinoekraanil / Katrin Rajasaare

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rajasaare, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    7.-11. juulini kinos Sõprus toimuval filminädalal "Rock On Screen" ekraanile jõudvatest rockmuusikuid portreteerivatest filmidest "Lou Reed's Berlin", "The Future Is Unwritten: Joe Strummer", "Control: Joy Division", "Hurriganes", "Shlaager"

  18. Rock Equity Holdings, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against Rock Equity Holdings, LLC, for alleged violations at The Cove at Kettlestone/98th Street Reconstruction located at 3015

  19. Pop & rock / Berk Vaher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaher, Berk, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Uute heliplaatide Redman "Malpractice", Brian Eno & Peter Schwalm "Popstars", Clawfinger "A Whole Lot of Nothing", Dario G "In Full Color", MLTR e. Michael Learns To Rock "Blue Night" lühitutvustused

  20. Solid as a rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincus, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Recent technologic developments have required a more comprehensive approach to the behavior of rock mass or rock substance plus discontinuities than was adequate previously. This work considers the inherent problems in such operations as the storage of hot or cold fluids in caverns and aquifers, underground storage of nuclear waste, underground recovery of heat from hydrocarbon fuels, tertiary recovery of oil by thermal methods, rapid excavation of large openings at shallow to great depths and in hostile environments, and retrofitting of large structures built on or in rock. The standardization of methods for determining rock properties is essential to all of the activities described, for use not only in design and construction but also in site selection and post-construction monitoring. Development of such standards is seen as a multidisciplinary effort

  1. Innovative rock bed construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.

    1983-06-01

    A general discussion of the use of rock beds for heating and cooling thermal storage is particularized for design and construction in Phoenix, Arizona. The rock bed parameters for three two-story condominium apartments constructed in 1982 are discussed, including sizing criteria and original construction details. A revised construction method using gabions that are self-supporting chain link cylinders provided a much more economical construction method as well as other advantages of speed and structural flexibility.

  2. Rock and Soil Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, Nicolae; Ene, Horia I.

    The first part of the volume contains theoretical considerations of the physical properties of soils and rocks. Articles on the mechanical and kinematical behavior of rocks as well as mathematical models are the base for the understanding of the physical properties of natural systems. In the second part articles deal with experiments and applications regarding creep deformation of clay, underground cavities, tunnels and deformation of sand and lamistrine sediments.

  3. Lead isotopic evidence for interaction between plume and lower crust during emplacement of peralkaline Lovozero rocks and related rare-metal deposits, East Fennoscandia, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zartman, R. E.; Kogarko, L. N.

    2017-05-01

    The Lovozero alkaline massif—an agpaitic nepheline syenite layered intrusion—is located in the central part of the Kola Peninsula, Russia, and belongs to the Kola ultramafic alkaline and carbonatitic province (KACP) of Devonian age. Associated loparite and eudialyte deposits, which contain immense resources of REE, Nb, Ta, and Zr, constitute a world class mineral district. Previous Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope investigations demonstrated that these rocks and mineral deposits were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, because the Sr, Nd, and Hf abundances in the Kola alkaline rocks are significantly elevated, their isotopic compositions were relatively insensitive to contamination by the underlying crustal rocks through which the intruding magmas passed. Pb occurring in relatively lower abundance in the KACP rocks, by contrast, would have been a more sensitive indicator of an acquired crustal component. Here, we investigate the lead isotopic signature of representative types of Lovozero rocks in order to further characterize their sources. The measured Pb isotopic composition was corrected using the determined U and Th concentrations to the age of the crystallization of the intrusion (376 ± 28 Ma, based on a 206Pb/204Pb versus 238U/204Pb isochron and 373 ± 9 Ma, from a 208Pb/204Pb versus 232Th/204Pb isochron). Unlike the previously investigated Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopes, the lead isotopic composition plot was well outside the FOZO field. The 206Pb/204Pb values fall within the depleted MORB field, with some rocks having lower 207Pb/204Pb but higher 208Pb/204Pb values. Together with other related carbonatites having both lower and higher 206Pb/204Pb values, the combined KACP rocks form an extended linear array defining either a 2.5-Ga secondary isochron or a mixing line. The projection of this isotopic array toward the very unradiogenic composition of underlying 2.4-2.5-Ga basaltic rocks of the Matachewan superplume and associated Archean granulite facies

  4. Brit Crit: Turning Points in British Rock Criticism 1960-1990

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Gestur; Lindberg, U.; Michelsen, M.

    2002-01-01

    The article examines the development of rock criticism in the United Kingdom from the perspective of a Bourdieuan field-analysis. Early British rock critics, like Nik Cohn, were international pioneers, a few years later there was a strong American influence, but British rock criticism has always ...

  5. Mechanics of a contracting reservoir in an elastic half-space with an intervening visco-elasto-plastic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossop, A.; Fredrich, J. T.

    2004-12-01

    The extraction of fluids from porous rocks within the Earth's crust leads to localised volume strains. These in turn induce stress changes and displacements in the surrounding rock mass. The relationships between these processes are governed by the constitutive properties of the rocks. For the case of a poroelastic fluid reservoir in a linear-elastic matrix the mechanics are relatively well known and understood. In this study we extend these models by investigating the case of a contracting rock body (caused by declining pore pressure) embedded within a linear-elastic half space, but with the addition of a visco-elasto-plastic layer between the contracting reservoir and the free surface. The problem is of growing importance as the exploitation of hydrocarbon reservoirs beneath salt bodies occurs at ever greater depths in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. This is because the creep properties of salt are strongly temperature dependent, so that as depths increase, and hence ambient temperatures, creep can occur at a rate that is impossible to ignore over the reservoir lifecycle. The models are explored using a finite element approach and make use of sophisticated salt constitutive models and large-deformation three-dimensional geomechanical simulation codes; the reservoir deformations are governed by either poro-elastic or cap plasticity constitutive laws. However, a general behaviour pattern can be observed: the visco-elasto-plastic salt layer tends to decouple the deformation fields from the free surface with stress and displacements accentuated below the salt. The magnitude of the increased horizontal displacements below the salt layer are relatively independent of the layer thickness. The accentuated vertical displacements though are more strongly dependent on the thickness of the salt layer. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories funded by the US DOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogam laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation

  6. Rock magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearst, R.B.; Morris, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    In 1978 the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program began the long task of site selection and evaluation for nuclear waste disposal. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, administered by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Research Company has provided the geophysicist with the unique opportunity to evaluate many modes of geophysical investigation in conjunction with detailed geologic mapping at a number of research areas. Of particular interest is research area RA-7, East Bull Lake, Algoma District, Ontario. Geophysical survey methods applied to the study of this included detailed gravity, ground magnetics, VLF, an airborne magnetic gradiometer survey and an airborne helicopter magnetic and EM survey. A comprehensive suite of rock property studies was also undertaken providing information on rock densities and magnetic rock properties. Preliminary modeling of the magnetic data sets assuming only induced magnetization illustrated the difficulty of arriving at a magnetic source geometry consistent with the mapped surficial and borehole geology. Integration of the magnetic rock properties observations and industry standard magnetic modelling techniques provides a source model geometry that is consistent with other geophysical/geological data sets, e.g. gravity and observed geology. The genesis of individual magnetic signatures in the East Bull Lake gabbro-anorthosite record the intrusion, metamorphism and fracture alteration of the pluton. As shown by this paper, only by understanding the rock magnetic signatures associated with each of these events is it possible to obtain geologically meaningful interpretative models

  7. Petrified lightning: the role of bubbles in the physical and chemical processes leading to formation of rock fulgurites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Elmi, C.; Goldsby, D. L.; Giere, R.

    2016-12-01

    Fulgurite is a vitrified soil, sand or rock resulting from lightning strikes. The thunderbolt, which can have an energy density of 3.3 ×106 J/m, is associated with air temperatures of up to 30,000 K and a current of up to 10 kA, which can heat the rock to >2000 K within tens of ms. The rapid fusing and subsequent quenching of the surface of the rock leaves a distinctive thin garbled coating comprised of glassy to fine-grained porous material. Similar materials and structures result from atomic bomb tests (trinitite) and from meteorite impacts (tektite). Chemical analysis of rock fulgurite samples on granites collected near Baveno, Italy reveals a glass composition of mainly SiO2 and Al2O3. A porosity of about 10% in the analyzed fulgurite was determined. The presence of newly-formed cristobalite and relict quartz in a relatively chemically homogenous glass matrix indicates induced temperatures >1700 ºC. The residual organic matter in the glass suggests that rapid cooling of the melt trapped NOx and COx gases vaporized during the lightning event. Tiny spheres mainly made of Fe and rich in Si point to reducing conditions. To better understand the formation of the porous glass matrix during intense Joule heating and subsequent rapid cooling, idealized physical models were developed to simulate bubble nucleation and redox reactions inside the bubbles. Preliminary results suggest that a weathered surface layer of higher electrical conductivity than the bulk rock results in strong Joule heating near the surface, facilitating the formation of a dense population of bubbles in the 10 mm-thick glass layer. Experiments to generate fulgurites in the laboratory, with well controlled energy input and sample properties, will aid our understanding of the physics of fulgurite formation and corroborate theoretical models. The results of such experiments, which are underway, will be presented.

  8. The analysis of pigments on rock surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fankhauser, B.; O'Connor, S.; Pittelkow, Y.

    1997-01-01

    A limestone slab of roof fall coated with a red pigment was recovered from a Rockshelter in the Napier Ranges of the Kimberley region, Western Australia. Next to the roof fall fragment in the same stratigraphic layer was a piece of ochre. Three questions were presented: (1) is the red substance an ochre? (2) is the piece of ochre identical to the red substance on the roof fall? and (3) are the layers of pigment on the top and bottom of the limestone slab the same? In addition, as an extension from these questions, a general method was developed for the in situ analysis of ochre pigments on substrates to determine likely compositions and ochre sources. The analysis of the red pigment presented an analytical problem because the substance was intimately associated with the rock slab and therefore the analysis had to be done in situ. Not only was the red layer thin, but on a micro level it was uneven. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) penetrated the red layer, simultaneously analysing this layer and the rock substrate to different degrees depending upon the thickness of the red layer. Determining if the substance was actually ochre involved a comparison of elemental analyses between the background (slab) and background with red coating. Coatings of other ochres with known elemental concentrations on the same limestone background gave a comparison of the effect of simultaneously analysing a thin layer and background with different compositions. Three graphical methods useful for insitu analysis are demeonstrated. The find dates (around 40,000 BP) add to a growing body of data in support of the widespread use of ochre accompanying the earliest documented use of widely separated and environmentally diverse regions of Australia by Aboriginal people

  9. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in rock musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høydal, Erik Harry; Lein Størmer, Carl Christian; Laukli, Einar; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2017-09-01

    Our focus in this study was the assessment of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in a large group of rock musicians. A further objective was to analyse tinnitus among rock musicians as related to TEOAEs. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random. A control group was included at random for comparison. We recruited 111 musicians and a control group of 40 non-musicians. Testing was conducted by using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, TEOAEs and a questionnaire. TEOAE SNR in the half-octave frequency band centred on 4 kHz was significantly lower bilaterally in musicians than controls. This effect was strongly predicted by age and pure-tone hearing threshold levels in the 3-6 kHz range. Bilateral hearing thresholds were significantly higher at 6 kHz in musicians. Twenty percent of the musicians had permanent tinnitus. There was no association between the TEOAE parameters and permanent tinnitus. Our results suggest an incipient hearing loss at 6 kHz in rock musicians. Loss of TEOAE SNR in the 4 kHz half-octave frequency band was observed, but it was related to higher mean 3-6 kHz hearing thresholds and age. A large proportion of rock musicians have permanent tinnitus.

  10. A proposal of constitutive creep model for soft rock to be applied to numerical analysis for mechanical interaction in the underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Masataka; Okada, Tetsuji

    2005-01-01

    are as follows; 1) Deformation of the hole cases within a year because the stress state of few layers in surrounding rock mass is over the residual strength. 2) Deformation of the hole after backfilling is strongly dependent on behavior of pore water pressure. (author)

  11. Sedimentary Rocks and Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    25 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows buttes composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock exposed by erosion within a crater occurring immediately west of Schiaparelli Basin near 4.0oS, 347.9oW. Surrounding these buttes is a field of dark sand dunes and lighter-toned, very large windblown ripples. The sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater interior was once the site of a lake. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  12. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  13. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  14. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  15. Development of boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.

    1980-01-01

    Boundary layers develop along the blade surfaces on both the pressure and the suction side in a non-stationary flow field. This is due to the fact that there is a strongly fluctuating flow on the downstream blade row, especially as a result of the wakes of the upstream blade row. The author investigates the formation of boundary layers under non-stationary flow conditions and tries to establish a model describing the non-stationary boundary layer. For this purpose, plate boundary layers are measured, at constant flow rates but different interferent frequency and variable pressure gradients. By introducing the sample technique, measurements of the non-stationary boundary layer become possible, and the flow rate fluctuation can be divided in its components, i.e. stochastic turbulence and periodical fluctuation. (GL) [de

  16. Prediction of crack propagation in layered ceramics with strong interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Šestáková, L.; Hutař, Pavel; Bermejo, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 11 (2010), s. 2192-2199 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB200410803; GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Ceramic laminate * Crack propagation direction * Residual stress * Flaw tolerant ceramics * Optimal design Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.571, year: 2010

  17. Contrasting responses of Central Asian rock glaciers to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Annina; Kääb, Andreas; Roesch, Andrea; Bigler, Christof; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    While the responses of Tien Shan glaciers – and glaciers elsewhere – to climatic changes are becoming increasingly well understood, this is less the case for permafrost in general and for rock glaciers in particular. We use a novel approach to describe the climate sensitivity of rock glaciers and to reconstruct periods of high and low rock glacier activity in the Tien Shan since 1895. Using more than 1500 growth anomalies from 280 trees growing on rock glacier bodies, repeat aerial photography from Soviet archives and high-resolution satellite imagery, we present here the world's longest record of rock glacier movements. We also demonstrate that the rock glaciers exhibit synchronous periods of activity at decadal timescales. Despite the complex energy-balance processes on rock glaciers, periods of enhanced activity coincide with warm summers, and the annual mass balance of Tuyuksu glacier fluctuates asynchronously with rock glacier activity. At multi-decadal timescales, however, the investigated rock glaciers exhibit site-specific trends reflecting different stages of inactivation, seemingly in response to the strong increase in air temperature since the 1970s. PMID:25657095

  18. Modelling of nuclear explosions in hard rock sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunish, W.M.; App, F.N.

    1993-01-01

    This study represents part of a larger effort to systematically model the effects of differing source region properties on ground motion from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. In previous work by the authors the primary emphasis was on alluvium and both saturated and unsaturated tuff. We have attempted to model events on Pahute Mesa, where either the working point medium, or some of the layers above the working point, or both, are hard rock. The complex layering at these sites, however, has prevented us from drawing unambiguous conclusions about modelling hard rock

  19. Northeast Church Rock Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northeast Church Rock Mine, a former uranium mine 17 miles northeast of Gallup, NM in the Pinedale Chapter of the Navajo Nation. EPA is working with NNEPA to oversee cleanup work by United Nuclear Corporation, a company owned by General Electric (GE).

  20. Rock-hard coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft jet engines have to be able to withstand infernal conditions. Extreme heat and bitter cold tax coatings to the limit. Materials expert Dr Ir. Wim Sloof fits atoms together to develop rock-hard coatings. The latest invention in this field is known as ceramic matrix composites. Sloof has signed an agreement with a number of parties to investigate this material further.

  1. Rock-hard coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft jet engines have to be able to withstand infernal conditions. Extreme heat and bitter cold tax coatings to the limit. Materials expert Dr Ir. Wim Sloof fits atoms together to develop rock-hard coatings. The latest invention in this field is known as ceramic matrix composites. Sloof has

  2. Fluids in metamorphic rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touret, J.L.R.

    2001-01-01

    Basic principles for the study of fluid inclusions in metamorphic rocks are reviewed and illustrated. A major problem relates to the number of inclusions, possibly formed on a wide range of P-T conditions, having also suffered, in most cases, extensive changes after initial trapping. The

  3. On wettability of shale rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, H; Al-Yaseri, A Z; Sarmadivaleh, M; Iglauer, S

    2016-08-01

    The low recovery of hydraulic fracturing fluid in unconventional shale reservoirs has been in the centre of attention from both technical and environmental perspectives in the last decade. One explanation for the loss of hydraulic fracturing fluid is fluid uptake by the shale matrix; where capillarity is the dominant process controlling this uptake. Detailed understanding of the rock wettability is thus an essential step in analysis of loss of the hydraulic fracturing fluid in shale reservoirs, especially at reservoir conditions. We therefore performed a suit of contact angle measurements on a shale sample with oil and aqueous ionic solutions, and tested the influence of different ion types (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2), concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 1M), pressures (0.1, 10 and 20MPa) and temperatures (35 and 70°C). Furthermore, a physical model was developed based on the diffuse double layer theory to provide a framework for the observed experimental data. Our results show that the water contact angle for bivalent ions is larger than for monovalent ions; and that the contact angle (of both oil and different aqueous ionic solutions) increases with increase in pressure and/or temperature; these increases are more pronounced at higher ionic concentrations. Finally, the developed model correctly predicted the influence of each tested variable on contact angle. Knowing contact angle and therefore wettability, the contribution of the capillary process in terms of water uptake into shale rocks and the possible impairment of hydrocarbon production due to such uptake can be quantified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  5. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  6. A Procedure for Determining Rock-Type Specific Hoek-Brown Brittle Parameter s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suorineni, F. T.; Chinnasane, D. R.; Kaiser, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    The Hoek-Brown failure criterion constants m and s are equivalent rock friction and cohesion parameters, respectively. On the laboratory scale, m depends on the rock type and texture (grain size), while s = 1 for all rocks. On the field scale, m is a function of rock type, texture, and rock mass quality (geological strength index, GSI), while s is simply a function of rock mass quality. The brittle Hoek-Brown damage initiation criterion ( m-zero criterion) is a modification to the conventional Hoek-Brown failure criterion with m = 0 and s = 0.11. The m-zero damage initiation criterion has been shown to better predict depths of failure in excavations in some moderate to massive (GSI ≥ 75) rock masses, but over predicts depths of failure in other rock types. It is now recognized that the Hoek-Brown brittle parameter ( s) is not the same for all hard, strong, brittle, moderate to massive rock masses, but depends on the rock type. However, there are no guidelines for its determination for specific rock types. This paper presents a semi-empirical procedure for the determination of rock-type specific brittle Hoek-Brown parameter s from the rock texture, mineralogical composition, and microstructure. The paper also differentiates between brittle and tenuous rocks. It is shown that, while the use of the term ‘brittle’ is appropriate for rock mechanical excavation and mode of failure in weak rocks with limited deformability, it is inappropriate for use in explaining the difference in resistance to stress-induced damage in different rock types, and can cause confusion. The terms ‘tenacity/toughness’ are introduced to describe rock resistance to stress-induced damage in excavation performance assessment, and a rock tenacity/toughness rating system is presented.

  7. Soil/Rock Properties Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Soil/Rock Properties LaboratoryLocation: Spokane SiteThe Soil/Rock Properties Laboratory is contained in the soils bay, a 4,700 sq. ft. facility that provides space...

  8. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  9. Tracer transport in fractured rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Tsang, Y.W.; Hale, F.V.

    1988-07-01

    Recent interest in the safety of toxic waste underground disposal and nuclear waste geologic repositories has motivated many studies of tracer transport in fractured media. Fractures occur in most geologic formations and introduce a high degree of heterogeneity. Within each fracture, the aperture is not constant in value but strongly varying. Thus for such media, tracer tends to flow through preferred flowpaths or channels within the fractures. Along each of these channels, the aperture is also strongly varying. A detailed analysis is carried out on a 2D single fracture with variable apertures and the flow through channels is demonstrated. The channels defined this way are not rigidly set pathways for tracer transport, but are the preferred flow paths in the sense of stream-tubes in the potential theory. It is shown that such variable-aperture channels can be characterized by an aperture probability distribution function, and not by the exact deterministic geometric locations. We also demonstrate that the 2D tracer transport in a fracture can be calculated by a model of a system of 1D channels characterized by this distribution function only. Due to the channeling character of tracer transport in fractured rock, random point measurements of tracer breakthrough curves may give results with a wide spread in value due to statistical fluctuations. The present paper suggests that such a wide spread can probably be greatly reduced by making line/areal (or multiple) measurements covering a few spatial correlation lengths. 13 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  10. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  11. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  12. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  13. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  14. Limados : Rock peruano

    OpenAIRE

    García Morete, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    Incentivado por la corriente nuevaolera que llegaba de México, fue señalado por especialistas como pionero del punk. Aunque el plan, era tocar con lo que hubiera. Un recodo ínfimo de un período breve pero sorprendentemente poderoso, los 60 en un país que hizo del rock una expresión propia de su cultura. Facultad de Periodismo y Comunicación Social

  15. Deformations of fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.

    1977-09-01

    Results of the DBM and FEM analysis in this study indicate that a suitable rock mass for repository of radioactive waste should be moderately jointed (about 1 joint/m 2 ) and surrounded by shear zones of the first order. This allowes for a gentle and flexible deformation under tectonic stresses and prevent the development of large cross-cutting failures in the repository area. (author)

  16. The rock melting approach to drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, G.E.; Goff, S.J.; Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W. Jr.; Dreesen, D.S.; Winchester, W.

    1993-09-01

    During the early and mid-1970`s the Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrated practical applications of drilling and coring using an electrically-heated graphite, tungsten, or molybdenum penetrator that melts a hole as it is slowly pushed through the rock or soil. The molten material consolidates into a rugged glass lining that prevents hole collapse; minimizes the potential for cross-flow, lost circulation, or the release of hazardous materials without casing operations; and produces no cuttings in porous or low density (<1.7 g/cc) formations. Because there are no drilling fluids required, the rock melting approach reduces waste handling, treatment and disposal. Drilling by rock melting has been demonstrated to depths up to 30 m in caliche, clay, alluvium, cobbles, sand, basalt, granite, and other materials. Penetrating large cobbles without debris removal was achieved by thermal stress fracturing and lateral extrusion of portions of the rock melt into the resulting cracks. Both horizontal and vertical holes in a variety of diameters were drilled in these materials using modular, self-contained field units that operate in remote areas. Because the penetrator does not need to rotate, steering by several simple approaches is considered quite feasible. Melting is ideal for obtaining core samples in alluvium and other poorly consolidated soils since the formed-in-place glass liner stabilizes the hole, encapsulates volatile or hazardous material, and recovers an undisturbed core. Because of the relatively low thermal conductivity of rock and soil materials, the heat-affected zone beyond the melt layer is very small, <1 inch thick. Los Alamos has begun to update the technology and this paper will report on the current status of applications and designs for improved drills.

  17. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  18. Hydrological characteristics of Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Akahori, Kuniaki

    1999-11-01

    It is crucial to evaluate the hydrogeological characteristics of rock in Japan in order to assess the performance of geosphere. This report summarizes the hydrogeological characteristics of various rock types obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields experiments at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at the Tono mine in central Japan. It is found that the hydraulic conductivity of rock mass ranges from 10 -9 m/s to 10 -8 m/s, whereas the hydraulic conductivity of fault zone ranges from 10 -9 m/s to 10 -3 m/s. It is also found that the hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease with depth. Therefore, the hydraulic conductivity of rock mass at the depth of a repository will be smaller than above values. From the investigations at outcrops and galleries throughout the country, fractures are observed as potential pathways in all rock types. All kinds of crystalline rocks and pre-Neogene sedimentary rocks are classified as fractured media where fracture flow is dominant. Among these rocks, granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media. On the other hand, andesite, tuff and Neogene sedimentary rocks are considered as intermediate between fractured media and porous media where flow in fractures as well as in rock matrix are significant. (author)

  19. Development of artificial soft rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kiyoshi

    1995-01-01

    When foundation base rocks are deeper than the level of installing structures or there exist weathered rocks and crushed rocks in a part of base rocks, often sound artificial base rocks are made by substituting the part with concrete. But in the construction of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., the foundation base rocks consist of mudstone, and the stiffness of concrete is large as compared with the surrounding base rocks. As the quality of the substituting material, the nearly same stiffness as that of the surrounding soft rocks and long term stability are suitable, and the excellent workability and economical efficiency are required, therefore, artificial soft rocks were developed. As the substituting material, the soil mortar that can obtain the physical property values in stable form, which are similar to those of Nishiyama mudstone, was selected. The mechanism of its hardening and the long term stability, and the manufacturing plant are reported. As for its application to the base rocks of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, the verification test at the site and the application to the base rocks for No. 7 plant reactor building and other places are described. (K.I.)

  20. A velocity-based approach to visco-elastic flow of rock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, W.; Hendriks, M.; Hart, M. 't

    2005-01-01

    In structural geology, viscous creep is generally recognized as the major deformation mechanism in the folding of rock layers through geological time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. Moreover, since deformation of rock salt by creep takes already place on relatively small time scales -

  1. Maturity of carboniferous source rocks in Central Onshore Netherlands. the impact of the Permian thermal anomaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul Fattah, R.; Verweij, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-Westphalian layers are considered as potential source rocks in the Netherlands. However, there is little amount of information available on their maturity. 3D basin modelling is carried out on Central Onshore Netherlands to investigate the maturity of the deep Carboniferous source rocks. A

  2. Folds in multilayered rocks of Proterozoic age, Rajasthan, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    First phase folds F1 developed in polydeformed Ajabgarh Group rocks of Proterozoic age are studied using various geometrical methods of analysis for compatibility of homogeneous strain in both class. 1–3 pairs by correlating tα/α plots with existing curves for competent layers and matching tα/α plots with the flattening ...

  3. Folds in multilayered rocks of Proterozoic age, Rajasthan, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First phase folds F1 developed in polydeformed Ajabgarh Group rocks of Proterozoic age are studied using various geometrical methods of analysis for compatibility of homogeneous strain in both class 1-3 pairs by correlating ′/ plots with existing curves for competent layers and matching / plots with the flattening ...

  4. Installation of depository for radioactive material in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, S.G.A.; Sagefors, K.I.; Aakesson, B.Aa.

    1985-01-01

    The rock outside the depository has a hollow space which is filled by elastoplastic material possible to deform. The solid body of the depository has a central vertical shaft and concentric vertical outer shafts. Between the shafts there are vertically oriented layers with tunnels for storage of waste. The tunnels slope down from the central shaft. (G.B.)

  5. The Delft Sand, Clay & Rock Cutting Model. Family Edition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    In dredging, trenching, (deep sea) mining, drilling, tunnel boring and many other applications, sand, clay or rock has to be excavated. The productions (and thus the dimensions) of the excavating equipment range from mm3/sec - cm3/sec to m3/sec. In oil drilling layers with a thickness of a magnitude

  6. Conducting Rock Mass Rating for tunnel construction on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemer, Heidi D.; Worrells, D. Scott

    2017-10-01

    Mars analogue missions provide researchers, scientists, and engineers the opportunity to establish protocols prior to sending human explorers to another planet. This paper investigated the complexity of a team of simulation astronauts conducting a Rock Mass Rating task during Analogue Mars missions. This study was conducted at the Mars Desert Research Station in Hanksville, UT, during field season 2015/2016 and with crews 167,168, and 169. During the experiment, three-person teams completed a Rock Mass Rating task during a three hour Extra Vehicular Activity on day six of their two-week simulation mission. This geological test is used during design and construction of excavations in rock on Earth. On Mars, this test could be conducted by astronauts to determine suitable rock layers for tunnel construction which would provide explorers a permanent habitat and radiation shielding while living for long periods of time on the surface. The Rock Mass Rating system derives quantitative data for engineering designs that can easily be communicated between engineers and geologists. Conclusions from this research demonstrated that it is feasible for astronauts to conduct the Rock Mass Rating task in a Mars simulated environment. However, it was also concluded that Rock Mass Rating task orientation and training will be required to ensure that accurate results are obtained.

  7. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  8. Strong interaction and QFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, T.

    1981-01-01

    With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ΔI = 1/2 rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) x U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the rho-meson transforms as a triplet under SU(2)sub(w), and this is the origin of the rho-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons. (orig.)

  9. Laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave anisotropy in synthetic rocks by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L.; Ostadhassan, M.; Tamimi, N.; Li, C.; Alexeyev, A.

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic rocks have been widely used to realize the models with controlled factors in rock physics and geomechanics experiments. Additive manufacturing technology, known as 3D printing, is becoming a popular method to produce the synthetic rocks as the advantages of timesaving, economics, and control. In terms of mechanical properties, the duplicability of 3D printed rock towards a natural rock has been studied whereas the seismic anisotropy still remains unknown as being the key factor in conducting rock physics experiments. This study utilized a 3D printer with gypsum as the ink to manufacture a series of synthetic rocks that have the shapes of octagonal prisms, with half of them printed from lateral and another half from the bottom. An ultrasonic investigation system was set up to measure the P- and S- wave velocities at different frequencies while samples were under dry conditions. The results show the impact of layered property on the P- and S- wave velocities. The measurement results were compared with the predicted results of Hudson model, demonstrating that the synthetic rock from 3D printing is a transverse isotropic model. The seismic anisotropy indicates that the availability of using 3D printed rocks to duplicate natural rocks for the purpose of recreating the experiments of rock physics. Future experiments will be performed on the dependence of seismic anisotropy on fracture geometry and density in 3D printed synthetic rocks.

  10. Strong Plate, Weak Slab Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R. I.; Stegman, D. R.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Models of mantle convection on Earth produce styles of convection that are not observed on Earth.Moreover non-Earth-like modes, such as two-sided downwellings, are the de facto mode of convection in such models.To recreate Earth style subduction, i.e. one-sided asymmetric recycling of the lithosphere, proper treatment of the plates and plate interface are required. Previous work has identified several model features that promote subduction. A free surface or pseudo-free surface and a layer of material with a relatively low strength material (weak crust) allow downgoing plates to bend and slide past overriding without creating undue stress at the plate interface. (Crameri, et al. 2012, GRL)A low viscosity mantle wedge, possibly a result of slab dehydration, decouples the plates in the system. (Gerya et al. 2007, Geo)Plates must be composed of material which, in the case of the overriding plate, are is strong enough to resist bending stresses imposed by the subducting plate and yet, as in the case of the subducting plate, be weak enough to bend and subduct when pulled by the already subducted slab. (Petersen et al. 2015, PEPI) Though strong surface plates are required for subduction such plates may present a problem when they encounter the lower mantle.As the subducting slab approaches the higher viscosity, lower mantle stresses are imposed on the tip.Strong slabs transmit this stress to the surface.There the stress field at the plate interface is modified and potentially modifies the style of convection. In addition to modifying the stress at the plate interface, the strength of the slab affects the morphology of the slab at the base of the upper mantle. (Stegman, et al 2010, Tectonophysics)Slabs that maintain a sufficient portion of their strength after being bent require high stresses to unbend or otherwise change their shape.On the other hand slabs that are weakened though the bending process are more amenable to changes in morphology. We present the results of

  11. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  12. Interior of Titan: 2-Layer or 3-Layer and Does It Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Bland, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Cassini gravity data for Titan is consistent with a hydrostatic interior and implies an incomplete separation of rock from ice. Simple 2-layer models of the interior have been proposed, in which Titan possesses a "core" and an "ice" layer. In the following, this ice layer should be understood to itself likely consist of higher and lower pressure phases of ice (and/or clathrate) separated by an internal ocean. This is not the "layering" in question in the title; here we address the gross structure of Titan, and what this might tell us about the accretion, evolution, and bombardment history of large icy satellites. Two-layer models face fundamental difficulties. If the "core" is a rock-ice mixture, its average density is ≈2500-2600 kg/m3 (to match Titan's moment-of-inertia [MOI]), and the silicate volume fraction implied may be too high to permit ice-mediated convection and efficient heat transport from the interior. Alternately, if the core is assumed to be a low-density carbonaceous rock, it must be iron deficient (non-solar) and hydrated. We have reexamined models of solar-composition rock for the outer solar system, and guided by high-pressure (multi-GPa) experiments, constructed an appropriate mineralogy based on up-to-date solar abundances (NCFMASNiSu system) and a maximum degree of hydroxylation and carbonation. In order of decreasing abundance, this rock model consists of iron-bearing antigorite, pyrrhotite, calcite, natrite, diaspore, and millerite, minerals stable at Titan core pressures and moderate temperatures. The STP density is 3,000 kg/m3, and is predominantly antigorite (74%) with appreciable sulfide (18%), but no iron metal or magnetite. No simple 2-layer model of Titan can be constructed with this rock that matches Titan's density and MOI. (And such rock as part of a rock-ice "core" guarantees that the rock volume fraction would exceed the critical value (~60%) where the viscosity of the mixture is controlled by a close-packed rock framework. Ice

  13. From stones to rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Marie-Astrid; Jean-Leroux, Kathleen; Cirio, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    With the Aquila earthquake in 2009, earthquake prediction is more and more necessary nowadays, and people are waiting for even more accurate data. Earthquake accuracy has increased in recent times mainly thanks to the understanding of how oceanic expansion works and significant development of numerical seismic prediction models. Despite the improvements, the location and the magnitude can't be as accurate as citizen and authorities would like. The basis of anticipating earthquakes requires the understanding of: - The composition of the earth, - The structure of the earth, - The relations and movements between the different parts of the surface of the earth. In order to answer these questions, the Alps are an interesting field for students. This study combines natural curiosity about understanding the predictable part of natural hazard in geology and scientific skills on site: observing and drawing landscape, choosing and reading a representative core drilling, replacing the facts chronologically and considering the age, the length of time and the strength needed. This experience requires students to have an approach of time and space radically different than the one they can consider in a classroom. It also limits their imagination, in a positive way, because they realize that prediction is based on real data and some of former theories have become present paradigms thanks to geologists. On each location the analyzed data include landscape, core drilling and the relation established between them by students. The data is used by the students to understand the meaning, so that the history of the formation of the rocks tells by the rocks can be explained. Until this year, the CBGA's perspective regarding the study of the Alps ground allowed students to build the story of the creation and disappearance of the ocean, which was a concept required by French educational authorities. But not long ago, the authorities changed their scientific expectations. To meet the

  14. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  15. Mechano-chemical coupling in stressed rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewers, Thomas; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    1989-06-01

    The free energy of a grain in a rock at depth varies as a function of the texture of its surroundings, either due to fluctuations in stress, strain energy, or interfacial factors. Herein we discuss methods Used to estimate the contribution by texture to grain free energy in deforming rocks, as well as implications for textural evolution when included in kinetic reaction-transport models. A key feature is the introduction of a formalism coupling rock flow and mineral reaction by means of a Navier-Stokes equation. The resulting set of equations describes mechano-chemical interactions under a wide range of conditions and may pose constraints on more descriptive models. Under certain circumstances, this free energy may lead to the autonomous enhancement of spatial ihhomogeneities in texture when coupled to reaction and transport in an intergranular fluid. We hold that such phenomena as metamorphic layering, spaced (solution) cleavage, geodes, and certain types of concretions are examples of mechano-chemical selforganization. The dynamics leading to formation of such texture may thus be understood in analogy with other examples of geochemical self-organization and may be quantified accordingly.

  16. Frictional Coulomb drag in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Martin Christian; Flensberg, Karsten; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    1997-01-01

    A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21) is eval......A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21......) is evaluated using diagrammatic techniques. The transresistivity is given by an integral over energy and momentum transfer weighted by the product of the screened interlayer interaction and the phase space for scattering events. We demonstrate, by a numerical analysis of the transresistivity, that for well...

  17. A smart rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressel, Phil

    2014-12-01

    This project was to design and build a protective weapon for a group of associations that believed in aliens and UFO's. They collected enough contributions from societies and individuals to be able to sponsor and totally fund the design, fabrication and testing of this equipment. The location of this facility is classified. It also eventually was redesigned by the Quartus Engineering Company for use at a major amusement park as a "shoot at targets facility." The challenge of this project was to design a "smart rock," namely an infrared bullet (the size of a gallon can of paint) that could be shot from the ground to intercept a UFO or any incoming suspicious item heading towards the earth. Some of the challenges to design this weapon were to feed cryogenic helium at 5 degrees Kelvin from an inair environment through a unique rotary coupling and air-vacuum seal while spinning the bullet at 1500 rpm and maintain its dynamic stability (wobble) about its spin axis to less than 10 micro-radians (2 arc seconds) while it operated in a vacuum. Precision optics monitored the dynamic motion of the "smart rock."

  18. Rock Properties Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lum, C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process

  19. Rock critics as 'Mouldy Modernists'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky Shepherd

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary rock criticism appears to be firmly tied to the past. The specialist music press valorise rock music of the 1960s and 1970s, and new emerging artists are championed for their ‘retro’ sounding music by journalists who compare the sound of these new artists with those included in the established ‘canon’ of rock music. This article examines the narrative tropes of authenticity and nostalgia that frame the retrospective focus of this contemporary rock writing, and most significantly, the maintenance of the rock canon within contemporary popular culture. The article concludes by suggesting that while contemporary rock criticism is predominately characterised by nostalgia, this nostalgia is not simply a passive romanticism of the past. Rather, this nostalgia fuels a process of active recontextualisation within contemporary popular culture.

  20. Disorder and transport of silver in some layered metal sulfides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, Anthonius Gijsbertus

    1987-01-01

    The chemical and physical properties of compounds with a layered structure are strongly determined by the two-dimensional nature of the bonding, viz. strong bonding within the layers and much weaker bonds between the layers; graphite is an example of such and anisotropic solid. the layered

  1. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  2. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  3. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  4. Controlled sample program publication No. 1: characterization of rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, L.L.

    1978-10-01

    A description is presented of the methodology used and the geologic parameters measured on several rocks which are being used in round-robin laboratory and nuclide adsorption methodology experiments. Presently investigators from various laboratories are determining nuclide distribution coefficients utilizing numerous experimental techniques. Unfortunately, it appears that often the resultant data are dependent not only on the type of groundwater and rock utilized, but also on the experimentor or method used. The Controlled Sample Program is a WISAP (Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program) attempt to resolve the apparent method and dependencies and to identify individual experimenter's bias. The rock samples characterized in an interlaboratory Kd methodology comparison program include Westerly granite, Argillaceous shale, Oolitic limestone, Sentinel Gap basalt, Conasauga shale, Climax Stock granite, anhydrite, Magenta dolomite and Culebra dolomite. Techniques used in the characterization include whole rock chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, optical examination, electron microprobe elemental mapping, and chemical analysis of specific mineral phases. Surface areas were determined by the B.E.T. and ethylene glycol sorption methods. Cation exchange capacities were determined with 85 Sr, but were of questionable value for the high calcium rocks. A quantitative mineralogy was also estimated for each rock. Characteristics which have the potential of strongly affecting radionuclide Kd values such as the presence of sulfides, water-soluble, pH-buffering carbonates, glass, and ferrous iron were listed for each rock sample

  5. Workshop on Pristine Highlands Rocks and the early History of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, J. (Editor); Ryder, G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Oxide composition of the Moon, evidence for an initially totally molten Moon, geophysical contraints on lunar composition, random sampling of a layered intrusion, lunar highland rocks, early evolution of the Moon, mineralogy and petrology of the pristine rocks, relationship of the pristine nonmore rocks to the highlands soils and breccias, ferroan anorthositic norite, early lunar igneous history, compositional variation in ferroan anosthosites, a lunar magma ocean, deposits of lunar pristine rocks, lunar and planetary compositions and early fractionation in the solar nebula, Moon composition models, petrogenesis in a Moon with a chondritic refractory lithophile pattern, a terrestrial analog of lunar ilmenite bearing camulates, and the lunar magma ocean are summarized.

  6. Applicability of geomechanical classifications for estimation of strength properties in Brazilian rock masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tatiana B; Lana, Milene S; Santos, Allan E M; Silveira, Larissa R C

    2017-01-01

    Many authors have been proposed several correlation equations between geomechanical classifications and strength parameters. However, these correlation equations have been based in rock masses with different characteristics when compared to Brazilian rock masses. This paper aims to study the applicability of the geomechanical classifications to obtain strength parameters of three Brazilian rock masses. Four classification systems have been used; the Rock Mass Rating (RMR), the Rock Mass Quality (Q), the Geological Strength Index (GSI) and the Rock Mass Index (RMi). A strong rock mass and two soft rock masses with different degrees of weathering located in the cities of Ouro Preto and Mariana, Brazil; were selected for the study. Correlation equations were used to estimate the strength properties of these rock masses. However, such correlations do not always provide compatible results with the rock mass behavior. For the calibration of the strength values obtained through the use of classification systems, ​​stability analyses of failures in these rock masses have been done. After calibration of these parameters, the applicability of the various correlation equations found in the literature have been discussed. According to the results presented in this paper, some of these equations are not suitable for the studied rock masses.

  7. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  8. Estimation of strong ground motion and micro-zonation for the city of Rome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeh, D.; Iodice, C.; Suhadolc, P.; Panza, G.F.

    1994-03-01

    A hybrid technique, based on mode summation and finite differences, is used to simulate the ground motion induced in the city of Rome by possible earthquakes occurring in the main seismogenetic areas surrounding the city: the Central Apennines and the Alban Hills. The results of the numerical simulations are used for a first order seismic micro-zonation in the city of Rome, which can be used for the retrofitting of buildings of special social and cultural value. Rome can be divided into six main zones: (1) the edge and (2) the central part of the alluvial basin of the river Tiber; (3) the edges and (4) the central part of the Paleotiber basin; the areas outside the large basins of the Tiber and Paleotiber, where we distinguish between (5) areas without, and (6) areas with a layer of volcanic rocks close to the surface. The strongest amplification effects have to be expected at the edges of the Tiber basin, with maximum spectral amplification of the order of 5 to 6, and strong amplifications occur inside the entire alluvial basin of the Tiber. The presence of a near-surface layer of rigid material is not sufficient to classify a location as a ''hard-rock site'', when the rigid material covers a sedimentary complex. The reason is that the underlying sedimentary complex causes amplifications at the surface due to resonance effects. This phenomenon can be observed in the Paleotiber basin, where spectral amplifications in the frequency range 0.3-1.0 Hz reach values of the order of 3 to 4. (author). 17 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  9. On the physics of relativistic double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-06-01

    A model of a strong, time-independent, and relativistic double layer is studied. Besides double layers having the electric field parallel to the current the model also describes a certain type of oblique double layers. The 'Langmuir condition' (ratio of ion current density to electron current density) as well as an expression for the potential drop of the double layer are derived. Furthermore, the distribution of charged particles, electric field, and potential within the double layer are clarified and discussed. It is found that the properties of relativistic double layers differ substantially from the properties of corresponding non-relativistic double layers. (Author)

  10. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secor, D.T. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    This report reviews the geology of the Piedmont Province of South Carolina with the aim of designating rock units favorable for field exploration for a potential underground repository for the storage of radioactive waste. Most of the rocks in the South Carolina Piedmont are metamorphosed sedimentary volcanic or igneous rocks that have experienced at least one episode of strong deformation. As a consequence of this deformation, they have irregular shapes, making it difficult to predict their subsurface extent. In evaluating the suitability of the rock units for radioactive waste storage, certain criteria were found to be particularly useful. The requirements that the storage site be located in a large volume of homogeneous, impermeable, relatively unfractured rock was the most important criteria in eliminating most of the Piedmont rock units for consideration as field study areas. Six large late- to post-tectonic igneous plutons (Winnsboro, Liberty Hill, Ogden, Newberry, Lowrys, and Bald Rock) are recommended as field study areas

  11. Rock and soil rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, N.; Ene, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the Euromech Colloquium 196 devoted to Rock and Soil Rheology is to review some of the main results obtained in the last years in this field of research and also to formulate some of the major not yet solved problems which are now under consideration. Exchange of opinions and scientific discussions are quite helpful mainly in those areas where some approaches are controversial and the progress made is quite fast. That is especially true for the rheology of geomaterials, domain of great interest for mining and petroleum engineers, engineering geology, seismology, geophysics, civil engineering, nuclear and industrial waste storage, geothermal energy storage, caverns for sports, culture, telecommunications, storage of goods and foodstuffs (cold, hot and refrigerated storages), underground oil and natural gas reservoirs etc. Some of the last obtained results are mentioned in the present volume. (orig./HP)

  12. Rock the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Created in 2005, the Swiss rock band "Wind of Change" is now candidate for the Eurovision Song Contest 2011 with a new song " Night & Light " with the music video filmed at CERN.   With over 20 gigs under their belt and two albums already released, the five members of the band (Alex Büchi, vocals; Arthur Spierer, drums; David Gantner, bass; Romain Mage and Yannick Gaudy, guitar) continue to excite audiences. For their latest composition "Night & Light", the group filmed their music video in the Globe of Science and Innovation. Winning the Eurovision contest would be a springboard in their artistic career for these young musicians. The selection results will be available December 11, 2010.      

  13. Prediction of thermal conductivity of rocks by soft computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2011-09-01

    The transfer of energy between two adjacent parts of rock mainly depends on its thermal conductivity. Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of rocks is necessary for the calculation of heat flow or for the longtime modeling of geothermal resources. In recent years, considerable effort has been made to develop artificial intelligence techniques to determine these properties. Present study supports the application of artificial neural network (ANN) in the study of thermal conductivity along with other intrinsic properties of rock due to its increasing importance in many areas of rock engineering, agronomy, and geoenvironmental engineering field. In this paper, an attempt has been made to predict the thermal conductivity (TC) of rocks by incorporating uniaxial compressive strength, density, porosity, and P-wave velocity using artificial neural network (ANN) technique. A three-layer feed forward back propagation neural network with 4-7-1 architecture was trained and tested using 107 experimental data sets of various rocks. Twenty new data sets were used for the validation and comparison of the TC by ANN. Multivariate regression analysis (MVRA) has also been done with same data sets of ANN. ANN and MVRA results were compared based on coefficient of determination (CoD) and mean absolute error (MAE) between experimental and predicted values of TC. It was found that CoD between measured and predicted values of TC by ANN and MVRA were 0.984 and 0.914, respectively, whereas MAE was 0.0894 and 0.2085 for ANN and MVRA, respectively.

  14. Diffusive flux and pore anisotropy in sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, C E; Towne, R M; Lazouskaya, V; Bishop, M E; Dong, H

    2012-04-01

    Diffusion of dissolved contaminants into or from bedrock matrices can have a substantial impact on both the extent and longevity of dissolved contaminant plumes. For layered rocks, bedding orientation can have a significant impact on diffusion. A series of laboratory experiments was performed on minimally disturbed bedrock cores to measure the diffusive flux both parallel and normal to mineral bedding of four different anisotropic sedimentary rocks. Measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 4.9×10(-8) to 6.5×10(-7)cm(2)/s. Effective diffusion coefficients differed by as great as 10-folds when comparing diffusion normal versus parallel to bedding. Differences in the effective diffusion coefficients corresponded to differences in the "apparent" porosity in the orientation of diffusion (determined by determining the fraction of pore cross-sectional area measured using scanning electron microscopy), with the difference in apparent porosity between normal and parallel bedding orientations differing by greater than 2-folds for two of the rocks studied. Existing empirical models failed to provide accurate predictions of the effective diffusion coefficient in either bedding orientation for all four rock types studied, indicating that substantial uncertainty exists when attempting to predict diffusive flux through sedimentary rocks containing mineral bedding. A modified model based on the apparent porosity of the rocks provided a reasonable prediction of the experimental diffusion data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. ROCK1-directed basement membrane positioning coordinates epithelial tissue polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, William P; Gervais, Elise M; Centanni, Samuel W; Gulfo, Kathryn M; Nelson, Deirdre A; Larsen, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    The basement membrane is crucial for epithelial tissue organization and function. However, the mechanisms by which basement membrane is restricted to the basal periphery of epithelial tissues and the basement membrane-mediated signals that regulate coordinated tissue organization are not well defined. Here, we report that Rho kinase (ROCK) controls coordinated tissue organization by restricting basement membrane to the epithelial basal periphery in developing mouse submandibular salivary glands, and that ROCK inhibition results in accumulation of ectopic basement membrane throughout the epithelial compartment. ROCK-regulated restriction of PAR-1b (MARK2) localization in the outer basal epithelial cell layer is required for basement membrane positioning at the tissue periphery. PAR-1b is specifically required for basement membrane deposition, as inhibition of PAR-1b kinase activity prevents basement membrane deposition and disrupts overall tissue organization, and suppression of PAR-1b together with ROCK inhibition prevents interior accumulations of basement membrane. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of wild-type PAR-1b results in ectopic interior basement membrane deposition. Significantly, culture of salivary epithelial cells on exogenous basement membrane rescues epithelial organization in the presence of ROCK1 or PAR-1b inhibition, and this basement membrane-mediated rescue requires functional integrin β1 to maintain epithelial cell-cell adhesions. Taken together, these studies indicate that ROCK1/PAR-1b-dependent regulation of basement membrane placement is required for the coordination of tissue polarity and the elaboration of tissue structure in the developing submandibular salivary gland.

  16. Studies of electrical properties of low-resistivity sandstones based on digital rock technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weichao; Sun, Jianmeng; Zhang, Jinyan; Yuan, Weiguo; Zhang, Li; Cui, Likai; Dong, Huaimin

    2018-02-01

    Electrical properties are important parameters to quantitatively calculate water saturation in oil and gas reservoirs by well logging interpretation. It is usual that oil layers show high resistivity responses, while water layers show low-resistivity responses. However, there are low-resistivity oil zones that exist in many oilfields around the world, leading to difficulties for reservoir evaluation. In our research, we used digital rock technology to study different internal and external factors to account for low rock resistivity responses in oil layers. We first constructed three-dimensional digital rock models with five components based on micro-computed tomography technology and x-ray diffraction experimental results, and then oil and water distributions in pores were determined by the pore morphology method. When the resistivity of each component was assigned, rock resistivities were calculated by using the finite element method. We collected 20 sandstone samples to prove the effectiveness of our numerical simulation methods. Based on the control variate method, we studied the effects of different factors on the resistivity indexes and rock resistivities. After sensitivity analyses, we found the main factors which caused low rock resistivities in oil layers. For unfractured rocks, influential factors arranged in descending order of importance were porosity, clay content, temperature, water salinity, heavy mineral, clay type and wettability. In addition, we found that the resistivity index could not provide enough information to identify a low-resistivity oil zone by using laboratory rock-electric experimental results. These results can not only expand our understandings of the electrical properties of low-resistivity rocks from oil layers, but also help identify low-resistivity oil zones better.

  17. From regolith to rock by shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieffer, S.W.

    1975-01-01

    A model for shock-lithification of terrestrial and lunar regolith is proposed. In this model it is proposed that air or an air-water mixture initially in the pores of terrestrial soil affects the behaviour of the soil-air-water system under shock-loading. Shock lithified rocks found at Meteor Crater are classified as 'strongly lithified' and 'weakly lithified' on the basis of their strength in hand specimen; only weakly lithified rocks are found at the missile impact craters. These qualitative strength properties are related to the mechanisms of bonding in the rocks. The densities of weakly lithified samples are directly related to the pressures to which they were shock-loaded. A comparison of the petrographic textures and densities of weakly lithified samples with textures and densities of 'regolith' shock-loaded to known pressures suggests that weakly lithified terrestrial samples formed at pressures well under 100kb., probably under 50 kb. If terrestrial soils are shock-loaded to pressures between 100 and 200 kb by impact events of short duration, the pore pressure due to hot air or air-water mixtures exceeds the strength of the weak lithification mechanisms and fragmentation rather than lithifications, occurs. At pressures above 200 kb, lithification can occur because the formation of glass provides a lithification mechanism which has sufficient strength to withstand the pore pressure. (Auth.)

  18. Rock Art in Kurdistan Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Lahafian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kurdistan, with great potential and prehistoric resources, has numerous petroglyphs in different areas of the province. During the last 14 years of extensive field study, more than 30 sites of rock art have been identified and introduced by the author. In this article, we summarize these rock art areas in Iranian Kurdistan.

  19. Beach rock from Goa Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Wagle, B.G.

    Beach rock is a common rock type in many parts of the southern hemisphere and also some areas north of the equator. Its distribution particularly in the Indian Ocean islands and atolls and coasts of India is reviewed. The mineralogic and faunal...

  20. The Ultramafites and layered Gabbro Sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, M.G.

    1963-01-01

    On Stjernöy, Seiland and the neighbouring peninsulas of Öksfjord and Bergsfjord ultramafic bodies of peridotite and pyroxenite with associated layered gabbro sequences occur within a complex of highly metamorphic gabbro gneisses, rocks akin to pyroxene-granulites and mafic charnockites. As is shown

  1. Rock strength under explosive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimer, N.; Proffer, W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation emphasizes the importance of a detailed description of the nonlinear deviatoric (strength) response of the surrounding rock in the numerical simulation of underground nuclear explosion phenomenology to the late times needed for test ban monitoring applications. We will show how numerical simulations which match ground motion measurements in volcanic tuffs and in granite use the strength values obtained from laboratory measurements on small core samples of these rocks but also require much lower strength values after the ground motion has interacted with the rock. The underlying physical mechanisms for the implied strength reduction are not yet well understood, and in fact may depend on the particular rock type. However, constitutive models for shock damage and/or effective stress have been used successfully at S-Cubed in both the Geophysics Program (primarily for DARPA) and the Containment Support Program (for DNA) to simulate late time ground motions measured at NTS in many different rock types

  2. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, T. (ed.) [McEwen Consulting, Leicester (United Kingdom); Kapyaho, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hella, P. [Saanio and Riekkola, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-15

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel.

  3. ROCK inhibitors in ocular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Halasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rho kinases (ROCKs have a crucial role in actin-cytoskeletal reorganization and thus are involved in broad aspects of cell motility, from smooth muscle contraction to neurite outgrowth. The first marketed ROCK inhibitor, called fasudil, has been used safely for treatment of cerebral vasospasm since 1995 in Japan. During the succeeding decades ROCK inhibitors have been applied in many pathological conditions from central nervous system disorders to cardiovascular disease as potential therapeutic agents or experimental tools to help understand the underlying (pathomechanisms. In 2014, a fasudil derivate named ripasudil was accepted for clinical use in glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Since ROCK kinases are widely expressed in ocular tissues, they have been implicated in the pathology of many ocular conditions such as corneal dysfunction, glaucoma, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and retinal detachment. This paper aims to provide an overview of the most recent status/application of ROCK inhibitors in the field of eye disease.

  4. Elastic properties of granulite facies rocks of Mahabalipuram, Tamil ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The variations in velocities and attenuation in these low porosity crystalline rocks are found to be strongly influenced by their mineral composition. The laboratory velocity data (extrapolated to high pressure) of the present study and the published field velocity data from deep seismic sounding studies indicate that these ...

  5. Deformation of footwall rock of Phulad Shear Zone, Rajasthan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The granite becomes intensely foliated with a strong downdip lineation and the rock becomes a true mylonite. In mesoscopic scale, the granite shows stretched porphyroclasts in both XZ and YZ sections indicating a flattening type of deformation. The angle between the C and S fabric is further reduced and finally becomes ...

  6. Paradoxical reproduction and body size in the rock lizard, Agama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rock lizard Agama atra atra from Namaqualand differs in both body size and reproduction from other populations of this species occurring elsewhere in southern Africa. Both sexes from Namaqualand are significantly larger than their counterparts in the south-western Cape. While reproduction in this species is strongly ...

  7. Vibration measurement for evaluating the danger of rock-collapse; Rakuseki kikendo hantei no tame no shindo sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T.; Harada, H. [The Nippon Road Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mitsuzuka, T. [Chishitsu-Keisoku Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Discussions were given on feasibility of a method for investigating a problem of the danger of rock-collapse by applying vibration measurement. The measurement investigation was carried out at a mouth of a tunnel under construction on a highway where the danger of rock-collapse is being investigated according to a qualitative determination criterion. Sixty-four rocks have been evaluated of their danger, with the degree of the danger having been classified to ranks one to three. Vibration measurement was performed on five floating rocks out of the 64 rocks. Vibroscopes were installed on upper portion of the rocks to be investigated and on exposed rocks nearby. The measurement revealed that the vibration has nearly the same amplitude in both of the floating rocks and the settled rocks before and after an automobile has passed, but the floating rocks shake more strongly than the settled rocks while an automobile is passing. This trend appears more noticeably in rocks regarded unstable in the danger determining investigation, indicating presence of close relationship between wave amplitude excited by the automobile and adhesion of the floating rocks. As a result of the discussions, it was made clear that the maximum amplitude ratio and the spectral ratio among the vibration characteristics of the floating rocks can be used as effective determination criteria. 2 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Influence of Core Permeability on Accropode Armour Layer Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Christensen, M.; Jensen, T.

    1998-01-01

    Hedar and van der Meer studied the influence of core permeability on the stability of two layer rock armour. In both cases a significant influence was found. However, it is to be expected that for single layer armour there will be an even larger influence on the core permeability. This is because...... the dissipation of wave energy in single layer armour will e smaller than in double layer armour, thus giving room for larger flow velocities in and over armour layer On this background a laboratory stud of single layer Accropode stability was undertaken at Aalborg University in 1995. The test results as well...

  9. Preliminary study on soil to rock spectral ratio method of microtremor measurement in Taipei Basin, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jyun Yan; Wen, Kuo Liang; Te Chen, Chun; Chang, Shun Chiang

    2014-05-01

    Taipei city is the capital of Taiwan which located in Taipei basin and covered with hundreds meter of alluvial layer that might cause serious damage during huge earthquake. Prediction of possible strong motion levels occurred in the basin then became popular. Engineers most like to use Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPEs) as common tool for seismic hazard calculation but GMPEs were usually debated that it can only give one prediction value (PGA, PGV, Sa etc.) rather than time history or spectrum. Seismologists tried theoretical simulation (1D, 2D, 3D method) but could only give low frequency (usually less than 1 Hz) results restricted to that the shallow structures were not clear enough. Resent years, wide frequency simulation techniques such as empirical green's function added stochastic simulation method (hybrid method) were applied to several different purposes but site effect still plays an important role that need to be considered. Traditionally soil to rock spectral ratio of shear wave (denoted as S/R) was widely applied to check basin effect for decades but the technique needs lots of permanent stations and several years to get enough records. If some site located within strong motion network but not close enough to the strong motion stations, interpolate or extrapolate results needed to be used. Wen and Huang (2012) conducted a dense microtremor measurement network in whole Taiwan and applied microtremor H/V to discuss dominant frequency with traditional transfer functions from earthquake shear wave and found good agreement between them. Furthermore, in this study, the ability of soil to rock spectral ratio of microtremor (denoted as MS/R) measurement was tested in Taipei basin. The preliminary results showed MS/R had good agreement with S/R between 0.2 to 5 Hz. And distance from soil site to reference rock site should no greater than 8 to 10 km base on degree of spectrum difference (DSPD) calculation. If the MS/R works that site effect study from this

  10. Size Effect on Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Coal-Rock Damage Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal-gas outburst, rock burst, and other mine dynamic disasters are closely related to the instability and failure of coal-rock. Coal-rock is the assemblies of mineral particles of varying sizes and shapes bonded together by cementing materials. The damage and rupture process of coal-rock is accompanied by acoustic emission (AE, which can be used as an effective means to monitor and predict the instability of coal-rock body. In this manuscript, considering the size effect of coal-rock, the influence of different height to diameter ratio on the acoustic emission characteristics of coal-rock damage evolution was discussed by microparticle flow PFC2D software platform. The results show that coal-rock size influences the uniaxial compressive strength, peak strain, and elastic modulus of itself; the size effect has little effect on the acoustic emission law of coal-rock damage and the effects of the size of coal-rock samples on acoustic emission characteristics are mainly reflected in three aspects: the triggering time of acoustic emission, the strain range of strong acoustic emission, and the intensity of acoustic emission; the damage evolution of coal-rock specimen can be divided into 4 stages: initial damage, stable development, accelerated development, and damage.

  11. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  12. They will rock you!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    On 30 September, CERN will be the venue for one of the most prestigious events of the year: the concert for the Bosons&More event, the Organization’s celebration of the remarkable performance of the LHC and all its technical systems, as well as the recent fundamental discoveries. Topping the bill will be the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, the CERN Choir, the Zürcher Sing-Akademie and the Alan Parsons Live Project rock group, who have joined forces to create an unforgettable evening’s entertainment.   The Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, directed by Maestro Neeme Järvi, artistic and musical director of the OSR. (Image: Grégory Maillot). >>> From the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande… Henk Swinnen, General Manager of the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (OSR), answers some questions for the CERN Bulletin, just a few days before the event. How did this project come about? When CERN invited us to take part in the B...

  13. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  14. Determination of silica activity in Bushveld rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, D. L.; Nolan, J.; Viljoen, E. A.

    1980-08-01

    Values of silica activity have been calculated for Bushveld rocks from an extension of the mafic layered sequence north of the town of Bethal in the south-eastern Transvaal as well as the Roossenekal area in the eastern limb of the Complex. The samples examined contain the coexisting assemblage olivine, Ca-poor pyroxene, Ca-rich pyroxene and plagioclase. This enabled silica activities to be calculated from the following reactions: (Mg, Fe)2SiO4+SiO2⇆2(Mg, Fe)SiO3, CaAl2SiO6+SiO2⇆CaAl2Si2O8. Parallel curves of increasing silica activity with fractionation were established 0.20 log units apart. This represented a pressure of emplacement for the top of the layered zone in the Bethal area of 2.72±0.79 kbars. A value of 1.47±0.62 kbars was obtained for the Roossenekal area. These values are equivalent to 9.1±2.6 km and 4.9±2.1 km respectively, the latter figure being consistent with the minimum thickness of 4550 m of felsite and granophyre originally overlying the layered sequence and still preserved in the area west of Roossenekal.

  15. Stability of Armour Units in Flow Through a Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; C. Thompson, Alex

    1984-01-01

    As part of a program to study the hydraulics of wave attack on rubble mound breakwaters tests were made on model armour units in a steady flow through a layer laid on a slope. The flow angle has little effect on stability for dolosse or rock layers. The head drop at failure across each type...

  16. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2012-01-01

    All materials exposed at the lunar surface undergo space weathering processes. On the Moon, boulders make up only a small percentage of the exposed surface, and areas where such rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions identified from remote sensing data. Yet space weathered surfaces (patina) are relatively common on returned rock samples, some of which directly sample the surface of larger boulders. Because, as witness plates to lunar space weathering, rocks and boulders experience longer exposure times compared to lunar soil grains, they allow us to develop a deeper perspective on the relative importance of various weathering processes as a function of time.

  18. Multiverso: Rock'n'Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years, there have been several projects involving astronomy and classical music. But have a rock band ever appeared at a science conference or an astronomer at a rock concert? We present a project, Multiverso, in which we mix rock and astronomy, together with poetry and video art (Caballero, 2010). The project started in late 2009 and has already reached tens of thousands people in Spain through the release of an album, several concert-talks, television, radio, newspapers and the internet.

  19. Mineral Detector for Igneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, S. T.; Hart, S. D.; Gulick, V. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a Raman spectral analysis tool that uses machine learning algorithms to classify pure minerals in igneous rocks. Experiments show greater than 90% accuracy classifying a test set of pure minerals against a database of similar reference minerals using an artificial neural network. Efforts are currently underway to improve this tool for use as a mineral detector in rock samples, an important milestone toward autonomously classifying rocks based on spectral, and previous imaging work. Although pure mineral classification has been widely successful, applying the same methods to rocks is difficult because the spectra may represent a combination of multiple, and often competing, mineral signatures. In such cases some minerals may appear with more intensity than others resulting in masking of weaker minerals. Furthermore, with our particular spectrometer (852 nm excitation, ~50 micron spot size), minerals such as potassium feldspar fluoresce, both obscuring its characteristic Raman features and suppressing those of weaker minerals. For example, plagioclase and quartz, two key minerals for determining the composition of igneous rocks, are often hidden by minerals such as potassium feldspar and pyroxene, and are consequently underrepresented in the spectral analysis. These technicalities tend to skew the perceived composition of a rock from its actual composition. Despite these obstacles, an experiment involving a training set of 26 minerals (plagioclase, potassium feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz) and a test set of 57 igneous rocks (basalt, gabbro, andesite, diorite, dacite, granodiorite, rhyolite, granite) shows that generalizations derived from their spectral data are consistent with expected trends: as rock composition goes from felsic to mafic there is a marked increase in the detection of minerals such as plagioclase and pyroxene along with a decrease in the detection of minerals such as quartz and potassium feldspar. The results suggest that phaneritic

  20. Fault rocks and uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Hangshou.

    1991-01-01

    The types of fault rocks, microstructural characteristics of fault tectonite and their relationship with uranium mineralization in the uranium-productive granite area are discussed. According to the synthetic analysis on nature of stress, extent of crack and microstructural characteristics of fault rocks, they can be classified into five groups and sixteen subgroups. The author especially emphasizes the control of cataclasite group and fault breccia group over uranium mineralization in the uranium-productive granite area. It is considered that more effective study should be made on the macrostructure and microstructure of fault rocks. It is of an important practical significance in uranium exploration

  1. Geotechnical issues and guidelines for storage of compressed air in excavated hard rock caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Fossum, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    The results of a literature survey on the stability of excavated hard rock caverns are presented. The objective of the study was to develop geotechnical criteria for the design of compressed air energy storage (CAES) caverns in hard rock formations. These criteria involve geologic, hydrological, geochemical, geothermal, and in situ stress state characteristics of generic rock masses. Their relevance to CAES caverns, and the identification of required research areas, are identified throughout the text. This literature survey and analysis strongly suggests that the chief geotechnical issues for the development and operation of CAES caverns in hard rock are impermeability for containment, stability for sound openings, and hydrostatic balance.

  2. Tectonic constraints on a deep-seated rock slide in weathered crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Luigi; Gullà, Giovanni

    2017-08-01

    Deep-seated rock slides (DSRSs), recognised as one of the most important mass wasting processes worldwide, involve large areas and cause several consequences in terms of environmental and economic damage; they result from a complex of controlling features and processes. DSRSs are common in Calabria (southern Italy) where the complex geo-structural setting plays a key role in controlling the geometry of the failure surface and its development. This paper describes an integrated multi-disciplinary approach to investigate a DSRS in Palaeozoic high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Sila Massif; it focuses on the definition of the internal structure and the predisposing factors of the Serra di Buda landslide near the town of Acri, which is a paradigm for numerous landslides in this area. An integrated interdisciplinary study based on geological, structural, and geomorphological investigations-including field observations of weathering grade of rocks, minero-petrographic characterisations, geotechnical investigations and, in particular, fifteen years of displacement monitoring-is presented. Stereoscopic analysis of aerial photographs and field observations indicate that the Serra di Buda landslide consists of two distinct compounded bodies: (i) an older and dormant body ( 7 ha) and (ii) a more recent and active body ( 13 ha) that overlies the previous one. The active landslide shows movement linked to a deep-seated translational rock slide (block slide); the velocity scale ranges from slow (1.6 m/year during paroxysmal stages) to extremely slow (responsible for the formation of this landslide. In particular, the landslide shows a strongly tectonic constraint: the flanks are bounded by high-angle faults, and the main basal failure surface developed inside an E-W southward-dipping thrust fault zone. The entire active rock mass (total volume of approximately 6 Mm3) slid at one time on a failure surface that dipped < 27°, and the maximum depth, as determined by inclinometer

  3. The Chronology of Rock Art

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Such phases are tentatively ascribed to different archaeological cultures on the basis of the contextual availability, stylistic similarities and so on. Ethnographic analogies are also attempted in the dating of rock art .

  4. Rock Art of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majeed Khan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is not only oil in which Saudi Arabia is rich, but it is also among the four richest rock art regions of the world. Hundreds and thousands of petroglyphs, painted rock art, and ancient Arabian inscriptions sites are located all over the country, representing various cultural phases, from the Neolithic until the recent past. One can see the naturalistic, schematic, abstract, mythical, and mystical images representing ancient ideology, thoughts about the metaphysical world, religious entity, economy, environment, human activities, and variety of animal types, according to particular climatic and environmental conditions. The rock art of Saudi Arabia is the mirror of its rich cultural heritage of so-called Bedouin or desert dwellers that surprises the world with its 4000 archaeological and more than 1500 rock art sites.

  5. Chemical methods of rock analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeffery, P. G; Hutchison, D

    1981-01-01

    A practical guide to the methods in general use for the complete analysis of silicate rock material and for the determination of all those elements present in major, minor or trace amounts in silicate...

  6. Elastic wave attenuation in rocks containing fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The low-frequency limit of Biot's theory of fluid-saturated porous media predicts that the coefficients for viscous attenuation of shear waves and of the fast compressional wave are proportional to the fluid permeability. Although the observed attenuation is generally in qualitative agreement with the theory, the magnitude of the observed attenuation coefficient in rocks is often more than an order of magnitude higher than expected. This apparent dilemma can be resolved without invoking other attenuation mechanisms if the intrinsic permeability of the rock is inhomogeneous and varies widely in magnitude. A simple calculation of the overall behavior of a layered porous material using local-flow Biot theory shows that the effective permeability for attenuation is the mean of the constituent permeabilities while the effective permeability for fluid flow is the harmonic mean. When the range of variation in the local permeability is one or more orders of magnitude, this difference in averaging method can easily explain some of the observed discrepancies

  7. Thermal influences on spontaneous rock dome exfoliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brian D.; Stock, Greg M.; Eppes, Martha C.; Lewis, Scott W.; Corbett, Skye C.; Smith, Joel B.

    2018-01-01

    Rock domes, with their onion-skin layers of exfoliation sheets, are among the most captivating landforms on Earth. Long recognized as integral in shaping domes, the exact mechanism(s) by which exfoliation occurs remains enigmatic, mainly due to the lack of direct observations of natural events. In August 2014, during the hottest days of summer, a granitic dome in California, USA, spontaneously exfoliated; witnesses observed extensive cracking, including a ~8000 kg sheet popping into the air. Subsequent exfoliation episodes during the following two summers were recorded by instrumentation that captured—for the first time—exfoliation deformation and stress conditions. Here we show that thermal cycling and cumulative dome surface heating can induce subcritical cracking that culminates in seemingly spontaneous exfoliation. Our results indicate that thermal stresses—largely discounted in dome formation literature—can play a key role in triggering exfoliation and therefore may be an important control for shaping domes worldwide.

  8. Classification and assessment of rock mass parameters in Choghart iron mine using P-wave velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Hemmati Nourani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Engineering rock mass classification, based on empirical relations between rock mass parameters and engineering applications, is commonly used in rock engineering and forms the basis for designing rock structures. The basic data required may be obtained from visual observation and laboratory or field tests. However, owing to the discontinuous and variable nature of rock masses, it is difficult for rock engineers to directly obtain the specific design parameters needed. As an alternative, the use of geophysical methods in geomechanics such as seismography may largely address this problem. In this study, 25 seismic profiles with the total length of 543 m have been scanned to determine the geomechanical properties of the rock mass in blocks I, III and IV-2 of the Choghart iron mine. Moreover, rock joint measurements and sampling for laboratory tests were conducted. The results show that the rock mass rating (RMR and Q values have a close relation with P-wave velocity parameters, including P-wave velocity in field (VPF, P-wave velocity in the laboratory (VPL and the ratio of VPF to VPL (i.e. KP = VPF/VPL. However, Q value, totally, has greater correlation coefficient and less error than the RMR. In addition, rock mass parameters including rock quality designation (RQD, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS, joint roughness coefficient (JRC and Schmidt number (RN show close relationship with P-wave velocity. An equation based on these parameters was obtained to estimate the P-wave velocity in the rock mass with a correlation coefficient of 91%. The velocities in two orthogonal directions and the results of joint study show that the wave velocity anisotropy in rock mass may be used as an efficient tool to assess the strong and weak directions in rock mass.

  9. Contaminant transport in fracture networks with heterogeneous rock matrices. The Picnic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barten, Werner [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Robinson, Peter C. [QuantiSci Limited, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    verification for these geometries relies chiefly on the verification for one-dimensional matrix diffusion, on qualitative estimates and on different self-consistency tests. The steady-state release for a single nuclide is additionally verified quantitatively. PICNIC has been verified as far as possible at present to allow application with confidence in performance assessment and in modelling of transport experiments. It is shown that structural geological information on small-scale heterogeneity can be entered easily into PICNIC. It is explained, e.g. that considering two-dimensional matrix diffusion into the layer of altered wall rock adjacent to open channels in the cataclastic zone can strongly increase the performance of the geosphere for migrating radionuclides, depending however on the properties of the nuclides and the rock. Considering the effects of matrix diffusion into a second rock layer can also be highly beneficial. (author)

  10. Contaminant transport in fracture networks with heterogeneous rock matrices. The Picnic code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barten, Werner; Robinson, Peter C.

    2001-02-01

    these geometries relies chiefly on the verification for one-dimensional matrix diffusion, on qualitative estimates and on different self-consistency tests. The steady-state release for a single nuclide is additionally verified quantitatively. PICNIC has been verified as far as possible at present to allow application with confidence in performance assessment and in modelling of transport experiments. It is shown that structural geological information on small-scale heterogeneity can be entered easily into PICNIC. It is explained, e.g. that considering two-dimensional matrix diffusion into the layer of altered wall rock adjacent to open channels in the cataclastic zone can strongly increase the performance of the geosphere for migrating radionuclides, depending however on the properties of the nuclides and the rock. Considering the effects of matrix diffusion into a second rock layer can also be highly beneficial. (author)

  11. Strong Velocity-Weakening of Nanograins at High Slip-Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, R.; Hirose, T.; Ando, J.

    2008-12-01

    It has been observed that slip localization zones in some experimental and natural faults consist of crystalline or amorphous nanograins of different minerals. Prolonged grinding of silicate rocks (e.g., quartz rock and granite) is known to produce amorphous silica nanograins and mechanical properties of the material (especially under wet condition) have been attributed to a mechanism of fault weakening. Also, recent high- velocity friction tests on carbonate rocks showed that faults can be weakened by thermal decomposition of calcite into nanograins of lime and carbon dioxide and the lubrication effect of the nanograins would be critical for the fault weakening. However, mechanical behavior(s) and friction mechanism(s) of fault slip zones with nanograins, especially at high slip-rates, are still poorly understood, despite their potential importance to the understanding of seismic faulting. In this contribution, we show you our experimental results indicating velocity-weakening of nanograins (probably caused by still unknown mechanical behaviors of nanograins) rather than by temperature-related weakening behavior. In our high-velocity friction tests on Carrara marble at seismic slip-rates, we have tried to "cool" the simulated fault with liquid nitrogen and compressed air during frictional sliding, and found, in the simulated fault coated with nanopowders of lime (CaO) formed by thermal decomposition, no correlation between friction and temperature measured with thermocouples (i.e., no temperature-related weakening behavior), although strong "velocity-weakening" behavior appeared. The observation was confirmed by another experiment: from (1) the calculated "maximum" sliding surface temperature [Carslaw and Jaeger, 1959] using the mechanical data, with an assumption of strong slip localization into a very thin layer, and (2) the measured temperature with thermocouples at a place just below the sliding surface and close to the periphery of the specimen, it was found

  12. Determination of Heat Capacity of Yucca Mountain Stratigraphic Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Hadgu; C. Lum; J.E. Bean

    2006-01-01

    The heat generated from the radioactive waste to be placed in the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will affect the thermal-hydrology of the Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layers. In order to assess the effect of the movement of repository heat into the fractured rocks accurate determination of thermodynamic and hydraulic properties is important. Heat capacity is one of the properties that are required to evaluate energy storage in the fractured rock. Rock-grain heat capacity, the subject of this study, is the heat capacity of the solid part of the rock. Yucca Mountain consists of alternating lithostratigraphic units of welded and non-welded ash-flow tuff, mainly rhyolitic in composition and displaying varying degrees of vitrification and alteration. A number of methods exist that can be used to evaluate heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers that consist of different compositions. In this study, the mineral summation method has been used to quantify the heat capacity of the stratigraphic layers based on Kopp's rule. The mineral summation method is an addition of the weighted heat capacity of each mineral found in a specific layer. For this study the weighting was done based on the mass percentage of each mineral in the layer. The method utilized a mineralogic map of the rocks at the Yucca Mountain repository site. The Calico Hills formation and adjacent bedded tuff layers display a bimodal mineral distribution of vitric and zeolitic zones with differing mineralogies. Based on this bimodal distribution in zeolite abundance, the boundary between the vitric and zeolitic zones was selected to be 15% zeolitic abundance. Thus, based on the zeolite abundance, subdivisions have been introduced to these layers into ''vitric'' and ''zeolitic'' zones. Heat capacity values have been calculated for these layers both as ''layer average'' and ''zone average''. The heat capacity determination method presented in this report did not account for spatial

  13. Strong Josephson Coupling in Planar Graphene Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinho; Lee, Gil-Ho; Lee, Jae Hyeong; Takane, Yositake; Imura, Ken-Ichiro; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Lee, Hu-Jong

    A recent breakthrough of processing graphene, employing encapsulation by hexagonal boron nitride layers (BGB structure), allows realizing the ballistic carrier transport in graphene. Thereafter, ballistic Josephson coupling has been studied by closely edge-contacted BGB structure with two superconducting electrodes. Here, we report on the strong Josephson coupling with planar graphene junction in truly short and ballistic regime. Our device showed high transmission probability and the junction critical current (IC) oscillating for sweeping the gate voltage along with the normal conductance oscillation (Fabry-Perot oscillations), providing a direct evidence for the ballistic nature of the junction pair current. We also observed the convex-upward shape of decreasing critical currents with increasing temperature, canonical properties of the short Josephson coupling. By fitting these curves into theoretical models, we demonstrate the strong Josephson coupling in our devices, which is also supported by the exceptionally large value of ICRN ( 2 Δ / e RNis the normal resistance).

  14. Distribution of rock fragments and their effects on hillslope soil erosion in purple soil, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan

    2017-04-01

    Purple soil is widely distributed in Sichuan Basin and Three Gorges Reservoir Area. Purple soil region is abundant in soil fertility and hydrothermal resources, playing an important role in the agricultural development of China. Soil erosion has long been recognized as a major environmental problem in the purple soil region where the population is large and slope farming is commonly practiced, and rainstorm is numerous. The existence of rock fragments is one of the most important characteristics of purple soil. Rock fragments at the soil surface or in the soil layer affect soil erosion processes by water in various direct and indirect ways, thus the erosion processes of soil containing rock fragments have unique features. Against the severe soil degradation by erosion of purple soil slope, carrying out the research about the characteristics of purple soil containing rock fragments and understanding the influence of rock fragments on soil erosion processes have important significance, which would promote the rational utilization of purple soil slope land resources and accurate prediction of purple soil loss. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of rock fragments in purple soil slope and the impact of rock fragment content on soil physical properties and soil erosion. First, field sampling methods were used to survey the spatial variability of rock fragments in soil profiles and along slope and the physical properties of soils containing rock fragments. Secondly, indoor simulated rainfall experiments were used to exam the effect of rock fragments in the soil layer on soil erosion processes and the relationships between rainfall infiltration, change of surface flow velocity, surface runoff volume and sediment on one hand, and rock fragment content (Rv, 0% 30%, which was determined according the results of field investigation for rock fragment distribution) on the other were investigated. Thirdly, systematic analysis about the

  15. Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-14

    Mathematical Sciences Institute. Ithaca, NY: Cornell. Guckenheimer, J. & Labouriau, 1. 1990. Bifurcation of the Hodgkin - Huxley equations: a new vt.vist. In...olm es -____ II_ John Guckenheimer Avwi tI.,,ti 1it y ’odes ,Av9L! an.,I/or Dist Special •D L 2 Narrative Philip Holmes is continuing to study the...not localized in spae like the structur observed in the turbulent baft y layer. Wavelet bases, having compact support, seem much more appropriate. J

  16. Geotechnical characteristics and stability analysis of rock-soil aggregate slope at the Gushui Hydropower Station, southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-wen; Shi, Chong; Xu, Fu-gang

    2013-01-01

    Two important features of the high slopes at Gushui Hydropower Station are layered accumulations (rock-soil aggregate) and multilevel toppling failures of plate rock masses; the Gendakan slope is selected for case study in this paper. Geological processes of the layered accumulation of rock and soil particles are carried out by the movement of water flow; the main reasons for the toppling failure of plate rock masses are the increasing weight of the upper rock-soil aggregate and mountain erosion by river water. Indoor triaxial compression test results show that, the cohesion and friction angle of the rock-soil aggregate decreased with the increasing water content; the cohesion and the friction angle for natural rock-soil aggregate are 57.7 kPa and 31.3° and 26.1 kPa and 29.1° for saturated rock-soil aggregate, respectively. The deformation and failure mechanism of the rock-soil aggregate slope is a progressive process, and local landslides will occur step by step. Three-dimensional limit equilibrium analysis results show that the minimum safety factor of Gendakan slope is 0.953 when the rock-soil aggregate is saturated, and small scale of landslide will happen at the lower slope.

  17. Groundwater monitoring of an open-pit limestone quarry: groundwater characteristics, evolution and their connections to rock slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eang, Khy Eam; Igarashi, Toshifumi; Fujinaga, Ryota; Kondo, Megumi; Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar

    2018-03-06

    Groundwater flow and its geochemical evolution in mines are important not only in the study of contaminant migration but also in the effective planning of excavation. The effects of groundwater on the stability of rock slopes and other mine constructions especially in limestone quarries are crucial because calcite, the major mineral component of limestone, is moderately soluble in water. In this study, evolution of groundwater in a limestone quarry located in Chichibu city was monitored to understand the geochemical processes occurring within the rock strata of the quarry and changes in the chemistry of groundwater, which suggests zones of deformations that may affect the stability of rock slopes. There are three distinct geological formations in the quarry: limestone layer, interbedded layer of limestone and slaty greenstone, and slaty greenstone layer as basement rock. Although the hydrochemical facies of all groundwater samples were Ca-HCO 3 type water, changes in the geochemical properties of groundwater from the three geological formations were observed. In particular, significant changes in the chemical properties of several groundwater samples along the interbedded layer were observed, which could be attributed to the mixing of groundwater from the limestone and slaty greenstone layers. On the rainy day, the concentrations of Ca 2+ and HCO 3 - in the groundwater fluctuated notably, and the groundwater flowing along the interbedded layer was dominated by groundwater from the limestone layer. These suggest that groundwater along the interbedded layer may affect the stability of rock slopes.

  18. Quantification of rock heterogeneities by structural geological field studies combined with laboratory analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Afsar, Filiz; Philipp, Sonja

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous rock properties in terms of layering and complex infrastructure of fault zones are typical in sedimentary successions. The knowledge of in-situ mechanical rock properties is crucial for a better understanding of processes such as fracturing and fluid transport in fractured reservoirs. To estimate in situ rock properties at different depths it is important to understand how rocks from outcrops differ from rocks at depth, for example due to alteration and removal of the overburden load. We aim at quantifying these properties by performing structural geological field studies in outcrop analogues combined with laboratory analyses of outcrop samples and drill-cores. The field studies focus on 1) fault zone infrastructure and 2) host rock fracture systems in two different study areas with different lithologies, the North German and the Bristol Channel Basin. We analyse quantitatively the dimension, geometry, persistence and connectivity of fracture systems. The field studies are complemented by systematic sampling to obtain the parameters Young's modulus, compressive and tensile strengths and elastic strain energy (also referred to as destruction work) from which we estimate rock and fracture toughnesses. The results show that in rocks with distinctive layering fractures are often restricted to individual layers, that is, stratabound. The probability of arrest seems to depend on the stiffness contrast between two single layers as well as on the thickness of the softer layer. The results also show that there are clear differences between fault zones in the different lithologies in terms of damage zone thicknesses and fracture system parameters. The results of laboratory analyses show that the mechanical properties vary considerably and for many samples there are clear directional differences. That is, samples taken perpendicular to layering commonly have higher stiffnesses and strengths than those taken parallel to layering. We combine the results of

  19. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs

  20. Evaluation of Rock Bolt Support for Polish Hard Rock Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypkowski, Krzysztof

    2018-03-01

    The article presents different types of rock bolt support used in Polish ore mining. Individual point resin and expansion rock bolt support were characterized. The roof classes for zinc and lead and copper ore mines were presented. Furthermore, in the article laboratory tests of point resin rock bolt support in a geometric scale of 1:1 with minimal fixing length of 0.6 m were made. Static testing of point resin rock bolt support were carried out on a laboratory test facility of Department of Underground Mining which simulate mine conditions for Polish ore and hard coal mining. Laboratory tests of point resin bolts were carried out, especially for the ZGH Bolesław, zinc and lead "Olkusz - Pomorzany" mine. The primary aim of the research was to check whether at the anchoring point length of 0.6 m by means of one and a half resin cartridge, the type bolt "Olkusz - 20A" is able to overcome the load.The second purpose of the study was to obtain load - displacement characteristic with determination of the elastic and plastic range of the bolt. For the best simulation of mine conditions the station steel cylinders with an external diameter of 0.1 m and a length of 0.6 m with a core of rock from the roof of the underground excavations were used.

  1. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  2. 30 CFR 75.402 - Rock dusting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock dusting. 75.402 Section 75.402 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.402 Rock dusting... or too high in incombustible content to propagate an explosion, shall be rock dusted to within 40...

  3. Correlation between Rock mass rating, Q-system and Rock mass index based on field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufi Amine

    2018-01-01

    The proposed regression models reveal strong correlations between RMR, Q and RMi indexes with high values of accuracy coefficients so that they can be used to estimate the “CPB3” underground rock mass quality for the range of RMR between 30% and 80%. The developed mathematical formulations of the geomechanicalindexes will certainly offer an effective tool to geologist and geotechnical professionals in the decision-making process, preliminary design phase, stability problems and suggestions of the required supporting system and techniques without the expense of more resources or time.

  4. Strongly nonlinear dynamics of electrolytes in large ac voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Bazant, Martin Z.; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    , ignoring any transverse instability or fluid flow. We analyze the resulting one-dimensional problem by matched asymptotic expansions in the limit of thin double layers and extend previous work into the strongly nonlinear regime, which is characterized by two features—significant salt depletion...... in the electrolyte near the electrodes and, at very large voltage, the breakdown of the quasiequilibrium structure of the double layers. The former leads to the prediction of “ac capacitive desalination” since there is a time-averaged transfer of salt from the bulk to the double layers, via oscillating diffusion...... to suppress the strongly nonlinear regime in the limit of concentrated electrolytes, ionic liquids, and molten salts. Beyond the model problem, our reduced equations for thin double layers, based on uniformly valid matched asymptotic expansions, provide a useful mathematical framework to describe additional...

  5. Effect of crustal heterogeneities and effective rock strength on the formation of HP and UHP rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Schmalholz, Stefan; White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    next step, we performed several hundred numerical simulations to understand the effects of km-scale heterogeneities and material parameters on pressure magnitudes, using a model setup that is otherwise very similar to the one of Li et al. (2010). Results show that significant non-lithostatic pressures occur if (lower) crustal rocks are dry or if km-scale (nappe-sized) heterogeneities with dryer rocks are present within the crust. Overpressure magnitudes can be up to 1 GPa or 100% and in some cases rock assemblages are temporarily in the coesite stability field at a depth of only 40 km, followed by rapid exhumation to the surface. Tectonic overpressures can vary strongly in magnitude versus time, but peak pressures are present sufficiently long for metamorphic reactions to occur. The presence of heterogeneities can affect the crustal-scaled deformation pattern, and the effective friction angle of crustal-scale rocks (or the dryness of these rocks) is a key parameter that determines the magnitude of non-lithostatic pressures. Our results thus reconcile previous findings and highlight the importance of having an accurate knowledge of the fluid-pressure, initial crustal structure and rock composition during continental collision. If rocks are dry by the time they enter a subduction zone, or are stronger/dryer than surrounding rocks, they are likely to develop significantly higher pressures than nearby rocks. This might explain the puzzling observation that some nappes have very high peak pressures, while juxtaposed nappes have much lower values, without clear structural evidence for deep burial and exhumation along a subduction channel of the high-pressure nappe. Our models might also give a partial explanation of why the reported timescales for high and ultra-high pressure stages of peak metamorphism are often very short. References: Burov, E., Francois, T., Agard, P., Le Pourhiet, L., Meyer, B., Tirel, C., Lebedev, S., Yamato, P., Brun, J.-P., 2014. Tectonophysics

  6. Current status of crushed rock and whole rock column studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vine, E.N.; Daniels, W.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Thompson, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements on a large number of crushed rock columns of tuff, granite, and argillite are discussed. The isotopes 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 133 Ba, 141 Ce, 152 Eu, /sup 95m/Tc, and 233 U were used. Flow rates were varied from approx. 30 to approx. 30000 m/y. Other parameters studied include isotope concentration and atmosphere. The sorption ratios calculated were compared with batch sorption ratios on the same samples. Methods of studying the movement of radionuclides through whole rock cores are described. The problems associated with sealing the cores to prevent leaking along the exterior surface and one possible solution are discussed. The strontium sorption ratio obtained by elution of one solid tuff core is compared with the batch and crushed rock column sorption ratios

  7. Quantum electrodynamics of strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields provides a broad survey of the theoretical and experimental work accomplished, presenting papers by a group of international researchers who have made significant contributions to this developing area. Exploring the quantum theory of strong fields, the volume focuses on the phase transition to a charged vacuum in strong electric fields. The contributors also discuss such related topics as QED at short distances, precision tests of QED, nonperturbative QCD and confinement, pion condensation, and strong gravitational fields In addition, the volume features a historical paper on the roots of quantum field theory in the history of quantum physics by noted researcher Friedrich Hund

  8. Iodine and selenium migration through argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasca, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Deep argillaceous formations are considered as potential host rock for high-level radioactive waste repository. Based on safety assessment calculations, active selenium ( 79 Se) and iodine ( 129 I) from high level radioactive waste might be ones of the major dose contributors due to their longevity and their anionic character. However, because of their high sensitivity to redox condition, a special attention to the oxidation state of these elements is required. A comparative study on the diffusion properties of selenium and iodine through argillaceous rocks was realized with the aim to determine the effects of both the redox conditions and the mineralogy on the migration of these two elements. For these purposes, we have studied two argillaceous rocks: Toarcian argillite from Tournemire (France) and Opalinus clay (OPA) from the Mont-Terri (Switzerland). The study of the iodide migration allowed to confirm the control on the iodide retention of both oxidized pyrite and natural organic matter. A kinetic control of the iodide sorption is also suspected. We focus the selenium study on the more oxidized species, Se(IV) and Se(VI). The Se(IV) migration is strongly dependant from oxido-reduction processes. Indeed, the Se(IV) diffusion experiments through Tournemire argillite and OPA indicated a significant reduction associated to Fe(II). The Se(VI) study evidenced a behavior dependant from the initial concentration: at the highest concentration, no significant retention was observed while the retention is significant at the lowest concentration. Furthermore, spectroscopic analyses tend to show a low Se(VI) reduction at the Fe contact. However, biotic origin cannot be excluded. (author)

  9. A guess resulted from resistivity character of rock in Xiangshan ore-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jixing; Qiao Baoqiang; Cao Shousun; Xie Guofa; Zhouyulong

    2012-01-01

    Based on a lot of survey achievements with audio frequency magnetotelluric prospecting method (AMT) in Xiangshan uranium ore-field, there are three different layers of rock resistivity. That is, high resistivity-low resistivity- high resistivity. At present, above two kinds of rocks had known detailed lithology in terms of drilling data. However, the rock representing high resistivity isn't still confirmed by the drill in deep. On the basis of a comprehensive analysis of the relation between rock types and relevant resistivity in Xiangshan region, the rock was regarded as granite. If the guess is true, it will be possibility to prospect some larger scale and high grade uranium deposits in Xiangshan region. (authors)

  10. Microstructural controls on the macroscopic behavior of geo-architected rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    Reservoir caprocks, are known to span a range of mechanical behavior from elastic granitic units to visco-elastic shale units. Whether a rock will behave elastically, visco-elastically or plastically depends on both the compositional and textural or microsctructural components of the rock, and how these components are spatially distributed. In this study, geo-architected caprock fabrication was performed to develop synthetic rock to study the role of rock rheology on fracture deformations, fluid flow and geochemical alterations. Samples were geo-architected with Portland Type II cement, Ottawa sand, and different clays (kaolinite, illite, and Montmorillonite). The relative percentages of these mineral components are manipulated to generate different rock types. With set protocols, the mineralogical content, texture, and certain structural aspects of the rock were controlled. These protocols ensure that identical samples with the same morphological and mechanical characteristics are constructed, thus overcoming issues that may arise in the presence of heterogeneity and high anisotropy from natural rock samples. Several types of homogeneous geo-architected rock samples were created, and in some cases the methods were varied to manipulate the physical parameters of the rocks. Characterization of rocks that the samples exhibit good repeatability. Rocks with the same mineralogical content generally yielded similar compressional and shear wave velocities, UCS and densities. Geo-architected rocks with 10% clay in the matrix had lower moisture content and effective porosities than rocks with no clay. The process by which clay is added to the matrix can strongly affect the resulting compressive strength and physical properties of the geo-architected sample. Acknowledgment: This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program under Award Number (DE-FG02-09ER16022).

  11. Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Mineral Mountain and Teapot Mountain quadrangles, Pinal County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, William J.; Theodore, Ted G.

    1979-01-01

    The widespread distribution of Tertiary volcanic rocks in south-central Arizona is controlled in part by prevolcanic structures along which volcanic vents were localized. Volcanic rocks in the Mineral Mountain and Teapot Mountain quadrangles mark the site of a major northwest-trending structural hingeline. This hingeline divides an older Precambrian X terrane on the west from intensely deformed sequences of rock as young as Pennsylvanian on the east, suggesting increased westerly uplift. The volcanic rocks consist of a pile of complexly interlayered rhyolite, andesite, dacite, flows and intrusive rocks, water-laid tuffs, and very minor olivine basalt. Although the rocks erupted from several different vents, time relations, space relations, and chemistry each give strong evidence of a single source for all the rocks. Available data (by the K-Ar dating method) on hornblende and biotite separates from the volcanic rocks range from 14 to 19 m.y. and establish the pre-middle Miocene age of major dislocations along the structural hingeline. Most of the volcanic rocks contain glass, either at the base of the flows or as an envelope around the intrusive phases. One of the intrusive rhyolites, however, seems to represent one of the final eruptions. Intense vesiculation of the intrusive rhyolite suggests a large content of volatiles at the time of its eruption. Mineralization is associated with the more silicic of these middle Miocene volcanic rocks; specifically, extensive fissure quartz veins contain locally significant amounts of silver, lead, and zinc and minor amounts of gold. Many of the most productive deposits are hosted by the volcanic rocks, although others occur in the Precambrian rocks. Magnetic data correspond roughly to the geology in outlining the overall extent of the volcanic rocks as a magnetic low.

  12. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrášik Martin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Crashed or dimensional rocks have been used as natural construction material, decoration stone or as material for artistic sculptures. Especially old historical towns not only in Slovakia have had experiences with use of stones for construction purposes for centuries. The whole buildings were made from dimensional stone, like sandstone, limestone or rhyolite. Pavements were made especially from basalt, andesite, rhyolite or granite. Also the most common modern construction material - concrete includes large amounts of crashed rock, especially limestone, dolostone and andesite.

  13. Fracture characteristics in Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Akahori, Kuniaki

    1999-11-01

    It is crucial for the performance assessment of geosphere to evaluate the characteristics of fractures that can be dominant radionuclide migration pathways from a repository to biosphere. This report summarizes the characteristics of fractures obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields surveys at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at outcrops and galleries throughout the country. The characteristics of fractures described in this report are fracture orientation, fracture shape, fracture frequency, fracture distribution in space, transmissivity of fracture, fracture aperture, fracture fillings, alteration halo along fracture, flow-wetted surface area in fracture, and the correlation among these characteristics. Since granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media, a large amount of fracture data is available in literature. In addition, granitic rock has been treated as a potential host rock in many overseas programs, and has JNC performed a number of field observations and experiments in granodiorite at the Kamaishi mine. Therefore, the characteristics of fractures in granitic rock are qualitatively and quantitatively clarified to some extent in this report, while the characteristics of fractures in another rock types are not clarified. (author)

  14. Hot dry rock heat mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchane, D.V.

    1992-01-01

    Geothermal energy utilizing fluids from natural sources is currently exploited on a commercial scale at sites around the world. A much greater geothermal resource exists, however, in the form of hot rock at depth which is essentially dry. This hot dry rock (HDR) resource is found almost everywhere, but the depth at which usefully high temperatures are reached varies from place to place. The technology to mine the thermal energy from HDR has been under development for a number of years. Using techniques adapted from the petroleum industry, water is pumped at high pressure down an injection well to a region of usefully hot rock. The pressure forces open natural joints to form a reservoir consisting of a small amount of water dispensed in a large volume of hot rock. This reservoir is tapped by second well located at some distance from the first, and the heated water is brought to the surface where its thermal energy is extracted. The same water is then recirculated to mine more heat. Economic studies have indicated that it may be possible to produce electricity at competitive prices today in regions where hot rock is found relatively close to the surface

  15. Anchor Dragging Analysis of Rock-Berm Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinho Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents dynamic responses of rock-berm structural system under anchor dragging and accordingly provides the characteristics of the stresses and displacements obtained. For the purpose, first, a rock-berm was modeled by the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics method and piecewise Drucker-Prager material model by facilitating the associated software package—ANSYS-AUTODYN. Second, 2-ton stockless anchor was modeled as a rigid body and eventually dragging external force was obtained. Then, the dragging velocity (1 and 2 m/s was considered as a parameter to investigate the effect of its variation on the responses. Finally, the dragging tensile forces of the anchor cable were obtained and compared according to the dragging velocities. It is shown that the four-layer rock-berm gives the safety margin to the submarine power cable according to the unaffected gauge points near the cable. This safety is accomplished by the four layers (related to rock-berm height and the number of rock particles at each layer (related to rock-berm widths.

  16. Strong WW Interaction at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, Jose R

    1998-12-14

    We present a brief pedagogical introduction to the Effective Electroweak Chiral Lagrangians, which provide a model independent description of the WW interactions in the strong regime. When it is complemented with some unitarization or a dispersive approach, this formalism allows the study of the general strong scenario expected at the LHC, including resonances.

  17. Electrical characteristics of rocks in fractured and caved reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tianzhi; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Haining; Jiang, Liming; Liu, Tangyan; Meng, He; Wang, Feifei

    2017-12-01

    The conductive paths formed by fractures and cave in complex reservoirs differ from those formed by pores and throats in clastic rocks. In this paper, a new formation model based on fractured and caved reservoirs is established, and the electrical characteristics of rocks are analyzed with different pore structures using resistance law to understand their effects on rock resistivity. The ratio of fracture width to cave radius (C e value) and fracture dip are employed to depict pore structure in this model. Our research shows that the electrical characteristics of rocks in fractured and caved reservoirs are strongly affected by pore structure and porous fluid distribution. Although the rock electrical properties associated with simple pore structure agree well with Archie formulae, the relationships between F and φ or between I and S w , in more complicated pore structures, are nonlinear in double logarithmic coordinates. The parameters in Archie formulae are not constant and they depend on porosity and fluid saturation. Our calculations suggest that the inclined fracture may lead to resistivity anisotropy in the formation. The bigger dip the inclining fracture has, the more anisotropy the formation resistivity has. All of these studies own practical sense for the evaluation of oil saturation using resistivity logging data.

  18. Theory of third sound in a compressible and layered superfluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puff, R.D.; Dash, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the theory of third sound, without attenuation effects, in layered superfluid films with finite compressibility. This theory, together with the application of a simple thermodynamic model for the film layers shows how the third-sound velocity can undergo strong variations with coverage associated with progressive changes in film compressibility, in-layer phase changes, and layer completion

  19. Strong-back safety latch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch

  20. Strong-back safety latch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-03-06

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch.

  1. Uranium endowments in phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Andrea E., E-mail: andrea.ulrich@env.ethz.ch [Institute for Environmental Decisions (IED), Natural and Social Science Interface, ETH Zurich Universitässtrasse 22, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Institute for Agricultural Sciences, Plant Nutrition, ETH Zurich, Eschikon 33, 8315 Lindau (Switzerland); Schnug, Ewald, E-mail: e.schnug@tu-braunschweig.de [Department of Life Sciences, Technical University of Braunschweig, Pockelsstraße 14, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Prasser, Horst-Michael, E-mail: prasser@lke.mavt.ethz.ch [Institute of Energy Technology, Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Frossard, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.frossard@usys.ethz.ch [Institute for Agricultural Sciences, Plant Nutrition, ETH Zurich, Eschikon 33, 8315 Lindau (Switzerland)

    2014-04-01

    This study seeks to identify and specify the components that make up the prospects of U recovery from phosphate rock. A systems approach is taken. The assessment includes i) reviewing past recovery experience and lessons learned; ii) identifying factors that determine recovery; and iii) establishing a contemporary evaluation of U endowments in phosphate rock reserves, as well as the available and recoverable amounts from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production. We find that in the past, recovery did not fulfill its potential and that the breakup of the Soviet Union worsened then-favorable recovery market conditions in the 1990s. We find that an estimated 5.7 million tU may be recoverable from phosphate rock reserves. In 2010, the recoverable tU from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production may have been 15,000 tU and 11,000 tU, respectively. This could have filled the world U supply-demand gap for nuclear energy production. The results suggest that the U.S., Morocco, Tunisia, and Russia would be particularly well-suited to recover U, taking infrastructural considerations into account. We demonstrate future research needs, as well as sustainability orientations. We conclude that in order to promote investment and production, it seems necessary to establish long-term contracts at guaranteed prices, ensuring profitability for phosphoric acid producers. - Highlights: • We identify components that underlie the recovery of uranium from phosphate rock. • We estimate that 11,000 tU may have been recoverable from phosphoric acid in 2010. • Recovery is a resource conservation and environmental pollution control strategy. • To ensure investment in recovery technology, profitability needs to be secured.

  2. Uranium deposits in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimori, R.K.; Ragland, P.C.; Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a review of published data bearing on the geology and origin of uranium deposits in granitic, pegmatitic and migmatitic rocks with the aim of assisting in the development of predictive criteria for the search for similar deposits in the U.S. Efforts were concentrated on the so-called ''porphyry'' uranium deposits. Two types of uranium deposits are primarily considered: deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in gneiss terrains, and disseminations of uranium in high-level granites. In Chapter 1 of this report, the general data on the distribution of uranium in igneous and metamorphic rocks are reviewed. Chapter 2 contains some comments on the classification of uranium deposits associated with igneous rocks and a summary of the main features of the geology of uranium deposits in granites. General concepts of the behavior of uranium in granites during crustal evolution are reviewed in Chapter 3. Also included is a discussion of the relationship of uranium mineralization in granites to the general evolution of mobile belts, plus the influence of magmatic and post-magmatic processes on the distribution of uranium in igneous rocks and related ore deposits. Chapter 4 relates the results of experimental studies on the crystallization of granites to some of the geologic features of uranium deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in high-grade metamorphic terrains. Potential or favorable areas for igneous uranium deposits in the U.S.A. are delineated in Chapter 5. Data on the geology of specific uranium deposits in granitic rocks are contained in Appendix 1. A compilation of igneous rock formations containing greater than 10 ppM uranium is included in Appendix 2. Appendix 3 is a report on the results of a visit to the Roessing area. Appendix 4 is a report on a field excursion to eastern Canada

  3. Influence of the density of placement on the stability of armour layers on breakwaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Bosch, A.; D' Angremond, K.; Verhagen, H.J.; Olthof, J.

    2002-01-01

    Studies on the stability of the amour layer (d’Angremond et. al. [1999] revealed the importance of density of placement. The current research focuses on the influence of the density of placement on the stability of cubes in a double armour layer and tetrapods and rocks in a single armour layer. The

  4. 20020732: Rock (14), panel (21)

    OpenAIRE

    None

    2002-01-01

    Rock Art photograph, (21); Element broken off much larger rock. [cam element='coordinate' qualifier='longitude']W 70deg34'55.5"[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='latitude']S 32deg49'48.8"[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='altitude']913[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='bearing']0[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='inclination']55[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='cartesian'](3.000,1.100,2.500)[/cam

  5. Some rock mass assessment procedures for discontinuous crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boodt, P.I.; Brown, E.T.

    1985-03-01

    Underground radioactive waste repositories place especially stringent demands on rock mass assessment and excavation design methodologies. As part of the Building Research Establishment's programme of research into geotechnical site assessment methodology, experiments were undertaken at an underground test site in granite at Troon, Cornwall, and in the Imperial College Laboratories. The results of discontinuity surveys showed that the borehole impression packer probe technique can provide an important source of information for radioactive waste repository site assessment. Similarly, borehole pressure tests can provide valuable data on discontinuity apertures and hydraulic conductivities and on rock mass permeabilities. A versatile, modular borehole pressure test system for use from restricted underground locations was developed and used successfully. Field tests gave values of equivalent parallel plate apertures and discontinuity hydraulic conductivities in similar ranges to those measured in laboratory tests on samples recovered from the site. Discontinuity normal stiffnesses were also measured successfully using the Terra Tek Geothermal Rock Mechanics Test System which proved itself capable of providing laboratory test data required to support geotechnical site assessment procedures for radioactive waste repositories in discontinuous rock. (author)

  6. Growth of highly textured SnS on mica using an SnSe buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.F.; Fong, W.K.; Wang, W.; Surya, C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the growth of SnS thin films on mica substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Excellent 2D layered structure and strong (001) texture were observed with a record low rocking curve full width at half maximum of ∼ 0.101° for the SnS(004) diffraction. An interface model is used to investigate the nucleation of SnS on mica which indicates the co-existence of six pairs of lateral growth orientations and is in excellent agreement with the experimental Φ-scan measurements indicating 12 peaks separated by 30° from each other. To control the lateral growth of the SnS epilayers we investigate the utilization of a thin SnSe buffer layer deposited on the mica substrate prior to the growth of the SnS thin film. The excellent lattice match between SnSe and mica enhances the alignment of the nucleation of SnS and suppresses the minor lateral orientations along the mica[110] direction and its orthogonal axis. Detailed low-frequency noise measurement was performed to characterize the trap density in the films and our results clearly demonstrate substantial reduction in the density of the localized states in the SnS epilayer with the use of an SnSe buffer layer. - Highlights: • A record low rocking curve FWHM for deposited SnS on mica • Investigation of the nucleation of SnS on mica using the interface model • Investigation of nucleation mechanism by phi-scan measurement • Grain boundary formation from crystallites of various nucleation orientations • Suppression of nucleation orientations using an SnSe buffer layer

  7. Processes of cation migration in clay-rocks: Final Scientific Report of the CatClay European Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, S.; Aertsens, M.; Appelo, T.; Bruggeman, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Glaus, M.; Jacquier, P.; Kupcik, T.; Maes, N.; Montoya, V.; Rabung, T.; Robinet, J.-C.; Savoye, S.; Schaefer, T.; Tournassat, C.; Van Laer, L.; Van Loon, L.

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the feasibility studies on the radioactive waste disposal in deep argillaceous formations, it is now well established that the transport properties of solutes in clay rocks, i.e. parameter values for Fick's law, are mainly governed by the negatively charged clay mineral surface. While a good understanding of the diffusive behaviour of non-reactive anionic and neutral species is now achieved, much effort has to be placed on improving understanding of coupled sorption/diffusion phenomena for sorbing cations. Indeed, several cations known to form highly stable surface complexes with sites on mineral surfaces migrate more deeply into clay rock than expected. Therefore, the overall objective of the EC CatClay project is to address this issue, using a 'bottom-up' approach, in which simpler, analogous systems (here a compacted clay, 'pure' illite) are experimentally studied and modelled, and then the transferability of these results to more complex materials, i.e. the clay rocks under consideration in France, Switzerland and Belgium for hosting radioactive waste disposal facilities, is verified. The cations of interest were chosen for covering a representative range of cations families: from a moderately sorbing cation, the strontium, to three strongly sorbing cations, Co(II), Zn(II) and Eu(III). For the 4 years of this project, much effort was devoted to developing and applying specific experimental methods needed for acquiring the high precision, reliable data needed to test the alternative hypotheses represented by different conceptual-numerical models. The enhanced diffusion of the sorbing cations of interest was confirmed both in the simpler analogous illite system for Sr 2+ , Co(II) and Zn(II), but also in the natural clay rocks, except for Eu(III). First modelling approach including diffusion in the diffuse double layer (DDL) promisingly succeeded in reproducing the experimental data under the various conditions both in

  8. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  9. Influence of joint dip angle on seismic behaviors of rock foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lei; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Yujing; Li, Bo; Li Shucai

    2012-01-01

    The seismic response of rock foundation to seismic loads is an important issue to the stability and safety of nuclear power plants. Due to the fact that the discontinuities like joints existing in the rock mass govern principally the deformation and failure behaviors of the rock mass, the influence of discontinuities on the seismic behaviors of rock mass remains as one of the fundamental problems in the safety assessment of nuclear power plants. In this study, the distinct element method (DEM) and finite element method (FEM) were adopted to investigate the seismic responses of rock foundation to a real seismic wave, taking into account the effect of joint dip angle on the deformation and dynamic behaviors of rock foundation. In the DEM simulations, the intact rock has an amplification effect on the amplitudes of seismic waves, while the joints exhibit an attenuation effect on the seismic waves. In the FEM simulations, however, the attenuation effect of joints is not obvious. The dip angle of joints has strong effects on the deformation and dynamic behaviors of rock foundation, in terms that different dip angles lead to obviously different deformation and horizontal stress in the rock foundation when subjected to seismic load. When the dip angle of joints is around 60deg, the seismic velocity, displacement and stress reach the maximums. Therefore, attentions need to be paid on this factor during the seismic design of nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. Microbial populations and activities in the rhizoplane of rock-weathering desert plants. I. root colonization and weathering of igneous rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. Puente; Y. Bashan; C.Y. Li; V.K. Lebsky

    2004-01-01

    Dense layers of bacteria and fungi in the rhizoplane of three species of cactus (Pachycereus pringlei, Stenocereus thurberi, Opuntia cholla) and a wild fig tree (Ficus palmeri) growing in rocks devoid of soil were revealed by bright-field and fluorescence microscopy and field emission...

  11. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory has been constructed as part of the preparations for the deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments are made to gain a better understanding of radionuclide retention in the rock and create confidence in the radionuclide transport models that are intended to be used in the licensing of a deep repository for spent fuel. Experiments with sorbing radioactive tracers have been completed in a single fracture over a distance of about 5 m. These tests have been subject to blind predictions by the Aespoe Task Force on groundwater flow and transports of solutes. Breakthrough of sorbing tracers in the TRUE-I tests is retarded more strongly than would be expected based on laboratory data alone. Results are consistent for all tracers and tracer tests. The main objective of the TRUE Block Scale Experiment is to increase understanding and our ability to predict tracer transport in a fracture network over spatial scales of 10 to 50 m. The total duration of the project is approximately 4.5 years with a scheduled finish at the end of the year 2000. The REX project focuses on the reduction of oxygen in a repository after closure due to reactions with rock minerals and microbial activity. Results show that oxygen is consumed within a few days both for the field and laboratory experiments. The project Degassing of groundwater and two phase flow was initiated to improve our understanding of observations of hydraulic conditions made in drifts and interpretation of experiments performed close to drifts. The analysis performed so far shows that the experimentally observed flow reductions indeed are consistent with the degassing hypothesis. The Prototype Repository Test is focused on testing and demonstrating repository system function. A full-scale prototype including six deposition holes with canisters with electric heaters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite will be built and

  12. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory has been constructed as part of the preparations for the deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments are made to gain a better understanding of radionuclide retention in the rock and create confidence in the radionuclide transport models that are intended to be used in the licensing of a deep repository for spent fuel. Experiments with sorbing radioactive tracers have been completed in a single fracture over a distance of about 5 m. These tests have been subject to blind predictions by the Aespoe Task Force on groundwater flow and transports of solutes. Breakthrough of sorbing tracers in the TRUE-I tests is retarded more strongly than would be expected based on laboratory data alone. Results are consistent for all tracers and tracer tests. The main objective of the TRUE Block Scale Experiment is to increase understanding and our ability to predict tracer transport in a fracture network over spatial scales of 10 to 50 m. The total duration of the project is approximately 4.5 years with a scheduled finish at the end of the year 2000. The REX project focuses on the reduction of oxygen in a repository after closure due to reactions with rock minerals and microbial activity. Results show that oxygen is consumed within a few days both for the field and laboratory experiments. The project Degassing of groundwater and two phase flow was initiated to improve our understanding of observations of hydraulic conditions made in drifts and interpretation of experiments performed close to drifts. The analysis performed so far shows that the experimentally observed flow reductions indeed are consistent with the degassing hypothesis. The Prototype Repository Test is focused on testing and demonstrating repository system function. A full-scale prototype including six deposition holes with canisters with electric heaters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite will be built and

  13. Anomalous radon emission as precursor of medium to strong earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Anomalous radon (Rn222) emissions enhanced by forthcoming earthquakes is considered to be a precursory phenomenon related to an increased geotectonic activity in seismic areas. Rock microfracturing in the Earth's crust preceding a seismic rupture may cause local surface deformation fields, rock dislocations, charged particle generation and motion, electrical conductivity changes, radon and other gases emission, fluid diffusion, electrokinetic, piezomagnetic and piezoelectric effects as well as climate fluctuations. Space-time anomalies of radon gas emitted in underground water, soil and near the ground air weeks to days in the epicentral areas can be associated with the strain stress changes that occurred before the occurrence of medium and strong earthquakes. This paper aims to investigate temporal variations of radon concentration levels in air near or in the ground by the use of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) CR-39 and LR-115 in relation with some important seismic events recorded in Vrancea region, Romania.

  14. Experimental study on the difference between gas and water permeability of clay-rich fault rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qingbao; Yang, Xiaosong; Chen, Jianye

    2017-04-01

    Gas permeability of clay rich rocks is generally higher than that measured with water as the pore fluid in laboratory. Besides the Klinkenberg gas slippage effect, the swelling and adsorption of clay minerals subjected to water may have strong influences (Faulkner and Rutter, 2000; Duan and Yang, 2014). To better understand the discrepancy between gas and water permeability of clay-rich fault rocks, we performed detail fluid transport property experiments on synthetic smectite-quartz, illite-quartz mixtures and natural fault gouge, as well as clay-deplete sandstones for the comparison purpose. Experiments were conducted on a fluid flow apparatus with effective pressures cycling between 5 and 105 MPa. Each sample was subject to nine pressure cycles (the first eight with nitrogen and the last one with de-ionized water as the pore fluid), along which permeability and porosity of either the dry or water-saturated samples were measured. In a few additional experiments, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to examine the hydration state of the smectite before and after the introduction of water. Results show that permeability of all the samples investigated decreases with increasing effective pressure, following a power law relation. Gas permeabilities exhibit strong pore pressure dependence, which can be attributed to the slippage effect. Water permeabilities of the samples are generally lower than the gas results after correction, with a few exceptions for the synthetic samples (clay content ≤10%). The permeability trends observed for samples after the introduction of water can be generally explained by the evolution of sample porosity, as can be obtained from the bulk and solid phase volume measurement results. Take the smectite-quartz synthetic samples for instance. Bulk volume of the samples generally expands after water saturation and XRD results show that almost three layers of water enter the smectite interlayers (001 basal spacing expands from about 14

  15. Brazilian Tensile Strength of Anisotropic Rocks: Review and New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianshou Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Strength anisotropy is one of the most distinct features of anisotropic rocks, and it also normally reveals strong anisotropy in Brazilian test Strength (“BtS”. Theoretical research on the “BtS” of anisotropic rocks is seldom performed, and in particular some significant factors, such as the anisotropic tensile strength of anisotropic rocks, the initial Brazilian disc fracture points, and the stress distribution on the Brazilian disc, are often ignored. The aim of the present paper is to review the state of the art in the experimental studies on the “BtS” of anisotropic rocks since the pioneering work was introduced in 1964, and to propose a novel theoretical method to underpin the failure mechanisms and predict the “BtS” of anisotropic rocks under Brazilian test conditions. The experimental data of Longmaxi Shale-I and Jixi Coal were utilized to verify the proposed method. The results show the predicted “BtS” results show strong agreement with experimental data, the maximum error is only ~6.55% for Longmaxi Shale-I and ~7.50% for Jixi Coal, and the simulated failure patterns of the Longmaxi Shale-I are also consistent with the test results. For the Longmaxi Shale-I, the Brazilian disc experiences tensile failure of the intact rock when 0° ≤ βw ≤ 24°, shear failure along the weakness planes when 24° ≤ βw ≤ 76°, and tensile failure along the weakness planes when 76° ≤ βw ≤ 90°. For the Jixi Coal, the Brazilian disc experiences tensile failure when 0° ≤ βw ≤ 23° or 76° ≤ βw ≤ 90°, shear failure along the butt cleats when 23° ≤ βw ≤ 32°, and shear failure along the face cleats when 32° ≤ βw ≤ 76°. The proposed method can not only be used to predict the “BtS” and underpin the failure mechanisms of anisotropic rocks containing a single group of weakness planes, but can also be generalized for fractured rocks containing multi-groups of weakness planes.

  16. Los abuelos de nuestro rock

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobo Celnik

    2016-01-01

    Los Yetis. Una bomba atómica a go go. La historia de los abuelos de nuestro rock. Diego Londoño; Pulso & Letra Editores, Instituto para el Desarrollo de Antioquia, Instituto de Cultura y Patrimonio de Antioquia, 2014, 98 págs., fotografías.

  17. Simulation of rock deformation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Я. И. Рудаев

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A task of simulating the deformation behavior of geomaterials under compression with account of over-extreme branch has been addressed. The physical nature of rock properties variability as initially inhomogeneous material is explained by superposition of deformation and structural transformations of evolutionary type within open nonequilibrium systems. Due to this the description of deformation and failure of rock is related to hierarchy of instabilities within the system being far from thermodynamic equilibrium. It is generally recognized, that the energy function of the current stress-strain state is a superposition of potential component and disturbance, which includes the imperfection parameter accounting for defects not only existing in the initial state, but also appearing under load. The equation of state has been obtained by minimizing the energy function by the order parameter. The imperfection parameter is expressed through the strength deterioration, which is viewed as the internal parameter of state. The evolution of strength deterioration has been studied with the help of Fokker – Planck equation, which steady form corresponds to rock statical stressing. Here the diffusion coefficient is assumed to be constant, while the function reflecting internal sliding and loosening of the geomaterials is assumed as an antigradient of elementary integration catastrophe. Thus the equation of state is supplemented with a correlation establishing relationship between parameters of imperfection and strength deterioration. While deformation process is identified with the change of dissipative media, coupled with irreversible structural fluctuations. Theoretical studies are proven with experimental data obtained by subjecting certain rock specimens to compression.

  18. Los abuelos de nuestro rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Celnik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Yetis. Una bomba atómica a go go. La historia de los abuelos de nuestro rock. Diego Londoño; Pulso & Letra Editores, Instituto para el Desarrollo de Antioquia, Instituto de Cultura y Patrimonio de Antioquia, 2014, 98 págs., fotografías.

  19. Strong Earthquake Motion Estimates for Three Sites on the U.C. Riverside Campus; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archuleta, R.; Elgamal, A.; Heuze, F.; Lai, T.; Lavalle, D.; Lawrence, B.; Liu, P.C.; Matesic, L.; Park, S.; Riemar, M.; Steidl, J.; Vucetic, M.; Wagoner, J.; Yang, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1-initial source and site characterization, drilling, geophysical logging

  20. Evaluation of early Archean volcaniclastic and volcanic flow rocks as possible sites for carbonaceous fossil microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Maud M

    2004-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks have traditionally been the focus of the search for Archean microfossils; the Earth's oldest fossil bacteria are associated with carbonaceous matter in sedimentary cherts in greenstone belts in the eastern Pilbara block of Western Australia and Barberton greenstone belt of South Africa. Reports of possible fossils in a martian meteorite composed of igneous rock and the discovery of modern bacteria associated with basalts have stimulated a new look at Archean volcanic rocks as possible sites for fossil microbes. This study examines silicified volcaniclastic rocks, near-surface altered volcanic flow rocks, and associated stromatolite- like structures from the Archean Barberton greenstone belt to evaluate their potential for the preservation of carbonaceous fossils. Detrital carbonaceous particles are widely admixed with current-deposited debris. Carbonaceous matter is also present in altered volcanic flow rocks as sparse particles in silica veins that appear to be fed by overlying carbonaceous chert layers. Neither microfossils nor mat-like material was identified in the altered volcanic rocks or adjacent stromatolite-like structures. Ancient volcanic flow and volcaniclastic rocks are not promising sites for carbonaceous fossil preservation.

  1. A Preliminary Study of 3D Printing on Rock Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Gao-Feng

    2015-05-01

    3D printing is an innovative manufacturing technology that enables the printing of objects through the accumulation of successive layers. This study explores the potential application of this 3D printing technology for rock mechanics. Polylactic acid (PLA) was used as the printing material, and the specimens were constructed with a "3D Touch" printer that employs fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests and direct tensile strength (DTS) tests were performed to determine the Young's modulus ( E) and Poisson's ratio ( υ) for these specimens. The experimental results revealed that the PLA specimens exhibited elastic to brittle behaviour in the DTS tests and exhibited elastic to plastic behaviour in the UCS tests. The influence of structural changes in the mechanical response of the printed specimen was investigated; the results indicated that the mechanical response is highly influenced by the input structures, e.g., granular structure, and lattice structure. Unfortunately, our study has demonstrated that the FDM 3D printing with PLA is unsuitable for the direct simulation of rock. However, the ability for 3D printing on manufactured rock remains appealing for researchers of rock mechanics. Additional studies should focus on the development of an appropriate substitution for the printing material (brittle and stiff) and modification of the printing technology (to print 3D grains with arbitrary shapes).

  2. The rock coast of South and Central America : chapter 10

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Chao, R.; Pedoja, K.; Witt, C.; Martinod, J.; Husson, L.; Regard, V.; Audin, Laurence; Nexer, M.; Delcaillau, B.; Saillard, M.; Melnick, D.; Dumont, J.F.; Santana, E.; Navarrete, E.; Martillo, C.

    2014-01-01

    The great variety of climatic conditions, tidal ranges and wave regimes of South and Central America act on a complex geology and tectonic framework. Many of the rock and cliffed coasts of South America are strongly controlled by the occurrence of extensive Cenozoic and Pleistocene sediments that crop out at the coast. Geology and the different uplift rates are a major factor in the whole coastal geomorphology of South and Central America, and consequently are a very important control of the ...

  3. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte Gutierrez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fracture systems have strong influence on the overall mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses due to their relatively lower stiffness and shear strength than those of the rock matrix. Understanding the effects of fracture geometrical distribution, such as length, spacing, persistence and orientation, is important for quantifying the mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses. The relation between fracture geometry and the mechanical characteristics of the fractured rock mass is complicated due to the fact that the fracture geometry and mechanical behaviors of fractured rock mass are strongly dependent on the length scale. In this paper, a comprehensive study was conducted to determine the effects of fracture distribution on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses over a wide range of fracture lengths. To account for the stochastic nature of fracture distributions, three different simulation techniques involving Oda's elastic compliance tensor, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS, and suitable probability density functions (PDFs were employed to represent the elastic compliance of fractured rock masses. To yield geologically realistic results, parameters for defining fracture distributions were obtained from different geological fields. The influence of the key fracture parameters and their relations to the overall elastic behavior of the fractured rock mass were studied and discussed. A detailed study was also carried out to investigate the validity of the use of a representative element volume (REV in the equivalent continuum representation of fractured rock masses. A criterion was also proposed to determine the appropriate REV given the fracture distribution of the rock mass.

  4. Numerical and Statistical Analysis of Fractures in Mechanically Dissimilar Rocks of Limestone Interbedded with Shale from Nash Point in Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeoye-Akinde, K.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2017-12-01

    Heterogeneity and anisotropy, especially with layered strata within the same reservoir, makes the geometry and permeability of an in-situ fracture network challenging to forecast. This study looks at outcrops analogous to reservoir rocks for a better understanding of in-situ fracture networks and permeability, especially fracture formation, propagation, and arrest/deflection. Here, fracture geometry (e.g. length and aperture) from interbedded limestone and shale is combined with statistical and numerical modelling (using the Finite Element Method) to better forecast fracture network properties and permeability. The main aim is to bridge the gap between fracture data obtained at the core level (cm-scale) and at the seismic level (km-scale). Analysis has been made of geometric properties of over 250 fractures from the blue Lias in Nash Point, UK. As fractures propagate, energy is required to keep them going, and according to the laws of thermodynamics, this energy can be linked to entropy. As fractures grow, entropy increases, therefore, the result shows a strong linear correlation between entropy and the scaling exponent of fracture length and aperture-size distributions. Modelling is used to numerically simulate the stress/fracture behaviour in mechanically dissimilar rocks. Results show that the maximum principal compressive stress orientation changes in the host rock as the fracture-induced stress tip moves towards a more compliant (shale) layer. This behaviour can be related to the three mechanisms of fracture arrest/deflection at an interface, namely: elastic mismatch, stress barrier and Cook-Gordon debonding. Tensile stress concentrates at the contact between the stratigraphic layers, ahead of and around the propagating fracture. However, as shale stiffens with time, the stresses concentrated at the contact start to dissipate into it. This can happen in nature through diagenesis, and with greater depth of burial. This study also investigates how induced

  5. COMPLEX GEOLOGICAL–GEOPHYSICAL 3D MODEL OF THE CRUST IN THE SOUTHEASTERN FENNOSCANDIAN SHIELD: NATURE OF DENSITY LAYERING OF THE CRUST AND THE CRUST–MANTLE BOUNDARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Glaznev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex geophysical 3D model of the Earth's crust and the upper mantle is created for the Archaean Karelian Craton and the Late Palaeoproterozoic accretionary Svecofennian Orogen of the southeastern Fennoscandian Shield with the use of methods of complex inversion of geophysical data based on stochastic description of interrelations of physical properties of the medium (density, P-wave velocity, and heat generation. To develop the model, we use results of deep seismic studies, gravity and surficial heat flow data on the studied region. Numerical solutions of 3D problems are obtained in the spherical setting with an allowance for the Earth's surface topography. The geophysical model is correlated with the regional geological data on the surface and results of seismic CMP studies along 4B, FIRE-1 and FIRE-3-3A profiles. Based on results of complex geophysical simulation and geological interpretation of the 3D model, the following conclusions are drawn. (1 The nearly horizontal density layering of the continental crust is superimposed on the previously formed geological structure; rock differentiation by density is decreasing with depth; the density layering is controlled by the recent and near-recent state of the crust, but can be disturbed by the latest deformations. (2 Temperature variations at the Moho are partially determined by local variations of heat generation in the mantle, which, in turn, are related to local features of its origin and transformation. (3 The concept of the lower continental crust being a reflectivity zone and the concept of the lower continental crust being a layer of high density and velocity are not equivalent: the lower crust is the deepest, high-density element of near-horizontal layering, whereas the seismic image of the reflectivity zone is primarily related to transformation of the crust as a result of magmatic under- and intraplating under conditions of extension and mantle-plume activity. (4 At certain

  6. Study of reactive transfer of hydrogen within intact clay-rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen gas will be produced by anaerobic corrosion of radioactive waste containers in the geological repository. This gas could affect the geological layer (Callovo-Oxfordian) stability, first due to its reductive capacity and then also due to its continuous production for about 100,000 years. The local pressure increase could affect the properties of hydro-gaseous dynamic of hydrogen transfers. The reductive capacity of H 2 could change the redox properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian and the barrier hydraulic properties, and therefore (1) its mineralogy, (2) the speciation of outgoing radionuclides and (3) their transfer. Moreover, if the hydrogen gas transport is difficult within the geological layer, the pressure increase could cause cracking and create preferential pathways for radionuclides migration. An experimental device was developed to measure the entry pressure of H 2 (g) and transport parameters as permeability and diffusion coefficient through the CO x . The entry pressure is estimated to be between 49 and 63 bar. Knowing that the maximum expected pressure is about 80 bar, there may therefore be a displacement of hydrogen gas into the water saturated clay-rock. Moreover, for a saturation greater than 0.90 and at T = 23 C, permeability is measured to be close to 10 -23 m 2 and the diffusion coefficient to be as low as 10 -12 m 2 .s -1 . Therefore hydrogen gas will move slowly in the geological layer, for example it will take about 31,710 years to go through one meter of clay-rock by diffusion. These transport parameters are found to depend mainly on the sample water saturation and not much on temperature. Regarding hydrogen reactivity, under conditions close to those in the storage, H 2 will reduce up to 9 wt% of structural Fe (III) at 90 C and PH 2 = 5 bar. This reaction is not complete and hydrogen gas will mainly sorb on the material, with a sorption up to 0.05 wt% at 90 C and PH 2 = 0.45 bar. This process depends strongly on the water saturation of

  7. The Polar Rock Repository: Rescuing Polar Collections for New Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, A.

    2016-12-01

    Geological field expeditions in polar regions are logistically difficult, financially expensive and can have a significant environmental impact on pristine regions. The scarcity of outcrop in Antarctica (98% ice-covered) makes previously collected rock samples very valuable to the science community. NSF recognized the need for preserving rock, dredge, and terrestrial core samples from polar areas and created the Polar Rock Repository (PRR). The PRR collection allows for full and open access to both samples and metadata via the PRR website. In addition to the physical samples and their basic metadata, the PRR archives supporting materials from the collector, field notebooks, images of the samples, field maps, air photos, thin sections and any associated bibliography/DOI's. Many of these supporting materials are unique. More than 40,000 samples are available from the PRR for scientific analysis to researchers around the globe. Most of the samples cataloged at the PRR were collected more than 30 years ago, some more than 100 years ago. The rock samples and metadata are made available online through an advanced search engine for the PRR website. This allows scientists to "drill down" into search results using categories and look-up object fields similar to websites like Amazon. Results can be viewed in a table, downloaded as a spreadsheet, or plotted on an interactive map that supports display of satellite imagery and bathymetry layers. Samples can be requested by placing them in the `shopping cart'. These old sample collections have been repeatedly used by scientists from around the world. One data request involved locating coal deposits in Antarctica for a global compilation and another for looking at the redox state of batholithic rocks from the Antarctic Peninsula using magnetic susceptibilities of PRR rocks. Sample usage has also included non-traditional geologic studies, such as a search for monopoles in Cenozoic volcanic samples, and remote sensing

  8. Onset of Convection in Strongly Shaken Granular Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshuis, Peter; Eshuis, P.G.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Alam, Meheboob; van Gerner, H.J.; van der Weele, J.P.; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Strongly vertically shaken granular matter can display a density inversion: A high-density cluster of beads is elevated by a dilute gaslike layer of fast beads underneath (“granular Leidenfrost effect”). For even stronger shaking the granular Leidenfrost state becomes unstable and granular

  9. Rock Slope Design Criteria : Executive Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Based on the stratigraphy and the type of slope stability problems, the flat lying, Paleozoic age, sedimentary rocks of Ohio were divided into three design units: 1) competent rock design unit consisting of sandstones, limestones, and siltstones that...

  10. Rock glaciers, Central Andes, Argentina, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Primary rock glaciers are fed by avalanche chutes. At the El Salto rock glacier, surveys have been undertaken in order to determine the creep rate. Between 1981 and...

  11. Epigenetic alterations of sedimentary rocks at deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarova, G.V.; Kondrat'eva, I.A.; Zelenova, O.I.

    1980-01-01

    Notions are explained, and technique for studying epigenetic alterations of sedimentary rocks at uranium deposits is described. Main types of epigenetic transformations and their mineralogic-geochemical characteristics are considered. Rock alterations, accompanying uranium mineralization, can be related to 2 types: oxidation and reduction. The main mineralogic-geochemical property of oxidation transformations is epigenetic limonitization. Stratal limonitization in primary grey-coloured terrigenic rocks and in epigenetically reduced (pyritized) rocks, as well as in rock, subjected to epigenetic gleying, are characterized. Reduction type of epigenetic transformations is subdivided into sulphidic and non-sulphidic (gley) subtypes. Sulphidic transformations in grey-coloured terrigenic rocks with organic substance of carbonic row, in rocks, containing organic substance of oil row, sulphide transformations of sedimentary rocks, as well as gley transformations, are considered

  12. Experimental study and stress analysis of rock bolt anchorage performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new method was developed to apply pull-and-shear loads to the bolt specimen in order to evaluate the anchorage performance of the rebar bolt and the D-Bolt. In the tests, five displacing angles (0°, 20°, 40°, 60°, and 90°, two joint gaps (0 mm and 30 mm, and three kinds of host rock materials (weak concrete, strong concrete, and concrete-granite were considered, and stress–strain measurements were conducted. Results show that the ultimate loads of both the D-Bolt and the rebar bolt remained constant with any displacing angles. The ultimate displacement of the D-Bolt changed from 140 mm at the 0° displacing angle (pure pull to approximately 70 mm at a displacing angle greater than 40°. The displacement capacity of the D-Bolt is approximately 3.5 times that of the rebar bolt under pure pull and 50% higher than that of the rebar bolt under pure shear. The compressive stress exists at 50 mm from the bolt head, and the maximum bending moment value rises with the increasing displacing angle. The rebar bolt mobilises greater applied load than the D-Bolt when subjected to the maximum bending. The yielding length (at 0° of the D-Bolt is longer than that of the rebar bolt. The displacement capacity of the bolts increased with the joint gap. The bolt subjected to joint gap effect yields more quickly with greater bending moment and smaller applied load. The displacement capacities of the D-Bolt and the rebar bolt are greater in the weak host rock than that in the hard host rock. In pure shear condition, the ultimate load of the bolts slightly decreases in the hard rock. The yielding speed in the hard rock is higher than that in the weak rock.

  13. Range sections as rock models for intensity rock scene segmentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkwelo, S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available can be drawn. • A methodology for rock-scene segmentation that com- bines intensity and range image analysis to reduce the effects of texture and color density variations is presented. • Post-processing in the form of outlier rejection... to the environment under imaging: poor lighting; color density and texture variations. Lighting conditions have been controlled through the elimination of natural lighting and proper design of syn- thetic lighting [3]. We present a methodology that avoids...

  14. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  15. Strong coupling phase in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Ken-ichi

    1988-01-01

    Existence of a strong coupling phase in QED has been suggested in solutions of the Schwinger-Dyson equation and in Monte Carlo simulation of lattice QED. In this article we recapitulate the previous arguments, and formulate the problem in the modern framework of the renormalization theory, Wilsonian renormalization. This scheme of renormalization gives the best understanding of the basic structure of a field theory especially when it has a multi-phase structure. We resolve some misleading arguments in the previous literature. Then we set up a strategy to attack the strong phase, if any. We describe a trial; a coupled Schwinger-Dyson equation. Possible picture of the strong coupling phase QED is presented. (author)

  16. Layering and Ordering in Electrochemical Double Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yihua [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Kawaguchi, Tomoya [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Pierce, Michael S. [Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, New York 14623, United States; Komanicky, Vladimir [Faculty of Science, Safarik University, 041 54 Kosice, Slovakia; You, Hoydoo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2018-02-26

    Electrochemical double layers (EDL) form at electrified interfaces. While Gouy-Chapman model describes moderately charged EDL, formation of Stern layers was predicted for highly charged EDL. Our results provide structural evidence for a Stern layer of cations, at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in alkali fluoride and chloride electrolytes. Layering was observed by x-ray crystal truncation rods and atomic-scale recoil responses of Pt(111) surface layers. Ordering in the layer is confirmed by glancing-incidence in-plane diffraction measurements.

  17. THE EFFECT OF ACID ROCK FROM CĂLIMANI MOUNTAINS ON MAKING UP A NUTRITIVE SUPPORT FOR PLANTS, BASED ON RED MUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Lacatusu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of an experiment carried out in controlled conditions, regarding triticale plants growth on a nutritive layer consisting of a mixture of red mud, acid rock and compost, in different proportions. The analytical results highlighted the strongly alkaline reaction of the layer, high organic carbon, mobile phosphorus and potassium contents and low nitrogen contents. The layer has a high salinity and sodium salts are predominant. The total microelements and heavy metals contents are generally acceptable. The triticale plants grew in these conditions up to 10-15 cm height, when the experiment was stopped. The plants accumulated normal nitrogen, calcium and magnesium quantities, low potassium ones, high phosphorus and very high sodium contents. The metallic microelements (copper, iron, manganese, zinc accumulated at relatively normal levels, but the heavy metals (cadmium, cobalt, chromium, nickel, lead concentrated up to values several tens of times higher than the normal contents. Introducing the obtained vegetal mass in the nutritive layer will contribute to enhancing its fertility for the next vegetation cycles.

  18. Rock-degrading endophytic bacteria in cacti

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Esther Puente; Ching Y. Li; Yoav Bashan

    2009-01-01

    A plant-bacterium association of the cardon cactus (Pachycereus pringlei) and endophytic bacteria promotes establishment of seedlings and growth on igneous rocks without soil. These bacteria weather several rock types and minerals, unbind significant amounts of useful minerals for plants from the rocks, fix in vitro N2. produce...

  19. The History of Rock Art Research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The History of Rock Art Research. Rock art in South India was discovered as early as 1891.The earliest discovery of petroglyphs on the Koppagallu hill in Bellary district was made by Fred Fawcett (1892) who with the ... Fawcett, as Archibald Carlylle in Central India, recognized the prehistoric antiquity of the Rock art.

  20. Discharge-mechanical method of rock breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazhov, V. F.; Datskevich, S. Y.; Zhurkov, M. Y.; Muratov, V. M.; Jeffryes, B.

    2017-05-01

    The electric discharge and mechanical technology of hard rock breakage was developed on the ground of mechanical and electrical pulse methods and it was tested for purposes of deep drilling. It was demonstrated that, due to breakage of the rock surface by electric discharges, the rock excavation volume (breakage performance) is significantly improved as compared to conventional mechanical methods.

  1. Strong Decomposition of Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jørgensen, Jørgen; Kagan, Abram M.; Pitt, Loren D.

    2007-01-01

    A random variable X is stongly decomposable if X=Y+Z where Y=Φ(X) and Z=X-Φ(X) are independent non-degenerated random variables (called the components). It is shown that at least one of the components is singular, and we derive a necessary and sufficient condition for strong decomposability...

  2. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules ...

  3. ESR dating of fault rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Kwon

    2002-03-01

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene

  4. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-08-02

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

  5. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders

  6. Applying rock mass classifications to carbonate rocks for engineering purposes with a new approach using the rock engineering system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gioacchino Francesco Andriani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Classical rock mass classification systems are not applicable to carbonate rocks, especially when these are affected by karst processes. Their applications to such settings could therefore result in outcomes not representative of the real stress–strain behavior. In this study, we propose a new classification of carbonate rock masses for engineering purposes, by adapting the rock engineering system (RES method by Hudson for fractured and karstified rock masses, in order to highlight the problems of implementation of geomechanical models to carbonate rocks. This new approach allows a less rigid classification for carbonate rock masses, taking into account the local properties of the outcrops, the site conditions and the type of engineering work as well.

  7. Uranium deposits in volcanic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-eight papers were presented at the meeting and two additional papers were provided. Three panels were organized to consider the specific aspects of the genesis of uranium deposits in volcanic rocks, recognition criteria for the characterization of such deposits, and approaches to exploration. The papers presented and the findings of the panels are included in the Proceedings. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these papers

  8. Upper Cretaceous source rocks of Northern South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, S.C. (DGSI, The Woodland, TX (United States)); DeToni, B. (Intevep, Los Teques (Venezuela)); Marcano, F. (Maraven, Caracas (Venezuela)); Sweeney, J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Rangel, A. (ICP, Bucaramanga (Colombia))

    1993-02-01

    Upper Cretaceous source rocks sourced most of the oil accumulations in Trinidad, Venezuela and Colombia. Extensive areas of mature to overmature organic-rich, calcareous shales and limestones are present in basins throughout the area. Paleogeographic reconstruction shows deposition of the source rocks in open marine, outer shelf-inner slope environments on the passive margin of the Cretaceous South American continent. Deposition is primarily related to marine transgressions caused by eustatic sea level changes and to Upper Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events. Sedimentological and geochemical data show regional variations in organic facies across the huge Upper Cretaceous shelf margin. Source rocks deposited in the pelagic domain in outer shelf-slope towards north and northwest are commonly organic-rich and contain oil prone, type II kerogen with essentially marine amorphous organic matter. In this organic facies, variations in organic content were primary controlled by changes in marine organic productivity and sedimentation rate, while the kerogen quality was influenced by short-term fluctuations in the thickness of oxygen-minimum layer. Source rocks deposited in outer neritic environment, towards south and southeast are usually less organic-rich and include oil and gas prone kerogen between types II and III with both marine amorphous and terrestrial organic matter. Temporal changes in the influx of terrestrial organic matter and fluctuations in relative anoxicity controlled the kerogen quality. Hydrocarbon generation from these source rocks occurred during the Tertiary. Basin modelling quantifies oil and gas generation and expulsion from the various organic facies. Oil characteristics can be predicted by the organic facies in the effective source area.

  9. Characterizing Groundwater and Contaminant Flux in Fractured Rock Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. A.; Cho, J.; Hatfield, K.; Klammler, H.; Annable, M. D.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J.; Kroeker, R.; Pedler, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    Complex hydrogeologic conditions such as fractured and karst bedrock settings pose substantial economic and technical challenges both to the characterization and remediation of DNAPL source zones. The objective of this project is to demonstrate and validate the fractured rock passive flux meter (FRPFM) as new technology for measuring the magnitudes and directions of cumulative water and contaminant fluxes in fractured rock aquifers. The sensor consists of an inflatable core that compresses a reactive fabric against the wall of a borehole and to any water-filled fractures intersected by a borehole. The reactive fabric is designed to intercept and retain target groundwater contaminants (e.g. TCE, DCE, VC); in addition, the fabric releases non-toxic tracers, some of which visibly indicate active fracture location, aperture, orientation, and direction of fracture flow along a borehole, while others quantify cumulative groundwater discharge within the fractures. Demonstration and validation studies are in progress comparing multiple technologies (including fractured rock passive flux meters, hydrophysical logging, scanning colloidal borescope, and borehole dilution tests). The technologies are being evaluated based upon their ability to: identify flowing fractures, determine flow direction, and quantify both water and contaminant mass flux in flowing fractures. Laboratory tests comparing capabilities of each technology have been performed in two separate flow simulators: a planar single fracture simulator (performed multiple tests for varying duration; fracture aperture = 0.5 mm; specific discharge range 25 - 2500 cm/day) and a large-scale three-dimensional aquifer box with layered high contrast flow zones (physical flow domain 2 m length, 0.5 m width, and 1 m height; alternating layers of low permeability sand separated by high permeability gravel; specific discharge range 25 to 4000 cm/day (per layer)). The primary objective of these tests is to develop a

  10. Targeting ROCK activity to disrupt and prime pancreatic cancer for chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennin, Claire; Rath, Nicola; Pajic, Marina; Olson, Michael F; Timpson, Paul

    2017-10-03

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease; the identification of novel targets and development of effective treatment strategies are urgently needed to improve patient outcomes. Remodeling of the pancreatic stroma occurs during PDAC development, which drives disease progression and impairs responses to therapy. The actomyosin regulatory ROCK1 and ROCK2 kinases govern cell motility and contractility, and have been suggested to be potential targets for cancer therapy, particularly to reduce the metastatic spread of tumor cells. However, ROCK inhibitors are not currently used for cancer patient treatment, largely due to the overwhelming challenge faced in the development of anti-metastatic drugs, and a lack of clarity as to the cancer types most likely to benefit from ROCK inhibitor therapy. In 2 recent publications, we discovered that ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression were increased in PDAC, and that increased ROCK activity was associated with reduced survival and PDAC progression by enabling extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and invasive growth of pancreatic cancer cells. We also used intravital imaging to optimize ROCK inhibition using the pharmacological ROCK inhibitor fasudil (HA-1077), and demonstrated that short-term ROCK targeting, or 'priming', improved chemotherapy efficacy, disrupted cancer cell collective movement, and impaired metastasis. This body of work strongly indicates that the use of ROCK inhibitors in pancreatic cancer therapy as 'priming' agents warrants further consideration, and provides insights as to how transient mechanical manipulation, or fine-tuning the ECM, rather than chronic stromal ablation might be beneficial for improving chemotherapeutic efficacy in the treatment of this deadly disease.

  11. ESR dating of fault rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Kwon

    2003-02-01

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs. grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size; these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Gori nuclear reactor. Most of the ESR signals of fault rocks collected from the basement are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of the faults had occurred before the Quaternary period. However, ESR dates from the Oyong fault zone range from 370 to 310 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity of the Oyong fault zone continued into the Pleistocene

  12. Source rock hydrocarbons. Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vially, R.; Maisonnier, G.; Rouaud, T.

    2013-01-01

    This report first presents the characteristics of conventional oil and gas system, and the classification of liquid and gaseous non conventional hydrocarbons, with the peculiar case of coal-bed methane. The authors then describe how source rock hydrocarbons are produced: production of shale oils and gases (horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, exploitation) and of coal-bed methane and coal mine methane. In the next part, they address and discuss the environmental impact of source rock hydrocarbon production: installation footprint, water resource management, drilling fluids, fracturing fluids composition, toxicity and recycling, air pollution, induced seismicity, pollutions from other exploitation and production activities. They propose an overview of the exploitation and production of source rock gas, coal-bed gas and other non conventional gases in the world. They describe the current development and discuss their economic impacts: world oil context and trends in the USA, in Canada and other countries, impacts on the North American market, on the world oil industry, on refining industries, on the world oil balance. They analyse the economic impacts of non conventional gases: development potential, stakes for the world gas trade, consequence for gas prices, development opportunities for oil companies and for the transport sector, impact on CO 2 emissions, macro-economic impact in the case of the USA

  13. The impact of mechanical properties of rock to the collision of rock piece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Macuh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analytical solution of the rock piece motion considering influences of geometrical and mechanical characteristics of rock mass on the arbitrary slope. The main objective of the paper is to determine the motion of the rock piece considering possibility of rock piece failure due to collision. Brief description of the analytical solution of the rock piece motion on a steep slope is given. The laboratory tests were performed to determine uniaxial compressive strength and elastic properties of the considered rock mass. Further, velocities that cause rock piece failure were determined. These maximum velocities indirectly belong to certain mass of rock piece and can be lower than velocities calculated in rock-fall analysis for certain slope geometry. Consequently, the energy magnitude is limited, because at certain velocity and mass of rock piece bigger pieces crash at collision.

  14. Strong Motion Seismograph Based On MEMS Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Y.; Hu, X.

    2013-12-01

    The MEMS strong motion seismograph we developed used the modularization method to design its software and hardware.It can fit various needs in different application situation.The hardware of the instrument is composed of a MEMS accelerometer,a control processor system,a data-storage system,a wired real-time data transmission system by IP network,a wireless data transmission module by 3G broadband,a GPS calibration module and power supply system with a large-volumn lithium battery in it. Among it,the seismograph's sensor adopted a three-axis with 14-bit high resolution and digital output MEMS accelerometer.Its noise level just reach about 99μg/√Hz and ×2g to ×8g dynamically selectable full-scale.Its output data rates from 1.56Hz to 800Hz. Its maximum current consumption is merely 165μA,and the device is so small that it is available in a 3mm×3mm×1mm QFN package. Furthermore,there is access to both low pass filtered data as well as high pass filtered data,which minimizes the data analysis required for earthquake signal detection. So,the data post-processing can be simplified. Controlling process system adopts a 32-bit low power consumption embedded ARM9 processor-S3C2440 and is based on the Linux operation system.The processor's operating clock at 400MHz.The controlling system's main memory is a 64MB SDRAM with a 256MB flash-memory.Besides,an external high-capacity SD card data memory can be easily added.So the system can meet the requirements for data acquisition,data processing,data transmission,data storage,and so on. Both wired and wireless network can satisfy remote real-time monitoring, data transmission,system maintenance,status monitoring or updating software.Linux was embedded and multi-layer designed conception was used.The code, including sensor hardware driver,the data acquisition,earthquake setting out and so on,was written on medium layer.The hardware driver consist of IIC-Bus interface driver, IO driver and asynchronous notification driver. The

  15. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  16. Radionuclide chain migration in fissured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmuson, A.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-04-01

    Diffusion into the rock matrix has a large impact on the migration of radionuclides in the geosphere. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of this mechanism on radionuclide chain migration. For this purpose a previously used numerical code TRUMP is extended to incorporate chain decay. The algorithm is also changed to directly include the decay terms. The extended version was given the acronym TRUCHN. Numerical solutions from TRUCHN are compared with the analytical solutions developed by Lester et al. A good agreement is obtained. To illustrate the impact of matrix diffusion on the arrival times to the biosphere of the members of a radionuclide chain a number of numerical calculations were done for the two chains U-238 to Th-230 to Ra-226 and Pu-239 to U-235 to Pa-231. The resulting curves are compared with the results for surface sorption (penetration depth 10 - 4 m) and volume sorption (complete penetration) obtained with the computer program GETOUT. The difference in first arrival times are very large. The arrival times in the surface and volume sorption cases, differ with as much as four orders of magnitude. The corresponding times for instationary diffusion are located between these extreme values. A daughter nuclide which is strongly sorbed may be heavily retarded if it is produced far inside the rock matrix and has a long way to diffuse before it reaches the flowing water. This effect is investigated, by considering diffusion only of a radionuclide chain, with analytical and numerical (TRUCHN) methods. Finally, in connection with the reconcentration effect, some means of describing the outflow of a daughter nuclide in terms of the outflow of its parent nuclide are proposed. (Authors)

  17. ROCK I Has More Accurate Prognostic Value than MET in Predicting Patient Survival in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Bharadwaj, Shruthi S; Guzman, Grace; Vishnubhotla, Ramana; Glover, Sarah C

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States despite improvements in incidence rates and advancements in screening. The present study evaluated the prognostic value of two tumor markers, MET and ROCK I, which have been noted in other cancers to provide more accurate prognoses of patient outcomes than tumor staging alone. We constructed a tissue microarray from surgical specimens of adenocarcinomas from 108 colorectal cancer patients. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression levels of tumor markers MET and ROCK I, with a pathologist blinded to patient identities and clinical outcomes providing the scoring of MET and ROCK I expression. We then used retrospective analysis of patients' survival data to provide correlations with expression levels of MET and ROCK I. Both MET and ROCK I were significantly over-expressed in colorectal cancer tissues, relative to the unaffected adjacent mucosa. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients' 5-year survival was inversely correlated with levels of expression of ROCK I. In contrast, MET was less strongly correlated with five-year survival. ROCK I provides better efficacy in predicting patient outcomes, compared to either tumor staging or MET expression. As a result, ROCK I may provide a less invasive method of assessing patient prognoses and directing therapeutic interventions. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Study on the characteristics of coal rock electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and the main influencing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoyan; Li, Xuelong; Li, Zhonghui; Zhang, Zhibo; Cheng, Fuqi; Chen, Peng; Liu, Yongjie

    2018-01-01

    Coal rock would produce electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in the loading process, but study on the influence factors influence on the coal rock EMR characteristics in the mesoscopic level is not insufficient. In the paper, the EMR characteristics of coal and rock samples under uniaxial loading are studied. Several typical microcosmic mechanisms affecting the characteristics of EMR are discussed, such as strength, composition and microstructure of the samples. Results show that the macroscopic structure of the outburst coal is soft, the corresponding EMR signal increases slowly with the loading increase and the EMR peak is smaller. The rockburst coal has a strong brittleness, the EMR signal increases quickly and EMR peak appears while the coal breaks is larger than the outburst coal. The EMR characteristics of rock samples are similar to the rockburst coal, but the EMR peak is the largest. When the coal rock microstructure is complete, the coal rock block is larger and the brittleness is stronger, then the corresponding strength would be larger. And the free charge generated by thermal excitation, field emission and intergranular chemical bond breakage would also be more. In the meantime, the crack propagation rate becomes greater, therefore the EMR is more stronger. The piezoelectric effect is mainly caused by the linear elastic stage of the specimen deformation and rupture, which contributes less to the EMR signals. This study is of great theoretical and practical value for assessing the mechanical state of coal rock through EMR technology, and accurately monitoring and predicting the coal rock dynamic disasters.

  19. Robust Backstepping Control of Wing Rock Using Disturbance Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wing rock is a highly nonlinear phenomenon when the aircraft suffers undesired roll-dominated oscillatory at high angle of attack (AOA. Considering the strong nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamic characteristics, an uncertain multi-input and multi-output (MIMO nonlinear wing rock model is studied, and system uncertainties, unsteady aerodynamic disturbances and externaldisturbancesareconsideredinthedesignofwingrockcontrollaw. Tohandletheproblemof multipledisturbances,arobustcontrolschemeisproposedbasedontheextendedstateobserver(ESO and the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN technique. Considering that the effectiveness of actuators are greatly decreased at high AOA, the input saturation problem is also handled by constructing a corresponding auxiliary system. Based on the improved ESO and the auxiliary system, a robust backstepping control law is proposed for the wing rock control. In addition, the dynamic surface control (DSC technique is introduced to avoid the tedious computations of time derivatives for the virtual control laws in the backstepping method. The stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed via rigorously Lyapunov analysis. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the ESO and the proposed wing rock control approach.

  20. Ultrapotassic rocks geology from Salgueiro region, Pernambuco state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Filho, A.F. da; Guimaraes, I.P.

    1990-01-01

    The Cachoeirinha-Salgueiro belt has Proterozoic age and is located in the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. The ultrapotassic rocks from Salgueiro region intrudes the Cachoeirinha-Salgueiro belt rocks. The ultrapotassics from Salgueiro region constitutes of three units; Serra do Livramento pluton, and two dyke swarms called respectively beige alkali feldspar granites and green alkali feldspar syenite/quartz-syenite. The Serra do Livramento pluton shows E-W direction, boudin shape, width between 0,15 and 2,10 km, and it is intruded into metamorphic rocks and into the Terra Nova complex. Detailed geological mapping at the Serra das Duas Irmas allowed us to establish the dyke swarm chronology. The mapping reveals seven intrusion episodes, into the Terra Nova pluton, of green alkali feldspar syenite/quartz-syenite and five episodes of bege alkali feldspar granite. They alternate between them in space and time, and there are evidence that they were intruded under the tectonic control of the Pernambuco lineament. A systematic whole-rock Rb-Sr geochronology was done in the green alkali feldspar syenite/quartz-syenite, and an age of 514,8 ± 20,3 Ma was obtained. The initial ratio is 0,710615 + 0,000441. The age obtained shows small error and an initial ratio compatible with a strong crustal contamination. (author)

  1. Textural remanence - A new model of lunar rock magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, A.

    1976-01-01

    In reexamining the accumulated magnetic data on lunar rocks, several common patterns of magnetic behavior are recognized. Their joint occurrence strongly suggests a new model of lunar rock magnetism, which is based on partial preferred textural alignment of the spontaneous moments of magnetic grains without requiring the existence of ancient lunar magnetic fields. This magnetic fabric, mimetic to locally oriented petrofabric, gives rise to an apparent 'textural remanent magnetization'. In order to account for the observed intensity of 'stable remanence' in lunar rocks, only a minute fraction (0.001 to 0.00001) of the single-domain iron grains present need be preferentially aligned. Several mechanisms operating on the lunar surface, including shock and diurnal thermal cycling, appear adequate for producing the required type and degree of magnetic alignment in all lunar rock classes. The model is supported by a wide variety of direct and indirect evidence, and its predictions (e.g., regarding anisotropic susceptibility and remanence acquisition) can be experimentally tested.

  2. Characterization of Effective Parameters in Abrasive Waterjet Rock Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2014-03-01

    The rock cutting performance of an abrasive waterjet is affected by various parameters. In this study, rock cutting tests are conducted with different energy (i.e., water pressure, traverse speed, and abrasive feed rate), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), and material parameters [i.e., uniaxial compressive strength (UCS)]. In particular, experimental tests are carried out at a long standoff distance (up to 60 cm) to consider field application. The effective parameters of the rock cutting process are identified based on the relationships between the cutting performance indices (depth, width, and volume) and parameters. In addition, the cutting efficiency is analyzed with effective parameters as well as different pump types and the number of cutting passes considering the concept of kinetic jet energy. Efficiency analysis reveals that the cutting depth efficiency tends to increase with an increase in the water pressure and traverse speed and with a decrease in the standoff distance and UCS. Cutting volume efficiency strongly depends on standoff distance. High efficiency of cutting volume is obtained at a long standoff distance regardless of the pump type. The efficiency analysis provides a realistic way to optimize parameters for abrasive waterjet rock excavation.

  3. Continual erosion of bare rocks after the Wenchuan earthquake and control strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Shi, Wenjing; Liu, Dandan

    2011-03-01

    The newly bared rocks created by the Wenchuan earthquake are undergoing continual intensive erosion in the form of detachment and movement of individual grains. Grain erosion is defined as the phenomenon of breaking down bare rocks under the action of insolation and temperature change, detachment of grains from the rockwalls by wind, flow down of grains on the slope under the action of gravity, and accumulation of grains at the toe of the mountain, forming a deposit fan. The Wenchuan earthquake, which occurred in Sichuan on May 12, 2008, caused thousands of avalanches and landslides and left scars on slopes and a huge area of bare rocks. Grain erosion causes flying stones, injured humans and resulted in numerous slope debris flows. The process of grain erosion and strategies to limit the erosion were studied by field investigations and field experiments. According to these field investigations and field studies, the most serious grain erosion occurs in spring and early summer when it is very dry. Rocks are broken down to grains under the action of insolation and temperature change. Then, wind blows the grains from the bare rock down slope. Experimental results showed that the amount of grains blown down by wind per area of rock surface per unit time is proportional to the fourth power of the wind speed. However, the size of the grains blown down by wind increases linearly with the wind speed. An experiment proved that grain erosion can be controlled with two moss species. Moss spores were mixed with clay suspension and splashed on bare rocks. The moss species germinated on the rock surface in one month and greened the bare rocks in two months. The moss layer protected the rocks from insolation and mitigated the effects of temperature change, thus effectively mitigated grain erosion.

  4. Characterization of crystalline rocks in the Lake Superior region, USA: implications for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, M.K.; Flower, M.F.J.; Edgar, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Lake Superior region (Wisconsin, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and Minnesota) contains 41 Precambrian crystalline rock complexes comprising 64 individual but related rock bodies with known surface exposures. Each complex has a map area greater than 78 km 2 . About 54% of the rock complexes have areas of up to 500 km 2 , 15% fall between 500 km 2 and 1000 km 2 , 19% lie between 1000 km 2 and 2500 km 2 , and 12% are over 2500 km 2 . Crystalline rocks of the region vary widely in composition, but they are predominantly granitic. Repeated thermo-tectonic events have produced early Archean gneisses, migmatites, and amphibolites with highly tectonized fabrics that impart a heterogeneous and anisotropic character to the rocks. Late Archean rocks are usually but not invariably gneissose and migmatitic. Proterozoic rocks of the region include synorogenic (foliated) granitic rocks, anorogenic (non-foliated) granites, and the layered gabbro-anorthosite-troctolite intrusives of the rift-related Keweenawan igneous activity. Compared with the Archean rocks of the region, the Proterozoic bodies generally lack highly tectonized fabrics and have more definable contacts where visible. Anorogenic intrusions are relatively homogeneous and isotropic. On the basis of observed geologic characteristics, postorogenic and anorogenic crystalline rock bodies located away from recognized tectonic systems have attributes that make them relatively more desirable as a possible site for a nuclear waste repository in the region. This study was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy through the Office of Crystalline Repository Development at Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio. 84 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  5. Modelling of nuclear explosions in hard rock sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunish, W.M.; App, F.N.

    1993-01-01

    This study represents part of a larger effort to systematically model the effects of differing source region properties on ground motion from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. In previous work by the authors the primary emphasis was on alluvium and both saturated and unsaturated tuff. We have attempted to model events on Pahute Mesa, where either the working point medium, or some of the layers above the working point, or both, are hard rock. The complex layering at these sites, however, has prevented us from drawing unambiguous conclusions about modelling hard rock. In order to learn more about the response of hard rock to underground nuclear explosions, we have attempted to model the PILEDRIVER event. PILEDRIVER was fired on June 2, 1966 in the granite stock of Area 15 at the Nevada Test Site. The working point was at a depth of 462.7 m and the yield was determined to be 61 kt. Numerous surface, sub-surface and free-field measurements were made and analyzed by SRI. An attempt was made to determine the contribution of spall to the teleseismic signal, but proved unsuccessful because most of the data from below-shot-level gauges was lost. Nonetheless, there is quite a bit of good quality data from a variety of locations. We have been able to obtain relatively good agreement with the experimental PILEDRIVER waveforms. In order to do so, we had to model the granodiorite as being considerably weaker than ''good quality'' granite, and it had to undergo considerable weakening due to shock damage as well. In addition, the near-surface layers had to be modeled as being weak and compressible and as have a much lower sound speed than the material at depth. The is consistent with a fractured and jointed material at depth, and a weathered material near the surface

  6. A Review on the British Rock Music

    OpenAIRE

    Hutapea, Alfian Hadi Pranata

    2011-01-01

    Music has an important role in people’s life. In people’s daily, music is often hearing of course and in people’s customs and traditions music is also be used. Music has many genres, one of them is rock music. Many people like rock music especially youngman because rock music has given a message in a song through enthusiasm expression. Rock music has many subgenres and each of subgenres have a distinctive feature. The developing of rock music is very wide in the world, especially in Great Bri...

  7. The physical principles of rock magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 5: The Physical Principles of Rock Magnetism explores the physical principles of rock magnetism, with emphasis on the properties of finely divided magnetic materials. It discusses the origin and stability of rock magnetizations, the role of remanent magnetism in interpreting magnetic surveys, magnetic anisotropy as an indicator of rock fabric, and the relationship between piezomagnetic changes and seismic activity. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume discusses the properties of solids, magnetite and hematite grains, and rocks with magnetite grains

  8. Sorption data bases for generic Swiss argillaceous rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B.; Thoenen, T.

    2010-09-01

    In Switzerland the site selection procedure for both high level waste (HLW) and low and intermediate level waste (L/ILW) repositories is specified by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy in the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories. In the forthcoming stage 2 of this plan, potential sites will be identified within regions previously selected based on the presence of suitable host rocks, namely Opalinus Clay, 'Brauner Dogger', Effingen Member and Helvetic Marl. Preliminary safety analyses are an integral part of this procedure, and require, amongst other information, the radionuclide sorption properties of the host rock. This report describes a methodology to develop a Generic Rock Sorption Data Base (GR-SDB) for argillaceous rocks. The method will be used to compile specific SDBs for the above mentioned host rocks. Arguments are presented that the main factor influencing sorption on argillaceous rocks is the phyllosilicate mineral content. These minerals are particularly effective at binding metals to their surfaces by cation exchange and surface complexation. Generally, the magnitude of sorption is directly correlated with the phyllosilicate content (2:1 type clays: illite/smectite/illitesmectite mixed layers), and this parameter best reflects the sorption potential of a given mineral assembly. Consequently, sorption measurements on illite were preferably used as source data for the GR-SDB. The second component influencing radionuclide sorption is the porewater chemistry. In the present report, generic water compositions were extracted from the analytical ranges of deep ground waters in various sedimentary formations in Switzerland. In order to cover the range of ionic strength (I) and pH values of Swiss ground waters in argillaceous rocks, five types of generic water compositions were defined, combining low, intermediate and high values of ionic strength and pH. The GR-SDB for in situ conditions was derived using conversion factors (CF). As the name

  9. Carbonate rock depositional models: A microfacies approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzi, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonate rocks contain more than 50% by weight carbonate minerals such as calcite, dolomite, and siderite. Understanding how these rocks form can lead to more efficient methods of petroleum exploration. Micofacies analysis techniques can be used as a method of predicting models of sedimentation for carbonate rocks. Micofacies in carbonate rocks can be seen clearly only in thin sections under a microscope. This section analysis of carbonate rocks is a tool that can be used to understand depositional environments, diagenetic evolution of carbonate rocks, and the formation of porosity and permeability in carbonate rocks. The use of micofacies analysis techniques is applied to understanding the origin and formation of carbonate ramps, carbonate platforms, and carbonate slopes and basins. This book will be of interest to students and professionals concerned with the disciplines of sedimentary petrology, sedimentology, petroleum geology, and palentology.

  10. Oil(Gas) - source rock correlation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The overview of bio-marker parameters which are applicable to hydrocarbon exploration has been illustrated. Experimental analysis of saturated hydrocarbon and bio-markers of the Pohang E and F core samples has been carried out. Samples were extracted by stirring in dichloromethane at 40-50 degree for 10 hours. The saturated, aromatic and resin fractions of the extract were obtained using thin layer chromatograms. The relative abundance of normal alkane fraction of the samples is low except lowest interval, which is probably due to the biodegradation. The bio-marker assemblage of hopanoids and steranes has been characterized. According to the analysis of saturated hydrocarbons and bio-markers, the sedimentary environment of the Pohang core samples is marine and transitional zone except the terrestrial environment of the lowest samples such as 610.5 m from E core and 667.2 m from F core. The thermal maturity through the studied interval did not reach oil window even though slight increase in thermal maturity with depth, which coincide with Rock Eval pyrolysis data. In order to check the validation of analysis of the bio-markers, same samples were analyzed by the University of Louis Pasteur, France. The distribution and relative peak area of the bio-markers were identical with those by laboratory of KIGAM. For the 2 nd stage of the research, analysis of bio-markers other than hopanoids and steranes should be continued. (author). 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Radiation shielding properties of some natural rocks in upper Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbady, A.; Ahmed, N.K.; Saied, M.H.; Uosif, M.A.; El-kamel, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    To support the use of some natural rocks in Upper Egypt as suitable radiation materials, the attenuation of gamma - ray through destructive and nondestructive samples of alabaster, marble and limestone have been tested in the energy range from 356 keV to 1173 keV. The attenuation coefficients of the nondestructive samples are found higher than the values of the destructive samples. The half - layer values for attenuation, and the concentration of uranium and thorium in the samples were calculated and discussed

  12. Recovery of uranium from HCl digested phosphate rock solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamser, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium is recovered from a solution containing phosphoric acid, uranium in the hexavalent state and a chloride salt from the group consisting of alkali metal chloride, alkaline earth metal chloride, ammonium chloride and mixtures thereof, such as a solution obtained by hydrochloride acid digestion of phosphate rock. The phosphoric acid is extracted from the solution before the uranium is recovered from the remaining constituents thereof. Extraction degradation and emulsification of the organic layer previously employed in organic solvent extraction methods are eliminated, and the uranium is recovered at low cost and in a highly efficient manner. (U.S.)

  13. Anomalies within the system - Rochechouart target rock meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, P.

    1982-01-01

    Contaminated impact crater formations are pertinent to the study of meteoritic contamination at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary and other Ir-enriched layers. Target mixing considerations and volumetric estimates of Rochechouart breccias are presently combined with the geochemistry of both major and siderophile trace elements, to evaluate how the chemistry of the preserved target rock-projectile mixture evolved since deposition. Over 99 percent of the mass of extraterrestrial Ir and Os in preserved formations at Rochechouart is located in suevite-like breccias and impact melts. Hydrothermal alteration and/or weathering are the most likely processes to explain both major and trace element redistribution in Rochechouart formations.

  14. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  15. Strongly Correlated Systems Theoretical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Avella, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern theoretical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciates consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as po...

  16. Strongly correlated systems numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern numerical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and material science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciate consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as possi...

  17. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  18. Evaluation of raw rock phosphate as substitute for bone meal in diet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiment was conducted to determine the optimal replacement level of Raw Rock Phosphate (RRP) for bone meal in layers diet. A total of 144, 55 week-old shavers X Hubbard cross-strain laying hens were used for the study. Triplicate groups of 12 hens per replicate were placed on four test diets containing 0, 1, 1.5 and ...

  19. Numerical study of mechanism of fold formation in a laminated rock

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    compression rate and the change in stress distribution leading to rupture at high compression rates is discussed. Wavelength, limb length .... simulates laboratory testing environment for rock samples. A uniaxial compression and ..... a layered viscoelastic medium in compression; J. Applied. Mechanics 26 393–400. Biot M A ...

  20. The determination of silver in silicate rocks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruscavage, P. J.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1979-01-01

    Silver is extracted from a 20% tartaric acid solution by using butyl acetate and diphenylthiourea, and the organic layer is analyzed directly by the graphite-furnace technique. The precisions is ca. 8% as estimated from multiple analysis of 13 standard rocks; there are no systematic errors. The detection limit is 2.4 ppb for 250-mg samples. ?? 1979.

  1. Application of laterolog-3 apparent resistivity to lithologic layering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wenming

    2007-01-01

    The application of laterolog-3 apparent resistivity to lithologic layering is discribed. The basic principle of laterolog-3 and main factors influencing laterolog-3 apparent resistivity are discussed. The laterolog-3 apparent resistivity has a good lithologic layering ability. compared with the other logging methods, the results measured by the laterolog-3 apparent resistivity are less influenced by these factors such as well, mud and wall rock. (authors)

  2. Flavour Democracy in Strong Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Abel, Steven; King, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of "strong unification". Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  3. Microelements containing in rock of the Aral region. Agrogeochemical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhumamuratov, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Lately chemization of agriculture has been done not only by mineral nutrification and pesticides but also by melioration with rocks and industrial waste. However, increase in soil fertility and the related efficiency of production requires systematic control and analysis of the chemization so as not to disturb the existing balance in ecosystem. The experiment on bringing mountain rocks up 30ton/hectare in soil shows that the socks have variable element contents (up a few orders of value) and under this condition the soil may be poisoned with undesirable toxic elements. Thus, it becomes actual to analyse the total element contents of soil and the inserted meliorants (rocks and other resources available in the region) used in agriculture production. Besides, the obtained information about element contents of mountain rocks allows to solve not only geochemical problems but also to evaluate soil formation process. Choose of a mountain rock having soil. Lack of microelements in soil can be made up by fitting optimal doses of meliorants consisting of mineral (NPK) and local fertilizers, mountain rocks or industrial waste. We proved earlier, that the soils of cotton planting area of Uzbekistan are exhausted with the nutrient elements (Co, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Mo, Rb, Cs, K and rarer P). Besides, the soil are polluted with As, Sb, Br, U, Th, REE and the Republics. Owing to pollution of the region soil with toxic elements, deficit of the nutritious in the environment, one can expect progressing of several diseases (sick ratr) in the population. Relating to the update agro-state of the soil of cotton planting region of Karakalpakstan, one can observe similar agrogeochemical processes complicated by a sharp accumulation on Na and Cl in subsurface layers of the soil. On the territory of the South Aral at different depths of many chinks and paleogenic terrigenic thick being opened in hills of Krantau, Khoja-Kul, Beshtube, Khojeily and also in the South-East Sultanuezdag

  4. Effect of Layering on Cracking Initiation and Propagation under Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiriasari, A.; Jiang, L.; Yoon, H.; Bobet, A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    Rock anisotropy can arise from textural and structural causes both of which contribute to anisotropic strength and moduli. Rock variability makes it difficult to determine which properties dominate failure. Here, laboratory experiments were performed on 3D printed samples to examine the effect of layering on crack formation. Samples with two pre-existing coplanar flaws were fabricated using an additive 3D printing process (Projet CJP 360). Layers of gypsum (0.2 mm thick) were printed in either a horizontal (H) or a vertical (V) orientation to create prismatic samples (152.4 mm x 76.2 mm x 25.1 mm) with two 12.7 mm long coplanar flaws (19.05 mm apart) oriented at 450 with the load. Cracks were induced under uniaxial loading conditions. Digital image correlation (DIC) and acoustic emission (AE) (18 AE sensors with a frequency range of 100-450 kHz) were used to monitor crack evolution. DIC imaging of the V specimen during uniaxial compression showed that smooth cracks were initiated and propagated from the tips of the flaws parallel to the layering. Unlike the strongly bonded samples, no cracks were formed between the pre-existing flaws. The failure mechanism between the flaws was controlled by the weak bonding between the layers, and not by the coalescence of the new cracks. However, for the H specimen, failure was caused by crack coalescence between the two flaws. The new cracks exhibited a step-like roughness that was influenced by the layering in the sample. AE events were only detected when a synchronized mode was used. 3D printed samples can be effectively used to study the effect of anisotropic layering on crack initiation and propagation in a repeatable and controlled manner. Acknowledgements: Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology & Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  5. Authors' reply to Discussion by E. Siebrits and S. L. Crouch regarding the paper "A two-dimensional linear variation displacement discontinuity method for three-layered elastic media", International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences, Vol. 36, No. 6, pp. 719-729, 1999

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shou, KJ

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the reply to discussion by E. Siebrits and S. L. Crouch regarding the paper "A two-dimensional linear variation displacement discontinuity method for three-layered elastic media". The purpose of the paper was to apply a...

  6. Electric polarization switching in an atomically thin binary rock salt structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Castro, Jose; Piantek, Marten; Schubert, Sonja; Persson, Mats; Serrate, David; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2018-01-01

    Inducing and controlling electric dipoles is hindered in the ultrathin limit by the finite screening length of surface charges at metal-insulator junctions1-3, although this effect can be circumvented by specially designed interfaces4. Heterostructures of insulating materials hold great promise, as confirmed by perovskite oxide superlattices with compositional substitution to artificially break the structural inversion symmetry5-8. Bringing this concept to the ultrathin limit would substantially broaden the range of materials and functionalities that could be exploited in novel nanoscale device designs. Here, we report that non-zero electric polarization can be induced and reversed in a hysteretic manner in bilayers made of ultrathin insulators whose electric polarization cannot be switched individually. In particular, we explore the interface between ionic rock salt alkali halides such as NaCl or KBr and polar insulating Cu2N terminating bulk copper. The strong compositional asymmetry between the polar Cu2N and the vacuum gap breaks inversion symmetry in the alkali halide layer, inducing out-of-plane dipoles that are stabilized in one orientation (self-poling). The dipole orientation can be reversed by a critical electric field, producing sharp switching of the tunnel current passing through the junction.

  7. NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE PROBLEM OF DOUBLE-LAYER REINFORCEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizomov Dzhakhongir Nizomovich

    2012-10-01

    The proposed solution is applicable in the lining of tunnels and subterranean structures in rock massifs, as well as galleries arranged in the body of earth dams. It represents two layers of concrete with different values of the modulus of elasticity and Poisson ratio. Tangential stress and reinforcement ring graphs are presented in the article.

  8. Atoms in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Huillier, A.

    2002-01-01

    When a high-power laser focuses into a gas of atoms, the electromagnetic field becomes of the same magnitude as the Coulomb field which binds a 1s electron in a hydrogen atom. 3 highly non-linear phenomena can happen: 1) ATI (above threshold ionization): electrons initially in the ground state absorb a large number of photons, many more than the minimum number required for ionization; 2) multiple ionization: many electrons can be emitted one at a time, in a sequential process, or simultaneously in a mechanism called direct or non-sequential; and 3) high order harmonic generation (HHG): efficient photon emission in the extreme ultraviolet range, in the form of high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser field can occur. The theoretical problem consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) that describes the interaction of a many-electron atom with a laser field. A number of methods have been proposed to solve this problem in the case of a hydrogen atom or a single-active electron atom in a strong laser field. A large effort is presently being devoted to go beyond the single-active approximation. The understanding of the physics of the interaction between atoms and strong laser fields has been provided by a very simple model called ''simple man's theory''. A unified view of HHG, ATI, and non-sequential ionization, originating from the simple man's model and the strong field approximation, expressed in terms of electrons trajectories or quantum paths is slowly emerging. (A.C.)

  9. Kapitza Resistance between Few-Layer Graphene and Water: Liquid Layering Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexeev, Dmitry; Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens Honore

    2015-01-01

    difference in the phonon mean free path between the FLG and water. Remarkably, RK is strongly dependent on the layering of water adjacent to the FLG, exhibiting an inverse proportionality relationship to the peak density of the first water layer, which is consistent with better acoustic phonon matching...... between FLG and water. These findings suggest novel ways to engineer the thermal transport properties of solid−liquidinterfaces by controlling and regulating the liquid layering at the interface....

  10. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  11. Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bruggisser, Francesco Riva, Alfredo Urbano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM can appear weakly coupled at small energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  12. Strongly interacting light dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Riva, Francesco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small-energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini) are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  13. Rydberg atoms in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Tsimmerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical achievements in studying Rydberg atoms in external fields are considered. Only static (or quasistatic) fields and ''one-electron'' atoms, i.e. atoms that are well described by one-electron states, are discussed. Mainly behaviour of alkali metal atoms in electric field is considered. The state of theoretical investigations for hydrogen atom in magnetic field is described, but experimental data for atoms of alkali metals are presented as an illustration. Results of the latest experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of Rydberg atoms in strong fields are presented

  14. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  15. DISCRETE LATTICE ELEMENT APPROACH FOR ROCK FAILURE MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijo Nikolić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the ‘discrete lattice model’, or, simply, the ‘lattice model’, developed for rock failure modeling. The main difficulties in numerical modeling, namely, those related to complex crack initiations and multiple crack propagations, their coalescence under the influence of natural disorder, and heterogeneities, are overcome using the approach presented in this paper. The lattice model is constructed as an assembly of Timoshenko beams, representing the cohesive links between the grains of the material, which are described by Voronoi polygons. The kinematics of the Timoshenko beams are enhanced by the embedded strong discontinuities in their axial and transversal directions so as to provide failure modes I, II, and III. The model presented is suitable for meso-scale rock simulations. The representative numerical simulations, in both 2D and 3D settings, are provided in order to illustrate the model’s capabilities.

  16. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    CERN Multimedia

    Brian Cox; John Barrowman; Eddie Izzard

    2008-01-01

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  17. Frequency Dependent Attenuation in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-20

    WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 62714E 7A10 DA DA 1𔃻 T. ,E (Incude Security Clasification ) Frequency Dependent Attenuation in Rocks Ŗ 0E;SO’.A_...P., and L. Peselnick, Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel , plexiglass, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10- to 10...P., and L. Peselnick, Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel , plexiglas, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10-8 to 10

  18. Structural Color of Rock Dove’s Neck Feather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eri; Yoshioka, Shinya; Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2008-12-01

    It is well known that some kinds of animal have surprisingly brilliant colors showing beautiful iridescence. These colors are called structural colors, and are thought to originate from optical interference caused by periodic microstructures that have sizes comparable with the wavelength of light. However, much larger structural modifications can also play an important role in the coloration mechanism. In this paper, we show through careful optical and structural investigations that the structural color of the neck feather of rock dove, Columba livia, has a very comprehensive mechanism: the thin-layer optical interference phenomenon fundamentally produces the iridescence, while the layer structure is accompanied by various kinds of larger-size structural modifications that control the angular range of the reflection. Further, it is found that the granules containing melanin pigment exist in a localized manner to effectively enhance the contrast of the color caused by optical interference.

  19. Physicomechanical parameters of sedimentary rocks in eastern Sichuan, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jian; Sun, Yan; Shu, Liangshu; Zhu, Wenbin; Wang, Feng; Li, Benliang; Liu, Deliang

    2009-01-01

    Rock samples were collected and selected from the sedimentary covering strata from Cambrian to Jurassic in eastern Sichuan, China, which belongs to the Upper Yangtze plate. Physicomechanical parameters were measured systematically. Based on parametric texture characteristics and observation data of geology, five regional layer-slip systems are derived. The five layer-slip systems correspond to five reservoir–cover systems, as the incompetent beds correspond to cover beds and the competent beds to reservoir beds. In comparison with the Middle and Lower Yangtze plates, the physicomechanical parameters, lithologic composition and structural characteristics are basically similar to the Upper Yangtze plate. This comparison offers some insight into the oil and gas reservoir–cover systems in the region

  20. An Alternative Stability Equation For Rock Armoured Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Burcharth, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Rubble mound breakwaters are by far the most common type of breakwater, the importance of which is clearly reflected in the vast amount of published research. Especially, the hydraulic stability of the main armour layer has been studied in order to obtain reliable design equations. It should...... be straight forward to assume, that a relation between the exerted wave loads and the stability of the armour layer would be of major interest, but the normal approach to the problem has simply been to relate easy accessible wave parameters, e.g. wave height and period, directly to the single unit weight...... equations and model test results still exists. When turning toward prototype the situation is even worse. With the objective to reduce some of the variability an alternative approach based on force considerations is presented. The paper will describe a new stability equation for rock armoured slopes derived...

  1. Multifractal model of magnetic susceptibility distributions in some igneous rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of in-situ magnetic susceptibility were compiled from mainly Precambrian crystalline basement rocks beneath the Colorado Plateau and ranges in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. The susceptibility meter used measures about 30 cm3 of rock and measures variations in the modal distribution of magnetic minerals that form a minor component volumetrically in these coarsely crystalline granitic to granodioritic rocks. Recent measurements include 50–150 measurements on each outcrop, and show that the distribution of magnetic susceptibilities is highly variable, multimodal and strongly non-Gaussian. Although the distribution of magnetic susceptibility is well known to be multifractal, the small number of data points at an outcrop precludes calculation of the multifractal spectrum by conventional methods. Instead, a brute force approach was adopted using multiplicative cascade models to fit the outcrop scale variability of magnetic minerals. Model segment proportion and length parameters resulted in 26 676 models to span parameter space. Distributions at each outcrop were normalized to unity magnetic susceptibility and added to compare all data for a rock body accounting for variations in petrology and alteration. Once the best-fitting model was found, the equation relating the segment proportion and length parameters was solved numerically to yield the multifractal spectrum estimate. For the best fits, the relative density (the proportion divided by the segment length of one segment tends to be dominant and the other two densities are smaller and nearly equal. No other consistent relationships between the best fit parameters were identified. The multifractal spectrum estimates appear to distinguish between metamorphic gneiss sites and sites on plutons, even if the plutons have been metamorphosed. In particular, rocks that have undergone multiple tectonic events tend to have a larger range of scaling exponents.

  2. Dynamical Aspects of Electrostatic Double Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raadu, M.A.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1988-01-01

    Electrostatic double layers have been proposed as an acceleration mechanism in solar flares and other astrophysical objects. They have been extensively studied in the laboratory and by means of computer simulations. The theory of steady-state double layers implies several existence criteria......, in particular the Bohm criteria, restricting the conditions under which double layers may form. In the present paper several already published theoretical models of different types of double layers are discussed. It is shown that the existence conditions often imply current-driven instabilities in the ambient...... plasma, at least for strong double layers, and it is argued that such conditions must be used with care when applied to real plasmas. Laboratory double layers, and by implication those arising in astrophysical plasmas often produce instabilities in the surrounding plasma and are generally time...

  3. Concept of Complex Environmental Monitoring Network - Vardzia Rock Cut City Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elashvili, Mikheil; Vacheishvili, Nikoloz; Margottini, Claudio; Basilaia, Giorgi; Chkhaidze, Davit; Kvavadze, Davit; Spizzichino, Daniele; Boscagli, Franceso; Kirkitadze, Giorgi; Adikashvili, Luka; Navrozashvili, Levan

    2016-04-01

    Vardzia represents an unique cultural heritage monument - rock cut city, which unites architectural monument and Natural-Geological complex. Such monuments are particularly vulnerable and their restoration and conservation requires complex approach. It is curved in various layers of volcanic tuffs and covers several hectares of area, with chronologically different segments of construction. This monument, as many similar monuments worldwide, is subjected to slow but permanent process of destruction, expressed in following factors: surface weathering of rock, active tectonics (aseismic displacement along the active faults and earthquakes), interaction between lithologically different rock layers, existence of major cracks and associated complex block structure, surface rainwater runoff and infiltrated ground water, temperature variations, etc. During its lifetime, Vardzia was heavily damaged by Historical Earthquake of 1283 and only partly restored afterwards. The technological progress together with the increased knowledge about ongoing environmental processes, established the common understanding that the complex monitoring of the environment represents the essential component for resolving such a principal issues, as: Proper management and prevention of natural disasters; Modeling of environmental processes, their short and long term prognosis; Monitoring of macro and micro climate; Safe functioning and preservation of important constructions. Research Center of Cultural Heritage and Environment of Ilia State University in cooperation with Experts from ISPRA, with the funding from the State agency of Cultural Heritage, has developed a concept of Vardzia complex monitoring network. Concept of the network includes: monitoring local meteorological conditions (meteorological station), monitoring microclimate in caves (temperature and humidity in the air and rock), monitoring microtremors and ambient seismic noise in Vardzia (local strong motion network), monitoring

  4. Sierra Nevada Rock Glaciers: Biodiversity Refugia in a Warming World?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, C. I.; Westfall, R. D.

    2007-12-01

    also mapped 125 discrete locations of American pika (Ochotona princeps) and found a strong association of pika presence with active and relict RIFs, in particular cirque rock glaciers, valley rock glaciers, and boulder streams. Using the PRISM climate model and a small network of temperature dataloggers from RIF habitats, we present a climate envelope for the pika habitats we surveyed. We propose that the large area of RIFs in the Sierra Nevada over a range of elevations could provide extensive habitat for pika in the warming future. RIFs in general are a group of landforms little studied in high mountains of western North America but of potential increasing importance to hydrologic and ecologic function as climate warms in the future. Millar, C.I. and R.D. Westfall. In press. Rock glaciers and periglacial rock-ice features in the Sierra Nevada; Classification, distribution, and climate relationships. Quaternary International.

  5. Mechanical weathering and rock erosion by climate-dependent subcritical cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Keanini, Russell

    2017-06-01

    This work constructs a fracture mechanics framework for conceptualizing mechanical rock breakdown and consequent regolith production and erosion on the surface of Earth and other terrestrial bodies. Here our analysis of fracture mechanics literature explicitly establishes for the first time that all mechanical weathering in most rock types likely progresses by climate-dependent subcritical cracking under virtually all Earth surface and near-surface environmental conditions. We substantiate and quantify this finding through development of physically based subcritical cracking and rock erosion models founded in well-vetted fracture mechanics and mechanical weathering, theory, and observation. The models show that subcritical cracking can culminate in significant rock fracture and erosion under commonly experienced environmental stress magnitudes that are significantly lower than rock critical strength. Our calculations also indicate that climate strongly influences subcritical cracking—and thus rock weathering rates—irrespective of the source of the stress (e.g., freezing, thermal cycling, and unloading). The climate dependence of subcritical cracking rates is due to the chemophysical processes acting to break bonds at crack tips experiencing these low stresses. We find that for any stress or combination of stresses lower than a rock's critical strength, linear increases in humidity lead to exponential acceleration of subcritical cracking and associated rock erosion. Our modeling also shows that these rates are sensitive to numerous other environment, rock, and mineral properties that are currently not well characterized. We propose that confining pressure from overlying soil or rock may serve to suppress subcritical cracking in near-surface environments. These results are applicable to all weathering processes.

  6. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  7. Hysteresis in layered spring magnets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J. S.; Kaper, H. G.; Leaf, G. K.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2001-01-01

    This article addresses a problem of micromagnetics: the reversal of magnetic moments in layered spring magnets. A one-dimensional model is used of a film consisting of several atomic layers of a soft material on top of several atomic layers of a hard material. Each atomic layer is taken to be uniformly magnetized, and spatial inhomogeneities within an atomic layer are neglected. The state of such a system is described by a chain of magnetic spin vectors. Each spin vector behaves like a spinning top driven locally by the effective magnetic field and subject to damping (Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation). A numerical integration scheme for the LLG equation is presented that is unconditionally stable and preserves the magnitude of the magnetization vector at all times. The results of numerical investigations for a bilayer in a rotating in-plane magnetic field show hysteresis with a basic period of 2{pi} at moderate fields and hysteresis with a basic period of {pi} at strong fields.

  8. Detailed site effect estimation in the presence of strong velocity reversals within a small-aperture strong-motion array in Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Rahpeyma, Sahar

    2016-08-11

    The rock site characterization for earthquake engineering applications in Iceland is common due to the easily exposed older bedrock and more recent volcanic lava rock. The corresponding site amplification is generally assumed to be low but has not been comprehensively quantified, especially for volcanic rock. The earthquake strong-motion of the Mw6.3 Ölfus earthquake on 29 May 2008 and 1705 of its aftershocks recorded on the first small-aperture strong-motion array (ICEARRAY I) in Iceland showed consistent and significant variations in ground motion amplitudes over short distances (<2 km) in an urban area located mostly on lava rock. This study analyses the aftershock recordings to quantify the local site effects using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and Standard Spectral Ratio (SSR) methods. Additionally, microseismic data has been collected at array stations and analyzed using the HVSR method. The results between the methods are consistent and show that while the amplification levels remain relatively low, the predominant frequency varies systematically between stations and is found to correlate with the geological units. In particular, for stations on lava rock the underlying geologic structure is characterized by repeated lava-soil stratigraphy characterized by reversals in the shear wave velocity with depth. As a result, standard modeling of HVSR using vertically incident body waves does not apply. Instead, modeling the soil structure as a two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system is found to capture the observed predominant frequencies of site amplification. The results have important implications for earthquake resistant design of structures on rock sites characterized by velocity reversals. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  9. Mapping Rock and Soil Units in the MPF IMP SuperPan Using a Kohonen Self Organizing Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrand, W.; Merenyi, E.; Murchie, S.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Johnson, J.

    2004-01-01

    The 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission provided information on a site in the Ares Vallis floodplain. Initial analysis of multispectral data from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) indicated the presence of only a single rock type, the 'gray rock' spectral class and various coated variants thereof (e.g., 'maroon rock'). Continued analysis of the IMP 'SuperPan' mosaic has confirmed multiple examples of a second 'black rock' spectral class existing as small cobbles in the near field and as boulders in the far field. These results are consistent with recent analysis of MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data which indicates that there is likely a mix of both 'Surface Type 1' (ST1) and 'Surface Type 2' (ST2) spectral classes at the MPF landing site. Nominally, the black rock spectral class would correspond to ST1 (basalts) and 'gray rock' would correspond to ST2 (andesites). Orbital remote sensing has also revealed the pervasive presence of layering on Mars. Recently it was suggested that there are extensive outcrops of the black rock spectral class in the SuperPan far field on the flanks of the Twin Peaks and on the rim of Big Crater. These authors suggested that these exposures represented outcrops of black rock from beneath a surficial, flood deposited layer. In this work, we have reexamined the MPF IMP SuperPan mosaic using an artificial neural network self organizing map (SOM) processing architecture in order to classify the distribution of spectral classes within the SuperPan. In this paper, we present initial results from that work and draw specific attention to a subset of the identified spectral classes in order to address questions relating to whether there are extensive exposures of black rock in the IMP far field, what other materials might be exposed in the far field, and what evidence there is for subsurface layering at the MPF landing site.

  10. Synchrotron Topographic and Diffractometer Studies of Buried Layered Structures Obtained by Implantation with Swift Heavy Ions in Silicon Single Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Zymierska, D.; Graeff, W.; Czosnyka, T.; Choinski, J.

    2006-01-01

    A distribution of crystallographic defects and deformation in silicon crystals subjected to deep implantation (20-50 μm) with ions of the energy of a few MeV/amu is studied. Three different buried layered structures (single layer, binary buried structure and triple buried structure) were obtained by implantation of silicon single crystals with 184 MeV argon ions, 29.7 MeV boron ions, and 140 MeV argon ions, each implantation at a fluency of 1x10 14 ions cm -2 . The implanted samples were examined by means of white beam X-ray section and projection topography, monochromatic beam topography and by recording local rocking curves with the beam restricted to 50 x 50 μm 2 . The experiment pointed to a very low level of implantation-induced strain (below 10 -5 ). The white beam Bragg case section experiment revealed a layer producing district black contrast located at a depth of the expected mean ion range. The presence of these buried layered structures in studied silicon crystals strongly affected the fringe pattern caused by curvature of the samples. In case of white beam projection and monochromatic beam topographs the implanted areas were revealed as darker regions with a very tiny grain like structure. One may interpret these results as the effect of considerable heating causing annihilation of point defects and formation of dislocation loops connected with point defect clusters. (author)

  11. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  12. Radon exhalation from granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Claro, Flávia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Corrêa, Janine N.; Mazer, Wellington; Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Martin, Aline Cristina; Denyak, Valeriy

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ( 238 U and 235 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. About 50% of personal radiation annual dose is related to radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), thoron ( 220 Rn), radium ( 226 Ra), thorium ( 232 Th) and potassium ( 40 K), which are present in modern materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. The radioactivity of marbles and granites is of big concern since under certain conditions the radioactivity levels of these materials can be hazardous to the population and require the implementation of mitigation procedures. Present survey of the 222 Rn and 220 Rn activity concentration liberated in the air was performed using commercialized Brazilian granite rocks at national market as well as exported to other countries. The 222 Rn and 220 Rn measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD instant monitor and RAD7 detector, respectively. This study was performed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Federal University of Technology – Paraná (UTFPR). Obtained results of radon concentration activity in air exhaled studied samples of granites varied from 3±1 Bq/m 3 to 2087±19 Bq/m 3 , which shows that some samples of granitic rocks represent rather elevated health risk the population. (author)

  13. Aespoe hard rock laboratory Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the new Aespoe hard rock laboratory is to demonstrate state of the art of technology and evaluation methods before the start of actual construction work on the planned deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The nine country OECD/NEA project in the Stripa mine in Sweden has been an excellent example of high quality international research co-operation. In Sweden the new Aespoe hard rock laboratory will gradually take over and finalize this work. SKB very much appreciates the continued international participation in Aespoe which is of great value for the quality efficiency, and confidence in this kind of work. We have invited a number of leading experts to this first international seminar to summarize the current state of a number of key questions. The contributions show the great progress that has taken place during the years. The results show that there is a solid scientific basis for using this knowledge on site specific preparation and work on actual repositories. (au)

  14. Physics of Strongly Coupled Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich [Universitat Rostock (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Strongly coupled plasmas (or non-ideal plasmas) are multi-component charged many-particle systems, in which the mean value of the potential energy of the system is of the same order as or even higher than the mean value of the kinetic energy. The constituents are electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. Dusty (or complex) plasmas contain still mesoscopic (multiply charged) particles. In such systems, the effects of strong coupling (non-ideality) lead to considerable deviations of physical properties from the corresponding properties of ideal plasmas, i.e., of plasmas in which the mean kinetic energy is essentially larger than the mean potential energy. For instance, bound state energies become density dependent and vanish at higher densities (Mott effect) due to the interaction of the pair with the surrounding particles. Non-ideal plasmas are of interest both for general scientific reasons (including, for example, astrophysical questions), and for technical applications such as inertially confined fusion. In spite of great efforts both experimentally and theoretically, satisfactory information on the physical properties of strongly coupled plasmas is not at hand for any temperature and density. For example, the theoretical description of non-ideal plasmas is possible only at low densities/high temperatures and at extremely high densities (high degeneracy). For intermediate degeneracy, however, numerical experiments have to fill the gap. Experiments are difficult in the region of 'warm dense matter'. The monograph tries to present the state of the art concerning both theoretical and experimental attempts. It mainly includes results of the work performed in famous Russian laboratories in recent decades. After outlining basic concepts (chapter 1), the generation of plasmas is considered (chapter 2, chapter 3). Questions of partial (chapter 4) and full ionization (chapter 5) are discussed including Mott transition and Wigner crystallization. Electrical and

  15. Electrical resistivities of rocks from Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsube, T.J.; Hume, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Bulk rock resistivity and bulk surface resistivity measurements have been obtained for 40 gneissic rock samples from Chalk River, Ontario. Though bulk rock resistivity is a function of pore structure, pore-fluid resistivity and pore-surface resistivity, the amount of data documented for pore-surface resistivity is small compared to that for pore structure and pore-fluid resistivity. This study indicates that pore-surface resistivity has a significant effect on bulk rock resistivity. It is important that this fact be considered when interpreting resistivity data obtained by geophysical methods. In addition, a group of mafic gneiss samples had pore-surface resistivity values that were much lower than those reported for clays, glass beads or petroleum reservoir rocks. This is thought to be due to metallic minerals lining the pore walls. Other rock samples collected from the same area showed pore-surface resistivity value similar to those reported in the literature

  16. Rock Physics and Petrographic Parameters Relationship Within Siliciclastic Rocks: Quartz Sandstone Outcrop Study Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafriyono, S.; Caesario, D.; Swastika, A.; Adlan, Q.; Syafri, I.; Abdurrokhim, A.; Mardiana, U.; Mohamad, F.; Alfadli, M. K.; Sari, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    Rock physical parameters value (Vp and Vs) is one of fundamental aspects in reservoir characterization as a tool to detect rock heterogenity. Its response is depend on several reservoir conditions such as lithology, pressure and reservoir fluids. The value of Vp and Vs is controlled by grain contact and contact stiffness, a function of clay mineral content and porosity also affected by mineral composition. The study about Vp and Vs response within sandstone and its relationship with petrographic parameters has become important to define anisotrophy of reservoir characteristics distribution and could give a better understanding about local diagenesis that influence clastic reservoir properties. Petrographic analysis and Vp-Vs calculation was carried out to 12 core sample which is obtained by hand-drilling of the outcrop in Sukabumi area, West Java as a part of Bayah Formation. Data processing and interpretation of sedimentary vertical succession showing that this outcrop comprises of 3 major sandstone layers indicating fluvial depositional environment. As stated before, there are 4 petrographic parameters (sorting, roundness, clay mineral content, and grain contact) which are responsible to the differences of shear wave and compressional wave value in this outcrop. Lithology with poor-sorted and well- roundness has Vp value lower than well-sorted and poor-roundness (sub-angular) grain. For the sample with high clay content, Vp value is ranging from 1681 to 2000 m/s and could be getting high until 2190 to 2714 m/s in low clay content sample even though the presence of clay minerals cannot be defined neither as matrix nor cement. The whole sample have suture grain contact indicating telogenesis regime whereas facies has no relationship with Vp and Vs value because of the different type of facies show similar petrographic parameters after diagenesis.

  17. Strongly coupled dust coulomb clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Wentau; Lai Yingju; Chen Mingheng; I Lin

    1999-01-01

    The structures and motions of quasi-2-dimensional strongly coupled dust Coulomb clusters with particle number N from few to hundreds in a cylindrical rf plasma trap are studied and compared with the results from the molecular dynamic simulation using more ideal models. Shell structures with periodic packing in different shells and intershell rotational motion dominated excitations are observed at small N. As N increases, the boundary has less effect, the system recovers to the triangular lattice with isotropic vortex type cooperative excitations similar to an infinite N system except the outer shell region. The above generic behaviors are mainly determined by the system symmetry and agree with the simulation results. The detailed interaction form causes minor effect such as the fine structure of packing

  18. Probability densities in strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhot, Victor

    2006-03-01

    In this work we, using Mellin’s transform combined with the Gaussian large-scale boundary condition, calculate probability densities (PDFs) of velocity increments P(δu,r), velocity derivatives P(u,r) and the PDF of the fluctuating dissipation scales Q(η,Re), where Re is the large-scale Reynolds number. The resulting expressions strongly deviate from the Log-normal PDF P(δu,r) often quoted in the literature. It is shown that the probability density of the small-scale velocity fluctuations includes information about the large (integral) scale dynamics which is responsible for the deviation of P(δu,r) from P(δu,r). An expression for the function D(h) of the multifractal theory, free from spurious logarithms recently discussed in [U. Frisch, M. Martins Afonso, A. Mazzino, V. Yakhot, J. Fluid Mech. 542 (2005) 97] is also obtained.

  19. Physical Properties Data for Rock Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    foreign substances, such as oil . Other characteristics of Rock salt is a coarsely crystalline, sedimentary rock rock salt, specifically porosity and...225Permian """ 280 - , Pennsyl vani an-. ’, ~320---.. Mississippian 345 Paleozoic Devonian 395- . Silurian 430... Silurian salt-bearing Salina Formation of Michi- well into the Gulf of Mexico to the Sigsbee knolls, which gan, northern Ohio, Ontario, New York

  20. Response of rocks to large stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schock, R.N.

    1976-01-01

    To predict the dimensions and characteristics of impact- and explosion-induced craters, one must know the equation of state of the rocks in which the crater is formed. Recent experimental data shed light upon inelastic processes that influence the stress/strain behavior of rocks. We examine these data with a view to developing models that could be used in predicting cratering phenomena. New data is presented on the volume behavior of two dissimilar rocks subjected to tensile stresses

  1. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Katherine L; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M; Schoon, Petra L; Zumberge, J Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A; George, Simon C; Love, Gordon D; Brocks, Jochen J; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E

    2015-05-12

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (rock) and total sterane (rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼ 2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  2. Response characteristics of reactor building on weathered soft rock ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Kazuta; Tochigi, Hitoshi

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the seismic stability of nuclear power plants on layered soft bedrock grounds, focusing on the seismic response of reactor buildings. In this case, the soft bedrock grounds refer to the weathered soft bedrocks with several tens meter thickness overlaying hard bedrocks. Under this condition, there are two subjects regarding the estimation of the seismic response of reactor buildings. One is the estimation of the seismic response of surface ground, and another is the estimation of soil-structure interaction characteristics for the structures embedded in the layered grounds with low impedandce ratio between the surface ground and the bedrock. Paying attention to these subjects, many cases of seismic response analysis were carried out, and the following facts were clarified. In the soft rock grounds overlaying hard bedrocks, it was proved that the response acceleration was larger than the case of uniform hard bedrocks. A simplified sway and rocking model was proposed to consider soil-structure interaction. It was proved that the response of reactor buildings was small when the effect of embedment was considered. (K.I.)

  3. Investigation on the oxygen transport mechanisms in the Sarcheshmeh waste rock dumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Yousefi

    2015-04-01

    present in some samples. The carbonate content as the major neutralizing agent was zero in all samples. Due to the presence of sulfide minerals, mainly as pyrite, and also lack of any carbonate minerals, the AMD generation from the Sarcheshmeh waste rocks during the weathering reactions is predictable. At the Sarcheshmeh mine waste, several secondary minerals such as butlerite, jarosite and gypsum were detected by XRD at some depths. Moreover, amorphous iron oxyhydroxide minerals visually observed in waste dumps were not detected by XRD due to being negligible and low level of crystallinity. Hence, they were measured in terms of (Feo-h by ASTM standard test method. The ASTM-D2492 standard test showed that pyrite, sulphate and iron oxyhydroxide minerals (Feo-h are present in all samples. Against the XRD method, the test even detected the negligible content of the minerals. The paste pH tests showed that 15 samples were acid-producing because they had pH lower than 4. On the basis of moisture content results, the samples by name A6, A7, B1 and B2 showed high level of moisture which can be sign of the particular status in them. Discussion According to the field observations, channels with a strong flow of warm and humid air were detected in the depth of 3 to 5 meters of the investigated waste rock dumps. High content of humidity (8.25 and 13.43 percent and sulfate (4.5 and 7.02 percent were observed together with low content of pyrite (1.5 and 6.23 percent and acidic paste pH values (3.13 and 2.88 around these channels. Therefore, from the relation of these occurrences, it can be inferred that the air convection is important for supply oxygen to pyrite oxidation in the waste dumps of Sarcheshmeh. The results also indicate that, two main factors including grain size distribution and formation of hardpan layer on top of old weathered rocks are responsible for the decreasing of oxygen transformation rate via the molecular diffusion mechanism through the waste rock dumps

  4. Fasudil, a Clinically Used ROCK Inhibitor, Stabilizes Rod Photoreceptor Synapses after Retinal Detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes-Anderson, Ellen; Wang, Jianfeng; Halász, Éva; Sugino, Ilene; Pitler, Amy; Whitehead, Ian; Zarbin, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Retinal detachment disrupts the rod-bipolar synapse in the outer plexiform layer by retraction of rod axons. We showed that breakage is due to RhoA activation whereas inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK), using Y27632, reduces synaptic damage. We test whether the ROCK inhibitor fasudil, used for other clinical applications, can prevent synaptic injury after detachment. Detachments were made in pigs by subretinal injection of balanced salt solution (BSS) or fasudil (1, 10 mM). In some animals, fasudil was injected intravitreally after BSS-induced detachment. After 2 to 4 hours, retinae were fixed for immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. Axon retraction was quantified by imaging synaptic vesicle label in the outer nuclear layer. Apoptosis was analyzed using propidium iodide staining. For biochemical analysis by Western blotting, retinal explants, detached from retinal pigmented epithelium, were cultured for 2 hours. Subretinal injection of fasudil (10 mM) reduced retraction of rod spherules by 51.3% compared to control detachments ( n = 3 pigs, P = 0.002). Intravitreal injection of 10 mM fasudil, a more clinically feasible route of administration, also reduced retraction (28.7%, n = 5, P ROCK, was decreased with 30 μM fasudil ( n = 8-10 explants, P ROCK signaling with fasudil reduced photoreceptor degeneration and preserved the rod-bipolar synapse after retinal detachment. These results support the possibility, previously tested with Y27632, that ROCK inhibition may attenuate synaptic damage in iatrogenic detachments.

  5. Humus soil as a critical driver of flora conversion on karst rock outcrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiai; Shen, Youxin; He, Beibei; Zhao, Zhimeng

    2017-10-03

    Rock outcrop is an important habitat supporting plant communities in karst landscape. However, information on the restoration of higher biotic populations on outcrops is limited. Here, we investigated the diversity, biomass changes of higher vascular plants (VP) and humus soil (HS) on karst outcrops during a restoration process. We surveyed VP on rock outcrops and measured HS reserved by various rock microhabitats in a rock desertification ecosystem (RDE), an anthropogenic forest ecosystem (AFE), and a secondary forest ecosystem (SFE) in Shilin County, southwest China. HS metrics (e.g. quantity and nutrients content) and VP metrics (e.g. richness, diversity and biomass) were higher at AFE than at RDE, but lower than at SFE, suggesting that the restoration of soil subsystem vegetation increased HS properties and favored the succession of VP on rock outcrops. There was significantly positive correlation between VP metrics and HS amount, indicating that the succession of VP was strongly affected by availability and heterogeneity of HS in various rock microhabitats. Thus, floral succession of rock subsystem was slow owing to the limited resources on outcrops, although the vegetation was restored in soil subsystem.

  6. Correlating P-wave Velocity with the Physico-Mechanical Properties of Different Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2013-04-01

    In mining and civil engineering projects, physico-mechanical properties of the rock affect both the project design and the construction operation. Determination of various physico-mechanical properties of rocks is expensive and time consuming, and sometimes it is very difficult to get cores to perform direct tests to evaluate the rock mass. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relationships between the different physico-mechanical properties of the various rock types with the P-wave velocity. Measurement of P-wave velocity is relatively cheap, non-destructive and easy to carry out. In this study, representative rock mass samples of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks were collected from the different locations of India to obtain an empirical relation between P-wave velocity and uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength, punch shear, density, slake durability index, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, impact strength index and Schmidt hammer rebound number. A very strong correlation was found between the P-wave velocity and different physico-mechanical properties of various rock types with very high coefficients of determination. To check the sensitivity of the empirical equations, Students t test was also performed, which confirmed the validity of the proposed correlations.

  7. Estimation of Material Loss due to Chemical Weathering of Some Rocks in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. de S. JAYAWARDENA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of weathering reduce the materials from the parent rocks. The material loss due to weathering can be estimated by a fundamental method because the remaining residual materials have strong relationship with their parent rock. The objective of this basic research is to find out the weight loss with the increase of chemical weathering in Sri lankan rocks. This may be an important data to calculate sedimentation rates in the reservoirs. Irregular samples from fresh rocks and differently weathered grades of each rock were collected from different localities without disturbing the structures. Bulk density and the porosity of each sample were measured. The total number of samples was about 300 from 73 locations. The results show the decrease of bulk density and the increase of porosity and weathering. It indicates that some materials moving away and separate from the original place create voids within the same volume during the processes of chemical weathering. The total loss of material is about 18 - 29 % by weight from the fresh rock stage to highly weathered stage. Increase of porosity goes up to 38 % in highly weathered rocks.

  8. Application of air hammer drilling technology in igneous rocks of Junggar basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongshan; Feng, Guangtong; Yu, Haiye

    2018-03-01

    There were many technical problems such as serious well deviation, low penetration rate and long drilling cycle in igneous rocks because of its hardness, strong abrasive and poor drillability, which severely influenced the exploration and development process of Junggar basin. Through analyzing the difficulties of gas drilling with roller bits in Well HS 2, conducting the mechanics experiments about igneous rock, and deeply describing the rock-breaking mechanism of air hammer drilling and its adaptability in igneous rocks, air hammer drilling can realize deviation control and fast drilling in igneous rocks of piedmont zone and avoid the wear and fatigue fracture of drilling strings due to its characteristics of low WOB, low RPM and high frequency impact. Through firstly used in igneous rocks of Well HS 201, compared with gas drilling with cone bit, the average penetration rate and one-trip footage of air hammer drilling respectively increased by more than 2.45 times and 6.42 times while the well deviation was always controlled less than 2 degrees. Two records for Block HS were set up such as the fastest penetration rate of 14.29m/h in Φ444.5mm well hole and the highest one-trip footage of 470.62m in Φ311.2mm well hole. So air hammer drilling was an effective way to realize optimal and fast drilling in the igneous rock formation of Junggar basin.

  9. Hopi and Anasazi Alignments and Rock Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Bryan C.

    The interaction of light and shadow on ancestral Puebloan rock art, or rock art demarcating sunrise/set horizon points that align with culturally significant dates, has long been assumed to be evidence of "intentional construct" for marking time or event by the native creator. However, anthropological rock art research requires the scientific control of cultural time, element orientation and placement, structure, and association with other rock art elements. The evaluation of five exemplars challenges the oft-held assumption that "if the interaction occurs, it therefore supports intentional construct" and thereby conveys meaning to the native culture.

  10. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active conformation by the direct binding of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–loaded Rho. In recent years, a number of ROCK isoform-specific binding partners have been found to modulate the kinase activity through direct interactions with the catalytic domain or via altered cellular localization of the kinases. Thus, these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer. PMID:23204112

  11. Rock breaking methods to replace blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huisheng; Xie, Xinghua; Feng, Yuqing

    2018-03-01

    The method of breaking rock by blasting has a high efficiency and the cost is relatively low, but the associated vibration, flyrock, production of toxic gases since the 1970’s, the Western developed countries began to study the safety of breaking rock. This paper introduces different methods and their progress to safely break rock. Ideally, safe rock breaking would have little vibration, no fly stone, and no toxic gases, which can be widely used in municipal engineering, road excavation, high-risk mining, quarrying and complex environment.

  12. Estética del rock

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, Sebastián

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo del presente artículo es el de analizar la estética del Rock en términos de la experiencia que ofrece este género musical. En primer lugar se construirá una relación entre el Nacimiento de la tragedia de Nietzsche y el surgimiento del Rock, bajo la premisa de que el origen del Rock es eminentemente dionisíaco; luego se mostrará una forma de la experiencia en la vida cotidiana de quien escucha Rock, en donde se da cuenta de la necesidad de expresar los sentimientos de placer y disp...

  13. Igneous rocks formed by hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Grieve, Richard A. F.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Neish, Catherine D.; Pilles, Eric A.; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2018-03-01

    Igneous rocks are the primary building blocks of planetary crusts. Most igneous rocks originate via decompression melting and/or wet melting of protolith lithologies within planetary interiors and their classification and compositional, petrographic, and textural characteristics, are well-studied. As our exploration of the Solar System continues, so too does the inventory of intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks, settings, and processes. The results of planetary exploration have also clearly demonstrated that impact cratering is a ubiquitous geological process that has affected, and will continue to affect, all planetary objects with a solid surface, whether that be rock or ice. It is now recognized that the production of igneous rocks is a fundamental outcome of hypervelocity impact. The goal of this review is to provide an up-to-date synthesis of our knowledge and understanding of igneous rocks formed by hypervelocity impact. Following a brief overview of the basics of the impact process, we describe how and why melts are generated during impact events and how impact melting differs from endogenic igneous processes. While the process may differ, we show that the products of hypervelocity impact can share close similarities with volcanic and shallow intrusive igneous rocks of endogenic origin. Such impact melt rocks, as they are termed, can display lobate margins and cooling cracks, columnar joints and at the hand specimen and microscopic scale, such rocks can display mineral textures that are typical of volcanic rocks, such as quench crystallites, ophitic, porphyritic, as well as features such as vesicles, flow textures, and so on. Historically, these similarities led to the misidentification of some igneous rocks now known to be impact melt rocks as being of endogenic origin. This raises the question as to how to distinguish between an impact versus an endogenic origin for igneous-like rocks on other planetary bodies where fieldwork and sample analysis may not

  14. Rock Art of the Greater Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, Edwin C.

    Archaeoastronomical studies in the American Southwest began in 1955 with recognition of what seemed to be pictorial eyewitness records of the Crab supernova of 1054 AD In time, reports of seasonally significant light-and-shadow effects on rock art and associations of rock art with astronomical alignments also emerged. Most astronomical rock art studies remained problematic, however, because criteria for proof of ancient intent were elusive. Disciplined methods for assessing cultural function were difficult to develop, but review of ethnographically documented astronomical traditions of California Indians and of Indians in the American Southwest subsequently increased confidence in the value of some astronomical rock art initiatives.

  15. Geochemistry of the Oruatemanu Formation, Arrow Rocks, Northland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, R.S.; Higuchi, Y.; Fujiki, T.; Maeda, T.; Ikehara, M.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the geochemical characteristics of sedimentary rocks from the Upper Permian - Middle Triassic Oruatemanu Formation on Arrow Rocks, Waipapa Terrane, New Zealand. The sedimentary rocks consist of limestone, tuffaceous shale, vari-coloured bedded chert, hemipelagic shale and green siliceous mudstone (= green argillite), in ascending order, a typical oceanic plate sequence. Shale and green argillite have higher Zr/Nb ratios than do chert and tuffaceous shales, and show similar REE patterns to PAAS (Post-Archean average Australian shale). In contrast, chert sequences from the basal part and intercalated tuff layers have high TiO 2 contents and Zr/Nb ratios similar to those of basaltic rocks from Arrow Rocks. These geochemical characteristics suggest that the sedimentary environment of the Oruatemanu Formation changed upward, from an open sea setting to the continental margin of Gondwanaland. Chemical compositions of bedded cherts from Arrow Rocks indicate a mixing of biogenic silica, detritus from continents and basaltic materials. In the interval from Upper Permian to Lower Middle Triassic this mixing shows remarkable secular variations. We detected geochemical signals of two Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs), one at the Permian/Triassic (P/T) boundary, and the other at the middle Upper Induan level. We name them the OAEα (P/T OAE) and OAEβ (Upper Induan OAE). These OAE horizons are enriched in S, U and other heavy metals (e.g. Mo and Cr), and also have high V/(V+Ni) ratios. Based on a comparison between enrichment factors of Cr and other redox-sensitive trace elements (e.g. Zn, Pb, Co, Cu), the Upper Induan OAEβ is considered to be more intense than the P/T boundary OAEα. This result is not in agreement with the superanoxia model previously proposed. In addition, OAEβ corresponds well with the radiolarian faunal turnover from Permian to Triassic forms documented from the Oruatemanu Formation in this volume. These results may suggest that peak time and

  16. Geochemistry and petrology of basaltic rocks from the Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alice S.; Schwab, William C.; Haggerty, Janet A.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of volcanic rock was recovered from the flanks of seamounts, guyots, atolls, and islands in the Ratak chain of the Marshall Islands on the U.S. Geological Survey cruise L9-84-CP. The main objective of this cruise was to study the distribution and composition of ferromanganese oxide crusts. Preliminary results of managanese crust composition are reported by Schwab et al. (1985) and detailed studies are in preparation (Schwab et al., 1986). A total of seven seafloor edifices were studied using 12 khz, 3.5 khz and air gun seismic reflection, chain dredge and box corer. Bathymetry and ship track lines are presented by Schwab and Bailey (1985). Of the seven edifices surveyed two support atolls (Majuro and Taongi) and one is a tiny island (Jemo). Dredge locations and water depths are given in Table 1 and dredge locations are shown in Figure 1. Due to equipment failures depths of dredge hauls were limited to shallow depth for all except the first two sites occupied. Recovery consisted mostly of young, poorly-consolidated limestone of fore-reef slope deposit and minor volcanogenic breccia and loose talus. The breccia and pieces of talus are thickly encrusted with ferromanganese oxide, whereas the young limestone is only coated by a thin layer. Four of the seven sites surveyed yielded volcanic rock. The volcanic rock, volumetrically a minor part of each dredge haul, consists mostly of lapilli and cobble-size clasts in a calcareous matrix or as loose talus. Most clasts show evidence of reworking, being sub- to well rounded, sometimes with a thin ferromanganese crust of their own. This paper reports preliminary findings on the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rock recovered.

  17. EDZ and permeability in clayey rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levasseur, Severine; Collin, Frederic; Charlier, Robert; Besuelle, Pierre; Chambon, Rene; Viggiani, Cino

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Deep geological layers are being considered as potential host rocks for the high level radioactivity waste disposals. During drilling in host rocks, an excavated damaged zone - EDZ is created. The fluid transmissivity may be modified in this damaged zone. This paper deals with the permeability evolution in relation with diffuse and/or localized crack propagation in the material. We mainly focus on argillaceous rocks and on some underground laboratories: Mol URL in Boom clay, Bure URL in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and Mont-Terri URL in Opalinus clay. First, observations of damage around galleries are summarized. Structure of damage in localized zone or in fracture has been observed at underground gallery scale within the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The first challenge for a correct understanding of all the processes occurring within the EDZ is the characterization at the laboratory scale of the damage and localization processes. The observation of the initiation and propagation of the localized zones needs for advanced techniques. X-ray tomography is a non-destructive imaging technique that allows quantification of internal features of an object in 3D. If mechanical loading of a specimen is applied inside a X-ray CT apparatus, successive 3D images at different loading steps show the evolution of the specimen. However, in general volumetric strain in a shear band is small compared to the shear strain and, unfortunately, in tomographic images grey level is mainly sensitive to the local mass density field. Such a limitation has been recently overcome by complementing X-ray tomography with 3D Volumetric Digital Image Correlation (V-DIC) which allows the determination of the full strain tensor field. Then it is possible to further explore the progression of localized deformation in the specimen. The second challenge is the robust modelling of the strain localized process. In fact, modelling the damage process with finite

  18. Effect of leading edge roundness on a delta wing in wing-rock motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T. Terry; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of wing leading-edge roundness on wing rock was investigated using flow visualization in a water tunnel. Eighty degree delta wing models were tested on free-to-roll and forced oscillation rigs. The onset of wing rock was delayed by increasing the roundness of the leading edges. The wing rock amplitude and frequency results suggested that damping was increased at lower angles of attack but reduced at higher angles of attack. Vortex lift-off and vortex breakdown, especially during dynamic situations, were strongly affected by the leading edge roundness. Different forms of wing rock motion could be sustained by combinations of vortex breakdown and vortex lift-off. Behaviors of the wing and vortex motions were explained by the influence of leading edge roundness on the separation location, vortex trajectory, and vortex breakdown.

  19. Strongly correlated superconductivity and quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    Doped Mott insulators and doped charge-transfer insulators describe classes of materials that can exhibit unconventional superconducting ground states. Examples include the cuprates and the layered organic superconductors of the BEDT family. I present results obtained from plaquette cellular dynamical mean-field theory. Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo evaluation of the hybridization expansion allows one to study the models in the large interaction limit where quasiparticles can disappear. The normal state which is unstable to the superconducting state exhibits a first-order transition between a pseudogap and a correlated metal phase. That transition is the finite-doping extension of the metal-insulator transition obtained at half-filling. This transition serves as an organizing principle for the normal and superconducting states of both cuprates and doped organic superconductors. In the less strongly correlated limit, these methods also describe the more conventional case where the superconducting dome surrounds an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. Sponsored by NSERC RGPIN-2014-04584, CIFAR, Research Chair in the Theory of Quantum Materials.

  20. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations and Implications for Landing Hazards on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks represent an obvious potential hazard to a landing spacecraft. They also represent an impediment to rover travel and objects of prime scientific interest. Although Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images are of high enough resolution to distinguish the largest rocks (an extremely small population several meters diameter or larger), traditionally the abundance and distribution of rocks on Mars have been inferred from thermal inertia and radar measurements, our meager ground truth sampling of landing sites, and terrestrial rock populations. In this abstract, we explore the effective thermal inertia of rocks and rock populations, interpret the results in terms of abundances and populations of potentially hazardous rocks, and conclude with interpretations of rock hazards on the Martian surface and in extremely high thermal inertia areas.

  1. Performance of Used Tire Cushion Layer under Rockfall Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhu Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock shed is widely used in traffic lines against rockfall. In order to cushion rockfall impact and dissipate impact energy, cushion layer is usually adopted in rock shed. Used tire cushion layer is proposed in this paper and it can cushion rockfall impact utilizing large radial deformation of tire. Reinforced concrete structure model is built with used tire cushion layer and artificial rockfall test is carried out. Twelve tests are divided into 4 sets with different rockfall mass, rockfall height, and tire filling material. Simplified calculation model with spring-damper is derived from radial repeated compression test of used tire, which improves the calculation efficiency. Test and numerical simulation show that application of used tire cushion layer in rock shed can cushion rockfall impact and effectively reduce peak acceleration and the maximum impact force. Filling sand and gravel in tire can improve tire stiffness and energy absorption capacity but will decrease cushion effect due to its large density. With the same impact energy, light rockfall is more destructive than weight rockfall for used tire cushion layer.

  2. Quasi-Steady Evolution of Hillslopes in Layered Landscapes: An Analytic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, R. C.; Anderson, R. S.

    2018-01-01

    Landscapes developed in layered sedimentary or igneous rocks are common on Earth, as well as on other planets. Features such as hogbacks, exposed dikes, escarpments, and mesas exhibit resistant rock layers adjoining more erodible rock in tilted, vertical, or horizontal orientations. Hillslopes developed in the erodible rock are typically characterized by steep, linear-to-concave slopes or "ramps" mantled with material derived from the resistant layers, often in the form of large blocks. Previous work on hogbacks has shown that feedbacks between weathering and transport of the blocks and underlying soft rock can create relief over time and lead to the development of concave-up slope profiles in the absence of rilling processes. Here we employ an analytic approach, informed by numerical modeling and field data, to describe the quasi-steady state behavior of such rocky hillslopes for the full spectrum of resistant layer dip angles. We begin with a simple geometric analysis that relates structural dip to erosion rates. We then explore the mechanisms by which our numerical model of hogback evolution self-organizes to meet these geometric expectations, including adjustment of soil depth, erosion rates, and block velocities along the ramp. Analytical solutions relate easily measurable field quantities such as ramp length, slope, block size, and resistant layer dip angle to local incision rate, block velocity, and block weathering rate. These equations provide a framework for exploring the evolution of layered landscapes and pinpoint the processes for which we require a more thorough understanding to predict their evolution over time.

  3. Hydrogeomechanics for rock engineering: coupling subsurface hydrogeomechanical assessement and hydrogeotechnical mapping on fracturated rock masses

    OpenAIRE

    Meirinhos, João Miguel de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    The present work aims to achieve and further develop a hydrogeomechanical approach in Caldas da Cavaca hydromineral system rock mass (Aguiar da Beira, NW Portugal), and contribute to a better understanding of the hydrogeological conceptual site model. A collection of several data, namely geology, hydrogeology, rock and soil geotechnics, borehole hydraulics and hydrogeomechanics, was retrieved from three rock slopes (Lagoa, Amores and Cancela). To accomplish a comprehensive analysis and rock e...

  4. Strong Ideal Convergence in Probabilistic Metric Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  5. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  6. Mineralogical controls on porosity and water chemistry during O2-SO2-CO2 reaction of CO2 storage reservoir and cap-rock core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Julie K.; Golab, Alexandra; Dawson, Grant K.W.; Knuefing, Lydia; Goodwin, Carley; Golding, Suzanne D.

    2016-01-01

    Reservoir and cap-rock core samples with variable lithology's representative of siliciclastic reservoirs used for CO 2 storage have been characterized and reacted at reservoir conditions with an impure CO 2 stream and low salinity brine. Cores from a target CO 2 storage site in Queensland, Australia were tested. Mineralogical controls on the resulting changes to porosity and water chemistry have been identified. The tested siliciclastic reservoir core samples can be grouped generally into three responses to impure CO 2 -brine reaction, dependent on mineralogy. The mineralogically clean quartzose reservoir cores had high porosities, with negligible change after reaction, in resolvable porosity or mineralogy, calculated using X-ray micro computed tomography and QEMSCAN. However, strong brine acidification and a high concentration of dissolved sulphate were generated in experiments owing to minimal mineral buffering. Also, the movement of kaolin has the potential to block pore throats and reduce permeability. The reaction of the impure CO 2 -brine with calcite-cemented cap-rock core samples caused the largest porosity changes after reaction through calcite dissolution; to the extent that one sample developed a connection of open pores that extended into the core sub-plug. This has the potential to both favor injectivity but also affect CO 2 migration. The dissolution of calcite caused the buffering of acidity resulting in no significant observable silicate dissolution. Clay-rich cap-rock core samples with minor amounts of carbonate minerals had only small changes after reaction. Created porosity appeared mainly disconnected. Changes were instead associated with decreases in density from Fe-leaching of chlorite or dissolution of minor amounts of carbonates and plagioclase. The interbedded sandstone and shale core also developed increased porosity parallel to bedding through dissolution of carbonates and reactive silicates in the sandy layers. Tight interbedded cap-rocks

  7. Clastic Pipes: Proxies of High Water Tables and Strong Ground Motion, Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, David; Chan, Marjorie

    2015-04-01

    Multiple soft sediment deformation features from bed-scale to basin-scale are well preserved within the Jurassic Carmel Formation of Southern Utah. Field mapping reveals thousands of small-scale clastic injectite pipes (10 cm to 10 m diameter, up to 20 m tall) in extremely high densities (up to 500+ pipes per 0.075 square kilometers). The pipes weather out in positive relief from the surrounding host strata of massive sandstone (sabkha) and crossbedded sands with minor conglomerate and shale (fluvial) deposits. The host rock shows both brittle and ductile deformation. Reverse, normal, and antithetical faulting is common with increased frequency, including ring faults, surrounding the pipes. The pipes formed from liquefaction and subsequent fluidization induced by strong ground motion. Down-dropped, graben blocks and ring faults surrounding pipes indicate initial sediment volume increase during pipe emplacement followed by sediment volume decrease during dewatering. Complex crosscutting relationships indicate several injection events where some pipe events reached the surface as sand blows. Multiple ash layers provide excellent stratigraphic and temporal constraints for the pipe system with the host strata deposited between 166 and 164 Ma. Common volcanic fragments and rounded volcanic cobbles occur within sandstone and conglomerate beds, and pipes. Isolated volcanic clasts in massive sandstone indicate explosive volcanic events that could have been the exogenic trigger for earthquakes. The distribution of pipes are roughly parallel to the Middle Jurassic paleoshoreline located in marginal environments between the shallow epicontinental Sundance Sea and continental dryland. At the vertical stratigraphic facies change from dominantly fluvial sediments to dominantly massive sabkha sediments, there is a 1-2 m-thick floodplain mudstone that was a likely seal for underlying, overpressurized sediments. The combination of loose porous sediment at a critical depth of water

  8. Remnants of strong tidal interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcglynn, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the properties of stellar systems that have recently undergone a strong tidal shock, i.e., a shock which removes a significant fraction of the particles in the system, and where the shocked system has a much smaller mass than the producer of the tidal field. N-body calculations of King models shocked in a variety of ways are performed, and the consequences of the shocks are investigated. The results confirm the prediction of Jaffe for shocked systems. Several models are also run where the tidal forces on the system are constant, simulating a circular orbit around a primary, and the development of tidal radii under these static conditions appears to be a mild process which does not dramatically affect material that is not stripped. The tidal radii are about twice as large as classical formulas would predict. Remnant density profiles are compared with a sample of elliptical galaxies, and the implications of the results for the development of stellar populations and galaxies are considered. 38 refs

  9. John Strong - 1941-2006

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on 31 July, a few days before his 65th birthday. John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers. He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such h...

  10. Strong seismic ground motion propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seale, S.; Archuleta, R.; Pecker, A.; Bouchon, M.; Mohammadioun, G.; Murphy, A.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1988-10-01

    At the McGee Creek, California, site, 3-component strong-motion accelerometers are located at depths of 166 m, 35 m and 0 m. The surface material is glacial moraine, to a depth of 30.5 m, overlying homfels. Accelerations were recorded from two California earthquakes: Round Valley, M L 5.8, November 23, 1984, 18:08 UTC and Chalfant Valley, M L 6.4, July 21, 1986, 14:42 UTC. By separating out the SH components of acceleration, we were able to determine the orientations of the downhole instruments. By separating out the SV component of acceleration, we were able to determine the approximate angle of incidence of the signal at 166 m. A constant phase velocity Haskell-Thomson model was applied to generate synthetic SH seismograms at the surface using the accelerations recorded at 166 m. In the frequency band 0.0 - 10.0 Hz, we compared the filtered synthetic records to the filtered surface data. The onset of the SH pulse is clearly seen, as are the reflections from the interface at 30.5 m. The synthetic record closely matches the data in amplitude and phase. The fit between the synthetic accelerogram and the data shows that the seismic amplification at the surface is a result of the contrast of the impedances (shear stiffnesses) of the near surface materials

  11. An investigation of rock fall and pore water pressure using LIDAR in Highway 63 rock cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this research work is compare LIDAR scanning measurements of rock fall with the natural changes in groundwater level to determining the effect of water pressures (levels) on rock fall. To collect the information of rock cut volume chan...

  12. New design equations for estimation of ultimate bearing capacity of shallow foundations resting on rock masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir H. Alavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock masses are commonly used as the underlying layer of important structures such as bridges, dams and transportation constructions. The success of a foundation design for such structures mainly depends on the accuracy of estimating the bearing capacity of rock beneath them. Several traditional numerical approaches are proposed for the estimation of the bearing capacity of foundations resting on rock masses to avoid performing elaborate and expensive experimental studies. Despite this fact, there still exists a serious need to develop more robust predictive models. This paper proposes new nonlinear prediction models for the ultimate bearing capacity of shallow foundations resting on non-fractured rock masses using a novel evolutionary computational approach, called linear genetic programming. A comprehensive set of rock socket, centrifuge rock socket, plate load and large-scaled footing load test results is used to develop the models. In order to verify the validity of the models, the sensitivity analysis is conducted and discussed. The results indicate that the proposed models accurately characterize the bearing capacity of shallow foundations. The correlation coefficients between the experimental and predicted bearing capacity values are equal to 0.95 and 0.96 for the best LGP models. Moreover, the derived models reach a notably better prediction performance than the traditional equations.

  13. Radon exhalation from granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Claro, Flávia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Corrêa, Janine N.; Mazer, Wellington; Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Martin, Aline Cristina [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: flaviadelclaro@gmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pelé Pequeno Príncipe (IPPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ({sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) and thorium ({sup 232}Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. About 50% of personal radiation annual dose is related to radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), thoron ({sup 220}Rn), radium ({sup 226}Ra), thorium ({sup 232}Th) and potassium ({sup 40}K), which are present in modern materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. The radioactivity of marbles and granites is of big concern since under certain conditions the radioactivity levels of these materials can be hazardous to the population and require the implementation of mitigation procedures. Present survey of the {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn activity concentration liberated in the air was performed using commercialized Brazilian granite rocks at national market as well as exported to other countries. The {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD instant monitor and RAD7 detector, respectively. This study was performed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Federal University of Technology – Paraná (UTFPR). Obtained results of radon concentration activity in air exhaled studied samples of granites varied from 3±1 Bq/m{sup 3} to 2087±19 Bq/m{sup 3}, which shows that some samples of granitic rocks represent rather elevated health risk the population. (author)

  14. Computational Models of Rock Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dave A.; Spiegelman, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Practitioners in computational geodynamics, as per many other branches of applied science, typically do not analyse the underlying PDE's being solved in order to establish the existence or uniqueness of solutions. Rather, such proofs are left to the mathematicians, and all too frequently these results lag far behind (in time) the applied research being conducted, are often unintelligible to the non-specialist, are buried in journals applied scientists simply do not read, or simply have not been proven. As practitioners, we are by definition pragmatic. Thus, rather than first analysing our PDE's, we first attempt to find approximate solutions by throwing all our computational methods and machinery at the given problem and hoping for the best. Typically this approach leads to a satisfactory outcome. Usually it is only if the numerical solutions "look odd" that we start delving deeper into the math. In this presentation I summarise our findings in relation to using pressure dependent (Drucker-Prager type) flow laws in a simplified model of continental extension in which the material is assumed to be an incompressible, highly viscous fluid. Such assumptions represent the current mainstream adopted in computational studies of mantle and lithosphere deformation within our community. In short, we conclude that for the parameter range of cohesion and friction angle relevant to studying rocks, the incompressibility constraint combined with a Drucker-Prager flow law can result in problems which have no solution. This is proven by a 1D analytic model and convincingly demonstrated by 2D numerical simulations. To date, we do not have a robust "fix" for this fundamental problem. The intent of this submission is to highlight the importance of simple analytic models, highlight some of the dangers / risks of interpreting numerical solutions without understanding the properties of the PDE we solved, and lastly to stimulate discussions to develop an improved computational model of

  15. Studies of ionic diffusion in crystalline rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlsson, Yvonne

    2001-01-01

    Matrix diffusion is of great importance in delaying radionuclides escaping from a deep geologic repository, on their way to the biosphere. There are, however, poorly understood mechanisms related to transport in pores with charged pore surfaces. Ions are affected by this charge and may be repelled or attracted by it. The rate of transport may be reduced, or even enhanced, as a result of this. Transport of ions is studied by traditional diffusion experiments, but mainly by a faster electrical conductivity method. With this method the pore connectivity, the formation factor variability and its relation to the porosity, as well as the surface conductivity are investigated. The method is compared. with traditional diffusion experiments, and an in-situ application is suggested and qualitatively tested. Furthermore, surface diffusion is studied by evaluating literature data and recently developed diffusion models. The pore connectivity reached to a depth of at least 15 cm in the rocks studied. The formation factor did not generally decrease with increasing sample length. It was also found that not only cations in the free pore water add to the electrical conductivity, but also at least part of those sorbed to the pore surfaces of the minerals. This surface conductivity influences the determination of the formation factor in low ionic strength pore waters, and was also found to be a function of the formation factor. It was furthermore dependent on the type of ion at the surface, giving for example a higher conductivity for Na{sup +} than for Cs{sup +}. It is not fully understood which part of the sorbed ions that are mobile. A simple model was developed assigning the mobile ions to the diffuse layer, and this model explained experimental data for diffusion of Cs{sup +} in clay well. This is contradicted by surface conductivity measurements that have shown that most mobile ions are found behind the Stern layer. The in-situ formation factor determination method seems

  16. Particle-Hole Transformation in Strongly-Doped Iron-Based Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    An exact particle-hole transformation is discovered in a local-moment description of a single layer in an iron-based superconductor. Application of the transformation to a surface layer of heavily electron-doped FeSe predicts a surface-layer high-temperature superconductor at strong hole doping. Comparison with existing low-T_c iron superconductors suggests that the critical temperature at heavy hole doping can be increased by increasing direct ferromagnetic exchange in between nearest neighb...

  17. Stability of Large Parallel Tunnels Excavated in Weak Rocks: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiuli; Weng, Yonghong; Zhang, Yuting; Xu, Tangjin; Wang, Tuanle; Rao, Zhiwen; Qi, Zufang

    2017-09-01

    Diversion tunnels are important structures for hydropower projects but are always placed in locations with less favorable geological conditions than those in which other structures are placed. Because diversion tunnels are usually large and closely spaced, the rock pillar between adjacent tunnels in weak rocks is affected on both sides, and conventional support measures may not be adequate to achieve the required stability. Thus, appropriate reinforcement support measures are needed, and the design philosophy regarding large parallel tunnels in weak rocks should be updated. This paper reports a recent case in which two large parallel diversion tunnels are excavated. The rock masses are thin- to ultra-thin-layered strata coated with phyllitic films, which significantly decrease the soundness and strength of the strata and weaken the rocks. The behaviors of the surrounding rock masses under original (and conventional) support measures are detailed in terms of rock mass deformation, anchor bolt stress, and the extent of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ), as obtained from safety monitoring and field testing. In situ observed phenomena and their interpretation are also included. The sidewall deformations exhibit significant time-dependent characteristics, and large magnitudes are recorded. The stresses in the anchor bolts are small, but the extents of the EDZs are large. The stability condition under the original support measures is evaluated as poor. To enhance rock mass stability, attempts are made to reinforce support design and improve safety monitoring programs. The main feature of these attempts is the use of prestressed cables that run through the rock pillar between the parallel tunnels. The efficacy of reinforcement support measures is verified by further safety monitoring data and field test results. Numerical analysis is constantly performed during the construction process to provide a useful reference for decision making. The calculated deformations are in

  18. Strongly interacting photons and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alge, W.

    1999-05-01

    This thesis contains the main results of the research topics I have pursued during the my PhD studies at the University of Innsbruck and partly in collaboration with the Institut d' Optique in Orsay, France. It is divided into three parts. The first and largest part discusses the possibility of using strong standing waves as a tool to cool and trap neutral atoms in optical cavities. This is very important in the field of nonlinear optics where several successful experiments with cold atoms in cavities have been performed recently. A discussion of the optical parametric oscillator in a regime where the nonlinearity dominates the evolution is the topic of the second part. We investigated mainly the statistical properties of the cavity output of the three interactive cavity modes. Very recently a system has been proposed which promises fantastic properties. It should exhibit a giant Kerr nonlinearity with negligible absorption thus leading to a photonic turnstile device based on cold atoms in cavity. We have shown that this model suffers from overly simplistic assumptions and developed several more comprehensive approaches to study the behavior of this system. Apart from the division into three parts of different contents the thesis is divided into publications, supplements and invisible stuff. The intention of the supplements is to reach researchers which work in related areas and provide them with more detailed information about the concepts and the numerical tools we used. It is written especially for diploma and PhD students to give them a chance to use the third part of our work which is actually the largest one. They consist of a large number of computer programs we wrote to investigate the behavior of the systems in parameter regions where no hope exists to solve the equations analytically. (author)

  19. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoric, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis discusses certain aspects of the turbulence of a fully ionised non-isothermal plasma dominated by the Langmuir mode. Some of the basic properties of strongly turbulent plasmas are reviewed. In particular, interest is focused on the state of Langmuir turbulence, that is the turbulence of a simple externally unmagnetized plasma. The problem of the existence and dynamics of Langmuir collapse is discussed, often met as a non-linear stage of the modulational instability in the framework of the Zakharov equations (i.e. simple time-averaged dynamical equations). Possible macroscopic consequences of such dynamical turbulent models are investigated. In order to study highly non-linear collapse dynamics in its advanced stage, a set of generalized Zakharov equations are derived. Going beyond the original approximation, the author includes the effects of higher electron non-linearities and a breakdown of slow-timescale quasi-neutrality. He investigates how these corrections may influence the collapse stabilisation. Recently, it has been realised that the modulational instability in a Langmuir plasma will be accompanied by the collisionless-generation of a slow-timescale magnetic field. Accordingly, a novel physical situation has emerged which is investigated in detail. The stability of monochromatic Langmuir waves in a self-magnetized Langmuir plasma, is discussed, and the existence of a novel magneto-modulational instability shown. The wave collapse dynamics is investigated and a physical interpretation of the basic results is given. A problem of the transient analysis of an interaction of time-dependent electromagnetic pulses with linear cold plasma media is investigated. (Auth.)

  20. Promoting Strong Written Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reason that an improvement in the quality of technical writing is still needed in the classroom is due to the fact that universities are facing challenging problems not only on the technological front but also on the socio-economic front. The universities are actively responding to the changes that are taking place in the global consumer marketplace. Obviously, there are numerous benefits of promoting strong written communication skills. They can be summarized into the following six categories. First, and perhaps the most important: The University achieves learner satisfaction. The learner has documented verbally, that the necessary knowledge has been successfully acquired. This results in learner loyalty that in turn will attract more qualified learners.Second, quality communication lowers the cost per pupil, consequently resulting in increased productivity backed by a stronger economic structure and forecast. Third, quality communications help to improve the cash flow and cash reserves of the university. Fourth, having high quality communication enables the university to justify the need for high costs of tuition and fees. Fifth, better quality in written communication skills result in attracting top-quality learners. This will lead to happier and satisfied learners, not to mention greater prosperity for the university as a whole. Sixth, quality written communication skills result in reduced complaints, thus meaning fewer hours spent on answering or correcting the situation. The University faculty and staff are thus able to devote more time on scholarly activities, meaningful research and productive community service. References Boyer, Ernest L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate.Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Hawkins, P., & Winter, J. (1997). Mastering change: Learning the lessons of the enterprise.London: Department for Education and Employment. Buzzel, Robert D., and Bradley T. Gale. (1987

  1. Interpreting magnetic fabrics in amphibole-bearing rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Kunze, Karsten; Hirt, Ann M.

    2018-01-01

    If amphibole is a major constituent in a rock, its magnetic fabric can be largely controlled by the crystallographic preferred orientation of amphibole. This study describes the (para)magnetic anisotropy in two amphibolites, both containing ca. 70% hornblende with rather strong crystallographic preferred orientation. Both amphibolites display a significant and well-defined anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, with the minimum susceptibility approximately normal to foliation. However, in one amphibolite, the maximum susceptibility is parallel to the lineation, whereas in the other it is not. This seemingly inconsistent observation can be explained by the intrinsic susceptibility anisotropy of single crystals of hornblende, and their texture in the rocks. Numerical models show how the principal susceptibility axes relate to macroscopic foliation and lineation for point and fiber textures. This study underlines the potential of using magnetic anisotropy to obtain information about mineral fabrics in mafic rocks. At the same time, it highlights the necessity for taking into account single crystal properties of the mineral(s) responsible for the anisotropy and their crystallographic preferred orientation when interpreting magnetic fabrics.

  2. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  3. Assignments of methyl rocking modes in trimethylphosphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, D. C.; McQuillan, G. P.

    Analysis of the vibrational spectra of trimethylphosphine- d3 and d6 leads to identification of the a2 methyl rocking mode at 779 cm -1 in the infrared crystal spectrum of the d0 species. The second e rock is found at 828 cm -1 in the gas phase.

  4. Hot-dry-rock feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    The hot-dry-rock project tasks are covered as follows: hot-dry-rock reservoir; generation facilities; water resources; transmission requirements; environmental issues; government and community institutional factors; leasing, ownership and management of facilities; regulations, permits, and laws; and financial considerations. (MHR)

  5. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successful...

  6. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja-Alor, J; Robison, R A

    1967-09-01

    Fossiliferous Cambrian, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks, never before found in southern Mexico, have been discovered in the Nochixtlán region. Superjacent unfossiliferous sedimentary rocks may be Permian in age. Early Paleozoic and late Paleozoic intervals of marine sedimentation were bounded by intervals of positive tectonism and erosion.

  7. ROCK RIVER CANYON WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MICHIGAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jesse W.; Morey, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Rock River Canyon Wilderness study area, Alger County, Michigan, concluded that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources in the study area. High silica sand and crushed rock from quartzose sandstone that is bedrock for much of the area occur but are available in more accessible areas outside of the wilderness.

  8. The History of Rock Art Research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The History of Rock Art Research. Rock art in South India was discovered as early as 1891.The earliest discovery of petroglyphs on the Koppagallu hill in Bellary district was made by Fred Fawcett (1892) who with the assistance of H.T.Knox and Robert Sewell ...

  9. Rock Music and Korean Adolescent's Antisocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inkyung; Kwak, Keumjoo; Chang, Geunyoung; Yang, Jinyoung

    The relationship between rock music preference and antisocial behavior among Korean adolescents was examined. The Korean versions of the Sensation Seeking Scale and the Antisocial Behavior Checklist were used to measure sensation seeking motivation and delinquency. Adolescents (N=1,079) were categorized as "rock/metal,""dance,"…

  10. RockIT: A Graphical Program for Labeling and Analyzing Rock Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, B.; Castano, A.; Anderson, R. C.; Castano, R.

    2005-12-01

    We have developed the Rock Identification Toolkit (RockIT), a mature, cross-platform, graphical program designed to help geologists rapidly and accurately label rocks and particles in images. As images are labeled, RockIT reports both individual rock (or particle) statistics and overall scene statistics. Basic statistics include 2D rock (image) area and average albedo. A more involved set of statistics uses a direct least squares technique to fit a rock trace to an ellipse and report the semimajor and semiminor axes, orientation, eccentricity, and quality of fit. When range data (e.g. derived from a stereo image pair) is available, RockIT provides both 3D rock size and overall scene area estimates. All statistics may be manipulated interactively and later exported to plain, tab-delimited text for easy import into tools like Excel or Matlab for further sophisticated analysis, summarization, and visualization. RockIT can read and display both image and, when available, corresponding range data. Although it supports several popular graphics file formats (e.g. JPEG, TIFF, etc.) our focus has been on more domain-specific file formats, particularly the MER Planetary Data System (PDS) formats. Images, once displayed, may be enhanced in continually, in real-time, throughout the analysis process. Examples of image enhancement include increasing or decreasing brightness and contrast, performing simple min/max intensity normalizations or more complicated histogram equalizations. Several scientists and students at JPL, NASA, Cornell, and PSI use RockIT to identify and characterize rock shape, size, and distribution in MER microscopic imager and panoramic images. Recently, Golombek et al. (2005) used RockIT to compare rock size distributions and calculate cumulative fractional area coverage at several locations along the Spirit traverse. We have a laptop computer running RockIT to demonstrate its capabilities and allow people to experiment on their own.

  11. Instability limits for spontaneous double layer formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J. Jr.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; VanDervort, R. W.; Magee, R. M.; Reynolds, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present time-resolved measurements that demonstrate that large amplitude electrostatic instabilities appear in pulsed, expanding helicon plasmas at the same time as particularly strong double layers appear in the expansion region. A significant cross-correlation between the electrostatic fluctuations and fluctuations in the number of ions accelerated by the double layer electric field is observed. No correlation is observed between the electrostatic fluctuations and ions that have not passed through the double layer. These measurements confirm that the simultaneous appearance of the electrostatic fluctuations and the double layer is not simple coincidence. In fact, the accelerated ion population is responsible for the growth of the instability. The double layer strength, and therefore, the velocity of the accelerated ions, is limited by the appearance of the electrostatic instability

  12. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active......Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key...... conformation by the direct binding of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-loaded Rho. In recent years, a number of ROCK isoform-specific binding partners have been found to modulate the kinase activity through direct interactions with the catalytic domain or via altered cellular localization of the kinases. Thus...

  13. Layer-dependent band alignment and work function of few-layer phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2014-10-20

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the electronic properties of few-layer phosphorene focusing on layer-dependent behavior of band gap, work function band alignment and carrier effective mass. It is found that few-layer phosphorene shows a robust direct band gap character, and its band gap decreases with the number of layers following a power law. The work function decreases rapidly from monolayer (5.16 eV) to trilayer (4.56 eV), and then slowly upon further increasing the layer number. Compared to monolayer phosphorene, there is a drastic decrease of hole effective mass along the ridge (zigzag) direction for bilayer phosphorene, indicating a strong interlayer coupling and screening effect. Our study suggests that 1). Few-layer phosphorene with a layer-dependent band gap and a robust direct band gap character is promising for efficient solar energy harvest. 2). Few-layer phosphorene outperforms monolayer counterpart in terms of a lighter carrier effective mass, a higher carrier density and a weaker scattering due to enhanced screening. 3). The layer-dependent band edges and work functions of few-layer phosphorene allow for modification of Schottky barrier with enhanced carrier injection efficiency. It is expected that few-layer phosphorene will present abundant opportunities for a plethora of new electronic applications.

  14. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  15. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  16. Fragment Size Distribution of Blasted Rock Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jug, Jasmin; Strelec, Stjepan; Gazdek, Mario; Kavur, Boris

    2017-12-01

    Rock mass is a heterogeneous material, and the heterogeneity of rock causes sizes distribution of fragmented rocks in blasting. Prediction of blasted rock mass fragmentation has a significant role in the overall economics of opencast mines. Blasting as primary fragmentation can significantly decrease the cost of loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Blast fragmentation chiefly depends on the specific blast design (geometry of blast holes drilling, the quantity and class of explosive, the blasting form, the timing and partition, etc.) and on the properties of the rock mass (including the uniaxial compressive strength, the rock mass elastic Young modulus, the rock discontinuity characteristics and the rock density). Prediction and processing of blasting results researchers can accomplish by a variety of existing software’s and models, one of them is the Kuz-Ram model, which is possibly the most widely used approach to estimating fragmentation from blasting. This paper shows the estimation of fragmentation using the "SB" program, which was created by the authors. Mentioned program includes the Kuz-Ram model. Models of fragmentation are confirmed and calibrated by comparing the estimated fragmentation with actual post-blast fragmentation from image processing techniques. In this study, the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model has been used for an open-pit limestone quarry in Dalmatia, southern Croatia. The resulting calibrated value of the rock factor enables the quality prognosis of fragmentation in further blasting works, with changed drilling geometry and blast design parameters. It also facilitates simulation in the program to optimize blasting works and get the desired fragmentations of the blasted rock mass.

  17. Mechanisms controlling rock coast evolution in paraglacial landscapes - examples from Arctic, Antarctic and Scandinavian regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, M. C.; Lim, M.; Kasprzek, M.; Swirad, Z. M.; Rachlewicz, G.; Migoń, P.; Pawlowski, L.; Jaskolski, M.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the processes controlling development of paraglacial rock coast systems in Hornsund, Svalbard, Admiralty Bay, South Shetland Islands and Gotland Island, Scandinavia. A suite of nested geomorphological and geophysical methods have been applied to characterize the functioning of rock cliffs, shore platforms and stacks influenced by lithological control and geomorphic processes driven by paraglacial coast environments - both in glaciated and deglaciated study sites. Rock hardness, quantified by Schmidt hammer rebound tests, demonstrate strong spatial control on the degree of rock weathering (rock strength) along studied rock coasts. Elevation controlled geomorphic zones are identified and linked to distinct processes and mechanisms, transitioning from peak hardness values at the icefoot/sea-ice through the wave and storm dominated scour zones to the lowest values on the cliff tops, where the effects of periglacial weathering dominate. Observations of rock surface change using a traversing micro-erosion meter (TMEM) indicate that significant changes in erosion rates occur at the junction between shore platform and the cliff toe, where rock erosion is facilitated by frequent wetting and drying and operation of nivation and sea ice processes (formation and melting of snow patches and icefoot complexes). Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys have been used to investigate frozen ground control on rock coast dynamics and reveal the strong interaction with marine processes in polar coastal settings. In Gotland, Scandinavia the morphology of rocky coastal landforms (rauks) bear traces of numerous environmental changes that occurred in Baltic region over the Holocene including salinity, temperature, ice-cover/storminess and relative sea-level. The results are synthesised to propose a new conceptual model of paraglacial rock coast systems, with the aim of contributing towards a unifying concept of cold region

  18. From ooze to sedimentary rock, the first diagenetic processes affecting the chalk of eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars

    strongly affect reservoir properties of the chalk both by establishing compartments and vertical connections. A better understanding of these reservoir modifications will be critical for improving the predictive capability of models describing the behaviour of drinking water and hydrocarbons hosted...... in chalk sedimentary rocks....

  19. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The rocks of the BVS sequence probably mark the collision of the northern and southern. Indian blocks during Proterozoic period. The explosive submarine volcanism may be related to ...... Basins (eds) Saunders A D and Norry M J, Geol. Soc. London Spec. Publ. 42 313–345. Sylvester P J 1998 Post-collisional strongly ...

  20. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  1. Strong localization of photonics in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y H; Tsao, C W; Chen, C H; Hsueh, W J

    2015-01-01

    Strong localization from the Fabry-Pérot-like resonances that occur in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices is presented in this study. When compared with traditional Fabry–Pérot resonators, in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices, the middle space is a variant rather than an invariant half-wavelength thickness for each resonance with different orders. In addition, the electric fields of the resonances may be located on both sides of the space layer in the superlattice, which is in contrast to those in a traditional Fabry–Pérot resonator. The electric field of the resonances is strongly localized as the generation order increases. Moreover, the group delays of these peaks increase with generation order. More strongly localized modes can be found from the symmetric Fibonacci superlattices than from the traditional Fabry–Pérot resonators, which makes the proposed structure an attractive alternative to a wide variety of optoelectronic devices. (paper)

  2. Full-waveform Inversion of Crosshole GPR Data Collected in Strongly Heterogeneous Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Chalk is an important reservoir rock for hydrocarbons and for groundwater resources for many major cities. Therefore, this rock type has been extensively investigated using both geological and geophysical methods. Many applications of crosshole GPR tomography rely on the ray approximation...... all the information contained in the data and is able to provide significantly improved images. Here, we apply full-waveform inversion to crosshole GPR data to image strong heterogeneity of the chalk related to changes in lithology and porosity. We have collected a crosshole tomography dataset...... address the importance of (i) adequate starting models, both in terms of the dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, (ii) the estimation of the source wavelet, (iii) and the effects of data sampling density when imaging this rock type. Moreover, we discuss the resolution of the bedding...

  3. Formation of an Anti-Core–Shell Structure in Layered Oxide Cathodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanlei [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast; Omenya, Fredrick [NorthEast; Whittingham, M. Stanley [NorthEast; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental; Zhou, Guangwen [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast

    2017-10-20

    The layeredrock-salt phase transformation in the layered dioxide cathodes for Li-ion batteries is believed to result in a “core-shell” structure of the primary particles, in which the core region maintains as the layered phase while the surface region undergoes the phase transformation to the rock-salt phase. Using transmission electron microscopy, here we demonstrate the formation of an “anti-core-shell” structure in cycled primary particles with a formula of LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2, in which the surface and subsurface regions remain as the layered structure while the rock-salt phase forms as domains in the bulk with a thin layer of the spinel phase between the rock-salt core and the skin of the layered phase. Formation of this anti-core-shell structure is attributed to the oxygen loss at the surface that drives the migration of oxygen from the bulk to the surface, thereby resulting in localized areas of significantly reduced oxygen levels in the bulk of the particle, which subsequently undergoes the phase transformation to the rock-salt domains. The formation of the anti-core-shell rock-salt domains is responsible for the reduced capacity, discharge voltage and ionic conductivity in cycled cathode.

  4. MFM study of magnetic interaction between recording and soft magnetic layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yukio; Tanahashi, Kiwamu; Hirayama, Yoshiyuki; Kikukawa, Atsushi; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to study the magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers in double-layer perpendicular media by observing the magnetization structure from the soft magnetic layer side. There was a strong magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers. Introducing a thin nonmagnetic intermediate layer between the two layers greatly reduced the magnetic interaction and drastically reduced the medium noise

  5. A novel composite alignment layer for transflective liquid crystal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuangyao; Li Xuan; Tao Du; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Kwok, Hoi Sing

    2010-01-01

    A novel composite photoalignment layer for transflective liquid crystal displays is explored. The key technique is to introduce a functional photo-crosslinkage into a rewritable azodye material with proper mixing. Bearing good alignment quality derived from the azodye material, the composite layer provides strong azimuthal and polar anchoring energy comparable to that of rubbed polyimide layers. The capability of dual modes fabrication in one cell exhibited by azodyes could be well retained and the new alignment film exhibits a display resolution of up to 2 μm. Furthermore, after exposure to strong LED unpolarized light the composite layer shows much better stability than that with a pure azodye material.

  6. Analysis of strong ground motions to evaluate regional attenuation relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Montaldo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Italian attenuation relationships at regional scale have been refined using a data set of 322 horizontal components of strong ground motions recorded mainly during the 1997-1998 Umbria-Marche, Central Italy, earthquake sequence. The data set includes records generated by events with local magnitude (M L ranging between 4.5 and 5.9, recorded at rock or soil sites and epicentral distance smaller than 100 km. Through a multiple step regression analysis, we calculated empirical equations for the peak ground acceleration and velocity, the Arias Intensity and for the horizontal components of the 5% damped velocity pseudo response spectra, corresponding to 14 frequencies ranging from 0.25 to 25 Hz. We compared our results with well known predictive equations, widely used on the national territory for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis. The results obtained in this study show smaller values for all the analyzed ground motion indicators compared to other predictive equations.

  7. Rock stars for the day

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    After a two-year hiatus, the CERN Hardronic Festival is back! On 8 August, ten CERN MusiClub bands will take to the stage for the popular event. As usual, the non-stop show will take place on the terrace of Restaurant 3 and will run until after midnight.   The Canettes Blues Band, part of the CERN MusiClub, performing live on the Music In The Park stage at the Montreux Jazz Festival, on 18 July 2013. A large range of musical styles will entertain the audience: from Irish folk, via 70s/80s/90s rock, to pop, blues and R&B. Alongside the music there will be activities for kids and food and drink stands. This year, the income from food sales will be donated to charity. The spirit that has characterised the festival ever since the first event in 1989 is that of a staff party. Any band who volunteers to play also helps to organise the event and set up the stage. “This is a really good thing because a festival that has been growing for many years requires a considerable amount of har...

  8. Terrestrial impact melt rocks and glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, B. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    2001-12-01

    The effects of meteorite and comet impact on Earth are rock brecciation, the formation of shock metamorphic features, rock melting, and the formation of impact structures, i.e. simple craters, complex craters, and multi-ring basins. Large events, such as the 65-Ma Chicxulub impact, are believed to have had catastrophic environmental effects that profoundly influenced the development of life on Earth. In this review, an attempt is made to summarize some of the voluminous literature on impact melting, one important aspect of planetary impact, provide some comments on this process, and to make suggestions for future research. The products of impact melting are glasses, impact melt rocks, and pseudotachylites. Our treatise deals mainly with the geological setting, petrography, and major-element chemistry of melt rocks and glasses. Impact glasses, in several petrographic aspects, are similar to volcanic glasses, but they are associated with shock metamorphosed mineral and rock fragments and, in places, with siderophile element anomalies suggestive of meteoritic contamination. They are found in allogenic breccia deposits within (fall-back 'suevite') and outside (fall-out 'suevite') impact craters and, as spherules, in distal ejecta. Large events, such as the K/T boundary Chicxulub impact, are responsible for the formation of worldwide ejecta horizons which are associated with siderophile element anomalies and shock metamorphosed mineral and rock debris. Impact glasses have a bulk chemical composition that is homogeneous but exemptions to this rule are common. On a microscopic scale, however, impact glasses are commonly strikingly heterogeneous. Tektites are glasses ejected from craters over large distances. They are characterized by very low water and volatile contents and element abundances and ratios that are evidence that tektites formed by melting of upper crustal, sedimentary rocks. Four tektite strewn-fields are known, three of which can be tied to specific impact

  9. Rock cavern storage of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won Jin; Kim, Kyung Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sang Ki [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The rock cavern storage for spent fuel has been assessed to apply in Korea with reviewing the state of the art of the technologies for surface storage and rock cavern storage of spent fuel. The technical feasibility and economic aspects of the rock cavern storage of spent fuel were also analyzed. A considerable area of flat land isolated from the exterior are needed to meet the requirement for the site of the surface storage facilities. It may, however, not be easy to secure such areas in the mountainous region of Korea. Instead, the spent fuel storage facilities constructed in the rock cavern moderate their demands for the suitable site. As a result, the rock cavern storage is a promising alternative for the storage of spent fuel in the aspect of natural and social environments. The rock cavern storage of spent fuel has several advantages compared with the surface storage, and there is no significant difference on the viewpoint of economy between the two alternatives. In addition, no great technical difficulties are present to apply the rock cavern storage technologies to the storage of domestic spent fuel.

  10. Sedimentation and transportation of mud rock material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Ochiai, S.

    2008-12-01

    This research focuses on the transportation and sedimentation of mud rock slope at Niupu, southern Taiwan. The main purpose of this research is trying to identify the mechanism of erosion and sedimentation rate of the mud rock from the slope into the lake. By using regular sonar surveying and rainfall data, it is possible to identify a high erosion rate on mud rock area. The cementation of Miocene mud rock is loose and slope at 40-45 degree which is highly sensitive to the rainfall. It is also vulnerable to the erosion processes. There are some interesting characters related to the observation and surveying. The erosion processes are highly related to amounts of rainfall. When there is typhoon, tropical storm, there is high erosion. The erosion could occur when there is rainfall more than 10 mm/event and the surface of the mud rock could be incised up to 3 cm after 30 mm rainfall. The sedimentation rate could also as high as 0.5 m when there are two typhoons which attacked to this area within three months. This research also demonstrates that the high erosion on mud rock area will generate high sedimentation and high denudation rate. However the comparison of the rate of erosion and deposition is identified in this presentation. For hazard mitigation purpose, it is necessary to reduce the bared mud rock slope area to prevent the further erosion.

  11. Organic History and Ice-Rock Decoupling on Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2007-12-01

    The Cassini detection of methane, propane and acetylene in the Enceladus plume, and condensed organic compounds (OC) on the south polar region imply an organic-bearing interior of the moon. At least a few wt. % of C is expected in rocks from which Enceladus accreted. By analogy with carbonaceous chondrites, the majority of accreted OC was in a polymer in which polyaromatic groups are linked by O-, N-, and S-bearing aliphatic units. If accreted, cometary-type materials also delivered CO2, CO(?), methanol, ethane, ethene, acetylene, and condensed OC. Subsequent water ice melting and hydrothermal processes driven by decay of short-lived radionuclides led to dissolution of CO, CO2 and methanol in water and transformations of the polymer and cometary OC. CO converted to formic acid, carbonate species, methanol and methane. Hydrous pyrolysis and oxidation of the polymer partially liberated aromatic molecules and led to the formation of O-bearing OC (carboxylic and amino acids, alcohols). Increase in temperature favored oxidation of OC to carbonate species and N2, and led to graphitization of the polymer. Despite net oxidation of OC driven by H2 escape, mineral- catalyzed Fisher-Tropsch like synthesis of hydrocarbons and methane occurred in H2-rich niches. As a result, an array of aromatic, aliphatic, and N-, O-, S-bearing OC, and methane was delivered into a primordial water ocean in hydrothermal fluids. Highly soluble OC (acids, alcohols) made multiple passes through hydrothermal systems causing further oxidation of OC in rocks and solutions. In contrast, hydrocarbons exolved from cold oceanic water and formed an organic layer below the ice shell. Subsequent cooling of ocean-entering fluids and ocean freezing from above led to further separation and accumulation of OC. Some OC was trapped in ice, and methane formed clathrates. After freezing of salt eutectic brines, the light oil (a solution/mixture of ethane, propane, butane, ethene, acetylene, methanol, toluene etc

  12. Geochemical modelling of water-rock interactions at the Osamu Utsumi mine and Morro do Ferro analogue study sites, Pocos de Caldas, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Puigdomenech, I.; McNutt, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Geochemical processes involving water-rock interactions have been modelled using groundwater composition, mineralogical data, ion plots and computations of speciation, non-thermodynamic mass balance and thermodynamic mass transfer for two natural analogue sites near Pocos de Caldas, Brazil: the Osamu Utsumi mine and Morro do Ferro. The main rock type is an alkaline igneous complex composed of volcanic and sub-volcanic phonolites that have been hydrothermally altered and highly weathered. This altered rock mass grades from a laterite at the surface to a saprolite and finally to unweathered, hydrothermally altered bedrock at depth. The mine site contains high concentrations of uranium and Morro do Ferro contains high concentrations of thorium and rare-earths. The reaction models can reproduce the water chemistry and mineral occurences and they were validated by predicting the masses of minerals precipitated and the pH of the final water. The model computations can also reproduce the pH and iron concentrations of the water samples during CO 2 degassing and iron(II) oxidation from exposure to air. The results from the geochemical reaction models reveal that the dominant processes are production of CO 2 in the soil zone through aerobic decay of organic matter, dissolution of fluorite, calcite, K-feldspar, albite and manganese oxides, oxidation of pyrite and sphalerite and precipitation of ferric oxides, silica and kaolinite. Recharge waters are undersaturated with respect to barite and discharging waters and deeper groundwaters are saturated to supersaturated with respect to barite, demonstrating a strong equilibrium solubility control. Strontium isotope data demonstrate that sources other than calcium-bearing minerals are required to account for the dissolved strontium in the ground. These may include K-feldspar, smectite-chlorite mixed-layer clays and goyazite. (author) 24 figs., 4 tabs., 18 refs

  13. Discussion on the origin of sedimentary rock resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Gangjian

    2012-01-01

    Conduction current way of sedimentary rock sedimentary rock is caused by the internal structure of sedimentary rock sedimentary rock pore resistance depends on the salinity of pore water and clay content and distribution. Resistivity of sedimentary rock sedimentary rock major factor in mineral composition, water resistance, oil resistance. and sedimentary structures. In practice, we should give full attention to the difference between lithology and physical properties. (author)

  14. Uranium deposits in magmatic and metamorphic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The association of uranium with certain types of magmatic and metamorphic rocks is well known. They have consequently been explored and studied quite extensively. In recent years interest in them has been eclipsed by the discovery of larger, lower cost deposits in other geological environments. Nonetheless, magmatic and metamorphic rocks continue to be important sources of uranium and large areas of the Earth's crust with such rocks are prospective locations for additional discoveries. As future exploration and development could be more difficult the full importance of individual deposits may not be recognized until after many years of investigation and experience. In addition to being important host rocks, magmatic and metamorphic rocks have been of considerable interest to uranium geologists as they are considered to be important source rocks for uranium and thus can lead to deposits nearby in other environments. Furthermore, these rocks provide important information on the geochemical cycle of uranium in the Earth's crust and mantle. Such information can lead to identification of uranium provinces and districts and to a basic understanding of processes of formation of uranium deposits. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium Deposits in Magmatic and Metamorphic Rocks. The meeting was held in Salamanca, Spain, from 29 September to 3 October 1986. It was followed by a two day field trip to uranium deposits in the Ciudad Rodrigo and Don Benito areas. The meeting was attended by 48 participants from 22 countries. Two panels were organized for discussion of the following topics: (1) ore deposit genesis and characterization and (2) exploration and resource assessment. The technical papers together with the panel reports form this publication. The scope and variety of the papers included and the panel reports provide a good coverage of current knowledge and thinking on uranium in magmatic and metamorphic rocks

  15. Magnetism in layered Ruthenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, Paul C.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, the magnetism of the layered Ruthenates has been studied by means of different neutron scattering techniques. Magnetic correlations in the single-layer Ruthenates of the series Ca 2-x Sr x RuO 4 have been investigated as function of Sr-concentration (x=0.2 and 0.62), temperature and magnetic field. These inelastic neutron scattering studies demonstrate the coexistence of ferromagnetic paramagnon scattering with antiferromagnetic fluctuations at incommensurate wave vectors. The temperature dependence of the amplitudes and energies of both types of excitations indicate the proximity to magnetic instabilities; their competition seems to determine the complex behavior of these materials. In Ca 1.8 Sr 0.2 RuO 4 , which shows a metamagnetic transition, the ferromagnetic fluctuations are strongly suppressed at low temperature, but appear at higher temperature or application of a magnetic field. In the high-field phase of Ca 1.8 Sr 0.2 RuO 4 above the metamagnetic transition, a ferromagnetic magnon dominates the excitation spectrum. Polarized neutron scattering revealed the existence of a very broad signal around the zone centre, in addition to the well-known incommensurate excitations at Q=(0.3,0.3,0) in the unconventional superconductor Sr 2 RuO 4 . With this additional contribution, it is possible to set up a general model for the Q-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is well consistent with the results of other measurement methods that do not resolve the Q-dependence. Upon doping with Ti, the incommensurate fluctuations are enhanced, in particular near the critical concentration for the onset of magnetic order, but no divergence down to very low temperature is observed. In the bilayer Ti-doped Ca 3 Ru 2 O 7 , the existence of magnetic order with a propagation vector of about ((1)/(4),(1)/(4),0) has been discovered and characterized in detail. Above and below T N , excitations at this wave vector and another one, related to Sr 3 Ru 2 O 7 , have been

  16. Magnetism in layered Ruthenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffens, Paul C.

    2008-07-01

    In this thesis, the magnetism of the layered Ruthenates has been studied by means of different neutron scattering techniques. Magnetic correlations in the single-layer Ruthenates of the series Ca{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}RuO{sub 4} have been investigated as function of Sr-concentration (x=0.2 and 0.62), temperature and magnetic field. These inelastic neutron scattering studies demonstrate the coexistence of ferromagnetic paramagnon scattering with antiferromagnetic fluctuations at incommensurate wave vectors. The temperature dependence of the amplitudes and energies of both types of excitations indicate the proximity to magnetic instabilities; their competition seems to determine the complex behavior of these materials. In Ca{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 4}, which shows a metamagnetic transition, the ferromagnetic fluctuations are strongly suppressed at low temperature, but appear at higher temperature or application of a magnetic field. In the high-field phase of Ca{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 4} above the metamagnetic transition, a ferromagnetic magnon dominates the excitation spectrum. Polarized neutron scattering revealed the existence of a very broad signal around the zone centre, in addition to the well-known incommensurate excitations at Q=(0.3,0.3,0) in the unconventional superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. With this additional contribution, it is possible to set up a general model for the Q-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is well consistent with the results of other measurement methods that do not resolve the Q-dependence. Upon doping with Ti, the incommensurate fluctuations are enhanced, in particular near the critical concentration for the onset of magnetic order, but no divergence down to very low temperature is observed. In the bilayer Ti-doped Ca{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the existence of magnetic order with a propagation vector of about ((1)/(4),(1)/(4),0) has been discovered and characterized in detail. Above and below T{sub N}, excitations at this

  17. Discrete Fracture Networks Groundwater Modelling at Bedding Control Fractured Sedimentary Rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Yeh; Yuan-Chieh, Wu

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater flow modelling in fractured rock mass is an important challenging work in predicting the transport of contamination. So far as we know about the numerical analysis method was consider for crystalline rock, which means discontinuous are treated as stochastic distribution in homogeneous rock mass. Based on the understanding of geology in Taiwan in past few decades, we know that the hydraulic conductivities of Quaternary and Tertiary system rock mass are strongly controlled by development of sedimentary structures (bedding plane). The main purpose of this study is to understand how Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) affects numerical results in terms of hydraulic behavior using different DFN generation methods. Base on surface geology investigation and core drilling work (3 boreholes with a total length of 120m), small scale fracture properties with in Cho-lan formation (muddy sandstone) are defined, including gently dip of bedding and 2 sub-vertical joint sets. Two FracMan/MAFIC numerical modellings are conducted, using ECPM approach (Equivalent Continuum Porous Media); case A considered all fracture were Power law distribution with Poisson fracture center; case B considered all bedding plans penetrate into modelling region, and remove the bedding count to recalculate joint fracture parameters. Modelling results show that Case B gives stronger groundwater pathways than Case A and have impact on flow field. This preliminary modelling result implicates the groundwater flow modelling work in some fractured sedimentary rock mass, might be considerate to rock sedimentary structure development itself, discontinuous maybe not follow the same stochastic DFN parameter.

  18. Correlating mode-I fracture toughness and mechanical properties of heat-treated crystalline rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayukh Talukdar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the effect of thermal treatment on the mode-I fracture toughness (FT, three crystalline rocks (two basalts and one tonalite were experimentally investigated. Semi-circular bend specimens of the rocks were prepared following the method suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM and were treated at various temperatures ranging from room temperature (25 °C to 600 °C. Mode-I FT was correlated with tensile strength (TS, ultrasonic velocities, and Young's modulus (YM. Additionally, petrographic and X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out to find the chemical changes resulting from the heat treatment. Further, scanning electron microscopy (SEM was conducted to observe the micro structural changes when subjected to high temperatures. These experiments demonstrate that heat treatment has a strong negative impact on the FT and mechanical properties of the rocks. From room temperature to 600 °C, mode-I FT values of massive basalt, giant plagioclase basalt, and tonalite were reduced by nearly 52%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. Also, at all temperature levels, FT and mechanical properties are found to be exponentially correlated. However, the exact nature of the relationship mainly depends on rock type. Besides, TS was found to be a better indicator of degradation degree than the mode-I FT. SEM images show that micro crack density and structural disintegration of the mineral grains increase with temperature. These physical changes confirm the observed reduction in the stiffness of heat-treated crystalline rocks.

  19. Incoherent SSI Analysis of Reactor Building using 2007 Hard-Rock Coherency Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo-Hyung; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Many strong earthquake recordings show the response motions at building foundations to be less intense than the corresponding free-field motions. To account for these phenomena, the concept of spatial variation, or wave incoherence was introduced. Several approaches for its application to practical analysis and design as part of soil-structure interaction (SSI) effect have been developed. However, conventional wave incoherency models didn't reflect the characteristics of earthquake data from hard-rock site, and their application to the practical nuclear structures on the hard-rock sites was not justified sufficiently. This paper is focused on the response impact of hard-rock coherency model proposed in 2007 on the incoherent SSI analysis results of nuclear power plant (NPP) structure. A typical reactor building of pressurized water reactor (PWR) type NPP is modeled classified into surface and embedded foundations. The model is also assumed to be located on medium-hard rock and hard-rock sites. The SSI analysis results are obtained and compared in case of coherent and incoherent input motions. The structural responses considering rocking and torsion effects are also investigated

  20. Thermal properties of rock salt and quartz monzonite to 5730K and 50-MPa confining pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal linear expansion have been made on two rock types, a rock salt and a quartz monzonite, at temperatures from 300 to 573 0 K and confining pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. The samples were taken from deep rock formations under consideration as possible sites for a nuclear waste repository - the rock salt from a domal salt formation at Avery Island, Louisiana, and the quartz monzonite from the Climax Stock, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The testing temperature and pressures are meant to bracket conditions expected in the repository. In both rock types, the thermal properties show a strong dependence upon temperature and a weak or non-dependence upon confining pressure. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity both decrease with increasing temperature in approximately linear fashion for samples which have not been previously heated. At 50 MPa in both rocks this decrease closely matches the measured or expected intrinsic (crack-free) behavior of the material. Preliminary indications from the quartz monzonite suggest that conductivity and diffusivity at low pressure and temperature may decrease as a result of heat treatment above 400 0 K

  1. Structure, stability, and tsunami hazard associated with a rock slope in Knight Inlet, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeyl, D. P.; Stead, D.; Sturzenegger, M.; Bornhold, B. D.; Clague, J. J.

    2015-06-01

    Rockfalls and rockslides during the past 12 000 years have deposited bouldery debris cones on the seafloor beneath massive rock slopes throughout the inner part of Knight Inlet. The 885 m high rock slope, located across from a former First Nations village destroyed in the late 1500s by a slide-induced wave, exposes the contact between a Late Cretaceous dioritic pluton and metamorphic rocks of the Upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation. The pluton margin is strongly foliated parallel to primary and secondary fabrics in the metamorphic rocks, resulting in highly persistent brittle structures. Other important structures include a set of sheeting joints and highly persistent mafic dykes and faults. Stability analysis indicates that planar and wedge rock slope failures up to about 500 000 m3 in volume could occur. We suspect that failures of this size in this setting would have the potential to generate locally hazardous waves. As several similar rock slopes fronted by large submarine debris cones exist in the inner part of Knight Inlet, it is clear that tsunami hazards should be considered in coastal infrastructure development and land-use planning in this area.

  2. Stress Wave Propagation in Viscoelastic-Plastic Rock-Like Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rock-like materials are composites that can be regarded as a mixture composed of elastic, plastic, and viscous components. They exhibit viscoelastic-plastic behavior under a high-strain-rate loading according to element model theory. This paper presents an analytical solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials under a high-strain-rate loading and verifies the solution through an experimental test. A constitutive equation of viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was first established, and then kinematic and kinetic equations were then solved to derive the analytic solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials. An experimental test using the SHPB (Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar for a concrete specimen was conducted to obtain a stress-strain curve under a high-strain-rate loading. Inverse analysis based on differential evolution was conducted to estimate undetermined variables for constitutive equations. Finally, the relationship between the attenuation factor and the strain rate in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was investigated. According to the results, the frequency of the stress wave, viscosity coefficient, modulus of elasticity, and density play dominant roles in the attenuation of the stress wave. The attenuation decreases with increasing strain rate, demonstrating strongly strain-dependent attenuation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials.

  3. the Martian atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrosyan, A.; Galperin, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2011-01-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) represents the part of the atmosphere that is strongly influenced by the presence of the underlying surface and mediates the key interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. On Mars, this represents the lowest 10 km of the atmosphere during the daytime...... atmosphere. To date, this region of the atmosphere has been studied directly, by instrumented lander spacecraft, and from orbital remote sensing, though not to the extent that is necessary to fully constrain its character and behavior. Current data strongly suggest that as for the Earth's PBL, classical...... of the modeling techniques used for the PBL on Earth are also being applied to the Martian PBL, including novel uses of very high resolution large eddy simulation methods. We conclude with those aspects of the PBL that require new measurements in order to constrain models and discuss the extent to which...

  4. Radon and rock bursts in deep mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulashevich, Yu.P.; Utkin, V.I.; Yurkov, A.K.; Nikolaev, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Variation fields of radon concentration in time to ascertain stress-strain state of the North Ural bauxite mines have been studied. It is shown that dynamic changes in the stress-strain state of the rocks prior to the rock burst bring about variations in radon concentration in the observation wells. Depending on mutual positioning of the observation points and the rock burst epicenter, the above-mentioned variations differ in principle, reduction of radon concentration in the near zone and its increase in the far zone are observed [ru

  5. Laboratory measurements of rock thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    The thermal properties of rocks are key elements in understanding and modelling the temperature field of the subsurface. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity can be measured in the laboratory if rock samples can be provided. We have introduced improvements to the divided bar and needle...... probe methods to be able to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The improvements we implement include, for both methods, a combination of fast numerical finite element forward modelling and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion scheme for estimating rock thermal parameters...

  6. Lead isotopes in archaean plutonic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversby, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    Archaean intrusive rocks have initial Pb isotopic compositions which show a varied and complex history for the source regions of the rocks. Even the oldest rocks from Greenland indicate heterogenous U and Pb distribution prior to 3800 m.y. ago. Source regions with μ values less than 7 must have played a significant role in the early history of the earth. By late Archaean time U/Pb ratios of source regions had increased substantially. Data from Australia and North America show distinct regional differences, both within and between continents. (Auth.)

  7. Sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: first observation of rocks in motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Richard D; Norris, James M; Lorenz, Ralph D; Ray, Jib; Jackson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved > 60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, "windowpane" ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of -4-5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2-5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice.

  8. Rapid formation of rock armour for soil - rock fragment mixture during simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultney, E.; McGrath, G. S.; Hinz, C.

    2009-04-01

    Preventing erosion is an important issue in disturbed semi-arid and arid landscapes. This is in particular of highest importance for mining companies while undertaking land rehabilitation. An onsite investigation of the impact of surface rock fragments on erosion was conducted at Telfer goldmine in the Great Sandy Desert, Western Australia. The study site is a waste rock dump designed to mimic the concave slope of a natural mesa to both discourage erosion and blend in with its natural surroundings. Four treatments were used to construct the slope: two are topsoil mixed with rock fragments, and two are unmixed topsoil. A field study investigating erosion rills, particle size distribution, rock fragment coverage surface roughness and vegetation was carried out to determine changes down and across slope. The treatments constructed by mixing topsoil and rock fragments are more stable and show rock fragment distributions that more closely resemble patterns found on natural mesas surrounding Telfer. A controlled study using trays of topsoil mixed with rock fragment volumes of 50%, 60%, 70% and 80% were used to investigate how varying mixtures of rock fragments and topsoil erode using rainfall intensities between 20 and 100 mm h-1. Two runs of 25 minutes each were used to assess the temporal evolution of rock armouring. Surface coverage results converged for the 50%, 60% and 70% mixtures after the first run to coverage of about 90%, suggesting that fine sediment proportion does not affect rate and degree of rock armouring.

  9. Sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: first observation of rocks in motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Norris

    Full Text Available The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved > 60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, "windowpane" ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of -4-5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2-5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice.

  10. Behavior of major and trace elements upon weathering of peridotites in New Caledonia : A possible site on ultramafic rocks for the Critical Zone Exploration Network (CZEN) ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillot, Farid; Fandeur, D.; Fritsch, E.; Morin, G.; Ambrosi, J. P.; Olivi, L.; Cognigni, A.; Hazemann, J. L.; Proux, O.; Webb, S.; Brown, G. E., Jr.

    2010-05-01

    Ultramafic rocks cover about 1% of the continental surfaces and are related to ophiolitic bodies formed near convergent plate boundaries (Coleman, 1977). The most typical ultramafic rocks are dunite and harzburgite, which are composed of easily weatherable ferromagnesian mineral species (olivines and pyroxenes), but also of more resistant spinels (chromite and magnetite). Oceanic serpentinization of these ultramafic rocks usually lead to partial transformation of these initial mineral assemblages by forming hydrous layer silicates such as serpentine (lizardite, chrysotile and antigorite) talc, chlorite and actinolite (Malpas, 1992). It also lead to the formation of highly sheared textures, which favor meteoric weathering through preferential water flows. Compared to their crystalline rock counterpart that covers most of the continental surfaces, these ultramafic rocks mainly differ by their lower SiO2, Al2O3 and K2O contents (less than 50%, 10% and 1%, respectively) and, on the opposite, much higher MgO content (more than 18%). Moreover, they commonly have higher concentrations in FeO and other trace elements, such as Ni, Cr, Mn and Co. Weathering of these rocks is then at the origin of major geochemical anomalies on continental surfaces, especially when they occur in tropical and subtropical regions. Such conditions are encountered in New Caledonia where one third of the surface is covered with peridotites (mainly harzburgite with small amounts of dunite) obducted about 35 millions years ago during large tectonic events in the Southwest Pacific at the Late Eocene (Cluzel et al., 2001). Tropical weathering of these ultramafic rocks lead to the development of thick lateritic regoliths where almost all Mg and Si have been leached out and Fe, Mn, Ni, Cr and Co have been relatively concentrated. In these oxisols, Ni, Cr and Co can exhibit concentration up to several wt%, which make them good candidates for ore mining (New Caledonia is the third Ni producer in the world

  11. Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids of layered double hydroxide and layered metal oxide: highly active visible light photocatalysts with improved chemical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Hyo Na; Kim, In Young; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-09-28

    Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids highly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation are synthesized by self-assembly between oppositely charged 2D nanosheets of Zn-Cr-layered double hydroxide (Zn-Cr-LDH) and layered titanium oxide. The layer-by-layer ordering of two kinds of 2D nanosheets is evidenced by powder X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high resolution-transmission electron microscopy. Upon the interstratification process, the original in-plane atomic arrangements and electronic structures of the component nanosheets remain intact. The obtained heterolayered nanohybrids show a strong absorption of visible light and a remarkably depressed photoluminescence signal, indicating an effective electronic coupling between the two component nanosheets. The self-assembly between 2D inorganic nanosheets leads to the formation of highly porous stacking structure, whose porosity is controllable by changing the ratio of layered titanate/Zn-Cr-LDH. The resultant heterolayered nanohybrids are fairly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation with a rate of ∼1.18 mmol h(-1) g(-1), which is higher than the O(2) production rate (∼0.67 mmol h(-1) g(-1)) by the pristine Zn-Cr-LDH material, that is, one of the most effective visible light photocatalysts for O(2) production, under the same experimental condition. This result highlights an excellent functionality of the Zn-Cr-LDH-layered titanate nanohybrids as efficient visible light active photocatalysts. Of prime interest is that the chemical stability of the Zn-Cr-LDH is significantly improved upon the hybridization, a result of the protection of the LDH lattice by highly stable titanate layer. The present findings clearly demonstrate that the layer-by-layer-ordered assembly between inorganic 2D nanosheets is quite effective not only in improving the photocatalytic activity of the component semiconductors but also in synthesizing novel porous LDH-based hybrid materials with improved chemical

  12. Application of Discriminant Analysis for Studying the Source Rock Potential of Probable Formations in the Lorestan Basin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Negahdari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the performance and role of each formation in a petroleum play is crucial for the efficient and precise exploration and exploitation of trapped hydrocarbons in a sedimentary basin. The Lorestan basin is one of the most important hydrocarbon basins of Iran, and it includes various oil-prone potential source rocks and reservoir rocks. Previous geochemical studies of the basin were not accurate and there remain various uncertainties about the potential of the probable source rocks of the basin. In the present research, the geochemical characteristics of four probable source rocks of the Lorestan basin are studied using Rock-Eval pyrolysis and discriminant analysis. In achieving this goal, several discriminant functions are defined to evaluate the discriminant factor for the division of samples into two groups. The function with the highest discriminant factor was selected for the classification of probable source rocks into two groups: weak and strong. Among the studied formations, Garau and Pabdeh had the richest and poorest source rocks of the Lorestan basin, respectively. The comparison of the obtained results with the previous literature shows that the proposed model is more reliable for the recognition of the richness of source rock in the area.

  13. Mode of occurrence of secondary radionuclide-bearing minerals in natural argillized rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimsaite, J.

    1982-01-01

    Three processes that may be activated by the emplacement of radionuclide-bearing waste in natural argilized rock are described: 1. natural decompositon of rock-forming and associated radioactive ore and accessory minerals, such as uraninite, uranothorite, allanite, pyrochlore, apatite, monazite, xenotime, tourmaline, zircon, sulphides and carbonates; 2. mobilization, migration and redeposition of U, Th, REE, Zr, radiogenic lead and other elements along fractures; 3. neoformation of autunite, torbernite, phosphuranylite, coffinite, boltwoodite, kasolite, uranophane, bayleyite, ruthefordine, liebigite, masuyite, anglesite, wulfenite and complex unidentified U, Th, Pb, REE and Zr compounds in clays and in fractures of hydrated rock-forming minerals. The mobilized radionuclides can be fixed by several processes, namely by adsorption, by reacting with other ions, and by entering and capture in the interlayer of swelling mixed-layer clays and hydrated layer silicates. These observations on the natural behaviour of radioactive and radiogenic materials can be applied in evaluating rock formations and planning preventive measures for the escape of nuclear waste from disposal sites

  14. Biogenic Cracks in Porous Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerle, A.; Hartung, J.; Hallatschek, O.; Goehring, L.; Herminghaus, S.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms growing on and inside porous rock may fracture it by various processes. Some of the mechanisms of biofouling and bioweathering are today identified and partially understood but most emphasis is on chemical weathering, while mechanical contributions have been neglected. However, as demonstrated by the perseverance of a seed germinating and cracking up a concrete block, the turgor pressure of living organisms can be very significant. Here, we present results of a systematic study of the effects of the mechanical forces of growing microbial populations on the weathering of porous media. We designed a model porous medium made of glass beads held together by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a curable polymer. The rheological properties of the porous medium, whose shape and size are tunable, can be controlled by the ratio of crosslinker to base used in the PDMS (see Fig. 1). Glass and PDMS being inert to most chemicals, we are able to focus on the mechanical processes of biodeterioration, excluding any chemical weathering. Inspired by recent measurements of the high pressure (~0.5 Mpa) exerted by a growing population of yeasts trapped in a microfluidic device, we show that yeast cells can be cultured homogeneously within porous medium until saturation of the porous space. We investigate then the effects of such an inner pressure on the mechanical properties of the sample. Using the same model system, we study also the complex interplay between biofilms and porous media. We focus in particular on the effects of pore size on the penetration of the biofilm within the porous sample, and on the resulting deformations of the matrix, opening new perspectives into the understanding of life in complex geometry. Figure 1. Left : cell culture growing in a model porous medium. The white spheres represent the grains, bonds are displayed in grey, and microbes in green. Right: microscopy picture of glass beads linked by PDMS bridges, scale bar: 100 μm.

  15. Geochemistry and mineralogy of Ogun phosphate rock

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    708 ... 2Department of Soil Science and Land Management, University of Agriculture, Abeokuta Ogun State, Nigeria. 3School of ... Suitability of direct application of phosphate rock as low cost phosphorus fertilizer for crop production must be ...

  16. Fluorine geochemistry in volcanic rock series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecher, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A new analytical procedure has been established in order to determine low fluorine concentrations (30–100 ppm F) in igneous rocks, and the method has also proven successful for higher concentrations (100–4000 ppm F). Fluorine has been measured in a series of olivine tholeiites from the Reykjanes...... Peninsula, a tholeiite to rhyolitic rock series from Kerlingarfjöll, central Iceland, and an alkaline rock series from Jan Mayen that ranges from ankaramites to trachytes. Fluorine is not appreciably degassed during extrusion and appears to be insensitive to slight weathering. The olivine tholeiites from...... the Reykjanes Peninsula have F contents of 30–300 ppm and exhibit linear increases proportional to the incompatible elements K, P, and Ti. Such incompatible behaviour for F has been confirmed for the less evolved rocks of the other series. The tholeiites from Kerlingarfjöll (100–2000 ppm F) show a linear...

  17. Rock glaciers, Prealps, Vaud, Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The investigated area forms part of the western lobe of the Prealps (Swiss Prealps). The 25 identified fossil rock glaciers are found mainly in the Prealpes medianes...

  18. Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riaz, M.

    1977-12-01

    The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

  19. Mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, D.W.; Raven, K.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report compiles and evaluates the hydrogeologic parameters describing the flow of groundwater and transport of solutes in fractured crystalline rocks. This report describes the processes of mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rocks, and compiles and evaluates the dispersion parameters determined from both laboratory and field tracer experiments. The compiled data show that extrapolation of the reliable test results performed over intermediate scales (10's of m and 10's to 100's of hours) to larger spatial and temporal scales required for performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock is not justified. The reliable measures of longitudinal dispersivity of fractured crystalline rock are found to range between 0.4 and 7.8 m

  20. ROCK GLACIERS IN THE KOLYMA HIGHLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Galanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on remote mapping and field studies inGrand Rapids, Tumansky,Hasynsky,Del-Urechen Ridges as well as Dukchinsky and Kilgansky Mountain Massifs there were identified about 1160 landforms which morphologically are similar to the rock glaciers or they develop in close association with them. Besides tongue-shaped cirque rock glaciers originated due to ablation, a large number of lobate-shaped slope-associated rock glaciers were recognized. Significant quantity of such forms are developing within the active neotectonic areas, in zones of seismic-tectonic badland and in association with active earthquakes-controlling faults. Multiplication of regional data on volcanic-ash-chronology, lichenometry, Schmidt Hammer Test, pollen spectra and single radiocarbon data, most of the active rock glaciers were preliminary attributed to the Late Holocene.