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Sample records for strongly influence gene

  1. The downside of strong emotional memories: how human memory-related genes influence the risk for posttraumatic stress disorder--a selective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilker, Sarah; Elbert, Thomas; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2014-07-01

    A good memory for emotionally arousing experiences may be intrinsically adaptive, as it helps the organisms to predict safety and danger and to choose appropriate responses to prevent potential harm. However, under conditions of repeated exposure to traumatic stressors, strong emotional memories of these experiences can lead to the development of trauma-related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This syndrome is characterized by distressing intrusive memories that can be so intense that the survivor is unable to discriminate past from present experiences. This selective review on the role of memory-related genes in PTSD etiology is divided in three sections. First, we summarize studies indicating that the likelihood to develop PTSD depends on the cumulative exposure to traumatic stressors and on individual predisposing risk factors, including a substantial genetic contribution to PTSD risk. Second, we focus on memory processes supposed to be involved in PTSD etiology and present evidence for PTSD-associated alterations in both implicit (fear conditioning, fear extinction) and explicit memory for emotional material. This is supplemented by a brief description of structural and functional alterations in memory-relevant brain regions in PTSD. Finally, we summarize a selection of studies indicating that genetic variations found to be associated with enhanced fear conditioning, reduced fear extinction or better episodic memory in human experimental studies can have clinical implications in the case of trauma exposure and influence the risk of PTSD development. Here, we focus on genes involved in noradrenergic (ADRA2B), serotonergic (SLC6A4), and dopaminergic signaling (COMT) as well as in the molecular cascades of memory formation (PRKCA and WWC1). This is supplemented by initial evidence that such memory-related genes might also influence the response rates of exposure-based psychotherapy or pharmacological treatment of PTSD, which underscores the

  2. Recurring Necrotic Enteritis Outbreaks in Commercial Broiler Chicken Flocks Strongly Influence Toxin Gene Carriage and Species Richness in the Resident Clostridium perfringens Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Marie-Lou; Perron, Gabriel G.; Arsenault, Julie; Letellier, Ann; Boulianne, Martine; Quessy, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Extensive use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in food animals has been questioned due to the globally increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. For the poultry industry, digestive health management following AGP withdrawal in Europe has been a challenge, especially the control of necrotic enteritis. Much research work has focused on gut health in commercial broiler chicken husbandry. Understanding the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in its ecological niche, the poultry barn, is key to a sustainable and cost-effective production in the absence of AGPs. Using polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we evaluated how the C. perfringens population evolved in drug-free commercial broiler chicken farms, either healthy or affected with recurring clinical necrotic enteritis outbreaks, over a 14-month period. We show that a high genotypic richness was associated with an increased risk of clinical necrotic enteritis. Also, necrotic enteritis-affected farms had a significant reduction of C. perfringens genotypic richness over time, an increase in the proportion of C. perfringens strains harboring the cpb2 gene, the netB gene, or both. Thus, necrotic enteritis occurrence is correlated with the presence of an initial highly diverse C. perfringens population, increasing the opportunity for the selective sweep of particularly virulent genotypes. Disease outbreaks also appear to largely influence the evolution of this bacterial species in poultry farms over time. PMID:28567032

  3. Recurring Necrotic Enteritis Outbreaks in Commercial Broiler Chicken Flocks Strongly Influence Toxin Gene Carriage and Species Richness in the Resident Clostridium perfringens Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Lou Gaucher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs in food animals has been questioned due to the globally increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. For the poultry industry, digestive health management following AGP withdrawal in Europe has been a challenge, especially the control of necrotic enteritis. Much research work has focused on gut health in commercial broiler chicken husbandry. Understanding the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in its ecological niche, the poultry barn, is key to a sustainable and cost-effective production in the absence of AGPs. Using polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we evaluated how the C. perfringens population evolved in drug-free commercial broiler chicken farms, either healthy or affected with recurring clinical necrotic enteritis outbreaks, over a 14-month period. We show that a high genotypic richness was associated with an increased risk of clinical necrotic enteritis. Also, necrotic enteritis-affected farms had a significant reduction of C. perfringens genotypic richness over time, an increase in the proportion of C. perfringens strains harboring the cpb2 gene, the netB gene, or both. Thus, necrotic enteritis occurrence is correlated with the presence of an initial highly diverse C. perfringens population, increasing the opportunity for the selective sweep of particularly virulent genotypes. Disease outbreaks also appear to largely influence the evolution of this bacterial species in poultry farms over time.

  4. Recurring Necrotic Enteritis Outbreaks in Commercial Broiler Chicken Flocks Strongly Influence Toxin Gene Carriage and Species Richness in the Resident Clostridium perfringens Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Marie-Lou; Perron, Gabriel G; Arsenault, Julie; Letellier, Ann; Boulianne, Martine; Quessy, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Extensive use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in food animals has been questioned due to the globally increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. For the poultry industry, digestive health management following AGP withdrawal in Europe has been a challenge, especially the control of necrotic enteritis. Much research work has focused on gut health in commercial broiler chicken husbandry. Understanding the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in its ecological niche, the poultry barn, is key to a sustainable and cost-effective production in the absence of AGPs. Using polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we evaluated how the C. perfringens population evolved in drug-free commercial broiler chicken farms, either healthy or affected with recurring clinical necrotic enteritis outbreaks, over a 14-month period. We show that a high genotypic richness was associated with an increased risk of clinical necrotic enteritis. Also, necrotic enteritis-affected farms had a significant reduction of C. perfringens genotypic richness over time, an increase in the proportion of C. perfringens strains harboring the cpb2 gene, the netB gene, or both. Thus, necrotic enteritis occurrence is correlated with the presence of an initial highly diverse C. perfringens population, increasing the opportunity for the selective sweep of particularly virulent genotypes. Disease outbreaks also appear to largely influence the evolution of this bacterial species in poultry farms over time.

  5. A strong deletion bias in nonallelic gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assis

    Full Text Available Gene conversion is the unidirectional transfer of genetic information between orthologous (allelic or paralogous (nonallelic genomic segments. Though a number of studies have examined nucleotide replacements, little is known about length difference mutations produced by gene conversion. Here, we investigate insertions and deletions produced by nonallelic gene conversion in 338 Drosophila and 10,149 primate paralogs. Using a direct phylogenetic approach, we identify 179 insertions and 614 deletions in Drosophila paralogs, and 132 insertions and 455 deletions in primate paralogs. Thus, nonallelic gene conversion is strongly deletion-biased in both lineages, with almost 3.5 times as many conversion-induced deletions as insertions. In primates, the deletion bias is considerably stronger for long indels and, in both lineages, the per-site rate of gene conversion is orders of magnitudes higher than that of ordinary mutation. Due to this high rate, deletion-biased nonallelic gene conversion plays a key role in genome size evolution, leading to the cooperative shrinkage and eventual disappearance of selectively neutral paralogs.

  6. LAMMPS strong scaling performance optimization on Blue Gene/Q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffman, Paul; Jiang, Wei; Romero, Nichols A.

    2014-11-12

    LAMMPS "Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator" is an open-source molecular dynamics package from Sandia National Laboratories. Significant performance improvements in strong-scaling and time-to-solution for this application on IBM's Blue Gene/Q have been achieved through computational optimizations of the OpenMP versions of the short-range Lennard-Jones term of the CHARMM force field and the long-range Coulombic interaction implemented with the PPPM (particle-particle-particle mesh) algorithm, enhanced by runtime parameter settings controlling thread utilization. Additionally, MPI communication performance improvements were made to the PPPM calculation by re-engineering the parallel 3D FFT to use MPICH collectives instead of point-to-point. Performance testing was done using an 8.4-million atom simulation scaling up to 16 racks on the Mira system at Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF). Speedups resulting from this effort were in some cases over 2x.

  7. White Matter Hyperintensities Are Under Strong Genetic Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Perminder S; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A; Ames, David; Wright, Margaret J; Wen, Wei

    2016-06-01

    The genetic basis of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) is still unknown. This study examines the heritability of WMH in both sexes and in different brain regions, and the influence of age. Participants from the Older Australian Twins Study were recruited (n=320; 92 monozygotic and 68 dizygotic pairs) who volunteered for magnetic resonance imaging scans and medical assessments. Heritability, that is, the ratio of the additive genetic variance to the total phenotypic variance, was estimated using the twin design. Heritability was high for total WMH volume (0.76), and for periventricular WMH (0.64) and deep WMH (0.77), and varied from 0.18 for the cerebellum to 0.76 for the occipital lobe. The genetic correlation between deep and periventricular WMH regions was 0.85, with one additive genetics factor accounting for most of the shared variance. Heritability was consistently higher in women in the cerebral regions. Heritability in deep but not periventricular WMH declined with age, in particular after the age of 75. WMH have a strong genetic influence but this is not uniform through the brain, being higher for deep than periventricular WMH and in the cerebral regions. The genetic influence is higher in women, and there is an age-related decline, most markedly for deep WMH. The data suggest some heterogeneity in the pathogenesis of WMH for different brain regions and for men and women. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. The influence of strong decay on the spectra of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beveren, E.J.H. van.

    1983-01-01

    At present, the theory of strong interactions cannot make use of perturbative calculations. For that reason, non-perturbative methods have been proposed recently in the quark model. The author shows that a geometrical model provides an adequate description of quark confinement in hadrons and of the mass spectrum by means of exactly-solvable equations. The properties which these models must possess, are obtained from phenomenological hadron models. First, the influence of hadronic decay on the properties of hadrons is discussed. Next, a numerical method for solving a coupled-channel Schroedinger equation is presented. The author deals with coupling constants, transition potentials, radial spectra and hadronic decay widths of light and heavy mesons. The spectra and strong decay of charmonium and beautonium are investigated and theoretically described using quarks in a de Sitter geometry. A conformal Lagrangian is constructed which describes quark confinement in an anti-de Sitter geometry by spontaneous symmetry breaking of the conformal Lagrangian. (G.J.P.)

  9. Renormalisation of Nonequilibrium Phonons Under Strong Perturbative Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sushrut Madhukar

    Effects of strong perturbative influences, namely the presence of a narrow distribution of acoustic phonons, and the presence of an electron plasma, on the dynamics of nonequilibrium, near zone center, longitudinal optical phonons in GaP have been investigated in two separate experiments. The study of the effects of the interaction between the LO phonons and a heavily populated, narrow distribution of acoustic phonons lead to the observation of a new optically driven nonequilibrium phonon state. Time Resolved Coherent Antistokes Raman Scattering (TR-CARS), with picosecond resolution, was used to investigate the new mode. In order to achieve high occupation numbers in the acoustic branch, the picosecond laser pulses used were amplified up to 1.0 GW/cm^2 peak power per laser beam. An important characteristic property of the new state which differentiates it from the well known LO phonon state is the fact that rather than having the single decay rate observed under thermal equilibrium, the new state has two decay rates. Moreover, these two decay rates depend strongly on the distribution of the acoustic phonon occupation number. The coupling of the LO phonons with an electron plasma, on the other hand, was investigated by measurements of the shape of the Raman scattered line associated with the phonon-plasmon coupled mode. The plasma was generated by thermal excitation of carriers in doped samples. It was possible to study a large variety of plasma excitations by controlling the concentration of the dopant and the ambient temperature. A complete, self consistant model based on standard dielectric response theory is presented, and applied to the measurements of the phonon-plasmon coupled mode. It is possible to recover, via this model, the effective coupled mode damping rate, the plasma damping rate, and the plasma frequency as functions of ambient temperature, or the carrier concentration.

  10. Diet strongly influences the gut microbiota of surgeonfishes

    KAUST Repository

    Miyake, Sou

    2015-01-20

    Intestinal tracts are among the most densely populated microbial ecosystems. Gut microbiota and their influence on the host have been well characterized in terrestrial vertebrates but much less so in fish. This is especially true for coral reef fishes, which are among the most abundant groups of vertebrates on earth. Surgeonfishes (family: Acanthuridae) are part of a large and diverse family of reef fish that display a wide range of feeding behaviours, which in turn has a strong impact on the reef ecology. Here, we studied the composition of the gut microbiota of nine surgeonfish and three nonsurgeonfish species from the Red Sea. High-throughput pyrosequencing results showed that members of the phylum Firmicutes, especially of the genus Epulopiscium, were dominant in the gut microbiota of seven surgeonfishes. Even so, there were large inter- and intraspecies differences in the diversity of surgeonfish microbiota. Replicates of the same host species shared only a small number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs), although these accounted for most of the sequences. There was a statistically significant correlation between the phylogeny of the host and their gut microbiota, but the two were not completely congruent. Notably, the gut microbiota of three nonsurgeonfish species clustered with some surgeonfish species. The microbiota of the macro- and microalgavores was distinct, while the microbiota of the others (carnivores, omnivores and detritivores) seemed to be transient and dynamic. Despite some anomalies, both host phylogeny and diet were important drivers for the intestinal microbial community structure of surgeonfishes from the Red Sea. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Flora Aparecida [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Cvoro, Aleksandra [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Amato, Angelica A. [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Filgueira, Carly S.; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy Sigamani [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Caro Alves de Lima, Maria do; Rocha Pitta, Ivan [Laboratório de Planejamento e Síntese de Fármacos – LPSF, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco de [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Webb, Paul, E-mail: pwebb@HoustonMethodist.org [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation.

  12. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, Flora Aparecida; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Amato, Angelica A.; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Filgueira, Carly S.; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy Sigamani; Caro Alves de Lima, Maria do; Rocha Pitta, Ivan; Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco de; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation

  13. Circulating anti-Mullerian hormone levels in adult men are under a strong genetic influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Kaprio, Jaakko; Vaaralahti, Kirsi; Rissanen, Aila; Raivio, Taneli

    2012-01-01

    The determinants of serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels in adult men remain unclear. The objective of the study was to investigate the genetic and environmental components in determining postpubertal AMH levels in healthy men. Serum AMH levels, body mass index (BMI), and fat mass (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) were measured in 64 healthy male (23 monozygotic and 41 dizygotic) twin pairs. Postpubertal AMH levels were highly genetically determined (broad sense heritability 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.83-0.96). AMH correlated negatively with BMI (r = -0.26, P = 0.030) and fat mass (r = -0.23, P = 0.048). As AMH, BMI had a high heritability (0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.83), but no genetic correlation was observed between them. AMH levels in men after puberty are under a strong genetic influence. Twin modeling suggests that AMH and BMI are influenced by different sets of genes.

  14. Plant and bird presence strongly influences the microbial communities in soils of Admiralty Bay, Maritime Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Lia C R S; Yeargeau, Etienne; Balieiro, Fabiano C; Piccolo, Marisa C; Peixoto, Raquel S; Greer, Charles W; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that shape microbial communities is crucial, especially in extreme environments, like Antarctica. Two main forces were reported to influence Antarctic soil microbes: birds and plants. Both birds and plants are currently undergoing relatively large changes in their distribution and abundance due to global warming. However, we need to clearly understand the relationship between plants, birds and soil microorganisms. We therefore collected rhizosphere and bulk soils from six different sampling sites subjected to different levels of bird influence and colonized by Colobanthus quitensis and Deschampsia antarctica in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Maritime Antarctic. Microarray and qPCR assays targeting 16S rRNA genes of specific taxa were used to assess microbial community structure, composition and abundance and analyzed with a range of soil physico-chemical parameters. The results indicated significant rhizosphere effects in four out of the six sites, including areas with different levels of bird influence. Acidobacteria were significantly more abundant in soils with little bird influence (low nitrogen) and in bulk soil. In contrast, Actinobacteria were significantly more abundant in the rhizosphere of both plant species. At two of the sampling sites under strong bird influence (penguin colonies), Firmicutes were significantly more abundant in D. antarctica rhizosphere but not in C. quitensis rhizosphere. The Firmicutes were also positively and significantly correlated to the nitrogen concentrations in the soil. We conclude that the microbial communities in Antarctic soils are driven both by bird and plants, and that the effect is taxa-specific.

  15. Plant and bird presence strongly influences the microbial communities in soils of Admiralty Bay, Maritime Antarctica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia C R S Teixeira

    Full Text Available Understanding the environmental factors that shape microbial communities is crucial, especially in extreme environments, like Antarctica. Two main forces were reported to influence Antarctic soil microbes: birds and plants. Both birds and plants are currently undergoing relatively large changes in their distribution and abundance due to global warming. However, we need to clearly understand the relationship between plants, birds and soil microorganisms. We therefore collected rhizosphere and bulk soils from six different sampling sites subjected to different levels of bird influence and colonized by Colobanthus quitensis and Deschampsia antarctica in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Maritime Antarctic. Microarray and qPCR assays targeting 16S rRNA genes of specific taxa were used to assess microbial community structure, composition and abundance and analyzed with a range of soil physico-chemical parameters. The results indicated significant rhizosphere effects in four out of the six sites, including areas with different levels of bird influence. Acidobacteria were significantly more abundant in soils with little bird influence (low nitrogen and in bulk soil. In contrast, Actinobacteria were significantly more abundant in the rhizosphere of both plant species. At two of the sampling sites under strong bird influence (penguin colonies, Firmicutes were significantly more abundant in D. antarctica rhizosphere but not in C. quitensis rhizosphere. The Firmicutes were also positively and significantly correlated to the nitrogen concentrations in the soil. We conclude that the microbial communities in Antarctic soils are driven both by bird and plants, and that the effect is taxa-specific.

  16. Plant and Bird Presence Strongly Influences the Microbial Communities in Soils of Admiralty Bay, Maritime Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Lia C. R. S.; Yeargeau, Etienne; Balieiro, Fabiano C.; Piccolo, Marisa C.; Peixoto, Raquel S.; Greer, Charles W.; Rosado, Alexandre S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that shape microbial communities is crucial, especially in extreme environments, like Antarctica. Two main forces were reported to influence Antarctic soil microbes: birds and plants. Both birds and plants are currently undergoing relatively large changes in their distribution and abundance due to global warming. However, we need to clearly understand the relationship between plants, birds and soil microorganisms. We therefore collected rhizosphere and bulk soils from six different sampling sites subjected to different levels of bird influence and colonized by Colobanthus quitensis and Deschampsia antarctica in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Maritime Antarctic. Microarray and qPCR assays targeting 16S rRNA genes of specific taxa were used to assess microbial community structure, composition and abundance and analyzed with a range of soil physico-chemical parameters. The results indicated significant rhizosphere effects in four out of the six sites, including areas with different levels of bird influence. Acidobacteria were significantly more abundant in soils with little bird influence (low nitrogen) and in bulk soil. In contrast, Actinobacteria were significantly more abundant in the rhizosphere of both plant species. At two of the sampling sites under strong bird influence (penguin colonies), Firmicutes were significantly more abundant in D. antarctica rhizosphere but not in C. quitensis rhizosphere. The Firmicutes were also positively and significantly correlated to the nitrogen concentrations in the soil. We conclude that the microbial communities in Antarctic soils are driven both by bird and plants, and that the effect is taxa-specific. PMID:23840411

  17. Vertical visual features have a strong influence on cuttlefish camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, K M; Buresch, K C; Kossodo, M M; Mäthger, L M; Siemann, L A; Hanlon, R T

    2013-04-01

    Cuttlefish and other cephalopods use visual cues from their surroundings to adaptively change their body pattern for camouflage. Numerous previous experiments have demonstrated the influence of two-dimensional (2D) substrates (e.g., sand and gravel habitats) on camouflage, yet many marine habitats have varied three-dimensional (3D) structures among which cuttlefish camouflage from predators, including benthic predators that view cuttlefish horizontally against such 3D backgrounds. We conducted laboratory experiments, using Sepia officinalis, to test the relative influence of horizontal versus vertical visual cues on cuttlefish camouflage: 2D patterns on benthic substrates were tested versus 2D wall patterns and 3D objects with patterns. Specifically, we investigated the influence of (i) quantity and (ii) placement of high-contrast elements on a 3D object or a 2D wall, as well as (iii) the diameter and (iv) number of 3D objects with high-contrast elements on cuttlefish body pattern expression. Additionally, we tested the influence of high-contrast visual stimuli covering the entire 2D benthic substrate versus the entire 2D wall. In all experiments, visual cues presented in the vertical plane evoked the strongest body pattern response in cuttlefish. These experiments support field observations that, in some marine habitats, cuttlefish will respond to vertically oriented background features even when the preponderance of visual information in their field of view seems to be from the 2D surrounding substrate. Such choices highlight the selective decision-making that occurs in cephalopods with their adaptive camouflage capability.

  18. Genes Underlying Positive Influence Of Prenatal Environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genes Underlying Positive Influence Of Prenatal Environmental Enrichment And ... Prenatal environmental enrichment (EE) has been proven to positively affect but ... Conclusion: The negative-positive prenatal effect could contribute to altered ...

  19. Inelastic electron scattering influence on the strong coupling oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabovich, A.M.; Voitenko, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    The superconducting order parameters Δ and energy gap Δ g are calculated taking into account the pair-breaking inelastic quasiparticle scattering by thermal Bose-excitations, e.g., phonons. The treatment is self-consistent because the scattering amplitude depends on Δ. The superconducting transition for any strength of the inelastic scattering is the phase transition of the first kind and the dependences Δ (T) and Δ g (T) tend to rectangular curve that agrees well with the experiment for high-Tc oxides. On the basis of the developed theory the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate R s in the superconducting state is calculated. The Hebel-Slichter peak in R s (T) is shown to disappear for strong enough inelastic scattering

  20. On the strong influence of molecular interactions over large distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of liquid water show deterministic chaos, i.e. an intentionally introduced molecular position shift of an individual molecule increases exponentially by a factor of 10 in 0.23 ps. This is a Lyaponov instability. As soon as it reaches molecular scale, the direction of the resulting shift in molecular motions is unpredictable. The influence of any individual distant particle on an observed molecule will be minute, but the effect will quickly increase to molecular scale and beyond due to this exponential growth. Consequently, any individual particle in the universe will affect the behavior of any molecule within at most 33 ps after the interaction reaches it. A larger distance of the faraway particle does not decrease the influence on an observed molecule, but the effect reaches molecular scale only some ps later. Thus in evaluating the interactions, nearby and faraway molecules have to be equally accounted for. The consequences of this quickly reacting network of interactions on universal scale are fundamental. Even in a strictly deterministic view, molecular behavior is principally unpredictable, and thus has to be regarded random. Corresponding statements apply for any particles interacting. This result leads to a fundamental rethinking of the structure of interactions of molecules and particles as well as the behavior of reality.

  1. Influence of strong perturbations on wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, O. R. H.; Ewenz Rocher, M.; Rodríguez-López, E.

    2018-01-01

    Single-point hot-wire measurements are made downstream of a series of spanwise repeating obstacles that are used to generate an artificially thick turbulent boundary layer. The measurements are made in the near field, in which the turbulent boundary layer is beginning to develop from the wall-bounded wakes of the obstacles. The recent paper of Rodríguez-López et al. [E. Rodríguez-López et al., Phys. Rev. Fluids 1, 074401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.1.074401] broadly categorized the mechanisms by which canonical turbulent boundary layers eventually develop from wall-bounded wakes into two distinct mechanisms, the wall-driven and wake-driven mechanisms. In the present work we attempt to identify the geometric parameters of tripping arrays that trigger these two mechanisms by examining the spectra of the streamwise velocity fluctuations and the intermittent outer region of the flow. Using a definition reliant upon the magnitude of the velocity fluctuations, an intermittency function is devised that can discriminate between turbulent and nonturbulent flow. These results are presented along with the spectra in order to try to ascertain which aspects of a trip's geometry are more likely to favor the wall-driven or wake-driven mechanism. The geometrical aspects of the trips tested are the aspect ratio, the total blockage, and the blockage at the wall. The results indicate that the presence, or not, of perforations is the most significant factor in affecting the flow downstream. The bleed of fluid through the perforations reenergizes the mean recirculation and leads to a narrower intermittent region with a more regular turbulent-nonturbulent interface. The near-wall turbulent motions are found to recover quickly downstream of all of the trips with a wall blockage of 50%, but a clear influence of the outer fluctuations, generated by the tip vortices of the trips, is observed in the near-wall region for the high total blockage trips. The trip with 100% wall blockage is

  2. Early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Janice A; Ahmed, Rashid; Chow, Eva W C; Brzustowicz, Linda M; Bassett, Anne S

    2012-05-01

    There are few studies of environmental factors in familial forms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether childhood adversity or environmental factors were associated with schizophrenia in a familial sample where schizophrenia is associated with the NOSA1P gene. We found that a cumulative adversity index including childhood illness, family instability and cannabis use was significantly associated with narrow schizophrenia, independent of NOSA1P risk genotype, previously measured childhood trauma, covariates and familial clustering (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=1.55 (1.01, 2.38)). The results provide further support that early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High chlorpyrifos resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes: strong synergy between resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alout, H; Labbé, P; Berthomieu, A; Makoundou, P; Fort, P; Pasteur, N; Weill, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the genetic determinism of high chlorpyrifos resistance (HCR), a phenotype first described in 1999 in Culex pipiens mosquitoes surviving chlorpyrifos doses ⩾1 mg l−1 and more recently found in field samples from Tunisia, Israel or Indian Ocean islands. Through chlorpyrifos selection, we selected several HCR strains that displayed over 10 000-fold resistance. All strains were homozygous for resistant alleles at two main loci: the ace-1 gene, with the resistant ace-1R allele expressing the insensitive G119S acetylcholinesterase, and a resistant allele of an unknown gene (named T) linked to the sex and ace-2 genes. We constructed a strain carrying only the T-resistant allele and studied its resistance characteristics. By crossing this strain with strains harboring different alleles at the ace-1 locus, we showed that the resistant ace-1R and the T alleles act in strong synergy, as they elicited a resistance 100 times higher than expected from a simple multiplicative effect. This effect was specific to chlorpyrifos and parathion and was not affected by synergists. We also examined how HCR was expressed in strains carrying other ace-1-resistant alleles, such as ace-1V or the duplicated ace-1D allele, currently spreading worldwide. We identified two major parameters that influenced the level of resistance: the number and the nature of the ace-1-resistant alleles and the number of T alleles. Our data fit a model that predicts that the T allele acts by decreasing chlorpyrifos concentration in the compartment targeted in insects. PMID:26463842

  4. Strong influence of El Niño Southern Oscillation on flood risk around the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, P.J.; Jongman, B.; Kummu, M.S.; Dettinger, M.D.; Sperna Weiland, F.C.; Winsemius, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most dominant interannual signal of climate variability and has a strong influence on climate over large parts of the world. In turn, it strongly influences many natural hazards (such as hurricanes and droughts) and their resulting socioeconomic impacts,

  5. <strong>Genes Involved in Human Ribosome Biogenesis areTranscriptionally Upregulated in Colorectal Cancerstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Lamy, Philippe; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p<10-3) when compared to normal mucosa. Overexpression was independent of microsate......Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p... of microsatellite status. The promoters of the genes studied showed a significant enrichment for several transcription factor binding sites. There was a significant correlation between the number of binding site targets for these transcription factors and the observed gene transcript upregulation. The upregulation...

  6. Influence of involvement and motivation to correction on product evaluation: Asymmetry for strong and weak brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Styśko-Kunkowska Małgorzata A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, studies on motivated correction in the evaluation of branded products are rare. This experimental study with 246 participants examined how the motivation to correct the impact of brand knowledge influences the product evaluation of actual strong and weak brands in low and high involvement situations. As predicted, asymmetry between the strong and weak brands was observed. After the induction of the motivation to correction, the smaller brand effect occurred only in the cases of low involvement and the weak (negative brand. The effect of motivated correction was smaller than the effect of high involvement; therefore, the overall results suggest that conscious explicit motivation to correction evokes correction only in cases of weak brands under certain circumstances. However, this impact is not as strong as the influence of high motivation or a strong brand, even though explicit instructions are given to avoid the negative influence of the brand.

  7. Interferon-β gene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  9. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangquan; Li, Wenqi; Zhu, Jinyan; Fan, Fangjun; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Weigong; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Zhou, Yijun; Yang, Jie

    2016-05-11

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21-24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA). By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  10. Strong influence of regional species pools on continent-wide structuring of local communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Fordyce, James A.

    2012-01-01

    pool, to examine the interplay between broad-scale evolutionary and fine-scale ecological processes. Finally, a renewed interest in the influence of species source pools on communities has shown that the definition of the source pool influences interpretations of patterns of community structure. We use...... of communities along climatic gradients. We find that the average phylogenetic relatedness of species in ant communities decreases from tropical to temperate regions, but the strength of this relationship depends on the level of ecological realism in the definition of source pools. We conclude that the evolution...... of climatic niches influences the phylogenetic structure of regional source pools and that the influence of regional source pools on local community structure is strong....

  11. Strong influence of El Niño Southern Oscillation on flood risk around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Philip J.; Jongman, B; Kummu, M.; Dettinger, Mike; Sperna Weiland, F.C; Winsemius, H.C

    2014-01-01

    El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most dominant interannual signal of climate variability and has a strong influence on climate over large parts of the world. In turn, it strongly influences many natural hazards (such as hurricanes and droughts) and their resulting socioeconomic impacts, including economic damage and loss of life. However, although ENSO is known to influence hydrology in many regions of the world, little is known about its influence on the socioeconomic impacts of floods (i.e., flood risk). To address this, we developed a modeling framework to assess ENSO’s influence on flood risk at the global scale, expressed in terms of affected population and gross domestic product and economic damages. We show that ENSO exerts strong and widespread influences on both flood hazard and risk. Reliable anomalies of flood risk exist during El Niño or La Niña years, or both, in basins spanning almost half (44%) of Earth’s land surface. Our results show that climate variability, especially from ENSO, should be incorporated into disaster-risk analyses and policies. Because ENSO has some predictive skill with lead times of several seasons, the findings suggest the possibility to develop probabilistic flood-risk projections, which could be used for improved disaster planning. The findings are also relevant in the context of climate change. If the frequency and/or magnitude of ENSO events were to change in the future, this finding could imply changes in flood-risk variations across almost half of the world’s terrestrial regions.

  12. Strong influence of El Niño Southern Oscillation on flood risk around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Philip J.; Jongman, Brenden; Kummu, Matti; Dettinger, Michael D.; Sperna Weiland, Frederiek C.; Winsemius, Hessel C.

    2014-01-01

    El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most dominant interannual signal of climate variability and has a strong influence on climate over large parts of the world. In turn, it strongly influences many natural hazards (such as hurricanes and droughts) and their resulting socioeconomic impacts, including economic damage and loss of life. However, although ENSO is known to influence hydrology in many regions of the world, little is known about its influence on the socioeconomic impacts of floods (i.e., flood risk). To address this, we developed a modeling framework to assess ENSO’s influence on flood risk at the global scale, expressed in terms of affected population and gross domestic product and economic damages. We show that ENSO exerts strong and widespread influences on both flood hazard and risk. Reliable anomalies of flood risk exist during El Niño or La Niña years, or both, in basins spanning almost half (44%) of Earth’s land surface. Our results show that climate variability, especially from ENSO, should be incorporated into disaster-risk analyses and policies. Because ENSO has some predictive skill with lead times of several seasons, the findings suggest the possibility to develop probabilistic flood-risk projections, which could be used for improved disaster planning. The findings are also relevant in the context of climate change. If the frequency and/or magnitude of ENSO events were to change in the future, this finding could imply changes in flood-risk variations across almost half of the world’s terrestrial regions. PMID:25331867

  13. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  14. The influence of hyperons and strong magnetic field in neutron star properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, L.L.; Menezes, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron stars are among the most exotic objects in the universe and constitute a unique laboratory to study nuclear matter above the nuclear saturation density. In this work, we study the equation of state (EoS) of the nuclear matter within a relativistic model subject to a strong magnetic field. We then apply this EoS to study and describe some of the physical characteristics of neutron stars, especially the massradius relation and chemical compositions. To study the influence of the magnetic field and the hyperons in the stellar interior, we consider altogether four solutions: two different magnetic fields to obtain a weak and a strong influence; and two configurations: a family of neutron stars formed only by protons, electrons, and neutrons and a family formed by protons, electrons, neutrons, muons, and hyperons. The limit and the validity of the results found are discussed with some care. In all cases, the particles that constitute the neutron star are in ,B equilibrium and zero total net charge. Our work indicates that the effect of a strong magnetic field has to be taken into account in the description of magnetars, mainly if we believe that there are hyperons in their interior, in which case the influence of the magnetic field can increase the mass by more than 10 %. We have also seen that although a magnetar can reach 2.48 M0, a natural explanation of why we do not know pulsars with masses above 2.0 Mo arises. We also discuss how the magnetic field affects the strangeness fraction in some standard neutron star masses, and to conclude our paper, we revisit the direct Urca process related to the cooling of the neutron stars and show how it is affected by the hyperons and the magnetic field. (author)

  15. Experimental evidence that density dependence strongly influences plant invasions through fragmented landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2018-04-01

    Populations of range expanding species encounter patches of both favorable and unfavorable habitat as they spread across landscapes. Theory shows that increasing patchiness slows the spread of populations modeled with continuously varying population density when dispersal is not influence by the environment or individual behavior. However, as is found in uniformly favorable landscapes, spread remains driven by fecundity and dispersal from low density individuals at the invasion front. In contrast, when modeled populations are composed of discrete individuals, patchiness causes populations to build up to high density before dispersing past unsuitable habitat, introducing an important influence of density dependence on spread velocity. To test the hypothesized interaction between habitat patchiness and density dependence, we simultaneously manipulated these factors in a greenhouse system of annual plants spreading through replicated experimental landscapes. We found that increasing the size of gaps and amplifying the strength of density dependence both slowed spread velocity, but contrary to predictions, the effect of amplified density dependence was similar across all landscape types. Our results demonstrate that the discrete nature of individuals in spreading populations has a strong influence on how both landscape patchiness and density dependence influence spread through demographic and dispersal stochasticity. Both finiteness and landscape structure should be critical components to theoretical predictions of future spread for range expanding native species or invasive species colonizing new habitat. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Strong influence of regional species pools on continent-wide structuring of local communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Borregaard, Michael K; Fordyce, James A; Rahbek, Carsten; Weiser, Michael D; Dunn, Robert R; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-22

    There is a long tradition in ecology of evaluating the relative contribution of the regional species pool and local interactions on the structure of local communities. Similarly, a growing number of studies assess the phylogenetic structure of communities, relative to that in the regional species pool, to examine the interplay between broad-scale evolutionary and fine-scale ecological processes. Finally, a renewed interest in the influence of species source pools on communities has shown that the definition of the source pool influences interpretations of patterns of community structure. We use a continent-wide dataset of local ant communities and implement ecologically explicit source pool definitions to examine the relative importance of regional species pools and local interactions for shaping community structure. Then we assess which factors underlie systematic variation in the structure of communities along climatic gradients. We find that the average phylogenetic relatedness of species in ant communities decreases from tropical to temperate regions, but the strength of this relationship depends on the level of ecological realism in the definition of source pools. We conclude that the evolution of climatic niches influences the phylogenetic structure of regional source pools and that the influence of regional source pools on local community structure is strong.

  17. Codon usage and amino acid usage influence genes expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Prosenjit; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2018-02-01

    Highly expressed genes in any species differ in the usage frequency of synonymous codons. The relative recurrence of an event of the favored codon pair (amino acid pairs) varies between gene and genomes due to varying gene expression and different base composition. Here we propose a new measure for predicting the gene expression level, i.e., codon plus amino bias index (CABI). Our approach is based on the relative bias of the favored codon pair inclination among the genes, illustrated by analyzing the CABI score of the Medicago truncatula genes. CABI showed strong correlation with all other widely used measures (CAI, RCBS, SCUO) for gene expression analysis. Surprisingly, CABI outperforms all other measures by showing better correlation with the wet-lab data. This emphasizes the importance of the neighboring codons of the favored codon in a synonymous group while estimating the expression level of a gene.

  18. Candidate genes detected in transcriptome studies are strongly dependent on genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Sarup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome transcriptomic studies can point to potential candidate genes for organismal traits. However, the importance of potential candidates is rarely followed up through functional studies and/or by comparing results across independent studies. We have analysed the overlap of candidate genes identified from studies of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster using similar technical platforms. We found little overlap across studies between putative candidate genes for the same traits in the same sex. Instead there was a high degree of overlap between different traits and sexes within the same genetic backgrounds. Putative candidates found using transcriptomics therefore appear very sensitive to genetic background and this can mask or override effects of treatments. The functional importance of putative candidate genes emerging from transcriptome studies needs to be validated through additional experiments and in future studies we suggest a focus on the genes, networks and pathways affecting traits in a consistent manner across backgrounds.

  19. Candidate Genes Detected in Transcriptome Studies are Strongly Dependent on Genetic Background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2011-01-01

    identified from studies of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster using similar technical platforms. We found little overlap across studies between putative candidate genes for the same traits in the same sex. Instead there was a high degree of overlap between different traits and sexes within the same...

  20. Complete plastid genome sequences suggest strong selection for retention of photosynthetic genes in the parasitic plant genus Cuscuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Joel R; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Boore, Jeffrey L; de Pamphilis, Claude W

    2007-10-24

    Plastid genome content and protein sequence are highly conserved across land plants and their closest algal relatives. Parasitic plants, which obtain some or all of their nutrition through an attachment to a host plant, are often a striking exception. Heterotrophy can lead to relaxed constraint on some plastid genes or even total gene loss. We sequenced plastid genomes of two species in the parasitic genus Cuscuta along with a non-parasitic relative, Ipomoea purpurea, to investigate changes in the plastid genome that may result from transition to the parasitic lifestyle. Aside from loss of all ndh genes, Cuscuta exaltata retains photosynthetic and photorespiratory genes that evolve under strong selective constraint. Cuscuta obtusiflora has incurred substantially more change to its plastid genome, including loss of all genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase. Despite extensive change in gene content and greatly increased rate of overall nucleotide substitution, C. obtusiflora also retains all photosynthetic and photorespiratory genes with only one minor exception. Although Epifagus virginiana, the only other parasitic plant with its plastid genome sequenced to date, has lost a largely overlapping set of transfer-RNA and ribosomal genes as Cuscuta, it has lost all genes related to photosynthesis and maintains a set of genes which are among the most divergent in Cuscuta. Analyses demonstrate photosynthetic genes are under the highest constraint of any genes within the plastid genomes of Cuscuta, indicating a function involving RuBisCo and electron transport through photosystems is still the primary reason for retention of the plastid genome in these species.

  1. Complete plastid genome sequences suggest strong selection for retention of photosynthetic genes in the parasitic plant genus Cuscuta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehl Jennifer V

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastid genome content and protein sequence are highly conserved across land plants and their closest algal relatives. Parasitic plants, which obtain some or all of their nutrition through an attachment to a host plant, are often a striking exception. Heterotrophy can lead to relaxed constraint on some plastid genes or even total gene loss. We sequenced plastid genomes of two species in the parasitic genus Cuscuta along with a non-parasitic relative, Ipomoea purpurea, to investigate changes in the plastid genome that may result from transition to the parasitic lifestyle. Results Aside from loss of all ndh genes, Cuscuta exaltata retains photosynthetic and photorespiratory genes that evolve under strong selective constraint. Cuscuta obtusiflora has incurred substantially more change to its plastid genome, including loss of all genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase. Despite extensive change in gene content and greatly increased rate of overall nucleotide substitution, C. obtusiflora also retains all photosynthetic and photorespiratory genes with only one minor exception. Conclusion Although Epifagus virginiana, the only other parasitic plant with its plastid genome sequenced to date, has lost a largely overlapping set of transfer-RNA and ribosomal genes as Cuscuta, it has lost all genes related to photosynthesis and maintains a set of genes which are among the most divergent in Cuscuta. Analyses demonstrate photosynthetic genes are under the highest constraint of any genes within the plastid genomes of Cuscuta, indicating a function involving RuBisCo and electron transport through photosystems is still the primary reason for retention of the plastid genome in these species.

  2. Floral contrivances and specialised pollination mechanism strongly influence mixed mating in Wrightia tomentosa (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, C; Singh, V K; Das, S; Tandon, R

    2018-05-01

    Reproductive success of a plant species is largely influenced by the outcome of mating pattern in a population. It is believed that a significantly larger proportion of animal-pollinated plants have evolved a mixed-mating strategy, the extent of which may vary among species. It is thus pertinent to investigate the key contributors to mating success, especially to identify the reproductive constraints in depauperate populations of threatened plant species. We examined the contribution of floral architecture, pollination mechanism and breeding system on the extent of outcrossing rate in a near-threatened tree species, Wrightia tomentosa. The breeding system was ascertained from controlled pollination experiments. In order to determine outcrossing rate, 60 open-pollinated progeny were analysed using an AFLP markers. Although the trees are self-compatible, herkogamy and compartmentalisation of pollen and nectar in different chambers of the floral tube effectively prevent spontaneous autogamy. Pollination is achieved through specialised interaction with moths. Differential foraging behaviour of settling moths and hawkmoths leads to different proportions of geitonogamous and xenogamous pollen on the stigma. However, most open-pollinated progeny were the result of xenogamy (outcrossing rate, tm = 0.68). The study shows that floral contrivances and pollination system have a strong influence on mating pattern. The differential foraging behaviour of the pollinators causes deposition of a mixture of self- and cross-pollen to produce a mixed brood. Inbreeding depression and geitonogamy appear to play a significant role in sustaining mixed mating in this species. © 2018 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Dynamics of liquid metal droplets and jets influenced by a strong axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, D.; Karcher, Ch

    2017-07-01

    Non-contact electromagnetic control and shaping of liquid metal free surfaces is crucial in a number of high-temperature metallurgical processes like levitation melting and electromagnetic sealing, among others. Other examples are the electromagnetic bending or stabilization of liquid metal jets that frequently occur in casting or fusion applications. Within this context, we experimentally study the influence of strong axial magnetic fields on the dynamics of falling metal droplets and liquid metal jets. GaInSn in eutectic composition is used as test melt being liquid at room temperature. In the experiments, we use a cryogen-free superconducting magnet (CFM) providing steady homogeneous fields of up to 5 T and allowing a tilt angle between the falling melt and the magnet axis. We vary the magnetic flux density, the tilt angle, the liquid metal flow rate, and the diameter and material of the nozzle (electrically conducting/insulating). Hence, the experiments cover a parameter range of Hartmann numbers Ha, Reynolds numbers Re, and Weber numbers We within 0 rotation ceases and the droplets are stretched in the field direction. Moreover, we observe that the jet breakup into droplets (spheroidization) is suppressed, and in the case of electrically conducting nozzles and tilt, the jets are bent towards the field axis.

  4. Influence of crystallographic orientation on the fracture toughness of strongly textured Ti--6Al--4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    Fracture toughness values for six test piece orientations in a strongly textured 57-mm thick rolled and annealed Ti--6Al--4V bar have been related to their crystallographic orientations. The K/sub Ic/ values, ranging from 46.3 to 93.3 MPa/m, could be divided into two groups. High values (74.7 to 93.3 MPa/m) were obtained when a crystallographic deformation mode ([1010] or [1122] slip) was parallel to the planes of maximum shear stress for plane strain conditions, and the significant fractographic feature for this group was a clearly defined stretch zone. In the second group, where crystallographic deformation modes were not aligned with the planes of maximum shear stress, much lower K/sub Ic/ values were recorded (46.3 to 50.7 MPa/m). In this case there was no stretch zone and, in addition, some test pieces appeared, in effect, to have delaminated in the immediate vicinity of the crack tip. Similar trends were also indicated by the results of Charpy impact tests. The influence of in-plane elastic anisotropy on fracture toughness is discussed, and the importance of test piece geometry highlighted. From the results it could be inferred that high toughness in anisotropic materials is possible only in certain orientations; stretch zone formation and fatigue striation formation are by the same mechanical process; and there will be significantly different critical crack sizes in textured titanium alloy components

  5. PRDM9 variation strongly influences recombination hot-spot activity and meiotic instability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Ingrid L; Neumann, Rita; Lam, Kwan-Wood G; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Odenthal-Hesse, Linda; May, Celia A; Jeffreys, Alec J

    2010-10-01

    PRDM9 has recently been identified as a likely trans regulator of meiotic recombination hot spots in humans and mice. PRDM9 contains a zinc finger array that, in humans, can recognize a short sequence motif associated with hot spots, with binding to this motif possibly triggering hot-spot activity via chromatin remodeling. We now report that human genetic variation at the PRDM9 locus has a strong effect on sperm hot-spot activity, even at hot spots lacking the sequence motif. Subtle changes within the zinc finger array can create hot-spot nonactivating or enhancing variants and can even trigger the appearance of a new hot spot, suggesting that PRDM9 is a major global regulator of hot spots in humans. Variation at the PRDM9 locus also influences aspects of genome instability-specifically, a megabase-scale rearrangement underlying two genomic disorders as well as minisatellite instability-implicating PRDM9 as a risk factor for some pathological genome rearrangements.

  6. Genetic signature of strong recent positive selection at interleukin-32 gene in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Rasool Asif

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Identification of the candidate genes that play key roles in phenotypic variations can provide new information about evolution and positive selection. Interleukin (IL-32 is involved in many biological processes, however, its role for the immune response against various diseases in mammals is poorly understood. Therefore, the current investigation was performed for the better understanding of the molecular evolution and the positive selection of single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-32 gene. Methods By using fixation index (FST based method, IL-32 (9375 gene was found to be outlier and under significant positive selection with the provisional combined allocation of mean heterozygosity and FST. Using nucleotide sequences of 11 mammalian species from National Center for Biotechnology Information database, the evolutionary selection of IL-32 gene was determined using Maximum likelihood model method, through four models (M1a, M2a, M7, and M8 in Codeml program of phylogenetic analysis by maximum liklihood. Results IL-32 is detected under positive selection using the FST simulations method. The phylogenetic tree revealed that goat IL-32 was in close resemblance with sheep IL-32. The coding nucleotide sequences were compared among 11 species and it was found that the goat IL-32 gene shared identity with sheep (96.54%, bison (91.97%, camel (58.39%, cat (56.59%, buffalo (56.50%, human (56.13%, dog (50.97%, horse (54.04%, and rabbit (53.41% respectively. Conclusion This study provides evidence for IL-32 gene as under significant positive selection in goat.

  7. Associated genetic syndromes and extracardiac malformations strongly influence outcomes of fetuses with congenital heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensemlali, Myriam; Bajolle, Fanny; Ladouceur, Magalie; Fermont, Laurent; Lévy, Marilyne; Le Bidois, Jérôme; Salomon, Laurent J; Bonnet, Damien

    2016-05-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is often associated with extracardiac malformations (ECMs) and genetic syndromes. To determine the effect of cytogenetic anomalies and/or ECMs associated with CHD on parental decision to choose termination of pregnancy (TOP) or compassionate care (CC), as well as on the outcome of children born alive. This 10-year retrospective study included all prenatally diagnosed cases of CHD in a single tertiary referral centre. From January 2002 to December 2011, 2036 consecutive cases of fetal CHD (798 TOPs and 1238 live births, including 59 with postnatal CC) were included. CHD was associated with a known cytogenetic anomaly in 9.8% of cases and a major ECM in 11.7% of cases. The proportion of prenatally identified associated cytogenetic anomalies was significantly lower in the live-birth group than in the TOP plus CC group (4.2% vs 17.5%; P<0.001); this was also true for ECMs (8.1% vs 16.7%; P<0.001). The mortality rate was higher in the group with an associated cytogenetic anomaly or ECM (29.1%) than in cases with isolated CHD; a 2.4-fold increase in the death rate was observed (95% confidence interval 1.34-4.38; P=0.003). These associations remained significant after multivariable analysis, including the severity of the CHD (uni- or biventricular physiology). Prenatal diagnosis of a known cytogenetic anomaly or major ECM strongly influences parental decision to choose TOP or postnatal CC. Genetic syndromes and ECMs are associated with a higher mortality rate, independent of the complexity of the CHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Burden analysis of rare microdeletions suggests a strong impact of neurodevelopmental genes in genetic generalised epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Ruppert, Ann-Kathrin; Trucks, Holger

    2015-01-01

    contribution of recurrent microdeletions at genomic rearrangement hotspots and non-recurrent microdeletions, and 3) identify potential candidate genes for GGE. We found a significant excess of microdeletions in 7.3% of GGE patients compared to 4.0% in controls (P = 1.8 x 10-7; OR = 1.9). Recurrent...

  9. Strong combined gene-environment effects in anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide-positive rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Garred, Peter

    2007-01-01

    To study the role of shared epitope (SE) susceptibility genes, alone and in combination with tobacco smoking and other environmental risk factors, for risk of subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) defined by the presence or absence of serum antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs)....

  10. Detection of the Helicobacter pylori dupA gene is strongly affected by the PCR design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Loffeld, Ruud J L F; Constancia, Ashandra C; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Kusters, Johannes G

    2014-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori virulence gene dupA is usually detected by PCR, but the primer binding sites used are highly variable. Our newly designed qPCR against a conserved region of dupA was positive in 64.2% of 394 clinical isolates while the positivity rate of the commonly used PCRs ranged from

  11. Genome sequencing of herb Tulsi (Ocimum tenuiflorum) unravels key genes behind its strong medicinal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Atul K; Chacko, Anita R; Gandhimathi, A; Ghosh, Pritha; Harini, K; Joseph, Agnel P; Joshi, Adwait G; Karpe, Snehal D; Kaushik, Swati; Kuravadi, Nagesh; Lingu, Chandana S; Mahita, J; Malarini, Ramya; Malhotra, Sony; Malini, Manoharan; Mathew, Oommen K; Mutt, Eshita; Naika, Mahantesha; Nitish, Sathyanarayanan; Pasha, Shaik Naseer; Raghavender, Upadhyayula S; Rajamani, Anantharamanan; Shilpa, S; Shingate, Prashant N; Singh, Heikham Russiachand; Sukhwal, Anshul; Sunitha, Margaret S; Sumathi, Manojkumar; Ramaswamy, S; Gowda, Malali; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2015-08-28

    Krishna Tulsi, a member of Lamiaceae family, is a herb well known for its spiritual, religious and medicinal importance in India. The common name of this plant is 'Tulsi' (or 'Tulasi' or 'Thulasi') and is considered sacred by Hindus. We present the draft genome of Ocimum tenuiflurum L (subtype Krishna Tulsi) in this report. The paired-end and mate-pair sequence libraries were generated for the whole genome sequenced with the Illumina Hiseq 1000, resulting in an assembled genome of 374 Mb, with a genome coverage of 61 % (612 Mb estimated genome size). We have also studied transcriptomes (RNA-Seq) of two subtypes of O. tenuiflorum, Krishna and Rama Tulsi and report the relative expression of genes in both the varieties. The pathways leading to the production of medicinally-important specialized metabolites have been studied in detail, in relation to similar pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. Expression levels of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes in leaf samples of Krishna Tulsi were observed to be relatively high, explaining the purple colouration of Krishna Tulsi leaves. The expression of six important genes identified from genome data were validated by performing q-RT-PCR in different tissues of five different species, which shows the high extent of urosolic acid-producing genes in young leaves of the Rama subtype. In addition, the presence of eugenol and ursolic acid, implied as potential drugs in the cure of many diseases including cancer was confirmed using mass spectrometry. The availability of the whole genome of O.tenuiflorum and our sequence analysis suggests that small amino acid changes at the functional sites of genes involved in metabolite synthesis pathways confer special medicinal properties to this herb.

  12. Novel strong tissue specific promoter for gene expression in human germ cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmin Denis

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue specific promoters may be utilized for a variety of applications, including programmed gene expression in cell types, tissues and organs of interest, for developing different cell culture models or for use in gene therapy. We report a novel, tissue-specific promoter that was identified and engineered from the native upstream regulatory region of the human gene NDUFV1 containing an endogenous retroviral sequence. Results Among seven established human cell lines and five primary cultures, this modified NDUFV1 upstream sequence (mNUS was active only in human undifferentiated germ-derived cells (lines Tera-1 and EP2102, where it demonstrated high promoter activity (~twice greater than that of the SV40 early promoter, and comparable to the routinely used cytomegaloviral promoter. To investigate the potential applicability of the mNUS promoter for biotechnological needs, a construct carrying a recombinant cytosine deaminase (RCD suicide gene under the control of mNUS was tested in cell lines of different tissue origin. High cytotoxic effect of RCD with a cell-death rate ~60% was observed only in germ-derived cells (Tera-1, whereas no effect was seen in a somatic, kidney-derived control cell line (HEK293. In further experiments, we tested mNUS-driven expression of a hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase (SB100X. The mNUS-SB100X construct mediated stable transgene insertions exclusively in germ-derived cells, thereby providing further evidence of tissue-specificity of the mNUS promoter. Conclusions We conclude that mNUS may be used as an efficient promoter for tissue-specific gene expression in human germ-derived cells in many applications. Our data also suggest that the 91 bp-long sequence located exactly upstream NDUFV1 transcriptional start site plays a crucial role in the activity of this gene promoter in vitro in the majority of tested cell types (10/12, and an important role - in the rest two cell lines.

  13. Detection of the Helicobacter pylori dupA gene is strongly affected by the PCR design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Loffeld, Ruud J L F; Constancia, Ashandra C; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Kusters, Johannes G

    2014-11-01

    The Helicobacter pylori virulence gene dupA is usually detected by PCR, but the primer binding sites used are highly variable. Our newly designed qPCR against a conserved region of dupA was positive in 64.2% of 394 clinical isolates while the positivity rate of the commonly used PCRs ranged from 29.9% to 37.8%. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Differentiating weak ties and strong ties among external sources of influences for enterprise resource planning (ERP) adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Benoit; Léger, Pierre-Majorique; Larocque, Denis

    2012-05-01

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems represent a major IT adoption decision. ERP adoption decisions, in the chemicals and allied products sectors, were examined between 1994 and 2005. Networks of strong ties and weak ties partners are investigated. Results show that neighbouring companies linked with strong ties can have an influence on organisations making such adoption decision. Past decisions made by major trading partners have a significant influence on the decision to adopt an ERP system for a given organisation. This reflects the complex nature of the knowledge required for such adoption.

  15. Influence of artificial carbon nanotubes on expression of Rb gene and viability of lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhornik, E.V.

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnologies that received the development last decades are the most perspective field of modern engineering and medicine. Alongside with the strong advantages nanoparticles can render negative influence on living cells and organisms. In connection with increasing use of nanotechnologies there is the necessity of studying the potential toxicity related to influence of nanoparticles. The changes in expression of Rb gene of human lymphocytes after short-term action of multiwalled carbon nanotubes at 100 mg/ml concentration was investigated to assess the potential risks of using the artificial nanotubes, and also the vitality of blood lymphocytes after their incubation with artificial nanotubes. The increase in the expression of Rb gene in time-dependent manner and the influence of nanoparticles on survival rate of lymphocytes in comparison with control samples were shown. (authors)

  16. Immune gene expression in Bombus terrestris: signatures of infection despite strong variation among populations, colonies, and sister workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska S Brunner

    Full Text Available Ecological immunology relies on variation in resistance to parasites. Colonies of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris vary in their susceptibility to the trypanosome gut parasite Crithidia bombi, which reduces colony fitness. To understand the possible origin of this variation in resistance we assayed the expression of 28 immunologically important genes in foraging workers. We deliberately included natural variation of the host "environment" by using bees from colonies collected in two locations and sampling active foraging workers that were not age controlled. Immune gene expression patterns in response to C. bombi showed remarkable variability even among genetically similar sisters. Nevertheless, expression varied with parasite exposure, among colonies and, perhaps surprisingly, strongly among populations (collection sites. While only the antimicrobial peptide abaecin is universally up regulated upon exposure, linear discriminant analysis suggests that the overall exposure effect is driven by a combination of several immune pathways and further immune functions such as ROS regulation. Also, the differences among colonies in their immune gene expression profiles provide clues to the mechanistic basis of well-known inter-colony variation in susceptibility to this parasite. Our results show that transcriptional responses to parasite exposure can be detected in ecologically heterogeneous groups despite strong background noise.

  17. A comparative genomics screen identifies a Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 sodM-like gene strongly expressed within host plant nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queiroux Clothilde

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used the genomic data in the Integrated Microbial Genomes system of the Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute to make predictions about rhizobial open reading frames that play a role in nodulation of host plants. The genomic data was screened by searching for ORFs conserved in α-proteobacterial rhizobia, but not conserved in closely-related non-nitrogen-fixing α-proteobacteria. Results Using this approach, we identified many genes known to be involved in nodulation or nitrogen fixation, as well as several new candidate genes. We knocked out selected new genes and assayed for the presence of nodulation phenotypes and/or nodule-specific expression. One of these genes, SMc00911, is strongly expressed by bacterial cells within host plant nodules, but is expressed minimally by free-living bacterial cells. A strain carrying an insertion mutation in SMc00911 is not defective in the symbiosis with host plants, but in contrast to expectations, this mutant strain is able to out-compete the S. meliloti 1021 wild type strain for nodule occupancy in co-inoculation experiments. The SMc00911 ORF is predicted to encode a “SodM-like” (superoxide dismutase-like protein containing a rhodanese sulfurtransferase domain at the N-terminus and a chromate-resistance superfamily domain at the C-terminus. Several other ORFs (SMb20360, SMc01562, SMc01266, SMc03964, and the SMc01424-22 operon identified in the screen are expressed at a moderate level by bacteria within nodules, but not by free-living bacteria. Conclusions Based on the analysis of ORFs identified in this study, we conclude that this comparative genomics approach can identify rhizobial genes involved in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with host plants, although none of the newly identified genes were found to be essential for this process.

  18. SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds induce RISC-mediated antisense strand selection and strong gene-silencing activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Takanori, E-mail: kubo-t@yasuda-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmacy, Yasuda Women' s University, 6-13-1 Yasuhigashi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima 731-0153 (Japan); Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi [Faculty of Pharmacy, Yasuda Women' s University, 6-13-1 Yasuhigashi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima 731-0153 (Japan); Division of Genetics, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Takei, Yoshifumi [Department of Biochemistry, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumi-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mihara, Keichiro [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Sato, Yuichiro; Seyama, Toshio [Faculty of Pharmacy, Yasuda Women' s University, 6-13-1 Yasuhigashi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima 731-0153 (Japan)

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds (Ar-siRNAs) at 5 Prime -sense strand were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs increased resistance against nuclease degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs were thermodynamically stable compared with the unmodified siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High levels of cellular uptake and cytoplasmic localization were found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong gene-silencing efficacy was exhibited in the Ar-siRNAs. -- Abstract: Short interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells. In this study, we focused on the development of siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds in order to improve the potency of RNAi and thus to overcome several problems with siRNAs, such as cellular delivery and nuclease stability. The siRNAs conjugated with phenyl, hydroxyphenyl, naphthyl, and pyrenyl derivatives showed strong resistance to nuclease degradation, and were thermodynamically stable compared with unmodified siRNA. A high level of membrane permeability in HeLa cells was also observed. Moreover, these siRNAs exhibited enhanced RNAi efficacy, which exceeded that of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified siRNAs, against exogenous Renilla luciferase in HeLa cells. In particular, abundant cytoplasmic localization and strong gene-silencing efficacy were found in the siRNAs conjugated with phenyl and hydroxyphenyl derivatives. The novel siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds are promising candidates for a new generation of modified siRNAs that can solve many of the problems associated with RNAi technology.

  19. Network Analysis of Human Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, Ettie M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections constitute a high burden of pulmonary disease in humans, resulting in over 1.5 million deaths per year. Building on the premise that genetic factors influence the instance, progression, and defense of infectious disease, we undertook a systems biology approach to investigate relationships among genetic factors that may play a role in increased susceptibility or control of mycobacterial infections. We combined literature and database mining with network analysis and pathway enrichment analysis to examine genes, pathways, and networks, involved in the human response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This approach allowed us to examine functional relationships among reported genes, and to identify novel genes and enriched pathways that may play a role in mycobacterial susceptibility or control. Our findings suggest that the primary pathways and genes influencing mycobacterial infection control involve an interplay between innate and adaptive immune proteins and pathways. Signaling pathways involved in autoimmune disease were significantly enriched as revealed in our networks. Mycobacterial disease susceptibility networks were also examined within the context of gene-chemical relationships, in order to identify putative drugs and nutrients with potential beneficial immunomodulatory or anti-mycobacterial effects. PMID:26751573

  20. Restriction genes for retroviruses influence the risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Hansen, Bettina; Nissen, Kari K

    2013-01-01

    known for a long time. Today human restriction genes for retroviruses include amongst others TRIMs, APOBEC3s, BST2 and TREXs. We have therefore looked for a role of these retroviral restriction genes in MS using genetic epidemiology. We here report that markers in two TRIMs, TRIM5 and TRIM22...... and a marker in BST2, associated statistically with the risk of getting MS, while markers in or near APOBEC3s and TREXs showed little or no effect. This indicates that the two TRIMs and BST2 influence the risk of disease and thus supports the hypothesis of a viral involvement....

  1. Early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition

    OpenAIRE

    Husted, Janice A.; Ahmed, Rashid; Chow, Eva W.C.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    There are few studies of environmental factors in familial forms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether childhood adversity or environmental factors were associated with schizophrenia in a familial sample where schizophrenia is associated with the NOSA1P gene. We found that a cumulative adversity index including childhood illness, family instability and cannabis use was significantly associated with narrow schizophrenia, independent of NOSA1P risk genotype, previously measured childhood tr...

  2. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism strongly influenced by non-magnetic cover layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, K.; Audehm, P.; Schütz, G.; Goering, E.; Pathak, M.; Chetry, K.B.; LeClair, P.R.; Gupta, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Energy filtering gives much larger sampling depth and escape length as expected. •XMCD sum rules could be dramatically altered by this effect. •Strong enhanced effective escape length for buried layers. •A “universal curve” model gives semi quantitative understanding. •Buried layers are more sensitive to self-absorption phenomena. -- Abstract: Total electron yield (TEY) is the dominating measurement mode in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), where the sampling depth is generally assumed to be quite small and constant, and the related self-absorption or saturation phenomena are about to be negligible at normal incidence conditions. From the OK edge to CrL 2,3 edge XAS ratio we determined a strong change in the effective electron escape length between an uncovered and a RuO 2 covered CrO 2 sample. This effect has been explained by a simple electron energy filtering model, providing a semi quantitative description. In addition, this simple model can quantitatively describe the unexpected reduced and positive CrL 2,3 X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) signal of a RuO 2 /CrO 2 bilayer, while previous results have identified a clear negative Cr magnetization at the RuO 2 /CrO 2 interface. In our case this escape length enhancement has strong impact on the XMCD sum rule results and in general it provides much deeper sampling depth, but also larger self-absorption or saturation effects

  3. STRATEGIC INFLUENCE OF PROMOTIONAL MIX ON ORGANISATION SALE TURNOVER IN THE FACE OF STRONG COMPETITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde BAYODE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aim at study strategic influence of promotional mix onorganisation sale turnover in manufacturing organisation. The research datawere gathered through the use of secondary data and primary data,secondary data included 6years annual report comprising the sales turnover(2005-2009 and questionnaire which is an instrument of primary datacollection. The questionnaires were administered to the workers of 7upCompany and some customers in Solebo Estate in Lagos. The researcheradopted the simple percentage and regression model for the analysis of thecollected data.. The result of the findings revealed that strategic promotionalmix influences the sale turnover with little 25% while other variable notincluded in the variable tested takes the larger 75% that will rapidly lead toorganisation growth. Since promotional mix constitute few % of variable thatcan push an organisation to the highest level, therefore other factors ofmarketing mix such as product development, effective pricing, distribution ofright quality and quantity to the consumers should be appropriatelyconsidered.

  4. Strong influence of regional species pools on continent-wide structuring of local communities

    OpenAIRE

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Borregaard, Michael K.; Fordyce, James A.; Rahbek, Carsten; Weiser, Michael D.; Dunn, Robert R.; Sanders, Nathan J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a long tradition in ecology of evaluating the relative contribution of the regional species pool and local interactions on the structure of local communities. Similarly, a growing number of studies assess the phylogenetic structure of communities, relative to that in the regional species pool, to examine the interplay between broad-scale evolutionary and fine-scale ecological processes. Finally, a renewed interest in the influence of species source pools on communities has shown that...

  5. Glacial runoff strongly influences food webs in Gulf of Alaska fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimitsu, M.; Piatt, J. F.; Mueter, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    Melting glaciers contribute large volumes of freshwater to the Gulf of Alaska coast. Rates of glacier volume loss have increased markedly in recent decades, raising concern about the eventual loss of glaciers as a source of freshwater in coastal waters. To better understand the influence of glacier melt water on fjord ecosystems, we sampled oceanography, nutrients, zooplankton, forage fish, and seabirds within four fjords in the coastal Gulf of Alaska. We used generalized additive models and geostatistics to identify the range of influence of glacier runoff in fjords of varying estuarine and topographic complexity. We also modeled the responses of chlorophyll a concentration, copepod biomass, fish and seabird abundance to physical, nutrient and biotic predictor variables. Physical and nutrient signatures of glacial runoff extended 10-20 km into coastal fjords. Glacially modified physical gradients and among-fjord differences explained 66% of the variation in phytoplankton abundance, which drives ecosystem structure at higher trophic levels. Copepod, euphausiid, fish and seabird distribution and abundance were also related to environmental gradients that could be traced to glacial freshwater input. Seabird density was predicted by prey availability and silica concentrations, which may indicate upwelling areas where this nutrient is in excess. Similarities in ecosystem structure among fjords were due to influx of cold, fresh, sediment and nutrient laden water, while differences were due to fjord topography and the relative importance of estuarine vs. ocean influences. We anticipate continued changes in the volume and magnitude of glacial runoff will affect coastal marine food webs in the future.

  6. The strong selective sweep candidate gene ADRA2C does not explain domestication related changes in the stress response of chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Elfwing

    Full Text Available Analysis of selective sweeps to pinpoint causative genomic regions involved in chicken domestication has revealed a strong selective sweep on chromosome 4 in layer chickens. The autoregulatory α-adrenergic receptor 2C (ADRA2C gene is the closest to the selective sweep and was proposed as an important gene in the domestication of layer chickens. The ADRA2C promoter region was also hypermethylated in comparison to the non-selected ancestor of all domesticated chicken breeds, the Red Junglefowl, further supporting its relevance. In mice the receptor is involved in the fight-or-flight response as it modulates epinephrine release from the adrenals. To investigate the involvement of ADRA2C in chicken domestication, we measured gene expression in the adrenals and radiolabeled receptor ligand in three brain regions comparing the domestic White Leghorn strain with the wild ancestor Red Junglefowl. In adrenals ADRA2C was twofold greater expressed than the related receptor gene ADRA2A, indicating that ADRA2C is the predominant modulator of epinephrine release but no strain differences were measured. In hypothalamus and amygdala, regions associated with the stress response, and in striatum, receptor binding pIC50 values ranged between 8.1-8.4, and the level was not influenced by the genotyped allele. Because chicken strains differ in morphology, physiology and behavior, differences attributed to a single gene may be lost in the noise caused by the heterogeneous genetic background. Therefore an F10 advanced intercross strain between White Leghorn and Red Junglefowl was used to investigate effects of ADRA2C alleles on fear related behaviors and fecundity. We did not find compelling genotype effects in open field, tonic immobility, aerial predator, associative learning or fecundity. Therefore we conclude that ADRA2C is probably not involved in the domestication of the stress response in chicken, and the strong selective sweep is probably caused by selection

  7. Factors influencing the potential for strong brand relationships with consumer product brands: An overview and research agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Bergkvist, Lars; Francis, Julie

    Based on the premise that consumer product brands are different with respect to their potential to form strong long-term relationships with consumers, this paper aims to identify factors that influence brands' potential for strong long-term relationships and to suggest how these can be empirically...... investigated. The paper reviews brand-centric and consumer-centric research and identifies twelve brand variables that may influence the relationship potential of consumer product brands. A research agenda is suggested and a number of issues that needs to be resolved before empirical research can be carried...... out are discussed. The paper concludes by speculating on possible outcomes in future empirical studies and it is suggested that multiple brand variables will have to be employed to evaluate the relationship potential of brands....

  8. Environmental factors influencing gene transfer agent (GTA mediated transduction in the subtropical ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D McDaniel

    Full Text Available Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT. However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10-30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA

  9. Garlic Influences Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Craig S; Dawson, Harry D; Novotny, Janet A

    2016-02-01

    There is a large body of preclinical research aimed at understanding the roles of garlic and garlic-derived preparations in the promotion of human health. Most of this research has targeted the possible functions of garlic in maintaining cardiovascular health and in preventing and treating cancer. A wide range of outcome variables has been used to investigate the bioactivity of garlic, ranging from direct measures of health status such as cholesterol concentrations, blood pressure, and changes in tumor size and number, to molecular and biochemical measures such as mRNA gene expression, protein concentration, enzyme activity, and histone acetylation status. Determination of how garlic influences mRNA gene expression has proven to be a valuable approach to elucidating the mechanisms of garlic bioactivity. Preclinical studies investigating the health benefits of garlic far outnumber human studies and have made frequent use of mRNA gene expression measurement. There is an immediate need to understand mRNA gene expression in humans as well. Although safety and ethical constraints limit the types of available human tissue, peripheral whole blood is readily accessible, and measuring mRNA gene expression in whole blood may provide a unique window to understanding how garlic intake affects human health. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. The influence on biotissue laser resection of a strongly absorbing layer at the optical fiber tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Kuznetsova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a method of laser resection using the silica glass core from which the cladding layer has been removed as the cutting part of a laser scalpel. An absorbing layer coating the silica fiber tip markedly alters its biotissue cutting characteristics. The results of histological studies of skin after exposure to a laser scalpel with and without a strongly absorbing coating (SAC at a wavelength of 0.97μm show that resection using a coated scalpel is more sparing. When an uncoated scalpel was used, skin injury was more apparent in both its surface spread and the depth of structural damage, resulting in poorer tissue regeneration.

  11. Spatial modification of laser beam under the influence of Λ-type strong pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Kyu; Noh, Young Chul; Jeon, Jin Ho; Lee, Jai Hyung; Chang, Joon Sung

    1999-01-01

    The laser beam propagating through the resonant medium undergo severe deformation because of nonlinear interaction such as self-focusing, self-defocusing, etc. When strong pump beam coexists with the probe beam, propagation characteristics can be changed. We use samarium (Sm) vapor as the nonlinear medium. Probe laser is tuned around 4f 6 6s 27 F 0 -> 4f 6 ( 7 F)6s6p( 1 P 0 ) transition line of Sm (561.601 nm) and the pump laser is tuned around 4f 6 6s 27 F 1 -> 4f 6 ( 7 F)6s6p( 1 P 0 ) transition line of Sm (572.019 nm). The probe and the pump beams are Λ-type configuration. The transmission of the probe beam is changed as the intensity and the detuning of the pump beam are varied. The degree of self-focusing is also modified. (author)

  12. A Strong-Lens Survey in AEGIS: the influence of large scalestructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Marshall, Phil; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil,Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hopkins, Andrew; Koekemoer, Anton; Konidaris,Nicholas P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.

    2006-10-13

    We report on the results of a visual search for galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses over 650 arcmin{sup 2} of HST/ACS (F606W and F814W) imaging in the DEEP2-Extended Groth Strip (EGS). In addition to a previously-known Einstein Cross also found by our search (the 'Cross', HSTJ141735+52264, z{sub lens} = 0.8106, z{sub source} = 3.40), we identify two new strong galaxy-galaxy lenses with multiple extended arcs. The first, HSTJ141820+52361 (the 'Dewdrop'; z{sub lens} = 0.5798), lenses two distinct extended sources into two pairs of arcs (z{sub source} = 0.9818), while the second, HSTJ141833+52435 (the 'Anchor'; z{sub lens} = 0.4625), produces a single pair of arcs (z{sub lens} not yet known). Four less convincing arc/counter-arc and two-image lens candidates are also found and presented for completeness. Lenses are found in a both underdense and overdense local environments, as characterized by a robust measure, 1+{delta}{sub 3}, a normalized density that uses the distance to the third nearest neighbor. All three definite lenses are fit reasonably well by simple singular isothermal ellipsoid models including external shear, giving {chi}{sub {nu}}{sup 2} values close to unity. These shears are much greater than those implied by a simple consideration of the three-dimensional convergence and shear from galaxies along the line of sight, where each galaxy is approximated by a singular isothermal sphere halo truncated at 200 h{sup -1} kpc. This shows how a realistic treatment of galaxies and the large scale structure they are embedded in is necessary, and that simply characterizing the very-local environment may be insufficient.

  13. Analysis of water control in an underground mine under strong karst media influence (Vazante mine, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninanya, Hugo; Guiguer, Nilson; Vargas, Eurípedes A.; Nascimento, Gustavo; Araujo, Edmar; Cazarin, Caroline L.

    2018-05-01

    This work presents analysis of groundwater flow conditions and groundwater control measures for Vazante underground mine located in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. According to field observations, groundwater flow processes in this mine are highly influenced by the presence of karst features located in the near-surface terrain next to Santa Catarina River. The karstic features, such as caves, sinkholes, dolines and conduits, have direct contact with the aquifer and tend to increase water flow into the mine. These effects are more acute in areas under the influence of groundwater-level drawdown by pumping. Numerical analyses of this condition were carried out using the computer program FEFLOW. This program represents karstic features as one-dimensional discrete flow conduits inside a three-dimensional finite element structure representing the geologic medium following a combined discrete-continuum approach for representing the karst system. These features create preferential flow paths between the river and mine; their incorporation into the model is able to more realistically represent the hydrogeological environment of the mine surroundings. In order to mitigate the water-inflow problems, impermeabilization of the river through construction of a reinforced concrete channel was incorporated in the developed hydrogeological model. Different scenarios for channelization lengths for the most critical zones along the river were studied. Obtained results were able to compare effectiveness of different river channelization scenarios. It was also possible to determine whether the use of these impermeabilization measures would be able to reduce, in large part, the elevated costs of pumping inside the mine.

  14. Electronic structure calculations of atomic transport properties in uranium dioxide: influence of strong correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorado, B.

    2010-09-01

    Uranium dioxide UO 2 is the standard nuclear fuel used in pressurized water reactors. During in-reactor operation, the fission of uranium atoms yields a wide variety of fission products (FP) which create numerous point defects while slowing down in the material. Point defects and FP govern in turn the evolution of the fuel physical properties under irradiation. In this study, we use electronic structure calculations in order to better understand the fuel behavior under irradiation. In particular, we investigate point defect behavior, as well as the stability of three volatile FP: iodine, krypton and xenon. In order to take into account the strong correlations of uranium 5f electrons in UO 2 , we use the DFT+U approximation, based on the density functional theory. This approximation, however, creates numerous metastable states which trap the system and induce discrepancies in the results reported in the literature. To solve this issue and to ensure the ground state is systematically approached as much as possible, we use a method based on electronic occupancy control of the correlated orbitals. We show that the DFT+U approximation, when used with electronic occupancy control, can describe accurately point defect and fission product behavior in UO 2 and provide quantitative information regarding point defect transport properties in the oxide fuel. (author)

  15. Organic carbon source in formulated sediments influences life traits and gene expression of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Julia; Menzel, Ralph; Höss, Sebastian; Claus, Evelyn; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2012-03-01

    River water quality is strongly influenced by their sediments and their associated pollutants. To assess the toxic potential of sediments, sediment toxicity tests require reliable control sediments, potentially including formulated control sediments as one major option. Although some standardization has been carried out, one critical issue still remains the quality of sediment organic matter (SOM). Organic carbon not only binds hydrophobic contaminants, but may be a source of mild toxicity, even if the SOM is essentially uncontaminated. We tested two different sources of organic carbon and the mixture of both (Sphagnum peat (P) and one commercial humic substances preparation-HuminFeed(®), HF) in terms of life trait variables and expression profiles of selected life performance and stress genes of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In synchronous cultures, gene expression profiling was done after 6 and 48 h, respectively. The uncontaminated Sphagnum P reduced growth, but increased numbers of offspring, whereas HF did not significantly alter life trait variables. The 6 h expression profile showed most of the studied stress genes repressed, except for slight to strong induction in cyp-35B1 (all exposures), gst-38 (only mixture), and small hsp-16 genes (all exposures). After 48 h, the expression of almost all studied genes increased, particularly genes coding for antioxidative defense, multiple xenobiotic resistance, vitellogenin-like proteins, and genes regulating lifespan. Overall, even essentially uncontaminated SOM may induce several modes of action on the molecular level in C. elegans which may lead to false results if testing synthetic xenobiotics. This contribution is a plea for a strict standardization of the SOM quality in formulated sediments and to check for corresponding effects in other model sediment organisms, especially if using molecular toxicity endpoints.

  16. Large-scale parent-child comparison confirms a strong paternal influence on telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordfjäll, Katarina; Svenson, Ulrika; Norrback, Karl-Fredrik; Adolfsson, Rolf; Roos, Göran

    2010-03-01

    Telomere length is documented to have a hereditary component, and both paternal and X-linked inheritance have been proposed. We investigated blood cell telomere length in 962 individuals with an age range between 0 and 102 years. Telomere length correlations were analyzed between parent-child pairs in different age groups and between grandparent-grandchild pairs. A highly significant correlation between the father's and the child's telomere length was observed (r=0.454, Pfather-son: r=0.465, Pfather-daughter: r=0.484, Pmothers, the correlations were weaker (mother-child: r=0.148, P=0.098; mother-son: r=0.080, P=0.561; mother-daughter: r=0.297, P=0.013). A positive telomere length correlation was also observed for grandparent-grandchild pairs (r=0.272, P=0.013). Our findings indicate that fathers contribute significantly stronger to the telomere length of the offspring compared with mothers (P=0.012), but we cannot exclude a maternal influence on the daughter's telomeres. Interestingly, the father-child correlations diminished with increasing age (P=0.022), suggesting that nonheritable factors have an impact on telomere length dynamics during life.

  17. Seasonality of fire weather strongly influences fire regimes in South Florida savanna-grassland landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Platt

    Full Text Available Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature. We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993-2009 data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires over a 13-year period with fire records (1997-2009. Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with

  18. Analysis of stream temperature and heat budget in an urban river under strong anthropogenic influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhuohang; Kinouchi, Tsuyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Stream temperature variations of the Tama River, which runs through highly urbanized areas of Tokyo, were studied in relation to anthropogenic impacts, including wastewater effluents, dam release and water withdrawal. Both long-term and longitudinal changes in stream temperature were identified and the influences of stream flow rate, temperature and volume of wastewater effluents and air temperature were investigated. Water and heat budget analyses were also conducted for several segments of the mainstream to clarify the relative impacts from natural and anthropogenic factors. Stream temperatures in the winter season significantly increased over the past 20 years at sites affected by intensive and warm effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located along the mainstream. In the summer season, a larger stream temperature increase was identified in the upstream reaches, which was attributable to the decreased flow rate due to water withdrawal. The relationship between air and stream temperatures indicated that stream temperatures at the upstream site were likely to be affected by a dam release, while temperatures in the downstream reaches have deviated more from air temperatures in recent years, probably due to the increased impacts of effluents from WWTPs. Results of the water and heat budget analyses indicated that the largest contributions to water and heat gains were attributable to wastewater effluents, while other factors such as groundwater recharge and water withdrawal were found to behave as energy sinks, especially in summer. The inflow from tributaries worked to reduce the impacts of dam release and the heat exchanges at the air-water interface contributed less to heat budgets in both winter and summer seasons for all river segments.

  19. Seasonality of Fire Weather Strongly Influences Fire Regimes in South Florida Savanna-Grassland Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, William J.; Orzell, Steve L.; Slocum, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature). We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993–2009) data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture) to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires) over a 13-year period with fire records (1997–2009). Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with timing of

  20. Influence of calculation error of total field anomaly in strongly magnetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoyu; Yao, Changli; Zheng, Yuanman; Li, Zelin

    2016-04-01

    An assumption made in many magnetic interpretation techniques is that ΔTact (total field anomaly - the measurement given by total field magnetometers, after we remove the main geomagnetic field, T0) can be approximated mathematically by ΔTpro (the projection of anomalous field vector in the direction of the earth's normal field). In order to meet the demand for high-precision processing of magnetic prospecting, the approximate error E between ΔTact and ΔTpro is studied in this research. Generally speaking, the error E is extremely small when anomalies not greater than about 0.2T0. However, the errorE may be large in highly magnetic environments. This leads to significant effects on subsequent quantitative inference. Therefore, we investigate the error E through numerical experiments of high-susceptibility bodies. A systematic error analysis was made by using a 2-D elliptic cylinder model. Error analysis show that the magnitude of ΔTact is usually larger than that of ΔTpro. This imply that a theoretical anomaly computed without accounting for the error E overestimate the anomaly associated with the body. It is demonstrated through numerical experiments that the error E is obvious and should not be ignored. It is also shown that the curves of ΔTpro and the error E had a certain symmetry when the directions of magnetization and geomagnetic field changed. To be more specific, the Emax (the maximum of the error E) appeared above the center of the magnetic body when the magnetic parameters are determined. Some other characteristics about the error Eare discovered. For instance, the curve of Emax with respect to the latitude was symmetrical on both sides of magnetic equator, and the extremum of the Emax can always be found in the mid-latitudes, and so on. It is also demonstrated that the error Ehas great influence on magnetic processing transformation and inversion results. It is conclude that when the bodies have highly magnetic susceptibilities, the error E can

  1. Maturity Status Strongly Influences the Relative Age Effect in International Elite Under-9 Soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Müller, Josef Gehmaier, Christoph Gonaus, Christian Raschner, Erich Müller

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the role of the relative age effect (RAE and to investigate the influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE in international under-9 soccer. The birth dates of 222 male participants of the U9 Eurochampionship Soccer Tournament in Vienna in 2016 were analyzed and divided into four relative age quarters (Q1-Q4 and the biological maturity status was assessed with the age at peak height velocity (APHV method. Based on the mean±standard deviation of the APHV, the athletes were divided into three groups of maturity: early, normal and late maturing. Chi-Square-tests were used to assess the difference between the observed and the expected even relative age quarter distribution and to evaluate the difference between the observed distribution of early, normal and late maturing athletes and the expected normal distribution. A univariate analysis of variance was performed to assess differences in the APHV between the relative age quarters. A RAE was present (χ2 = 23.87; p < 0.001; ω = 0.33. A significant difference was found in APHV between the four relative age quarters (F = 9.906; p < 0.001; relatively older athletes were significantly less mature. A significant difference was found between the distribution of early, normal and late maturing athletes and the expected normal distribution for athletes of Q1 (high percentage of late maturing athletes: 27%; χ2 = 17.69; p < 0.001; ω = 0.46 and of Q4 (high percentage of early maturing soccer players: 31%; χ2 = 12.08; p = 0.002; ω = 0.58. These findings demonstrated that the selection process in international soccer, with athletes younger than 9 years, seems to be associated with the biological maturity status and the relative age. Relatively younger soccer players seem to have a better chance for selection for international tournaments, if they enter puberty at an earlier age, whereas relatively older athletes seem to have an increased likelihood for

  2. Promoting calls to a quitline: quantifying the influence of message theme, strong negative emotions and graphic images in television advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Matthew C; Davis, Kevin C; Nonnemaker, James M; Kamyab, Kian; Jackson, Christine

    2011-07-01

    To understand the relative effectiveness of television advertisements that differ in their thematic focus and portrayals of negative emotions and/or graphic images in promoting calls to a smokers' quitline. Regression analysis is used to explain variation in quarterly media market-level per smoker calls to the New York State Smokers' Quitline from 2001 to 2009. The primary independent variable is quarterly market-level delivery of television advertisements measured by target audience rating points (TARPs). Advertisements were characterised by their overall objective--promoting cessation, highlighting the dangers of secondhand smoke (SHS) or other--and by their portrayals of strong negative emotions and graphic images. Per smoker call volume is positively correlated with total TARPs (padvertisements are more effective than SHS advertisements in promoting quitline call volume. Advertisements with graphic images only or neither strong negative emotions nor graphic images are associated with higher call volume with similar effect sizes. Call volume was not significantly associated with the number of TARPs for advertisements with strong negative emotions only (p=0.71) or with both graphic images and strong emotions (p=0.09). Exposure to television advertisements is strongly associated with quitline call volume, and both cessation and SHS advertisements can be effective. The use of strong negative emotions in advertisements may be effective in promoting smoking cessation in the population but does not appear to influence quitline call volume. Further research is needed to understand the role of negative emotions in promoting calls to quitlines and cessation more broadly among the majority of smokers who do not call quitlines.

  3. The Arabidopsis GASA10 gene encodes a cell wall protein strongly expressed in developing anthers and seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapalis, Menelaos; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2017-07-01

    The Arabidopsis GASA10 gene encodes a GAST1-like (Gibberellic Acid-Stimulated) protein. Reporter gene analysis identified consistent expression in anthers and seeds. In anthers expression was developmentally regulated, first appearing at stage 7 of anther development and reaching a maximum at stage 11. Strongest expression was in the tapetum and developing microspores. GASA10 expression also occurred throughout the seed and in root vasculature. GASA10 was shown to be transported to the cell wall. Using GASA1 and GASA6 as positive controls, gibberellic acid was found not to induce GASA10 expression in Arabidopsis suspension cells. Overexpression of GASA10 (35S promoter-driven) resulted in a reduction in silique elongation. GASA10 shares structural similarities to the antimicrobial peptide snakin1, however, purified GASA10 failed to influence the growth of a variety of bacterial and fungal species tested. We propose cell wall associated GASA proteins are involved in regulating the hydroxyl radical levels at specific sites in the cell wall to facilitate wall growth (regulating cell wall elongation). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Species-Level Para- and Polyphyly in DNA Barcode Gene Trees: Strong Operational Bias in European Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanen, Marko; Kivelä, Sami M; Vos, Rutger A; Doorenweerd, Camiel; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Hausmann, Axel; Huemer, Peter; Dincă, Vlad; van Nieukerken, Erik J; Lopez-Vaamonde, Carlos; Vila, Roger; Aarvik, Leif; Decaëns, Thibaud; Efetov, Konstantin A; Hebert, Paul D N; Johnsen, Arild; Karsholt, Ole; Pentinsaari, Mikko; Rougerie, Rodolphe; Segerer, Andreas; Tarmann, Gerhard; Zahiri, Reza; Godfray, H Charles J

    2016-11-01

    The proliferation of DNA data is revolutionizing all fields of systematic research. DNA barcode sequences, now available for millions of specimens and several hundred thousand species, are increasingly used in algorithmic species delimitations. This is complicated by occasional incongruences between species and gene genealogies, as indicated by situations where conspecific individuals do not form a monophyletic cluster in a gene tree. In two previous reviews, non-monophyly has been reported as being common in mitochondrial DNA gene trees. We developed a novel web service "Monophylizer" to detect non-monophyly in phylogenetic trees and used it to ascertain the incidence of species non-monophyly in COI (a.k.a. cox1) barcode sequence data from 4977 species and 41,583 specimens of European Lepidoptera, the largest data set of DNA barcodes analyzed from this regard. Particular attention was paid to accurate species identification to ensure data integrity. We investigated the effects of tree-building method, sampling effort, and other methodological issues, all of which can influence estimates of non-monophyly. We found a 12% incidence of non-monophyly, a value significantly lower than that observed in previous studies. Neighbor joining (NJ) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods yielded almost equal numbers of non-monophyletic species, but 24.1% of these cases of non-monophyly were only found by one of these methods. Non-monophyletic species tend to show either low genetic distances to their nearest neighbors or exceptionally high levels of intraspecific variability. Cases of polyphyly in COI trees arising as a result of deep intraspecific divergence are negligible, as the detected cases reflected misidentifications or methodological errors. Taking into consideration variation in sampling effort, we estimate that the true incidence of non-monophyly is ∼23%, but with operational factors still being included. Within the operational factors, we separately assessed the

  5. A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xing-Xing; Salichos, Leonidas; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-09-02

    Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal

  6. Influence of wind speed on free space optical communication performance for Gaussian beam propagation through non Kolmogorov strong turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Peng; Yuan Xiuhua; Zeng Yanan; Zhao Ming; Luo Hanjun

    2011-01-01

    In free-space optical communication links, atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both the intensity and the phase of the received signal, affecting link performance. Most theoretical treatments have been described by Kolmogorov's power spectral density model through weak turbulence with constant wind speed. However, several experiments showed that Kolmogorov theory is sometimes incomplete to describe atmospheric turbulence properly, especially through the strong turbulence with variable wind speed, which is known to contribute significantly to the turbulence in the atmosphere. We present an optical turbulence model that incorporates into variable wind speed instead of constant value, a non-Kolmogorov power spectrum that uses a generalized exponent instead of constant standard exponent value 11/3, and a generalized amplitude factor instead of constant value 0.033. The free space optical communication performance for a Gaussian beam wave of scintillation index, mean signal-to-noise ratio , and mean bit error rate , have been derived by extended Rytov theory in non-Kolmogorov strong turbulence. And then the influence of wind speed variations on free space optical communication performance has been analyzed under different atmospheric turbulence intensities. The results suggest that the effects of wind speed variation through non-Kolmogorov turbulence on communication performance are more severe in many situations and need to be taken into account in free space optical communication. It is anticipated that this work is helpful to the investigations of free space optical communication performance considering wind speed under severe weather condition in the strong atmospheric turbulence.

  7. The load and release characteristics on a strong cationic ion-exchange fiber: kinetics, thermodynamics, and influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Gao, Yanan; Wang, Xinyu; Liu, Hongzhuo; Che, Xin; Xu, Lu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qifang; Wang, Yan; Li, Sanming

    2014-01-01

    Ion-exchange fibers were different from conventional ion-exchange resins in their non-cross-linked structure. The exchange was located on the surface of the framework, and the transport resistance reduced significantly, which might mean that the exchange is controlled by an ionic reaction instead of diffusion. Therefore, this work aimed to investigate the load and release characteristics of five model drugs with the strong cationic ion-exchange fiber ZB-1. Drugs were loaded using a batch process and released in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) dissolution apparatus 2. Opposing exchange kinetics, suitable for the special structure of the fiber, were developed for describing the exchange process with the help of thermodynamics, which illustrated that the load was controlled by an ionic reaction. The molecular weight was the most important factor to influence the drug load and release rate. Strong alkalinity and rings in the molecular structures made the affinity between the drug and fiber strong, while logP did not cause any profound differences. The drug-fiber complexes exhibited sustained release. Different kinds and concentrations of counter ions or different amounts of drug-fiber complexes in the release medium affected the release behavior, while the pH value was independent of it. The groundwork for in-depth exploration and further application of ion-exchange fibers has been laid.

  8. Spatiotemporal Variance of Global Horizontal Moisture Transport and the Influence of Strong ENSO Events Using ERA-Interim Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutta, E. J.; Hubbart, J. A.; Svoma, B. M.; Eichler, T. P.; Lupo, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is well documented as a leading source of seasonal to inter-annual variations in global weather and climate. Strong ENSO events have been shown to alter the location and magnitude of Hadley and Walker circulations that maintain equilibrium at tropical latitudes and regulate moisture transport into mid-latitude storm tracks. Broad impacts associated with ENSO events include anomalous regional precipitation (ARP) and temperature patterns and subsequent impacts to socioeconomic and human health systems. Potential socioeconomic and human health impacts range from regional changes in water resources and agricultural productivity to local storm water management, particularly in rapidly urbanizing watersheds. Evidence is mounting to suggest that anthropogenic climate change will increase the frequency of heavy precipitation events, which compounds impacts of ARP patterns associated with strong El Nino events. Therefore, the need exists to identify common regional patterns of spatiotemporal variance of horizontal moisture flux (HMF) during months (Oct-Feb) associated with the peak intensity (Oceanic Nino Index [ONI]) of the three strongest El Nino (ONI > µ + 2σ) and La Nina (ONI hourly resolution before taking the density weighted vertical average. Long term means (LTM; 1979-2015) were quantified and the influence of strong ENSO events was assessed by quantifying deviations from the LTM for each respective covariance property during months associated with the selected ENSO events. Results reveal regions of statistically significant (CI = 0.05) differences from the LTM for the vertically integrated HMF and each covariance quantity. Broader implications of this work include potential for improved seasonal precipitation forecasts at regional scales and subsequent improvements to local water resource management. There is potential for future work objectively comparing these results with output from Earth System Models to improve

  9. New microsatellites revealed strong gene flow among populations of a new outbreak pest, Athetis lepigone (Möschler).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W-C; Sun, J-T; Dai, J; Huang, J-R; Chen, L; Hong, X-Y

    2017-11-27

    Athetis lepigone (Möschler) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a new outbreak pest in China. Consequently, it is unclear whether the emergence and spread of the outbreak of this pest are triggered by rapid in situ population size increases in each outbreak area, or by immigrants from a potential source area in China. In order to explore the outbreak process of this pest through a population genetics approach, we developed ten novel polymorphic expressed sequence tags (EST)-derived microsatellites. These new microsatellites had moderately high levels of polymorphism in the tested population. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 19, with an average of 8.6, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.269 to 0.783. A preliminary population genetic analysis using these new microsatellites revealed a lack of population genetic structure in natural populations of A. lepigone. The estimates of recent migration rate revealed strong gene flow among populations. In conclusion, our study developed the first set of EST-microsatellite markers and shed a new light on the population genetic structure of this pest in China.

  10. The tumor suppressor homolog in fission yeast, myh1+, displays a strong interaction with the checkpoint gene rad1+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Kristina; Warringer, Jonas; Farewell, Anne; Park, Han-Oh; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Hayles, Jacqueline; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2008-01-01

    The DNA glycosylase MutY is strongly conserved in evolution, and homologs are found in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes examined. This protein is implicated in repair of oxidative DNA damage, in particular adenine mispaired opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine. Previous investigations in Escherichia coli, fission yeast, and mammalian cells show an association of mutations in MutY homologs with a mutator phenotype and carcinogenesis. Eukaryotic MutY homologs physically associate with several proteins with a role in replication, DNA repair, and checkpoint signaling, specifically the trimeric 9-1-1 complex. In a genetic investigation of the fission yeast MutY homolog, myh1 + , we show that the myh1 mutation confers a moderately increased UV sensitivity alone and in combination with mutations in several DNA repair genes. The myh1 rad1, and to a lesser degree myh1 rad9, double mutants display a synthetic interaction resulting in enhanced sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. UV irradiation of myh1 rad1 double mutants results in severe chromosome segregation defects and visible DNA fragmentation, and a failure to activate the checkpoint. Additionally, myh1 rad1 double mutants exhibit morphological defects in the absence of DNA damaging agents. We also found a moderate suppression of the slow growth and UV sensitivity of rhp51 mutants by the myh1 mutation. Our results implicate fission yeast Myh1 in repair of a wider range of DNA damage than previously thought, and functionally link it to the checkpoint pathway

  11. Influence of obesity gene in quantitative traits of swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciele Segantini do Nascimento Borges

    2002-01-01

    -grandparental generation, when the male grandparent is replaced by the great-grandparental generation. The obesity gene did not influence any of the carcass evaluation data from crossbred animals. In pure swine, where the only genotypes were TT and TC, it greatly influenced shoulder weight and meat texture, with the highest average in heterozygotes (shoulder: 4.07 vs. 3.93; texture: 2.62 vs. 1.82, suggesting better carcass quality and worse meat quality than in homozygotes. The obesity gene did not influence any trait in the expected progeny difference (EPD study.

  12. Influence of strong single-ion anisotropy on phase states of 3D and 2D frustrated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, Yu.A.; Kosmachev, O.A.; Matunin, D.A.; Gorelikov, G.A.; Klevets, Ph.N.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the influence of strong single-ion anisotropy, exceeding exchange interaction, and frustrated exchange interaction on spin-wave excitation spectra and phase states using the Hubbard operators' technique, allowing the exact account of single-ion anisotropy. The results show that both the homogeneous phases (ferromagnetic and quadrupolar) and the spatially inhomogeneous phase (spiral structure) are possible in the 3D magnetic crystal. The region of existence of the spiral structure is considerably smaller than that in the analogues system, but with weak single-ion anisotropy. The situation is more complex in the 2D system; another spatially inhomogeneous state (the domain structure) can be realized in addition to the spiral magnetic structure. The phase diagrams for both the 3D and 2D systems were plotted.

  13. Iris phenotypes and pigment dispersion caused by genes influencing pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael G; Hawes, Norman L; Trantow, Colleen M; Chang, Bo; John, Simon W M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous mutations altering mouse coat colors have been a classic resource for discovery of numerous molecular pathways. Although often overlooked, the mouse iris is also densely pigmented and easily observed, thus representing a similarly powerful opportunity for studying pigment cell biology. Here, we present an analysis of iris phenotypes among 16 mouse strains with mutations influencing melanosomes. Many of these strains exhibit biologically and medically relevant phenotypes, including pigment dispersion, a common feature of several human ocular diseases. Pigment dispersion was identified in several strains with mutant alleles known to influence melanosomes, including beige, light, and vitiligo. Pigment dispersion was also detected in the recently arising spontaneous coat color variant, nm2798. We have identified the nm2798 mutation as a missense mutation in the Dct gene, an identical re-occurrence of the slaty light mutation. These results suggest that dysregulated events of melanosomes can be potent contributors to the pigment dispersion phenotype. Combined, these findings illustrate the utility of studying iris phenotypes as a means of discovering new pathways, and re-linking old ones, to processes of pigmented cells in health and disease.

  14. How Strong Is Your Coffee? The Influence of Visual Metaphors and Textual Claims on Consumers' Flavor Perception and Product Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenko, Anna; de Vries, Roxan; van Rompay, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the relative impact of textual claims and visual metaphors displayed on the product's package on consumers' flavor experience and product evaluation. For consumers, strength is one of the most important sensory attributes of coffee. The 2 × 3 between-subjects experiment ( N = 123) compared the effects of visual metaphor of strength (an image of a lion located either on top or on the bottom of the package of coffee beans) and the direct textual claim ("extra strong") on consumers' responses to coffee, including product expectation, flavor evaluation, strength perception and purchase intention. The results demonstrate that both the textual claim and the visual metaphor can be efficient in communicating the product attribute of strength. The presence of the image positively influenced consumers' product expectations before tasting. The textual claim increased the perception of strength of coffee and the purchase intention of the product. The location of the image also played an important role in flavor perception and purchase intention. The image located on the bottom of the package increased the perceived strength of coffee and purchase intention of the product compared to the image on top of the package. This result could be interpreted from the perspective of the grounded cognition theory, which suggests that a picture in the lower part of the package would automatically activate the "strong is heavy" metaphor. As heavy objects are usually associated with a position on the ground, this would explain why perceiving a visually heavy package would lead to the experience of a strong coffee. Further research is needed to better understand the relationships between a metaphorical image and its spatial position in food packaging design.

  15. Choice of mineral fertilizer substitution principle strongly influences LCA environmental benefits of nutrient cycling in the agri-food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanserud, Ola Stedje; Cherubini, Francesco; Øgaard, Anne Falk; Müller, Daniel B; Brattebø, Helge

    2018-02-15

    Increased nutrient cycling in the agri-food system is a way to achieve a healthier nutrient stewardship and more sustainable food production. In life cycle assessment (LCA) studies, use of recycled fertilizer products is often credited by the substitution method, which subtracts the environmental burdens associated with avoided production of mineral fertilizer from the system under study. The environmental benefits from avoided fertilizer production can make an important contribution to the results, but different calculation principles and often implicit assumptions are used to estimate the amount of avoided mineral fertilizer. This may hinder comparisons between studies. The present study therefore examines how the choice of substitution principles influences LCA results. Three different substitution principles, called one-to-one, maintenance, and adjusted maintenance, are identified, and we test the importance of these in a case study on cattle slurry management. We show that the inventory of avoided mineral fertilizer varies greatly when the different principles are applied, with strong influences on two-thirds of LCA impact categories. With the one-to-one principle, there is a risk of systematically over-estimating the environmental benefits from nutrient cycling. In a sensitivity analysis we show that the difference between the principles is closely related to the application rate and levels of residual nutrients in the soil. We recommend that LCA practitioners first and foremost state and justify the substitution method they use, in order to increase transparency and comparability with other studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Start Position Strongly Influences Fixation Patterns during Face Processing: Difficulties with Eye Movements as a Measure of Information Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizpe, Joseph; Kravitz, Dwight J.; Yovel, Galit; Baker, Chris I.

    2012-01-01

    Fixation patterns are thought to reflect cognitive processing and, thus, index the most informative stimulus features for task performance. During face recognition, initial fixations to the center of the nose have been taken to indicate this location is optimal for information extraction. However, the use of fixations as a marker for information use rests on the assumption that fixation patterns are predominantly determined by stimulus and task, despite the fact that fixations are also influenced by visuo-motor factors. Here, we tested the effect of starting position on fixation patterns during a face recognition task with upright and inverted faces. While we observed differences in fixations between upright and inverted faces, likely reflecting differences in cognitive processing, there was also a strong effect of start position. Over the first five saccades, fixation patterns across start positions were only coarsely similar, with most fixations around the eyes. Importantly, however, the precise fixation pattern was highly dependent on start position with a strong tendency toward facial features furthest from the start position. For example, the often-reported tendency toward the left over right eye was reversed for the left starting position. Further, delayed initial saccades for central versus peripheral start positions suggest greater information processing prior to the initial saccade, highlighting the experimental bias introduced by the commonly used center start position. Finally, the precise effect of face inversion on fixation patterns was also dependent on start position. These results demonstrate the importance of a non-stimulus, non-task factor in determining fixation patterns. The patterns observed likely reflect a complex combination of visuo-motor effects and simple sampling strategies as well as cognitive factors. These different factors are very difficult to tease apart and therefore great caution must be applied when interpreting absolute

  17. How Strong Is Your Coffee? The Influence of Visual Metaphors and Textual Claims on Consumers’ Flavor Perception and Product Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenko, Anna; de Vries, Roxan; van Rompay, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the relative impact of textual claims and visual metaphors displayed on the product’s package on consumers’ flavor experience and product evaluation. For consumers, strength is one of the most important sensory attributes of coffee. The 2 × 3 between-subjects experiment (N = 123) compared the effects of visual metaphor of strength (an image of a lion located either on top or on the bottom of the package of coffee beans) and the direct textual claim (“extra strong”) on consumers’ responses to coffee, including product expectation, flavor evaluation, strength perception and purchase intention. The results demonstrate that both the textual claim and the visual metaphor can be efficient in communicating the product attribute of strength. The presence of the image positively influenced consumers’ product expectations before tasting. The textual claim increased the perception of strength of coffee and the purchase intention of the product. The location of the image also played an important role in flavor perception and purchase intention. The image located on the bottom of the package increased the perceived strength of coffee and purchase intention of the product compared to the image on top of the package. This result could be interpreted from the perspective of the grounded cognition theory, which suggests that a picture in the lower part of the package would automatically activate the “strong is heavy” metaphor. As heavy objects are usually associated with a position on the ground, this would explain why perceiving a visually heavy package would lead to the experience of a strong coffee. Further research is needed to better understand the relationships between a metaphorical image and its spatial position in food packaging design. PMID:29459840

  18. How Strong Is Your Coffee? The Influence of Visual Metaphors and Textual Claims on Consumers’ Flavor Perception and Product Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Fenko

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relative impact of textual claims and visual metaphors displayed on the product’s package on consumers’ flavor experience and product evaluation. For consumers, strength is one of the most important sensory attributes of coffee. The 2 × 3 between-subjects experiment (N = 123 compared the effects of visual metaphor of strength (an image of a lion located either on top or on the bottom of the package of coffee beans and the direct textual claim (“extra strong” on consumers’ responses to coffee, including product expectation, flavor evaluation, strength perception and purchase intention. The results demonstrate that both the textual claim and the visual metaphor can be efficient in communicating the product attribute of strength. The presence of the image positively influenced consumers’ product expectations before tasting. The textual claim increased the perception of strength of coffee and the purchase intention of the product. The location of the image also played an important role in flavor perception and purchase intention. The image located on the bottom of the package increased the perceived strength of coffee and purchase intention of the product compared to the image on top of the package. This result could be interpreted from the perspective of the grounded cognition theory, which suggests that a picture in the lower part of the package would automatically activate the “strong is heavy” metaphor. As heavy objects are usually associated with a position on the ground, this would explain why perceiving a visually heavy package would lead to the experience of a strong coffee. Further research is needed to better understand the relationships between a metaphorical image and its spatial position in food packaging design.

  19. Methylation of the chicken vitellogenin gene: influence of estradiol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijlink, F C; Philipsen, J N; Gruber, M; Ab, G

    1983-01-01

    The degree of methylation of the chicken vitellogenin gene has been investigated. Upon induction by administration of estradiol to a rooster, methyl groups at specific sites near the 5'-end of the gene are eliminated. The process of demethylation is slower than the activation of the gene. Demethylation is therefore probably not a prerequisite to gene transcription. At least two other sites in the coding region of the gene are methylated in the liver of estrogenized roosters, but not in the liver of a laying hen, where the gene is naturally active. Images PMID:6298743

  20. Attachment style and oxytocin receptor gene variation interact in influencing social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notzon, S; Domschke, K; Holitschke, K; Ziegler, C; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Reif, A; Deckert, J; Zwanzger, P

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety has been suggested to be promoted by an insecure attachment style. Oxytocin is discussed as a mediator of trust and social bonding as well as a modulator of social anxiety. Applying a gene-environment (G × E) interaction approach, in the present pilot study the main and interactive effects of attachment styles and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variation were probed in a combined risk factor model of social anxiety in healthy probands. Participants (N = 388; 219 females, 169 males; age 24.7 ± 4.7 years) were assessed for anxiety in social situations (Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory) depending on attachment style (Adult Attachment Scale, AAS) and OXTR rs53576 A/G genotype. A less secure attachment style was significantly associated with higher social anxiety. This association was partly modulated by OXTR genotype, with a stronger negative influence of a less secure attachment style on social anxiety in A allele carriers as compared to GG homozygotes. The present pilot data point to a strong association of less secure attachment and social anxiety as well as to a gene-environment interaction effect of OXTR rs53576 genotype and attachment style on social anxiety possibly constituting a targetable combined risk marker of social anxiety disorder.

  1. Influence of FCGRT gene polymorphisms on pharmacokinetics of therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, Christophe; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Renault, Sylvaine; Baroukh, Nadine; Arnoult, Christophe; Ohresser, Marc; Boisdron-Celle, Michèle; Gamelin, Erick; Watier, Hervé; Paintaud, Gilles; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) encoded by FCGRT is known to be involved in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Variability in the expression of FCGRT gene and consequently in the FcRn protein level could explain differences in PK observed between patients treated with mAbs. We studied whether the previously described variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) or copy number variation (CNV) of FCGRT are associated with individual variations of PK parameters of cetuximab. VNTR and CNV were assessed on genomic DNA of 198 healthy individuals and of 94 patients treated with the therapeutic mAb. VNTR and CNV were analyzed by allele-specific PCR and duplex real-time PCR with Taqman (®) technology, respectively. The relationship between FCGRT polymorphisms (VNTR and CNV) and PK parameters of patients treated with cetuximab was studied. VNTR3 homozygote patients had a lower cetuximab distribution clearance than VNTR2/VNTR3 and VNTR3/VNTR4 patients (p = 0.021). We observed no affects of VNTR genotype on elimination clearance. One healthy person (0.5%) and 1 patient (1.1%) had 3 copies of FCGRT. The PK parameters of this patient did not differ from those of patients with 2 copies. The FCGRT promoter VNTR may influence mAbs' distribution in the body. CNV of FCGRT cannot be used as a relevant pharmacogenetic marker because of its low frequency.

  2. The influence of environmental factors and dredging on chironomid larval diversity in urban drainage systems in polders strongly influenced by seepage from large rivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermonden, K.; Brodersen, Klaus Peter; Jacobsen, Dean

    2011-01-01

    , in urban waters strongly influenced by seepage of large rivers. Chironomid assemblages were studied in urban surface-water systems (man-made drainage ditches) in polder areas along lowland reaches of the rivers Rhine-Meuse in The Netherlands. Multivariate analysis was used to identify the key environmental...... factors. Taxon richness, Shannon index (H'), rareness of species, and life-history strategies at urban locations were compared with available data from similar man-made water bodies in rural areas, and the effectiveness of dredging for restoring chironomid diversity in urban waters was tested. Three...... diversity of chironomid communities in urban waters affected by nutrient-rich seepage or inlet of river water...

  3. CADM1 is a strong neuroblastoma candidate gene that maps within a 3.72 Mb critical region of loss on 11q23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michels, Evi; Speleman, Frank; Hoebeeck, Jasmien; De Preter, Katleen; Schramm, Alexander; Brichard, Bénédicte; De Paepe, Anne; Eggert, Angelika; Laureys, Geneviève; Vandesompele, Jo

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent loss of part of the long arm of chromosome 11 is a well established hallmark of a subtype of aggressive neuroblastomas. Despite intensive mapping efforts to localize the culprit 11q tumour suppressor gene, this search has been unsuccessful thus far as no sufficiently small critical region could be delineated for selection of candidate genes. To refine the critical region of 11q loss, the chromosome 11 status of 100 primary neuroblastoma tumours and 29 cell lines was analyzed using a BAC array containing a chromosome 11 tiling path. For the genes mapping within our refined region of loss, meta-analysis on published neuroblastoma mRNA gene expression datasets was performed for candidate gene selection. The DNA methylation status of the resulting candidate gene was determined using re-expression experiments by treatment of neuroblastoma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and bisulphite sequencing. Two small critical regions of loss within 11q23 at chromosomal band 11q23.1-q23.2 (1.79 Mb) and 11q23.2-q23.3 (3.72 Mb) were identified. In a first step towards further selection of candidate neuroblastoma tumour suppressor genes, we performed a meta-analysis on published expression profiles of 692 neuroblastoma tumours. Integration of the resulting candidate gene list with expression data of neuroblastoma progenitor cells pinpointed CADM1 as a compelling candidate gene. Meta-analysis indicated that CADM1 expression has prognostic significance and differential expression for the gene was noted in unfavourable neuroblastoma versus normal neuroblasts. Methylation analysis provided no evidence for a two-hit mechanism in 11q deleted cell lines. Our study puts CADM1 forward as a strong candidate neuroblastoma suppressor gene. Further functional studies are warranted to elucidate the role of CADM1 in neuroblastoma development and to investigate the possibility of CADM1 haploinsufficiency in neuroblastoma

  4. The STAT4 gene influences the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, B; Broen, J; Simeon, C; Hesselstrand, R; Diaz, B; Suárez, H; Ortego-Centeno, N; Riemekasten, G; Fonollosa, V; Vonk, M C; van den Hoogen, F H J; Sanchez-Román, J; Aguirre-Zamorano, M A; García-Portales, R; Pros, A; Camps, M T; Gonzalez-Gay, M A; Coenen, M J H; Airo, P; Beretta, L; Scorza, R; van Laar, J; Gonzalez-Escribano, M F; Nelson, J L; Radstake, T R D J; Martin, J

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of STAT4 gene in the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis (SSc) susceptibility or clinical phenotype. A total of 1317 SSc patients [896 with limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) and 421 with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc)] and 3113 healthy controls, from an initial case-control set of Spanish Caucasian ancestry and five independent cohorts of European ancestry (The Netherlands, Germany, Sweden, Italy and USA), were included in the study. The rs7574865 polymorphism was selected as STAT4 genetic marker. We observed that the rs7574865 T allele was significantly associated with susceptibility to lcSSc in the Spanish population [P = 1.9 x 10(-5) odds ratio (OR) 1.61 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.29-1.99], but not with dcSSc (P = 0.41 OR 0.84 95% CI 0.59-1.21). Additionally, a dosage effect was observed showing individuals with rs7574865 TT genotype higher risk for lcSSc (OR 3.34, P = 1.02 x 10(-7) 95% CI 2.11-5.31). The association of the rs7574865 T allele with lcSSc was confirmed in all the replication cohorts with different effect sizes (OR ranging between 1.15 and 1.86), as well as the lack of association of STAT4 with dcSSc. A meta-analysis to test the overall effect of the rs7574865 polymorphism showed a strong risk effect of the T allele for lcSSc susceptibility (pooled OR 1.54 95% CI 1.36-1.74; P < 0.0001). Our data show a strong and reproducible association of the STAT4 gene with the genetic predisposition to lcSSc suggesting that this gene seems to be one of the genetic markers influencing SSc phenotype.

  5. Target gene expression levels and competition between transfected and endogenous microRNAs are strong confounding factors in microRNA high-throughput experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNA (miRNA) target genes tend to have relatively long and conserved 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), but to what degree these characteristics contribute to miRNA targeting is poorly understood. Different high-throughput experiments have, for example, shown that miRNAs preferentially regulate genes with both short and long 3' UTRs and that target site conservation is both important and irrelevant for miRNA targeting. Results We have analyzed several gene context-dependent features, including 3' UTR length, 3' UTR conservation, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels, reported to have conflicting influence on miRNA regulation. By taking into account confounding factors such as technology-dependent experimental bias and competition between transfected and endogenous miRNAs, we show that two factors - target gene expression and competition - could explain most of the previously reported experimental differences. Moreover, we find that these and other target site-independent features explain about the same amount of variation in target gene expression as the target site-dependent features included in the TargetScan model. Conclusions Our results show that it is important to consider confounding factors when interpreting miRNA high throughput experiments and urge special caution when using microarray data to compare average regulatory effects between groups of genes that have different average gene expression levels. PMID:22325809

  6. Influence of leukotriene gene polymorphisms on chronic rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duval Melanie

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is increasingly viewed as an inflammatory condition of the sinonasal mucosa interacting with bacteria and/or fungi. However, factors conferring susceptibility to disease remain unknown. Advances in genomics offer powerful tools to explore this disorder. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP on CRS in a panel of genes related to cysteinyl leukotriene metabolism. Methods Severe cases of CRS and postal code match controls were recruited prospectively. A total of 206 cases and 200 controls were available for the present study. Using a candidate gene approach, five genes related to cysteinyl leukotriene metabolism were assessed. For each gene, we selected the maximally informative set of common SNPs (tagSNPs using the European-derived (CEU HapMap dataset. These SNPs are in arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5, arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (ALOX5AP, leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S, cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CYSLTR1 and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (CYSLTR2 genes. Results A total of 59 SNPs were genotyped to capture the common genetic variations within these genes. Three SNPs located within the ALOX5, CYSLTR1 and ALOX5AP genes reached the nominal p-value threshold (p Conclusion While these initial results do not support that polymorphsims in genes assessed involved in the leukotriene pathways are contributing to the pathogenesis of CRS, this initial study was not powered to detect polymorphisms with relative risk of 2.0 or less, where we could expect many gene effects for complex diseases to occur. Thus, despite this lack of significant association noted in this study, we believe that validation with external populations and the use of better-powered studies in the future may allow more conclusive findings.

  7. Host genetic variation influences gene expression response to rhinovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Çalışkan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhinovirus (RV is the most prevalent human respiratory virus and is responsible for at least half of all common colds. RV infections may result in a broad spectrum of effects that range from asymptomatic infections to severe lower respiratory illnesses. The basis for inter-individual variation in the response to RV infection is not well understood. In this study, we explored whether host genetic variation is associated with variation in gene expression response to RV infections between individuals. To do so, we obtained genome-wide genotype and gene expression data in uninfected and RV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 98 individuals. We mapped local and distant genetic variation that is associated with inter-individual differences in gene expression levels (eQTLs in both uninfected and RV-infected cells. We focused specifically on response eQTLs (reQTLs, namely, genetic associations with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV infection. We identified local reQTLs for 38 genes, including genes with known functions in viral response (UBA7, OAS1, IRF5 and genes that have been associated with immune and RV-related diseases (e.g., ITGA2, MSR1, GSTM3. The putative regulatory regions of genes with reQTLs were enriched for binding sites of virus-activated STAT2, highlighting the role of condition-specific transcription factors in genotype-by-environment interactions. Overall, we suggest that the 38 loci associated with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV-infection represent promising candidates for affecting immune and RV-related respiratory diseases.

  8. Host genetic variation influences gene expression response to rhinovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalışkan, Minal; Baker, Samuel W; Gilad, Yoav; Ober, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) is the most prevalent human respiratory virus and is responsible for at least half of all common colds. RV infections may result in a broad spectrum of effects that range from asymptomatic infections to severe lower respiratory illnesses. The basis for inter-individual variation in the response to RV infection is not well understood. In this study, we explored whether host genetic variation is associated with variation in gene expression response to RV infections between individuals. To do so, we obtained genome-wide genotype and gene expression data in uninfected and RV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 98 individuals. We mapped local and distant genetic variation that is associated with inter-individual differences in gene expression levels (eQTLs) in both uninfected and RV-infected cells. We focused specifically on response eQTLs (reQTLs), namely, genetic associations with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV infection. We identified local reQTLs for 38 genes, including genes with known functions in viral response (UBA7, OAS1, IRF5) and genes that have been associated with immune and RV-related diseases (e.g., ITGA2, MSR1, GSTM3). The putative regulatory regions of genes with reQTLs were enriched for binding sites of virus-activated STAT2, highlighting the role of condition-specific transcription factors in genotype-by-environment interactions. Overall, we suggest that the 38 loci associated with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV-infection represent promising candidates for affecting immune and RV-related respiratory diseases.

  9. Major genes and QTL influencing wool production and quality: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvis Ian

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The opportunity exists to utilise our knowledge of major genes that influence the economically important traits in wool sheep. Genes with Mendelian inheritance have been identified for many important traits in wool sheep. Of particular importance are genes influencing pigmentation, wool quality and the keratin proteins, the latter of which are important for the morphology of the wool fibre. Gene mapping studies have identified some chromosomal regions associated with variation in wool quality and production traits. The challenge now is to build on this knowledge base in a cost-effective way to deliver molecular tools that facilitate enhanced genetic improvement programs for wool sheep.

  10. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beilin; Gao, Yanxia; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  11. Functional characterisation of an Arabidopsis gene strongly induced by ionising radiation: the gene coding the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (AthPARP-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet-Chabeaud, G.

    2000-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana, the model-system in plant genetics, has been used to study the responses to DNA damage, experimentally introduced by γ-irradiation. We have characterised a radiation-induced gene coding a 111 kDa protein, AthPARP-1, homologous to the human poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (hPARP-1). As hPARP-1 is composed by three functional domain with characteristic motifs, AthPARP-1 binds to DNA bearing single-strand breaks and shows DNA damage-dependent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. The preferential expression of AthPARP-1 in mitotically active tissues is in agreement with a potential role in the maintenance of genome integrity during DNA replication, as proposed for its human counterpart. Transcriptional gene activation by ionising radiation of AthPARP-1 and AthPARP-2 genes is to date plant specific activation. Our expression analyses after exposure to various stress indicate that 1) AthPARP-1 and AthPARP-2 play an important role in the response to DNA lesions, particularly they are activated by genotoxic agents implicating the BER DNA repair pathway 2) AthPARP-2 gene seems to play an additional role in the signal transduction induced by oxidative stress 3) the observed expression profile of AthPARP-1 is in favour of the regulation of AthPARP-1 gene expression at the level of transcription and translation. This mode of regulation of AthPARP-1 protein biosynthesis, clearly distinct from that observed in animals, needs the implication of a so far unidentified transcription factor that is activated by the presence of DNA lesions. The major outcome of this work resides in the isolation and characterisation of such new transcription factor, which will provide new insight on the regulation of plant gene expression by genotoxic stress. (author) [fr

  12. Multigenerational Influences of the Fut2 Gene on the Dynamics of the Gut Microbiota in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Rausch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The FUT2 gene encodes an α-1,2-fucosyltransferase responsible for the expression of ABO histo-blood-group antigens on mucosal surfaces and bodily secretions. Individuals who carry at least one functional allele are known as “secretors,” whereas those homozygous for loss-of-function mutations are known as “non-secretors.” Non-secretor individuals are more susceptible to chronic inflammatory disorders such as Crohn’s Disease, which may be mediated by alterations in the microbiota. Here, we investigated the dynamics of microbial community assembly with respect to genotype using a Fut2-deficient mouse model, taking the genotype of the maternal lineage over two generations into account. We found strong differences in community assembly of microbial communities over time, depending on the Fut2 genotype of the host and that of their progenitors. By applying network analyses, we further identified patterns of specialization and stabilization over time, which are influenced by the host and parental genotype during the process of community development. We also show genotype- and breeding-dependent patterns of community susceptibility to disturbance in a novel in silico approach integrating ecological- and network analysis. Our results indicate that it may be important to investigate the influence of Fut2 genotype in a familial context in order to fully understand its role in the etiology of chronic inflammatory disorders.

  13. Nucleotide sequences of two cellulase genes from alkalophilic Bacillus sp. strain N-4 and their strong homology.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumori, F; Sashihara, N; Kudo, T; Horikoshi, K

    1986-01-01

    Two genes for cellulases of alkalophilic Bacillus sp. strain N-4 (ATCC 21833) have been sequenced. From the DNA sequences the cellulases encoded in the plasmids pNK1 and pNK2 consist of 488 and 409 amino acids, respectively. The DNA and protein sequences of the pNK1-encoded cellulase are related to those of the pNK2-encoded cellulase. The pNK2-encoded cellulase lacks the direct repeat sequence of a stretch of 60 amino acids near the C-terminal end of the pNK1-encoded cellulase. The duplicatio...

  14. Gene expression profiling for human iPS-derived motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients reveals a strong association between mitochondrial functions and neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Chrystian J.; Dariolli, Rafael; Jorge, Frederico M.; Monteiro, Matheus R.; Maximino, Jessica R.; Martins, Roberto S.; Strauss, Bryan E.; Krieger, José E.; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Chadi, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to widespread motor neuron death, general palsy and respiratory failure. The most prevalent sporadic ALS form is not genetically inherited. Attempts to translate therapeutic strategies have failed because the described mechanisms of disease are based on animal models carrying specific gene mutations and thus do not address sporadic ALS. In order to achieve a better approach to study the human disease, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-differentiated motor neurons were obtained from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS and non-ALS subjects using the STEMCCA Cre-Excisable Constitutive Polycistronic Lentivirus system and submitted to microarray analyses using a whole human genome platform. DAVID analyses of differentially expressed genes identified molecular function and biological process-related genes through Gene Ontology. REVIGO highlighted the related functions mRNA and DNA binding, GTP binding, transcription (co)-repressor activity, lipoprotein receptor binding, synapse organization, intracellular transport, mitotic cell cycle and cell death. KEGG showed pathways associated with Parkinson's disease and oxidative phosphorylation, highlighting iron homeostasis, neurotrophic functions, endosomal trafficking and ERK signaling. The analysis of most dysregulated genes and those representative of the majority of categorized genes indicates a strong association between mitochondrial function and cellular processes possibly related to motor neuron degeneration. In conclusion, iPSC-derived motor neurons from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS patients may recapitulate key mechanisms of neurodegeneration and may offer an opportunity for translational investigation of sporadic ALS. Large gene profiling of differentiated motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients highlights mitochondrial participation in the establishment of autonomous mechanisms associated with sporadic ALS

  15. Multispecies coalescent analysis of the early diversification of neotropical primates: phylogenetic inference under strong gene trees/species tree conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrago, Carlos G; Menezes, Albert N; Furtado, Carolina; Bonvicino, Cibele R; Seuanez, Hector N

    2014-11-05

    Neotropical primates (NP) are presently distributed in the New World from Mexico to northern Argentina, comprising three large families, Cebidae, Atelidae, and Pitheciidae, consequently to their diversification following their separation from Old World anthropoids near the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, some 40 Ma. The evolution of NP has been intensively investigated in the last decade by studies focusing on their phylogeny and timescale. However, despite major efforts, the phylogenetic relationship between these three major clades and the age of their last common ancestor are still controversial because these inferences were based on limited numbers of loci and dating analyses that did not consider the evolutionary variation associated with the distribution of gene trees within the proposed phylogenies. We show, by multispecies coalescent analyses of selected genome segments, spanning along 92,496,904 bp that the early diversification of extant NP was marked by a 2-fold increase of their effective population size and that Atelids and Cebids are more closely related respective to Pitheciids. The molecular phylogeny of NP has been difficult to solve because of population-level phenomena at the early evolution of the lineage. The association of evolutionary variation with the distribution of gene trees within proposed phylogenies is crucial for distinguishing the mean genetic divergence between species (the mean coalescent time between loci) from speciation time. This approach, based on extensive genomic data provided by new generation DNA sequencing, provides more accurate reconstructions of phylogenies and timescales for all organisms. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Maternal vernalization and vernalization-pathway genes influence progeny seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auge, Gabriela A; Blair, Logan K; Neville, Hannah; Donohue, Kathleen

    2017-10-01

    Different life stages frequently respond to the same environmental cue to regulate development so that each life stage is matched to its appropriate season. We investigated how independently each life stage can respond to shared environmental cues, focusing on vernalization, in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. We first tested whether effects of rosette vernalization persisted to influence seed germination. To test whether genes in the vernalization flowering pathway also influence germination, we assessed germination of functional and nonfunctional alleles of these genes and measured their level of expression at different life stages in response to rosette vernalization. Rosette vernalization increased seed germination in diverse ecotypes. Genes in the vernalization flowering pathway also influenced seed germination. In the Columbia accession, functional alleles of most of these genes opposed the germination response observed in the ecotypes. Some genes influenced germination in a manner consistent with their known effects on FLOWERING LOCUS C gene regulation during the transition to flowering. Others did not, suggesting functional divergence across life stages. Despite persistent effects of environmental conditions across life stages, and despite pleiotropy of genes that affect both flowering and germination, the function of these genes can differ across life stages, potentially mitigating pleiotropic constraints and enabling independent environmental regulation of different life stages. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Brain Plasticity, Intelligence and Schizophrenia: influence of genes and environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedman, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis shows that the adult human brain has plastic properties. These plastic properties are at least in part heritable and have functional significance. Identifying genes and environmental factors implicated in brain plasticity is an important next step to optimize brain development in health

  18. Influence of the experimental design of gene expression studies on the inference of gene regulatory networks: environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Emmert-Streib

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The inference of gene regulatory networks gained within recent years a considerable interest in the biology and biomedical community. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence that environmental conditions can exhibit on the inference performance of network inference algorithms. Specifically, we study five network inference methods, Aracne, BC3NET, CLR, C3NET and MRNET, and compare the results for three different conditions: (I observational gene expression data: normal environmental condition, (II interventional gene expression data: growth in rich media, (III interventional gene expression data: normal environmental condition interrupted by a positive spike-in stimulation. Overall, we find that different statistical inference methods lead to comparable, but condition-specific results. Further, our results suggest that non-steady-state data enhance the inferability of regulatory networks.

  19. HPRT gene mutation frequency and the factor of influence in adult peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingyong; Zheng Siying; Cui Fengmei; Wang Liuyi; Lao Qinhua; Wu Hongliang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the HPRT gene loci mutation frequencies and the factor of influence in peripheral blood lymphocytes of adult with ages ranging from 21-50. Methods: HPRT gene mutation frequency (GMf) were examined by the technique of multinuclear cell assay. Relation between GMf and years were fitted with a computer. Results: Relation could be described by the following equation: y = 0.7555 + 0.0440x, r = 0.9829. Smoking has influence on GMf and sex hasn't. Conclusion: HPRT gene mutation frequency increases with increasing of age. Increasing rate is 0.00440% per year

  20. Influence of Isoflurane on Immediate-Early Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Bunting, Kristopher M.; Nalloor, Rebecca I.; Vazdarjanova, Almira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterograde amnesia is a hallmark effect of volatile anesthetics. Isoflurane is known to affect both the translation and transcription of plasticity-associated genes required for normal memory formation in many brain regions. What is not known is whether isoflurane anesthesia prevents the initiation of transcription or whether it halts transcription already in progress. We tested the hypothesis that general anesthesia with isoflurane prevents learning-induced initiation of transcr...

  1. Identification of landscape features influencing gene flow: How useful are habitat selection models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretchen H. Roffler; Michael K. Schwartz; Kristine Pilgrim; Sandra L. Talbot; George K. Sage; Layne G. Adams; Gordon Luikart

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how dispersal patterns are influenced by landscape heterogeneity is critical for modeling species connectivity. Resource selection function (RSF) models are increasingly used in landscape genetics approaches. However, because the ecological factors that drive habitat selection may be different from those influencing dispersal and gene flow, it is...

  2. Influence of neonatal hypothyroidism on hepatic gene expression and lipid metabolism in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santana-Farré, Ruymán; Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are required for normal growth and development in mammals. Congenital-neonatal hypothyroidism (CH) has a profound impact on physiology, but its specific influence in liver is less understood. Here, we studied how CH influences the liver gene expression program in adulthood. Pregn...

  3. Discovery and replication of gene influences on brain structure using LASSO regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid eKohannim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We implemented LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression to evaluate gene effects in genome-wide association studies (GWAS of brain images, using an MRI-derived temporal lobe volume measure from 729 subjects scanned as part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI. Sparse groups of SNPs in individual genes were selected by LASSO, which identifies efficient sets of variants influencing the data. These SNPs were considered jointly when assessing their association with neuroimaging measures. We discovered 22 genes that passed genome-wide significance for influencing temporal lobe volume. This was a substantially greater number of significant genes compared to those found with standard, univariate GWAS. These top genes are all expressed in the brain and include genes previously related to brain function or neuropsychiatric disorders such as MACROD2, SORCS2, GRIN2B, MAGI2, NPAS3, CLSTN2, GABRG3, NRXN3, PRKAG2, GAS7, RBFOX1, ADARB2, CHD4 and CDH13. The top genes we identified with this method also displayed significant and widespread post-hoc effects on voxelwise, tensor-based morphometry (TBM maps of the temporal lobes. The most significantly associated gene was an autism susceptibility gene known as MACROD2. We were able to successfully replicate the effect of the MACROD2 gene in an independent cohort of 564 young, Australian healthy adult twins and siblings scanned with MRI (mean age: 23.8±2.2 SD years. In exploratory analyses, three selected SNPs in the MACROD2 gene were also significantly associated with performance intelligence quotient (PIQ. Our approach powerfully complements univariate techniques in detecting influences of genes on the living brain.

  4. Variation in genes related to cochlear biology is strongly associated with adult-onset deafness in border collies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Yokoyama

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Domestic dogs can suffer from hearing losses that can have profound impacts on working ability and quality of life. We have identified a type of adult-onset hearing loss in Border Collies that appears to have a genetic cause, with an earlier age of onset (3-5 years than typically expected for aging dogs (8-10 years. Studying this complex trait within pure breeds of dog may greatly increase our ability to identify genomic regions associated with risk of hearing impairment in dogs and in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS to detect loci underlying adult-onset deafness in a sample of 20 affected and 28 control Border Collies. We identified a region on canine chromosome 6 that demonstrates extended support for association surrounding SNP Chr6.25819273 (p-value = 1.09 × 10(-13. To further localize disease-associated variants, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS of one affected and two unaffected dogs was performed. Through additional validation based on targeted genotyping of additional cases (n = 23 total and controls (n = 101 total and an independent replication cohort of 16 cases and 265 controls, we identified variants in USP31 that were strongly associated with adult-onset deafness in Border Collies, suggesting the involvement of the NF-κB pathway. We found additional support for involvement of RBBP6, which is critical for cochlear development. These findings highlight the utility of GWAS-guided fine-mapping of genetic loci using targeted NGS to study hereditary disorders of the domestic dog that may be analogous to human disorders.

  5. Variation in Genes Related to Cochlear Biology Is Strongly Associated with Adult-Onset Deafness in Border Collies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Alison L.; Erdman, Carolyn A.; Robertson, Kathryn R.; Webb, Aubrey A.; Williams, D. Colette; Chang, Melanie L.; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Lohi, Hannes; Hamilton, Steven P.; Neff, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic dogs can suffer from hearing losses that can have profound impacts on working ability and quality of life. We have identified a type of adult-onset hearing loss in Border Collies that appears to have a genetic cause, with an earlier age of onset (3–5 years) than typically expected for aging dogs (8–10 years). Studying this complex trait within pure breeds of dog may greatly increase our ability to identify genomic regions associated with risk of hearing impairment in dogs and in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to detect loci underlying adult-onset deafness in a sample of 20 affected and 28 control Border Collies. We identified a region on canine chromosome 6 that demonstrates extended support for association surrounding SNP Chr6.25819273 (p-value = 1.09×10−13). To further localize disease-associated variants, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of one affected and two unaffected dogs was performed. Through additional validation based on targeted genotyping of additional cases (n = 23 total) and controls (n = 101 total) and an independent replication cohort of 16 cases and 265 controls, we identified variants in USP31 that were strongly associated with adult-onset deafness in Border Collies, suggesting the involvement of the NF-κB pathway. We found additional support for involvement of RBBP6, which is critical for cochlear development. These findings highlight the utility of GWAS–guided fine-mapping of genetic loci using targeted NGS to study hereditary disorders of the domestic dog that may be analogous to human disorders. PMID:23028339

  6. [Influence of physiologic 17 beta-estradiol concentrations on gene E6 expression in HVP type 18 in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubińska-Parol, Izabella; Gasowska, Urszula; Rzymowska, Jolanta; Kwaśniewska, Anna

    2003-09-01

    Many recent studies indicate that long term use of contraceptives is a strong risk factor in the development of cervical cancer. Steroid hormones, in persistent papilloma virus infection act on various levels, one of them is enhancing transforming activity of the virus. The aim of the study was to estimate if physiological concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol could influence expression of viral transforming genes. HeLa cell lines were incubated with three different physiological concentrations and and on the third day of incubation the level of E6 gene expression was determined. Results show no differences in expression between the control culter, and cultures incubated with physiological concentrations. It indicates that normal levels of 17 beta-estradiol don't play role in transforming process but it also shows need to analyse higher levels of hormones by quantitative analyses in prospective studies.

  7. Aging rather than stress strongly influences amino acid metabolisms in the brain and genital organs of female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, Momoko; Nagasawa, Mao; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ikeda, Hiromi; Minaminaka, Kimie; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Aging and stress affect quality of life, and proper nourishment is one of means of preventing this effect. Today, there is a focus on the amount of protein consumed by elderly people; however, changes in the amino acid metabolism of individuals have not been fully considered. In addition, the difference between average life span and healthy life years is larger in females than it is in males. To prolong the healthy life years of females, in the present study we evaluated the influence of stress and aging on metabolism and emotional behavior by comparing young and middle-aged female mice. After 28 consecutive days of immobilization stress, behavioral tests were conducted and tissue sampling was performed. The results showed that the body weight of middle-aged mice was severely lowered by stress, but emotional behaviors were hardly influenced by either aging or stress. Aging influenced changes in amino acid metabolism in the brain and increased various amino acid levels in the uterus and ovary. In conclusion, we found that aged mice were more susceptible to stress in terms of body-weight reduction, and that amino acid metabolisms in the brain and genital organs were largely influenced by aging rather than by stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The percentage of bacterial genes on leading versus lagging strands is influenced by multiple balancing forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xizeng; Zhang, Han; Yin, Yanbin; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The majority of bacterial genes are located on the leading strand, and the percentage of such genes has a large variation across different bacteria. Although some explanations have been proposed, these are at most partial explanations as they cover only small percentages of the genes and do not even consider the ones biased toward the lagging strand. We have carried out a computational study on 725 bacterial genomes, aiming to elucidate other factors that may have influenced the strand location of genes in a bacterium. Our analyses suggest that (i) genes of some functional categories such as ribosome have higher preferences to be on the leading strands; (ii) genes of some functional categories such as transcription factor have higher preferences on the lagging strands; (iii) there is a balancing force that tends to keep genes from all moving to the leading and more efficient strand and (iv) the percentage of leading-strand genes in an bacterium can be accurately explained based on the numbers of genes in the functional categories outlined in (i) and (ii), genome size and gene density, indicating that these numbers implicitly contain the information about the percentage of genes on the leading versus lagging strand in a genome. PMID:22735706

  10. A common deletion in the uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UGT) 2B17 gene is a strong determinant of androgen excretion in healthy pubertal boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Sørensen, K; Aksglaede, L

    2008-01-01

    2B17 genotypes on urinary excretion of androgen metabolites in pubertal boys. STUDY DESIGN: A clinical study of 116 healthy boys aged 8-19 yr. UGT2B17 genotyping was performed using quantitative PCR. Serum FSH, LH, T, estradiol (E2), and SHBG were analyzed by immunoassays, and urinary levels......BACKGROUND: Testosterone (T) is excreted in urine as water-soluble glucuronidated and sulfated conjugates. The ability to glucuronidate T and other steroids depends on a number of different glucuronidases (UGT) of which UGT2B17 is essential. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of UGT...... of androgen metabolites were quantitated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in all subjects. RESULTS: Ten of 116 subjects (9%) presented with a homozygote deletion of the UGT2B17 gene (del/del), whereas 52 and 54 boys were hetero- and homozygous carriers of the UGT2B17 gene (del/ins and ins...

  11. Clock Genes Influence Gene Expression in Growth Plate and Endochondral Ossification in Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Takeshi; Kodama, Ayumi; Hotta, Shogo; Mieda, Michihiro; Shimba, Shigeki; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown transient promotion by parathyroid hormone of Period-1 (Per1) expression in cultured chondrocytes. Here we show the modulation by clock genes of chondrogenic differentiation through gene transactivation of the master regulator of chondrogenesis Indian hedgehog (IHH) in chondrocytes of the growth plate. Several clock genes were expressed with oscillatory rhythmicity in cultured chondrocytes and rib growth plate in mice, whereas chondrogenesis was markedly inhibited in stable transfectants of Per1 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells and in rib growth plate chondrocytes from mice deficient of brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (BMAL1). Ihh promoter activity was regulated by different clock gene products, with clear circadian rhythmicity in expression profiles of Ihh in the growth plate. In BMAL1-null mice, a predominant decrease was seen in Ihh expression in the growth plate with a smaller body size than in wild-type mice. BMAL1 deficit led to disruption of the rhythmic expression profiles of both Per1 and Ihh in the growth plate. A clear rhythmicity was seen with Ihh expression in ATDC5 cells exposed to dexamethasone. In young mice defective of BMAL1 exclusively in chondrocytes, similar abnormalities were found in bone growth and Ihh expression. These results suggest that endochondral ossification is under the regulation of particular clock gene products expressed in chondrocytes during postnatal skeletogenesis through a mechanism relevant to the rhythmic Ihh expression. PMID:22936800

  12. Resveratrol strongly enhances the retinoic acid-induced superoxide generating activity via up-regulation of gp91-phox gene expression in U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Mimuro, Hitomi; Kuribayashi, Futoshi

    2018-01-01

    The membrane bound cytochrome b 558 composed of gp91-phox and p22-phox proteins, and cytosolic proteins p40-, p47-and p67-phox are important components of superoxide (O 2 - )-generating system in phagocytes. Here, we describe that resveratrol, a pleiotropic phytochemical belonging to the stilbenoids, dramatically activates the O 2 - -generating system during retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation of human monoblastic leukemia U937 cells to macrophage-like cells. When U937 cells were cultured in the presence of RA and resveratrol, the O 2 - -generating activity increased more than 5-fold compared with that in the absence of the latter. Semiquantitative RT-PCR showed that co-treatment with RA and resveratrol strongly enhanced transcription of the gp91-phox compared with those of the RA-treatment only. On the other hand, immunoblot analysis revealed that co-treatment with RA and resveratrol caused remarkable accumulation of protein levels of gp91-phox (to 4-fold), p22-phox (to 5-fold) and p47-phox (to 4-fold) compared with those of the RA-treatment alone. In addition, ChIP assay suggested that resveratrol participates in enhancing the gene expression of gp91-phox via promoting acetylation of Lys-9 residues and Lys-14 residues of histone H3 within chromatin around the promoter regions of the gene. These results suggested that resveratrol strongly enhances the RA-induced O 2 - -generating activity via up-regulation of gp91-phox gene expression in U937 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Beyond the single gene: How epistasis and gene-by-environment effects influence crop domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doust, Andrew N; Lukens, Lewis; Olsen, Kenneth M; Mauro-Herrera, Margarita; Meyer, Ann; Rogers, Kimberly

    2014-04-29

    Domestication is a multifaceted evolutionary process, involving changes in individual genes, genetic interactions, and emergent phenotypes. There has been extensive discussion of the phenotypic characteristics of plant domestication, and recent research has started to identify the specific genes and mutational mechanisms that control domestication traits. However, there is an apparent disconnect between the simple genetic architecture described for many crop domestication traits, which should facilitate rapid phenotypic change under selection, and the slow rate of change reported from the archeobotanical record. A possible explanation involves the middle ground between individual genetic changes and their expression during development, where gene-by-gene (epistatic) and gene-by-environment interactions can modify the expression of phenotypes and opportunities for selection. These aspects of genetic architecture have the potential to significantly slow the speed of phenotypic evolution during crop domestication and improvement. Here we examine whether epistatic and gene-by-environment interactions have shaped how domestication traits have evolved. We review available evidence from the literature, and we analyze two domestication-related traits, shattering and flowering time, in a mapping population derived from a cross between domesticated foxtail millet and its wild progenitor. We find that compared with wild progenitor alleles, those favored during domestication often have large phenotypic effects and are relatively insensitive to genetic background and environmental effects. Consistent selection should thus be able to rapidly change traits during domestication. We conclude that if phenotypic evolution was slow during crop domestication, this is more likely due to cultural or historical factors than epistatic or environmental constraints.

  14. The influence of fragmentation models on the determination of the strong coupling constant in e+e- annihilation into hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrend, H.J.; Chen, C.; Fenner, H.; Schachter, M.J.; Schroeder, V.; Sindt, H.; D'Agostini, G.; Apel, W.D.; Banerjee, S.; Bodenkamp, J.; Chrobaczek, D.; Engler, J.; Fluegge, G.; Fries, D.C.; Fues, W.; Gamerdinger, K.; Hopp, G.; Kuester, H.; Mueller, H.; Randoll, H.; Schmidt, G.; Schneider, H.; Boer, W. de; Buschhorn, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Gunderson, B.; Kiesling, C.; Kotthaus, R.; Kruse, U.; Lierl, H.; Lueers, D.; Oberlack, H.; Schacht, P.; Colas, P.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Fournier, D.; Grivaz, J.F.; Haissinski, J.; Journe, V.; Klarsfeld, A.; Laplanche, F.; Le Diberder, F.; Mallik, U.; Veillet, J.J.; Field, J.H.; George, R.; Goldberg, M.; Grossetete, B.; Hamon, O.; Kapusta, F.; Kovacs, F.; London, G.; Poggioli, L.; Rivoal, M.; Aleksan, R.; Bouchez, J.; Carnesecchi, G.; Cozzika, G.; Ducros, Y.; Gaidot, A.; Jadach, S.; Lavagne, Y.; Pamela, J.; Pansart, J.P.; Pierre, F.

    1983-01-01

    Hadronic events obtained with the CELLO detector at PETRA were compared with first-order QCD predictions using two different models for the fragmentation of quarks and gluons, the Hoyer model and the Lund model. Both models are in reasonable agreement with the data, although they do not completely reproduce the details of many distributions. Several methods have been applied to determine the strong coupling constant αsub(s). Although within one model the value of αsub(s) varies by 20% among the different methods, the values determined using the Lund model are 30% or more larger (depending on the method used) than the values determined with the Hoyer model. Our results using the Hoyer model are in agreement with previous results based on this approach. (orig.)

  15. Disgust evoked by strong wormwood bitterness influences the processing of visual food cues in women: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Daniela; Giraldo, Matteo; Spiegl, Benjamin; Schienle, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The perception of intense bitterness is associated with disgust and food rejection. The present cross-modal event-related potential (ERP) study investigated whether a bitter aftertaste is able to influence affective ratings and the neuronal processing of visual food cues. We presented 39 healthy normal-weight women (mean age: 22.5 years) with images depicting high-caloric meat dishes, high-caloric sweets, and low-caloric vegetables after they had either rinsed their mouth with wormwood tea (bitter group; n = 20) or water (control group; n = 19) for 30s. The bitter aftertaste of wormwood enhanced fronto-central early potentials (N100, N200) and reduced P300 amplitudes for all food types (meat, sweets, vegetables). Moreover, meat and sweets elicited higher fronto-central LPPs than vegetables in the water group. This differentiation was absent in the bitter group, which gave lower arousal ratings for the high-caloric food. We found that a minor intervention ('bitter rinse') was sufficient to induce changes in the neuronal processing of food images reflecting increased early attention (N100, N200) as well as reduced affective value (P300, LPP). Future studies should investigate whether this intervention is able to influence eating behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genes influenced by the non-muscle isoform of Myosin light chain kinase impact human cancer prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available The multifunctional non-muscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK is critical to the rapid dynamic coordination of the cytoskeleton involved in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We identified 45 nmMLCK-influenced genes by bioinformatic filtering of genome-wide expression in wild type and nmMLCK knockout (KO mice exposed to preclinical models of murine acute inflammatory lung injury, pathologies that are well established to include nmMLCK as an essential participant. To determine whether these nmMLCK-influenced genes were relevant to human cancers, the 45 mouse genes were matched to 38 distinct human orthologs (M38 signature (GeneCards definition and underwent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in training and validation cohorts. These studies revealed that in training cohorts, the M38 signature successfully identified cancer patients with poor overall survival in breast cancer (P<0.001, colon cancer (P<0.001, glioma (P<0.001, and lung cancer (P<0.001. In validation cohorts, the M38 signature demonstrated significantly reduced overall survival for high-score patients of breast cancer (P = 0.002, colon cancer (P = 0.035, glioma (P = 0.023, and lung cancer (P = 0.023. The association between M38 risk score and overall survival was confirmed by univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis of overall survival in the both training and validation cohorts. This study, providing a novel prognostic cancer gene signature derived from a murine model of nmMLCK-associated lung inflammation, strongly supports nmMLCK-involved pathways in tumor growth and progression in human cancers and nmMLCK as an attractive candidate molecular target in both inflammatory and neoplastic processes.

  17. Influence of Isoflurane on Immediate-Early Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Kristopher M; Nalloor, Rebecca I; Vazdarjanova, Almira

    2015-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia is a hallmark effect of volatile anesthetics. Isoflurane is known to affect both the translation and transcription of plasticity-associated genes required for normal memory formation in many brain regions. What is not known is whether isoflurane anesthesia prevents the initiation of transcription or whether it halts transcription already in progress. We tested the hypothesis that general anesthesia with isoflurane prevents learning-induced initiation of transcription of several memory-associated immediate-early genes (IEGs) correlated with amnesia; we also assessed whether it stops transcription initiated prior to anesthetic administration. Using a Tone Fear Conditioning paradigm, rats were trained to associate a tone with foot-shock. Animals received either no anesthesia, anesthesia immediately after training, or anesthesia before, during, and after training. Animals were either sacrificed after training or tested 24 h later for long-term memory. Using Cellular Compartment Analysis of Temporal Activity by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (catFISH), we examined the percentage of neurons expressing the IEGs Arc/Arg3.1 and Zif268/Egr1/Ngfi-A/Krox-24 in the dorsal hippocampus, primary somatosensory cortex, and primary auditory cortex. On a cellular level, isoflurane administered at high doses (general anesthesia) prevented initiation of transcription, but did not stop transcription of Arc and Zif268 mRNA initiated prior to anesthesia. On a behavioral level, the same level of isoflurane anesthesia produced anterograde amnesia for fear conditioning when administered before and during training, but did not produce retrograde amnesia when administered immediately after training. General anesthesia with isoflurane prevents initiation of learning-related transcription but does not stop ongoing transcription of two plasticity-related IEGs, Arc and Zif268, a pattern of disruption that parallels the effects of isoflurane on memory formation. Combined with

  18. Influence of isoflurane on Immediate-Early Gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher M Bunting

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterograde amnesia is a hallmark effect of volatile anesthetics. Isoflurane is known to affect both the translation and transcription of plasticity-associated genes required for normal memory formation in many brain regions. What is not known is whether isoflurane anesthesia prevents the initiation of transcription or whether it halts transcription already in progress. We tested the hypothesis that general anesthesia with isoflurane prevents learning-induced initiation of transcription of several memory-associated immediate-early genes (IEGs correlated with amnesia; we also assessed whether it stops transcription initiated prior to anesthetic administration.Methods: Using a Tone Fear Conditioning paradigm, rats were trained to associate a tone with foot-shock. Animals received either no anesthesia, anesthesia immediately after training, or anesthesia before, during, and after training. Animals were either sacrificed after training or tested 24 hours later for memory. Using Cellular Compartment Analysis of Temporal Activity by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (catFISH, we examined the percentage of neurons expressing the IEGs Arc/Arg3.1 and Zif268/Egr1/Ngfi-A/Krox-24 in the dorsal hippocampus, primary somatosensory cortex, and primary auditory cortex.Results: On a cellular level, isoflurane administered at high doses (general anesthesia prevented initiation of transcription, but did not stop transcription of Arc and Zif268 mRNA initiated prior to anesthesia. On a behavioral level, the same level of isoflurane anesthesia produced anterograde amnesia for fear conditioning when administered before and during training, but did not produce retrograde amnesia when administered immediately after training. Conclusions: General anesthesia with isoflurane prevents initiation of learning-related transcription but does not stop ongoing transcription of two plasticity-related IEGs, Arc and Zif268, a pattern of disruption that parallels the

  19. Hip Fracture-Related Pain Strongly Influences Functional Performance of Patients With an Intertrochanteric Fracture Upon Discharge From the Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2013-01-01

    .7 seconds to perform the TUG. No significant differences were observed in baseline characteristics or pain medication given for patients with a cervical versus an intertrochanteric fracture (P ≥ .22), but patients with an intertrochanteric fracture presented more often with moderate to severe pain during......OBJECTIVE: To examine whether functional performance upon hospital discharge is influenced by pain in the region of the hip fracture or related to the fracture type. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: A 20-bed orthopedic hip fracture unit. PATIENTS: Fifty-five cognitively intact...... patients (20 men and 35 women; ages 75.8 ± 10 years), 33 with a cervical hip fracture and 22 with an intertrochanteric hip fracture, all of whom were allowed to bear full weight after surgery. METHODS: All patients were evaluated upon discharge from the hospital to their own homes at a mean of 10 ± 6 days...

  20. Heterogeneous Stock Rat: A Unique Animal Model for Mapping Genes Influencing Bone Fragility

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Imranul; Koller, Daniel L.; Sun, Qiwei; Roeder, Ryan K.; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; López-Aumatell, Regina; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont, Carme; Díaz, Sira; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Whitley, Adam; Strid, Pernilla

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that skeletal mass, structure and biomechanical properties vary considerably among 11 different inbred rat strains. Subsequently, we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in 4 inbred rat strains (F344, LEW, COP and DA) for different bone phenotypes and identified several candidate genes influencing various bone traits. The standard approach to narrowing QTL intervals down to a few candidate genes typically employs the generation of congenic lines, which ...

  1. Influence of ghrelin gene polymorphisms on hypertension and atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, Heiner K; Giannakidou, Eleni; Krone, Wilhelm; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2010-02-01

    Ghrelin is involved in several metabolic and cardiovascular processes. Recent evidence suggests its involvement in blood pressure regulation and hypertension. The aim of the study was to determine associations of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of the ghrelin gene (GHRL) with hypertension and atherosclerotic disease. Six GHRL SNPs (rs27647, rs26802, rs34911341, rs696217, rs4684677 and a -473G/A (with no assigned rsID)) were investigated in a sample of 1143 hypertensive subjects and 1489 controls of Caucasian origin. Both single-locus and haplotype association analyses were performed. In single-locus analyses, only the non-synonymous rs34911341 was associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR)=1.95 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26-3.02), P=0.003). Six common haplotypes with frequency >1% were inferred from the studied GHRL SNPs, and their frequency distribution was significantly different between hypertensive subjects and controls (chi(2)=12.96 with 5 d.f. (degree of freedom), P=0.024). The effect of rs26802 was found to be significantly (P=0.017) modulated by other GHRL SNPs, as its C allele conferred either an increased risk (OR=1.30 (1.08-1.57), P=0.005) or a decreased risk (OR=0.50 (0.23-1.06), P=0.07) of hypertension according to the two different haplotypes on which it can be found. No association of GHRL SNPs or haplotypes with atherosclerotic disease was observed. In conclusion, we observed statistical evidence for association between GHRL SNPs and risk of hypertension.

  2. Silencing of the SlNAP7 gene influences plastid development and lycopene accumulation in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Da-Qi; Meng, Lan-Huan; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Yan, Hua-Xue; Luo, Yun-Bo

    2016-12-01

    Ripening is an important stage of fruit development. To screen the genes associated with pigment formation in tomato fruit, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library was constructed by using tomato fruit in the green ripe and break ripe stages, and 129 differential genes were obtained. Using redness as a screening marker, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the differential genes was performed with a sprout vacuum-infiltration system (SVI). The results showed that silencing the SlNAP7 gene affected the chloroplast development of tomato leaves, manifesting as a photo-bleaching phenotype, and silenced fruit significantly affected the accumulation of lycopene, manifested as a yellow phenotype. In our study, we found that silencing the SlNAP7 gene downregulates the expression of the POR and PORA genes and destroys the normal development of the chloroplast. The expression of related genes included in the lycopene biosynthesis pathway was not significantly changed, but lycopene accumulation was significantly reduced in tomato fruit. Perhaps it was caused by the destruction of the chromoplast, which leads to the oxidation of lycopene. The results show that the SlNAP7 gene influences chloroplast development and lycopene accumulation in tomato.

  3. Influence of sublethal concentrations of common disinfectants on expression of virulence genes in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Larsen, M. H.; Gram, Lone

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne human pathogen that causes listeriosis, a relatively rare infection with a high fatality rate. The regulation of virulence gene expression is influenced by several environmental factors, and the aim of the present study was to determine how disinfectants use......, such as antibiotic resistance....... by Northern blot analysis. Eleven disinfectants representing four different groups of active components were evaluated in this study. Disinfectants with the same active ingredients had a similar effect on gene expression. Peroxy and chlorine compounds reduced the expression of the virulence genes...

  4. Tibial Slope Strongly Influences Knee Stability After Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Prospective 5- to 15-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinner, Clemens; Weiler, Andreas; Roider, Manoussos; Schaefer, Frederik M; Jung, Tobias M

    2017-02-01

    The reported failure rate after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction remains high. Previous studies have shown that the tibial slope (TS) influences sagittal plane laxity. Consequently, alterations of TS might have an effect on postoperative knee stability after PCL reconstruction. We hypothesized that flattening of TS is associated with increased posterior laxity after PCL reconstruction. Cohort study; Level of evidence 3. This study consisted of 48 patients who underwent PCL reconstruction in a single-surgeon series. Eight patients underwent an isolated PCL reconstruction, 27 patients underwent an additional posterolateral corner reconstruction, and 13 patients underwent a combined reconstruction of the PCL, anterior cruciate ligament, and posterolateral corner. Three blinded observers measured TS and the side-to-side difference (SSD) of posterior tibial translation (PTT) before and after PCL reconstruction using standardized stress radiographs. The minimum follow-up was 5 years. At a mean follow-up of 103 months (range, 65-187), the mean SSD of PTT was significantly reduced (10.9 ± 2.9 vs 4.9 ± 4.3 mm; P slope.

  5. Normally occurring environmental and behavioral influences on gene activity: from central dogma to probabilistic epigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, G

    1998-10-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology holds that "information" flows from the genes to the structure of the proteins that the genes bring about through the formula DNA-->RNA-->Protein. In this view, a set of master genes activates the DNA necessary to produce the appropriate proteins that the organism needs during development. In contrast to this view, probabilistic epigenesis holds that necessarily there are signals from the internal and external environment that activate DNA to produce the appropriate proteins. To support this view, a substantial body of evidence is reviewed showing that external environmental influences on gene activation are normally occurring events in a large variety of organisms, including humans. This demonstrates how genes and environments work together to produce functional organisms, thus extending the author's model of probabilistic epigenesis.

  6. Identification of key pathways and genes influencing prognosis in bladder urothelial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning X

    2017-03-01

    enrichment of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate-protein kinase G signaling pathway, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and differentiation, which are associated with tumor angiogenesis and cancer prognosis.Conclusion: Genes and pathways related to cell cycle and DNA damage and repair may play a crucial role in BUC pathogenesis, whereas those pertaining to tumor angiogenesis may be key factors in influencing BUC prognosis, especially in advanced disease stages. Keywords: bioinformatics analytical tools, bladder urothelial carcinoma, microarray, differentially expressed gene, prognosis 

  7. The Influence of Gene Expression Time Delays on Gierer–Meinhardt Pattern Formation Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2010-03-23

    There are numerous examples of morphogen gradients controlling long range signalling in developmental and cellular systems. The prospect of two such interacting morphogens instigating long range self-organisation in biological systems via a Turing bifurcation has been explored, postulated, or implicated in the context of numerous developmental processes. However, modelling investigations of cellular systems typically neglect the influence of gene expression on such dynamics, even though transcription and translation are observed to be important in morphogenetic systems. In particular, the influence of gene expression on a large class of Turing bifurcation models, namely those with pure kinetics such as the Gierer-Meinhardt system, is unexplored. Our investigations demonstrate that the behaviour of the Gierer-Meinhardt model profoundly changes on the inclusion of gene expression dynamics and is sensitive to the sub-cellular details of gene expression. Features such as concentration blow up, morphogen oscillations and radical sensitivities to the duration of gene expression are observed and, at best, severely restrict the possible parameter spaces for feasible biological behaviour. These results also indicate that the behaviour of Turing pattern formation systems on the inclusion of gene expression time delays may provide a means of distinguishing between possible forms of interaction kinetics. Finally, this study also emphasises that sub-cellular and gene expression dynamics should not be simply neglected in models of long range biological pattern formation via morphogens. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  8. Genetic variants in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes influence AIDS progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sher L Hendrickson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human mitochondrial genome includes only 13 coding genes while nuclear-encoded genes account for 99% of proteins responsible for mitochondrial morphology, redox regulation, and energetics. Mitochondrial pathogenesis occurs in HIV patients and genetically, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups with presumed functional differences have been associated with differential AIDS progression.Here we explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within 904 of the estimated 1,500 genes that specify nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (NEMPs influence AIDS progression among HIV-1 infected patients. We examined NEMPs for association with the rate of AIDS progression using genotypes generated by an Affymetrix 6.0 genotyping array of 1,455 European American patients from five US AIDS cohorts. Successfully genotyped SNPs gave 50% or better haplotype coverage for 679 of known NEMP genes. With a Bonferroni adjustment for the number of genes and tests examined, multiple SNPs within two NEMP genes showed significant association with AIDS progression: acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 4 (ACSM4 on chromosome 12 and peroxisomal D3,D2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (PECI on chromosome 6.Our previous studies on mitochondrial DNA showed that European haplogroups with presumed functional differences were associated with AIDS progression and HAART mediated adverse events. The modest influences of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes found in the current study add support to the idea that mitochondrial function plays a role in AIDS pathogenesis.

  9. Influence of CFH gene on symptom severity of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen Zhang,1 Qinyu Lv,1 Weixing Fan,2 Wei Tang,3 Zhenghui Yi1 1Schizophrenia Program, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Department of Psychiatry, Jinhua Second Hospital, Jinhua, 3Department of Psychiatry, Wenzhou Kanging Hospital, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: Recent advances have provided compelling evidence for the role of excessive complement activity in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In this study, we aimed to detect the association of the gene encoding complement factor H (CFH, a regulator in complement activation, with schizophrenia. Materials and methods: A sample of 1783 individuals with or without schizophrenia was recruited for genetic analysis. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from peripheral blood cells using multiplex polymerase chain reaction and the SNaPshot assay. A Database for Schizophrenia Genetic Research (SZDB was used to detect the association of brain CFH expression with schizophrenia. Next, we performed a genotype–phenotype analysis to identify the relationship between CFH Y402H polymorphism and clinical features of schizophrenia. Results: There was a significant association of hippocampal CFH expression with schizophrenia (P=0.017, whereas this significance did not survive after adjusting for false discovery rate (P=0.105. Comparing the genotype and allele frequencies of the genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms between case and control groups showed no significant difference. There were significant differences in the scores of negative symptoms and delayed memory between the patients with C allele and those without C allele (P<0.01 and P=0.04 after Bonferroni correction, respectively. Furthermore, we observed a marginally significant association between the Y402H polymorphism and CFH expression in the hippocampus (P=0.051; however, this significance was lost after multiple testing correction (P=0.51, after Bonferroni correction

  10. Childhood quality influences genetic sensitivity to environmental influences across adulthood: A life-course Gene × Environment interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keers, Robert; Pluess, Michael

    2017-12-01

    While environmental adversity has been shown to increase risk for psychopathology, individuals differ in their sensitivity to these effects. Both genes and childhood experiences are thought to influence sensitivity to the environment, and these factors may operate synergistically such that the effects of childhood experiences on later sensitivity are greater in individuals who are more genetically sensitive. In line with this hypothesis, several recent studies have reported a significant three-way interaction (Gene × Environment × Environment) between two candidate genes and childhood and adult environment on adult psychopathology. We aimed to replicate and extend these findings in a large, prospective multiwave longitudinal study using a polygenic score of environmental sensitivity and objectively measured childhood and adult material environmental quality. We found evidence for both Environment × Environment and Gene × Environment × Environment effects on psychological distress. Children with a poor-quality material environment were more sensitive to the negative effects of a poor environment as adults, reporting significantly higher psychological distress scores. These effects were further moderated by a polygenic score of environmental sensitivity. Genetically sensitive children were more vulnerable to adversity as adults, if they had experienced a poor childhood environment but were significantly less vulnerable if their childhood environment was positive. These findings are in line with the differential susceptibility hypothesis and suggest that a life course approach is necessary to elucidate the role of Gene × Environment in the development of mental illnesses.

  11. Promoter polymorphisms in genes involved in porcine myogenesis influence their transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorni, Silvia; Tilesi, Francesca; Bicorgna, Silvia; Iacoponi, Francesca; Willems, Daniela; Gargani, Maria; D'Andrea, MariaSilvia; Pilla, Fabio; Valentini, Alessio

    2014-11-07

    Success of meat production and selection for improvement of meat quality is among the primary aims in animal production. Meat quality traits are economically important in swine; however, the underlying genetic nature is very complex. Therefore, an improved pork production strongly depends on identifying and studying how genetic variations contribute to modulate gene expression. Promoters are key regions in gene modulation as they harbour several binding motifs to transcription regulatory factors. Therefore, polymorphisms in these regions are likely to deeply affect RNA levels and consequently protein synthesis. In this study, we report the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in promoter regions of candidate genes involved in development, cellular differentiation and muscle growth in Sus scrofa. We identified SNPs in the promoter regions of genes belonging to the Myogenic Regulatory Factors (MRF) gene family (the Myogenic Differentiation gene, MYOD1) and to Growth and Differentiation Factors (GDF) gene family (Myostatin gene, MSTN, GDF8), in Casertana and Large White breeds. The purpose of this study was to investigate if polymorphisms in the promoters could affect the transcriptional activity of these genes. With this aim, we evaluated in vitro the functional activity of the luciferase reporter gene luc2 activity, driven by two constructs carrying different promoter haplotypes. We tested the effects of the G302A (U12574) transition on the promoter efficiency in MYOD1 gene. We ascertained a difference in transcription efficiency for the two variants. A stronger activity of the A-carrying construct is more evident in C2C12. The luciferase expression driven by the MYOD1-A allelic variant displayed a 3.8-fold increased transcriptional activity. We investigated the activity of two haplotype variants (AY527152) in the promoter of GDF8 gene. The haploptype-1 (A435-A447-A879) up-regulated the expression of the reporter gene by a two-fold increase, and

  12. Impact of strong selection for the PrP major gene on genetic variability of four French sheep breeds (Open Access publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantano Thais

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Effective selection on the PrP gene has been implemented since October 2001 in all French sheep breeds. After four years, the ARR "resistant" allele frequency increased by about 35% in young males. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of this strong selection on genetic variability. It is focussed on four French sheep breeds and based on the comparison of two groups of 94 animals within each breed: the first group of animals was born before the selection began, and the second, 3–4 years later. Genetic variability was assessed using genealogical and molecular data (29 microsatellite markers. The expected loss of genetic variability on the PrP gene was confirmed. Moreover, among the five markers located in the PrP region, only the three closest ones were affected. The evolution of the number of alleles, heterozygote deficiency within population, expected heterozygosity and the Reynolds distances agreed with the criteria from pedigree and pointed out that neutral genetic variability was not much affected. This trend depended on breed, i.e. on their initial states (population size, PrP frequencies and on the selection strategies for improving scrapie resistance while carrying out selection for production traits.

  13. Type 2 diabetes mellitus susceptibility gene TCF7L2 is strongly associated with hyperglycemia in the Saudi Arabia Population of the eastern province of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, S; Al-Elq, A; Al-Nafaie, A; Muzaheed, M; Al-Ali, A

    2015-08-01

    We studied the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs7903146, rs12255372 and rs4506565 in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) susceptibility gene, transcription factor 7 like 2 (TCF7L2) with T2DM among the population of the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. In a case-control study, blood samples were collected from 359 T2DM patients and 351 age and sex-matched normoglycemic controls. Genotyping was done by allele specific PCR assay. Our results revealed a strong association between risk T alleles in variants rs12255372 (OR: G/T=1.4233; T/T=2.0395) and rs4506565 (OR: A/T=1.6066; T/T=3.1301) and T2DM among the Saudi population of the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. This is the first time that this association has been identified in a Saudi population. However, a common variant, rs7903146, often found to be associated with T2DM in other populations failed to demonstrate any association to T2DM with the present population. These data further strengthens the hypothesis that Saudi populations might carry a distinct risk allele in T2DM susceptibility gene TCF7L2. The present results confirm that rs12255372 and rs4506565 variants of TCF7L2 show an association, but not rs7903146, with T2DM for the Saudi population of the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia.

  14. Phloroglucinol functions as an intracellular and intercellular chemical messenger influencing gene expression in Pseudomonas protegens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jennifer C; Buchanan, Alex; Vining, Oliver; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Chang, Jeff H; McPhail, Kerry L; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-10-01

    Bacteria can be both highly communicative and highly competitive in natural habitats and antibiotics are thought to play a role in both of these processes. The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 produces a spectrum of antibiotics, two of which, pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), function in intracellular and intercellular communication, both as autoinducers of their own production. Here, we demonstrate that phloroglucinol, an intermediate in DAPG biosynthesis, can serve as an intercellular signal influencing the expression of pyoluteorin biosynthesis genes, the production of pyoluteorin, and inhibition of Pythium ultimum, a phytopathogenic oomycete sensitive to pyoluteorin. Through analysis of RNAseq data sets, we show that phloroglucinol had broad effects on the transcriptome of Pf-5, significantly altering the transcription of more than two hundred genes. The effects of nanomolar versus micromolar concentrations of phloroglucinol differed both quantitatively and qualitatively, influencing the expression of distinct sets of genes or having opposite effects on transcript abundance of certain genes. Therefore, our results support the concept of hormesis, a phenomenon associated with signalling molecules that elicit distinct responses at different concentrations. Phloroglucinol is the first example of an intermediate of antibiotic biosynthesis that functions as a chemical messenger influencing gene expression in P. protegens. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genetic influence of radiation measured by the effect on the mutation rate of human minisatellite genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Mieko

    2002-01-01

    Human minisatellite genes are composed from 0.1-30 kb with a high frequency of polymorphism. The genes exist in mammalian genomes and mice's ones are well studied after irradiation of their gonad cells by X-ray and γ-ray. Following five reports concerning the significant and/or insignificant increases of the mutation rate of the genes post A-bomb exposure, Chernobyl accident and nuclear weapons test in Semipalatinsk are reviewed and discussed on the subject number, exposed dose, problems of the control group, regions examined of loci and exposure conditions. Genetic influences of radiation examined by the author's facility are not recognized in the mutation rate (3.21% vs 4.94% in the control) of minisatellite genes in children of A-bomb survivors and their parents. The mutation rates are 4.27 vs 2.52% (positive influence) and 4.2-6.01% vs 3.5-6.34% in Chernobyl, and 4.3 (parents) and 3.8% (F 1 ) vs 2.5% (positive). Mutation of human minisatellite genes can be an important measure of genetic influences at the medical level. (K.H.)

  16. Influence of the IL6 Gene in Susceptibility to Systemic Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cenit, M.C.; Simeon, C.P.; Vonk, M.C.; Callejas-Rubio, J.L.; Espinosa, G.; Carreira, P.; Blanco, F.J.; Narvaez, J.; Tolosa, C.; Roman-Ivorra, J.A.; Gomez-Garcia, I.; Garcia-Hernandez, F.J.; Gallego, M.; Garcia-Portales, R.; Egurbide, M.V.; Fonollosa, V.; Garcia de la Pena, P.; Lopez-Longo, F.J.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; The Spanish Scleroderma, G.; Hesselstrand, R.; Riemekasten, G.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Voskuyl, A.E.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Madhok, R.; Fonseca, C.; Denton, C.; Nordin, A.; Palm, O.; Laar, J.M. van; Hunzelmann, N.; Distler, J.H.; Kreuter, A.; Herrick, A.; Worthington, J.; Koeleman, B.P.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Martin, J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease; the genetic component has not been fully defined. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a crucial role in immunity and fibrosis, both key aspects of SSc. We investigated the influence of IL6 gene in the susceptibility and

  17. Population genomic analysis suggests strong influence of river network on spatial distribution of genetic variation in invasive saltcedar across the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Rang; Jo, Yeong-Seok; Park, Chan-Ho; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Olson, Matthew S.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the complex influences of landscape and anthropogenic elements that shape the population genetic structure of invasive species provides insight into patterns of colonization and spread. The application of landscape genomics techniques to these questions may offer detailed, previously undocumented insights into factors influencing species invasions. We investigated the spatial pattern of genetic variation and the influences of landscape factors on population similarity in an invasive riparian shrub, saltcedar (Tamarix L.) by analysing 1,997 genomewide SNP markers for 259 individuals from 25 populations collected throughout the southwestern United States. Our results revealed a broad-scale spatial genetic differentiation of saltcedar populations between the Colorado and Rio Grande river basins and identified potential barriers to population similarity along both river systems. River pathways most strongly contributed to population similarity. In contrast, low temperature and dams likely served as barriers to population similarity. We hypothesize that large-scale geographic patterns in genetic diversity resulted from a combination of early introductions from distinct populations, the subsequent influence of natural selection, dispersal barriers and founder effects during range expansion.

  18. The influence of nutrigenetics on the lipid profile: interaction between genes and dietary habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Fabiana M; Bulhões, Andréa C; Maluf, Sharbel W; Schuch, Jaqueline B; Voigt, Francine; Lucatelli, Juliana F; Barros, Alessandra C; Hutz, Mara H

    2010-04-01

    Nutrigenetics is a new field with few studies in Latin America. Our aim is to investigate the way in which different genes related to the lipid profile influence the response to specific dietary habits. Eight polymorphisms on seven genes were investigated in a sample (n = 567) from Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. All the volunteers completed a food diary that was then assessed and classified into nine food groups. A number of nutrigenetic interactions were detected primarily related to the apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene. For example, frequent consumption of foods rich in polyunsaturated fat resulted in the beneficial effect of increasing HDL-C only in individuals who were not carriers of the E*4 allele of the APOE gene, whereas variations in eating habits of E*4 carriers did not affect their HDL-C (P = 0.018). Our data demonstrate for the first time nutrigenetic interactions in a Brazilian population.

  19. Random transposon mutagenesis of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome reveals additional genes influencing erythromycin biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedashchin, Andrij; Cernota, William H.; Gonzalez, Melissa C.; Leach, Benjamin I.; Kwan, Noelle; Wesley, Roy K.; Weber, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    A single cycle of strain improvement was performed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea mutB and 15 genotypes influencing erythromycin production were found. Genotypes generated by transposon mutagenesis appeared in the screen at a frequency of ∼3%. Mutations affecting central metabolism and regulatory genes were found, as well as hydrolases, peptidases, glycosyl transferases and unknown genes. Only one mutant retained high erythromycin production when scaled-up from micro-agar plug fermentations to shake flasks. This mutant had a knockout of the cwh1 gene (SACE_1598), encoding a cell-wall-associated hydrolase. The cwh1 knockout produced visible growth and morphological defects on solid medium. This study demonstrated that random transposon mutagenesis uncovers strain improvement-related genes potentially useful for strain engineering. PMID:26468041

  20. Strong association of 677 C>T substitution in the MTHFR gene with male infertility--a study on an indian population and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishi Gupta

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is an important enzyme of folate and methionine metabolism, making it crucial for DNA synthesis and methylation. The objective of this study was to analyze MTHFR gene 677C>T polymorphism in infertile male individuals from North India, followed by a meta-analysis on our data and published studies.We undertook genotyping on a total of 837 individuals including well characterized infertile (N = 522 and confirmed fertile (N = 315 individuals. The SNP was typed by direct DNA sequencing. Chi square test was done for statistical analysis. Published studies were searched using appropriate keywords. Source of data collection for meta-analysis included 'Pubmed', 'Ovid' and 'Google Scholar'. Those studies analyzing 677C>T polymorphism in male infertility and presenting all relevant data were included in meta-analysis. The genotype data for infertile subjects and fertile controls was extracted from each study. Chi square test was done to obtain odds ratio (OR and p-value. Meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software (Version 2. The frequency of mutant (T allele (p = 0.0025 and genotypes (CT+TT (p = 0.0187 was significantly higher in infertile individuals in comparison to fertile controls in our case-control study. The overall summary estimate (OR for allele and genotype meta-analysis were 1.304 (p = 0.000, 1.310 (p = 0.000, respectively, establishing significant association of 677C>T polymorphism with male infertility.677C>T substitution associated strongly with male infertility in Indian population. Allele and genotype meta-analysis also supported its strong correlation with male infertility, thus establishing it as a risk factor.

  1. Phylogenetic inference in Rafflesiales: the influence of rate heterogeneity and horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal-Russell Romina

    2004-10-01

    be influencing only some taxa and some mitochondrial genes, thus indicating that the process is acting at the single gene (not whole genome level.

  2. <strong>Mini-project>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki

    2008-01-01

    In this project the goal is to develop the safe * family of containers for the CPH STL. The containers to be developed should be safer and more reliable than any of the existing implementations. A special focus should be put on strong exception safety since none of the existing prototypes available...

  3. Genetic influences on insight problem solving: the role of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weili; Shang, Siyuan; Su, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    People may experience an "aha" moment, when suddenly realizing a solution of a puzzling problem. This experience is called insight problem solving. Several findings suggest that catecholamine-related genes may contribute to insight problem solving, among which the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is the most promising candidate. The current study examined 753 healthy individuals to determine the associations between 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms on the COMT gene and insight problem-solving performance, while considering gender differences. The results showed that individuals carrying A allele of rs4680 or T allele of rs4633 scored significantly higher on insight problem-solving tasks, and the COMT gene rs5993883 combined with gender interacted with correct solutions of insight problems, specifically showing that this gene only influenced insight problem-solving performance in males. This study presents the first investigation of the genetic impact on insight problem solving and provides evidence that highlights the role that the COMT gene plays in insight problem solving.

  4. Strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froissart, Marcel

    1976-01-01

    Strong interactions are introduced by their more obvious aspect: nuclear forces. In hadron family, the nucleon octet, OMEGA - decuplet, and quark triply are successively considered. Pion wave having been put at the origin of nuclear forces, low energy phenomena are described, the force being explained as an exchange of structure corresponding to a Regge trajectory in a variable rotating state instead of the exchange of a well defined particle. At high energies the concepts of pomeron, parton and stratons are introduced, pionization and fragmentation are briefly differentiated [fr

  5. Parents' preferences strongly influence their decisions to withhold prescribed opioids when faced with analgesic trade-off dilemmas for children: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Smith, Ellen Lavoie; Zyzanski, Sarah; Tait, Alan R

    2015-08-01

    Despite parents' stated desire to treat pain in their children, recent studies have critiqued their underuse of prescribed analgesics to treat pain in their children after painful procedures. Parents' analgesic preferences, including their perceived importance of providing pain relief or avoiding adverse drug effects may have important implications for their analgesic decisions, yet no studies have evaluated the influence of preferences on decisions to withhold prescribed opioids for children. We prospectively explored how parents' preferences influenced decisions to withhold prescribed opioids when faced with hypothetical dilemmas and after hospital discharge. Prospective Observational Study Design: Phase 1 included hypothetical analgesic decisions and Phase 2, real analgesic decisions after hospital discharge. Large tertiary care pediatric hospital in the Midwest of the United States. Five-hundred seven parents whose children underwent a painful surgical procedure requiring an opioid prescription were included. At baseline, parents completed surveys assessing their pain relief preference (i.e., their rated importance of pain relief relative to adverse drug event avoidance), preferred treatment thresholds (i.e., pain level at which they would give an opioid), adverse drug event understanding, and hypothetical trade-off decisions (i.e., scenarios presenting variable pain and adverse drug event symptoms in a child). After discharge, parents recorded all analgesics they gave their child as well as pain scores at the time of administration. Higher preference to provide pain relief (over avoid analgesic risk) lessened the likelihood that parents would withhold the prescribed opioid when adverse drug event symptoms were present together with high pain scores in the hypothetical scenarios. Additionally, higher preferred treatment thresholds increased the likelihood of parents withholding opioids during their hypothetical decision-making as well as at home. The strong

  6. Influence of Coding Variability in APP-Aβ Metabolism Genes in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste Sassi

    Full Text Available The cerebral deposition of Aβ42, a neurotoxic proteolytic derivate of amyloid precursor protein (APP, is a central event in Alzheimer's disease (AD(Amyloid hypothesis. Given the key role of APP-Aβ metabolism in AD pathogenesis, we selected 29 genes involved in APP processing, Aβ degradation and clearance. We then used exome and genome sequencing to investigate the single independent (single-variant association test and cumulative (gene-based association test effect of coding variants in these genes as potential susceptibility factors for AD, in a cohort composed of 332 sporadic and mainly late-onset AD cases and 676 elderly controls from North America and the UK. Our study shows that common coding variability in these genes does not play a major role for the disease development. In the single-variant association analysis, the main hits, none of which statistically significant after multiple testing correction (1.9e-4strong effect size (1.84genes mainly involved in Aβ extracellular degradation (TTR, ACE, clearance (LRP1 and APP trafficking and recycling (SORL1. These results were partially replicated in the gene-based analysis (c-alpha and SKAT tests, that reports ECE1, LYZ and TTR as nominally associated to AD (1.7e-3 genes is not a critical factor for AD development and 2 Aβ degradation and clearance, rather than Aβ production, may play a key role in the etiology of sporadic AD.

  7. [Influence of interleukin-1 beta gene polymorphism and childhood maltreatment on antidepressant treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Zhijun; Xu, Zhi; Pu, Mengjia; Geng, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    To explore the influence of interleukin-1 beta (IL1B) gene polymorphism and childhood maltreatment on antidepressant treatment. Two hundred and four patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have received treatment with single antidepressant drugs and were followed up for 8 weeks. Hamilton depression scale-17 (HAMD-17) was used to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms and therapeutic effect. Childhood maltreatment was assessed using Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, a 28-item Short Form (CTQ-SF). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the IL1B gene was determined using a SNaPshot method. Correlation of rs16944 gene polymorphism with response to treatment was analyzed using Unphased 3.0.13 software. The main and interactive effects of SNP and childhood maltreatment on the antidepressant treatment were analyzed using Logistic regression analysis. No significant difference of gender, age, year of education, family history, episode time, and antidepressant agents was detected between the remitters and non-remitters. Association analysis has found that the SNP rs16944 in the IL1B AA genotype carriers antidepressant response was poorer (χ2=3.931, P=0.047). No significant difference was detected in the CTQ scores between the two groups. Genetic and environmental interaction analysis has demonstrated a significant correlation between rs16944 AA genotype and childhood maltreatment and poorer response to antidepressant treatment. The SNP rs16944 in the IL1B gene and its interaction with childhood maltreatment may influence the effect of antidepressant treatment for patients with MDD.

  8. Do gene polymorphism in IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 influence therapeutic response in patients with drug refractory epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Prabhakar; Dwivedi, Rekha; Mansoori, Nasim; Alam, Rizwan; Chauhan, Ugam Kumari; Tripathi, Manjari; Mukhopadhyay, Asok Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines may play an important pathophysiological role in patients with epilepsy. To understand the role of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines in epilepsy, this study aimed to evaluate the polymorphisms of the promoter regions of IL-1β-511C>T (rs16944), TNF-α-308G>A (rs1800629) and IL-6-174G>C (rs1800795) genes and to look into the interaction between these genes in influencing seizure susceptibility, seizure frequency and response to therapy. The comparative frequency of polymorphism was determined in rs16944, rs1800629 and rs1800795 using PCR-RFLP in a group of 120 persons with epilepsy (PWE) and 110 ethnically matched healthy subjects of comparable age and sex in the North Indian population. Alleles and genotypes of rs16944, rs1800629 and rs1800795 were not found to influence the odds ratio of having susceptibility to epilepsy. Also gene-gene interaction of possible nine combinations of these genes did not show any positive association with epilepsy. The genotype and allelic frequency of rs1800795 showed a significant association (prs16944 and rs1800629 were not found to have such effect. This study demonstrates that the rs16944, rs1800629 and rs1800795 polymorphism does not act as a strong susceptibility factor for epilepsy in North Indian population. The genotypic association of rs1800795 with seizure frequency and drug-refractory epilepsy raises the issue that a specific set of polymorphic genes can influence seizures and therapeutic response in epilepsy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The formation of estrogen-like tamoxifen metabolites and their influence on enzyme activity and gene expression of ADME genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johänning, Janina; Kröner, Patrick; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M; Nörenberg, Astrid; Eichelbaum, Michel; Schwab, Matthias; Brauch, Hiltrud; Schroth, Werner; Mürdter, Thomas E

    2018-03-01

    Tamoxifen, a standard therapy for breast cancer, is metabolized to compounds with anti-estrogenic as well as estrogen-like action at the estrogen receptor. Little is known about the formation of estrogen-like metabolites and their biological impact. Thus, we characterized the estrogen-like metabolites tamoxifen bisphenol and metabolite E for their metabolic pathway and their influence on cytochrome P450 activity and ADME gene expression. The formation of tamoxifen bisphenol and metabolite E was studied in human liver microsomes and Supersomes™. Cellular metabolism and impact on CYP enzymes was analyzed in upcyte® hepatocytes. The influence of 5 µM of tamoxifen, anti-estrogenic and estrogen-like metabolites on CYP activity was measured by HPLC MS/MS and on ADME gene expression using RT-PCR analyses. Metabolite E was formed from tamoxifen by CYP2C19, 3A and 1A2 and from desmethyltamoxifen by CYP2D6, 1A2 and 3A. Tamoxifen bisphenol was mainly formed from (E)- and (Z)-metabolite E by CYP2B6 and CYP2C19, respectively. Regarding phase II metabolism, UGT2B7, 1A8 and 1A3 showed highest activity in glucuronidation of tamoxifen bisphenol and metabolite E. Anti-estrogenic metabolites (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, (Z)-endoxifen and (Z)-norendoxifen inhibited the activity of CYP2C enzymes while tamoxifen bisphenol consistently induced CYPs similar to rifampicin and phenobarbital. On the transcript level, highest induction up to 5.6-fold was observed for CYP3A4 by tamoxifen, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, tamoxifen bisphenol and (E)-metabolite E. Estrogen-like tamoxifen metabolites are formed in CYP-dependent reactions and are further metabolized by glucuronidation. The induction of CYP activity by tamoxifen bisphenol and the inhibition of CYP2C enzymes by anti-estrogenic metabolites may lead to drug-drug-interactions.

  10. The tumor suppressor homolog in fission yeast, myh1{sup +}, displays a strong interaction with the checkpoint gene rad1{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Kristina; Warringer, Jonas; Farewell, Anne [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Goeteborg University, P.O. Box 462, Goeteborg SE-405 30 (Sweden); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corporation, 49-3, Munpyeong-dong, Daedeok-gu, Daejon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk [Functional Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hayles, Jacqueline [Cell Cycle Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln' s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX (United Kingdom); Sunnerhagen, Per [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Goeteborg University, P.O. Box 462, Goeteborg SE-405 30 (Sweden)], E-mail: per.sunnerhagen@cmb.gu.se

    2008-09-26

    The DNA glycosylase MutY is strongly conserved in evolution, and homologs are found in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes examined. This protein is implicated in repair of oxidative DNA damage, in particular adenine mispaired opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine. Previous investigations in Escherichia coli, fission yeast, and mammalian cells show an association of mutations in MutY homologs with a mutator phenotype and carcinogenesis. Eukaryotic MutY homologs physically associate with several proteins with a role in replication, DNA repair, and checkpoint signaling, specifically the trimeric 9-1-1 complex. In a genetic investigation of the fission yeast MutY homolog, myh1{sup +}, we show that the myh1 mutation confers a moderately increased UV sensitivity alone and in combination with mutations in several DNA repair genes. The myh1 rad1, and to a lesser degree myh1 rad9, double mutants display a synthetic interaction resulting in enhanced sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. UV irradiation of myh1 rad1 double mutants results in severe chromosome segregation defects and visible DNA fragmentation, and a failure to activate the checkpoint. Additionally, myh1 rad1 double mutants exhibit morphological defects in the absence of DNA damaging agents. We also found a moderate suppression of the slow growth and UV sensitivity of rhp51 mutants by the myh1 mutation. Our results implicate fission yeast Myh1 in repair of a wider range of DNA damage than previously thought, and functionally link it to the checkpoint pathway.

  11. Silencing of the pentose phosphate pathway genes influences DNA replication in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornalewicz, Karolina; Wieczorek, Aneta; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Łyżeń, Robert

    2017-11-30

    Previous reports and our recently published data indicated that some enzymes of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle can affect the genome replication process by changing either the efficiency or timing of DNA synthesis in human normal cells. Both these pathways are connected with the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP pathway). The PPP pathway supports cell growth by generating energy and precursors for nucleotides and amino acids. Therefore, we asked if silencing of genes coding for enzymes involved in the pentose phosphate pathway may also affect the control of DNA replication in human fibroblasts. Particular genes coding for PPP pathway enzymes were partially silenced with specific siRNAs. Such cells remained viable. We found that silencing of the H6PD, PRPS1, RPE genes caused less efficient enterance to the S phase and decrease in efficiency of DNA synthesis. On the other hand, in cells treated with siRNA against G6PD, RBKS and TALDO genes, the fraction of cells entering the S phase was increased. However, only in the case of G6PD and TALDO, the ratio of BrdU incorporation to DNA was significantly changed. The presented results together with our previously published studies illustrate the complexity of the influence of genes coding for central carbon metabolism on the control of DNA replication in human fibroblasts, and indicate which of them are especially important in this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of strong monsoon winds on the water quality around a marine cage-culture zone in a shallow and semi-enclosed bay in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Chao Angelo; Huang, Shou-Chung; Meng, Pei-Jie; Hsieh, Hernyi Justin; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2012-04-01

    Influences of marine cage culture and monsoonal disturbances, northeasterly (NE) and southwesterly (SW) monsoons on the proximal marine environment were investigated across a gradient of sites in a semi-enclosed bay, Magong Bay (Penghu Islands, Taiwan). Elevated levels of ammonia produced by the cages were the main pollutant and distinguished the cage-culture and intermediary zones (1000 m away from the cages) from the reference zone in the NE monsoon, indicating currents produced by the strong monsoon may have extended the spread of nutrient-enriched waters without necessarily flushing such effluents outside Magong Bay. Moreover, the levels of chlorophyll-a, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity were distinguishable between two seasons, suggesting that resuspension caused by the NE monsoon winds may also influence the water quality across this bay. It indicated that the impacts of marine cage culture vary as a function of distance, and also in response to seasonal movements of water driven by local climatic occurrences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MSTN genotypes in Thoroughbred horses influence skeletal muscle gene expression and racetrack performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivney, Beatrice A; Browne, John A; Fonseca, Rita G; Katz, Lisa M; Machugh, David E; Whiston, Ronan; Hill, Emmeline W

    2012-12-01

    Myostatin, encoded by the MSTN gene, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily that regulates skeletal muscle development. A MSTN SNP significantly associated with Thoroughbred horse racing phenotypes has recently been identified as well as significant reductions in Thoroughbred skeletal muscle gene expression for three transcripts 400-1500 base pairs downstream of the MSTN gene following a period of training. Together, these findings indicate that MSTN genotypes may influence MSTN gene expression. To investigate this, MSTN mRNA expression was measured in biopsies from the middle gluteal muscle from 60 untrained yearling Thoroughbreds (C/C, n = 15; C/T, n = 28; T/T, n = 17) using two independent real-time qRT-PCR assays. MSTN gene expression was also evaluated in a subset (N = 33) of these animals using samples collected after a ten-month period of training. A significant association was observed between genotype and mRNA abundance for the untrained horses (assay I, P = 0.0237; assay II, P = 0.003559), with the C/C cohort having the highest MSTN mRNA levels, the T/T group the lowest levels and the C/T group intermediate levels. Following training, there was a significant decrease in MSTN mRNA (-3.35-fold; P = 6.9 × 10(-7) ), which was most apparent for the C/C cohort (-5.88-fold, P = 0.001). These data demonstrate the tight relationship between phenotype, genotype and gene expression at the MSTN gene in Thoroughbred racehorses. © 2012 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2012 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. Magnetic hyperthermia properties of nanoparticles inside lysosomes using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations: Influence of key parameters and dipolar interactions, and evidence for strong spatial variation of heating power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, R. P.; Carrey, J.; Respaud, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the influence of dipolar interactions in magnetic hyperthermia experiments is of crucial importance for fine optimization of nanoparticle (NP) heating power. In this study we use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to calculate hysteresis loops that correctly account for both time and temperature. This algorithm is shown to correctly reproduce the high-frequency hysteresis loop of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic NPs without any ad hoc or artificial parameters. The algorithm is easily parallelizable with a good speed-up behavior, which considerably decreases the calculation time on several processors and enables the study of assemblies of several thousands of NPs. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic NPs dispersed inside spherical lysosomes is studied as a function of several key parameters: volume concentration, applied magnetic field, lysosome size, NP diameter, and anisotropy. The influence of these parameters is illustrated and comprehensively explained. In summary, magnetic interactions increase the coercive field, saturation field, and hysteresis area of major loops. However, for small amplitude magnetic fields such as those used in magnetic hyperthermia, the heating power as a function of concentration can increase, decrease, or display a bell shape, depending on the relationship between the applied magnetic field and the coercive/saturation fields of the NPs. The hysteresis area is found to be well correlated with the parallel or antiparallel nature of the dipolar field acting on each particle. The heating power of a given NP is strongly influenced by a local concentration involving approximately 20 neighbors. Because this local concentration strongly decreases upon approaching the surface, the heating power increases or decreases in the vicinity of the lysosome membrane. The amplitude of variation reaches more than one order of magnitude in certain conditions. This transition occurs on a thickness corresponding to approximately

  15. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  16. Functional characterization of a Penicillium chrysogenum mutanase gene induced upon co-cultivation with Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajaj, I.; Veiga, T.; Van Dissel, D.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microbial gene expression is strongly influenced by environmental growth conditions. Comparison of gene expression under different conditions is frequently used for functional analysis and to unravel regulatory networks, however, gene expression responses to co-cultivation with other

  17. Structural influence of gene networks on their inference: analysis of C3NET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmert-Streib Frank

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of large-scale high-throughput data possesses considerable challenges toward their functional analysis. For this reason gene network inference methods gained considerable interest. However, our current knowledge, especially about the influence of the structure of a gene network on its inference, is limited. Results In this paper we present a comprehensive investigation of the structural influence of gene networks on the inferential characteristics of C3NET - a recently introduced gene network inference algorithm. We employ local as well as global performance metrics in combination with an ensemble approach. The results from our numerical study for various biological and synthetic network structures and simulation conditions, also comparing C3NET with other inference algorithms, lead a multitude of theoretical and practical insights into the working behavior of C3NET. In addition, in order to facilitate the practical usage of C3NET we provide an user-friendly R package, called c3net, and describe its functionality. It is available from https://r-forge.r-project.org/projects/c3net and from the CRAN package repository. Conclusions The availability of gene network inference algorithms with known inferential properties opens a new era of large-scale screening experiments that could be equally beneficial for basic biological and biomedical research with auspicious prospects. The availability of our easy to use software package c3net may contribute to the popularization of such methods. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Lev Klebanov, Joel Bader and Yuriy Gusev.

  18. Expression patterns of the aquaporin gene family during renal development: influence of genetic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Kleber S; Debaix, Huguette; Cnops, Yvette; Geffers, Lars; Devuyst, Olivier

    2009-08-01

    High-throughput analyses have shown that aquaporins (AQPs) belong to a cluster of genes that are differentially expressed during kidney organogenesis. However, the spatiotemporal expression patterns of the AQP gene family during tubular maturation and the potential influence of genetic variation on these patterns and on water handling remain unknown. We investigated the expression patterns of all AQP isoforms in fetal (E13.5 to E18.5), postnatal (P1 to P28), and adult (9 weeks) kidneys of inbred (C57BL/6J) and outbred (CD-1) mice. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we evidenced two mRNA patterns during tubular maturation in C57 mice. The AQPs 1-7-11 showed an early (from E14.5) and progressive increase to adult levels, similar to the mRNA pattern observed for proximal tubule markers (Megalin, NaPi-IIa, OAT1) and reflecting the continuous increase in renal cortical structures during development. By contrast, AQPs 2-3-4 showed a later (E15.5) and more abrupt increase, with transient postnatal overexpression. Most AQP genes were expressed earlier and/or stronger in maturing CD-1 kidneys. Furthermore, adult CD-1 kidneys expressed more AQP2 in the collecting ducts, which was reflected by a significant delay in excreting a water load. The expression patterns of proximal vs. distal AQPs and the earlier expression in the CD-1 strain were confirmed by immunoblotting and immunostaining. These data (1) substantiate the clustering of important genes during tubular maturation and (2) demonstrate that genetic variability influences the regulation of the AQP gene family during tubular maturation and water handling by the mature kidney.

  19. Influence of apolipoprotein-E gene on lipid profile, physical activity and body fat relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Boaventura Rachid Nascimento

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and body fat modify lipemia, and this effect seems to be influenced by apolipoprotein-E (APOE gene polymorphism. Thus, the purpose of this article was to review main results of studies that have analyzed the relation of APOE gene with physical activity and body fat on triglycerides, total cholesterol and low (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL concentrations. The Scientific Electronic Library Online – SciELO, Web of Science and PubMed database were used to locate the articles. The keywords used in combination were: apoe genotype, apolipoprotein-E polymorphism, physical exercise, physical activity, aerobic exercise, body fat and obesity. Originals scientific investigations performed with humans were included, and excluded those ones which involved samples with diseases, except obesity and/or lipemic disorders. It was observed a trend, that ε2 allele carriers are the ones with the greater improvements on lipemia from physical exercise. In addition, the body fat impact on the elevation of triglycerides and LDL are stronger in carriers of the ε2 and ε4 allele, respectively. Considering the small number of originals scientific investigations and their divergent results, reliable inferences can not be made about the APOE gene polymorphism influences on physical activity and body fat effect on lipemia. Thus, further studies with others populations and more volunteers for allele, as well as others exercise modalities and intensities, are necessary.

  20. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciados, Mark; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2016-12-13

    During the development of an individual from a single cell to prenatal stages to adolescence to adulthood and through the complete life span, humans are exposed to countless environmental and stochastic factors, including estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals. Brain cells and neural circuits are likely to be influenced by estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EEDs) because they strongly dependent on estrogens. In this review, we discuss both environmental, epidemiological, and experimental evidence on brain health with exposure to oral contraceptives, hormonal therapy, and EEDs such as bisphenol-A (BPA), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phthalates, and metalloestrogens, such as, arsenic, cadmium, and manganese. Also we discuss the brain health effects associated from exposure to EEDs including the promotion of neurodegeneration, protection against neurodegeneration, and involvement in various neurological deficits; changes in rearing behavior, locomotion, anxiety, learning difficulties, memory issues, and neuronal abnormalities. The effects of EEDs on the brain are varied during the entire life span and far-reaching with many different mechanisms. To understand endocrine disrupting chemicals mechanisms, we use bioinformatics, molecular, and epidemiologic approaches. Through those approaches, we learn how the effects of EEDs on the brain go beyond known mechanism to disrupt the circulatory and neural estrogen function and estrogen-mediated signaling. Effects on EEDs-modified estrogen and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) signaling genes with exposure to natural estrogen, pharmacological estrogen-ethinyl estradiol, PCBs, phthalates, BPA, and metalloestrogens are presented here. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EEDs interactions and brain disease associations identified hundreds of genes that were altered by exposure to estrogen, phthalate, PCBs, BPA or metalloestrogens. Many genes modified by EEDs are common targets of both 17 β-estradiol (E2) and NRF1. Some of

  1. Genetic Influences on Adolescent Sexual Behavior: Why Genes Matter for Environmentally-Oriented Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, K. Paige

    2013-01-01

    There are dramatic individual differences among adolescents in how and when they become sexually active adults, and “early” sexual activity is frequently cited as a cause of concern for scientists, policymakers, and the general public. Understanding the causes and developmental impact of adolescent sexual activity can be furthered by considering genes as a source of individual differences. Quantitative behavioral genetics (i.e., twin and family studies) and candidate gene association studies now provide clear evidence for the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in adolescent sexual behavior and related phenotypes. Genetic influences on sexual behavior may operate through a variety of direct and indirect mechanisms, including pubertal development, testosterone levels, and dopaminergic systems. Genetic differences may be systematically associated with exposure to environments that are commonly treated as causes of sexual behavior (gene-environment correlation). Possible gene-environment correlations pose a serious challenge for interpreting the results of much behavioral research. Multivariate, genetically-informed research on adolescent sexual behavior compares twins and family members as a form of “quasi-experiment”: How do twins who differ in their sexual experiences differ in their later development? The small but growing body of genetically-informed research has already challenged dominant assumptions regarding the etiology and sequelae of adolescent sexual behavior, with some studies indicating possible positive effects of teenage sexuality. Studies of gene × environment interaction may further elucidate the mechanisms by which genes and environments combine to shape the development of sexual behavior and its psychosocial consequences. Overall, the existence of heritable variation in adolescent sexual behavior has profound implications for environmentally-oriented theory and research. PMID:23855958

  2. The behavior of antibiotic resistance genes and arsenic influenced by biochar during different manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Erping; Wu, Ying; Jiao, Yanan; Zuo, Yiru; Rensing, Christopher; Chen, Hong

    2017-06-01

    The effect of two different biochar types, rice straw biochar (RSB) and mushroom biochar (MB), on chicken manure composting was previously examined by monitoring the fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and arsenic. The behavior of ARGs and arsenic in other kinds of manure composting with the same biochar types had not been examined. In this study, we added either RSB or MB to pig and duck manure composts to study the behavior of ARGs (tet genes, sul genes, and chloramphenicol resistance genes) and arsenic under the same experimental condition. The results showed that the average removal values of selected ARGs were respectively 2.56 and 2.09 log units in duck and pig manure compost without the addition of biochar. The effect of biochar addition on the average removal value of ARGs depended on the type of biochar and manure. For instance, in pig manure compost, MB addition increased the average removal value of ARGs, while RSB addition decreased. And both biochar additions had a negative influence on the average removal value of ARGs in duck manure compost. Analytical results also demonstrated that MB addition reduced total arsenic and the percentage of bioavailable arsenic more than RSB.

  3. The garlic allelochemical diallyl disulfide affects tomato root growth by influencing cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L., and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. seed germination, root growth, mitotic index and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs, auxin transport genes (SlPINs and expansin genes (EXPs in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM. This result suggests that tomato root growth

  4. A single dose of lysergic acid diethylamide influences gene expression patterns within the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Charles D; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2002-05-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) have profound effects on humans including hallucinations and detachment from reality. These remarkable behavioral effects have many similarities to the debilitating symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. The effects of hallucinogens are thought to be mediated by serotonin receptor activation; however, how these drugs elicit the unusual behavioral effects remains largely a mystery, despite much research. We have undertaken the first comprehensive analysis of gene expression influenced by acute LSD administration in the mammalian brain. These studies represent a novel approach to elucidate the mechanism of action of this class of drugs. We have identified a number of genes that are predicted to be involved in the processes of synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic signaling and cytoskeletal architecture. Understanding these molecular events will lead to new insights into the etiology of disorders whose behavioral symptoms resemble the temporary effects of hallucinogenic drugs, and also may ultimately result in new therapies.

  5. Pectin Methylesterase Genes Influence Solid Wood Properties of Eucalyptus pilularis1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Timothy R.; Henry, Robert J.; Harwood, Chris E.; Thomas, Dane S.; McManus, Luke J.; Raymond, Carolyn; Henson, Michael; Shepherd, Mervyn

    2012-01-01

    This association study of Eucalyptus pilularis populations provides empirical evidence for the role of Pectin Methylesterase (PME) in influencing solid wood characteristics of Eucalyptus. PME6 was primarily associated with the shrinkage and collapse of drying timber, which are phenotypic traits consistent with the role of pectin as a hydrophilic polysaccharide. PME7 was primarily associated with cellulose and pulp yield traits and had an inverse correlation with lignin content. Selection of specific alleles in these genes may be important for improving trees as sources of high-quality wood products. A heterozygote advantage was postulated for the PME7 loci and, in combination with haplotype blocks, may explain the absence of a homozygous class at all single-nucleotide polymorphisms investigated in this gene. PMID:22052017

  6. A codon window in mRNA downstream of the initiation codon where NGG codons give strongly reduced gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Isaksson, Leif A

    2004-01-01

    and GGG, but not GGN or GNG (where N is non-G), are unique since they are associated with a very low gene expression also if located at positions +2, +3 and +5. All codons, including NGG, give a normal gene expression if placed at positions +7. The negative effect by the NGG codons is true for both...

  7. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Preciados

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During the development of an individual from a single cell to prenatal stages to adolescence to adulthood and through the complete life span, humans are exposed to countless environmental and stochastic factors, including estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals. Brain cells and neural circuits are likely to be influenced by estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EEDs because they strongly dependent on estrogens. In this review, we discuss both environmental, epidemiological, and experimental evidence on brain health with exposure to oral contraceptives, hormonal therapy, and EEDs such as bisphenol-A (BPA, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, phthalates, and metalloestrogens, such as, arsenic, cadmium, and manganese. Also we discuss the brain health effects associated from exposure to EEDs including the promotion of neurodegeneration, protection against neurodegeneration, and involvement in various neurological deficits; changes in rearing behavior, locomotion, anxiety, learning difficulties, memory issues, and neuronal abnormalities. The effects of EEDs on the brain are varied during the entire life span and far-reaching with many different mechanisms. To understand endocrine disrupting chemicals mechanisms, we use bioinformatics, molecular, and epidemiologic approaches. Through those approaches, we learn how the effects of EEDs on the brain go beyond known mechanism to disrupt the circulatory and neural estrogen function and estrogen-mediated signaling. Effects on EEDs-modified estrogen and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 signaling genes with exposure to natural estrogen, pharmacological estrogen-ethinyl estradiol, PCBs, phthalates, BPA, and metalloestrogens are presented here. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EEDs interactions and brain disease associations identified hundreds of genes that were altered by exposure to estrogen, phthalate, PCBs, BPA or metalloestrogens. Many genes modified by EEDs are common targets of both 17 β-estradiol (E2 and

  8. Genes influence young children's human figure drawings and their association with intelligence a decade later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, Rosalind; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Garfield, Victoria; Plomin, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Drawing is ancient; it is the only childhood cognitive behavior for which there is any direct evidence from the Upper Paleolithic. Do genes influence individual differences in this species-typical behavior, and is drawing related to intelligence (g) in modern children? We report on the first genetically informative study of children's figure drawing. In a study of 7,752 pairs of twins, we found that genetic differences exert a greater influence on children's figure drawing at age 4 than do between-family environmental differences. Figure drawing was as heritable as g at age 4 (heritability of .29 for both). Drawing scores at age 4 correlated significantly with g at age 4 (r = .33, p drawing at age 4 and g at age 14 was .52, 95% confidence interval = [.31, .75]. Individual differences in this widespread behavior have an important genetic component and a significant genetic link with g. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Lack of influence of GTP cyclohydrolase gene (GCH1 variations on pain sensitivity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionne Raymond A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To assess the effect of variations in GTP cyclohydrolase gene (GCH1 on pain sensitivity in humans. Methods Thermal and cold pain sensitivity were evaluated in a cohort of 735 healthy volunteers. Among this cohort, the clinical pain responses of 221 subjects after the surgical removal of impacted third molars were evaluated. Genotyping was done for 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose heterozygosity > 0.2 in GCH1. Influence of the genetic variations including SNPs and haplotypes on pain sensitivity were analyzed. Results Minor allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium show significant differences in European Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans. Association analyses in European Americans do not replicate the previously reported important influence of GCH1 variations on pain sensitivity. Conclusion Considering population stratification, previously reported associations between GCH1 genetic variations and pain sensitivity appear weak or negligible in this well characterized model of pain.

  10. Heterogeneous stock rat: a unique animal model for mapping genes influencing bone fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Imranul; Koller, Daniel L; Sun, Qiwei; Roeder, Ryan K; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; López-Aumatell, Regina; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont, Carme; Díaz, Sira; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Whitley, Adam; Strid, Pernilla; Diez, Margarita; Johannesson, Martina; Flint, Jonathan; Econs, Michael J; Turner, Charles H; Foroud, Tatiana

    2011-05-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that skeletal mass, structure and biomechanical properties vary considerably among 11 different inbred rat strains. Subsequently, we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in four inbred rat strains (F344, LEW, COP and DA) for different bone phenotypes and identified several candidate genes influencing various bone traits. The standard approach to narrowing QTL intervals down to a few candidate genes typically employs the generation of congenic lines, which is time consuming and often not successful. A potential alternative approach is to use a highly genetically informative animal model resource capable of delivering very high resolution gene mapping such as Heterogeneous stock (HS) rat. HS rat was derived from eight inbred progenitors: ACI/N, BN/SsN, BUF/N, F344/N, M520/N, MR/N, WKY/N and WN/N. The genetic recombination pattern generated across 50 generations in these rats has been shown to deliver ultra-high even gene-level resolution for complex genetic studies. The purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of the HS rat model for fine mapping and identification of genes underlying bone fragility phenotypes. We compared bone geometry, density and strength phenotypes at multiple skeletal sites in HS rats with those obtained from five of the eight progenitor inbred strains. In addition, we estimated the heritability for different bone phenotypes in these rats and employed principal component analysis to explore relationships among bone phenotypes in the HS rats. Our study demonstrates that significant variability exists for different skeletal phenotypes in HS rats compared with their inbred progenitors. In addition, we estimated high heritability for several bone phenotypes and biologically interpretable factors explaining significant overall variability, suggesting that the HS rat model could be a unique genetic resource for rapid and efficient discovery of the genetic determinants of bone fragility. Copyright

  11. Microarray Analysis of Iris Gene Expression in Mice with Mutations Influencing Pigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantow, Colleen M.; Cuffy, Tryphena L.; Fingert, John H.; Kuehn, Markus H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Several ocular diseases involve the iris, notably including oculocutaneous albinism, pigment dispersion syndrome, and exfoliation syndrome. To screen for candidate genes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases, genome-wide iris gene expression patterns were comparatively analyzed from mouse models of these conditions. Methods. Iris samples from albino mice with a Tyr mutation, pigment dispersion–prone mice with Tyrp1 and Gpnmb mutations, and mice resembling exfoliation syndrome with a Lyst mutation were compared with samples from wild-type mice. All mice were strain (C57BL/6J), age (60 days old), and sex (female) matched. Microarrays were used to compare transcriptional profiles, and differentially expressed transcripts were described by functional annotation clustering using DAVID Bioinformatics Resources. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to validate a subset of identified changes. Results. Compared with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, each disease context exhibited a large number of statistically significant changes in gene expression, including 685 transcripts differentially expressed in albino irides, 403 in pigment dispersion–prone irides, and 460 in exfoliative-like irides. Conclusions. Functional annotation clusterings were particularly striking among the overrepresented genes, with albino and pigment dispersion–prone irides both exhibiting overall evidence of crystallin-mediated stress responses. Exfoliative-like irides from mice with a Lyst mutation showed overall evidence of involvement of genes that influence immune system processes, lytic vacuoles, and lysosomes. These findings have several biologically relevant implications, particularly with respect to secondary forms of glaucoma, and represent a useful resource as a hypothesis-generating dataset. PMID:20739468

  12. Influence of SNPs in nutrient-sensitive candidate genes and gene-diet interactions on blood lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahe, Lena Kirchner; Angquist, Lars; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup

    2013-01-01

    Blood lipid response to a given dietary intervention could be determined by the effect of diet, gene variants or gene-diet interactions. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether variants in presumed nutrient-sensitive genes involved in lipid metabolism modified lipid profile ...

  13. Identification of the MUC2 Promoter as a Strong Promoter for Intestinal Gene Expression through Generation of Transgenic Quail Expressing GFP in Gut Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Woodfint

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of tissue- and stage-specific gene promoters is valuable for delineating the functional roles of specific genes in genetically engineered animals. Here, through the comparison of gene expression in different tissues by analysis of a microarray database, the intestinal specificity of mucin 2 (MUC2 expression was identified in mice and humans, and further confirmed in chickens by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR analysis. An analysis of cis-acting elements in avian MUC2 gene promoters revealed conservation of binding sites, within a 2.9 kb proximal promoter region, for transcription factors such as caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2, GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4A, and transcription factor 4 (TCF4 that are important for maintaining intestinal homeostasis and functional integrity. By generating transgenic quail, we demonstrated that the 2.9 kb chicken MUC2 promoter could drive green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter expression exclusively in the small intestine, large intestine, and ceca. Fluorescence image analysis further revealed GFP expression in intestine epithelial cells. The GFP expression was barely detectable in the embryonic intestine, but increased during post-hatch development. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of the reporter gene confirmed that the 2.9 kb MUC2 promoter could retain the regulatory element to drive expression of target genes in intestinal tissues after hatching. This new transgene expression system, using the MUC2 promoter, will provide a new method of overexpressing target genes to study gene function in the avian intestine.

  14. Extracellular matrix influence in Streptococcus mutans gene expression in a cariogenic biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez Salamanca, E J; Klein, M I

    2018-04-01

    Caries etiology is biofilm-diet-dependent. Biofilms are highly dynamic and structured microbial communities enmeshed in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix. The study evaluated the expression dynamics of Streptococcus mutans genes associated with exopolysaccharides (EPS) (gtfBCD, gbpB, dexA), lipoteichoic acids (LTA) (dltABCD, SMU_775c) and extracellular DNA (eDNA) (lytST, lrgAB, ccpA) during matrix development within a mixed-species biofilm of S. mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii. Mixed-species biofilms using S. mutans strains UA159 or ΔgtfB formed on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs were submitted to a nutritional challenge (providing an abundance of sucrose and starch). Biofilms were removed at eight developmental stages for gene expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The pH of spent culture media remained acidic throughout the experimental periods, being lower after sucrose and starch exposure. All genes were expressed at all biofilm developmental phases. EPS- and LTA-associated genes had a similar expression profile for both biofilms, presenting lower levels of expression at 67, 91 and 115 hours and a peak of expression at 55 hours, but having distinct expression magnitudes, with lower values for ΔgtfB (eg, fold-difference of ~382 for gtfC and ~16 for dltB at 43 hours). The eDNA-associated genes presented different dynamics of expression between both strains. In UA159 biofilms lrgA and lrgB genes were highly expressed at 29 hours (which were ~13 and ~5.4 times vs ΔgtfB, respectively), whereas in ΔgtfB biofilms an inverse relationship between lytS and lrgA and lrgB expression was detected. Therefore, the deletion of gtfB influences dynamics and magnitude of expression of genes associated with matrix main components. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The presence of p53 influences the expression of multiple human cytomegalovirus genes at early times postinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Holger; Rosenke, Kyle; O'Dowd, John M; Fortunato, Elizabeth A

    2009-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and immunosuppressed individuals. During infection, HCMV is known to employ host transcription factors to facilitate viral gene expression. To further understand the previously observed delay in viral replication and protein expression in p53 knockout cells, we conducted microarray analyses of p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) immortalized fibroblast cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1 at 24 h postinfection (p.i.), the expression of 22 viral genes was affected by the absence of p53. Eleven of these 22 genes (group 1) were examined by real-time reverse transcriptase, or quantitative, PCR (q-PCR). Additionally, five genes previously determined to have p53 bound to their nearest p53-responsive elements (group 2) and three control genes without p53 binding sites in their upstream sequences (group 3) were also examined. At an MOI of 1, >3-fold regulation was found for five group 1 genes. The expression of group 2 and 3 genes was not changed. At an MOI of 5, all genes from group 1 and four of five genes from group 2 were found to be regulated. The expression of control genes from group 3 remained unchanged. A q-PCR time course of four genes revealed that p53 influences viral gene expression most at immediate-early and early times p.i., suggesting a mechanism for the reduced and delayed production of virions in p53(-/-) cells.

  16. Genes that influence swarming motility and biofilm formation in Variovorax paradoxus EPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Pehl

    Full Text Available Variovorax paradoxus is an aerobic soil bacterium associated with important biodegradative processes in nature. We use V. paradoxus EPS to study multicellular behaviors on surfaces.We recovered flanking sequence from 123 clones in a Tn5 mutant library, with insertions in 29 different genes, selected based on observed surface behavior phenotypes. We identified three genes, Varpa_4665, Varpa_4680, and Varpa_5900, for further examination. These genes were cloned into pBBR1MCS2 and used to complement the insertion mutants. We also analyzed expression of Varpa_4680 and Varpa_5900 under different growth conditions by qPCR.The 29 genes we identified had diverse predicted functions, many in exopolysaccharide synthesis. Varpa_4680, the most commonly recovered insertion site, encodes a putative N-acetyl-L-fucosamine transferase similar to WbuB. Expression of this gene in trans complemented the mutant fully. Several unique insertions were identified in Varpa_5900, which is one of three predicted pilY1 homologs in the EPS genome. No insertions in the two other putative pilY1 homologs present in the genome were identified. Expression of Varpa_5900 altered the structure of the wild type swarm, as did disruption of the chromosomal gene. The swarming phenotype was complemented by expression of Varpa_5900 from a plasmid, but biofilm formation was not restored. Both Varpa_4680 and Varpa_5900 transcripts were downregulated in biofilms and upregulated during swarming when compared to log phase culture. We identified a putative two component system (Varpa_4664-4665 encoding a response regulator (shkR and a sensor histidine kinase (shkS, respectively. Biofilm formation increased and swarming was strongly delayed in the Varpa_4665 (shkS mutant. Complementation of shkS restored the biofilm phenotype but swarming was still delayed. Expression of shkR in trans suppressed biofilm formation in either genetic background, and partially restored swarming in the mutant

  17. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variant C677T influences susceptibility to migraine with aura

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    Sundholm James

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C677T variant in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene is associated with increased levels of circulating homocysteine and is a mild risk factor for vascular disease. Migraine, with and without aura (MA and MO, is a prevalent and complex neurovascular disorder that may also be affected by genetically influenced hyperhomocysteinaemia. To determine whether the C677T variant in the MTHFR gene is associated with migraine susceptibility we utilised unrelated and family-based case-control study designs. Methods A total of 652 Caucasian migraine cases were investigated in this study. The MTHFR C677T variant was genotyped in 270 unrelated migraine cases and 270 controls as well as 382 affected subjects from 92 multiplex pedigrees. Results In the unrelated case-control sample we observed an over-representation of the 677T allele in migraine patients compared to controls, specifically for the MA subtype (40% vs. 33% (χ2 = 5.70, P = 0.017. The Armitage test for trend indicated a significant dosage effect of the risk allele (T for MA (χ2 = 5.72, P = 0.017. This linear trend was also present in the independent family-based sample (χ2 = 4.25, Padjusted = 0.039. Overall, our results indicate that the T/T genotype confers a modest, yet significant, increase in risk for the MA subtype (odds ratio: 2.0 – 2.5. No increased risk for the MO subtype was observed (P > 0.05. Conclusions In Caucasians, the C677T variant in the MTHFR gene influences susceptibility to MA, but not MO. Investigation into the enzyme activity of MTHFR and the role of homocysteine in the pathophysiology of migraine is warranted.

  18. Influence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene polymorphism on cognitive function in schizophrenia✰,✰✰

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonodi, Ikwunga; McMahon, Robert P.; Krishna, Nithin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Liu, Judy; Glassman, Matthew; Hong, L. Elliot; Gold, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits compromise quality of life and productivity for individuals with schizophrenia and have no effective treatments. Preclinical data point to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism as a potential target for pro-cognitive drug development. We have previously demonstrated association of a kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene variant with reduced KMO gene expression in postmortem schizophrenia cortex, and neurocognitive endophenotypic deficits in a clinical sample. KMO encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), the rate-limiting microglial enzyme of cortical kynurenine metabolism. Aberration of the KMO gene might be the proximal cause of impaired cortical kynurenine metabolism observed in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between KMO variation and cognitive function in schizophrenia is unknown. This study examined the effects of the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele on cognitive function in schizophrenia. Methods We examined the association of KMO polymorphisms with general neuropsychological performance and P50 gating in a sample of 150 schizophrenia and 95 healthy controls. Results Consistent with our original report, the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele was associated with deficits in general neuropsychological performance, and this effect was more marked in schizophrenia compared with controls. Additionally, the C (Arg452) allele of the missense rs1053230C>T variant (KMO Arg452Cys) showed a trend effect on cognitive function. Neither variant affected P50 gating. Conclusions These data suggest that KMO variation influences a range of cognitive domains known to predict functional outcome. Extensive molecular characterization of this gene would elucidate its role in cognitive function with implications for vertical integration with basic discovery. PMID:25464917

  19. Influence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene polymorphism on cognitive function in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonodi, Ikwunga; McMahon, Robert P; Krishna, Nithin; Mitchell, Braxton D; Liu, Judy; Glassman, Matthew; Hong, L Elliot; Gold, James M

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive deficits compromise quality of life and productivity for individuals with schizophrenia and have no effective treatments. Preclinical data point to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism as a potential target for pro-cognitive drug development. We have previously demonstrated association of a kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene variant with reduced KMO gene expression in postmortem schizophrenia cortex, and neurocognitive endophenotypic deficits in a clinical sample. KMO encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), the rate-limiting microglial enzyme of cortical kynurenine metabolism. Aberration of the KMO gene might be the proximal cause of impaired cortical kynurenine metabolism observed in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between KMO variation and cognitive function in schizophrenia is unknown. This study examined the effects of the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele on cognitive function in schizophrenia. We examined the association of KMO polymorphisms with general neuropsychological performance and P50 gating in a sample of 150 schizophrenia and 95 healthy controls. Consistent with our original report, the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele was associated with deficits in general neuropsychological performance, and this effect was more marked in schizophrenia compared with controls. Additionally, the C (Arg452) allele of the missense rs1053230C>T variant (KMO Arg452Cys) showed a trend effect on cognitive function. Neither variant affected P50 gating. These data suggest that KMO variation influences a range of cognitive domains known to predict functional outcome. Extensive molecular characterization of this gene would elucidate its role in cognitive function with implications for vertical integration with basic discovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene influences ERP old/new effects during recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert S; Medrano, Paolo; Boyle, Kaitlin; Smolen, Andrew; Curran, Tim; Nyhus, Erika

    2015-11-01

    Recognition memory is defined as the ability to recognize a previously encountered stimulus and has been associated with spatially and temporally distinct event-related potentials (ERPs). Allelic variations of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) have recently been shown to impact memory performance. Common variants of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) of the SLC6A4 gene result in long (l) and short (s) allelic variants with carriers of the s allele having lowered transcriptional efficiency. Thus, the current study examines the effects polymorphisms of the SLC6A4 gene have on performance and ERP amplitudes commonly associated with recognition memory. Electroencephalogram (EEG), genetic, and behavioral data were collected from sixty participants as they performed an item and source memory recognition task. In both tasks, participants studied and encoded 200 words, which were then mixed with 200 new words during retrieval. Participants were monitored with EEG during the retrieval portion of each memory task. EEG electrodes were grouped into four ROIs, left anterior superior, right anterior superior, left posterior superior, and right posterior superior. ERP mean amplitudes during hits in the item and source memory task were compared to correctly recognizing new items (correct rejections). Results show that s-carriers have decreased mean hit amplitudes in both the right anterior superior ROI 1000-1500ms post stimulus during the source memory task and the left anterior superior ROI 300-500ms post stimulus during the item memory task. These results suggest that individual differences due to genetic variation of the serotonin transporter gene influences recognition memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PSPHL as a candidate gene influencing racial disparities in endometrial cancer incidence and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay eAllard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic malignancy in the United States and is characterized by a well recognized racial disparity in both incidence and survival. Specifically Caucasians are about two times more likely to develop endometrial cancer than are African Americans. However, African American women are more likely to die from this disease than are Caucasians. The basis for this disparity remains unknown. Previous studies have identified differences in the types and frequencies of gene mutations among endometrial cancers from Caucasians and African Americans suggesting. We performed a gene expression microarray study in an effort to further examine differences between African American and Caucasian women’s endometrial cancers. This expression screen identified a list of potential biomarkers differentially expressed between these two groups of cancers. Of these we identified a poorly characterized transcript with a region of homology to phospho serine phospatase (PSPH and designated phospho serine phospatase like (PSPHL as the most differentially over-expressed gene in cancers from African Americans. We clarified the nature of expressed transcripts. Northern blot analysis confirmed PSPHL messages under 1 KB. Sequence analysis of transcripts confirmed two alternate open reading frame (ORF isoforms due to alternative splicing events. Splice specific primer sets confirmed both isoforms were differentially expressed in tissues from Caucasians and African Americans. We further examined the expression in other tissues from women to include normal endometrium, normal and malignant ovary. In all cases PSPHL expression was more often present in tissues from African-Americans than Caucasians. Our data confirm the African-American based expression of the PSPHL transcript several tissue types. PSPHL represents a candidate gene that might influence the observed racial disparity in endometrial and other cancers.

  2. Influence of EARLI1-like genes on flowering time and lignin synthesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Zhang, X; Xu, Z-Y; Li, L; Zhang, C; Schläppi, M; Xu, Z-Q

    2011-09-01

    EARLI1 encodes a 14.7 kDa protein in the cell wall, is a member of the PRP (proline-rich protein) family and has multiple functions, including resistance to low temperature and fungal infection. RNA gel blot analyses in the present work indicated that expression of EARLI1-like genes, EARLI1, At4G12470 and At4G12490, was down-regulated in Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants derived from transformation with Agrobacterium strain ABI, which contains a construct encoding a double-strand RNA targeting 8CM of EARLI1. Phenotype analyses revealed that Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants of EARLI1 flowered earlier than Col-FRI-Sf2 wild-type plants. The average bolting time of Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants was 39.7 and 19.4 days, respectively, under a long-day photoperiod. In addition, there were significant differences in main stem length, internode number and rosette leaf number between Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants. RT-PCR showed that EARLI1-like genes might delay flowering time through the autonomous and long-day photoperiod pathways by maintaining the abundance of FLC transcripts. In Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants, transcription of FLC was repressed, while expression of SOC1 and FT was activated. Microscopy observations showed that EARLI1-like genes were also associated with morphogenesis of leaf cells in Arabidopsis. Using histochemical staining, EARLI1-like genes were found to be involved in regulation of lignin synthesis in inflorescence stems, and Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants had 9.67% and 8.76% dry weight lignin, respectively. Expression analysis revealed that cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in lignin synthesis, was influenced by EARLI1-like genes. These data all suggest that EARLI1-like genes could control the flowering process and lignin synthesis in Arabidopsis. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Soil DNA extraction procedure influences protist 18S rRNA gene community profiling outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Susana S.; Nunes, Ines Marques; Nielsen, Tue K.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies allow deeper studies of the soil protist diversity and function. However, little attention has been given to the impact of the chosen soil DNA extraction procedure to the overall results. We examined the effect of three acknowledged DNA recovery methods, two...... manual methods (ISOm-11063, GnS-GII) and one commercial kit (MoBio), on soil protist community structures obtained from different sites with different land uses. Results from 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing suggest that DNA extraction method significantly affect the replicate homogeneity, the total...... number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered and the overall taxonomic structure and diversity of soil protist communities. However, DNA extraction effects did not overwhelm the natural variation among samples, as the community data still strongly grouped by geographical location...

  4. Preliminary evidence that allelic variation in the LMX1A gene influences training-related working memory improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellander, Martin; Brehmer, Yvonne; Westerberg, Helena; Karlsson, Sari; Fürth, Daniel; Bergman, Olle; Eriksson, Elias; Bäckman, Lars

    2011-06-01

    LMX1A is a transcription factor involved in the development of dopamine (DA)-producing neurons in midbrain. Previous research has shown that allelic variations in three LMX1A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were related to risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that these SNPs may influence the number of mesencephalic DA neurons. Prompted by the established link between striatal DA functions and working memory (WM) performance, we examined two of these SNPs in relation to the ability to benefit from 4 weeks of WM training. One SNP (rs4657412) was strongly associated with the magnitude of training-related gains in verbal WM. The allele linked to larger gains has previously been suggested to be associated with higher dopaminergic nerve cell density. No differential gains of either SNP were observed for spatial WM, and the genotype groups were also indistinguishable in tests of attention, interference control, episodic memory, perceptual speed, and reasoning for both SNPs. This pattern of data is in agreement with previous findings from our group, suggesting that cognitive effects of DA-related genes may be more easily detected in a training context than for single-assessment performance scores. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Perturbative analysis of the influence of π+π- strong interaction on the relation between A2π creation probabilities in ns-states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voskresenskaya, O.O.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the relations between probabilities of A 2π -atoms creation in ns-states, derived with neglecting of the strong interaction between pions, hold practically unchanged if the strong interaction is taken into account in the first order of the perturbation theory. The formulation of Deser equation for the energy levels shift of the hadronic atoms (HA) is given in terms of the effective range of the strong interaction and relative correction to the Coulomb wave function of HA at origin, caused by the strong interaction. (author)

  6. [THE INFLUENCE OF SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER AND MONOAMINE OXIDASE A GENES POLYMORPHISM ON PSYCHO-EMOTION AND KARYOLOGICAL STABILITY OF ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaev, V N; Nechaeva, M S; Korneeva, O S; Cherenkov, D A

    2015-11-01

    The influence of polymorphism of the serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase A genes, associated with man's aggressiveness on the psycho-emotional state and karyological status of single combat athletes. It was revealed that the carriers of less active ("short"), monoamine oxidase A gene variant have a high motivation to succeed and less rigidity and frustrated, compared to the carriers of more active ("long") version of the gene. Heterozygote carriers of less active ("short") variant of the serotonin transporter gene 5-HTTL had more physical aggression, guilt and were less frustrated compared with carriers of two long alleles. It has been revealed the association of studied genes with the karyological status of athletes. So fighters who are carriers of the short and long alleles of the serotonin transporter gene had more cells with nuclear abnormalities in the buccal epithelium than single combat athletes which both alleles were long.

  7. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  8. Studying the influence of strong meteorological disturbances in the Earth's lower atmosphere on variations of ionospheric parameters in the Asian region of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernigovskaya, Marina; Kurkin, Vladimir; Orlov, Igor; Oinats, Alexey; Sharkov, Eugenii

    2010-05-01

    Short-period temporal variations of ionospheric parameters were analyzed to study probabilities of manifestation of strong meteorological disturbances in the Earth's lower atmosphere in variations of upper atmosphere parameters in a zone far removed from a disturbance source. In the analysis, we used data on maximum observed frequencies (MOF) of oblique sounding (OS) signals along Norilsk-Irkutsk, Magadan-Irkutsk, and Khabarovsk-Irkutsk paths in East Siberia and the Far East. These data were obtained during solar minimum at equinoxes (March, September) in 2008-2009. Analyzing effects of wave disturbances in ionospheric parameters, we take into account helio-geomagnetic and meteorological conditions in regions under study to do an effective separation between disturbances associated with magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling and those induced by the influence of the lower atmosphere on the upper one. The frequency analysis we conducted revealed time intervals with higher intensity of short-period oscillations which may have been interpreted as manifestation of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) whose sources were internal gravity waves (IGWs) with periods of 1-5 hours. The complex analysis of helio-geomagnetic, ionospheric, and atmospheric data as well as data on tropical cyclones established that the detected TIDs were unrelated to helio-geomagnetic disturbances (2008-2009 exhibited solar minimum and quiet geomagnetic conditions). The analysis of other potential sources of the observed short-period wave disturbances shows that observed TIDs do not always coincide in time with passage of local meteorological fronts through the region of subionospheric points of OS paths and are not associated with passage of solar terminator. An attempt was made to connect a number of detected TIDs with ionospheric responses to tropical cyclones (TC) which were in active phase in the north-west of the Pacific Ocean during the periods considered. A considerable

  9. Genetic influences on hand osteoarthritis in Finnish women--a replication study of candidate genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Hämäläinen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Our aims were to replicate some previously reported associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in five genes (A2BP1, COG5, GDF5, HFE, ESR1 with hand osteoarthritis (OA, and to examine whether genes (BCAP29, DIO2, DUS4L, DVWA, HLA, PTGS2, PARD3B, TGFB1 and TRIB1 associated with OA at other joint sites were associated with hand OA among Finnish women. DESIGN: We examined the bilateral hand radiographs of 542 occupationally active Finnish female dentists and teachers aged 45 to 63 and classified them according to the presence of OA by using reference images. Data regarding finger joint pain and other risk factors were collected using a questionnaire. We defined two hand OA phenotypes: radiographic OA in at least three joints (ROA and symptomatic DIP OA. The genotypes were determined by PCR-based methods. In statistical analysis, we used SNPStats software, the chi-square test and logistic regression. RESULTS: Of the SNPs, rs716508 in A2BP1 was associated with ROA (OR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9 and rs1800470 in TGFB1 with symptomatic DIP OA (1.8, 1.2-2.9. We found an interaction between ESR1 (rs9340799 and occupation: teachers with the minor allele were at an increased risk of symptomatic DIP OA (2.8, 1.3-6.5. We saw no association among the dentists. We also found that the carriage of the COG5 rs3757713 C allele increased the risk of ROA only among women with the BCAP29 rs10953541 CC genotype (2.6; 1.1-6.1. There was also a suggestive interaction between the HFE rs179945 and the ESR1 rs9340799, and the carriage of the minor allele of either of these SNPs was associated with an increased risk of symptomatic DIP OA (2.1, 1.3-2.5. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the earlier findings of A2BP1 and TBGF1 being OA susceptibility genes and provide evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction in the genetic influence on hand OA predisposition.

  10. Analysis of PSPHL as a Candidate Gene Influencing the Racial Disparity in Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, Jay E. [Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Chandramouli, Gadisetti V. R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Stagliano, Katherine [Curtis and Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah, GA (United States); Hood, Brian L. [Women’s Health Integrated Research Center at Inova Health System, Annandale, VA (United States); Litzi, Tracy [Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Women’s Health Integrated Research Center at Inova Health System, Annandale, VA (United States); Shoji, Yutaka [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Curtis and Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah, GA (United States); Boyd, Jeff [Curtis and Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah, GA (United States); Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Berchuck, Andrew [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Conrads, Thomas P. [Curtis and Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah, GA (United States); Maxwell, G. Larry [Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Women’s Health Integrated Research Center at Inova Health System, Annandale, VA (United States); Risinger, John I., E-mail: john.risinger@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Curtis and Elizabeth Anderson Cancer Institute at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah, GA (United States)

    2012-07-04

    endometrial cancer and also identify its expression in other tissues from African-Americans including ovary and ovarian cancer. PSPHL represents a candidate gene that might influence the observed racial disparity in endometrial and other cancers.

  11. Analysis of PSPHL as a Candidate Gene Influencing the Racial Disparity in Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Jay E.; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V. R.; Stagliano, Katherine; Hood, Brian L.; Litzi, Tracy; Shoji, Yutaka; Boyd, Jeff; Berchuck, Andrew; Conrads, Thomas P.; Maxwell, G. Larry; Risinger, John I.

    2012-01-01

    endometrial cancer and also identify its expression in other tissues from African-Americans including ovary and ovarian cancer. PSPHL represents a candidate gene that might influence the observed racial disparity in endometrial and other cancers.

  12. Functional characterization of the Hyles euphorbiae hawkmoth transcriptome reveals strong expression of phorbol ester detoxification and seasonal cold hardiness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, M Benjamin; Buchwalder, Katja; Kawahara, Akito Y; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Shanlin; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Rotter, Björn; Horres, Ralf; Hundsdoerfer, Anna K

    2018-01-01

    The European spurge hawkmoth, Hyles euphorbiae (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae), has been intensively studied as a model organism for insect chemical ecology, cold hardiness and evolution of species delineation. To understand species isolation mechanisms at a molecular level, this study aims at determining genetic factors underlying two adaptive ecological trait candidates, phorbol ester (TPA) detoxification and seasonal cold acclimation. A draft transcriptome of H. euphorbiae was generated using Illumina sequencing, providing the first genomic resource for the hawkmoth subfamily Macroglossinae. RNA expression levels in tissues of experimental TPA feeding larvae and cooled pupae was compared to levels in control larvae and pupae using 26 bp RNA sequence tag libraries (DeepSuperSAGE). Differential gene expression was assessed by homology searches of the tags in the transcriptome. In total, 389 and 605 differentially expressed transcripts for detoxification and cold hardiness, respectively, could be identified and annotated with proteins. The majority (22 of 28) of differentially expressed detox transcripts of the four 'drug metabolism' enzyme groups (cytochrome P450 (CYP), carboxylesterases (CES), glutathione S-transferases (GST) and lipases) are up-regulated. Triacylglycerol lipase was significantly over proportionally annotated among up-regulated detox transcripts. We record several up-regulated lipases, GSTe2, two CESs, CYP9A21, CYP6BD6 and CYP9A17 as candidate genes for further H. euphorbiae TPA detoxification analyses. Differential gene expression of the cold acclimation treatment is marked by metabolic depression with enriched Gene Ontology terms among down-regulated transcripts almost exclusively comprising metabolism, aerobic respiration and dissimilative functions. Down-regulated transcripts include energy expensive respiratory proteins like NADH dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase and ATP synthase. Gene expression patterns show shifts in carbohydrate

  13. Fatty acid translocase gene CD36 rs1527483 variant influences oral fat perception in Malaysian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hing-Huat; Tan, Yen-Nee; Say, Yee-How

    2017-01-01

    We determined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs1761667 and rs1527483) in the fatty acid translocase CD36 gene - a receptor for fatty acids - is associated with oral fat perception (OFP) of different fat contents in custards and commercially-available foods, and obesity measures in Malaysian subjects (n=313; 118 males, 293 ethnic Chinese; 20 ethnic Indians). A 170-mm visual analogue scale was used to assess the ratings of perceived fat content, oiliness and creaminess of 0%, 2%, 6% and 10% fat content-by-weight custards and low-fat/regular versions of commercially-available milk, mayonnaise and cream crackers. Overall, the subjects managed to significantly discriminate the fat content, oiliness and creaminess between low-fat/regular versions of milk and mayonnaise. Females rated the perception of fat content and oiliness of both milks higher, but ethnicity, obesity and adiposity status did not seem to play a role in influencing most of OFP. The overall minor allele frequencies for rs1761667 and rs1527483 were 0.30 and 0.26, respectively. Females and individuals with rs1527483 TT genotype significantly perceived greater creaminess of 10% fat-by-weight custard. Also, individuals with rs1527483 TT genotype and T allele significantly perceived greater fat content of cream crackers, independent of fat concentration. rs1761667 SNP did not significantly affect OFP, except for cream crackers. Both gene variants were also not associated with obesity measures. Taken together, this study supports the notion that CD36 - specifically rs1527483, plays a role in OFP, but not in influencing obesity in Malaysian subjects. Besides, gender is an important factor for OFP, where females had higher sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sequence variants at the myostatin gene locus influence the body composition of Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki, Teruaki; Sato, Fumio; Hill, Emmeline W; Miyake, Takeshi; Endo, Yoshiro; Kakoi, Hironaga; Gawahara, Hitoshi; Hirota, Kei-ichi; Nakano, Yasuko; Nambo, Yasuo; Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2011-12-01

    Myostatin is a member of the transforming growth factor-β family with a key role in inhibition of muscle growth by negative regulation of both myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Recently, a genomic region on ECA18, which includes the MSTN gene, was identified as a candidate region influencing racing performance in Thoroughbreds. In this study, four SNPs on ECA18, g.65809482T>C, g.65868604G>T, g.66493737C>T, and g.66539967A>G, were genotyped in 91 Thoroughbred horses-in-training to evaluate the association between genotype and body composition traits, including body weight, withers height, chest circumference, cannon circumference, and body weight/withers height. Of these, statistically differences in body weight and body weight/withers height were associated with specific genotypes in males. Specifically, body weight/withers height showed statistically significant differences depending on genotype at g.658604G>T, g.66493737C>T, and g.66539967A>G (PT, had the highest value (3.17 ± 0.05 kg·cm(-1)) for body weight/withers height in March, while those with a genotype associated with suitability for long-distance racing, T/T, had the lowest (2.99 ± 0.03 kg·cm(-1)). In females, the trends in the association of body weight/withers height with genotypes were similar to those observed in males. As the SNPs are not believed to be linked to coding variants in MSTN, these results suggest that regulation of MSTN gene expression influences skeletal muscle mass and hence racing performance, particularly optimum race distance, in Thoroughbred horses.

  15. Variants in toll-like receptor 9 gene influence susceptibility to tuberculosis in a Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-García, Diana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; García-Sancho Figueroa, Ma Cecilia; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; Mendoza-Milla, Criselda; Barquera, Rodrigo; Carrera-Eusebio, Aida; Ramírez-Bravo, Salomón; Campos, Lizeth; Angeles, Javier; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Gopal, Radha; Khader, Shabaana A; Yunis, Edmond J; Zuñiga, Joaquin

    2013-09-21

    The control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection begins with the recognition of mycobacterial structural components by toll like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern recognition receptors. Our objective was to determine the influence of TLRs polymorphisms in the susceptibility to develop tuberculosis (TB) in Amerindian individuals from a rural area of Oaxaca, Mexico with high TB incidence. We carried out a case-control association community based study, genotyping 12 polymorphisms of TLR2, TLR4, TLR6 and TLR9 genes in 90 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB and 90 unrelated exposed but asymptomatic household contacts. We found a significant increase in the frequency of the allele A of the TLR9 gene polymorphism rs352139 (A>G) in the group of TB patients (g.f. = 0.522) when compared with controls (g.f. = 0.383), (Pcorr = 0.01, OR = 1.75). Under the recessive model (A/G + A/A vs G/G) this polymorphism was also significantly associated with TB (Pcorr = 0.01, OR= 2.37). The association of the SNP rs352139 was statistically significant after adjustment by age, gender and comorbidities by regression logistic analysis (Dominant model: p value = 0.016, OR = 2.31; Additive model: p value = 0.023, OR = 1.68). The haplotype GAA of TLR9 SNPs was also associated with TB susceptibility (Pcorr = 0.02). Differences in the genotype or allele frequencies of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 polymorphisms between TB patients and healthy contacts were not detected. Our study suggests that the allele A of the intronic polymorphism rs352139 on TLR9 gene might contribute to the risk of developing TB in Mexican Amerindians.

  16. Variants in toll-like receptor 9 gene influence susceptibility to tuberculosis in a Mexican population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection begins with the recognition of mycobacterial structural components by toll like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern recognition receptors. Our objective was to determine the influence of TLRs polymorphisms in the susceptibility to develop tuberculosis (TB) in Amerindian individuals from a rural area of Oaxaca, Mexico with high TB incidence. Methods We carried out a case–control association community based study, genotyping 12 polymorphisms of TLR2, TLR4, TLR6 and TLR9 genes in 90 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB and 90 unrelated exposed but asymptomatic household contacts. Results We found a significant increase in the frequency of the allele A of the TLR9 gene polymorphism rs352139 (A>G) in the group of TB patients (g.f. = 0.522) when compared with controls (g.f. = 0.383), (Pcorr = 0.01, OR = 1.75). Under the recessive model (A/G + A/A vs G/G) this polymorphism was also significantly associated with TB (Pcorr = 0.01, OR= 2.37). The association of the SNP rs352139 was statistically significant after adjustment by age, gender and comorbidities by regression logistic analysis (Dominant model: p value = 0.016, OR = 2.31; Additive model: p value = 0.023, OR = 1.68). The haplotype GAA of TLR9 SNPs was also associated with TB susceptibility (Pcorr = 0.02). Differences in the genotype or allele frequencies of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 polymorphisms between TB patients and healthy contacts were not detected. Conclusions Our study suggests that the allele A of the intronic polymorphism rs352139 on TLR9 gene might contribute to the risk of developing TB in Mexican Amerindians. PMID:24053111

  17. Influence of secondary water supply systems on microbial community structure and opportunistic pathogen gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Li, Shang; Tang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Jianfu; Xia, Siqing; Zhang, Weixian; Wang, Hong

    2018-06-01

    Secondary water supply systems (SWSSs) refer to the in-building infrastructures (e.g., water storage tanks) used to supply water pressure beyond the main distribution systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of SWSSs on microbial community structure and the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens, the latter of which are an emerging public health concern. Higher numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, Legionella and mycobacterial gene markers were found in public building taps served by SWSSs relative to the mains, regardless of the flushing practice (P water retention time, warm temperature and loss of disinfectant residuals promoted microbial growth and colonization of potential pathogens in SWSSs. Varied levels of microbial community shifts were found in different types of SWSSs during water transportation from the distribution main to taps, highlighting the critical role of SWSSs in shaping the drinking water microbiota. Overall, the results provided insight to factors that might aid in controlling pathogen proliferation in real-world water systems using SWSSs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic variations in key inflammatory cytokines exacerbates the risk of diabetic nephropathy by influencing the gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Iqra; Masoodi, Shariq R; Malik, Perveez A; Mir, Shahnaz A; Ghazanfar, Khalid; Ganai, Bashir A

    2018-06-30

    Diabetic nephropathy is the single strongest predictor of mortality in patients with diabetes. The development of overt nephropathy involves important inter-individual variations, even after adjusting for potential confounding influences of modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Genome-wide transcriptome studies have reported the activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and there is mounting indication of the role of genetic factors. We screened nine genetic variations in three cytokine genes (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-β) in 1326 unrelated subjects comprising of healthy controls (n = 464), type 2 diabetics with nephropathy (DN, n = 448) and type 2 diabetes without nephropathy (T2D, n = 414) by sequence-specific amplification. Functional implication of SNPs was elucidated by correlation studies and relative gene expression using Realtime-Quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Individual SNP analysis showed highest association of IL-1β rs16944-TT genotype (OR = 3.51, 95%CI = 2.36-5.21, P = 0.001) and TNF-α rs1800629-AA genotype (OR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.64-4.59, P = 0.001) with T2D and DN respectively. The haplotype frequency showed significant risk of seven combinations among T2D and four combinations among DN subjects. The highest risk of T2D and DN was associated with GGTGAGTTT (OR = 4.25, 95%CI = 3.3-14.20, P = 0.0016) and GACGACCTT (OR = 21.3, 95%CI = 15.1-28.33, P = 0.026) haplotypes respectively. Relative expression by RT-qPCR showed increased cytokine expression in cases as compared to controls. TNF-α expression was increased by more than four-folds (n-fold = 4.43 ± 1.11) in DN. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β transcript levels were significantly modulated by promoter region SNPs. The present study implicates a strong association between cytokine TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β gene promoter polymorphisms and modulation of transcript levels with susceptibility to nephropathy in diabetes subjects. Copyright

  19. Sporozoite Route of Infection Influences In Vitro var Gene Transcription of Plasmodium falciparum Parasites From Controlled Human Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimonte, Sandra; Bruske, Ellen I; Hass, Johanna; Supan, Christian; Salazar, Carmen L; Held, Jana; Tschan, Serena; Esen, Meral; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Koch, Iris; Berger, Jürgen; Bachmann, Anna; Sim, Betty K L; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Frank, Matthias

    2016-09-15

    Antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum is mediated by the multicopy var gene family. Each parasite possesses about 60 var genes, and switching between active var loci results in antigenic variation. In the current study, the effect of mosquito and host passage on in vitro var gene transcription was investigated. Thirty malaria-naive individuals were inoculated by intradermal or intravenous injection with cryopreserved, isogenic NF54 P. falciparum sporozoites (PfSPZ) generated from 1 premosquito culture. Microscopic parasitemia developed in 22 individuals, and 21 in vitro cultures were established. The var gene transcript levels were determined in early and late postpatient cultures and in the premosquito culture. At the early time point, all cultures preferentially transcribed 8 subtelomeric var genes. Intradermal infections had higher var gene transcript levels than intravenous infections and a significantly longer intrahost replication time (P = .03). At the late time point, 9 subtelomeric and 8 central var genes were transcribed at the same levels in almost all cultures. Premosquito and late postpatient cultures transcribed the same subtelomeric and central var genes, except for var2csa  The duration of intrahost replication influences in vitro var gene transcript patterns. Differences between premosquito and postpatient cultures decrease with prolonged in vitro growth. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Gene conversion is strongly induced in human cells by double-strand breaks and is modulated by the expression of BCL-XL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Pierce, Andrew J.; Gauny, Stacey S.; Jasin, Maria; Kronenberg, Amy

    2001-01-01

    Homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a well-established mechanism that contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability in rodent cells, and it has been assumed that HDR is of similar importance in the repair of DSBs in human cells. However, in addition to promoting genomic stability, some outcomes of homologous recombination can be deleterious, suggesting that factors exist to regulate HDR. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of BCL-2 or BCL-xL enhanced the frequency of x-ray-induced mutations involving the TK1 locus, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events presumed to arise by mitotic recombination. The present study was designed to test whether HDR is a prominent DSB repair pathway in human cells, and to directly determine whether ectopic expression of BCL-xL affects HDR. We used the B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6, which expresses wild-type TP53 and resembles normal lymphocytes in undergoing apoptosis following genotoxic stress. U sing isogenic derivatives of TK6 cells (TK6-neo, TK6-bcl-xL), we find that a DSB in an integrated HDR reporter stimulates gene conversion 40-50-fold in TK6-neo cells, demonstrating that a DSB can be efficiently repaired by gene conversion in human cells. Significantly, DSB-induced gene conversion events are 3- to 4-fold more frequent in BCL-xL overexpressing cells. The results demonstrate that HDR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity in human cells and that ectopic expression of BCL-xL enhances HDR of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight a function for BCL-xL in modulating DSB repair in human cells

  1. INFLUENCE OF GENETIC POLYMORPHISM IN FABP3 AND LEPR GENES ON INTRAMUSCULAR FAT CONTENT IN PIG CARCASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Budimir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Intensive production conditions, selection directed to increase the percentage of muscle tissue in carcasses and consumer demand have led to a reduction of intramuscular fat content in pig carcasses. Intramuscular fat is a factor affecting the flavor, juiciness and tenderness of pork meat. FABP protein family causes the differences in the content of intramuscular fat in different pig breeds. FABP3 and LEPR gene are candidate genes for intramuscular fat content and their polymorphisms explain the variability that can occur in different pig breeds. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the influence of genes on different intramuscular fat content in pig carcasses due to pigs genotype.

  2. Polymorphisms of the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4 VNTR) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene (CNR1) are not strongly related to cue-reactivity after alcohol exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, E. van den; Janssen, R.G.J.H.; Hutchison, K.E.; Breukelen, G.J.P. van; Wiers, R.W.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the D4 dopamine receptor gene (DRD4) and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR1) have been associated with a differential response to alcohol after consumption. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether heavy drinkers with these polymorphisms would respond with

  3. Systematic assessment of prognostic gene signatures for breast cancer shows distinct influence of time and ER status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xi; Rødland, Einar Andreas; Sørlie, Therese; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Russnes, Hege G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to assess and compare prognostic power of nine breast cancer gene signatures (Intrinsic, PAM50, 70-gene, 76-gene, Genomic-Grade-Index, 21-gene-Recurrence-Score, EndoPredict, Wound-Response and Hypoxia) in relation to ER status and follow-up time. A gene expression dataset from 947 breast tumors was used to evaluate the signatures for prediction of Distant Metastasis Free Survival (DMFS). A total of 912 patients had available DMFS status. The recently published METABRIC cohort was used as an additional validation set. Survival predictions were fairly concordant across most signatures. Prognostic power declined with follow-up time. During the first 5 years of followup, all signatures except for Hypoxia were predictive for DMFS in ER-positive disease, and 76-gene, Hypoxia and Wound-Response were prognostic in ER-negative disease. After 5 years, the signatures had little prognostic power. Gene signatures provide significant prognostic information beyond tumor size, node status and histological grade. Generally, these signatures performed better for ER-positive disease, indicating that risk within each ER stratum is driven by distinct underlying biology. Most of the signatures were strong risk predictors for DMFS during the first 5 years of follow-up. Combining gene signatures with histological grade or tumor size, could improve the prognostic power, perhaps also of long-term survival

  4. Quantitative Campylobacter spp., antibiotic resistance genes, and veterinary antibiotics in surface and ground water following manure application: Influence of tile drainage control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Steven K; Topp, Edward; Khan, Izhar U H; Ball, Bonnie R; Edwards, Mark; Gottschall, Natalie; Sunohara, Mark; Lapen, David R

    2015-11-01

    This work investigated chlortetracycline, tylosin, and tetracycline (plus transformation products), and DNA-based quantitative Campylobacter spp. and Campylobacter tetracycline antibiotic resistant genes (tet(O)) in tile drainage, groundwater, and soil before and following a liquid swine manure (LSM) application on clay loam plots under controlled (CD) and free (FD) tile drainage. Chlortetracycline/tetracycline was strongly bound to manure solids while tylosin dominated in the liquid portion of manure. The chlortetracycline transformation product isochlortetracycline was the most persistent analyte in water. Rhodamine WT (RWT) tracer was mixed with manure and monitored in tile and groundwater. RWT and veterinary antibiotic (VA) concentrations were strongly correlated in water which supported the use of RWT as a surrogate tracer. While CD reduced tile discharge and eliminated application-induced VA movement (via tile) to surface water, total VA mass loading to surface water was not affected by CD. At both CD and FD test plots, the biggest 'flush' of VA mass and highest VA concentrations occurred in response to precipitation received 2d after application, which strongly influenced the flow abatement capacity of CD on account of highly elevated water levels in field initiating overflow drainage for CD systems (when water level tile and groundwater became very low within 10d following application. Both Campylobacter spp. and Campylobacter tet(O) genes were present in groundwater and soil prior to application, and increased thereafter. Unlike the VA compounds, Campylobacter spp. and Campylobacter tet(O) gene loadings in tile drainage were reduced by CD, in relation to FD. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of local emissions on concentration and isotopic composition of trace gases (CO2 and CH4) under strong anthropopression: A case study from Krakow, southern Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florkowski, T.; Korus, A.; Kuc, T.; Lasa, J.; Necki, J.M.; Zimnoch, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Measurements of the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide and methane together with their concentrations in the atmosphere, yield useful information on the contribution of anthropogenic sources to regional budgets of these gases and their seasonal changes. Observed correlation between isotopic composition and inverse concentration of these gases is used for estimation of mean isotopic composition of the local source. Monitoring of atmospheric CO 2 has been initiated in Krakow in 1982. The sampling point is located in a polluted urban area with strong contribution of anthropogenic gases originating both from local sources (coal burning, car traffic, leakages from city gas network, landfills) and large distant emitters - industrial district located ca. 80 km to the west from Krakow (Silesia district). Quasi-continuous measurements of CO 2 , and CH 4 concentrations in the low atmosphere are performed using gas chromatographic method. For isotope measurements, the atmospheric CO 2 is continuously sampled by sorption on molecular sieve in be-weekly intervals and radiocarbon concentration is measured by liquid scintillation spectrometer, while δ 13 C is determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Measurement error (1σ for single measurement) is in the order of 0.1 ppm for CO 2 concentration, ±8 per mille for δ 14 C, and ± 0.1 per mille for δ 13 C. In 1994, a new station for regular observations of greenhouse gases in lower atmosphere was set up in the High Tatra mountains, at Kasprowy Wierch (49 deg. N, 20 deg. E, 1980 m a.s.l., 300 m above the tree line). Kasprowy Wierch, with only small influences from local sources of trace gases can be considered as a reference station for this region of Poland. The record of CO 2 and CH 4 concentration and their isotope composition obtained at Kasprowy Wierch is considered as a background level for Krakow observations. The presented study was aimed at better characterisation and quantification of the local

  6. The product of C9orf72, a gene strongly implicated in neurodegeneration, is structurally related to DENN Rab-GEFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Timothy P; Daniels, Rachel D; Gatta, Alberto T; Wong, Louise H; Hayes, Matthew J

    2013-02-15

    Fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also called motor neuron disease, MND) are severe neurodegenerative diseases that show considerable overlap at the clinical and cellular level. The most common single mutation in families with FTD or ALS has recently been mapped to a non-coding repeat expansion in the uncharacterized gene C9ORF72. Although a plausible mechanism for disease is that aberrant C9ORF72 mRNA poisons splicing, it is important to determine the cellular function of C9ORF72, about which nothing is known. Sensitive homology searches showed that C9ORF72 is a full-length distant homologue of proteins related to Differentially Expressed in Normal and Neoplasia (DENN), which is a GDP/GTP exchange factor (GEF) that activates Rab-GTPases. Our results suggest that C9ORF72 is likely to regulate membrane traffic in conjunction with Rab-GTPase switches, and we propose to name the gene and its product DENN-like 72 (DENNL72).

  7. Farm exposure and time trends in early childhood may influence DNA methylation in genes related to asthma and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, S; Busato, F; Genuneit, J; Pekkanen, J; Dalphin, J-C; Riedler, J; Mazaleyrat, N; Weber, J; Karvonen, A M; Hirvonen, M-R; Braun-Fahrländer, C; Lauener, R; von Mutius, E; Kabesch, M; Tost, J

    2013-03-01

    Genetic susceptibility and environmental influences are important contributors to the development of asthma and atopic diseases. Epigenetic mechanisms may facilitate gene by environment interactions in these diseases. We studied the rural birth cohort PASTURE (Protection against allergy: study in rural environments) to investigate (a) whether epigenetic patterns in asthma candidate genes are influenced by farm exposure in general, (b) change over the first years of life, and (c) whether these changes may contribute to the development of asthma. DNA was extracted from cord blood and whole blood collected at the age of 4.5 years in 46 samples per time point. DNA methylation in 23 regions in ten candidate genes (ORMDL1, ORMDL2, ORMDL3, CHI3L1, RAD50, IL13, IL4, STAT6, FOXP3, and RUNX3) was assessed by pyrosequencing, and differences between strata were analyzed by nonparametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests. In cord blood, regions in ORMDL1 and STAT6 were hypomethylated in DNA from farmers' as compared to nonfarmers' children, while regions in RAD50 and IL13 were hypermethylated (lowest P-value (STAT6) = 0.001). Changes in methylation over time occurred in 15 gene regions (lowest P-value (IL13) = 1.57*10(-8)). Interestingly, these differences clustered in the genes highly associated with asthma (ORMDL family) and IgE regulation (RAD50, IL13, and IL4), but not in the T-regulatory genes (FOXP3, RUNX3). In this first pilot study, DNA methylation patterns change significantly in early childhood in specific asthma- and allergy-related genes in peripheral blood cells, and early exposure to farm environment seems to influence methylation patterns in distinct genes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The most common mutation causing medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is strongly associated with a particular haplotype in the region of the gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølvraa, S; Gregersen, N; Blakemore, A I

    1991-01-01

    RFLP haplotypes in the region containing the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene on chromosome 1 have been determined in patients with MCAD deficiency. The RFLPs were detected after digestion of patient DNA with the enzymes BanII. PstI and TaqI and with an MCAD cDNA-clone as a probe....... Of 32 disease-causing alleles studied, 31 possessed the previously published A----G point-mutation at position 985 of the cDNA. This mutation has been shown to result in inactivity of the MCAD enzyme. In at least 30 of the 31 alleles carrying this G985 mutation a specific RFLP haplotype was present...

  9. Hormone-replacement therapy influences gene expression profiles and is associated with breast-cancer prognosis: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoog Lambert

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postmenopausal hormone-replacement therapy (HRT increases breast-cancer risk. The influence of HRT on the biology of the primary tumor, however, is not well understood. Methods We obtained breast-cancer gene expression profiles using Affymetrix human genome U133A arrays. We examined the relationship between HRT-regulated gene profiles, tumor characteristics, and recurrence-free survival in 72 postmenopausal women. Results HRT use in patients with estrogen receptor (ER protein positive tumors (n = 72 was associated with an altered regulation of 276 genes. Expression profiles based on these genes clustered ER-positive tumors into two molecular subclasses, one of which was associated with HRT use and had significantly better recurrence free survival despite lower ER levels. A comparison with external data suggested that gene regulation in tumors associated with HRT was negatively correlated with gene regulation induced by short-term estrogen exposure, but positively correlated with the effect of tamoxifen. Conclusion Our findings suggest that post-menopausal HRT use is associated with a distinct gene expression profile related to better recurrence-free survival and lower ER protein levels. Tentatively, HRT-associated gene expression in tumors resembles the effect of tamoxifen exposure on MCF-7 cells.

  10. Using Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms and Genetic Mapping to find Candidate Genes that Influence Varroa-Specific Hygiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varroa-sensitive hygienic (VSH) behavior is one of two behaviors identified that are most important for controlling the growth of Varroa mite populations in bee hives. A study was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) that influence VSH so that resistance genes could be identified. Crosses ...

  11. A gene-gene interaction between polymorphisms in the OCT2 and MATE1 genes influences the renal clearance of metformin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard Christensen, Mette Marie; Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between the renal clearance (CL(renal)) of metformin in healthy Caucasian volunteers and the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.808G>T (rs316019) in OCT2 as well as the relevance of the gene-gene interactions between this SNP and (a) the ...

  12. Strongly intensive quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Gazdzicki, M.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of fluctuations of hadron production properties in collisions of relativistic particles profits from use of measurable intensive quantities which are independent of system size variations. The first family of such quantities was proposed in 1992; another is introduced in this paper. Furthermore we present a proof of independence of volume fluctuations for quantities from both families within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. These quantities are referred to as strongly intensive ones. Influence of conservation laws and resonance decays is also discussed.

  13. Neighborhood alcohol outlet density and genetic influences on alcohol use: evidence for gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutske, Wendy S; Deutsch, Arielle R; Piasecki, Thomas M

    2018-05-07

    Genetic influences on alcohol involvement are likely to vary as a function of the 'alcohol environment,' given that exposure to alcohol is a necessary precondition for genetic risk to be expressed. However, few gene-environment interaction studies of alcohol involvement have focused on characteristics of the community-level alcohol environment. The goal of this study was to examine whether living in a community with more alcohol outlets would facilitate the expression of the genetic propensity to drink in a genetically-informed national survey of United States young adults. The participants were 2434 18-26-year-old twin, full-, and half-sibling pairs from Wave III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Participants completed in-home interviews in which alcohol use was assessed. Alcohol outlet densities were extracted from state-level liquor license databases aggregated at the census tract level to derive the density of outlets. There was evidence that the estimates of genetic and environmental influences on alcohol use varied as a function of the density of alcohol outlets in the community. For example, the heritability of the frequency of alcohol use for those residing in a neighborhood with ten or more outlets was 74% (95% confidence limits = 55-94%), compared with 16% (95% confidence limits = 0-34%) for those in a neighborhood with zero outlets. This moderating effect of alcohol outlet density was not explained by the state of residence, population density, or neighborhood sociodemographic characteristics. The results suggest that living in a neighborhood with many alcohol outlets may be especially high-risk for those individuals who are genetically predisposed to frequently drink.

  14. Common variants of the liver fatty acid binding protein gene influence the risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance in Spanish population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Mansego

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: The main objective was to evaluate the association between SNPs and haplotypes of the FABP1-4 genes and type 2 diabetes, as well as its interaction with fat intake, in one general Spanish population. The association was replicated in a second population in which HOMA index was also evaluated. METHODS: 1217 unrelated individuals were selected from a population-based study [Hortega study: 605 women; mean age 54 y; 7.8% with type 2 diabetes]. The replication population included 805 subjects from Segovia, a neighboring region of Spain (446 females; mean age 52 y; 10.3% with type 2 diabetes. DM2 mellitus was defined in a similar way in both studies. Fifteen SNPs previously associated with metabolic traits or with potential influence in the gene expression within the FABP1-4 genes were genotyped with SNPlex and tested. Age, sex and BMI were used as covariates in the logistic regression model. RESULTS: One polymorphism (rs2197076 and two haplotypes of the FABP-1 showed a strong association with the risk of DM2 in the original population. This association was further confirmed in the second population as well as in the pooled sample. None of the other analyzed variants in FABP2, FABP3 and FABP4 genes were associated. There was not a formal interaction between rs2197076 and fat intake. A significant association between the rs2197076 and the haplotypes of the FABP1 and HOMA-IR was also present in the replication population. CONCLUSIONS: The study supports the role of common variants of the FABP-1 gene in the development of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians.

  15. Inherited Variants in Wnt Pathway Genes Influence Outcomes of Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Hung Geng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant Wnt signaling has been associated with many types of cancer. However, the association of inherited Wnt pathway variants with clinical outcomes in prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has not been determined. Here, we comprehensively studied the contribution of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in Wnt pathway genes to the clinical outcomes of 465 advanced prostate cancer patients treated with ADT. Two SNPs, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC rs2707765 and rs497844, were significantly (p ≤ 0.009 and q ≤ 0.043 associated with both prostate cancer progression and all-cause mortality, even after multivariate analyses and multiple testing correction. Patients with a greater number of favorable alleles had a longer time to disease progression and better overall survival during ADT (p for trend ≤ 0.003. Additional, cDNA array and in silico analyses of prostate cancer tissue suggested that rs2707765 affects APC expression, which in turn is correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. This study identifies the influence of inherited variants in the Wnt pathway on the efficacy of ADT and highlights a preclinical rationale for using APC as a prognostic marker in advanced prostate cancer.

  16. Progranulin gene variability influences the risk for bipolar I disorder, but not bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Prunas, Cecilia; Paoli, Riccardo A; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Fenoglio, Chiara; Villa, Chiara; Palazzo, Carlotta; Cigliobianco, Michela; Camuri, Giulia; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Altamura, A Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Recent data have shown that genetic variability in the progranulin (GRN) gene may contribute to the susceptibility to developing bipolar disorder (BD). However, in regard to patients with BD, no information is available on the role of genetic variability and plasma progranulin levels in different types of this disorder. In this study, we performed an association analysis of GRN in an Italian population consisting of 134 patients with BD and 232 controls to evaluate progranulin plasma levels. The presence of the polymorphic variant of the rs5848 single nucleotide polymorphism is protective for the development of bipolar I disorder (BD-I) (odds ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.93; p = 0.024) but not bipolar II disorder (BD-II) (p > 0.05). In addition, plasma progranulin levels are significantly decreased in BD [mean ± standard deviation (SD) 112 ± 35 versus 183 ± 93 ng/mL in controls; p < 0.001]. Regarding the influence of GRN variability on BD susceptibility, the predisposing genetic background differs between BD-I and BD-II, possibly implying that pathogenic mechanisms differ between the two subtypes of BD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Contamination with bacterial zoonotic pathogen genes in U.S. streams influenced by varying types of animal agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Duris, Joseph W.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Focazio, Michael J.; Meyer, Michael T.; Johnson, Heather E.; Oster, Ryan J.; Foreman, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Animal waste, stream water, and streambed sediment from 19 small (animal agriculture (control, n = 4), or predominantly beef (n = 4), dairy (n = 3), swine (n = 5), or poultry (n = 3) were tested for: 1) cholesterol, coprostanol, estrone, and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations, and 2) shiga-toxin producing and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and pathogenic and vancomycin-resistant enterococci by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on enrichments, and/or direct quantitative PCR. Pathogen genes were most frequently detected in dairy wastes, followed by beef, swine and poultry wastes in that order; there was only one detection of an animal-source-specific pathogen gene (stx1) in any water or sediment sample in any control watershed. Post-rainfall pathogen gene numbers in stream water were significantly correlated with FIB, cholesterol and coprostanol concentrations, and were most highly correlated in dairy watershed samples collected from 3 different states. Although collected across multiple states and ecoregions, animal-waste gene profiles were distinctive via discriminant analysis. Stream water gene profiles could also be discriminated by the watershed animal type. Although pathogen genes were not abundant in stream water or streambed samples, PCR on enrichments indicated that many genes were from viable organisms, including several (shiga-toxin producing or enterotoxigenic E. coli, Salmonella, vancomycin-resistant enterococci) that could potentially affect either human or animal health. Pathogen gene numbers and types in stream water samples were influenced most by animal type, by local factors such as whether animals had stream access, and by the amount of local rainfall, and not by studied watershed soil or physical characteristics. Our results indicated that stream water in small agricultural U.S. watersheds was susceptible to pathogen gene inputs under typical agricultural practices and environmental conditions

  18. The Influence of Gene Expression Time Delays on Gierer–Meinhardt Pattern Formation Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.; Gaffney, E. A.; Monk, N. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    investigations demonstrate that the behaviour of the Gierer-Meinhardt model profoundly changes on the inclusion of gene expression dynamics and is sensitive to the sub-cellular details of gene expression. Features such as concentration blow up, morphogen

  19. Genetic and environmental influences on last-year major depression in adulthood: a highly heritable stable liability but strong environmental effects on 1-year prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Gardner, C O

    2017-07-01

    This study seeks to clarify the contribution of temporally stable and occasion-specific genetic and environmental influences on risk for major depression (MD). Our sample was 2153 members of female-female twin pairs from the Virginia Twin Registry. We examined four personal interview waves conducted over an 8-year period with MD in the last year defined by DSM-IV criteria. We fitted a structural equation model to the data using classic Mx. The model included genetic and environmental risk factors for a latent, stable vulnerability to MD and for episodes in each of the four waves. The best-fit model was simple and included genetic and unique environmental influences on the latent liability to MD and unique wave-specific environmental effects. The path from latent liability to MD in the last year was constant over time, moderate in magnitude (+0.65) and weaker than the impact of occasion-specific environmental effects (+0.76). Heritability of the latent stable liability to MD was much higher (78%) than that estimated for last-year MD (32%). Of the total unique environmental influences on MD, 13% reflected enduring consequences of earlier environmental insults, 17% diagnostic error and 70% wave-specific short-lived environmental stressors. Both genetic influences on MD and MD heritability are stable over middle adulthood. However, the largest influence on last-year MD is short-lived environmental effects. As predicted by genetic theory, the heritability of MD is increased substantially by measurement at multiple time points largely through the reduction of the effects of measurement error and short-term environmental risk factors.

  20. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  1. Recombination in the 5' leader of murine leukemia virus is accurate and influenced by sequence identity with a strong bias toward the kissing-loop dimerization region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    1998-01-01

    during minus-strand DNA synthesis occurred within defined areas of the genome and did not lead to misincorporations at the crossover site. The nonrandom distribution of recombination sites did not reflect a bias for specific sites due to selection at the level of marker gene expression. We address...... whether template switching is affected by the length of sequence identity, by palindromic sequences, and/or by putative stem-loop structures. Sixteen of 24 sites of recombination colocalized with the kissing-loop dimerization region, and we propose that RNA-RNA interactions between palindromic sequences...

  2. Gene-environment interaction: Does fluoride influence the reproductive hormones in male farmers modified by ERα gene polymorphisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Huang, Hui; Sun, Long; Zhou, Tong; Zhu, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xuemin; Duan, Lijv; Li, Zhiyuan; Cui, Liuxin; Ba, Yue

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of endemic fluorosis is derived from high fluoride levels in drinking water and industrial fumes or dust. Reproductive disruption is also a major harm caused by fluoride exposure besides dental and skeletal lesions. However, few studies focus on the mechanism of fluoride exposure on male reproductive function, especially the possible interaction of fluoride exposure and gene polymorphism on male reproductive hormones. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study in rural areas of Henan province in China to explore the interaction between the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene and fluoride exposure on reproductive hormone levels in male farmers living in the endemic fluorosis villages. The results showed that fluoride exposure significantly increased the serum level of estradiol in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis in male farmers. Moreover, the observations indicated that fluoride exposure and genetic markers had an interaction on serum concentration of follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol, and the interaction among different loci of the ERα gene could impact the serum testosterone level. Findings in the present work suggest that chronic fluoride exposure in drinking water could modulate the levels of reproductive hormones in males living in endemic fluorosis areas, and the interaction between fluoride exposure and ERα polymorphisms might affect the serum levels of hormones in the HPT axis in male farmers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  4. Influence of Experimental Parameters Using the Dip-Coating Method on the Barrier Performance of Hybrid Sol-Gel Coatings in Strong Alkaline Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita B. Figueira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the barrier effect and the performance of organic-inorganic hybrid (OIH sol-gel coatings are highly dependent on the coating deposition method as well as on the processing conditions. However, studies on how the coating deposition method influences the barrier properties in alkaline environments are scarce. The aim of this experimental research was to study the influence of experimental parameters using the dip-coating method on the barrier performance of an OIH sol-gel coating in contact with simulated concrete pore solutions (SCPS. The influence of residence time (Rt, a curing step between each dip step and the number of layers of sol-gel OIH films deposited on hot-dip galvanized steel to prevent corrosion in highly alkaline environments was studied. The barrier performance of these OIH sol-gel coatings, named U(400, was assessed in the first instants of contact with SCPS, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic methods. The durability and stability of the OIH coatings in SCPS was monitored during eight days by macrocell current density. The morphological characterization of the surface was performed by Scanning Electronic Microscopy before and after exposure to SCPS. Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy was used to investigate the thickness of the U(400 sol-gel coatings as a function of the number of layers deposited with and without Rt in the coatings thickness.

  5. Neighborhood characteristics influence DNA methylation of genes involved in stress response and inflammation: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer A; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Xu; Ratliff, Scott M; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Roux, Ava V Diez; Needham, Belinda L

    2017-08-01

    Living in a disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with poor health outcomes even after accounting for individual-level socioeconomic factors. The chronic stress of unfavorable neighborhood conditions may lead to dysregulation of the stress reactivity and inflammatory pathways, potentially mediated through epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation. We used multi-level models to examine the relationship between 2 neighborhood conditions and methylation levels of 18 genes related to stress reactivity and inflammation in purified monocytes from 1,226 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population-based sample of US adults. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage, a summary of 16 census-based metrics, was associated with DNA methylation [False discovery rate (FDR) q-value ≤ 0.1] in 2 out of 7 stress-related genes evaluated (CRF, SLC6A4) and 2 out of 11 inflammation-related genes (F8, TLR1). Neighborhood social environment, a summary measure of aesthetic quality, safety, and social cohesion, was associated with methylation in 4 of the 7 stress-related genes (AVP, BDNF, FKBP5, SLC6A4) and 7 of the 11 inflammation-related genes (CCL1, CD1D, F8, KLRG1, NLRP12, SLAMF7, TLR1). High socioeconomic disadvantage and worse social environment were primarily associated with increased methylation. In 5 genes with significant associations between neighborhood and methylation (FKBP5, CD1D, F8, KLRG1, NLRP12), methylation was associated with gene expression of at least one transcript. These results demonstrate that multiple dimensions of neighborhood context may influence methylation levels and subsequent gene expression of stress- and inflammation-related genes, even after accounting for individual socioeconomic factors. Further elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these relationships will be important for understanding the etiology of health disparities.

  6. The Influence of Major Life Events on Economic Attitudes in a World of Gene-Environment Interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatemi, Peter K

    2013-10-01

    The role of "genes" on political attitudes has gained attention across disciplines. However, person-specific experiences have yet to be incorporated into models that consider genetic influences. Relying on a gene-environment interplay approach, this study explicates how life-events, such as losing one's job or suffering a financial loss, influence economic policy attitudes. The results indicate genetic and environmental variance on support for unions, immigration, capitalism, socialism and property tax is moderated by financial risks. Changes in the magnitude of genetic influences, however, are temporary. After two years, the phenotypic effects of the life events remain on most attitudes, but changes in the sources of individual differences do not. Univariate twin models that estimate the independent contributions of genes and environment on the variation of attitudes appear to provide robust baseline indicators of sources of individual differences. These estimates, however, are not event or day specific. In this way, genetic influences add stability, while environment cues change, and this process is continually updated.

  7. Genome-Wide Scan and Test of Candidate Genes in the Snail Biomphalaria glabrata Reveal New Locus Influencing Resistance to Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A Tennessen

    Full Text Available New strategies to combat the global scourge of schistosomiasis may be revealed by increased understanding of the mechanisms by which the obligate snail host can resist the schistosome parasite. However, few molecular markers linked to resistance have been identified and characterized in snails.Here we test six independent genetic loci for their influence on resistance to Schistosoma mansoni strain PR1 in the 13-16-R1 strain of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata. We first identify a genomic region, RADres, showing the highest differentiation between susceptible and resistant inbred lines among 1611 informative restriction-site associated DNA (RAD markers, and show that it significantly influences resistance in an independent set of 439 outbred snails. The additive effect of each RADres resistance allele is 2-fold, similar to that of the previously identified resistance gene sod1. The data fit a model in which both loci contribute independently and additively to resistance, such that the odds of infection in homozygotes for the resistance alleles at both loci (13% infected is 16-fold lower than the odds of infection in snails without any resistance alleles (70% infected. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium is high, with both sod1 and RADres residing on haplotype blocks >2 Mb, and with other markers in each block also showing significant effects on resistance; thus the causal genes within these blocks remain to be demonstrated. Other candidate loci had no effect on resistance, including the Guadeloupe Resistance Complex and three genes (aif, infPhox, and prx1 with immunological roles and expression patterns tied to resistance, which must therefore be trans-regulated.The loci RADres and sod1 both have strong effects on resistance to S. mansoni. Future approaches to control schistosomiasis may benefit from further efforts to characterize and harness this natural genetic variation.

  8. Available nitrogen is the key factor influencing soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Xu, Han; Li, Yide; Deng, Ye; Li, Diqiang; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-08-20

    Tropical rainforests cover over 50% of all known plant and animal species and provide a variety of key resources and ecosystem services to humans, largely mediated by metabolic activities of soil microbial communities. A deep analysis of soil microbial communities and their roles in ecological processes would improve our understanding on biogeochemical elemental cycles. However, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforests and causative factors remain unclear. GeoChip, contained almost all of the key functional genes related to biogeochemical cycles, could be used as a specific and sensitive tool for studying microbial gene diversity and metabolic potential. In this study, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest was analyzed by using GeoChip technology. Gene categories detected in the tropical rainforest soils were related to different biogeochemical processes, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling. The relative abundance of genes related to C and P cycling detected mostly derived from the cultured bacteria. C degradation gene categories for substrates ranging from labile C to recalcitrant C were all detected, and gene abundances involved in many recalcitrant C degradation gene categories were significantly (P rainforest. Soil available N could be the key factor in shaping the soil microbial functional gene structure and metabolic potential.

  9. Lupanine Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Influencing KATP Channels and Insulin Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Wiedemann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The glucose-lowering effects of lupin seeds involve the combined action of several components. The present study investigates the influence of one of the main quinolizidine alkaloids, lupanine, on pancreatic beta cells and in an animal model of type-2 diabetes mellitus. In vitro studies were performed with insulin-secreting INS-1E cells or islets of C57BL/6 mice. In the in vivo experiments, hyperglycemia was induced in rats by injecting streptozotocin (65 mg/kg body weight. In the presence of 15 mmol/L glucose, insulin secretion was significantly elevated by 0.5 mmol/L lupanine, whereas the alkaloid did not stimulate insulin release with lower glucose concentrations. In islets treated with l-arginine, the potentiating effect of lupanine already occurred at 8 mmol/L glucose. Lupanine increased the expression of the Ins-1 gene. The potentiating effect on secretion was correlated to membrane depolarization and an increase in the frequency of Ca2+ action potentials. Determination of the current through ATP-dependent K+ channels (KATP channels revealed that lupanine directly inhibited the channel. The effect was dose-dependent but, even with a high lupanine concentration of 1 mmol/L or after a prolonged exposure time (12 h, the KATP channel block was incomplete. Oral administration of lupanine did not induce hypoglycemia. By contrast, lupanine improved glycemic control in response to an oral glucose tolerance test in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. In summary, lupanine acts as a positive modulator of insulin release obviously without a risk for hypoglycemic episodes.

  10. Method for Screening Compounds That Influence Virulence Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Frees, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple assay to examine effects of compounds on virulence gene expression in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The assay employs transcriptional reporter strains carrying lacZ fused to central virulence genes. Compounds affecting virulence gene expression and activity...... of the agr locus are scored based on color change in the presence of a chromogenic beta-galactosidase substrate. The assay can be used to screen for novel antivirulence compounds from many different sources, such as fungi, as demonstrated here....

  11. The schizophrenia risk gene ZNF804A influences the antipsychotic response of positive schizophrenia symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Mössner, R; Schumacher, A; Wagner, M; Lennertz, L; Steinbrecher, A; Quednow, Boris B; Rujescu, D; Rietschel, M; Maier, W

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors determining the response to antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia are poorly understood. A new schizophrenia susceptibility gene, the zinc-finger gene ZNF804A, has recently been identified. To assess the pharmacogenetic importance of this gene, we treated 144 schizophrenia patients and assessed the response of positive and negative symptoms by PANSS. Patients homozygous for the ZNF804A risk allele for schizophrenia (rs1344706 AA) showed poorer improvement of positive sympto...

  12. Inactivation of the Major Hemolysin Gene Influences Expression of the Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Gene swrA in the Insect Pathogen Serratia sp. Strain SCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Lauren M; LaCourse, Kaitlyn; Schöner, Tim A; Bode, Helge; Tisa, Louis S

    2017-11-01

    Hemolysins are important virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens, including Serratia marcescens The role of the major hemolysin gene in the insect pathogen Serratia sp. strain SCBI was investigated using both forward and reverse-genetics approaches. Introduction of the major hemolysin gene into Escherichia coli resulted in a gain of both virulence and hemolytic activity. Inactivation of this hemolysin in Serratia sp. SCBI resulted in a loss of hemolysis but did not attenuate insecticidal activity. Unexpectedly, inactivation of the hemolysin gene in Serratia sp. SCBI resulted in significantly increased motility and increased antimicrobial activity. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of mutants with a disrupted hemolysin gene showed a dramatic increase in mRNA levels of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene, swrA , which produces the surfactant serrawettin W2. Mutation of the swrA gene in Serratia sp. SCBI resulted in highly varied antibiotic activity, motility, virulence, and hemolysis phenotypes that were dependent on the site of disruption within this 17.75-kb gene. When introduced into E. coli , swrA increases rates of motility and confers antimicrobial activity. While it is unclear how inactivation of the major hemolysin gene influences the expression of swrA , these results suggest that swrA plays an important role in motility and antimicrobial activity in Serratia sp. SCBI. IMPORTANCE The opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Serratia are widespread in the environment and can cause human illness. A comparative genomics analysis between Serratia marcescens and a new Serratia species from South Africa, termed Serratia sp. strain SCBI, shows that these two organisms are closely related but differ in pathogenesis. S. marcescens kills Caenorhabditis nematodes, while Serratia sp. SCBI is not harmful and forms a beneficial association with them. This distinction presented the opportunity to investigate potential differences

  13. Energy homeostasis genes and breast cancer risk: The influence of ancestry, body size, and menopausal status, the breast cancer health disparities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Hines, Lisa; Wolff, Roger K; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; Baumgartner, Kathy N; John, Esther M

    2015-12-01

    Obesity and breast cancer risk is multifaceted and genes associated with energy homeostasis may modify this relationship. We evaluated 10 genes that have been associated with obesity and energy homeostasis to determine their association with breast cancer risk in Hispanic/Native American (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Cholecystokinin (CCK) rs747455 and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) rs6713532 and rs7565877 (for low Indigenous American (IA) ancestry); CCK rs8192472 and neuropeptide Y (NYP) rs16141 and rs14129 (intermediate IA ancestry); and leptin receptor (LEPR) rs11585329 (high IA ancestry) were strongly associated with multiple indicators of body size. There were no significant associations with breast cancer risk between genes and SNPs overall. However, LEPR was significantly associated with breast cancer risk among women with low IA ancestry (PARTP=0.024); POMC was significantly associated with breast cancer risk among women with intermediate (PARTP=0.015) and high (PARTP=0.012) IA ancestry. The overall pathway was statistically significant for pre-menopausal women with low IA ancestry (PARTP=0.05), as was cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript protein (CARTPT) (PARTP=0.014) and ghrelin (GHRL) (PARTP=0.007). POMC was significantly associated with breast cancer risk among post-menopausal women with higher IA ancestry (PARTP=0.005). Three SNPs in LEPR (rs6704167, rs17412175, and rs7626141), and adiponectin (ADIPOQ); rs822391) showed significant 4-way interactions (GxExMenopausexAncestry) for multiple indicators of body size among pre-menopausal women. Energy homeostasis genes were associated with breast cancer risk; menopausal status, body size, and genetic ancestry influenced this relationship. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The hypoxic proteome is influenced by gene-specific changes in mRNA translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne; Seigneuric, Renaud; Magagnin, Michael G.; Beucken, Twan van den; Lambin, Philippe; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia causes a rapid reduction in mRNA translation efficiency. This inhibition does not affect all mRNA species to the same extent and can therefore contribute significantly to hypoxia-induced differential protein expression. Our aim in this study was to characterize changes in gene expression during acute hypoxia and evaluate the contribution of regulation via mRNA translation on these changes. For each gene, the contribution of changes in mRNA abundance versus mRNA translation was determined. Materials and methods: DU145 prostate carcinoma cells were exposed to 4 h of hypoxia ( 2 ). Efficiently translated mRNAs were isolated by sedimentation through a sucrose gradient. Affymetrix microarray technology was used to evaluate both the transcriptional and translational contribution to gene expression. Results were validated by quantitative PCR. Results: One hundred and twenty genes were more than 4-fold upregulated by hypoxia in the efficiently translated fraction of mRNA, in comparison to only 76 genes at the level of transcription. Of the 50 genes demonstrating the largest changes in translation, 11 were found to be more than 2-fold over represented in the translated fraction in comparison to their overall transcriptional level. The gene with the highest translational contribution to its induction was CITED-2, which is a negative regulator of HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Conclusions: Gene-specific regulation of mRNA translation contributes significantly to differential gene expression during hypoxia

  15. Sterile DJH rearrangements reveal that distance between gene segments on the human Ig H chain locus influences their ability to rearrange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Østergaard; Lange, Anders Blaabjerg; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of the Ig locus occurs in two steps. First, a JH gene is rearranged to a D gene followed by a VH gene rearranging to the DJH rearrangement. By next generation sequencing, we analyzed 9969 unique DJH rearrangements and 5919 unique VHDJH rearrangements obtained from peripheral blood B...... frequently than JH locus distal D genes, whereas VH locus proximal D genes were observed more frequently in nonproductive VHDJH rearrangements. We further demonstrate that the distance between VH, D, and JH gene segments influence their ability to rearrange within the human Ig locus....

  16. Integrated analyses of microRNAs demonstrate their widespread influence on gene expression in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Chad J; Hernandez-Herrera, Anadulce; Jacobsen, Anders; Levine, Douglas A; Mankoo, Parminder; Schultz, Nikolaus; Du, Ying; Zhang, Yiqun; Larsson, Erik; Sheridan, Robert; Xiao, Weimin; Spellman, Paul T; Getz, Gad; Wheeler, David A; Perou, Charles M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Hayes, D Neil; Gunaratne, Preethi H

    2012-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network recently comprehensively catalogued the molecular aberrations in 487 high-grade serous ovarian cancers, with much remaining to be elucidated regarding the microRNAs (miRNAs). Here, using TCGA ovarian data, we surveyed the miRNAs, in the context of their predicted gene targets. Integration of miRNA and gene patterns yielded evidence that proximal pairs of miRNAs are processed from polycistronic primary transcripts, and that intronic miRNAs and their host gene mRNAs derive from common transcripts. Patterns of miRNA expression revealed multiple tumor subtypes and a set of 34 miRNAs predictive of overall patient survival. In a global analysis, miRNA:mRNA pairs anti-correlated in expression across tumors showed a higher frequency of in silico predicted target sites in the mRNA 3'-untranslated region (with less frequency observed for coding sequence and 5'-untranslated regions). The miR-29 family and predicted target genes were among the most strongly anti-correlated miRNA:mRNA pairs; over-expression of miR-29a in vitro repressed several anti-correlated genes (including DNMT3A and DNMT3B) and substantially decreased ovarian cancer cell viability. This study establishes miRNAs as having a widespread impact on gene expression programs in ovarian cancer, further strengthening our understanding of miRNA biology as it applies to human cancer. As with gene transcripts, miRNAs exhibit high diversity reflecting the genomic heterogeneity within a clinically homogeneous disease population. Putative miRNA:mRNA interactions, as identified using integrative analysis, can be validated. TCGA data are a valuable resource for the identification of novel tumor suppressive miRNAs in ovarian as well as other cancers.

  17. Quaternized Polyamidoamine Dendrimers as Novel Gene Delivery System: Relationship between Degree of Quaternization and Their Influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Lim, Yong beom; Choi, Joon Sig; Choi, Myung Un; Yang, Chul Hak; Park, Jong Sang

    2003-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium groups were introduced to Starburst polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers for a gene carrier. These quaternary dendritic carriers exhibited reduced cytotoxicity on 293T cells compared to parent dendrimers examined and their transfection efficiency were similar with parent dendrimers. Quaternization could be a promising tool to improve properties of dendrimers as a gene delivery carrier

  18. The influence of bovine milk high or low in isoflavones on hepatic gene expression in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaanild, Mette Tingleff; Nielsen, Tina Skau

    2012-01-01

    Isoflavones have generated much attention due to their potential positive effects in various diseases. Phytoestrogens especially equol can be found in bovine milk, as feed ration for dairy cows is comprised of plants containing phytoestrogens. The aim of this study was to analyze the changes...... in hepatic gene expression after dietary intake of milk high and low in isoflavones. In addition to pelleted feed female NMRI mice were offered water, water added either 17β-estradiol, equol, Tween 80, and milk high and low in isoflavone content for a week. Gene expression was analyzed using an array q......PCR kit. It was revealed that Tween 80 and 17β-estradiol upregulated both phase I and phase II genes to the same extent whereas equol alone, high and low isoflavone milk did not alter the expression of phase I genes but decreased the expression of phase II genes. This study shows that dietary isoflavones...

  19. Effects of physical forcing on COastal ZOoplankton community structure: study of the unusual case of a MEDiterranean ecosystem under strong tidal influence (Project COZOMED-MERMEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Groupe COZOMED: R. Arfi (1), A. Atoui (2), H. Ayadi (6), B. Bejaoui (1), N. Bhairy (1), N. Barraj (2), M. Belhassen (2), S. Benismail (2), M.Y Benkacem (2), J. Blanchot (1), M. Cankovic(5), F. Carlotti (1), C. Chevalier (1), I Ciglenecki-Jusic (5), D. Couet (1), N. Daly Yahia (3), L. Dammak (2), J.-L. Devenon (1), Z. Drira (6), A. Hamza (2), S. Kmia (6), N. Makhlouf (3), M. Mahfoudi (2), M. Moncef (4), M. Pagano (1), C. Sammari (2), H. Smeti (2), A. Zouari (2) The COZOMED-MERMEX project aims at understanding how hydrodynamic forcing (currents, tides, winds) combine with anthropogenic forcing and climate to affect the variability of coastal Mediterranean zooplankton communities under contrasting tidal influence. This study includes (i) a zero state of knowledge via a literature review of existing data and (ii) a case study on the system Boughrara lagoon - Gulf of Gabes. This ecosystem gives major services for Tunisia (about 65% of national fish production) but is weakened by its situation in a heavily anthropized area and under influence of urban, industrial and agricultural inputs. Besides this region is subject to specific climate forcing (Sahelian winds, scorching heat, intense evaporation, flooding) which possible changes will be considered. The expected issues are (i) to improve our knowledge of hydrodynamic forcing on zooplankton and ultimately on the functioning of coastal Mediterranean ecosystems impacted by anthropogenic and climatic effects and (ii) to elaborate management tools to help preserving good ecological status of these ecosystems: hydrodynamic circulation model, mapping of isochrones of residence times, mapping of the areas of highest zooplankton abundances (swarms), and sensitive areas, etc. This project strengthens existing scientific collaborations within the MERMEX program (The MerMex Group, 2011) and in the frame of an international joint laboratory (COSYS-Med) created in 2014. A first field mulidisciplinary campaign was performed in October

  20. Strong influence of dietary intake and physical activity on body fatness in elderly Japanese men: age-associated loss of polygenic resistance against obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanisawa, Kumpei; Ito, Tomoko; Sun, Xiaomin; Ise, Ryuken; Oshima, Satomi; Cao, Zhen-Bo; Sakamoto, Shizuo; Tanaka, Masashi; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with body mass index (BMI) in middle-aged populations; however, it is unclear whether these SNPs are associated with body fatness in elderly people. We examined the association between genetic risk score (GRS) from BMI-associated SNPs and body fatness in elderly Japanese men. We also examined the contribution of GRS, dietary macronutrient intake, and physical activity to body fatness by different age groups. GRS was calculated from 10 BMI-associated SNPs in 84 middle-aged (30-64 years) and 97 elderly (65-79 years) Japanese men; subjects were divided into low, middle, and high GRS groups. Dietary macronutrient intake was assessed using a questionnaire, and physical activity was evaluated using both a questionnaire and an accelerometer. The middle-aged individuals with a high GRS had greater BMI; waist circumference; and total abdominal fat, visceral fat, and subcutaneous fat areas than the middle-aged individuals with low GRS, whereas the indicators were not different between the GRS groups in elderly individuals. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that GRS was the strongest predictor of BMI, total abdominal fat, and visceral fat in the middle-aged group, whereas fat, alcohol, and protein intakes or vigorous-intensity physical activity were more strongly associated with these indicators than was GRS in the elderly group. These results suggest that GRS from BMI-associated SNPs is not predictive of body fatness in elderly Japanese men. The stronger contribution of dietary macronutrient intake and physical activity to body fatness may attenuate the genetic predisposition in elderly men.

  1. The influence of polyanion molecular weight on polyelectrolyte multilayers at surfaces: elasticity and susceptibility to saloplasticity of strongly dissociated synthetic polymers at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ashley D; Dong, Wen-Fei; Benbow, Natalie L; Webber, Jessie L; Krasowska, Marta; Beattie, David A; Ferri, James K

    2017-09-13

    dependence of molecular weight on saloplasticity in strongly dissociated polyelectrolytes.

  2. Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Oberg, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Beye, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Dell' Angela, M. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Turner, J. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gladh, J. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ng, M. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sellberg, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kaya, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mercurio, G. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Hieke, F. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Nordlund, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dakovski, G. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Minitti, M. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fohlisch, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Univ. Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Wolf, M. [Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, Berlin (Germany); Wurth, W. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY Photon Science, Hamburg (Germany); Ogasawara, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Norskov, J. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Ostrom, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, L. G. M. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ablid-Pedersen, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    We show that coadsorbed oxygen atoms have a dramatic influence on the CO desorption dynamics from Ru(0001). In contrast to the precursor-mediated desorption mechanism on Ru(0001), the presence of surface oxygen modifies the electronic structure of Ru atoms such that CO desorption occurs predominantly via the direct pathway. This phenomenon is directly observed in an ultrafast pump-probe experiment using a soft x-ray free-electron laser to monitor the dynamic evolution of the valence electronic structure of the surface species. This is supported with the potential of mean force along the CO desorption path obtained from density-functional theory calculations. Charge density distribution and frozen-orbital analysis suggest that the oxygen-induced reduction of the Pauli repulsion, and consequent increase of the dative interaction between the CO 5σ and the charged Ru atom, is the electronic origin of the distinct desorption dynamics. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO desorption from Ru(0001) and oxygen-coadsorbed Ru(0001) provide further insights into the surface bond-breaking process.

  3. Dietary fat influences the expression of contractile and metabolic genes in rat skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Mizunoya

    Full Text Available Dietary fat plays a major role in obesity, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases. To determine whether the intake of different types of dietary fats affect the muscle fiber types that govern the metabolic and contractile properties of the skeletal muscle, we fed male Wistar rats with a 15% fat diet derived from different fat sources. Diets composed of soybean oil (n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA-rich, fish oil (n-3 PUFA-rich, or lard (low in PUFAs were administered to the rats for 4 weeks. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms were used as biomarkers to delineate the skeletal muscle fiber types. Compared with soybean oil intake, fish oil intake showed significantly lower levels of the fast-type MyHC2B and higher levels of the intermediate-type MyHC2X composition in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle, which is a fast-type dominant muscle. Concomitantly, MyHC2X mRNA levels in fish oil-fed rats were significantly higher than those observed in the soybean oil-fed rats. The MyHC isoform composition in the lard-fed rats was an intermediate between that of the fish oil and soybean oil-fed rats. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4, and porin mRNA showed significantly upregulated levels in the EDL of fish oil-fed rats compared to those observed in soybean oil-fed and lard-fed rats, implying an activation of oxidative metabolism. In contrast, no changes in the composition of MyHC isoforms was observed in the soleus muscle, which is a slow-type dominant muscle. Fatty acid composition in the serum and the muscle was significantly influenced by the type of dietary fat consumed. In conclusion, dietary fat affects the expression of genes related to the contractile and metabolic properties in the fast-type dominant skeletal muscle, where the activation of oxidative metabolism is more pronounced after fish oil intake than that after soybean oil intake.

  4. The many shades of enhancement: timing of post-gadolinium images strongly influences the scoring of juvenile idiopathic arthritis wrist involvement on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieter, Jasper F.M.M.; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Avenarius, Derk F.M. [Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe (Norway); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Paediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Radiology Department, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, K1, Bergen (Norway)

    2016-10-15

    Potential long-term side effects of treatment for juvenile idiopathic arthritis are concerning. This has necessitated accurate tools, such as MRI, to monitor treatment response and allow for personalized therapy. To examine the extent to which timing of post-contrast MR images influences the scoring of inflammatory change in the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We studied two sets of post-contrast 3-D gradient echo MRI series of the wrist in 34 children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. These images were obtained immediately after administration of intravenous contrast material and again after approximately 10 min. The dataset was drawn from a prospective multicenter project conducted 2006-2010. We assessed five wrist locations for synovial enhancement, effusion and overall inflammation. Examinations were scored by one radiologist in two sessions - the first was based on the early post-contrast images, and the later session, for which the previous findings were masked, was based on the later post-contrast images. Fifty-two of the 170 locations (30.6%) received a higher synovial enhancement score based on the late post-contrast images as compared to the early images. Sixty of the 170 (35%) locations received a higher total inflammation score. The mean scores of synovial enhancement and total inflammation were significantly higher when based on the late post-contrast images as compared to the early post-contrast images. An MRI-based scoring system for the presence and degree of synovitis should be based on a standardized MR-protocol with a fixed interval between intravenous contrast injection and post-contrast images. (orig.)

  5. The influence of bisphosphonates on human osteoblast migration and integrin aVb3/tenascin C gene expression in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Yekta Sareh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bisphosphonates are therapeutics of bone diseases, such as Paget's disease, multiple myeloma or osteoclastic metastases. As a severe side effect the bisphosphonate induced osteonecrosis of the jaw (BONJ often requires surgical treatment and is accompanied with a disturbed wound healing. Therefore, the influence on adhesion and migration of human osteoblasts (hOB after bisphosphonate therapy has been investigated by morphologic as well as gene expression methods. Methods By a scratch wound experiment, which measures the reduction of defined cell layer gap, the morphology and migration ability of hOB was evaluated. A test group of hOB, which was stimulated by zoledronate 5 × 10-5M, and a control group of unstimulated hOB were applied. Furthermore the gene expression of integrin aVb3 and tenascin C was quantified by Real-Time rtPCR at 5data points over an experimental period of 14 days. The bisphosphonates zoledronate, ibandronate and clodronate have been compared with an unstimulated hOB control. Results After initially identical migration and adhesion characteristics, zoledronate inhibited hOB migration after 50 h of stimulation. The integrinavb3 and tenascin C gene expression was effected by bisphosphonates in a cell line dependent manner with decreased, respectively inconsistent gene expression levels over time. The non-nitrogen containing bisphosphonates clodronate led to decreased gene expression levels. Conclusion Bisphosphonates seem to inhibit hOB adhesion and migration. The integrin aVb3 and tenascin C gene expression seem to be dependent on the cell line. BONJ could be enhanced by an inhibition of osteoblast adhesion and migration. The gene expression results, however, suggest a cell line dependent effect of bisphosphonates, which could explain the interindividual differences of BONJ incidences.

  6. Influence of putative exopolysaccharide genes on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilm stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Martin; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Fazli, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    We report a study of the role of putative exopolysaccharide gene clusters in the formation and stability of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilm. Two novel putative exopolysaccharide gene clusters, pea and peb, were identified, and evidence is provided that they encode products that stabilize P....... putida KT2440 biofilm. The gene clusters alg and bcs, which code for proteins mediating alginate and cellulose biosynthesis, were found to play minor roles in P. putida KT2440 biofilm formation and stability under the conditions tested. A P. putida KT2440 derivative devoid of any identifiable...

  7. Recurring Necrotic Enteritis Outbreaks in Commercial Broiler Chicken Flocks Strongly Influence Toxin Gene Carriage and Species Richness in the Resident Clostridium perfringens Population

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Lou Gaucher; Marie-Lou Gaucher; Marie-Lou Gaucher; Gabriel G. Perron; Julie Arsenault; Ann Letellier; Martine Boulianne; Sylvain Quessy

    2017-01-01

    Extensive use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in food animals has been questioned due to the globally increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. For the poultry industry, digestive health management following AGP withdrawal in Europe has been a challenge, especially the control of necrotic enteritis. Much research work has focused on gut health in commercial broiler chicken husbandry. Understanding the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in its ecological niche, the poultry barn, is k...

  8. Influence of the xonA gene of Escherichia coli in response to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce M, J.; Serment G, J.; Brena V, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteria has a repair and tolerance system known as SOS that works when there is damage in the DNA. However it is necessary that this damage modifies before the system is activated. For this it has intended to the enzymes that degrade DNA like responsible for generating this modifications. It has already been identified to the product of the gene recJ and according to the results that here are presented that of the gene xonA has similar activity. When both genes fail, not alone the activity SOS is inhibited but rather the mortality increases, for ionizing radiation. The above mentioned reinforces the importance of these genes in the recovery to the damage caused to the genome. (Author)

  9. Protocols for screening antimicrobial peptides that influence virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Baldry, Mara; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Compounds that inhibit virulence gene expression in bacterial pathogens have received increasing interest as possible alternatives to the traditional antibiotic treatment of infections. For the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, we have developed two simple assays based on reporter gene fusions...... to central virulence genes that are easily applicable for screening various sources of natural and synthetic peptides for anti-virulence effects. The plate assay is qualitative but simultaneously assesses the effect of gradient concentrations of the investigated compound, whereas the liquid assay...... is quantitative and can be employed to address whether a compound is acting on the central quorum sensing regulatory system, agr, that controls a large number of virulence genes in S. aureus....

  10. Microbial ecology, bacterial pathogens, and antibiotic resistant genes in swine manure wastewater as influenced by three swine management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, John P; Adeli, Ardeshir; McLaughlin, Michael R

    2014-06-15

    The environmental influence of farm management in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) can yield vast changes to the microbial biota and ecological structure of both the pig and waste manure lagoon wastewater. While some of these changes may not be negative, it is possible that CAFOs can enrich antibiotic resistant bacteria or pathogens based on farm type, thereby influencing the impact imparted by the land application of its respective wastewater. The purpose of this study was to measure the microbial constituents of swine-sow, -nursery, and -finisher farm manure lagoon wastewater and determine the changes induced by farm management. A total of 37 farms were visited in the Mid-South USA and analyzed for the genes 16S rRNA, spaQ (Salmonella spp.), Camp-16S (Campylobacter spp.), tetA, tetB, ermF, ermA, mecA, and intI using quantitative PCR. Additionally, 16S rRNA sequence libraries were created. Overall, it appeared that finisher farms were significantly different from nursery and sow farms in nearly all genes measured and in 16S rRNA clone libraries. Nearly all antibiotic resistance genes were detected in all farms. Interestingly, the mecA resistance gene (e.g. methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) was below detection limits on most farms, and decreased as the pigs aged. Finisher farms generally had fewer antibiotic resistance genes, which corroborated previous phenotypic data; additionally, finisher farms produced a less diverse 16S rRNA sequence library. Comparisons of Camp-16S and spaQ GU (genomic unit) values to previous culture data demonstrated ratios from 10 to 10,000:1 depending on farm type, indicating viable but not cultivatable bacteria were dominant. The current study indicated that swine farm management schemes positively and negatively affect microbial and antibiotic resistant populations in CAFO wastewater which has future "downstream" implications from both an environmental and public health perspective. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Ghrelin Gene Variants Influence on Metabolic Syndrome Components in Aged Spanish Population

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Mireia; Adam, Victoria; Palomera, Elisabet; Blesa, Sebastian; Díaz, Gonzalo; Buquet, Xavier; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Martín-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Palanca, Ana; Chaves, Javier Felipe; Puig-Domingo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of genetic variations within the ghrelin gene on cardiometabolic profile and nutritional status is still not clear in humans, particularly in elderly people. OBJECTIVES: We investigated six SNPs of the ghrelin gene and their relationship with metabolic syndrome (MS) components. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 824 subjects (413 men/411 women, age 77.31±5.04) participating in the Mataró aging study (n = 310) and the Hortega study (n = 514) were analyzed. Anthropometric variables, ghr...

  12. Genetic polymorphisms in homologous recombination repair genes in healthy Slovenian population and their influence on DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goricar, Katja; Erculj, Nina; Zadel, Maja; Dolzan, Vita

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair is an important mechanism involved in repairing double-strand breaks in DNA and for maintaining genomic stability. Polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in this pathway may influence the capacity for DNA repair. The aim of this study was to select tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific genes involved in HR repair, to determine their allele frequencies in a healthy Slovenian population and their influence on DNA damage detected with comet assay. In total 373 individuals were genotyped for nine tag SNPs in three genes: XRCC3 722C>T, XRCC3 -316A>G, RAD51 -98G>C, RAD51 -61G>T, RAD51 1522T>G, NBS1 553G>C, NBS1 1197A>G, NBS1 37117C>T and NBS1 3474A>C using competitive allele-specific amplification (KASPar assay). Comet assay was performed in a subgroup of 26 individuals to determine the influence of selected SNPs on DNA damage. We observed that age significantly affected genotype frequencies distribution of XRCC3 -316A>G (P = 0.039) in healthy male blood donors. XRCC3 722C>T (P = 0.005), RAD51 -61G>T (P = 0.023) and NBS1 553G>C (P = 0.008) had a statistically significant influence on DNA damage. XRCC3 722C>T, RAD51 -61G>T and NBS1 553G>C polymorphisms significantly affect the repair of damaged DNA and may be of clinical importance as they are common in Slovenian population

  13. Zearalenone (ZEN and Its Influence on Regulation of Gene Expression in Carp (Cyprinus carpio L. Liver Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Pietsch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (ZEN is a frequently-occurring mycotoxin in both animal and fish feeds. In order to characterize its effects on carp, three groups of fish were fed for 28 days with feeds contaminated with three different levels of ZEN (low: 332 µg kg−1, medium: 621 µg kg−1, and high: 797 µg kg−1 feed. The reversibility of the effects of ZEN was assessed by feeding all of the groups with uncontaminated feed for a further 14 days. Gene expression of immune genes in the liver tissue of the fish was analysed, revealing reduced expressions of immune, antioxidative, and estrogen-related genes after the fish had been exposed to ZEN. However, the expression of vacuole-type H+ ATPase increased substantially with ZEN exposure, thus supporting the previously-reported sensitivity of lysosomal functions to ZEN. Feeding the fish with a ZEN-free diet for a further two weeks changed the effects of ZEN on the expression of some genes, including the expressions of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, and arginase 2, which were not influenced after four weeks of treatment, but showed lower values after the recovery phase in fish previously treated with ZEN compared with the control group. In summary, this study confirmed the broad effects of ZEN on different essential functions in carp and suggests that the current maximum allowable levels in compound feed are too high to prevent damage to fish.

  14. Zearalenone (ZEN) and Its Influence on Regulation of Gene Expression in Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) Liver Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Constanze

    2017-09-15

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a frequently-occurring mycotoxin in both animal and fish feeds. In order to characterize its effects on carp, three groups of fish were fed for 28 days with feeds contaminated with three different levels of ZEN (low: 332 µg kg -1 , medium: 621 µg kg -1 , and high: 797 µg kg -1 feed). The reversibility of the effects of ZEN was assessed by feeding all of the groups with uncontaminated feed for a further 14 days. Gene expression of immune genes in the liver tissue of the fish was analysed, revealing reduced expressions of immune, antioxidative, and estrogen-related genes after the fish had been exposed to ZEN. However, the expression of vacuole-type H⁺ ATPase increased substantially with ZEN exposure, thus supporting the previously-reported sensitivity of lysosomal functions to ZEN. Feeding the fish with a ZEN-free diet for a further two weeks changed the effects of ZEN on the expression of some genes, including the expressions of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, and arginase 2, which were not influenced after four weeks of treatment, but showed lower values after the recovery phase in fish previously treated with ZEN compared with the control group. In summary, this study confirmed the broad effects of ZEN on different essential functions in carp and suggests that the current maximum allowable levels in compound feed are too high to prevent damage to fish.

  15. Influence of smoking on colonic gene expression profile in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Csillag, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    the included material: CD smokers (n = 28) or never-smokers (n = 14) as compared to fifteen healthy controls (8 smokers and 7 never-smokers). RNA was isolated and gene expression assessed with Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0. Data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), Wilcoxon......BACKGROUND: The development and course of Crohn's disease (CD) is related to both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been found to exacerbate the course of CD by increasing the risk of developing fistulas and strictures as well as the need for surgery, possibly because of an interaction...... smokers). AIM: To identify any difference in gene expression of the descending colonic mucosa between smoking and never-smoking CD patients (and controls) by determining genetic expression profiles from microarray analysis. METHODS: Fifty-seven specimens were obtained by routine colonoscopy from...

  16. The combination of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC genes influences murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eyler, Y L; Pfau, C J; Broomhall, K S

    1989-01-01

    with the recessive disease phenotype. In all cases, susceptibility was dominant. In backcross progeny obtained from matings of parental strains differing in both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC (SWR; C3H), 90% of the challenged mice died, indicating that at least three loci controlled...... susceptibility to the disease. When the parental strains carried similar MHC haplotypes but dissimilar background genes (B10.BR; CBA), 78% of the backcross mice succumbed, indicating that at least two non-MHC loci influenced disease susceptibility. It is unlikely, however, that the same two non-MHC loci...... are critical in all genetic combinations, since F1 produced from two H-2 identical, resistant strains (B10.BR; C3H) were found to be fully susceptible. When congenic mice, differing only in the D-end of the MHC region, were analysed, 50% of the backcross animals died, indicating that one gene in the MHC region...

  17. The trehalose utilization gene thuA ortholog in Mesorhizobium loti does not influence competitiveness for nodulation on Lotus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Jensen, John Beck

    2014-03-01

    Competitiveness for nodulation is a desirable trait in rhizobia strains used as inoculant. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 mutation in either of the trehalose utilization genes thuA or thuB influences its competitiveness for root colonization and nodule occupancy depending on the interacting host. We have therefore investigated whether mutation in the thuA ortholog in Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 also leads to a similar competitive phenotype on its hosts. The results show that M. loti thuA mutant Ml7023 was symbiotically effective and was as competitive as the wild type in colonization and nodule occupancy on Lotus corniculatus and Lotus japonicus. The thuA gene in M. loti was not induced during root colonization or in the infection threads unlike in S. meliloti, despite its induction by trehalose and high osmolarity in in vitro assays.

  18. Temperature influences the expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following DNA vaccination and VHS virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Gautier, Laurent; Rasmussen, Jesper Skou

    balancing mechanism of the immune system. An experimental VHSV challenge was performed 7 weeks pv. Similar protection levels of approximately 10% mortality were found for the vaccinated fish, regardless of temperature during immunisation and challenge, whereas the course and level of mortality among...... an early unspecific antiviral response as well as a long-lasting specific protection. However, temperature appears to influence immune response with respect to the nature and duration of the protective mechanisms. In this study, groups of fish were temperature acclimated, vaccinated and challenged at three...... different temperatures (5, 10 and 15ºC). Tissue and organ samples were collected at numerous time points post vaccination (pv) and post viral challenge (pch). Then, gene expression levels of a two immune genes (Vig-1 and Mx3) involved in unspecific antiviral response mechanisms were determined by Q...

  19. Influence of doxorubicin on fluconazole susceptibility and efflux pump gene expression of Candida dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schulz, Bettina

    2012-05-01

    The effect of doxorubicin (DOX) on the fluconazole (FLU) susceptibility of C. dubliniensis was investigated. Isolates were exposed to DOX and FLU in a chequerboard assay and resistance gene expressions were analysed after DOX exposure. The susceptibility of the yeast to FLU was decreased in the presence of DOX in the chequerboard assay with FIC indices suggesting an antagonistic effect. Gene expression analyses showed an overexpression of CdCDR2. Hence, DOX was found to have an impact on resistance mechanisms in C. dubliniensis isolates.

  20. Assessment of reference gene stability influenced by extremely divergent disease symptoms in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Wrzesińska, Barbara; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2013-12-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is one of the most important vegetables of great worldwide economic value. The scientific importance of the vegetable results from the fact that the genome of S. lycopersicum has been sequenced. This allows researchers to study fundamental mechanisms playing an essential role during tomato development and response to environmental factors contributing significantly to cell metabolism alterations. Parallel with the development of contemporary genetics and the constant increase in sequencing data, progress has to be aligned with improvement of experimental methods used for studying genes functions and gene expression levels, of which the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is still the most reliable. As well as with other nucleic acid-based methods used for comparison of the abundance of specific RNAs, the RT-qPCR data have to be normalised to the levels of RNAs represented stably in a cell. To achieve the goal, the so-called housekeeping genes (i.e., RNAs encoding, for instance, proteins playing an important role in the cell metabolism or structure maintenance), are used for normalisation of the target gene expression data. However, a number of studies have indicated the transcriptional instability of commonly used reference genes analysed in different situations or conditions; for instance, the origin of cells, tissue types, or environmental or other experimental conditions. The expression of ten common housekeeping genes of S. lycopersicum, namely EF1α, TUB, CAC, EXP, RPL8, GAPDH, TBP, ACT, SAND and 18S rRNA were examined during viral infections of tomato. Changes in the expression levels of the genes were estimated by comparison of the non-inoculated tomato plants with those infected with commonly known tomato viral pathogens, Tomato torrado virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Tobacco mosaic virus and Pepino mosaic virus, inducing a diverse range of disease symptoms on the common host, ranging from mild leaves chlorosis to

  1. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Ze, Sang-Zi; Stanley, David W; Yang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. The cDNAs for ecCuZnSOD, icCuZnSOD, and MnSOD, respectively, encode 24.55, 15.81, and 23.14 kDa polypeptides, which possess structural features typical of other insect SODs. They showed 20-94% identity to other known SOD sequences from Bombyx mori, Musca domestica, Nasonia vitripennis, Pediculus humanus corporis, and Tribolium castaneum. Expression of these genes was analyzed in selected tissues and developmental stages, and following exposure to Escherichia coli and parasitization by Scleroderma guani. We recorded expression of all three SODs in cuticle, fat body, and hemocytes and in the major developmental stages. Relatively higher expressions were detected in late-instar larvae and pupae, compared to other developmental stages. Transcriptional levels were upregulated following bacterial infection. Analysis of pupae parasitized by S. guani revealed that expression of T. molitor SOD genes was significantly induced following parasitization. We infer that these genes act in immune response and in host-parasitoid interactions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Influence of Populus Genotype on Gene Expression by the Wood Decay Fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill Gaskell; Amber Marty; Michael Mozuch; Philip J. Kersten; Sandra Splinter Bondurant; Grzegorz Sabat; Ali Azarpira; John Ralph; Oleksandr Skyba; Shawn D. Mansfield; Robert A. Blanchette; Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    We examined gene expression patterns in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium when it colonizes hybrid poplar (Populus alba tremula) and syringyl (S)-rich transgenic derivatives. Acombination ofmicroarrays and liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed detection of a total of 9,959 transcripts and 793...

  3. Influence of high-frequency electromagnetic fields on different modes of cell death and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, M; Abend, M; Römer, B; Van Beuningen, D

    2003-09-01

    International thresholds for exposure to non-ionizing radiation leading to non-thermal effects were conservatively set by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The aim of this study was to examine whether biological effects such as different modes of cell death and gene expression modifications related to tumorgenesis are detectable above the threshold defined. Human leukaemia cells (HL-60) grown in vitro were exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF; t 1/2(r) about 1 ns; field strength about 25 times higher than the ICNIRP reference levels for occupational exposure) leading to non-thermal effects using a high-voltage-improved GTEM cell 5302 (EMCO) connected to a pulse generator NP20 (C = 1 nF, U(Load) = 20kV). HL-60 cells were harvested at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after radiation exposure. Micronuclei, apoptosis and abnormal cells (e.g. necrosis) were determined using morphological criteria. In parallel, the expression of 1176 genes was measured using Atlas Human 1.2. Array. Based on high data reproducibility calculated from two independent experiments (> 99%), array analysis was performed. No significant change in apoptosis, micronucleation, abnormal cells and differential gene expression was found. Exposure of HL-60 cells to EMFs 25 times higher than the ICNIRP reference levels for occupational exposure failed to induce any changes in apoptosis, micronucleation, abnormal morphologies and gene expression. Further experiments using EMFs above the conservatively defined reference level set by the ICNIRP may be desirable.

  4. Two Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase genes influence motor control and development in different ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among its other biological roles, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7), encoded by two ace genes in most insects, catalyses the breakdown of acetylcholine, thereby terminating synaptic transmission. ace1 encodes the synaptic enzyme and ace2 has other essential actions in many insect species, such...

  5. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor....

  6. Heterogeneity at the CETP gene locus. Influence on plasma CETP concentrations and HDL cholesterol levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuivenhoven, J.A.; de Knijff, P.; Boer, J M; Smalheer, H A; Botma, G.J.; Seidell, J C; Kastelein, J.J.; Pritchard, P H

    This study was designed to investigate the association(s) between heterogeneity at the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene locus, CETP plasma concentrations, and HDL cholesterol levels. Healthy men with the lowest, median, and highest deciles of HDL cholesterol were selected from a large

  7. The STAT4 gene influences the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueda, B.; Broen, J.; Simeon, C.; Hesselstrand, R.; Diaz, B.; Suarez, H.; Ortego-Centeno, N.; Riemekasten, G.; Fonollosa, V.; Vonk, M.C.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Sanchez-Roman, J.; Aguirre-Zamorano, M.A.; Garcia-Portales, R.; Pros, A.; Camps, M.T.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Airo, P.; Beretta, L.; Scorza, R.; Laar, J. van; Gonzalez-Escribano, M.F.; Nelson, J.L.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Martin, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of STAT4 gene in the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis (SSc) susceptibility or clinical phenotype. A total of 1317 SSc patients [896 with limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc) and 421 with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc)] and 3113 healthy

  8. Brain Gene Expression is Influenced by Incubation Temperature During Leopard Gecko (Eublepharis macularius) Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotta, Maria Michela; Turano, Mimmo; Ronca, Raffaele; Mezzasalma, Marcello; Petraccioli, Agnese; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Sexual differentiation (SD) during development results in anatomical, metabolic, and physiological differences that involve not only the gonads, but also a variety of other biological structures, such as the brain, determining differences in morphology, behavior, and response in the breeding season. In many reptiles, whose sex is determined by egg incubation temperature, such as the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, embryos incubated at different temperatures clearly differ in the volume of brain nuclei that modulate behavior. Based on the premise that "the developmental decision of gender does not flow through a single gene", we performed an analysis on E. macularius using three approaches to gain insights into the genes that may be involved in brain SD during the thermosensitive period. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we studied the expression of genes known to be involved in gonadal SD such as WNT4, SOX9, DMRT1, Erα, Erβ, GnRH, P450 aromatase, PRL, and PRL-R. Then, further genes putatively involved in sex dimorphic brain differentiation were sought by differential display (DDRT-PCR) and PCR array. Our findings indicate that embryo exposure to different sex determining temperatures induces differential expression of several genes that are involved not only in gonadal differentiation (PRL-R, Wnt4, Erα, Erβ, p450 aromatase, and DMRT1), but also in neural differentiation (TN-R, Adora2A, and ASCL1) and metabolic pathways (GP1, RPS15, and NADH12). These data suggest that the brains of SDT reptiles might be dimorphic at birth, thus behavioral experiences in postnatal development would act on a structure already committed to male or female. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-07-07

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. Copyright © 2016 Reis et al.

  10. Influence of Dopamine-Related Genes on Neurobehavioral Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury during Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble-Barna, Amery; Wade, Shari L; Martin, Lisa J; Pilipenko, Valentina; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry; Kurowski, Brad G

    2017-06-01

    The present study examined the association of dopamine-related genes with short- and long-term neurobehavioral recovery, as well as neurobehavioral recovery trajectories over time, in children who had sustained early childhood traumatic brain injuries (TBI) relative to children who had sustained orthopedic injuries (OI). Participants were recruited from a prospective, longitudinal study evaluating outcomes of children who sustained a TBI (n = 68) or OI (n = 72) between the ages of 3 and 7 years. Parents completed ratings of child executive function and behavior at the immediate post-acute period (0-3 months after injury); 6, 12, and 18 months after injury; and an average of 3.5 and 7 years after injury. Thirty-two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in dopamine-related genes (dopamine receptor D2 [DRD2], solute carrier family 6 member 3 [SLC6A3], solute carrier family 18 member A2 [SLC18A2], catechol-o-methyltransferase [COMT], and ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1 [ANKK1]) were examined in association with short- and long-term executive function and behavioral adjustment, as well as their trajectories over time. After controlling for premorbid child functioning, genetic variation within the SLC6A3 (rs464049 and rs460000) gene was differentially associated with neurobehavioral recovery trajectories over time following TBI relative to OI, with rs464049 surviving multiple testing corrections. In addition, genetic variation within the ANKK1 (rs1800497 and rs2734849) and SLC6A3 (rs464049, rs460000, and rs1042098) genes was differentially associated with short- and long-term neurobehavioral recovery following TBI, with rs460000 and rs464049 surviving multiple testing corrections. The findings provide preliminary evidence that genetic variation in genes involved in DRD2 expression and density (ANKK1) and dopamine transport (SLC6A3) plays a role in neurobehavioral recovery following pediatric TBI.

  11. [The Influence of New Medium with RGD on Cell Growth,Cell Fusion and Expression of Exogenous Gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Wei, Da-Peng; Zhu, Tong-Bo

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the influence of a new culture medium added with RGD on cell growth,cell fusion and expression of exogenous gene. A new medium was prepared by adding different concentrations of RGD to ordinary culture medium. The optimum concentration of RGD was determined by observation of the growth of human pancreatic epithelial cell line HPDE6-C7. After determining the optimum concentration of RGD,different concentrations of cells HPDE6-C7 (5×10 4 ,10 5 ,5×10 5 mL -1 ) were inoculated in the two mediums. The morphology,adherence,growth and density of the cells were observed by inverted microscope; The ratio of clone formation and the positive rate of cloning were compared between the two cultures after fusion; The fluorescence intensity after the transfection of plasmid with green fluorescent protein ( GFP ) and the protein expression after transfection of plasmid with KRAS were observed to campare the expression of exogenous genes between the new medium with ordinary medium. Firstly,the optimal concentration of RGD was 10 ng/mL. Compared with the normal medium,the cultured cells with RGD had better morphology,adhesion and faster proliferation. In addition,both of the number and positive rate of clones formed in the new medium were significantly higher than that in the ordinary medium ( P exogenous gene GFP in the new medium was significantly higher than that in normal medium ( P exogenous gene KRAS of the new medium was also significantly higher than that in normal medium. The new culture medium has highlighted advantages in cell growth,cell fusion and expression of exogenous genes. RGD peptide has widely prospect and potential value in the cell culture. Copyright© by Editorial Board of Journal of Sichuan University (Medical Science Edition).

  12. New PAH gene promoter KLF1 and 3'-region C/EBPalpha motifs influence transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Kristel; Stankovic, Biljana; Kotur, Nikola; Djordjevic, Maja; Zukic, Branka; Nikcevic, Gordana; Ugrin, Milena; Spasovski, Vesna; Srzentic, Sanja; Pavlovic, Sonja; Stojiljkovic, Maja

    2017-02-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a metabolic disease caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Although the PAH genotype remains the main determinant of PKU phenotype severity, genotype-phenotype inconsistencies have been reported. In this study, we focused on unanalysed sequences in non-coding PAH gene regions to assess their possible influence on the PKU phenotype. We transiently transfected HepG2 cells with various chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter constructs which included PAH gene non-coding regions. Selected non-coding regions were indicated by in silico prediction to contain transcription factor binding sites. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and supershift assays were performed to identify which transcriptional factors were engaged in the interaction. We found novel KLF1 motif in the PAH promoter, which decreases CAT activity by 50 % in comparison to basal transcription in vitro. The cytosine at the c.-170 promoter position creates an additional binding site for the protein complex involving KLF1 transcription factor. Moreover, we assessed for the first time the role of a multivariant variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) region located in the 3'-region of the PAH gene. We found that the VNTR3, VNTR7 and VNTR8 constructs had approximately 60 % of CAT activity. The regulation is mediated by the C/EBPalpha transcription factor, present in protein complex binding to VNTR3. Our study highlighted two novel promoter KLF1 and 3'-region C/EBPalpha motifs in the PAH gene which decrease transcription in vitro and, thus, could be considered as PAH expression modifiers. New transcription motifs in non-coding regions will contribute to better understanding of the PKU phenotype complexity and may become important for the optimisation of PKU treatment.

  13. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  14. Influence of the gene xthA in the activation of SOS response of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez M, V.

    2013-01-01

    The SOS response is one of the strategies that has Escherichia coli to counteract the lesions in the genetic material. The response is integrated for approximately 60 genes that when are activated they provide to the cell a bigger opportunity to survive. For the activation of this system is necessary that DNA regions of simple chain are generated, in such a way that most of the lesions should be processed, to be able to induce this answer. Some genes that intervene in this procedure, as recO, recB and recJ are recognized since when being exposed to the radiation, their activity SOS is smaller than in a wild strain. In previous works has been studied that to inactivate the genes that are involves in the lesions processing to generate DNA of simple chain, the SOS induction level diminishes with regard to a wild strain, but that when eliminating the genes that are involves directly in the repair, the SOS response increases. In this work a strain with defects in the gene xthA was built, which encodes for an endonuclease AP that participates in the repair mechanism by base excision and was evaluated their sensibility as the activity of the SOS response when exposing it to UV light and gamma radiation. The results showed that the lethality of the strain with the defect is very similar to the wild strain; while the activation level of the SOS response is bigger in comparison with the wild strain when being exposed to UV light; suggesting the existence of an enzyme that recognizes the lesions that produces this radiation, however, is not this the main repair channel, since the survival is similar to that of the wild strain. On the contrary, the results obtained with gamma radiation showed that the lethality diminishes in comparison to that of the wild strain, like the SOS activity; due surely to that the gene product intervenes in the repair for base excision, participating in the formation of the previous substrate to the activation of the SOS response. (Author)

  15. Genetic influences on human body odor: from genes to the axillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, George; Leyden, James J

    2010-02-01

    Several groups have identified the characteristic axillary odorants and how they arrive on the skin surface, pre-formed, bound to water-soluble odorless precursors in apocrine secretions. In the current issue, Martin et al., (2010) describe the relationship between the production of axillary odorants and variants in the ABCC11 gene. Individuals who are homozygotic for a SNP (538G>A) were found to have significantly less of the characteristic axillary odorants than either individuals who were heterozygotic for this change or those who had the wild-type gene. The 538G>A SNP predominates in Asians who have nearly complete loss of typical body odor. ABCC11 is expressed and localized in apocrine sweat glands. These findings are remarkably similar to the ethnic distribution and expression patterns for apocrine apoD, a previously identified carrier of a characteristic axillary odorant.

  16. Blood type gene locus has no influence on ACE association with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braae, Anne; Medway, Christopher; Carrasquillo, Minerva; Younkin, Steven; Kehoe, Patrick G; Morgan, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    The ABO blood group locus was recently found to contribute independently and via interactions with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene variation to plasma levels of ACE. Variation in ACE has previously been not only implicated as individually conferring susceptibility for Alzheimer's disease (AD) but also proposed to confer risk via interactions with other as yet unknown genes. More recently, larger studies have not supported ACE as a risk factor for AD, whereas the role of ACE pathway in AD has come under increased levels of scrutiny with respect to various aspects of AD pathology and possible therapies. We explored the potential combined involvement of ABO and ACE variations in the genetic susceptibility of 2067 AD cases compared with 1376 nondemented elderly. Including the effects of ABO haplotype did not provide any evidence for the genetic association of ACE with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Wolbachia on host gene expression in an obligatory symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremer Natacha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia are intracellular bacteria known to be facultative reproductive parasites of numerous arthropod hosts. Apart from these reproductive manipulations, recent findings indicate that Wolbachia may also modify the host’s physiology, notably its immune function. In the parasitoid wasp, Asobara tabida, Wolbachia is necessary for oogenesis completion, and aposymbiotic females are unable to produce viable offspring. The absence of egg production is also associated with an increase in programmed cell death in the ovaries of aposymbiotic females, suggesting that a mechanism that ensures the maintenance of Wolbachia in the wasp could also be responsible for this dependence. In order to decipher the general mechanisms underlying host-Wolbachia interactions and the origin of the dependence, we developed transcriptomic approaches to compare gene expression in symbiotic and aposymbiotic individuals. Results As no genetic data were available on A. tabida, we constructed several Expressed Sequence Tags (EST libraries, and obtained 12,551 unigenes from this species. Gene expression was compared between symbiotic and aposymbiotic ovaries through in silico analysis and in vitro subtraction (SSH. As pleiotropic functions involved in immunity and development could play a major role in the establishment of dependence, the expression of genes involved in oogenesis, programmed cell death (PCD and immunity (broad sense was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. We showed that Wolbachia might interfere with these numerous biological processes, in particular some related to oxidative stress regulation. We also showed that Wolbachia may interact with immune gene expression to ensure its persistence within the host. Conclusions This study allowed us to constitute the first major dataset of the transcriptome of A. tabida, a species that is a model system for both host/Wolbachia and host/parasitoid interactions. More specifically, our results

  18. Sprouty gene dosage influences temporal-spatial dynamics of primary enamel knot formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lochovská, Kateřina; Peterková, Renata; Pavlíková, Zuzana; Hovořáková, Mária

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, APR 22 (2015), s. 21 ISSN 1471-213X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1766; GA ČR GB14-37368G Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : enamel knot * tooth development * mouse molar * sprouty genes * sonic hedgehog * cre-loxp system * supernumerary tooth Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.096, year: 2015

  19. The Influence of SV40 polyA on Gene Expression of Baculovirus Expression Vector Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Z Salem

    Full Text Available The simian virus 40 polyadenylation signal (SV40 polyA has been routinely inserted downstream of the polyhedrin promoter in many baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS. In the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV, the polyhedrin promoter (very late promoter transcribes its gene by a viral RNA polymerase therefore there is no supporting evidence that SV40 polyA is required for the proper gene expression under the polyhedrin promoter. Moreover, the effect of the SV40 polyA sequence on the polyhedrin promoter activity has not been tested either at its natural polyhedrin locus or in other loci in the viral genome. In order to test the significance of adding the SV40 polyA sequence on gene expression, the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp was evaluated with and without the presence of SV40 polyA under the control of the polyhedrin promoter at different genomic loci (polyherin, ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt, and gp37. In this study, spectrofluorometry and western blot showed reduction of EGFP protein for all recombinant viruses with SV40 polyA, whereas qPCR showed an increase in the egfp mRNA levels. Therefore, we conclude that SV40 polyA increases mRNA levels but decreases protein production in the BEVS when the polyhedrin promoter is used at different loci. This work suggests that SV40 polyA in BEVSs should be replaced by an AcMNPV late gene polyA for optimal protein production or left untouched for optimal RNA production (RNA interference applications.

  20. The Influence of SV40 polyA on Gene Expression of Baculovirus Expression Vector Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Tamer Z.; Seaborn, Craig P.; Turney, Colin M.; Xue, Jianli; Shang, Hui; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The simian virus 40 polyadenylation signal (SV40 polyA) has been routinely inserted downstream of the polyhedrin promoter in many baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS). In the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), the polyhedrin promoter (very late promoter) transcribes its gene by a viral RNA polymerase therefore there is no supporting evidence that SV40 polyA is required for the proper gene expression under the polyhedrin promoter. Moreover, the effect of the SV40 polyA sequence on the polyhedrin promoter activity has not been tested either at its natural polyhedrin locus or in other loci in the viral genome. In order to test the significance of adding the SV40 polyA sequence on gene expression, the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) was evaluated with and without the presence of SV40 polyA under the control of the polyhedrin promoter at different genomic loci (polyherin, ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt), and gp37). In this study, spectrofluorometry and western blot showed reduction of EGFP protein for all recombinant viruses with SV40 polyA, whereas qPCR showed an increase in the egfp mRNA levels. Therefore, we conclude that SV40 polyA increases mRNA levels but decreases protein production in the BEVS when the polyhedrin promoter is used at different loci. This work suggests that SV40 polyA in BEVSs should be replaced by an AcMNPV late gene polyA for optimal protein production or left untouched for optimal RNA production (RNA interference applications). PMID:26659470

  1. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs.

  2. Different Influences of Lipofection and Electrotransfection on In Vitro Gene Delivery to Primary Cultured Cortex Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xui-Si; Huang, Jing; Zhan, Cong-Qing; Chen, Jing; Li, Tao; Kaye, Alan D; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Xiao, Lan

    2016-03-01

    Many pain states are linked to central nervous system (CNS) diseases involving the dysfunction of dendritic arborization, making restoration a promising therapeutic strategy. Transfection of primary cortex neurons offers the possibility to study mechanisms which are important for the restoration of proper arborization. Its progress is, however, limited at present due to the lack of suitable gene transfer techniques. To obtain better insight into the transfection potential of currently used techniques, 2 non-viral transfection methods, lipofection and gene electrotransfer (GET), were compared. This is a comparison study performed on cultured cells. The transfection efficiency and neuronal viability, as well as the neuronal dendritic arborization after lipofection or GET, were compared. Primary cultured cortex neurons were transfected with the pEGFP-N1 plasmid, either using Lipofectamine 2000 (2, 3, or 4µL) or with electroporation, with our previously optimized protocol (200V/25 ms). Transfection efficiency and cell viability were inversely proportional for lipofection. The appropriate ratio of Lipofectamine and plasmid DNA provides optimal conditions for lipofection. Although GET offered higher transfection efficiency, it could not induce complex dendritic arborization, which made it unsuitable for in vitro gene transfer into cortex neurons. Limitations include species variability and translational applicability for CNS diseases and pain states related to potential toxicity. Based on these findings, lipofection might be advantageous for in vitro application to primary cultured cortex neurons. Pain states, stress mediated pathogenesis, and certain CNS diseases might potentially utilize this important technique in the future as a therapeutic modality.

  3. Influence of the halothane gene (HAL) on pork quality in two commercial crossbreeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, A C P; Freitas, P F A; César, A S M; Cesar, A S M; Antunes, R C; Guimarães, E C; Batista, D F A; Torido, L C

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of the halothane (HAL) gene on the quality of pork in domestic pigs. Half-carcasses from two different commercial pig (Sus domestica) crossbreeds were analyzed, 46 of which were homozygous dominant (HAL(NN)) and 69 of which were heterozygous (HAL(Nn)) for the halothane gene. The measures included backfat thickness, lean meat percentage, carcass weight, pH 24 h after slaughtering, color, and drip loss; DNA was extracted from the haunch muscle. Swine with the HAL(Nn) genotype had less backfat thickness and higher lean meat percentages than swine with the HAL(NN) genotype. Yet, swine with the HAL(Nn) genotype had lower quality meat than those with the HAL(NN) swine. The pH at 24 h was lower in HAL(Nn) swine. The meat color was paler in HAL(Nn) animals, the drip loss was greater in those animals bearing the n allele, and the amount of intramuscular fat was not related to the halothane genotype. We conclude that bearers of the recessive allele of the halothane gene produce more meat, but with quality parameters that are inferior to those sought by consumers and industry.

  4. IDE Gene Polymorphism Influences on BPSD in Mild Dementia of Alzheimer's Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Sato

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE degrades amyloid (A, which may inhibit the accumulation of A in a brain affected with dementia of Alzheimer's type (DAT. A decrease in the activity of IDE results in changes in glucose utilization in the brain, which could affect the cognitive and psychiatric symptoms of DAT. We investigated a possible association of IDE gene polymorphism and the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD in mild DAT. The genotyping for IDE and apolipoprotein E (ApoE was determined in 207 patients with mild DAT and 215 controls. The occurrence of BPSD was demonstrated using the Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale (BEHAVE-AD. IDE gene polymorphism is unlikely to play a substantial role in conferring susceptibility to DAT, but it may be involved in the development of affective disturbance through the course of mild DAT, regardless of the presence of an ApoE 4 allele. The present data could be the result of a small sample size. Further investigations using larger samples are thus required to clarify the correlation between IDE gene polymorphism, susceptibility to DAT, and emergence of BPSD.

  5. Individual and combined influence of ACE and ACTN3 genes on muscle phenotypes in Polish athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orysiak, Joanna; Mazur-Różycka, Joanna; Busko, Krzysztof; Gajewski, Jan; Szczepanska, Beata; Malczewska-Lenczowska, Jadwiga

    2017-02-08

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between ACE and ACTN3 genes, independently or in combination, and muscle strength and power in male and female athletes. The study involved 398 young male (n=266) and female (n=132) athletes representing various sport disciplines (ice hockey, canoeing, swimming, volleyball). All were Caucasians. The following measurements were taken: height of jump and mechanical power in countermovement jump (CMJ) and spike jump (SPJ), and muscle strength of 10 muscle groups (flexors and extensors of the elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and trunk). The ID polymorphism of ACE and the R577X polymorphism of ACTN3 were typed using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism), respectively. The genotype distribution of the ACE and ACTN3 genes did not differ significantly between groups of athletes for either sex. There was no association between ACE and ACTN3 genotypes (alone or in combination) and sum of muscle strength, height of jump or mechanical power in both jump tests (CMJ and SPJ) for male and female athletes. These findings do not support an influential role of the ACE and ACTN3 genes in determining power/strength performance of elite athletes.

  6. Mosaicism for the FMR1 gene influences adaptive skills development in fragile X-affected males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, I.L.; Sudhalter, V.; Nolin, S.L. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States)

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X syndrome is one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, and the first of a new class of genetic disorders associated with expanded trinucleotide repeats. Previously, we found that about 41% of affected males are mosaic for this mutation in that some of their blood cells have an active fragile X gene and others do not. It has been hypothesized that these mosaic cases should show higher levels of functioning than those who have only the inactive full mutation gene, but previous studies have provided negative or equivocal results. In the present study, the cross-sectional development of communication, self-care, socialization, and motor skills was studied in 46 males with fragile X syndrome under age 20 years as a function of two variables: age and the presence or absence of mosaicism. The rate of adaptive skills development was 2-4 times as great in mosaic cases as in full mutation cases. There was also a trend for cases with autism to be more prevalent in the full-mutation group. These results have implications for prognosis, for the utility of gene or protein replacement therapies for this disorder, and for understanding the association between mental retardation, developmental disorders, and fragile X syndrome. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  7. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction.

  8. The transcriptional regulator gene E2 of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 influences the radiosensitivity of cervical keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindel, Katja; Rieken, Stefan; Daffinger, Sigrid; Weber, Klaus J; Villiers, Ethel-Michele de; Debus, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that HPV induced tumors constitute a specific subclass of cancer with a better response to radiation treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate meaning of viral E2-gene for radiosensitivity. W12 cells contain episomal HPV 16 genomes, whereas S12 cells, which derive from the W12 line, contain HPV DNA as integrated copies. Clonogenic survival was analyzed using 96-well in vitro test. Using flow cytometry cell cycle analyses were performed. Expression of pRb and p53 were analyzed using intracellular staining. W12 cells (intact E2 gene) showed a lower survival fraction than S12 cells. W12 cells developed a G2/M block 24 h after irradiation with 2 Gy whereas S12 showed no G2/M bloc. After irradiation S12 cells developed polyploidy and pRb-positive cells decreased. W12 cells showed no change of pRb-positive cells. Depending on E2 gene status differences in cell cycle regulation might cause radioresistance. The E2/E7/pRb pathway seems to influence HPV-induced radiosensitivity. Our experiments demonstrated an effect of HPV on radiosensitivity of cervical keratinocytes via viral transcription regulator E2 pathway

  9. Gene-environment interplay in alcoholism and other substance abuse disorders: expressions of heritability and factors influencing vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Tomas; Kostrzewa, R M; Beninger, R J; Archer, T

    2004-01-01

    Factors that confer predisposition and vulnerability for alcoholism and other substance abuse disorders may be described usefully within the gene-environment interplay framework. Thus, it is postulated that heritability provides a major contribution not only to alcohol but also to other substances of abuse. Studies of evoked potential amplitude reduction have provided a highly suitable and testable method for the assessment of both environmentally-determined and heritable characteristics pertaining to substance use and dependence. The different personal attributes that may co-exist with parental influence or exist in a shared, monozygotic relationship contribute to the final expression of addiction. In this connection, it appears that personality disorders are highly prevalent co-morbid conditions among addicted individuals, and, this co-morbidity is likely to be accounted for by multiple complex etiological relationships, not least in adolescent individuals. Co-morbidity associated with deficient executive functioning may be observed too in alcohol-related aggressiveness and crimes of violence. The successful intervention into alcohol dependence and craving brought about by baclofen in both human and animal studies elucidates glutamatergic mechanisms in alcoholism whereas the role of the dopamine transporter, in conjunction with both the noradrenergic and serotonergic transporters, are implicated in cocaine dependence and craving. The role of the cannabinoids in ontogeny through an influence upon the expression of key genes for the development of neurotransmitter systems must be considered. Finally, the particular form of behaviour/characteristic outcome due to childhood circumstance may lie with biological, gene-based determinants, for example individual characteristics of monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity levels, thereby rendering simple predictive measures both redundant and misguiding.

  10. Genes that act downstream of sensory neurons to influence longevity, dauer formation, and pathogen responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M Gaglia

    Full Text Available The sensory systems of multicellular organisms are designed to provide information about the environment and thus elicit appropriate changes in physiology and behavior. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sensory neurons affect the decision to arrest during development in a diapause state, the dauer larva, and modulate the lifespan of the animals in adulthood. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are incompletely understood. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we identified transcripts whose levels are altered by mutations in the intraflagellar transport protein daf-10, which result in impaired development and function of many sensory neurons in C. elegans. In agreement with existing genetic data, the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO was affected by daf-10 mutations. In addition, we found altered expression of transcriptional targets of the DAF-12/nuclear hormone receptor in the daf-10 mutants and showed that this pathway influences specifically the dauer formation phenotype of these animals. Unexpectedly, pathogen-responsive genes were repressed in daf-10 mutant animals, and these sensory mutants exhibited altered susceptibility to and behavioral avoidance of bacterial pathogens. Moreover, we found that a solute transporter gene mct-1/2, which was induced by daf-10 mutations, was necessary and sufficient for longevity. Thus, sensory input seems to influence an extensive transcriptional network that modulates basic biological processes in C. elegans. This situation is reminiscent of the complex regulation of physiology by the mammalian hypothalamus, which also receives innervations from sensory systems, most notably the visual and olfactory systems.

  11. Natural Variation in Synthesis and Catabolism Genes Influences Dhurrin Content in Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad M. Hayes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyanogenic glucosides are natural compounds found in more than 1000 species of angiosperms that produce HCN and are deemed undesirable for agricultural use. However, these compounds are important components of the primary defensive mechanisms of many plant species. One of the best-studied cyanogenic glucosides is dhurrin [(--hydroxymandelonitrile-β--glucopyranoside], which is produced primarily in sorghum [ (L. Moench]. The biochemical basis for dhurrin metabolism is well established; however, little information is available on its genetic control. Here, we dissect the genetic control of leaf dhurrin content through a genome-wide association study (GWAS using a panel of 700 diverse converted sorghum lines (conversion panel previously subjected to pre-breeding and selected for short stature (∼1 m in height and photoperiod insensitivity. The conversion panel was grown for 2 yr in three environments. Wide variation for leaf dhurrin content was found in the sorghum conversion panel, with the Caudatum group exhibiting the highest dhurrin content and the Guinea group showing the lowest dhurrin content. A GWAS using a mixed linear model revealed significant associations (a false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.05 close to both UGT 185B1 in the canonical biosynthetic gene cluster on chromosome 1 and close to the catabolic dhurrinase loci on chromosome 8. Dhurrin content was associated consistently with biosynthetic genes in the two N-fertilized environments, while dhurrin content was associated with catabolic loci in the environment without supplemental N. These results suggest that genes for both biosynthesis and catabolism are important in determining natural variation for leaf dhurrin in sorghum in different environments.

  12. Dietary fat composition influences tissue lipid profile and gene expression in Fischer-344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Albert L; Hintze, Korry J; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Ward, Robert E

    2012-12-01

    The AIN-76A diet causes fatty liver in rodents when fed for long periods of time. The aim of this study was to utilize fatty acid analysis and transcriptomics to investigate the effects of different fat sources in the AIN-76A diet on tissue lipid profiles and gene expression in male, weanling Fischer-344 rats. Animals were fed isocaloric diets that differed only in the fat source: (1) corn oil (CO) (2) anhydrous milk fat (AMF), and (3) AMF supplemented with 10% phospholipids from the milk fat globule membrane (AMF-MFGM). There were no differences in food intake, body weight, growth rate, or body fat composition among the groups, and the fatty acid compositions of red blood cells (RBC), plasma, muscle, and visceral adipose tissues reflected the dietary fat sources. Modifying the fat source resulted in 293 genes differentially regulated in skeletal muscle, 1,124 in adipose, and 831 in liver as determined by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Although tissue fatty acid profiles mostly reflected the diet, there were several quantitative differences in lipid classes in the liver and plasma. The AMF diet resulted in the highest level of hepatic triacylglycerols, but the lowest level in plasma. The CO diet resulted in significant accumulation of hepatic unesterified fatty acids and decreased DGAT expression and activity, a potential trigger for steatohepatitis. These results indicate that the fatty acid composition and presence of polar lipids in the AIN-76A diets have significant effects on lipid partitioning, gene expression, and potentially the development of liver pathology.

  13. Blood and Bones: The Influence of the Mass Media on Australian Primary School Children's Understandings of Genes and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jenny; Venville, Grady

    2014-02-01

    Previous research showed that primary school children held several misconceptions about genetics of concern for their future lives. Included were beliefs that genes and DNA are separate substances, with genes causing family resemblance and DNA identifying suspects at crime scenes. Responses to this work `blamed' the mass media for these misunderstandings. This study aimed to determine whether that blame had any foundation by examining the media habits and conceptions about genes and DNA of Australian children. With little prior research considering the influence of entertainment mass media on children's academically relevant knowledge, this was an exploratory study with a mixed modes design. Data were collected by detailed media questionnaires and face-to-face interviews with 62 children aged 10-12 years, and subjected to content and thematic analysis. Specific mass media examples children reported using were examined for genetics content. Results indicate 5 h/day of media use, mostly television including crime shows, and that children perceived television to be their main source of information about genetics. Most children (89 %) knew DNA, 60 % knew genes, and more was known about uses of DNA outside the body such as crime solving or resolving family relationships than about its biological nature and function. Half believed DNA is only in blood and body parts used for forensics. These concepts paralleled the themes emerging from the media examples. The results indicate that the mass media is a pervasive teacher of children, and that fundamental concepts could be introduced earlier in schools to establish scientific concepts before misconceptions arise.

  14. Influence of IL-1 gene polymorphism on the periodontal microbiota of HIV-infected Brazilian individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Lucio de Souza; Ferreira, Sônia Maria Soares; Souza, Celso Oliveira; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the association of IL-1A (+4845) and IL-1B (+3954) gene polymorphism with the subgingival microbiota and periodontal status of HIV-infected Brazilian individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). One hundred and five subjects were included in the study, distributed into 2 HIV groups [29 chronic periodontitis (CP+) and 30 periodontally healthy (H+)]; and 2 non-HIV groups (29 CP- and 17 H- patients). IL-1A and B were genotyped by PCR and restriction enzyme...

  15. Ghrelin Gene Variants Influence on Metabolic Syndrome Components in Aged Spanish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Mireia; Adam, Victoria; Palomera, Elisabet; Blesa, Sebastian; Díaz, Gonzalo; Buquet, Xavier; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Martín-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Palanca, Ana; Chaves, Javier Felipe; Puig-Domingo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The role of genetic variations within the ghrelin gene on cardiometabolic profile and nutritional status is still not clear in humans, particularly in elderly people. We investigated six SNPs of the ghrelin gene and their relationship with metabolic syndrome (MS) components. 824 subjects (413 men/411 women, age 77.31±5.04) participating in the Mataró aging study (n = 310) and the Hortega study (n = 514) were analyzed. Anthropometric variables, ghrelin, lipids, glucose and blood pressure levels were measured, and distribution of SNPs -994CT (rs26312), -604GA (rs27647), -501AC (rs26802), R51Q (rs34911341), M72L (rs696217) and L90G (rs4684677) of the ghrelin gene evaluated. Genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR and SNaPshot minisequencing. MS (IDF criteria) was found in 54.9%. No association between any of the SNPs and levels of total fasting circulating ghrelin levels was found. C/A-A/A genotype of M72L was associated with increased risk of central obesity according to IDF criteria, while G/A-G/G genotypes of -604GA with reduced risk. A/A genotype of -501AC polymorphism was associated to decreased BMI. In relation to lipid profile, the same genotypes of -604GA were associated with increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and -501AC with reduced triglycerides. There were no associations with systolic or diastolic blood pressure levels or with hypertension, glucose levels or diabetes and ghrelin polymorphisms. However, G/G genotype of -604GA was associated with glucose >100 mg/dL. Haplotype analysis showed that only one haplotype is associated with increased risk of waist circumference and central obesity. The analysis of subjects by gender showed an important and different association of these polymorphisms regarding MS parameters. Ghrelin gene variants -604GA, -501AC and M72L are associated with certain components of MS, in particular to BMI and lipid profile in elderly Spanish subjects.

  16. Ghrelin Gene Variants Influence on Metabolic Syndrome Components in Aged Spanish Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Mora

    Full Text Available The role of genetic variations within the ghrelin gene on cardiometabolic profile and nutritional status is still not clear in humans, particularly in elderly people.We investigated six SNPs of the ghrelin gene and their relationship with metabolic syndrome (MS components.824 subjects (413 men/411 women, age 77.31±5.04 participating in the Mataró aging study (n = 310 and the Hortega study (n = 514 were analyzed. Anthropometric variables, ghrelin, lipids, glucose and blood pressure levels were measured, and distribution of SNPs -994CT (rs26312, -604GA (rs27647, -501AC (rs26802, R51Q (rs34911341, M72L (rs696217 and L90G (rs4684677 of the ghrelin gene evaluated. Genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR and SNaPshot minisequencing. MS (IDF criteria was found in 54.9%.No association between any of the SNPs and levels of total fasting circulating ghrelin levels was found. C/A-A/A genotype of M72L was associated with increased risk of central obesity according to IDF criteria, while G/A-G/G genotypes of -604GA with reduced risk. A/A genotype of -501AC polymorphism was associated to decreased BMI. In relation to lipid profile, the same genotypes of -604GA were associated with increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and -501AC with reduced triglycerides. There were no associations with systolic or diastolic blood pressure levels or with hypertension, glucose levels or diabetes and ghrelin polymorphisms. However, G/G genotype of -604GA was associated with glucose >100 mg/dL. Haplotype analysis showed that only one haplotype is associated with increased risk of waist circumference and central obesity. The analysis of subjects by gender showed an important and different association of these polymorphisms regarding MS parameters.Ghrelin gene variants -604GA, -501AC and M72L are associated with certain components of MS, in particular to BMI and lipid profile in elderly Spanish subjects.

  17. Lipoplex morphologies and their influences on transfection efficiency in gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baichao; Zhang, Shubiao; Jiang, Huiming; Zhao, Budiao; Lv, Hongtao

    2007-11-20

    Cationic lipid-mediated gene transfer is widely used for their advantages over viral gene transfer because it is non-immunogenic, easy to produce and not oncogenic. The main drawback of the application of cationic lipids is their low transfection efficiency. Many reports about transfection efficiency of cationic lipids have been published in recent years. In this review, the current status and prospects for transfection efficiency of different morphologies of lipoplexes are discussed. High transfection activity will be acquired for H(C)(II) structure when membrane fusion is dominant, but when serum is present L(C)(alpha) lipoplexes show great superiority for their inhibition dissociation by serum during lipoplexes transporting. Increasing DOPE often gains high activity for the H(C)(II) structure promoted by DOPE. High lipofection will be gained from large lipoplexes when endocytosis is dominant, because large particles facilitate membrane contact and fusion. We suggest morphologies of lipoplex should be characterized at two levels, lipoplex size and self-assemble structures of lipoplexes, and understanding these would be very important for scientists to prepare novel cationic lipids and design novel formulations with high transfection efficiency.

  18. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Influence T1D Susceptibility among Pakistanis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mukhtar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The vitamin D receptor (VDR gene regulates insulin secretion from the pancreas and acts as a mediator of the immune response through vitamin D. Polymorphism in VDR causes alterations in the functioning of vitamin D, leading to type 1 diabetes (T1D predisposition. The aim of the present study was to determine VDR gene polymorphism in association with T1D in Pakistanis. Methods. The association was evaluated by selecting rs2228570 (FokΙ, rs7975232 (ApaΙ, and rs731236 (TaqΙ polymorphic sites in 102 patients and 100 controls. Genotypes were identified by DNA sequencing and PCR-RFLP. Results. The allelic and genotypic frequencies of FokΙ and ApaI were significantly associated with T1D (p0.05. CCGC, CCGG, CCTC, and CCTG haplotypes were significantly associated with disease development (p<0.05. However, CTGG haplotype was protective towards T1D (p<0.01. Conclusion. VDR polymorphisms were identified as susceptible regions for T1D development in the Pakistani population.

  19. The Influence of BMX Gene Polymorphisms on Clinical Symptoms after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is one of the most common neurological disorders. Most patients diagnosed with mTBI could fully recover, but 15% of patients suffer from persistent symptoms. In recent studies, genetic factors were found to be associated with recovery and clinical outcomes after TBI. In addition, results from our previous research have demonstrated that the bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X (BMX, a member of the Tec family of kinases, is highly expressed in rats with TBI. Therefore, our aim in this study was to identify the association between genetic polymorphisms of BMX and clinical symptoms following mTBI. Four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs of BMX with minimum allele frequency (MAF >1% were selected from the HapMap Han Chinese database. Among these polymorphisms, rs16979956 was found to be associated with the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI scores within the first week after head injury. Additionally, another SNP, rs35697037, showed a significant correlation with dizziness symptoms. These findings suggested that polymorphisms of the BMX gene could be a potential predictor of clinical symptoms following mTBI.

  20. Burden of rare variants in ALS genes influences survival in familial and sporadic ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shirley Yin-Yu; Hsu, Jacob Shujui; Teo, Kay-Cheong; Li, Yan; Kung, Michelle H W; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Chan, Danny; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Li, Miaoxin; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2017-10-01

    Genetic variants are implicated in the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but it is unclear whether the burden of rare variants in ALS genes has an effect on survival. We performed whole genome sequencing on 8 familial ALS (FALS) patients with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation and whole exome sequencing on 46 sporadic ALS (SALS) patients living in Hong Kong and found that 67% had at least 1 rare variant in the exons of 40 ALS genes; 22% had 2 or more. Patients with 2 or more rare variants had lower probability of survival than patients with 0 or 1 variant (p = 0.001). After adjusting for other factors, each additional rare variant increased the risk of respiratory failure or death by 60% (p = 0.0098). The presence of the rare variant was associated with the risk of ALS (Odds ratio 1.91, 95% confidence interval 1.03-3.61, p = 0.03), and ALS patients had higher rare variant burden than controls (MB, p = 0.004). Our findings support an oligogenic basis with the burden of rare variants affecting the development and survival of ALS. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The potato-specific apyrase is apoplastically localized and has influence on gene expression, growth, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riewe, David; Grosman, Lukasz; Fernie, Alisdair R; Wucke, Cornelia; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Apyrases hydrolyze nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates and are found in all eukaryotes and a few prokaryotes. Although their enzymatic properties have been well characterized, relatively little is known regarding their subcellular localization and physiological function in plants. In this study, we used reverse genetic and biochemical approaches to investigate the role of potato (Solanum tuberosum)-specific apyrase. Silencing of the apyrase gene family with RNA interference constructs under the control of the constitutive 35S promoter led to a strong decrease in apyrase activity to below 10% of the wild-type level. This decreased activity led to phenotypic changes in the transgenic lines, including a general retardation in growth, an increase in tuber number per plant, and differences in tuber morphology. Silencing of apyrase under the control of a tuber-specific promoter led to similar changes in tuber morphology; however, there were no direct effects of apyrase inhibition on tuber metabolism. DNA microarrays revealed that decreased expression of apyrase leads to increased levels of transcripts coding for cell wall proteins involved in growth and genes involved in energy transfer and starch synthesis. To place these results in context, we determined the subcellular localization of the potato-specific apyrase. Using a combination of approaches, we were able to demonstrate that this enzyme is localized to the apoplast. We describe the evidence that underlies both this fact and that potato-specific apyrase has a crucial role in regulating growth and development.

  2. Mycorrhizal fungi influence on silver uptake and membrane protein gene expression following silver nanoparticle exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noori, Azam [State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry (United States); White, Jason C. [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (United States); Newman, Lee A., E-mail: lanewman@esf.edu [State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry (United States)

    2017-02-15

    The rapid growth of nanotechnology and the high demand for nanomaterial use have greatly increased the risk of particle release into the environment. Understanding nanomaterial interactions with crop species and their associated microorganisms is critical to food safety and security. In the current study, tomato was inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi and subsequently exposed to 12, 24, or 36 mg/kg of 2- or 15-nm silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Mycorrhizal (M) and non-mycorrhizal (NM) tomatoes exposed to 36 mg/kg of 2-nm Ag-NPs accumulated 1300 and 1600 μg/g silver in their tissues, respectively. Mycorrhizal plants accumulated 14% less silver compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. To begin to understand the mechanisms by which plants accumulate NPs, the expression of two aquaporin channel genes, the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) and the tonoplast membrane intrinsic protein (TIP), and one potassium channel (KC) gene were studied. In non-mycorrhizal plants, the expression of KC, PIP, and TIP was eight, five, and nine times higher than the control, respectively. These expressions for mycorrhizal plants were 5.8, 3.5, and 2 times higher than controls, respectively. The expression of KC and PIP, which are located on the plasma membrane, was 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, times higher than TIP, which is located on the tonoplast. PIP expression was significantly higher in NM tomatoes exposed to 12 mg/kg of 2-nm Ag-NPs compared to M plants. These results show that mycorrhizal colonization decreases Ag accumulation in NP-exposed plants and also moderates changes in expression level of membrane transport proteins.

  3. Mycorrhizal fungi influence on silver uptake and membrane protein gene expression following silver nanoparticle exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noori, Azam; White, Jason C.; Newman, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid growth of nanotechnology and the high demand for nanomaterial use have greatly increased the risk of particle release into the environment. Understanding nanomaterial interactions with crop species and their associated microorganisms is critical to food safety and security. In the current study, tomato was inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi and subsequently exposed to 12, 24, or 36 mg/kg of 2- or 15-nm silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Mycorrhizal (M) and non-mycorrhizal (NM) tomatoes exposed to 36 mg/kg of 2-nm Ag-NPs accumulated 1300 and 1600 μg/g silver in their tissues, respectively. Mycorrhizal plants accumulated 14% less silver compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. To begin to understand the mechanisms by which plants accumulate NPs, the expression of two aquaporin channel genes, the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) and the tonoplast membrane intrinsic protein (TIP), and one potassium channel (KC) gene were studied. In non-mycorrhizal plants, the expression of KC, PIP, and TIP was eight, five, and nine times higher than the control, respectively. These expressions for mycorrhizal plants were 5.8, 3.5, and 2 times higher than controls, respectively. The expression of KC and PIP, which are located on the plasma membrane, was 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, times higher than TIP, which is located on the tonoplast. PIP expression was significantly higher in NM tomatoes exposed to 12 mg/kg of 2-nm Ag-NPs compared to M plants. These results show that mycorrhizal colonization decreases Ag accumulation in NP-exposed plants and also moderates changes in expression level of membrane transport proteins.

  4. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  5. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, G. Pasquinucci Hospital, Via Aurelia Sud, Massa (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  6. Oxytocin gene polymorphisms influence human dopaminergic function in a sex-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Tiffany M; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Peciña, Marta; Mickey, Brian; Koeppe, Robert A; Stohler, Christian S; Goldman, David; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2012-08-01

    Oxytocin, classically involved in social and reproductive activities, is increasingly recognized as an antinociceptive and anxiolytic agent, effects which may be mediated via oxytocin's interactions with the dopamine system. Thus, genetic variation within the oxytocin gene (OXT) is likely to explain variability in dopamine-related stress responses. As such, we examined how OXT variation is associated with stress-induced dopaminergic neurotransmission in a healthy human sample. Fifty-five young healthy volunteers were scanned using [¹¹C]raclopride positron emission tomography while they underwent a standardized physical and emotional stressor that consisted of moderate levels of experimental sustained deep muscle pain, and a baseline, control state. Four haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms located in regions near OXT were genotyped. Measures of pain, affect, anxiety, well-being and interpersonal attachment were also assessed. Female rs4813625 C allele carriers demonstrated greater stress-induced dopamine release, measured as reductions in receptor availability from baseline to the pain-stress condition relative to female GG homozygotes. No significant differences were detected among males. We also observed that female rs4813625 C allele carriers exhibited higher attachment anxiety, higher trait anxiety and lower emotional well-being scores. In addition, greater stress-induced dopamine release was associated with lower emotional well-being scores in female rs4813625 C allele carriers. Our results suggest that variability within the oxytocin gene appear to explain interindividual differences in dopaminergic responses to stress, which are shown to be associated with anxiety traits, including those linked to attachment style, as well as emotional well-being in women. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Oestrogen influences on mitochondrial gene expression and respiratory chain activity in cortical and mesencephalic astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, G W; Beyer, C; Arnold, S

    2008-07-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism plays an essential role in the central nervous system (CNS). Abnormalities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain often accompany neurodegenerative diseases. This makes mitochondria a perfect target for strategies of cellular protection against toxic compounds and pathological conditions. Steroid hormones, such as oestrogen, are well-known to fulfil a protective role in the brain during ischaemic and degenerative processes. Because astrocytes function as the major energy supplier in the CNS, we have analysed oestrogen effects on the mitochondrial respiratory chain of this cell type. In our studies, we applied semi- and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression and polarographic measurements of the respiratory chain activity of mitochondria. We observed that structural and functional properties were regulated dependent on the oestrogen exposure time and the brain region, but independent of the nuclear oestrogen receptors. We could demonstrate that long-term oestrogen exposure increases the subunit gene expression of respiratory chain complexes and the mitochondrial DNA content, thereby indicating an up-regulation of the amount of mitochondria per cell together with an increase of mitochondrial energy production. This could represent an important indirect mechanism by which long-term oestrogen exposure protects neurones from cell death under neurotoxic conditions. On the other hand, we observed short-term effects of oestrogen on the activity of mitochondrial, proton-pumping respiratory chain complexes. In astrocytes from the cortex, respiratory chain activity was decreased, whereas it was increased in astrocytes from the mesencephalon. An increased production of reactive oxygen species would be the consequence of an increased respiratory chain activity in mesencephalic astrocytes. This could explain the different efficiencies of oestrogen-mediated short-term protection in distinct brain

  8. Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Santhi K; Tragante, Vinicius; Guo, Wei; Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B; Smith, Erin N; Johnson, Toby; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E; Franceschini, Nora; Gaunt, Tom R; Gho, Johannes M I H; Gieger, Christian; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E; Mateo Leach, Irene; McDonough, Caitrin W; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Mellander, Olle; Molony, Cliona M; Nolte, Ilja M; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Price, Tom S; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Most, Peter J; Van Iperen, Erik P A; Van Setten, Jessica; Van Setten, Jessic A; Vonk, Judith M; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L; Berenson, Gerald S; Bhatt, Deepak L; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Burkley, Ben; Burt, Amber; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Wei; Cooper-Dehoff, Rhonda M; Curtis, Sean P; Dreisbach, Albert; Duggan, David; Ehret, Georg B; Fabsitz, Richard R; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Ervin; Furlong, Clement E; Gansevoort, Ron T; Hofker, Marten H; Hovingh, G Kees; Kirkland, Susan A; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kutlar, Abdullah; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Langaee, Taimour Y; Li, Yun R; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Kiang; Maiwald, Steffi; Malik, Rainer; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W; Pepine, Carl J; Pettinger, Mary; Polak, Joseph F; Ramachandran, Vasan S; Ranchalis, Jane; Redline, Susan; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Scharnag, Hubert; Schork, Nicholas J; Shimbo, Daichi; Shuldiner, Alan R; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Stolk, Ronald P; Taylor, Herman A; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Verschuren, W Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J Hunter; Boehm, Bernhard O; Caulfield, Mark J; Chasman, Daniel I; Davidson, Karina W; Doevendans, Pieter A; Fitzgerald, Garret A; Gums, John G; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hillege, Hans L; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Kastelein, John J P; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Mitchell, Braxton D; Murray, Sarah S; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Reiner, Alex P; Schadt, Eric E; Silverstein, Roy L; Snieder, Harold; Stanton, Alice V; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Samani, Nilesh J; Johnson, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; de Bakker, Paul I W; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J; Asselbergs, Folkert W

    2013-04-15

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ∼50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ∼2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10(-6)). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally...

  10. Strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    After a brief discussion of beam-excited Langmuir turbulence in the solar wind, we explain the criteria for wave-particle, three-wave and strong turbulence interactions. We then present the results of a numerical integration of the Zakharov equations, which describe the strong turbulence saturation of a weak (low-density) high energy, bump-on-tail beam instability. (author)

  11. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise...... to lower muscle glycogen content in one leg and then, the following day, completed 2.5 h low intensity two-legged cycling exercise. Nuclei and mRNA were isolated from biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the control and reduced glycogen (pre-exercise glycogen = 609 +/- 47 and 337 +/- 33...... mmol kg(-1) dry weight, respectively) legs before and after 0, 2 and 5 h of recovery. Exercise induced a significant (P glycogen leg only. Although PDK4...

  12. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viguerie, Nathalie; Montastier, Emilie; Maoret, Jean-José

    2012-01-01

    weight maintenance diets. For 175 genes, opposite regulation was observed during calorie restriction and weight maintenance phases, independently of variations in body weight. Metabolism and immunity genes showed inverse profiles. During the dietary intervention, network-based analyses revealed strong...... interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index...... on expression of a subset of genes persisted during the dietary intervention. Twenty-two genes revealed a metabolic syndrome signature common to men and women. Genetic control of AT gene expression by cis signals was observed for 46 genes. Dietary intervention, sex, and cis genetic variants independently...

  13. Rethinking the influence of hydroelectric development on gene flow in a long-lived fish, the Lake Sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A McDougall

    Full Text Available Many hydroelectric dams have been in place for 50 - >100 years, which for most fish species means that enough generations have passed for fragmentation induced divergence to have accumulated. However, for long-lived species such as Lake Sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, it should be possible to discriminate between historical population structuring and contemporary gene flow and improve the broader understanding of anthropogenic influence. On the Winnipeg River, Manitoba, two hypotheses were tested: 1 Measureable quantities of former reservoir dwelling Lake Sturgeon now reside downstream of the Slave Falls Generating Station, and 2 genetically differentiated populations of Lake Sturgeon occur upstream and downstream, a result of historical structuring. Genetic methods based on ten microsatellite markers were employed, and simulations were conducted to provide context. With regards to contemporary upstream to downstream contributions, the inclusion of length-at-age data proved informative. Both pairwise relatedness and Bayesian clustering analysis substantiated that fast-growing outliers, apparently entrained after residing in the upstream reservoir for several years, accounted for ~15% of the Lake Sturgeon 525-750 mm fork length captured downstream. With regards to historical structuring, upstream and downstream populations were found to be differentiated (FST = 0.011, and 0.013-0.014 when fast-growing outliers were excluded, and heterozygosity metrics were higher for downstream versus upstream juveniles. Historical asymmetric (downstream gene flow in the vicinity of the generating station was the most logical explanation for the observed genetic structuring. In this section of the Winnipeg River, construction of a major dam does not appear to have fragmented a previously panmictic Lake Sturgeon population, but alterations to habitat may be influencing upstream to downstream contributions in unexpected ways.

  14. High-resolution linkage analyses to identify genes that influence Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruda, Jennifer M; Harris, Jeffrey W; Bourgeois, Lanie; Danka, Robert G; Hunt, Greg J

    2012-01-01

    Varroa mites (V. destructor) are a major threat to honey bees (Apis melilfera) and beekeeping worldwide and likely lead to colony decline if colonies are not treated. Most treatments involve chemical control of the mites; however, Varroa has evolved resistance to many of these miticides, leaving beekeepers with a limited number of alternatives. A non-chemical control method is highly desirable for numerous reasons including lack of chemical residues and decreased likelihood of resistance. Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior is one of two behaviors identified that are most important for controlling the growth of Varroa populations in bee hives. To identify genes influencing this trait, a study was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Individual workers of a backcross family were observed and evaluated for their VSH behavior in a mite-infested observation hive. Bees that uncapped or removed pupae were identified. The genotypes for 1,340 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms were used to construct a high-resolution genetic map and interval mapping was used to analyze the association of the genotypes with the performance of Varroa sensitive hygiene. We identified one major QTL on chromosome 9 (LOD score = 3.21) and a suggestive QTL on chromosome 1 (LOD = 1.95). The QTL confidence interval on chromosome 9 contains the gene 'no receptor potential A' and a dopamine receptor. 'No receptor potential A' is involved in vision and olfaction in Drosophila, and dopamine signaling has been previously shown to be required for aversive olfactory learning in honey bees, which is probably necessary for identifying mites within brood cells. Further studies on these candidate genes may allow for breeding bees with this trait using marker-assisted selection.

  15. High-resolution linkage analyses to identify genes that influence Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior in honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Tsuruda

    Full Text Available Varroa mites (V. destructor are a major threat to honey bees (Apis melilfera and beekeeping worldwide and likely lead to colony decline if colonies are not treated. Most treatments involve chemical control of the mites; however, Varroa has evolved resistance to many of these miticides, leaving beekeepers with a limited number of alternatives. A non-chemical control method is highly desirable for numerous reasons including lack of chemical residues and decreased likelihood of resistance. Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior is one of two behaviors identified that are most important for controlling the growth of Varroa populations in bee hives. To identify genes influencing this trait, a study was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTL. Individual workers of a backcross family were observed and evaluated for their VSH behavior in a mite-infested observation hive. Bees that uncapped or removed pupae were identified. The genotypes for 1,340 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms were used to construct a high-resolution genetic map and interval mapping was used to analyze the association of the genotypes with the performance of Varroa sensitive hygiene. We identified one major QTL on chromosome 9 (LOD score = 3.21 and a suggestive QTL on chromosome 1 (LOD = 1.95. The QTL confidence interval on chromosome 9 contains the gene 'no receptor potential A' and a dopamine receptor. 'No receptor potential A' is involved in vision and olfaction in Drosophila, and dopamine signaling has been previously shown to be required for aversive olfactory learning in honey bees, which is probably necessary for identifying mites within brood cells. Further studies on these candidate genes may allow for breeding bees with this trait using marker-assisted selection.

  16. Influence of X-ray on the P53 gene in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Wenwei; Cai Ting

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the reliability and safety of varying X-ray dosage. Methods: peripheral lymphocytes of five healthy volunteers were processed by varying X-rays, then detect the P53 gene mutation in 5-9 exons by PCR-SSCP silver staining, investigate the 249 th codon's mutation by PCR-RFLP, through immunohistochemistry staining monitor the abnormal expression of P53 and screen the apoptosis employing the Bio-dUTP terminal labelling technology included by DNA terminal transferase. Results: The frequency of apoptosis represents transparent dose-dependent manner with X-ray. When exposed to X-ray > 50 cGy after 48 h, the apoptosis group has evident difference compared with the control (P 0.05). After treating peripheral lymphocytes with 5-200 cGy X-ray and culturing 96 h, utilizing PCR-SSCP to determine the mutation in 5-9 exons, there was no single strand DNA abnormal migration. PCR-RFLP result indicates no mutation in the hotspot site-249 codon, and there was no obviously abnormal expression of P53 in immunohistochemistry staining. Conclusions: The apoptosis of peripheral lymphocytes is sensitive to the X-ray, and this can be a guideline or model reflecting the body state when exposing to the radiation

  17. The influence of metabolic gene polymorphisms on urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentration in Thai bus drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchpoung, Krittaya; Kaojarern, Sming; Yoovathaworn, Krongtong; Sura, Thanyachai; Sirivarasai, Jintana

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are associated with an increased cancer risk. CYP1A1 and GSTs enzymes are important in metabolism of PAHs. Genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes are responsible for enzyme activity and concentration variation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate association of 1-OHP concentration with genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1 and GSTs in Thai bus drivers. The results showed that 1-OHP levels in bus drivers were significantly higher than that in the control group. Significant difference in 1-OHP was found between smokers and non-smokers, in only bus drivers. Significantly increasing of 1-OHP levels were observed in bus drivers with CYP1A1 MspI and exon 7 variants. Whereas, bus drivers with GSTP1 Val and GSTM1 null genotypes showed decreasing in excretion of 1-OHP. No association between 1-OHP and polymorphisms of GSTT1 was found. This study indicated that 1-OHP concentrations were associated with exposure to air pollution, cigarette smoking and polymorphisms of CYP1A1, GSTM1 and GSTP1 genes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Seasonal influence on gene expression of monoterpene synthases in Salvia officinalis (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grausgruber-Gröger, Sabine; Schmiderer, Corinna; Steinborn, Ralf; Novak, Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Garden sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is one of the most important medicinal and aromatic plants and possesses antioxidant, antimicrobial, spasmolytic, astringent, antihidrotic and specific sensorial properties. The essential oil of the plant, formed mainly in very young leaves, is in part responsible for these activities. It is mainly composed of the monoterpenes 1,8-cineole, α- and β-thujone and camphor synthesized by the 1,8-cineole synthase, the (+)-sabinene synthase and the (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, respectively, and is produced and stored in epidermal glands. In this study, the seasonal influence on the formation of the main monoterpenes in young, still expanding leaves of field-grown sage plants was studied in two cultivars at the level of mRNA expression, analyzed by qRT-PCR, and at the level of end-products, analyzed by gas chromatography. All monoterpene synthases and monoterpenes were significantly influenced by cultivar and season. 1,8-Cineole synthase and its end product 1,8-cineole remained constant until August and then decreased slightly. The thujones increased steadily during the vegetative period. The transcript level of their corresponding terpene synthase, however, showed its maximum in the middle of the vegetative period and declined afterwards. Camphor remained constant until August and then declined, exactly correlated with the mRNA level of the corresponding terpene synthase. In summary, terpene synthase mRNA expression and respective end product levels were concordant in the case of 1,8-cineole (r=0.51 and 0.67 for the two cultivars, respectively; p<0.05) and camphor (r=0.75 and 0.82; p<0.05) indicating basically transcriptional control, but discordant for α-/β-thujone (r=-0.05 and 0.42; p=0.87 and 0.13, respectively). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Strong intrinsic motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Dessi, Roberta; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    A large literature in psychology, and more recently in economics, has argued that monetary rewards can reduce intrinsic motivation. We investigate whether the negative impact persists when intrinsic motivation is strong, and test this hypothesis experimentally focusing on the motivation to undertake interesting and challenging tasks, informative about individual ability. We find that this type of task can generate strong intrinsic motivation, that is impervious to the effect of monetary incen...

  20. Bitcoin Meets Strong Consistency

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Christian; Seidel, Jochen; Wattenhofer, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The Bitcoin system only provides eventual consistency. For everyday life, the time to confirm a Bitcoin transaction is prohibitively slow. In this paper we propose a new system, built on the Bitcoin blockchain, which enables strong consistency. Our system, PeerCensus, acts as a certification authority, manages peer identities in a peer-to-peer network, and ultimately enhances Bitcoin and similar systems with strong consistency. Our extensive analysis shows that PeerCensus is in a secure state...

  1. Strong gravity and supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Salam, A.; Strathdee, J.

    1977-11-01

    A supersymmetric theory is constructed for a strong f plus a weak g graviton, together with their accompanying massive gravitinos, by gaugin the gradel 0Sp(2,2,1)x 0Sp(2,2,1) structure. The mixing term between f and g fields, which makes the strong graviton massive, can be introduced through a spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism implemented in this note by constructing a non-linear realization of the symmetry group

  2. Influence of cationic lipid concentration on properties of lipid–polymer hybrid nanospheres for gene delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose RJC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rajendran JC Bose,1,2 Yoshie Arai,1 Jong Chan Ahn,1 Hansoo Park,2 Soo-Hong Lee11Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seongnam, 2Department of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Nanoparticles have been widely used for nonviral gene delivery. Recently, cationic hybrid nanoparticles consisting of two different materials were suggested as a promising delivery vehicle. In this study, nanospheres with a poly(D,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA core and cationic lipid shell were prepared, and the effect of cationic lipid concentrations on the properties of lipid polymer hybrid nanocarriers investigated. Lipid–polymer hybrid nanospheres (LPHNSs were fabricated by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method using different concentrations of cationic lipids and characterized for size, surface charge, stability, plasmid DNA-binding capacity, cytotoxicity, and transfection efficiency. All LPHNSs had narrow size distribution with positive surface charges (ζ-potential 52–60 mV, and showed excellent plasmid DNA-binding capacity. In vitro cytotoxicity measurements with HEK293T, HeLa, HaCaT, and HepG2 cells also showed that LPHNSs exhibited less cytotoxicity than conventional transfection agents, such as Lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine–PLGA. As cationic lipid concentrations increased, the particle size of LPHNSs decreased while their ζ-potential increased. In addition, the in vitro transfection efficiency of LPHNSs increased as lipid concentration increased. Keywords: core–shell hybrid nanospheres, lipid concentration, surface modification, low cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency

  3. Occurrence and removal of antibiotics and the corresponding resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants: effluents' influence to downstream water environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Cheng, Weixiao; Xu, Like; Jiao, Yanan; Baig, Shams Ali; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the occurrence of 8 antibiotics [3 tetracyclines (TCs), 4 sulfonamides, and 1 trimethoprim (TMP)], 12 antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (10 tet, 2 sul), 4 types of bacteria [no antibiotics, anti-TC, anti-sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and anti-double], and intI1 in two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were assessed and their influences in downstream lake were investigated. Both WWTPs' effluent demonstrated some similarities, but the abundance and removal rate varied significantly. Results revealed that biological treatment mainly removed antibiotics and ARGs, whereas physical techniques were found to eliminate antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARBs) abundance (about 1 log for each one). UV disinfection did not significantly enhance the removal efficiency, and the release of the abundantly available target contaminants from the excess sludge may pose threats to human and the environment. Different antibiotics showed diverse influences on the downstream lake, and the concentrations of sulfamethazine (SM2) and SMX were observed to increase enormously. The total ARG abundance ascended about 0.1 log and some ARGs (e.g., tetC, intI1, tetA) increased due to the high input of the effluent. In addition, the abundance of ARB variation in the lake also changed, but the abundance of four types of bacteria remained stable in the downstream sampling sites.

  4. Sex determines the influence of smoking and gene polymorphism on glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Tine Halsen; Sigsgaard, Torben; Andersen, Helle Raun

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) is one of the major oxidative enzymes. Our aim was to characterize factors influencing its activity and to determine whether or not the activity is associated with asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Serum selenium concentration was measured, GPX1 polymorphisms...... %) had doctor-diagnosed asthma. RESULTS: The average serum selenium concentration was too low for optimal enzyme activity (mean (SE), 83.4 (0.76) ng/mL). GPX1 activity in men was lower than in women, 52.6 (0.66) and 56.4 (0.59) U/g protein, respectively (p... associated with serum selenium concentration (p = 0.005) and negatively associated with both active smoking (p = 0.009) and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (p = 0.02). In women, activity was associated with genotypes with 59.2 (1.4), 56.0 (1.4) and 54.2 (1.4) U/g protein in the homozygote wild...

  5. Sleep homeostatic pressure and PER3 VNTR gene polymorphism influence antidepressant response to sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaspezia, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Lorenzi, Cristina; Pirovano, Adele; Colombo, Cristina; Benedetti, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Combined Total sleep deprivation (TSD) and light therapy (LT) cause a rapid improvement in bipolar depression which has been hypothesized to be paralleled by changes in sleep homeostasis. Recent studies showed that bipolar patients had lower changes of EEG theta power after sleep and responders to antidepressant TSD+LT slept less and showed a lower increase of EEG theta power then non-responders. A polymorphism in PER3 gene has been associated with diurnal preference, sleep structure and homeostatic response to sleep deprivation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the individual variability in the homeostatic response to TSD could be a correlate of antidepressant response and be influenced by genetic factors. We administered three TSD+LT cycles to bipolar depressed patients. Severity of depression was rated on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Actigraphic recordings were performed in a group of patients. PER3 polymorphism influenced changes in total sleep time (F=2.24; p=0.024): while PER3(4/4) and PER3(4/5) patients showed a reduction in it after treatment, PER3(5/5) subjects showed an increase of about 40min, suggesting a higher homeostatic pressure. The same polymorphism influenced the change of depressive symptomatology during treatment (F=3.72; p=0.028). Sleep information was recorded till the day after the end of treatment: a longer period of observation could give more information about the possible maintenance of allostatic adaptation. A higher sleep homeostatic pressure reduced the antidepressant response to TSD+LT, while an allostatic adaptation to sleep loss was associated with better response. This process seems to be under genetic control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms influence susceptibility to esophageal cancer in Japanese alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, A; Muramatsu, T; Omori, T; Matsushita, S; Yoshimizu, H; Higuchi, S; Yokoyama, T; Maruyama, K; Ishii, H

    1999-11-01

    screening procedure for the highest risk gene combination (ADH2*1/2*1 and ALDH2*1/2*2) will require further investigation.

  7. OAS1: a multiple sclerosis susceptibility gene that influences disease severity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 interferons upregulate oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1). A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in exon 7 of OAS1 results in differential RNAseL enzyme activity, the A allele coding for a truncated form with low activity and the G conferring high activity. We hypothesized that OAS1 genotypes would influence both susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) and disease activity with the AA genotype being overrepresented and the GG genotype underrepresented in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) with increased disease activity. METHODS: We examined OAS1 genotype distribution in 401 patients with MS, 394 healthy controls, and 178 patients with RRMS receiving interferon-beta (IFNbeta) assessed as 1) having no or minimal disease activity on IFNbeta, 2) having disease activity despite IFNbeta, and 3) 65 patients with RRMS with highly active disease. RESULTS: The OAS1 genotype distribution differed between patients with MS and controls (p = 0.000003), with lower frequency of GG homozygotes in patients with MS (6%) compared with controls (17%). In relation to disease severity, 34 (32%) patients with no or minimal disease activity on IFNbeta had the AA and 8 (8%) the GG genotype; of patients with disease activity despite IFNbeta, 27 (51%) were AA, while only 1 (2%) was GG (p = 0.03). Median time to first relapse on IFNbeta was 24 months in patients with RRMS with AA genotype and 33 months with AG or GG genotype (p = 0.04). The GG genotype was absent in 65 patients with highly active RRMS (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: A functional OAS1 SNP, AA genotype, confers susceptibility to MS and the GG genotype may protect against increased disease activity.

  8. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, rs25531) influences the analgesic response to the short acting opioid Remifentanil in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Schalling Martin; Lonsdorf Tina B; Jensen Karin B; Kosek Eva; Ingvar Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background There is evidence from animal studies that serotonin (5-HT) can influence the antinociceptive effects of opioids at the spinal cord level. Therefore, there could be an influence of genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system on individual variability in response to opioid treatment of pain. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is a key regulator of serotonin metabolism and availability and its gene harbors several known polymorphisms that are known to affect 5-HTT expressio...

  9. [The influence of interleukin gene polymorphism on the serum cytokine level in the patients presenting with chonic suppurative otitis media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baike, E V; Vitkovsky, Yu A; Dutova, A A

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of allelic variant associations of 1-beta interleukin (C3953T, &511C, T31C), interleukin-6 (C174G), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (G308A) gene polymorphisms on the serum cytokine level in the patients presenting with chronic suppurative otitis media. A total of 299 patients at the age varying from 16 to 55 years with this condition divided into three groups were examined. Group 1 was comprised of 146 patients suffering from the tubotympanic form of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). Group 2 was composed of 153 patients with epitympanic antral form of this condition. The control group included 183 subjects who have never suffered pathological changes in the middle ear. Human genomic DNA was analyzed with the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The serum cytokine levels were measured by the solid-state enzyme immunoassay in the beginning and at the end of the treatment period. The study has demonstrated that 56.2% of the healthy residents of the trans-Baikal region had the C/T Il-1b (C3953T) genotype. 79.1% of the patients presenting with the carious carious-destructive form of chronic suppurative otitis media were the heterozygous carriers of the T511C gene of 1-beta interleukin and had the maximally high concentrations of this interleukin in the blood serum. A rise in the production of the pro-inflammatory mediator (IL-6) was found to be related to the severity of the inflammatory process in the middle ear. The TNF-alpha content in the patients with CSOM during the active period of the disease proved to increase by a factor of 6 in comparison with that in the subjects of the control group irrespective of the type of mutation.

  10. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in the Bax Gene Promoter Affects Transcription and Influences Retinal Ganglion Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila J Semaan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pro-apoptotic Bax is essential for RGC (retinal ganglion cell death. Gene dosage experiments in mice, yielding a single wild-type Bax allele, indicated that genetic background was able to influence the cell death phenotype. DBA/2J Bax+/− mice exhibited complete resistance to nerve damage after 2 weeks (similar to Bax −/− mice, but 129B6 Bax+/− mice exhibited significant cell loss (similar to wild-type mice. The different cell death phenotype was associated with the level of Bax expression, where 129B6 neurons had twice the level of endogenous Bax mRNA and protein as DBA/2J neurons. Sequence analysis of the Bax promoters between these strains revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism (T129B6 to CDBA/2J at position −515. A 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in transcriptional activity was observed from the 129B6 promoter in transient transfection assays in a variety of cell types, including RGC5 cells derived from rat RGCs. Since this polymorphism occurred in a p53 half-site, we investigated the requirement of p53 for the differential transcriptional activity. Differential transcriptional activity from either 129B6 or DBA/2J Bax promoters were unaffected in p53−/− cells, and addition of exogenous p53 had no further effect on this difference, thus a role for p53 was excluded. Competitive electrophoretic mobility-shift assays identified two DNA-protein complexes that interacted with the polymorphic region. Those forming Complex 1 bound with higher affinity to the 129B6 polymorphic site, suggesting that these proteins probably comprised a transcriptional activator complex. These studies implicated quantitative expression of the Bax gene as playing a possible role in neuronal susceptibility to damaging stimuli.

  11. Strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakr W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision measurements on the thermodynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the superfluid transition. The onset of superfluidity is directly observed in the compressibility, the chemical potential, the entropy, and the heat capacity. Our measurements provide benchmarks for current many-body theories on strongly interacting fermions. Secondly, we have studied the evolution of fermion pairing from three to two dimensions in these gases, relating to the physics of layered superconductors. In the presence of p-wave interactions, Fermi gases are predicted to display toplogical superfluidity carrying Majorana edge states. Two possible avenues in this direction are discussed, our creation and direct observation of spin-orbit coupling in Fermi gases and the creation of fermionic molecules of 23Na 40K that will feature strong dipolar interactions in their absolute ground state.

  12. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  13. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegmund Kimberly D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism. Results Despite their trace dietary phytanic acid intake, all great ape species had elevated red blood cell (RBC phytanic acid levels relative to humans on diverse diets. Unlike humans, chimpanzees showed sexual dimorphism in RBC phytanic acid levels, which were higher in males relative to females. Cultured skin fibroblasts from all species had a robust capacity to degrade phytanic acid. We provide indirect evidence that great apes, in contrast to humans, derive significant amounts of phytanic acid from the hindgut fermentation of plant materials. This would represent a novel reduction of metabolic activity in humans relative to the great apes. Conclusion We identified differences in the physiological levels of phytanic acid in humans and great apes and propose this is causally related to their gut anatomies and microbiomes. Phytanic acid levels could contribute to cross-species and sex-specific differences in human and great ape transcriptomes, especially those related to lipid metabolism. Based on the medical conditions caused by phytanic acid accumulation, we suggest that differences in phytanic acid metabolism could influence the functions of human and great ape nervous, cardiovascular, and skeletal systems.

  14. Autocrine secretion of tumor necrosis factor under the influence of interferon-γ amplifies HLA-DR gene induction in human monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenzana-Seisdedos, F.; Mogensen, S.C.; Vuillier, F.; Fiers, W.; Virelizier, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFN-γ) induced HLA-DR gene expression in both U937 and THP-1 human monocytic cell lines, although the former was only very weakly inducible. Combination of recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IFN-γ resulted in a synergistic enhancement of DR mRNA and protein induction in both cell lines. TNF alone increased the constitutive expression of the DR gene in THP-1 cells. In the HLA class II-negative U937 cells, TNF used alone was not able to induce DR gene expression. Such a negative result was not due to a lack of TNF receptor expression in U937 cells, since TNF clearly induced HLA class I and TNF gene expression in this cell line. THP-1, but not U937, cells secreted TNF under the influence of IFN-γ. Neutralization of TNF by a specific antibody decreased IFN-γ-induced DR antigen expression in THP-1 cultures. These observations indicate that TNF is not able to directly induce DR gene expression, but rather amplifies ongoing expression of this gene, whether constitutive or induced by IFN-γ. In the two cell lines tested, the level of DR inducibility under the influence of IFN-γ used alone depended on a different inducibility of TNF secretion by IFN-γ. Altogether, the observations indicate that TNF, whether exogenous or endogenously produced under the influence of IFN-γ, amplifies DR gene expression in monocytes, a phenomenon that may provide to such antigen-presenting cells a selective sensitivity to the DR-inducing effects of IFN-γ

  15. Mutant genes in pea breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiecicki, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutations of genes Dpo (dehiscing pods) and A (anthocyanin synthesis) played a role in pea domestication. A number of other genes were important in cultivar development for 3 types of usage (dry seeds, green vegetable types, fodder), e.g. fn, fna, le, p, v, fas and af. New genes (induced and spontaneous), are important for present ideotypes and are registered by the Pisum Genetics Association (PGA). Comparison of a pea variety ideotype with the variation available in gene banks shows that breeders need 'new' features. In mutation induction experiments, genotype, mutagen and method of treatment (e.g. combined or fractionated doses) are varied for broadening the mutation spectrum and selecting more genes of agronomic value. New genes are genetically analysed. In Poland, some mutant varieties with the gene afila were registered, controlling lodging by a shorter stem and a higher number of internodes. Really non-lodging pea varieties could strongly increase seed yield. But the probability of detecting a major gene for lodging resistance is low. Therefore, mutant genes with smaller influence on plant architecture are sought, to combine their effect by crossing. Promising seem to be the genes rogue, reductus and arthritic as well as a number of mutant genes not yet genetically identified. The gene det for terminal inflorescence - similarly to Vicia faba - changes plant development. Utilisation of assimilates and ripening should be better. Improvement of harvest index should give higher seed yield. A number of genes controlling disease resistance are well known (eg. Fw, Fnw, En, mo and sbm). Important in mass screening of resistance are closely linked gene markers. Pea gene banks collect respective lines, but mutants induced in highly productive cultivars would be better. Inducing gene markers sometimes seems to be easier than transfer by crossing. Mutation induction in pea breeding is probably more important because a high number of monogenic features are

  16. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  17. Multi-drug resistance (MDR1 gene and P-glycoprotein influence on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodymanic of therapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linardi Renata Lehn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available (MDR1 gene expressed in tumor cells and also in several normal tissues, such as intestine, liver, kidney, blood-brain barrier, spinal cord, and placenta. P-gp has been identified in mice, rat, bovine, monkey, rodents, and human beings and has been receiving a particular clinical relevance because this protein expression limits brain access and intestinal absorption of many drugs. This protein plays a role as a protective barrier against a wide variety of substrates, avoiding drug entry into the central nervous system. P-glycoprotein also interferes with drug bioavailability and disposition, including absorption, distribution, metabolization, and excretion, influencing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic of drugs. Modulation of P-gp may help the efficacy of treatment of several diseases and can explain some adverse central nervous system effects induced by drugs after intravenous administration and the poor response of oral administration in patients. Alteration in P-gp expression or function has been associated with several diseases susceptibility in humans and animals. Furthermore, additional studies relating MDR1 and P-gp expression has an important clinical implication also in terms of treatment efficacy.

  18. Interpretations of education about gene-environment influences on health in rural Ethiopia: the context of a neglected tropical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tora, Abebayehu; Ayode, Desta; Tadele, Getnet; Farrell, David; Davey, Gail; McBride, Colleen M

    2016-07-01

    Misunderstandings of the role of genetics in disease development are associated with stigmatizing behaviors and fatalistic attitudes about prevention. This report describes an evaluation of community understanding of an educational module about genetic and environmental influences on the development of podoconiosis, a neglected tropical disease endemic in highland Ethiopia. A qualitative process assessment was conducted as part of a large prospective intervention trial in August 2013, in Wolaita Zone, southern Ethiopia. Sixty five participants were purposively selected from 600 households randomized to receive the inherited susceptibility module. The educational module used pictorial representations and oral explanations of the interaction of inherited sensitivity and soil exposure and was delivered by lay health educators in participants' homes. Data were collected using semi-structured individual interviews (IDIs) or focus group discussions (FGDs). Qualitative analyses showed that most participants improved their understanding of inherited soil sensitivity and susceptibility to podoconiosis. Participants linked their new understanding to decreased stigma-related attitudes. The module also corrected misconceptions that the condition was contagious, again diminishing stigmatizing attitudes. Lastly, these improvements in understanding increased the perceived value of foot protection. Taken together, these improvements support the acceptability, feasibility and potential benefits of implementing gene-environment education in low and middle income countries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Roehe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e

  20. A variant in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) and variants near the melanocortin-4 receptor gene (MC4R) do not influence dietary intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Ann L; Angquist, Lars; Christiansen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the role of the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) and variants near the melanocortin-4 receptor gene (MC4R) in modulating habitual intake of total energy and macronutrients, glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary energy density, and energy from 20 food groups in adults...... with intake of energy from whole grains (P >or= 0.04). These associations did not remain significant after controlling for multiple testing. The outcome of this study indicates that polymorphisms in the FTO gene and near the MC4R gene do not have a role in regulating food intake and preference for specific....... In a population-based sample of 756 healthy adult twin pairs, we studied associations between FTO rs9939609, near-MC4R rs12970134, rs17700633, and rs17782313 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and habitual dietary intake. Habitual dietary intake was assessed by a 247-question FFQ. Nontransformed variables...

  1. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  2. Polymorphisms of genes related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis influence the cortisol awakening response as well as self-perceived stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Tempel, Ting; Larra, Mauro F; Winnikes, Ulrike; Tempel, Tobias; DeRijk, Roel H; Schulz, André; Schächinger, Hartmut; Meyer, Jobst; Schote, Andrea B

    2016-09-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a crucial endocrine system for coping with stress. A reliable and stable marker for the basal state of that system is the cortisol awakening response (CAR). We examined the influence of variants of four relevant candidate genes; the mineralocorticoid receptor gene (MR), the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR), the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) and the gene encoding the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on CAR and self-perceived stress in 217 healthy subjects. We found that polymorphisms of GR influenced both, the basal state of the HPA axis as well as self-perceived stress. MR only associated with self-perceived stress and 5-HTT only with CAR. BDNF did not affected any of the investigated indices. In summary, we suggest that GR variants together with the CAR and supplemented with self reports on perceived stress might be useful indicators for the basal HPA axis activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Strongly disordered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muttalib, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    We examine some universal effects of strong non-magnetic disorder on the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions in a superconductor. In particular we explicitly take into account the effect of slow diffusion of electrons in a disordered medium by working in an exact impurity eigenstate representation. We find that the normal diffusion of electrons characterized by a constant diffusion coefficient does not lead to any significant correction to the electron-phonon or the effective electron-electron interactions in a superconductor. We then consider sufficiently strong disorder where Anderson localization of electrons becomes important and determine the effect of localization on the electron-electron interactions. We find that due to localization, the diffusion of electrons becomes anomalous in the sense that the diffusion coefficient becomes scale dependent. This results in an increase in the effective electron-electron interaction with increasing disorder. We propose that this provides a natural explanation for the unusual sensitivity of the transition temperature T/sub c/ of the high T/sub c/ superconductors (T/sub c/ > 10 0 K) to damage effects

  4. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  5. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  6. The influence of cytokine gene polymorphisms on the risk of developing gastric cancer in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubljar, David; Jeverica, Samo; Jukic, Tomislav; Skvarc, Miha; Pintar, Tadeja; Tepes, Bojan; Kavalar, Rajko; Stabuc, Borut; Peterlin, Borut; Ihan, Alojz

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastric cancer. The disease progression is influenced by the host inflammatory responses, and cytokine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may have a role in the course of the disease. The aim of our study was to investigate proinflammatory cytokine polymorphisms, previously associated with the development of gastric cancer, in a Slovenian population. In total 318 patients and controls were selected for the study and divided into three groups: (i) patients with gastric cancer (n = 58), (ii) patients with chronic gastritis (n = 60) and (iii) healthy control group (n = 200). H. pylori infection in patient groups was determined by serology, histology and culture. Four proinflammatory gene polymorphisms were determined (IL-1β, IL-1ra, TNF-α, TLR-4) in all subjects. We found a statistically significant difference between males and females for the groups (p = 0.025). Odds ratio (OR) for gastric cancer risk for females was 0.557 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.233–1.329) and for chronic gastritis 2.073 (95% CI: 1.005–4.277). IL-1B-511*T/T homozygous allele for cancer group had OR = 2.349 (95% CI: 0.583–9.462), heterozygous IL-1B-511*T had OR = 1.470 (95% CI: 0.583–3.709) and heterozygotes in TNF-A-308 genotype for chronic gastritis had OR = 1.402 (95% CI: 0.626–3.139). Other alleles had OR less than 1. We could not prove association between gastric cancer and chronic gastritis due to H. pylori in any cytokine SNPs studied in Slovenian population. Other SNPs might be responsible besides infection with H. pylori for the progression from atrophy to neoplastic transformation

  7. MAL Overexpression Leads to Disturbed Expression of Genes That Influence Cytoskeletal Organization and Differentiation of Schwann Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Schmid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the developing peripheral nervous system, a coordinated reciprocal signaling between Schwann cells and axons is crucial for accurate myelination. The myelin and lymphocyte protein MAL is a component of lipid rafts that is important for targeting proteins and lipids to distinct domains. MAL overexpression impedes peripheral myelinogenesis, which is evident by a delayed onset of myelination and reduced expression of the myelin protein zero (Mpz/P0 and the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75NTR . This study shows that MAL overexpression leads to a significant reduction of Mpz and p75NTR expression in primary mouse Schwann cell cultures, which was already evident before differentiation, implicating an effect of MAL in early Schwann cell development. Their transcription was robustly reduced, despite normal expression of essential transcription factors and receptors. Further, the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB and phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways important for Schwann cell differentiation were correctly induced, highlighting that other so far unknown rate limiting factors do exist. We identified novel genes expressed by Schwann cells in a MAL-dependent manner in vivo and in vitro. A number of those, including S100a4, RhoU and Krt23, are implicated in cytoskeletal organization and plasma membrane dynamics. We showed that S100a4 is predominantly expressed by nonmyelinating Schwann cells, whereas RhoU was localized within myelin membranes, and Krt23 was detected in nonmyelinating as well as in myelinating Schwann cells. Their differential expression during early peripheral nerve development further underlines their possible role in influencing Schwann cell differentiation and myelination.

  8. Influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on epigenetic regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene in Holocaust survivor offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; Lehrner, Amy; Desarnaud, Frank; Bader, Heather N; Makotkine, Iouri; Flory, Janine D; Bierer, Linda M; Meaney, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Differential effects of maternal and paternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been observed in adult offspring of Holocaust survivors in both glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and vulnerability to psychiatric disorder. The authors examined the relative influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on DNA methylation of the exon 1F promoter of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR-1F) gene (NR3C1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and its relationship to glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity in Holocaust offspring. Adult offspring with at least one Holocaust survivor parent (N=80) and demographically similar participants without parental Holocaust exposure or parental PTSD (N=15) completed clinical interviews, self-report measures, and biological procedures. Blood samples were collected for analysis of GR-1F promoter methylation and of cortisol levels in response to low-dose dexamethasone, and two-way analysis of covariance was performed using maternal and paternal PTSD as main effects. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to permit visualization of maternal compared with paternal PTSD effects on clinical variables and GR-1F promoter methylation. A significant interaction demonstrated that in the absence of maternal PTSD, offspring with paternal PTSD showed higher GR-1F promoter methylation, whereas offspring with both maternal and paternal PTSD showed lower methylation. Lower GR-1F promoter methylation was significantly associated with greater postdexamethasone cortisol suppression. The clustering analysis revealed that maternal and paternal PTSD effects were differentially associated with clinical indicators and GR-1F promoter methylation. This is the first study to demonstrate alterations of GR-1F promoter methylation in relation to parental PTSD and neuroendocrine outcomes. The moderation of paternal PTSD effects by maternal PTSD suggests different mechanisms for the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related vulnerabilities.

  9. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  10. Strongly interacting Higgs bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelquist, T.; Bernard, C.

    1980-01-01

    The sensitivity of present-energy weak interactions to a strongly interacting heavy-Higgs-boson sector is discussed. The gauged nonlinear sigma model, which is the limit of the linear model as the Higgs-boson mass goes to infinity, is used to organize and catalogue all possible heavy-Higgs-boson effects. As long as the SU(2)/sub L/ x SU(2)/sub R/ symmetry of the Higgs sector is preserved, these effects are found to be small, of the order of the square of the gauge coupling times logarithms (but not powers) of the Higgs-boson mass divided by the W mass. We work in the context of a simplified model with gauge group SU(2)/sub L/; the extension to SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1) is briefly discussed

  11. Influence of white spot syndrome virus infection on hepatopancreas gene expression of `Huanghai No. 2' shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianhong; Shi, Xiaoli; Kong, Jie; Luan, Sheng; Luo, Kun; Cao, Baoxiang; Liu, Ning; Lu, Xia; Li, Xupeng; Deng, Kangyu; Cao, Jiawang; Zhang, Yingxue; Zhang, Hengheng

    2017-10-01

    To elucidate the molecular response of shrimp hepatopancreas to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, microarray was applied to investigate the differentially expressed genes in the hepatopancreas of `Huanghai No. 2' ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis). A total of 59137 unigenes were designed onto a custom-made 60K Agilent chip. After infection, the gene expression profiles in the hepatopancreas of the shrimp with a lower viral load at early (48-96 h), peak (168-192 h) and late (264-288 h) infection phases were analyzed. Of 18704 differentially expressed genes, 6412 were annotated. In total, 5453 differentially expressed genes (1916 annotated) expressed at all three phases, and most of the annotated were either up- or down-regulated continuously. These genes function diversely in, for example, immune response, cytoskeletal system, signal transduction, stress resistance, protein synthesis and processing, metabolism among others. Some of the immune-related genes, including antilipopolysaccharide factor, Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor, C-type lectin and serine protease encoding genes, were up-regulated after WSSV infection. These genes have been reported to be involved in the anti-WSSV responses. The expression of genes related to the cytoskeletal system, including β-actin and myosin but without tubulin genes, were down-regulated after WSSV infection. Astakine was found for the first time in the WSSV-infected F. chinensis. To further confirm the expression of differentially expressed genes, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to test the expression of eight randomly selected genes and verified the reliability and accuracy of the microarray expression analysis. The data will provide valuable information to understanding the immune mechanism of shrimp's response to WSSV.

  12. Imaging oxytocin x dopamine interactions: An epistasis effect of CD38 and COMT gene variants influences the impact of oxytocin on amygdala activation to social stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina eSauer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although oxytocin (OT has become a major target for the investigation of positive social processes, it can be assumed that it exerts its effects in concert with other neurotransmitters. One candidate for such an interaction is dopamine (DA. For both systems, genetic variants have been identified that influence the availability of the particular substance. A variant of the gene coding for the transmembrane protein CD38 (rs3796863, which is engaged in OT secretion, has been associated with OT plasma level. The common catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT val158met polymorphism is known to influence COMT activity and therefore the degradation of DA. The present study aimed to investigate OTxDA interactions in the context of an OT challenge study. Hence, we tested the influence of the above mentioned genetic variants and their interaction on the activation of different brain regions (amygdala, VTA, ventral striatum and fusiform gyrus during the presentation of social stimuli. In a pharmacological cross-over design 55 participants were investigated under OT and placebo (PLA by means of fMRI.Brain imaging results revealed no significant effects for VTA or ventral striatum. Regarding the fusiform gyrus, we could not find any effects apart from those already described in (Sauer et al., 2012. Analyses of amygdala activation resulted in no gene main effect, no gene x substance interaction but a significant gene x gene x substance interaction. While under PLA the effect of CD38 on bilateral amygdala activation to social stimuli was modulated by the COMT genotype, no such epistasis effect was found under OT. Our results provide evidence for an OTxDA interaction during responses to social stimuli. We postulate that the effect of central OT secretion on amygdala response is modulated by the availability of DA. Therefore, for an understanding of the effect of social hormones on social behavior, interactions of OT with other transmitter systems have to be taken

  13. Analysis of genes that influence sheep follicular development by different nutrition levels during the luteal phase using expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, F; Jia, R; Ying, S; Wang, Z; Wang, F

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition is an important factor that regulates reproductive performance of sheep and affects follicle development. However, the correlation between nutrition and follicle development is poorly understood at the molecular level. To study its possible molecular mechanisms, we performed expression profiling of granulosa cells isolated from sheep that were fed different levels of nutrition levels during the luteal phase. To do this, ewes received a maintenance diet (M), and their estrus was synchronized by intravaginal progestogen sponges for 12 days. Ewes were randomly divided into the short-term dietary-restricted group (R; 0.5 × M) and the nutrient-supplemented group (S; 1.5 × M). RNA samples were extracted from granulosa cells. Transcriptome libraries from each group were constructed by Illumina sequencing. Among 18 468 detected genes, 170 genes were significantly differentially expressed, of which 140 genes were upregulated and 30 genes were downregulated in group S relative to group R. These genes could be candidates regulating follicular development in sheep. Gene Ontology, KEGG and clustering analyses were performed. Genes related to oocyte meiosis, such as ADCY7, were upregulated. We identified two important groups of related genes that were upregulated with improved nutrition: one group comprising the genes PTGS2, UCP2 and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the other group comprising interleukin-1A and interleukin-1B. The genes within each group showed similar expression patterns. Additionally, all five genes are involved in the reproduction process. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to validate the results of expression profiling. These data in our study are an abundant genomic resource to expand the understanding of the molecular and cellular events underlying follicle development. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  15. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  16. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  17. Influence of IL15 gene variations on the clinical features, treatment response and risk of developing childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Latvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Dmitrijs; Kreile, Madara; Nikulshin, Sergejs; Kovalova, Zhanna; Gailite, Linda

    2018-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Modern treatment protocols allow achievement of long-term event-free survival rates in up to 85% of cases, although the treatment response varies among different patient groups. It is hypothesized that treatment response is influenced by the IL15 gene variations, although research results are conflicting. To analyze IL15 gene variations influence treatment response, clinical course and the risk of developing ALL we performed a case-control and family-based study. The study included 81 patients with childhood ALL. DNA samples of both or one biological parent were available for 62 of ALL patients and 130 age and gender adjusted healthy samples were used as a control group. Analyzed IL15 gene variations: rs10519612, rs10519613 and rs17007695 were genotyped using PCR-RFLP assay. Our results shows that IL15 gene variations haplotypes are associated with the risk of developing childhood ALL (p variations separately. The variations rs10519612 and rs1059613 in a recessive pattern of inheritance were associated with hyperdiploidy (p = 0.048). Analyzed genetic variations had no impact on other clinical features and treatment response (assessed by the minimal residual disease) in our study.

  18. Landscape features influence gene flow as measured by cost-distance and genetic analyses: a case study for giant pandas in the Daxiangling and Xiaoxiangling Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fuwen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene flow maintains genetic diversity within a species and is influenced by individual behavior and the geographical features of the species' habitat. Here, we have characterized the geographical distribution of genetic patterns in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca living in four isolated patches of the Xiaoxiangling and Daxiangling Mountains. Three geographic distance definitions were used with the "isolation by distance theory": Euclidean distance (EUD, least-cost path distance (LCD defined by food resources, and LCD defined by habitat suitability. Results A total of 136 genotypes were obtained from 192 fecal samples and one blood sample, corresponding to 53 unique genotypes. Geographical maps plotted at high resolution using smaller neighborhood radius definitions produced large cost distances, because smaller radii include a finer level of detail in considering each pixel. Mantel tests showed that most correlation indices, particularly bamboo resources defined for different sizes of raster cell, were slightly larger than the correlations calculated for the Euclidean distance, with the exception of Patch C. We found that natural barriers might have decreased gene flow between the Xiaoxiangling and Daxiangling regions. Conclusions Landscape features were found to partially influence gene flow in the giant panda population. This result is closely linked to the biological character and behavior of giant pandas because, as bamboo feeders, individuals spend most of their lives eating bamboo or moving within the bamboo forest. Landscape-based genetic analysis suggests that gene flow will be enhanced if the connectivity between currently fragmented bamboo forests is increased.

  19. Gene expression patterns of wood decay fungi Postia placenta and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are influenced by wood substrate composition during degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksandr Skyba; Daniel Cullen; Carl J. Douglas; Shawn D. Mansfield

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the specific genes and enzymes involved in the fungal degradation of lignocellulosic biomass derived from feedstocks with various compositions is essential to the development of improved bioenergy processes. In order to elucidate the effect of substrate composition on gene expression in wood-rotting fungi, we employed microarrays based on the...

  20. Genome Wide Association Study of SNP-, Gene-, and Pathway-based Approaches to Identify Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan eYe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS to identify specific genetic variants that underlie susceptibility to disease caused by Staphylococcus aureus in humans. Methods: Cases (n=309 and controls (n=2,925 were genotyped at 508,921 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Cases had at least one laboratory and clinician confirmed disease caused by S. aureus whereas controls did not. R-package (for SNP association, EIGENSOFT (to estimate and adjust for population stratification and gene- (VEGAS and pathway-based (DAVID, PANTHER, and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis analyses were performed.Results: No SNP reached genome-wide significance. Four SNPs exceeded the pConclusion: We identified potential susceptibility genes for S. aureus diseases in this preliminary study but confirmation by other studies is needed. The observed associations could be relevant given the complexity of S. aureus as a pathogen and its ability to exploit multiple biological pathways to cause infections in humans.

  1. Candidate gene resequencing to identify rare, pedigree-specific variants influencing healthy aging phenotypes in the long life family study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Druley, Todd E; Wang, Lihua; Lin, Shiow J

    2016-01-01

    from six pedigrees. OBFC1 (chromosome 10) is involved in telomere maintenance, and falls within a linkage peak recently reported from an analysis of telomere length in LLFS families. Two different algorithms for single gene associations identified three genes with an enrichment of variation......BACKGROUND: The Long Life Family Study (LLFS) is an international study to identify the genetic components of various healthy aging phenotypes. We hypothesized that pedigree-specific rare variants at longevity-associated genes could have a similar functional impact on healthy phenotypes. METHODS......: We performed custom hybridization capture sequencing to identify the functional variants in 464 candidate genes for longevity or the major diseases of aging in 615 pedigrees (4,953 individuals) from the LLFS, using a multiplexed, custom hybridization capture. Variants were analyzed individually...

  2. Do polymorphisms in MDR1 and CYP3A5 genes influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harivenkatesh, Natarajan; Kumar, Lalit; Bakhshi, Sameer; Sharma, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Gogia, Ajay; Shastri, Shivaram S; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Influence of polymorphisms in the genes coding for imatinib transporters and metabolizing enzymes on cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is not known. One hundred and four patients (52 cases with cytogenetic relapse and 52 controls without relapse) with chronic-phase CML on imatinib therapy and have completed 5 years of follow-up were enrolled. The following single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped; C1236T, C3435T, G2677T/A in MDR1 gene and A6986G in CYP3A5 gene, using PCR-RFLP method and validated by direct gene sequencing. Imatinib trough levels were measured using LC-MS/MS. Patients with CC genotype for MDR1-C1236T polymorphism were at significantly higher risk for cytogenetic relapse [OR =4.382, 95% CI (1.145, 16.774), p = .022], while those with TT genotype for MDR1-C3435T polymorphism had significantly lower risk of relapse [OR =0.309, 95% CI (0.134, 0.708), p = .005]. Imatinib trough levels were lower in patients with relapse compared to those without relapse (1551.4 ± 1324.1 vs. 2154.2 ± 1358.3 ng/mL; p = .041). MDR1-C3435T genotype [adjusted-OR: 0.266; 95% CI (0.111, 0.636); p = .003] and trough levels (p = .014) were independent predictors of relapse in multivariate analysis. To conclude, C1236T and C3435T polymorphisms in MDR1 gene and trough levels significantly influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse. MDR1-C3435T genotype might emerge as a potential biomarker to predict the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with CML.

  3. Actin isoform and alpha 1B-adrenoceptor gene expression in aortic and coronary smooth muscle is influenced by cyclical stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, M S; Sadhu, D N; Grumman, V E; Chilian, W M; Ramos, K S

    1995-09-01

    The occurrence of vascular domains with specific biological and pharmacological characteristics suggests that smooth muscle cells in different arteries may respond differentially to a wide range of environmental stimuli. To determine if some of these vessel-specific differences may be attributable to mechano-sensitive gene regulation, the influence of cyclical stretch on the expression of actin isoform and alpha 1B-adrenoceptor genes was examined in aortic and coronary smooth muscle cells. Cells were seeded on an elastin substrate and subjected to maximal stretching (24% elongation) and relaxation cycles at a frequency of 120 cycles/min in a Flexercell strain unit for 72 h. Total RNA was extracted and hybridized to radiolabeled cDNA probes to assess gene expression. Stretch caused a greater reduction of actin isoform mRNA levels in aortic smooth muscle cells as compared to cells from the coronary artery. Steady-state mRNA levels of alpha 1B-adrenoceptor were also decreased by cyclical stretch in both cell types but the magnitude of the response was greater in coronary smooth muscle cells. No changes in alpha 1B-adrenoceptor or beta/gamma-actin steady-state mRNA levels were observed in H4IIE cells, a nonvascular, immortalized cell line. The relative gene expression of heat shock protein 70 was not influenced by the cyclic stretch regimen in any of these cell types. These results suggest that stretch may participate in the regulation of gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and that this response exhibits some degree of cell-specificity.

  4. Haplotyping, linkage mapping and expression analysis of barley genes regulated by terminal drought stress influencing seed quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wobus Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasingly narrow genetic background characteristic of modern crop germplasm presents a challenge for the breeding of cultivars that require adaptation to the anticipated change in climate. Thus, high priority research aims at the identification of relevant allelic variation present both in the crop itself as well as in its progenitors. This study is based on the characterization of genetic variation in barley, with a view to enhancing its response to terminal drought stress. Results The expression patterns of drought regulated genes were monitored during plant ontogeny, mapped and the location of these genes was incorporated into a comprehensive barley SNP linkage map. Haplotypes within a set of 17 starch biosynthesis/degradation genes were defined, and a particularly high level of haplotype variation was uncovered in the genes encoding sucrose synthase (types I and II and starch synthase. The ability of a panel of 50 barley accessions to maintain grain starch content under terminal drought conditions was explored. Conclusion The linkage/expression map is an informative resource in the context of characterizing the response of barley to drought stress. The high level of haplotype variation among starch biosynthesis/degradation genes in the progenitors of cultivated barley shows that domestication and breeding have greatly eroded their allelic diversity in current elite cultivars. Prospective association analysis based on core drought-regulated genes may simplify the process of identifying favourable alleles, and help to understand the genetic basis of the response to terminal drought.

  5. Metal Catalysis with Nanostructured Metals Supported Inside Strongly Acidic Cross-linked Polymer Frameworks: Influence of Reduction Conditions of AuIII-containing Resins on Metal Nanoclusters Formation in Macroreticular and Gel-Type Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Calore, L.; Cavinato, g.; Canton, P.; Peruzzo, L.; Banavali, R.; Jeřábek, Karel; Corain, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 391, AUG 30 (2012), s. 114-120 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : strongly acidic cross-linked polymer * frameworks * gold(0) nanoclusters Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.687, year: 2012

  6. Influence of apolipoprotein-E gene on lipid profile, physical activity and body fat relationship. DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n2p221

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Boaventura Rachid Nascimento

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and body fat modify lipemia, and this effect seems to be influenced by apolipoprotein-E (APOE gene polymorphism. Thus, the purpose of this article was to review main results of studies that have analyzed the relation of APOE gene with physical activity and body fat on triglycerides, total cholesterol and low (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL concentrations. The Scientific Electronic Library Online – SciELO, Web of Science and PubMed database were used to locate the articles. The keywords used in combination were: apoe genotype, apolipoprotein-E polymorphism, physical exercise, physical activity, aerobic exercise, body fat and obesity. Originals scientific investigations performed with humans were included, and excluded those ones which involved samples with diseases, except obesity and/or lipemic disorders. It was observed a trend, that ε2 allele carriers are the ones with the greater improvements on lipemia from physical exercise. In addition, the body fat impact on the elevation of triglycerides and LDL are stronger in carriers of the ε2 and ε4 allele, respectively. Considering the small number of originals scientific investigations and their divergent results, reliable inferences can not be made about the APOE gene polymorphism influences on physical activity and body fat effect on lipemia. Thus, further studies with others populations and more volunteers for allele, as well as others exercise modalities and intensities, are necessary.

  7. Ageing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2018-01-01

    The idea of gerontogenes is in line with the evolutionary explanation of ageing as being an emergent phenomenon as a result of the imperfect maintenance and repair systems. Although evolutionary processes did not select for any specific ageing genes that restrict and determine the lifespan...... of an individual, the term ‘gerontogenes’ primarily refers to any genes that may seem to influence ageing and longevity, without being specifically selected for that role. Such genes can also be called ‘virtual gerontogenes’ by virtue of their indirect influence on the rate and process of ageing. More than 1000...... virtual gerontogenes have been associated with ageing and longevity in model organisms and humans. The ‘real’ genes, which do influence the essential lifespan of a species, and have been selected for in accordance with the evolutionary life history of the species, are known as the longevity assurance...

  8. [Influence and mechanism of PinX1 gene on the chemotherapy sensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells in response to Cisplatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Congxiang; Liu, Yanhui; Wen, Zhong; Yang, Keke; Li, Guanxue; Zhang, Shenhua; Zhang, Xinyu

    2015-06-23

    To explore the influence and mechanism of PinX1 gene on the chemotherapy sensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells in response to Cisplatin. Transfected nasopharyngeal carcinoma 5-8F cell lines with pCDH-CMV-PinX1-copGFP vector constructed by lentivirus to generate Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cells containing PinX1 gene, using Lenti-Ctrl-5-8F cell (blank vector without PinX1 gene was used to transfect 5-8F cell lines) and 5-8F cell as controls. Expression of PinX1 gene, telomerase activity, the inhibition of cancer cells proliferation, combined anticancer effect with Cisplatin and the expression of lung resistance protein (LRP) and Bcl-2 were detected with fluorescent quantitation polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry, thiazolyl blue (MTT) method, areole test, Western blot and drug sensitivity test, respectively, in four groups (Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell + Cisplatin, Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell, Cisplatin and 5-8F cell) so as to explore the influence and mechanism of PinX1 gene on the chemotherapy sensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells in response to Cisplatin. The telomerase activity in Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell (0.146 ± 0.004) was lower than those in the other two control cells (Lenti-Ctrl-5-8F cell: 0.967 ± 0.016, 5-8F cell: 1.000 ± 0.034, both P Cisplatin after lower level telomerase activity induced by PinX1 gene. Proliferation index (PI) (%) in Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell + Cisplatin (14.39 ± 3.66) was also less than the other groups (Lenti-PinX1-5-8F cell, Cisplatin and 5-8F cell groups, 32.97 ± 3.00, 31.18 ± 4.24 and 47.19 ± 4.19, all P Cisplatin, which may be mediated by the down-regulation of telomerase activity and the inhibition of LRP and Bcl-2 gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

  9. A rat model of smoke inhalation injury: Influence of combustion smoke on gene expression in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Heung M.; Greeley, George H.; Herndon, David N.; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce A.; Englander, Ella W.

    2005-01-01

    Acute smoke inhalation causes death and injury in victims of home and industrial fires as well as victims of combat situations. The lethal factors in combustion smoke inhalation are toxic gases and oxygen deficiency, with carbon monoxide (CO) as a primary cause of death. In survivors, inhalation of smoke can result in severe immediate and delayed neuropathologies. To gain insight into the progression of molecular events contributing to smoke inhalation sequelae in the brain, we developed a smoke inhalation rat model and conducted a genome-wide analysis of gene expression. Microarray analysis revealed a modified brain transcriptome with changes peaking at 24 h and subsiding within 7 days post-smoke. Overall, smoke inhalation downregulated genes associated with synaptic function, neurotransmission, and neurotrophic support, and upregulated genes associated with stress responses, including nitric oxide synthesis, antioxidant defenses, proteolysis, inflammatory response, and glial activation. Notably, among the affected genes, many have been previously implicated in other types of brain injury, demonstrating the usefulness of microarrays for analysis of changes in gene expression in complex insults. In accord with previously described modulations of nitric oxide homeostasis in CO poisoning, microarray analysis revealed increased brain expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and NOS ligand after inhalation of smoke. Furthermore, immunostaining showed significant elevations in perivascular NOS and in protein nitration, corroborating the involvement of nitric oxide perturbations in post-smoke sequelae in the brain. Thus, the new rat model, in combination with microarray analyses, affords insight into the complex molecular pathophysiology of smoke inhalation in the brain

  10. Identification and gene expression analysis of AUX1 influencing adventitious root induction in olive cuttings (Olea europaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mehdi Hosseini Mazinani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Olive is one of the most important fruit crops throughout the Mediterranean Basin, mainly propagated by cuttings. The adventitious root development is a key stage in vegetative propagation however the low rooting capacity of some cultivars severely affects the efficiency of olive clonal propagation. Auxin Influx Carrier gene (AUX1, plays a key role in lateral root formation in many plant species promoting the export of IAA from newly developing leaves to lateral root primordia. Putative olive homologues were amplified by using degenerate primers designed on the conserved regions of AUX1 transcripts identified in other plants. Transcript and amino acid sequences in root (OeAUX1R and base of cutting (OeAUX1B were different causes of polymorphisms relating to possible distinct roles in these tissues. In order to investigate the gene expression patterns, Real-time PCR was performed on cuttings during the rooting stage collected from genotypes characterized by high and low rooting ability. Moreover, the gene expression was investigated on different olive tissues. Preliminary results showed that the expression of OeAUX1B and OeAUX1R in base of cuttings and roots of the high-rooting genotype were higher which suggests the hypothesis of the involvement of OeAUX1 in olive rooting. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that AUX1 gene had 8 exons in olive and the sequence of this gene in plant was conserved during evolution.

  11. Combined influences of genes, prenatal environment, cortisol, and parenting on the development of children’s internalizing vs. externalizing problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Natsuaki, Misaki; Fisher, Philip A.; Leve, Leslie D.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that genetic, prenatal, endocrine, and parenting influences across development individually contribute to internalizing and externalizing problems in children. The present study tests the combined contributions of genetic risk for psychopathology, prenatal environments (maternal drug use and internalizing symptoms), child cortisol at age 4.5 years, and overreactive parenting influences across childhood on 6-year-old children’s internalizing and externalizing problems. We used data from an adoption design that included 361 domestically adopted children and their biological and adopted parents prospectively followed from birth. Only parenting influences contributed (independently) to externalizing problems. However, genetic influences were indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through increased prenatal risk and subsequent morning cortisol), and parenting factors were both directly and indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through morning cortisol). Results suggest that prenatal maternal drug use/symptoms and children’s morning cortisol levels are mechanisms of genetic and environmental influences on internalizing problems, but not externalizing problems, in childhood. PMID:25355319

  12. Combined Influences of Genes, Prenatal Environment, Cortisol, and Parenting on the Development of Children's Internalizing Versus Externalizing Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Laurent, Heidemarie K; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S; Natsuaki, Misaki N; Fisher, Philip A; Leve, Leslie D

    2015-05-01

    Research suggests that genetic, prenatal, endocrine, and parenting influences across development individually contribute to internalizing and externalizing problems in children. The present study tests the combined contributions of genetic risk for psychopathology, prenatal environments (maternal drug use and internalizing symptoms), child cortisol at age 4.5 years, and overreactive parenting influences across childhood on 6-year-old children's internalizing and externalizing problems. We used data from an adoption design that included 361 domestically adopted children and their biological and adopted parents prospectively followed from birth. Only parenting influences contributed (independently) to externalizing problems. However, genetic influences were indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through increased prenatal risk and subsequent morning cortisol), and parenting factors were both directly and indirectly associated with internalizing problems (through morning cortisol). Results suggest that prenatal maternal drug use/symptoms and children's morning cortisol levels are mechanisms of genetic and environmental influences on internalizing problems, but not externalizing problems, in childhood.

  13. Influence of different Sinorhizobium meliloti inocula on abundance of genes involved in nitrogen transformations in the rhizosphere of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Katarina Huić; Schauss, Kristina; Hai, Brigitte; Sikora, Sanja; Redzepović, Sulejman; Radl, Viviane; Schloter, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Inoculation of leguminous seeds with selected rhizobial strains is practised in agriculture to ameliorate the plant yield by enhanced root nodulation and nitrogen uptake of the plant. However, effective symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia does not only depend on the capacity of nitrogen fixation but also on the entire nitrogen turnover in the rhizosphere. We investigated the influence of seed inoculation with two indigenous Sinorhizobium meliloti strains exhibiting different efficiency concerning plant growth promotion on nitrogen turnover processes in the rhizosphere during the growth of alfalfa. Quantification of six target genes (bacterial amoA, nirK, nirS, nosZ, nifH and archaeal amoA) within the nitrogen cycle was performed in rhizosphere samples before nodule formation, at bud development and at the late flowering stage. The results clearly demonstrated that effectiveness of rhizobial inocula is related to abundance of nifH genes in the late flowering phase of alfalfa. Moreover, other genes involved in nitrogen turnover had been affected by the inocula, e.g. higher numbers of amoA copies were observed during flowering when the more effective strain had been inoculated. However, the respective gene abundances differed overall to a greater extent between the three plant development stages than between the inoculation variants.

  14. Influence of cloning by chromatin transfer on placental gene expression at Day 45 of pregnancy in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Fernando S; Machado, Sergio A; Drnevich, Jenny; Borowicz, Pawel; Wang, Zhongde; Nowak, Romana A

    2013-01-30

    Poor success rates in somatic cell cloning are often attributed to abnormal early embryonic development as well as late abnormal fetal growth and placental development. Although promising results have been reported following chromatin transfer (CT), a novel cloning method that includes the remodeling of the donor nuclei in vitro prior to their transfer into enucleated oocytes, animals cloned by CT show placental abnormalities similar to those observed following conventional nuclear transfer. We hypothesized that the placental gene expression pattern from cloned fetuses was ontologically related to the frequently observed placental phenotype. The aim of the present study was to compare global gene expression by microarray analysis of Day 44-47 cattle placentas derived from CT cloned fetuses with those derived from in vitro fertilization (i.e. control), and confirm the altered mRNA and protein expression of selected molecules by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The differentially expressed genes identified in the present study are known to be involved in a range of activities associated with cell adhesion, cell cycle control, intracellular transport and proteolysis. Specifically, an imprinted gene, involved with cell proliferation and placentomegaly in humans (CDKN1C) and a peptidase that serves as a marker for non-invasive trophoblast cells in human placentas (DPP4), had mRNA and protein altered in CT placentas. It was concluded that the altered pattern of gene expression observed in CT samples may contribute to the abnormal placental development phenotypes commonly identified in cloned offspring, and that expression of imprinted as well as trophoblast invasiveness-related genes is altered in cattle cloned by CT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication oriS influences origin-dependent DNA replication and flanking gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Sommer, Marvin H; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T; Arvin, Ann M

    2015-07-01

    The VZV genome has two origins of DNA replication (oriS), each of which consists of an AT-rich sequence and three origin binding protein (OBP) sites called Box A, C and B. In these experiments, the mutation in the core sequence CGC of the Box A and C not only inhibited DNA replication but also inhibited both ORF62 and ORF63 expression in reporter gene assays. In contrast the Box B mutation did not influence DNA replication or flanking gene transcription. These results suggest that efficient DNA replication enhances ORF62 and ORF63 transcription. Recombinant viruses carrying these mutations in both sites and one with a deletion of the whole oriS were constructed. Surprisingly, the recombinant virus lacking both copies of oriS retained the capacity to replicate in melanoma and HELF cells suggesting that VZV has another origin of DNA replication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    during SCES 2010. As we learned, past dogmas about strongly correlated materials and phenomena must be re-examined with an open and inquisitive mind. Invited speakers and respected leaders in the field were invited to contribute to this special issue and we have insisted that they present new data, ideas, or perspectives, as opposed to simply an overview of their past work. As with the conference, this special issue touches upon recent developments of strongly correlated electron systems in d-electron materials, such as Sr3Ru2O7, graphene, and the new Fe-based superconductors, but it is dominated by topics in f-electron compounds. Contributions reflect the growing appreciation for the influence of disorder and frustration, the need for organizing principles, as well as detailed investigations on particular materials of interest and, of course, new materials. As this special issue could not possibly capture the full breadth and depth that the conference had to offer, it is being published simultaneously with an issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series containing 157 manuscripts in which all poster presenters at SCES 2010 were invited to contribute. Since this special issue grew out of the 2010 SCES conference, we take this opportunity to give thanks. This conference would not have been possible without the hard work of the SCES 2010 Program Committee, International and National Advisory Committees, Local Committee, and conference organizers, the New Mexico Consortium. We thank them as well as those organizations that generously provided financial support: ICAM-I2CAM, Quantum Design, Lakeshore, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the Department of Energy National Laboratories at Argonne, Berkeley, Brookhaven, Los Alamos and Oak Ridge. Of course, we especially thank the participants for bringing new ideas and new results, without which SCES 2010 would not have been possible. Strongly correlated electron systems contents Spin-orbit coupling and k

  17. Measuring the genetic influence on human life span: gene-environment interaction and sex-specific genetic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; De Benedictis, G; Yashin, Annatoli

    2001-01-01

    New approaches are needed to explore the different ways in which genes affect the human life span. One needs to assess the genetic effects themselves, as well as gene–environment interactions and sex dependency. In this paper, we present a new model that combines both genotypic and demographicinf......New approaches are needed to explore the different ways in which genes affect the human life span. One needs to assess the genetic effects themselves, as well as gene–environment interactions and sex dependency. In this paper, we present a new model that combines both genotypic...

  18. Strong selection during the last millennium for African ancestry in the admixed population of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierron, Denis; Heiske, Margit; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Pereda-Loth, Veronica; Sanchez, Jazmin; Alva, Omar; Arachiche, Amal; Boland, Anne; Olaso, Robert; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Ricaut, Francois-Xavier; Rakotoarisoa, Jean-Aimé; Radimilahy, Chantal; Stoneking, Mark; Letellier, Thierry

    2018-03-02

    While admixed populations offer a unique opportunity to detect selection, the admixture in most of the studied populations occurred too recently to produce conclusive signals. By contrast, Malagasy populations originate from admixture between Asian and African populations that occurred ~27 generations ago, providing power to detect selection. We analyze local ancestry across the genomes of 700 Malagasy and identify a strong signal of recent positive selection, with an estimated selection coefficient >0.2. The selection is for African ancestry and affects 25% of chromosome 1, including the Duffy blood group gene. The null allele at this gene provides resistance to Plasmodium vivax malaria, and previous studies have suggested positive selection for this allele in the Malagasy population. This selection event also influences numerous other genes implicated in immunity, cardiovascular diseases, and asthma and decreases the Asian ancestry genome-wide by 10%, illustrating the role played by selection in recent human history.

  19. Influence of dietary vitamin E supplementation on meat quality traits and gene expression related to lipid metabolism in the Beijing-you chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W J; Zhao, G P; Chen, J L; Zheng, M Q; Wen, J

    2009-03-01

    1. The effects of dietary vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) on carcase and meat quality, oxidative stability, fatty acid composition of muscle lipids, and gene expression related to lipid metabolism were studied in Beijing-you chickens. 2. A total of 360 female birds were distributed among 6 treatments, containing 6 replicates, each of 10 birds. The feed for each treatment was supplemented with vitamin E (0, 10, 50, 100, 150, or 200 mg/kg feed). At 120 d, 30 birds from each treatment were slaughtered to examine the effect of dietary vitamin E supplementation on evaluated traits. 3. The results showed that supplemental vitamin E in diet significantly increased alpha-tocopherol contents of breast and thigh muscles, reduced the drip loss and improved tenderness but did not influence carcase yield, meat colour or pH value 24 h after slaughter. 4. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values decreased with increase in dietary vitamin E, and the addition of 100 mg/kg or more vitamin E had a beneficial effect on oxidative stability as indicated by TBARS values during storage up to 7 d. 5. Dietary vitamin E supplementation significantly altered fatty acid composition of breast muscle. Supplementing with 200 mg/kg vitamin E led to lower saturated fatty acids and greater polyunsaturated fatty acids proportions in breast muscle than control and 10 mg/kg vitamin E treatments. 6. Vitamin E supplementation significantly inhibited expression of the cytosolic phospholipase A(2) gene (cPLA(2)) in breast muscle, while enhancing that of the peroxisome proliterator-activated receptor beta (PPAP-beta) and heart fatty acid binding protein genes (H-FABP). The results indicate that dietary supplementation with vitamin E increased lipid stability in muscle and improved meat quality and fatty acid composition, probably by its influence on the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism.

  20. Fine-scale linkage mapping reveals a small set of candidate genes influencing honey bee grooming behavior in response to Varroa mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel E Arechavaleta-Velasco

    Full Text Available Populations of honey bees in North America have been experiencing high annual colony mortality for 15-20 years. Many apicultural researchers believe that introduced parasites called Varroa mites (V. destructor are the most important factor in colony deaths. One important resistance mechanism that limits mite population growth in colonies is the ability of some lines of honey bees to groom mites from their bodies. To search for genes influencing this trait, we used an Illumina Bead Station genotyping array to determine the genotypes of several hundred worker bees at over a thousand single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a family that was apparently segregating for alleles influencing this behavior. Linkage analyses provided a genetic map with 1,313 markers anchored to genome sequence. Genotypes were analyzed for association with grooming behavior, measured as the time that individual bees took to initiate grooming after mites were placed on their thoraces. Quantitative-trait-locus interval mapping identified a single chromosomal region that was significant at the chromosome-wide level (p<0.05 on chromosome 5 with a LOD score of 2.72. The 95% confidence interval for quantitative trait locus location contained only 27 genes (honey bee official gene annotation set 2 including Atlastin, Ataxin and Neurexin-1 (AmNrx1, which have potential neurodevelopmental and behavioral effects. Atlastin and Ataxin homologs are associated with neurological diseases in humans. AmNrx1 codes for a presynaptic protein with many alternatively spliced isoforms. Neurexin-1 influences the growth, maintenance and maturation of synapses in the brain, as well as the type of receptors most prominent within synapses. Neurexin-1 has also been associated with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia in humans, and self-grooming behavior in mice.

  1. Review: Environmental influences on alcohol use: Informing research on the joint effects of genes and the environment in diverse U.S. populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Karen G; Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J; Cummings, Cory R; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2017-08-01

    This review aimed to inform the current state of alcohol research on the joint effects of genes and the environment conducted in U.S. racial/ethnic minority populations, focusing on African Americans, Latinos/Hispanics, Asians, and American Indians. A key-word and author-based search was conducted and supplemented with direct contact to researchers in this area to ensure a comprehensive inclusion of published, peer-reviewed studies. These studies were considered in terms of the racial/ethnic population groups, phenotypes, genetic variants, and environmental influences covered. Research findings from alcohol epidemiologic studies were highlighted to introduce some potential environmental variables for future studies of gene and environment (G-E) relationships. Twenty-six (N = 26) studies were reviewed. They predominantly involved African American and Asian samples and had a very limited focus on Latinos/Hispanics and American Indians. There was a wide range of alcohol-related phenotypes examined, and studies almost exclusively used a candidate gene approach. Environmental influences focused on the most proximate social network relationships with family and peers. There was far less examination of community- and societal-level environmental influences on drinking. Epidemiologic studies informing the selection of potential environmental factors at these higher order levels suggest inclusion of indicators of drinking norms, alcohol availability, socioeconomic disadvantage, and unfair treatment. The review of current literature identified a critical gap in the study of environments: There is the need to study exposures at community and societal levels. These initial studies provide an important foundation for evolving the dialogue and generating other investigations of G-E relationships in diverse racial/ethnic groups. (Am J Addict 2017;26:446-460). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  2. Use of a wine yeast deletion collection reveals genes that influence fermentation performance under low-nitrogen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Josephine J; Watson, Tommaso L; Walker, Michelle E; Gardner, Jennifer M; Lang, Tom A; Borneman, Anthony; Forgan, Angus; Tran, Tina; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2018-05-01

    A deficiency of nitrogenous nutrients in grape juice can cause stuck and sluggish alcoholic fermentation, which has long been a problem in winemaking. Nitrogen requirements vary between wine yeast strains, and the ability of yeast to assimilate nitrogen depends on the nature and concentration of nitrogen present in the medium. In this study, a wine yeast gene deletion collection (1844 deletants in the haploid AWRI1631 background) was screened to identify genes whose deletion resulted in a reduction in the time taken to utilise all sugars when grown in a chemically defined grape juice medium supplemented with limited nitrogen (75 mg L-1 as a free amino acid mixture). Through micro-scale and laboratory-scale fermentations, 15 deletants were identified that completed fermentation in a shorter time than the wildtype (c.a. 15%-59% time reduction). This group of genes was annotated to biological processes including protein modification, transport, metabolism and ubiquitination (UBC13, MMS2, UBP7, UBI4, BRO1, TPK2, EAR1, MRP17, MFA2 and MVB12), signalling (MFA2) and amino acid metabolism (AAT2). Deletion of MFA2, encoding mating factor-a, resulted in a 55% decrease in fermentation duration. Mfa2Δ was chosen for further investigation to understand how this gene deletion conferred fermentation efficiency in limited nitrogen conditions.

  3. Genetic polymorphism in ATG16L1 gene influences the response to adalimumab in Crohn's disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koder, Silvo; Repnik, Katja; Ferkolj, Ivan; Pernat, Cvetka; Skok, Pavel; Weersma, Rinse K.; Potocnik, Uros

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To see if SNPs could help predict response to biological therapy using adalimumab (ADA) in Crohn's disease (CD). Materials & methods: IBDQ index and CRP levels were used to monitor therapy response. We genotyped 31 CD-associated genes in 102 Slovenian CD patients. Results: The strongest

  4. Chicken Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene variants with influence on MBL serum concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærup, Rikke Munkholm; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Skjødt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    . The human MBL2 gene is highly polymorphic, and it causes varying MBL serum levels. Several of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with the severity of diseases of bacterial, viral or parasitic origin. Association between various diseases and different MBL serum levels has also...

  5. Gibberellin and auxin influence the diurnal transcription pattern of photoreceptor genes via CRY1a in tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Facella

    Full Text Available Plant photoreceptors, phytochromes and cryptochromes, regulate many aspects of development and growth, such as seed germination, stem elongation, seedling de-etiolation, cotyledon opening, flower induction and circadian rhythms. There are several pieces of evidence of interaction between photoreceptors and phyto-hormones in all of these physiological processes, but little is known about molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying hormone-photoreceptor crosstalk.In this work, we investigated the molecular effects of exogenous phyto-hormones to photoreceptor gene transcripts of tomato wt, as well as transgenic and mutant lines with altered cryptochromes, by monitoring day/night transcript oscillations. GA and auxin alter the diurnal expression level of different photoreceptor genes in tomato, especially in mutants that lack a working form of cryptochrome 1a: in those mutants the expression of some (IAA or most (GA photoreceptor genes is down regulated by these hormones.Our results highlight the presence of molecular relationships among cryptochrome 1a protein, hormones, and photoreceptors' gene expression in tomato, suggesting that manipulation of cryptochromes could represent a good strategy to understand in greater depth the role of phyto-hormones in the plant photoperceptive mechanism.

  6. Influence of UV-C irradiation on expansin and pectin-methylesterase gene expression in strawberry fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pombo, M.; Dotto, M.; Martinez, G.; Civello, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The exposure to UV-C delays fruit softening, one of the main factors determining fruit post harvest life. This delay in softening may be caused by changes in the activities of enzymes and proteins involved in cell wall disassembly. Expansins are cell wall proteins involved in fruit softening, while pectin-melhylesterases (PME) are cell wall enzymes related to pectin demethylation, and their activity is affected by heating, another physical treatment based on abiotic stress. We analyzed FaPME 1 gene expression in irradiated strawberry fruits and also measured PME activity after treatment. An increase in PME activity immediately after the treatment was found. The expression of FaEXP2, FaEXP4 and FaEXP5 genes was analyzed in the same fruit samples, as well as expansin protein accumulation. For these three genes we found a decrease in expression 4 h after treatment and an increase after 24 h. The decrease in gene expression after treatment correlated with a diminution of expansins. (author)

  7. Alterations in the 5 'untranslated region of the EPSPS gene influence EPSPS overexpression in glyphosate-resistant Eleusine indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Feng, Li; Tian, Xing-Shan

    2018-04-26

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Overexpression of the EPSPS gene is one of the molecular mechanisms conferring glyphosate resistance in weeds, but the transcriptional regulation of this gene is poorly understood. The EPSPS gene was found to be significantly up-regulated following glyphosate treatment in a glyphosate- resistant Eleusine indica population from South China. To further investigate the regulation of EPSPS overexpression, the promoter of the EPSPS gene from this E. indica population was cloned and analyzed. Two upstream regulatory sequences, Epro-S (862 bp) and Epro-R (877 bp) of EPSPS were obtained from glyphosate-susceptible (S) and -resistant (R) E. indica plants respectively by HiTAIL-PCR. The Epro-S and Epro-R sequences were 99% homologous, except for the two insertions (3 bp and12 bp) in the R sequence. The 12-base insertion of the Epro-R sequence was located in the 5'-UTR-Py-rich stretch element. The promoter activity tests showed that the 12-base insertion resulted in significant enhancement of the Epro-R promoter activity, whereas the 3-base insertion had little effect on Epro-R promoter activity. Alterations in the 5'-UTR-Py-rich stretch element of EPSPS are responsible for glyphosate induced EPSPS overexpression. Therefore, EPSPS transcriptional regulation confers glyphosate resistance in this E. indica population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Avian metapneumovirus SH gene end and G protein mutations influence the level of protection of live-vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Clive J; Ling, Roger; Edworthy, Nicole; Savage, Carol E; Easton, Andrew J

    2007-06-01

    A prototype avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) vaccine (P20) was previously shown to give variable outcomes in experimental trials. Following plaque purification, three of 12 viruses obtained from P20 failed to induce protection against virulent challenge, whilst the remainder retained their protective capacity. The genome sequences of two protective viruses were identical to the P20 consensus, whereas two non-protective viruses differed only in the SH gene transcription termination signal. Northern blotting showed that the alterations in the SH gene-end region of the non-protective viruses led to enhanced levels of dicistronic mRNA produced by transcriptional readthrough. A synthetic minigenome was used to demonstrate that the altered SH gene-end region reduced the level of protein expression from a downstream gene. The genomes of the remaining eight plaque-purified viruses were sequenced in the region where the P20 consensus sequence differed from the virulent progenitor. The seven protective clones were identical, whereas the non-protective virus retained the virulent progenitor sequence at two positions and contained extensive alterations in its attachment (G) protein sequence associated with a reduced or altered expression pattern of G protein on Western blots. The data indicate that the efficacy of a putative protective vaccine strain is affected by mutations altering the balance of G protein expression.

  9. The influence of VKORC1 and CYP2C9 gene sequence variants on the stability of maintenance phase warfarin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Jane; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Leppin, Anja

    2013-01-01

    alleles require lower doses and have increased risk of overanticoagulation. METHODS: We investigated the influence of the above sequence variants on stability of maintenance phase warfarin therapy in a prospective study of 300 consecutive patients followed for one year at an anticoagulant clinic. RESULTS...... of common gene sequence variants in CYP2C9 and VKORC1 on stability of maintenance phase warfarin therapy. Patients attending an anticoagulant clinic using computer-assisted dosage were safely monitored regardless of these sequence variants, but for the small subgroup of patients with the CYP2C9 genotype *2...

  10. Dietary approaches to stop hypertension influence on insulin receptor substrate-1gene expression: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Kafeshani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insulin receptor substrate (IRS Type 1 is a main substrate for the insulin receptor, controls insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the vascular, so it is an important candidate gene for insulin resistance (IR. We aimed to compare the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH and Usual Dietary Advices (UDA on IRS1 gene expression in women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed in 44 women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly assigned to a UDA diet or the DASH diet. The DASH diet was rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products and low in saturated fat, total fat, cholesterol, refined grains, and sweets, with a total of 2400 mg/day sodium. The UDA diet was a regular diet with healthy dietary advice. Gene expression was assessed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction at the first of study and after 12 weeks. Independent sample t-test and paired-samples t-test were used to compare means of all variables within and between two groups respectively. Results: IRS1 gene expression was increased in DASH group compared with UDA diet (P = 0.00. Weight and waist circumference decreased in DASH group significantly compared to the UDA group (P < 0.05 but the results between the two groups showed no significant difference. Conclusion: DASH diet increased IRS1 gene expression and probably has beneficial effects on IR risks.

  11. An adenylyl cyclase like-9 gene (NlAC9) influences growth and fecundity in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, LinQuan; Gu, HaoTian; Huang, Bo; Song, Qisheng; Stanley, David; Liu, Fang; Yang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2017-01-01

    The cAMP/PKA intracellular signaling pathway is launched by adenylyl cyclase (AC) conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to 3', 5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent activation of PKA. Although this pathway is very well known in insect physiology, there is little to no information on it in some very small pest insects, such as the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens Stål. BPH is a destructive pest responsible for tremendous crop losses in rice cropping systems. We are investigating the potentials of novel pest management technologies from RNA interference perspective. Based on analysis of transcriptomic data, the BPH AC like-9 gene (NlAC9) was up-regulated in post-mating females, which led us to pose the hypothesis that NlAC9 is a target gene that would lead to reduced BPH fitness and populations. Targeting NlAC9 led to substantially decreased soluble ovarian protein content, yeast-like symbiont abundance, and vitellogenin gene expression, accompanied with stunted ovarian development and body size. Eggs laid were decreased and oviposition period shortened. Taken together, our findings indicated that NlAC9 exerted pronounced effects on female fecundity, growth and longevity, which strongly supports our hypothesis.

  12. An adenylyl cyclase like-9 gene (NlAC9 influences growth and fecundity in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål (Hemiptera: Delphacidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LinQuan Ge

    Full Text Available The cAMP/PKA intracellular signaling pathway is launched by adenylyl cyclase (AC conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP to 3', 5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP and cAMP-dependent activation of PKA. Although this pathway is very well known in insect physiology, there is little to no information on it in some very small pest insects, such as the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens Stål. BPH is a destructive pest responsible for tremendous crop losses in rice cropping systems. We are investigating the potentials of novel pest management technologies from RNA interference perspective. Based on analysis of transcriptomic data, the BPH AC like-9 gene (NlAC9 was up-regulated in post-mating females, which led us to pose the hypothesis that NlAC9 is a target gene that would lead to reduced BPH fitness and populations. Targeting NlAC9 led to substantially decreased soluble ovarian protein content, yeast-like symbiont abundance, and vitellogenin gene expression, accompanied with stunted ovarian development and body size. Eggs laid were decreased and oviposition period shortened. Taken together, our findings indicated that NlAC9 exerted pronounced effects on female fecundity, growth and longevity, which strongly supports our hypothesis.

  13. Expression of a single siRNA against a conserved region of NP gene strongly inhibits in vitro replication of different Influenza A virus strains of avian and swine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppani, Elena; Bassi, Ivan; Dotti, Silvia; Lizier, Michela; Ferrari, Maura; Lucchini, Franco

    2015-08-01

    Influenza A virus is the principal agent responsible of the respiratory tract's infections in humans. Every year, highly pathogenic and infectious strains with new antigenic assets appear, making ineffective vaccines so far developed. The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) opened the way to the progress of new promising drugs against Influenza A virus and also to the introduction of disease resistance traits in genetically modified animals. In this paper, we show that Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) cassette, designed on a specific conserved region of the nucleoprotein (NP) viral genome, can strongly inhibit the viral replication of four viral strains sharing the target sequence, reducing the viral mRNA respectively to 2.5×10(-4), 7.5×10(-5), 1.7×10(-3), 1.9×10(-4) compared to the control, as assessed by real-time PCR. Moreover, we demonstrate that during the challenge with a viral strain bearing a single mismatch on the target sequence, although a weaker inhibition is observed, viral mRNA is still lowered down to 1.2×10(-3) folds in the shRNA-expressing clone compared to the control, indicating a broad potential use of this approach. In addition, we developed a highly predictive and fast screening test of siRNA sequences based on dual-luciferase assay, useful for the in vitro prediction of the potential effect of viral inhibition. In conclusion, these findings reveal new siRNA sequences able to inhibit Influenza A virus replication and provide a basis for the development of siRNAs as prophylaxis and therapy for influenza infection both in humans and animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An intronic polymorphism of IRF4 gene influences gene transcription in vitro and shows a risk association with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Thuy N; Ucisik-Akkaya, Esma; Davis, Charronne F; Morrison, Brittany A; Dorak, M Tevfik

    2010-02-01

    The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family of DNA-binding proteins regulates expression of interferon-inducible genes with roles in the immune response and carcinogenesis. IRF4 is involved in the differentiation of B and T cells and is overexpressed in B-cell malignancies as a result of c-REL (NF-kappaB) hyperactivation. IRF4 polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We examined 13 IRF4 SNPs in 114 cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 388 newborn controls from Wales (U.K.) using TaqMan assays. IRF4 intron 4 SNP rs12203592 showed a male-specific risk association (OR=4.4, 95% CI=1.5 to 12.6, P=0.007). Functional consequences of the C>T substitution at this SNP were assessed by cell-based reporter assays using three different cell lines. We found a repressive effect of the rs12203592 wildtype allele C on IRF4 promoter activity (Pcell line tested. Thus, homozygosity for the rs12203592 variant allele would result in increased IRF4 expression. This increase would be compounded by high levels of NF-kappaB activity in males due to the absence of estrogen. IRF4 differs from other IRFs in its anti-interferon activity which interferes with immune surveillance. We propose that a detailed study of IRF4 can provide information on the mechanism of the sex effect and the role of immune surveillance in childhood ALL development. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Powerful bivariate genome-wide association analyses suggest the SOX6 gene influencing both obesity and osteoporosis phenotypes in males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Zhong Liu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS are normally implemented in a univariate framework and analyze different phenotypes in isolation. This univariate approach ignores the potential genetic correlation between important disease traits. Hence this approach is difficult to detect pleiotropic genes, which may exist for obesity and osteoporosis, two common diseases of major public health importance that are closely correlated genetically.To identify such pleiotropic genes and the key mechanistic links between the two diseases, we here performed the first bivariate GWAS of obesity and osteoporosis. We searched for genes underlying co-variation of the obesity phenotype, body mass index (BMI, with the osteoporosis risk phenotype, hip bone mineral density (BMD, scanning approximately 380,000 SNPs in 1,000 unrelated homogeneous Caucasians, including 499 males and 501 females. We identified in the male subjects two SNPs in intron 1 of the SOX6 (SRY-box 6 gene, rs297325 and rs4756846, which were bivariately associated with both BMI and hip BMD, achieving p values of 6.82x10(-7 and 1.47x10(-6, respectively. The two SNPs ranked at the top in significance for bivariate association with BMI and hip BMD in the male subjects among all the approximately 380,000 SNPs examined genome-wide. The two SNPs were replicated in a Framingham Heart Study (FHS cohort containing 3,355 Caucasians (1,370 males and 1,985 females from 975 families. In the FHS male subjects, the two SNPs achieved p values of 0.03 and 0.02, respectively, for bivariate association with BMI and femoral neck BMD. Interestingly, SOX6 was previously found to be essential to both cartilage formation/chondrogenesis and obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting the gene's dual role in both bone and fat.Our findings, together with the prior biological evidence, suggest the SOX6 gene's importance in co-regulation of obesity and osteoporosis.

  16. Powerful Bivariate Genome-Wide Association Analyses Suggest the SOX6 Gene Influencing Both Obesity and Osteoporosis Phenotypes in Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Zhong; Pei, Yu-Fang; Liu, Jian-Feng; Yang, Fang; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Yan, Han; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Yin-Ping; Levy, Shawn; Recker, Robert R.; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Background Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are normally implemented in a univariate framework and analyze different phenotypes in isolation. This univariate approach ignores the potential genetic correlation between important disease traits. Hence this approach is difficult to detect pleiotropic genes, which may exist for obesity and osteoporosis, two common diseases of major public health importance that are closely correlated genetically. Principal Findings To identify such pleiotropic genes and the key mechanistic links between the two diseases, we here performed the first bivariate GWAS of obesity and osteoporosis. We searched for genes underlying co-variation of the obesity phenotype, body mass index (BMI), with the osteoporosis risk phenotype, hip bone mineral density (BMD), scanning ∼380,000 SNPs in 1,000 unrelated homogeneous Caucasians, including 499 males and 501 females. We identified in the male subjects two SNPs in intron 1 of the SOX6 (SRY-box 6) gene, rs297325 and rs4756846, which were bivariately associated with both BMI and hip BMD, achieving p values of 6.82×10−7 and 1.47×10−6, respectively. The two SNPs ranked at the top in significance for bivariate association with BMI and hip BMD in the male subjects among all the ∼380,000 SNPs examined genome-wide. The two SNPs were replicated in a Framingham Heart Study (FHS) cohort containing 3,355 Caucasians (1,370 males and 1,985 females) from 975 families. In the FHS male subjects, the two SNPs achieved p values of 0.03 and 0.02, respectively, for bivariate association with BMI and femoral neck BMD. Interestingly, SOX6 was previously found to be essential to both cartilage formation/chondrogenesis and obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting the gene's dual role in both bone and fat. Conclusions Our findings, together with the prior biological evidence, suggest the SOX6 gene's importance in co-regulation of obesity and osteoporosis. PMID:19714249

  17. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoric, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis discusses certain aspects of the turbulence of a fully ionised non-isothermal plasma dominated by the Langmuir mode. Some of the basic properties of strongly turbulent plasmas are reviewed. In particular, interest is focused on the state of Langmuir turbulence, that is the turbulence of a simple externally unmagnetized plasma. The problem of the existence and dynamics of Langmuir collapse is discussed, often met as a non-linear stage of the modulational instability in the framework of the Zakharov equations (i.e. simple time-averaged dynamical equations). Possible macroscopic consequences of such dynamical turbulent models are investigated. In order to study highly non-linear collapse dynamics in its advanced stage, a set of generalized Zakharov equations are derived. Going beyond the original approximation, the author includes the effects of higher electron non-linearities and a breakdown of slow-timescale quasi-neutrality. He investigates how these corrections may influence the collapse stabilisation. Recently, it has been realised that the modulational instability in a Langmuir plasma will be accompanied by the collisionless-generation of a slow-timescale magnetic field. Accordingly, a novel physical situation has emerged which is investigated in detail. The stability of monochromatic Langmuir waves in a self-magnetized Langmuir plasma, is discussed, and the existence of a novel magneto-modulational instability shown. The wave collapse dynamics is investigated and a physical interpretation of the basic results is given. A problem of the transient analysis of an interaction of time-dependent electromagnetic pulses with linear cold plasma media is investigated. (Auth.)

  18. Influence of the 5-HT3A Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Childhood Sexual Trauma on Central Serotonin Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuk-In Jang

    Full Text Available Gene-environment interactions are important for understanding alterations in human brain function. The loudness dependence of auditory evoked potential (LDAEP is known to reflect central serotonergic activity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the 5-HT3A serotonin receptor gene are associated with psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to investigate the effect between 5-HT3A receptor gene polymorphisms and childhood sexual trauma on the LDAEP as an electrophysiological marker in healthy subjects.A total of 206 healthy subjects were recruited and evaluated using the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS. Peak-to-peak N1/P2 was measured at five stimulus intensities, and the LDAEP was calculated as the linear-regression slope. In addition, the rs1062613 SNPs of 5-HT3A (CC, CT, and TT were analyzed in healthy subjects.There was a significant interaction between scores on the CTQ-sexual abuse subscale and 5-HT3A genotype on the LDAEP. Subjects with the CC polymorphism had a significantly higher LDEAP than T carriers in the sexually abused group. In addition, CC genotype subjects in the sexually abused group showed a significantly higher LDAEP compared with CC genotype subjects in the non-sexually abused group.Our findings suggest that people with the CC polymorphism of the 5-HT3A gene have a greater risk of developing mental health problems if they have experienced childhood sexual abuse, possibly due to low central serotonin activity. Conversely, the T polymorphism may be protective against any central serotonergic changes following childhood sexual trauma.

  19. Influence of correlation between HLA-G polymorphism and Interleukin-6 (IL6) gene expression on the risk of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, Venkataram; Debnath, Monojit; Venugopal, Deepthi; Rajasekaran, Ashwini; Kalmady, Sunil V; Subbanna, Manjula; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Amaresha, Anekal C; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2018-07-01

    Converging evidence suggests important implications of immuno-inflammatory pathway in the risk and progression of schizophrenia. Prenatal infection resulting in maternal immune activation and developmental neuroinflammation reportedly increases the risk of schizophrenia in the offspring by generating pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6. However, it is not known how prenatal infection can induce immuno-inflammatory responses despite the presence of immuno-inhibitory Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules. To address this, the present study was aimed at examining the correlation between 14 bp Insertion/Deletion (INDEL) polymorphism of HLA-G and IL-6 gene expression in schizophrenia patients. The 14 bp INDEL polymorphism was studied by PCR amplification/direct sequencing and IL-6 gene expression was quantified by using real-time RT-PCR in 56 schizophrenia patients and 99 healthy controls. We observed significantly low IL6 gene expression in the peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of schizophrenia patients (t = 3.8, p = .004) compared to the controls. In addition, schizophrenia patients carrying Del/Del genotype of HLA-G 14 bp INDEL exhibited significantly lower IL6 gene expression (t = 3.1; p = .004) than the Del/Ins as well as Ins/Ins carriers. Our findings suggest that presence of "high-expressor" HLA-G 14 bp Del/Del genotype in schizophrenia patients could attenuate IL-6 mediated inflammation in schizophrenia. Based on these findings it can be assumed that HLA-G and cytokine interactions might play an important role in the immunological underpinnings of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of mutations in some structural genes of heat-shock proteins on radiation resistance of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbenko, V.N.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; Bikineeva, E.G.; Kalinin, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lethal effects of γ-irradiation were studied in Escherichia coli strains with normal repair genotype and in radiation-resistant Gam r strains, both carrying additional mutations in the structural genes dnaK, grpE, groES or groEL. The null mutation ΔdnaK52::Cm r enhanced radiation sensitivity of wild-type cells and abolished the effect of heat induced rediation-resistance (ETIRR) and elevated radiation resistance of the Gam r strains

  1. Influence of crop load on the expression patterns of starch metabolism genes in alternate-bearing Citrus trees.

    OpenAIRE

    González Nebauer, Sergio; Renau Morata, Begoña; Lluch Gomez, Yolanda Patricia; BAROJA FERNANDEZ, EDURNE; POZUETA-ROMERO, JAVIER; Molina Romero, Rosa Victoria

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The fruit is the main sink organ in Citrus and captures almost all available photoassimilates during its development. Consequently, carbohydrate partitioning and starch content depend on the crop load of Citrus trees. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the starch metabolism at the tree level in relation to presence of fruit. The aim of this study was to find the relation between the seasonal variation of expression and activity of the genes involved in carbon...

  2. Influence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator on expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadri Luis EN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. Infections of the respiratory tract are a hallmark in CF. The host immune responses in CF are not adequate to eradicate pathogens, such as P. aeruginosa. Dendritic cells (DC are crucial in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Changes in DC function could contribute to abnormal immune responses on multiple levels. The role of DC in CF lung disease remains unknown. Methods This study investigated the expression of CFTR gene in bone marrow-derived DC. We compared the differentiation and maturation profile of DC from CF and wild type (WT mice. We analyzed the gene expression levels in DC from naive CF and WT mice or following P. aeruginosa infection. Results CFTR is expressed in DC with lower level compared to lung tissue. DC from CF mice showed a delayed in the early phase of differentiation. Gene expression analysis in DC generated from naive CF and WT mice revealed decreased expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav1, a membrane lipid raft protein, in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Consistently, protein and activity levels of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, a negative regulator of Cav1 expression, were increased in CF DC. Following exposure to P. aeruginosa, expression of 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7 reductase (Dhcr7 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2, two enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism that are also regulated by SREBP, was less decreased in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Conclusion These results suggest that CFTR dysfunction in DC affects factors involved in membrane structure and lipid-metabolism, which may contribute to the abnormal inflammatory and immune response characteristic of CF.

  3. Diets high in corn oil or extra-virgin olive oil differentially modify the gene expression profile of the mammary gland and influence experimental breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, Raquel; Escrich, Raquel; Solanas, Montserrat; Vela, Elena; Ruiz de Villa, M Carme; Escrich, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    Nutritional factors, especially dietary lipids, may have a role in the etiology of breast cancer. We aimed to analyze the effects of high-fat diets on the susceptibility of the mammary gland to experimental malignant transformation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a low-fat, high-corn-oil, or high-extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) diet from weaning or from induction. Animals were induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene at 53 days and euthanized at 36, 51, 100 and 246 days. Gene expression profiles of mammary glands were determined by microarrays. Further molecular analyses were performed by real-time PCR, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry. Carcinogenesis parameters were determined at 105 and 246 days. High-corn-oil diet increased body weight and mass when administered from weaning. The EVOO diet did not modify these parameters and increased the hepatic expression of UCP2, suggesting a decrease in intake/expenditure balance. Both diets differentially modified the gene expression profile of the mammary gland, especially after short dietary intervention. Corn oil down-regulated the expression of genes related to immune system and apoptosis, whereas EVOO modified the expression of metabolism genes. Further analysis suggested an increase in proliferation and lower apoptosis in the mammary glands by effect of the high-corn-oil diet, which may be one of the mechanisms of its clear stimulating effect on carcinogenesis. The high-corn-oil diet strongly stimulates mammary tumorigenesis in association with modifications in the expression profile and an increased proliferation/apoptosis balance of the mammary gland.

  4. The Mutyh base excision repair gene influences the inflammatory response in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Casorelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mutyh DNA glycosylase is involved in the repair of oxidized DNA bases. Mutations in the human MUTYH gene are responsible for colorectal cancer in familial adenomatous polyposis. Since defective DNA repair genes might contribute to the increased cancer risk associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, we compared the inflammatory response of wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice to oxidative stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The severity of colitis, changes in expression of genes involved in DNA repair and inflammation, DNA 8-oxoguanine levels and microsatellite instability were analysed in colon of mice treated with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS. The Mutyh(-/- phenotype was associated with a significant accumulation of 8-oxoguanine in colon DNA of treated mice. A single DSS cycle induced severe acute ulcerative colitis in wild-type mice, whereas lesions were modest in Mutyh(-/- mice, and this was associated with moderate variations in the expression of several cytokines. Eight DSS cycles caused chronic colitis in both wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice. Lymphoid hyperplasia and a significant reduction in Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells were observed only in Mutyh(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that, in this model of ulcerative colitis, Mutyh plays a major role in maintaining intestinal integrity by affecting the inflammatory response.

  5. Gene-by-Psychosocial Factor Interactions Influence Diastolic Blood Pressure in European and African Ancestry Populations: Meta-Analysis of Four Cohort Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Smith

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variability in blood pressure (BP is influenced by both genetic and non-genetic factors including socioeconomic and psychosocial stressors. A deeper understanding of the gene-by-socioeconomic/psychosocial factor interactions on BP may help to identify individuals that are genetically susceptible to high BP in specific social contexts. In this study, we used a genomic region-based method for longitudinal analysis, Longitudinal Gene-Environment-Wide Interaction Studies (LGEWIS, to evaluate the effects of interactions between known socioeconomic/psychosocial and genetic risk factors on systolic and diastolic BP in four large epidemiologic cohorts of European and/or African ancestry. After correction for multiple testing, two interactions were significantly associated with diastolic BP. In European ancestry participants, outward/trait anger score had a significant interaction with the C10orf107 genomic region (p = 0.0019. In African ancestry participants, depressive symptom score had a significant interaction with the HFE genomic region (p = 0.0048. This study provides a foundation for using genomic region-based longitudinal analysis to identify subgroups of the population that may be at greater risk of elevated BP due to the combined influence of genetic and socioeconomic/psychosocial risk factors.

  6. The Influences of Bacillus subtilis on the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila and Expression of luxS Gene of Both Bacteria Under Co-cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuwei; Li, Sisi; Wu, Zhixin; Zhou, Chengchong; Zhang, Ding; Chen, Xiaoxuan

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the influence of Bacillus subtilis CH9 on Aeromonas hydrophila SC2005. The transcription level of virulence genes of A. hydrophila SC2005 and its hemolysin activity as well as its cytotoxicity were analyzed when B. subtilis CH9 and A. hydrophila SC2005 were co-cultured. The results indicated that the transcription levels of four virulence genes of A. hydrophila, including aer, ahyB, hcp, and emp, decreased when A. hydrophila was cultured with B. subtilis CH9. Furthermore, the extracellular products of A. hydrophila showed attenuated hemolysin activity as well as cytotoxicity when A. hydrophila was cultured with B. subtilis CH9. Finally, the transcriptional levels of luxS genes of B. subtilis CH9 and A. hydrophila SC2005 were determined when these two species were co-cultured. RT-qPCR results suggested that the transcription level of A. hydrophila was down-regulated significantly. On the contrary, the transcription level of B. subtilis CH9 was up-regulated significantly. These results suggested that the probiotic role of B. subtilis CH9 is related to the inhibition of growth and virulence of A. hydrophila SC2005, and quorum sensing may be involved.

  7. Short rare hTERT-VNTR2-2nd alleles are associated with prostate cancer susceptibility and influence gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Se-Lyun; Cheon, Sang-Hyeon; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jung, Se-Il; Do, Eun-Ju; Lee, Se-Ra; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Chu, In-Sun; Kim, Wun-Jae; Jung, Jaeil; Kim, Choung Soo

    2010-01-01

    The hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) gene contains five variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and previous studies have described polymorphisms for hTERT-VNTR2-2 nd . We investigated how allelic variation in hTERT-VNTR2-2 nd may affect susceptibility to prostate cancer. A case-control study was performed using DNA from 421 cancer-free male controls and 329 patients with prostate cancer. In addition, to determine whether the VNTR polymorphisms have a functional consequence, we examined the transcriptional levels of a reporter gene linked to these VNTRs and driven by the hTERT promoter in cell lines. Three new rare alleles were detected from this study, two of which were identified only in cancer subjects. A statistically significant association between rare hTERT-VNTR2-2 nd alleles and risk of prostate cancer was observed [OR, 5.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-24.43; P = 0.021]. Furthermore, the results indicated that these VNTRs inserted in the enhancer region could influence the expression of hTERT in prostate cancer cell lines. This is the first study to report that rare hTERT VNTRs are associated with prostate cancer predisposition and that the VNTRs can induce enhanced levels of hTERT promoter activity in prostate cancer cell lines. Thus, the hTERT-VNTR2-2 nd locus may function as a modifier of prostate cancer risk by affecting gene expression

  8. The influence of L-opsin gene polymorphisms and neural ageing on spatio-chromatic contrast sensitivity in 20-71 year olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Elise W; Gilson, Stuart J; Neitz, Maureen; Baraas, Rigmor C

    2015-11-01

    Chromatic contrast sensitivity may be a more sensitive measure of an individual's visual function than achromatic contrast sensitivity. Here, the first aim was to quantify individual- and age-related variations in chromatic contrast sensitivity to a range of spatial frequencies for stimuli along two complementary directions in color space. The second aim was to examine whether polymorphisms at specific amino acid residues of the L- and M-opsin genes (OPN1LW and OPN1MW) known to affect spectral tuning of the photoreceptors could influence spatio-chromatic contrast sensitivity. Chromatic contrast sensitivity functions were measured in 50 healthy individuals (20-71 years) employing a novel pseudo-isochromatic grating stimulus. The spatio-chromatic contrast sensitivity functions were found to be low pass for all subjects, independent of age and color vision. The results revealed a senescent decline in spatio-chromatic contrast sensitivity. There were considerable between-individual differences in sensitivity within each age decade for individuals 49 years old or younger, and age did not predict sensitivity for these age decades alone. Forty-six subjects (including a color deficient male and eight female carriers) were genotyped for L- and M-opsin genes. The Ser180Ala polymorphisms on the L-opsin gene were found to influence the subject's color discrimination and their sensitivity to spatio-chromatic patterns. The results expose the significant role of neural and genetic factors in the deterioration of visual function with increasing age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of night-shift and napping at work on urinary melatonin, 17-β-estradiol and clock gene expression in pre-menopausal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, M; Copertaro, A; Manzella, N; Staffolani, S; Strafella, E; Nocchi, L; Barbaresi, M; Copertaro, B; Rapisarda, V; Valentino, M; Santarelli, L

    2013-01-01

    Night-workers experience disruption of the sleep-wake cycle and light at night which may increase breast cancer risk by suppressing the nocturnal melatonin surge, resulting in higher levels of circulating estrogens. Night-work may also deregulate peripheral clock genes which have been found to be altered in breast cancer. This study investigated urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), serum 17-beta-estradiol levels in premenopausal shift nurses at the end of the night-shift compared to a control group of daytime nurses. Peripheral clock gene expression in lymphocytes were also investigated. All participants were sampled in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. The effect of nurses’ ability to take a short nap during the night-shift was also explored. The shift-work group had significantly lower aMT6s levels than daytime nurses independently of a nap. Night-shift napping significantly influences 17-beta-estradiol levels resulting in higher outcomes in nurses who do not take a nap compared to napping group and daytime workers. Peripheral clock genes expression investigated was not significantly different among the groups. Our findings suggest that shift nurses experience changes in aMT6s levels after a night-shift. Napping habits influence 17-beta-estradiol levels at the end of a night-shift. These findings might be related to the increased cancer risk reported in night-shift workers and suggest that a short nap during night-shifts may exert a positive effect.

  10. Microbial ecology, bacterial pathogens, and antibiotic resistant genes in swine manure as influenced by three swine management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The environmental influence of farm management in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) can yield vastly different microbial constituents in both the pig and the manure lagoons used to treat the fecal waste of the operation. While some of these changes may not be negative, it is possible th...

  11. Cry1Ab expression rice does not influence expression of fecundity related genes in the wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin proteins on the arthropod assemblages in rice agroecosystems, including non-target predatory arthropods, has been well documented. However, the influence of Bt toxins on predators remains understudied at the cellular and molecular levels. Here, we inve...

  12. Quantum electrodynamics of strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields provides a broad survey of the theoretical and experimental work accomplished, presenting papers by a group of international researchers who have made significant contributions to this developing area. Exploring the quantum theory of strong fields, the volume focuses on the phase transition to a charged vacuum in strong electric fields. The contributors also discuss such related topics as QED at short distances, precision tests of QED, nonperturbative QCD and confinement, pion condensation, and strong gravitational fields In addition, the volume features a historical paper on the roots of quantum field theory in the history of quantum physics by noted researcher Friedrich Hund

  13. Instabilities in strongly coupled plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kalman, G J

    2003-01-01

    The conventional Vlasov treatment of beam-plasma instabilities is inappropriate when the plasma is strongly coupled. In the strongly coupled liquid state, the strong correlations between the dust grains fundamentally affect the conditions for instability. In the crystalline state, the inherent anisotropy couples the longitudinal and transverse polarizations, and results in unstable excitations in both polarizations. We summarize analyses of resonant and non-resonant, as well as resistive instabilities. We consider both ion-dust streaming and dust beam-plasma instabilities. Strong coupling, in general, leads to an enhancement of the growth rates. In the crystalline phase, a resonant transverse instability can be excited.

  14. Fatty acid CoA ligase-4 gene polymorphism influences fatty acid metabolism in metabolic syndrome, but not in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Miroslav; Vecka, Marek; Jáchymová, Marie; Jirák, Roman; Tvrzická, Eva; Stanková, Barbora; Zák, Ales

    2009-04-01

    The composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in cell membranes and body tissues is altered in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and depressive disorder (DD). Within the cell, fatty acid coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs) activate PUFAs by esterifying with CoA. The FACL4 isoform prefers PUFAs (arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid) as substrates, and the FACL4 gene is mapped to Xq23. We have analyzed the association between the common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs1324805, C to T substitution) in the first intron of the FACL4 gene and MetS or DD. The study included 113 healthy subjects (54 Males/59 Females), 56 MetS patients (34M/22F) and 41 DD patients (7M/34F). In MetS group, T-carriers and patients with CC or C0 (CC/C0) genotype did not differ in the values of metabolic indices of MetS and M/F ratio. Nevertheless, in comparison with CC/C0, the T-allele carriers were characterized by enhanced unfavorable changes in fatty acid metabolism typical for MetS: higher content of dihomogammalinolenic acid (P phosphatidylcholine (PC) (P = 0.052), lower index of Delta5 desaturation (P insulin, conjugated dienes and index of insulin resistance, but showed no significant association with the studied SNP. The present study shows that the common SNP (C to T substitution) in the first intron of the FACL4 gene is associated with altered FA composition of plasma phosphatidylcholines in patients with MetS.

  15. Influence of high glucose and advanced glycation end-products (ages) levels in human osteoblast-like cells gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Cristina; Giner, Mercè; Montoya, M José; Vázquez, M Angeles; Miranda, M José; Pérez-Cano, Ramón

    2016-08-31

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. Several factors have been identified as being potentially responsible for this risk, such as alterations in bone remodelling that may have been induced by changes in circulating glucose or/and by the presence of non-oxidative end products of glycosylation (AGEs). The aim of this study is to assess whether such variations generate a change in the gene expression related to the differentiation and osteoblast activity (OPG, RANKL, RUNX2, OSTERIX, and AGE receptor) in primary cultures of human osteoblast-like cells (hOB). We recruited 32 patients; 10 patients had osteoporotic hip fractures (OP group), 12 patients had osteoporotic hip fractures with T2DM (T2DM group), and 10 patients had hip osteoarthritis (OA group) with no osteoporotic fractures and no T2DM. The gene expression was analyzed in hOB cultures treated with physiological glucose concentration (4.5 mM) as control, high glucose (25 mM), and high glucose plus AGEs (2 μg/ml) for 24 h. The hOB cultures from patients with hip fractures presented slower proliferation. Additionally, the hOB cultures from the T2DM group were the most negatively affected with respect to RUNX2 and OSX gene expression when treated solely with high glucose or with high glucose plus AGEs. Moreover, high levels of glucose induced a major decrease in the RANKL/OPG ratio when comparing the OP and the T2DM groups to the OA group. Our data indicates an altered bone remodelling rate in the T2DM group, which may, at least partially, explain the reduced bone strength and increased incidence of non-traumatic fractures in diabetic patients.

  16. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase gene polymorphisms in healthy North Indians compared to variations in other ethnic groups worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Kapoor, Rakesh; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases have a range of biological functions, including the liberation of cytokines and membrane-bound receptors, with roles in promotion of tumor invasion and angiogenesis. Several polymorphisms in MMPs have been implicated in the development of cancer as well as other diseases. Since their frequency distributions in the general North Indian population is not known the present study was conducted with the focus on MMP-1(-519) Aandgt; G, MMP-1(-1607) 1Gandgt; 2G, and MMP-7(-181) Aandgt; G gene polymorphisms. PCR-based analysis was conducted for 200 normal healthy individuals of similar ethnicity. Allelic frequencies in wild type of MMP-1(-519) Aandgt; G were 71.2% A; MMP-1(-1607) 1Gandgt; 2G 48.2% 1G; MMP-7(-181) Aandgt; G 60.7% A. The variant allele frequencies were 29% A in MMP-1(-519) Aandgt; G; 52% 2G in MMP-1(-1607) 1Gandgt; 2G; and 39.3% G in MMP-7(-181) Aandgt; G respectively. We further compared frequency distribution for these genes with various published studies in different ethnicity globally. Our results suggest that frequency in these MMP genes exhibit distinctive patterns in India that could perhaps be attributed to ethnic variation. This study is important as it can form a baseline for screening individuals who are at high risk when exposed to environmental carcinogens. More emphasis is needed on evaluating polymorphisms, alone or in combination, as modifiers of risk from relevant environmental/lifestyle exposures.

  17. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism independently influences recovery of male sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy in postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Delli Muti, Nicola; Corona, Giovanni; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Few and contradictory studies have evaluated the possible influence of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism on male sexual function. In this study we evaluated the role of AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism in the recovery of sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition which is often associated with hypopituitarism and in which the sexual benefits of TRT must be distinguished from those of pituitary-function replacement therapies. Fifteen men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT. Main outcome measures included sexual parameters as assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire, levels of pituitary dependent hormones (total testosterone, free T3, free T4, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 [IGF-1], prolactin), and results of genetic analysis (AR gene CAG repeat number). Plasma concentrations of free T3, free T4, cortisol, and prolactin did not vary significantly between the two phases, while testosterone and IGF-1 increased significantly after TRT. A significant improvement in all sexual parameters studied was found. The number of CAG triplets was negatively and significantly correlated with changes in all the sexual parameters, while opposite correlations were found between changes in sexual parameters and changes in testosterone levels; no correlation of change in IGF1 with change in sexual parameters was reported. On multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for changes in testosterone, nearly all the associations between the number of CAG triplets and changes in sexual parameters were confirmed. Shorter length AR gene CAG repeat number is associated with the recovery of sexual function after TRT in postsurgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, independently of the effects of concomitant pituitary-replacement therapies. © 2014 International Society

  18. Porcine SOX9 Gene Expression Is Influenced by an 18 bp Indel in the 5'-Untranslated Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram Brenig

    Full Text Available Sex determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9 is an important regulator of sex and skeletal development and is expressed in a variety of embryonal and adult tissues. Loss or gain of function resulting from mutations within the coding region or chromosomal aberrations of the SOX9 locus lead to a plethora of detrimental phenotypes in humans and animals. One of these phenotypes is the so-called male-to-female or female-to-male sex-reversal which has been observed in several mammals including pig, dog, cat, goat, horse, and deer. In 38,XX sex-reversal French Large White pigs, a genome-wide association study suggested SOX9 as the causal gene, although no functional mutations were identified in affected animals. However, besides others an 18 bp indel had been detected in the 5'-untranslated region of the SOX9 gene by comparing affected animals and controls. We have identified the same indel (Δ18 between position +247 bp and +266 bp downstream the transcription start site of the porcine SOX9 gene in four other pig breeds; i.e., German Large White, Laiwu Black, Bamei, and Erhualian. These animals have been genotyped in an attempt to identify candidate genes for porcine inguinal and/or scrotal hernia. Because the 18 bp segment in the wild type 5'-UTR harbours a highly conserved cAMP-response element (CRE half-site, we analysed its role in SOX9 expression in vitro. Competition and immunodepletion electromobility shift assays demonstrate that the CRE half-site is specifically recognized by CREB. Both binding of CREB to the wild type as well as the absence of the CRE half-site in Δ18 reduced expression efficiency in HEK293T, PK-15, and ATDC5 cells significantly. Transfection experiments of wild type and Δ18 SOX9 promoter luciferase constructs show a significant reduction of RNA and protein levels depending on the presence or absence of the 18 bp segment. Hence, the data presented here demonstrate that the 18 bp indel in the porcine SOX9 5'-UTR is of functional

  19. Variation in the gene coding for the M5 Muscarinic receptor (CHRM5 influences cigarette dose but is not associated with dependence to drugs of addiction: evidence from a prospective population based cohort study of young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Craig A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mesolimbic structures of the brain are important in the anticipation and perception of reward. Moreover, many drugs of addiction elicit their response in these structures. The M5 muscarinic receptor (M5R is expressed in dopamine-containing neurones of the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area, and regulates the release of mesolimbic dopamine. Mice lacking M5R show a substantial reduction in both reward and withdrawal responses to morphine and cocaine. The CHRM5, the gene that codes for the M5R, is a strong biological candidate for a role in human addiction. We screened the coding and core promoter sequences of CHRM5 using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography to identify common polymorphisms. Additional polymorphisms within the coding and core promoter regions that were identified through dbSNP were validated in the test population. We investigated whether these polymorphisms influence substance dependence and dose in a cohort of 1947 young Australians. Results Analysis was performed on 815 participants of European ancestry who were interviewed at wave 8 of the cohort study and provided DNA. We observed a 26.8% increase in cigarette consumption in carriers of the rs7162140 T-allele, equating to 20.1 cigarettes per week (p=0.01. Carriers of the rs7162140 T-allele were also found to have nearly a 3-fold increased risk of developing cannabis dependence (OR=2.9 (95%CI 1.1-7.4; p=0.03. Conclusion Our data suggest that variation within the CHRM5 locus may play an important role in tobacco and cannabis but not alcohol addiction in European ancestry populations. This is the first study to show an association between CHRM5 and substance use in humans. These data support the further investigation of this gene as a risk factor in substance use and dependence.

  20. Maternal experience with predation risk influences genome-wide embryonic gene expression in threespined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommer, Brett C; Bell, Alison M

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence for nongenetic effects of maternal experience on offspring. For example, previous studies have shown that female threespined stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to predation risk produce offspring with altered behavior, metabolism and stress physiology. Here, we investigate the effect of maternal exposure to predation risk on the embryonic transcriptome in sticklebacks. Using RNA-sequencing we compared genome-wide transcription in three day post-fertilization embryos of predator-exposed and control mothers. There were hundreds of differentially expressed transcripts between embryos of predator-exposed mothers and embryos of control mothers including several non-coding RNAs. Gene Ontology analysis revealed biological pathways involved in metabolism, epigenetic inheritance, and neural proliferation and differentiation that differed between treatments. Interestingly, predation risk is associated with an accelerated life history in many vertebrates, and several of the genes and biological pathways that were identified in this study suggest that maternal exposure to predation risk accelerates the timing of embryonic development. Consistent with this hypothesis, embryos of predator-exposed mothers were larger than embryos of control mothers. These findings point to some of the molecular mechanisms that might underlie maternal effects.

  1. Maternal experience with predation risk influences genome-wide embryonic gene expression in threespined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett C Mommer

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence for nongenetic effects of maternal experience on offspring. For example, previous studies have shown that female threespined stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus exposed to predation risk produce offspring with altered behavior, metabolism and stress physiology. Here, we investigate the effect of maternal exposure to predation risk on the embryonic transcriptome in sticklebacks. Using RNA-sequencing we compared genome-wide transcription in three day post-fertilization embryos of predator-exposed and control mothers. There were hundreds of differentially expressed transcripts between embryos of predator-exposed mothers and embryos of control mothers including several non-coding RNAs. Gene Ontology analysis revealed biological pathways involved in metabolism, epigenetic inheritance, and neural proliferation and differentiation that differed between treatments. Interestingly, predation risk is associated with an accelerated life history in many vertebrates, and several of the genes and biological pathways that were identified in this study suggest that maternal exposure to predation risk accelerates the timing of embryonic development. Consistent with this hypothesis, embryos of predator-exposed mothers were larger than embryos of control mothers. These findings point to some of the molecular mechanisms that might underlie maternal effects.

  2. Influence of a reconstituted basement membrane and its components on casein gene expression and secretion in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.L.; Aggeler, J.; Farson, D.A.; Hatier, C.; Hassell, J.; Bissell, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    When primary mouse mammary epithelial cells are cultured on plastic, they rapidly lose their ability to synthesize and secrete most milk proteins even in the presence of lactogenic hormones, whereas cells cultured on release type I collagen gels show greatly enhanced mRNA levels and secretion rates of β-casein and of some other milk proteins. The authors show here that culture on a reconstituted basement membrane from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm tumor (EHS) allows > 90% of cells to produce high levels of β-casein. By comparison, 30-40% of cells on released type 1 gels and only 2-10% of cells on plastic express β-casein after 6 days in culture. Because only 40% of cells from late pregnant gland produced β-casein before culture, the EHS matrix can both induce and maintain an increased level of casein gene expression. Individual basal lamina components were also evaluated. Type IV collagen and fibronectin had little effect on morphology and β-casein mRNA levels. In contrast, both laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan increased β-casein mRNA levels. Profound morphological differences were evident between cells cultured on plastic and on EHS matrix, the latter cells forming ducts, ductules, and lumina and resembling secretory alveoli. These results emphasize the vital role of the extracellular matrix in receiving and integrating structural and functional signals that can direct specific gene expression in differentiated tissues

  3. Methylation patterns in sentinel genes in peripheral blood cells of heavy smokers: Influence of cruciferous vegetables in an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccianti, Chiara; Ricceri, Fulvio; Ferrari, Pietro; Cuenin, Cyrille; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Polidoro, Silvia; Jenab, Mazda; Hainaut, Pierre; Vineis, Paolo; Herceg, Zdenko

    2011-09-01

    Changes in DNA methylation patterns are a hallmark of tobacco-induced carcinogenesis. We have conducted a randomized 4-week intervention trial to investigate the effects of three dietary regimens to modify DNA methylation patterns in peripheral white blood cells of heavy smokers. A group of 88 smokers were randomly assigned to and distributed among three diets, including (1) normal isocaloric diet (balanced in fruits and vegetables), according to international guidelines; (2) a diet enriched in flavonoids and isothiocyanates (particularly cruciferous vegetables); (3) a regimen consisting of diet 1 supplemented with flavonoids (green tea and soy products). Methylation patterns were analyzed by pyrosequencing in LINE1 (Long Interspersed DNA Elements), RASSF1A, ARF and CDKN2a (tumor suppressor genes), MLH1 (mismatch DNA repair) and MTHFR (folate metabolism). Three distinct patterns of methylation were observed. In LINE1, methylation showed a small but reproducible increase with all three regimens. MTHFR was constitutively methylated with no significant modulation by diets. The four other loci showed low basal levels of methylation with no substantial change after intervention. These data suggest that the isocaloric diet may stabilize global epigenetic (LINE1 DNA methylation) patterns in peripheral white blood cells but does not provide evidence for methylation changes in specific genes associated with this short-term dietary intervention.

  4. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial community composition in a river influenced by a wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Marti

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance represents a global health problem, requiring better understanding of the ecology of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs, their selection and their spread in the environment. Antibiotics are constantly released to the environment through wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluents. We investigated, therefore, the effect of these discharges on the prevalence of ARGs and bacterial community composition in biofilm and sediment samples of a receiving river. We used culture-independent approaches such as quantitative PCR to determine the prevalence of eleven ARGs and 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing to examine the composition of bacterial communities. Concentration of antibiotics in WWTP influent and effluent were also determined. ARGs such as qnrS, bla TEM, bla CTX-M, bla SHV, erm(B, sul(I, sul(II, tet(O and tet(W were detected in all biofilm and sediment samples analyzed. Moreover, we observed a significant increase in the relative abundance of ARGs in biofilm samples collected downstream of the WWTP discharge. We also found significant differences with respect to community structure and composition between upstream and downstream samples. Therefore, our results indicate that WWTP discharges may contribute to the spread of ARGs into the environment and may also impact on the bacterial communities of the receiving river.

  5. Influence of zinc on biogas production and antibiotic resistance gene profiles during anaerobic digestion of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran; Wang, Xiaojuan; Gu, Jie; Zhang, Yajun

    2017-11-01

    This study determined the accumulated biogas, methane content, and absolute abundances (AAs) of 14 common antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two integrons during the anaerobic digestion of swine manure for 52days with different amounts of added zinc. The accumulated biogas increased by 51.2% and 56.0% with 125mgL -1 (L) and 1250mgL -1 (H) zinc, respectively, compared with the control with no added zinc (CK), but there was no significant difference between L and H. Compared with CK, excluding tetW and tetC, all the other ARGs detected in this study increased in the L and H reactors. However, the low concentration of zinc (L reactor) caused greater increases in the AAs of ARGs in the AD products. Redundancy analysis showed that NO 3 -N and bio-zinc significantly explained the changes in genes, where they accounted for 60.9% and 20.3% of the total variation in the environmental factors, respectively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Short proofs of strong normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Wojdyga, Aleksander

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents simple, syntactic strong normalization proofs for the simply-typed lambda-calculus and the polymorphic lambda-calculus (system F) with the full set of logical connectives, and all the permutative reductions. The normalization proofs use translations of terms and types to systems, for which strong normalization property is known.

  7. Strong-back safety latch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch

  8. Characterization of the rcsA Gene from Pantoea sp. Strain PPE7 and Its Influence on Extracellular Polysaccharide Production and Virulence on Pleurotus eryngii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Keun Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available RcsA is a positive activator of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS synthesis in the Enterobacteriaceae. The rcsA gene of the soft rot pathogen Pantoea sp. strain PPE7 in Pleurotus eryngii was cloned by PCR amplification, and its role in EPS synthesis and virulence was investigated. The RcsA protein contains 3 highly conserved domains, and the C-terminal end of the open reading frame shared significant amino acid homology to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif of bacterial activator proteins. The inactivation of rcsA by insertional mutagenesis created mutants that had decreased production of EPS compared to the wild-type strain and abolished the virulence of Pantoea sp. strain PPE7 in P. eryngii. The Pantoea sp. strain PPE7 rcsA gene was shown to strongly affect the formation of the disease symptoms of a mushroom pathogen and to act as the virulence factor to cause soft rot disease in P. eryngii.

  9. Epistatic interaction between haplotypes of the ghrelin ligand and receptor genes influence susceptibility to myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baessler, Andrea; Fischer, Marcus; Mayer, Bjoern; Koehler, Martina; Wiedmann, Silke; Stark, Klaus; Doering, Angela; Erdmann, Jeanette; Riegger, Guenter; Schunkert, Heribert; Kwitek, Anne E; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2007-04-15

    Data from both experimental models and humans provide evidence that ghrelin and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (ghrelin receptor, GHSR), possess a variety of cardiovascular effects. Thus, we hypothesized that genetic variants within the ghrelin system (ligand ghrelin and its receptor GHSR) are associated with susceptibility to myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the GHSR region as well as eight SNPs across the ghrelin gene (GHRL) region were genotyped in index MI patients (864 Caucasians, 'index MI cases') from the German MI family study and in matched controls without evidence of CAD (864 Caucasians, 'controls', MONICA Augsburg). In addition, siblings of these MI patients with documented severe CAD (826 'affected sibs') were matched likewise with controls (n = 826 Caucasian 'controls') and used for verification. The effect of interactions between genetic variants of both genes of the ghrelin system was explored by conditional classification tree models. We found association of several GHSR SNPs with MI [best SNP odds ratio (OR) 1.7 (1.2-2.5); P = 0.002] using a recessive model. Moreover, we identified a common GHSR haplotype which significantly increases the risk for MI [multivariate adjusted OR for homozygous carriers 1.6 (1.1-2.5) and CAD OR 1.6 (1.1-2.5)]. In contrast, no relationship between genetic variants and the disease could be revealed for GHRL. However, the increase in MI/CAD frequency related to the susceptible GHSR haplotype was abolished when it coincided with a common GHRL haplotype. Multivariate adjustments as well as permutation-based methods conveyed the same results. These data are the first to demonstrate an association of SNPs and haplotypes within important genes of the ghrelin system and the susceptibility to MI, whereas association with MI/CAD could be identified for genetic variants across GHSR, no relationship could be revealed for GHRL

  10. Influence of CYP3A5 and ABCB1 gene polymorphisms on calcineurin inhibitor-related neurotoxicity after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Naruto, Takuya; Tanoshima, Reo; Kato, Hiromi; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Kajiwara, Ryosuke; Fujii, Hisaki; Tanaka, Fumiko; Goto, Hiroaki; Yagihashi, Tatsuhiko; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Yokota, Shumpei

    2010-01-01

    One severe side effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs: such as cyclosporine [CsA] and tacrolimus [FK506]) is neurotoxicity. CNIs are substrates for CYP3A5 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by ABCB1 gene. In the present study, we hypothesized that genetic variability in CYP3A5 and ABCB1 genes may be associated with CNI-related neurotoxicity. The effects of the polymorphisms, such as CYP3A5 A6986G, ABCB1 C1236T, G2677T/A, and C3435T, associated with CNI-related neurotoxicity were evaluated in 63 patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.   Of the 63 cases, 15 cases developed CNI-related neurotoxicity. In the CsA patient group (n = 30), age (p = 0.008), hypertension (p = 0.017), renal dysfunction (p < 0.001), ABCB1 C1236T (p < 0.001), and G2677T/A (p = 0.014) were associated with neurotoxicities. The CC genotype at ABCB1 C1236T was associated with it, but not significantly so (p = 0.07), adjusted for age, hypertension, and renal dysfunction. In the FK506 patient group (n = 33), CYP3A5 A6986G (p < 0.001), and ABCB1 C1236T (p = 0.002) were associated with neurotoxicity. At least one A allele at CYP3A5 A6986G (expressor genotype) was strongly associated with it according to logistic regression analysis (p = 0.01; OR, 8.5; 95% CI, 1.4-51.4).   The polymorphisms in CYP3A5 and ABCB1 genes were associated with CNI-related neurotoxicity. This outcome is probably because of CYP3A5 or P-gp functions or metabolites of CNIs. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Selection of the In Vitro Culture Media Influences mRNA Expression of Hedgehog Genes, Il-6, and Important Genes regarding Reactive Oxygen Species in Single Murine Preimplantation Embryos

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    Pfeifer, N.; Baston-Büst, D. M.; Hirchenhain, J.; Friebe-Hoffmann, U.; Rein, D. T.; Krüssel, J. S.; Hess, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aim of this paper was to determine the influence of different in vitro culture media on mRNA expression of Hedgehog genes, il-6, and important genes regarding reactive oxygen species in single mouse embryos. Methods. Reverse transcription of single embryos either cultured in vitro from day 0.5 until 3.5 (COOK's Cleavage medium or Vitrolife's G-1 PLUS medium) or in vivo until day 3.5 post coitum. PCR was carried out for β-actin followed by nested-PCR for shh, ihh, il-6, nox, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2. Results. The number of murine blastocysts cultured in COOK medium which expressed il-6, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2 mRNA differed significantly compared to the in vivo group. Except for nox, the mRNA profile of the Vitrolife media group embryos varied significantly from the in vivo ones regarding the number of blastocysts expressing the mRNA of shh, ihh, il-6, gpx4, gpx1 and prdx2. Conclusions. The present study shows that different in vitro culture media lead to different mRNA expression profiles during early development. Even the newly developed in vitro culture media are not able to mimic the female reproductive tract. The question of long-term consequences for children due to assisted reproduction techniques needs to be addressed in larger studies. PMID:22919324

  12. Selection of the In Vitro Culture Media Influences mRNA Expression of Hedgehog Genes, Il-6, and Important Genes regarding Reactive Oxygen Species in Single Murine Preimplantation Embryos

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    N. Pfeifer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this paper was to determine the influence of different in vitro culture media on mRNA expression of Hedgehog genes, il-6, and important genes regarding reactive oxygen species in single mouse embryos. Methods. Reverse transcription of single embryos either cultured in vitro from day 0.5 until 3.5 (COOK’s Cleavage medium or Vitrolife’s G-1 PLUS medium or in vivo until day 3.5 post coitum. PCR was carried out for β-actin followed by nested-PCR for shh, ihh, il-6, nox, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2. Results. The number of murine blastocysts cultured in COOK medium which expressed il-6, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2 mRNA differed significantly compared to the in vivo group. Except for nox, the mRNA profile of the Vitrolife media group embryos varied significantly from the in vivo ones regarding the number of blastocysts expressing the mRNA of shh, ihh, il-6, gpx4, gpx1 and prdx2. Conclusions. The present study shows that different in vitro culture media lead to different mRNA expression profiles during early development. Even the newly developed in vitro culture media are not able to mimic the female reproductive tract. The question of long-term consequences for children due to assisted reproduction techniques needs to be addressed in larger studies.

  13. Selection of the in vitro culture media influences mRNA expression of Hedgehog genes, Il-6, and important genes regarding reactive oxygen species in single murine preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, N; Baston-Büst, D M; Hirchenhain, J; Friebe-Hoffmann, U; Rein, D T; Krüssel, J S; Hess, A P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine the influence of different in vitro culture media on mRNA expression of Hedgehog genes, il-6, and important genes regarding reactive oxygen species in single mouse embryos. Reverse transcription of single embryos either cultured in vitro from day 0.5 until 3.5 (COOK's Cleavage medium or Vitrolife's G-1 PLUS medium) or in vivo until day 3.5 post coitum. PCR was carried out for β-actin followed by nested-PCR for shh, ihh, il-6, nox, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2. The number of murine blastocysts cultured in COOK medium which expressed il-6, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2 mRNA differed significantly compared to the in vivo group. Except for nox, the mRNA profile of the Vitrolife media group embryos varied significantly from the in vivo ones regarding the number of blastocysts expressing the mRNA of shh, ihh, il-6, gpx4, gpx1 and prdx2. The present study shows that different in vitro culture media lead to different mRNA expression profiles during early development. Even the newly developed in vitro culture media are not able to mimic the female reproductive tract. The question of long-term consequences for children due to assisted reproduction techniques needs to be addressed in larger studies.

  14. Genetic and non-genetic influences during pregnancy on infant global and site specific DNA methylation: role for folate gene variants and vitamin B12.

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    Jill A McKay

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variation in patterns of DNA methylation at birth can be explained by the influence of environmental, genetic and stochastic factors. This study investigates the genetic and non-genetic determinants of variation in DNA methylation in human infants. Given its central role in provision of methyl groups for DNA methylation, this study focuses on aspects of folate metabolism. Global (LUMA and gene specific (IGF2, ZNT5, IGFBP3 DNA methylation were quantified in 430 infants by Pyrosequencing®. Seven polymorphisms in 6 genes (MTHFR, MTRR, FOLH1, CβS, RFC1, SHMT involved in folate absorption and metabolism were analysed in DNA from both infants and mothers. Red blood cell folate and serum vitamin B(12 concentrations were measured as indices of vitamin status. Relationships between DNA methylation patterns and several covariates viz. sex, gestation length, maternal and infant red cell folate, maternal and infant serum vitamin B(12, maternal age, smoking and genotype were tested. Length of gestation correlated positively with IGF2 methylation (rho = 0.11, p = 0.032 and inversely with ZNT5 methylation (rho = -0.13, p = 0.017. Methylation of the IGFBP3 locus correlated inversely with infant vitamin B(12 concentration (rho = -0.16, p = 0.007, whilst global DNA methylation correlated inversely with maternal vitamin B(12 concentrations (rho = 0.18, p = 0.044. Analysis of common genetic variants in folate pathway genes highlighted several associations including infant MTRR 66G>A genotype with DNA methylation (χ(2 = 8.82, p = 0.003 and maternal MTHFR 677C>T genotype with IGF2 methylation (χ(2 = 2.77, p = 0.006. These data support the hypothesis that both environmental and genetic factors involved in one-carbon metabolism influence DNA methylation in infants. Specifically, the findings highlight the importance of vitamin B(12 status, infant MTRR genotype and maternal MTHFR genotype, all of which may influence the supply of methyl groups for

  15. The MEDIATOR genes MED12 and MED13 control Arabidopsis root system configuration influencing sugar and auxin responses.

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    Raya-González, Javier; López-Bucio, Jesús Salvador; Prado-Rodríguez, José Carlos; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Guevara-García, Ángel Arturo; López-Bucio, José

    2017-09-01

    Arabidopsis med12 and med13 mutants exhibit shoot and root phenotypes related to an altered auxin homeostasis. Sucrose supplementation reactivates both cell division and elongation in primary roots as well as auxin-responsive and stem cell niche gene expression in these mutants. An analysis of primary root growth of WT, med12, aux1-7 and med12 aux1 single and double mutants in response to sucrose and/or N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) placed MED12 upstream of auxin transport for the sugar modulation of root growth. The MEDIATOR (MED) complex plays diverse functions in plant development, hormone signaling and biotic and abiotic stress tolerance through coordination of transcription. Here, we performed genetic, developmental, molecular and pharmacological analyses to characterize the role of MED12 and MED13 on the configuration of root architecture and its relationship with auxin and sugar responses. Arabidopsis med12 and med13 single mutants exhibit shoot and root phenotypes consistent with altered auxin homeostasis including altered primary root growth, lateral root development, and root hair elongation. MED12 and MED13 were required for activation of cell division and elongation in primary roots, as well as auxin-responsive and stem cell niche gene expression. Remarkably, most of these mutant phenotypes were rescued by supplying sucrose to the growth medium. The growth response of primary roots of WT, med12, aux1-7 and med12 aux1 single and double mutants to sucrose and application of auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) revealed the correlation of med12 phenotype with the activity of the auxin intake permease and suggests that MED12 acts upstream of AUX1 in the root growth response to sugar. These data provide compelling evidence that MEDIATOR links sugar sensing to auxin transport and distribution during root morphogenesis.

  16. Polymorphisms in the dopamine receptor 2 gene region influence improvements during working memory training in children and adolescents.

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    Söderqvist, Stina; Matsson, Hans; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Kere, Juha; Klingberg, Torkel

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effects of cognitive training can lead to finding better treatments, but it can also be a tool for investigating factors important for brain plasticity and acquisition of cognitive skills. In this study, we investigated how single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ratings of intrinsic motivation were associated to interindividual differences in improvement during working memory training. The study included 256 children aged 7-19 years who were genotyped for 13 SNPs within or near eight candidate genes previously implicated in learning: COMT, SLC6A3 (DAT1), DRD4, DRD2, PPP1R1B (DARPP32), MAOA, LMX1A, and BDNF. Ratings on the intrinsic motivation inventory were also available for 156 of these children. All participants performed at least 20 sessions of working memory training, and performance during the training was logged and used as the outcome variable. We found that two SNPs, rs1800497 and rs2283265, located near and within the dopamine receptor 2 (DRD2) gene, respectively, were significantly associated with improvements during training (p motivation did not correlate with training outcome. However, we observed both the main effect of genotype at those two loci as well as the interaction between genotypes and ratings of intrinsic motivation (perceived competence). Both SNPs have previously been shown to affect DRD2 receptor density primarily in the BG. Our results suggest that genetic variation is accounting for some interindividual differences in how children acquire cognitive skills and that part of this effect is also seen on intrinsic motivation. Moreover, they suggest that dopamine D2 transmission in the BG is a key factor for cognitive plasticity.

  17. Variations in Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated genes and their influence in progression to gastric cancer: implications for prevention.

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    Cosmeri Rizzato

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (HP is a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach and can establish a long-term infection of the gastric mucosa. Persistent Hp infection often induces gastritis and is associated with the development of peptic ulcer disease, atrophic gastritis, and gastric adenocarcinoma. Virulent HP isolates harbor the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island (cagPAI, a 40 kb stretch of DNA that encodes components of a type IV secretion system (T4SS. This T4SS forms a pilus for the injection of virulence factors into host target cells, such as the CagA oncoprotein. We analyzed the genetic variability in cagA and other selected genes of the HP cagPAI (cagC, cagE, cagL, cagT, cagV and cag Gamma using DNA extracted from frozen gastric biopsies or from clinical isolates. Study subjects were 95 cagA+ patients that were histologically diagnosed with chronic gastritis or gastric canc